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Sample records for computerized tomography comparison

  1. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  2. Comparison of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of acute and chronic cholecystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Matolo, N.M.; Stadalnik, R.C.; McGahan, J.P.

    1982-12-01

    Seventy-five patients with abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant who were subsequently confirmed operatively and histologically to have acute or chronic cholecystitis underwent radionuclide imaging of the biliary tree, ultrasonography, and/or computerized tomography before operation. fifty-eight of the patients had acute cholecystitis and 17 had chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. Analysis of our data indicates that ultrasonography is an accurate and better screening test than cholescintigraphy in the diagnosis of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis, but it is less accurate in the detection of acute cholecystitis. On the other hand, radionuclide imaging is highly sensitive and specific in the early diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, but it is poor in the diagnosis of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis unless the cystic duct is obstructed. CT scanning is more expensive than ultrasonography but may be extremely helpful in problematic cases such as the diagnosis of the cause in biliary obstruction or in imaging of the pancreas.

  3. Comparisons of ionospheric electron density distributions reconstructed by GPS computerized tomography, backscatter ionograms, and vertical ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Lei, Yong; Li, Bofeng; An, Jiachun; Zhu, Peng; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong; Ni, Binbin; Wang, Zemin; Zhou, Xuhua

    2015-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) computerized ionosphere tomography (CIT) and ionospheric sky wave ground backscatter radar are both capable of measuring the large-scale, two-dimensional (2-D) distributions of ionospheric electron density (IED). Here we report the spatial and temporal electron density results obtained by GPS CIT and backscatter ionogram (BSI) inversion for three individual experiments. Both the GPS CIT and BSI inversion techniques demonstrate the capability and the consistency of reconstructing large-scale IED distributions. To validate the results, electron density profiles obtained from GPS CIT and BSI inversion are quantitatively compared to the vertical ionosonde data, which clearly manifests that both methods output accurate information of ionopsheric electron density and thereby provide reliable approaches to ionospheric soundings. Our study can improve current understanding of the capability and insufficiency of these two methods on the large-scale IED reconstruction.

  4. X-ray computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, S.L.; Vinegar, H.J.

    1987-08-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is a new radiological imaging technique that measures density and atomic composition inside opaque objects. A revolutionary advance in medical radiology since 1972, CT has only recently been applied in petrophysics and reservoir engineering. This paper discusses several petrophysical applications, including three-dimensional (3D) measurement of density and porosity; rock mechanics studies; correlation of core logs with well logs; characterization of mud invasion, fractures, and disturbed core; and quantification of complex mineralogies and sand/shale ratios. Reservoir engineering applications presented include fundamental studies of CO/sub 2/ displacement in cores, focussing on viscous fingering, gravity segregation, miscibility, and mobility control.

  5. Comparison of micro-computerized tomography and cone-beam computerized tomography in the detection of accessory canals in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Tatar, İlkan; Arıkan, Volkan; Çelik, Hakan Hamdi; Yüksel, Selcen; Özen, Tuncer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the accuracy of micro-computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting accessory canals in primary molars. Materials and Methods Forty-one extracted human primary first and second molars were embedded in wax blocks and scanned using micro-CT and CBCT. After the images were taken, the samples were processed using a clearing technique and examined under a stereomicroscope in order to establish the gold standard for this study. The specimens were classified into three groups: maxillary molars, mandibular molars with three canals, and mandibular molars with four canals. Differences between the gold standard and the observations made using the imaging methods were calculated using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient test. Results The presence of accessory canals in micro-CT images of maxillary and mandibular root canals showed a statistically significant correlation with the stereomicroscopic images used as a gold standard. No statistically significant correlation was found between the CBCT findings and the stereomicroscopic images. Conclusion Although micro-CT is not suitable for clinical use, it provides more detailed information about minor anatomical structures. However, CBCT is convenient for clinical use but may not be capable of adequately analyzing the internal anatomy of primary teeth. PMID:26730367

  6. Diagnostic value of multislice computerized tomography angiography for aortic dissection: A comparison with DSA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dong; Li, Cheng-Li; Lv, Wei-Fu; Ni, Ming; Deng, Ke-Xue; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Zhang, Zhen-Feng; Zhang, Xing-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare multislice computed tomography angiography (MSCTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the diagnosis of aortic dissection. In total, 49 patients with aortic lesions received enhanced computed tomography scanning, and three-dimensional (3D) images were reconstructed by volume rendering (VR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), multiplanar reformation (MPR) and curved planar reconstruction (CPR). The display rate of the entry tear site, intimal flap, true and false lumen from each reconstruction method was calculated. For 30 patients with DeBakey type III aortic dissection, the entry tear site and size of the first intimal flap, aortic maximum diameter at the orifice of left subclavian artery (LSCA), distance between the first entry tear site and the orifice of LSCA, and maximum diameter of aortic true and false lumens were measured prior to implantation of endovascular covered stent-grafts. Data obtained by MSCTA and DSA were then compared. For the entry tear site, MPR, CPR and VR provided a display rate of 95.92, 95.92 and 18.37%, respectively, and the display rate of the intimal flap was 100% in the three methods. MIP did not directly display the entry tear site and intimal flap. For true and false lumens, MPR, CPR, and VR showed a display rate of 100%, while MIP only provided a display rate of 67.35%. When MSCTA was compared with DSA, there was a significant difference in the display of entry site number and position (P<0.05), whereas no significant difference was shown in the measurement of aortic maximum diameter at the orifice of LSCA and the maximum diameter of true and false lumens (P>0.05). In conclusion, among the 3D post-processing reconstruction methods of MSCTA used, MPR and CPR were optimal, followed by VR, and MIP. MSCTA may be the preferable imaging method to diagnose aortic dissection and evaluate treatment of endovascular-covered stent-grafting, preoperatively. PMID:28352308

  7. Methods of predicting visceral fat in Brazilian adults and older adults: a comparison between anthropometry and computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; de Oliveira, Carolina Cunha; Moreira, Pricilla Almeida; Eickemberg, Michaela; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Sampaio, Lílian Ramos

    2011-03-01

    Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is linked with the metabolic consequences of obesity, being necessary the use alternative methods of predicting this type of fat, like anthropometry. The objective of this study was assess the performance of anthropometry in predicting visceral fat measured with computerized tomography in adults and older adults. Study transversal with 197 individuals underwent computerized tomography (CT) and anthropometry. The variables analized were: visceral adipose tissue area by CT, Sagittal Abdominal Diameter (SAD), Waist Circumference (WC) and Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR). A descriptive analysis, Pearson correlation and ROC curve were carried out. We observed Correlations higher than 0.7 (p = 0.000) between the SAD, WC and the VAT area were found in adult men and older men and in adult women. WHR displayed the least correlations. The most sensitive and specific SAD cut-off points were equal for all the men (Adults: 20.2 cm/Older adults: 20.2 cm) but different for the women (Adults: 21.0 cm; sens.: 83.3; spec.: 79.1/Older adults: 19.9 cm; sens.: 81.0; spec.:79.3). The WC cutoff points that identified a VAT area = 130 cm2 were 90.2 cm and 92.2 cm for men (adult men--sens.: 86.7; spec.: 86.1--and older men-sens.: 79.3; spec.: 77.8 -respectively), while for women the recorded values were 92.3 cm (adult women--sens.: 83.3; spec: 81.4) and 88.2 cm (older women--sens.:76.2; spec.: 69.0). This study showed that WC and SAD achieved the best performance in the identification of visceral fat considered at risk for the development of cardiometabolic diseases in adults and older adults.

  8. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  9. [Computerized tomography and craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Richter, H P; Braun, V

    1993-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now the standard neuroradiological examination for patients with major head injuries, although conventional X-ray of the skull should not be neglected. Whereas the latter only shows such skull pathology as fractures or intracranial air following a basal fracture, CT clearly visualizes intracranial pathology. It allows differentiation between haematoma and contusion, between localized oedema and generalized brain swelling; CT is therefore indicated in every patient with disturbed consciousness, focal neurological signs, and/or secondary clinical impairment, and also in all drunken patients with head injury. In a patient with impaired consciousness and focal neurological deficit the probability of a pathologic CT is 85%. An extracerebral haematoma is often present, which needs urgent evacuation. A modern, non-expensive communications system using a standard telephone line enables hospitals without a neurosurgical unit to send CT pictures that are difficult to interpret to a neurosurgeon and to discuss them on-line by telephone. This system has now been in operation for over 2 years and has improved the care of patients with head injury in our region. It is highly efficient and reliable and improves cooperation between distant hospitals. It also helps to avoid unnecessary transfers, which are not only expensive but may even harm a critically ill patient.

  10. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  11. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  12. A retrospective radiographic evaluation of the anterior loop of the mental nerve: Comparison between panoramic radiography and cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vujanovic-Eskenazi, Aleksandar; Valero-James, Jesus-Manuel; Sánchez-Garcés, María-Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the prevalence and the length of mental loop, measured with panoramic radiography (PR) and cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods: PG and CBCT images where analyzed by a single calibrated examiner to determine the presence and the position of the mental foramen (MF), its distance to the lower mandible border, the anterior length of the mental loop (ML) and the bone quality in 82 PR and 82 CBCT. Results: ML was identified in 36.6 % of PR and 48.8 % of CBCT. PR showed a magnification of 1.87 when compared to CBCT. The mean of anterior extension of the inferior alveolar nerve and the distance to the inferior border of the mandible was higher for PR (2.8 mm, sd 0.91 mm on the PR , range 1.5 to 4.7 mm and 1.59, sd 0.9 on the CBCT ,range 0.4 to 4.0 mm) Conclusions: There is a magnification in PR images with respect to those of CBCT. The differences between CBCT and PR with regards to the identification and length of the ML are not statistically significant. Identification and accuracy measurements of ML did not depend on the bone quality. Considering that two dimensional imaging provides less accurate and reliable information regarding the anterior loop, a CBCT scan could be recommended when planning implant placement in the anterior region. Key words:Mental loop, mental nerve, mental canal, preoperative implant planning, panoramic tomography, cone beam computerized tomography. PMID:25549693

  13. Anti-3-[18F]FACBC Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomography and 111In-Capromab Pendetide Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography-Computerized Tomography for Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Amzat, Rianot; Bowman, F. DuBois; Halkar, Raghuveer K.; Master, Viraj A.; Nye, Jonathon A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun A.; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Alaei-Taleghani, Pooneh; Goodman, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the amino acid analogue positron emission tomography radiotracer anti-3-[18F]FACBC compared to ProstaScint® (111In-capromab pendetide) single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography to detect recurrent prostate carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 93 patients met study inclusion criteria who underwent anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography plus 111In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for suspected recurrent prostate carcinoma within 90 days. Reference standards were applied by a multidisciplinary board. We calculated diagnostic performance for detecting disease. Results In the 91 of 93 patients with sufficient data for a consensus on the presence or absence of prostate/bed disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 90.2% sensitivity, 40.0% specificity, 73.6% accuracy, 75.3% positive predictive value and 66.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromab pendetide with 67.2%, 56.7%, 63.7%, 75.9% and 45.9%, respectively. In the 70 of 93 patients with a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 55.0% sensitivity, 96.7% specificity, 72.9% accuracy, 95.7% positive predictive value and 61.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromabpendetide with10.0%, 86.7%, 42.9%, 50.0% and 41.9%, respectively. Of 77 index lesions used to prove positivity histological proof was obtained in 74 (96.1%). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC identified 14 more positive prostate bed recurrences (55 vs 41) and 18 more patients with extraprostatic involvement (22 vs 4). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography correctly up-staged 18 of 70 cases (25.7%) in which there was a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic involvement. Conclusions Better diagnostic performance was noted for anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography than for 111In

  14. Computerized tomography with total variation and with shearlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garduño, Edgar; Herman, Gabor T.

    2017-04-01

    To reduce the x-ray dose in computerized tomography (CT), many constrained optimization approaches have been proposed aiming at minimizing a regularizing function that measures a lack of consistency with some prior knowledge about the object that is being imaged, subject to a (predetermined) level of consistency with the detected attenuation of x-rays. One commonly investigated regularizing function is total variation (TV), while other publications advocate the use of some type of multiscale geometric transform in the definition of the regularizing function, a particular recent choice for this is the shearlet transform. Proponents of the shearlet transform in the regularizing function claim that the reconstructions so obtained are better than those produced using TV for texture preservation (but may be worse for noise reduction). In this paper we report results related to this claim. In our reported experiments using simulated CT data collection of the head, reconstructions whose shearlet transform has a small ℓ 1-norm are not more efficacious than reconstructions that have a small TV value. Our experiments for making such comparisons use the recently-developed superiorization methodology for both regularizing functions. Superiorization is an automated procedure for turning an iterative algorithm for producing images that satisfy a primary criterion (such as consistency with the observed measurements) into its superiorized version that will produce results that, according to the primary criterion are as good as those produced by the original algorithm, but in addition are superior to them according to a secondary (regularizing) criterion. The method presented for superiorization involving the ℓ 1-norm of the shearlet transform is novel and is quite general: It can be used for any regularizing function that is defined as the ℓ 1-norm of a transform specified by the application of a matrix. Because in the previous literature the split Bregman algorithm is used

  15. Identifying and classifying hyperostosis frontalis interna via computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    May, Hila; Peled, Nathan; Dar, Gali; Hay, Ori; Abbas, Janan; Masharawi, Youssef; Hershkovitz, Israel

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to recognize the radiological characteristics of hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI) and to establish a valid and reliable method for its identification and classification. A reliability test was carried out on 27 individuals who had undergone a head computerized tomography (CT) scan. Intra-observer reliability was obtained by examining the images three times, by the same researcher, with a 2-week interval between each sample ranking. The inter-observer test was performed by three independent researchers. A validity test was carried out using two methods for identifying and classifying HFI: 46 cadaver skullcaps were ranked twice via computerized tomography scans and then by direct observation. Reliability and validity were calculated using Kappa test (SPSS 15.0). Reliability tests of ranking HFI via CT scans demonstrated good results (K > 0.7). As for validity, a very good consensus was obtained between the CT and direct observation, when moderate and advanced types of HFI were present (K = 0.82). The suggested classification method for HFI, using CT, demonstrated a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 90.5%, and positive predictive value of 91.3%. In conclusion, volume rendering is a reliable and valid tool for identifying HFI. The suggested three-scale classification is most suitable for radiological diagnosis of the phenomena. Considering the increasing awareness of HFI as an early indicator of a developing malady, this study may assist radiologists in identifying and classifying the phenomena.

  16. Characterization of flow in fractured tuff using computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, C.W.; Sharer, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this effort was to demonstrate TerraTek`s capability to use X-ray computerized tomography (CT) to observe fluid flow down a fracture and rock matrix imbibition in a sample of Bandelier tuff. To accomplish the objective, a tuff sample 152.4 mm long and 50.8 mm in diameter was prepared. A portion of the sample was artificially fractured and coupled to a section of matrix material so that the fracture was not exposed. Water was flowed through the sample at five flow rates and CT scanning performed at set intervals during the flow. Cross sectional images and longitudinal reconstructions were built and saturation profiles calculated for the sample at each time interval at each flow rate. The results showed that for the test conditions, the fracture was not a primary pathway of fluid flow down the sample. Fluid flow was governed by the high imbibition capability of the rock matrix material.

  17. Digital balanced detection for fast optical computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Rehan; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2006-10-01

    Analogue Balanced Photo-detection has found extensive usage in high- sensitivity small signal applications e.g. coherent heterodyne detection. It is particularly effective for laser intensity noise removal. Nevertheless, the high cost of the commercially available analogue systems makes them unsuitable for multi-channel applications, such as fast tomography. In this paper a flexible, scalable, inexpensive and compact solution for multi channel digital balanced detection is presented. The proposed system has two components: an analogue front-end, comprising a differential photodiode amplifier for minimizing the external interference noise, and a digital balanced noise remover. The latter component initially calculates a balancing factor (BF) from the average power ratio of the signal and reference photocurrents, measured with the object removed from the signal path. Three digital balancing algorithms (DBAx) are considered for subsequent processing. In DBA1, BF is directly used in real-time ratiometric calculations. In DBA2, the BF is adjusted in real time by monitoring the window-averaged power of the received photocurrents. In DBA3, first the baseline is removed using differentiation and then ratiometric detection is performed. Using the digital alternative only one measurement of the reference beam is necessary for single-source, multi-channel detection systems. The data from multiple channels are processed in parallel by pipelined hardware, configured as a state machine. The proposed system leads to a fast optical computerized tomography system using digital balanced detection.

  18. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in pediatric patients: is computerized tomography a must?

    PubMed

    Gedik, Abdullah; Tutus, Ali; Kayan, Devrim; Yılmaz, Yakup; Bircan, Kamuran

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of pediatric percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) cases, and discuss the results and necessity of non-contrast computerized tomography (CT) in these cases. In all, 48 pediatric patients who underwent PNL were retrospectively evaluated. Before PNL, either intravenous urography or CT was performed. In all patients, we evaluated the PNL time, scopy time with stone burden, and complications. During the PNL procedure, we switched to open surgery in two cases: in one because of renal pelvis perforation and in the other because of transcolonic access. In one patient who was scheduled to undergo PNL, we performed open surgery, primarily because we detected a retrorenal colon with CT. The stone burden in 45 patients who underwent PNL was 445 ± 225 mm(2), the PNL time was 51 ± 23 min, and the scopy time was 6.1 ± 2.7 min. We removed nephrostomy tubes 1-4 days after the procedure. In two patients, 24 h after removal of nephrostomy tubes, we inserted double J stents because of prolonged urine extravasation from the tract. In all, 34 of the 45 patients were stone-free, 5 patients had clinically insignificant stone fragments, and 6 patients had residual stones. PNL is a safe and effective method in the treatment of pediatric patients with kidney stones. Clinical experience is the most important factor in obtaining stone-free results. CT should be performed in all pediatric patients in order to prevent colon perforation.

  19. A combined reconstruction algorithm for computerized ionospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, D. B.; Ou, J. K.; Yuan, Y. B.

    Ionospheric electron density profiles inverted by tomographic reconstruction of GPS derived total electron content TEC measurements has the potential to become a tool to quantify ionospheric variability and investigate ionospheric dynamics The problem of reconstructing ionospheric electron density from GPS receiver to satellite TEC measurements are formulated as an ill-posed discrete linear inverse problem A combined reconstruction algorithm of computerized ionospheric tomography CIT is proposed in this paper In this algorithm Tikhonov regularization theory TRT is exploited to solve the ill-posed problem and its estimate from GPS observation data is input as the initial guess of simultaneous iterative reconstruction algorithm SIRT The combined algorithm offer a more reasonable method to choose initial guess of SIRT and the use of SIRT algorithm is to improve the quality of the final reconstructed imaging Numerical experiments from the actual GPS observation data are used to validate the reliability of the method the reconstructed results show that the new algorithm works reasonably and effectively with CIT the overall reconstruction error reduces significantly compared to the reconstruction error of SIRT only or TRT only

  20. An alternative approach to computerized tomography (CT) in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Asser H; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Uhrenholt, Lars; Vesterby, Annie

    2009-01-10

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is used by some forensic pathology departments as a supplement to the forensic autopsy. Departments with a limited number of autopsies may find it relatively expensive to acquire and operate a CT-scanner. Furthermore, it requires a great deal of training and experience to interpret the radiological data. We are currently evaluating CT in order to decide whether the benefits match the efforts. In selected death-investigations the Department of Radiology at Aarhus University Hospital performs CT of the body on behalf of the Institute of Forensic Medicine at Aarhus University and a skilled radiologist interprets the data. We present our radiological findings in the 20 cases where we have used CT and compare them to the autopsy findings. The cases include fatalities from beatings, stabbings, gunshots, fires and traffic accidents. CT is an excellent tool for documenting and illustrating certain lesions, such as gunshot wounds and bone fractures, where we can obtain information that possibly would have been missed at the autopsy. We believe, however, that further research is required before we can recommend CT as a part of a standard forensic autopsy. The cooperation between forensic and radiological departments is a good approach for smaller forensic departments that insures a skilled interpretation without having to divert a lot of resources to equipment and training.

  1. Vertebral sarcoidosis: demonstration of bone involvement by computerized axial tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dinerstein, S.L.; Kovarsky, J.

    1984-08-01

    A report is given of a rare case of vertebral sarcoidosis with negative conventional spinal x-ray films, yet with typical cystic lesions of the spine found incidentally during abdominal computerized axial tomography (CAT). The patient was a 28-year-old black man, who was admitted for evaluation of a 1 1/2-year history of diffuse myalgias, intermittent fever to 102 F orally, bilateral hilar adenopathy, and leukopenia. A technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed diffuse areas of increased uptake over the sternum, entire vertebral column, and pelvis. Conventional x-ray films of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and an AP view of the pelvis were all normal. Chest x-ray film revealed only bilateral hilar adenopathy. During the course of an extensive negative evaluation for infection, an abdominal CAT scan was done, showing multiple, small, sclerotic-rimmed cysts at multiple levels of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. Bone marrow biopsy revealed only changes consistent with anemia of chronic disease. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy revealed noncaseating granulomas. A tentative diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and treatment with prednisone, isoniazid and rifampin was begun. Within two weeks of initiation of prednisone therapy, the patient was symptom-free. A repeat technetium polyphosphate bone scan revealed only a small residual area of mildly increased uptake over the upper thoracic vertebrae.

  2. Three-dimensional computerized tomography: a quantum leap in diagnostic imaging?

    PubMed

    Morrison, R; McCarty, J; Cushing, F R

    1994-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of radium by Madame Curie, men and women of vision and science have labored to improve radiation technology. Over a period of approximately 85 years, we have gone from this initial discovery to three-dimensional computerized transmission tomography; one of the latest techniques in modern day x-ray imaging. Its uses are vast and unparalleled in many facets of medicine and surgery, outlining pathology as never before seen, and possibly, never before completely understood. Three-dimensional computerized tomography is rapidly gaining popularity in cross-sectional imaging of the foot and ankle. It has proven invaluable in elucidating osseous and soft tissue pathology. Abnormalities of the musculoskeletal system that exhibit complex anatomy are often difficult to interpret using standard radiographic techniques. Overall, three-dimensional computerized tomography has established itself as a means by which clinicians may appreciate the three-dimensional disposition of anatomy and disease.

  3. Why is high resolution computerized tomography scanning used in evaluating the lungs?

    PubMed Central

    Graves, W. A.; Collins, J. D.; Miller, T. Q.

    1989-01-01

    High resolution computerized tomography scans have been used for medical and legal purposes to evaluate patients with a history of exposure to asbestos. Some investigators argue that high resolution scanning provides a better image of the lungs than routine computerized tomography. A review of the literature shows that although high resolution scanning displays the lymphatics in the lung, it offers no new useful diagnostic information. The authors conclude that no real advantage is attained with high resolution scanning of the lung and that pathology of disease can be determined decisively only by histology. Images Figure 1 Figure 2A Figure 2B Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2681799

  4. Positron emission tomography / computerized tomography evaluation of primary Hodgkin's disease of liver.

    PubMed

    Gota, V S; Purandare, N C; Gujral, S; Shah, S; Nair, R; Rangarajan, V

    2009-01-01

    Occurrence of primary Hodgkin's lymphoma (PHL) of the liver is extremely rare. We report on a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with liver mass and B-symptomatology. Hepatoma or hepatic metastasis from a gastrointestinal primary was initially suspected. Tumor markers like AFP, CEA, Total PSA, and CA-19.9 were within normal limits. Positron Emission Tomography / Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) revealed a large hepatic lesion and a nodal mass in the porta hepatis. A liver biopsy was consistent with Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was complete regression of the hepatic lesion and evidence of shrinkage of the nodal mass following four cycles of chemotherapy. 18F Fluro -de-oxy Glucose (FDG) PET / CT in this case helped in establishing a primary hepatic lymphoma by demonstrating the absence of pathologically hypermetabolic foci in any other nodes or organs. PET / CT scan is a useful adjunct to conventional imaging and histopathology, not only to establish the initial diagnosis, but also to monitor treatment response in PHL.

  5. A Comparison of Computerized Job Matching Systems. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botterbusch, Karl F.

    This publication describes and compares 15 nationally available computerized job matching systems. The first section discusses job matching systems in general and provides an outline and a summary comparison table of the systems. The second section, which makes up the major part of the document, contains descriptions of 15 systems. For each…

  6. Calcification of all four parathyroid glands in a hemodialysis patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism revealed by computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Rodríguez, M; González, F; Ablanedo, P

    2001-09-01

    This report describes the parathyroid scan, computerized tomography and histologic findings in a young female hemodialysis patient with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. These findings included hyperplasia and calcification of all four parathyroid glands.

  7. Sensitivity of radionuclide brain imaging and computerized transaxial tomography in detecting subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Razzak, M.A.; Mudarris, F.; Christie, J.H.

    1980-04-01

    In a series of 23 patients with surgically proven subdural hematoma of durations ranging between two days to seven months, the detection rate of Tc-99m-pertechnetate brain imaging was higher than computerized transaxial tomography (CT). With dynamic perfusion scanning, the detection rate was 71.5%. In contrast, CT demonstrated the hematoma in 52% of the cases. Lastly, the result of CT scanning was dependent on the size of the subdural hematoma as evaluated at the time of operation.

  8. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  9. Evaluation of Biomaterials Using Micro-Computerized Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Torris, A. T. Arun; Columbus, K. C. Soumya; Saaj, U. S.; Krishnan, Kalliyana V.; Nair, Manitha B.

    2008-09-26

    Micro-computed tomography or Micro-CT is a high resolution, non-invasive, x-ray scanning technique that allows precise three-dimensional imaging and quantification of micro-architectural and structural parameters of objects. Tomographic reconstruction is based on a cone-beam convolution-back-projection algorithm. Micro-architectural and structural parameters such as porosity, surface area to volume ratio, interconnectivity, pore size, wall thickness, anisotropy and cross-section area of biomaterials and bio-specimens such as trabecular bone, polymer scaffold, bio-ceramics and dental restorative were evaluated through imaging and computer aided manipulation of the object scan data sets.

  10. Evaluation of Biomaterials Using Micro-Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torris, A. T. Arun; Columbus, K. C. Soumya; Saaj, U. S.; Nair, Manitha B.; Krishnan, Kalliyana V.

    2008-09-01

    Micro-computed tomography or Micro-CT is a high resolution, non-invasive, x-ray scanning technique that allows precise three-dimensional imaging and quantification of micro-architectural and structural parameters of objects. Tomographic reconstruction is based on a cone-beam convolution-back-projection algorithm. Micro-architectural and structural parameters such as porosity, surface area to volume ratio, interconnectivity, pore size, wall thickness, anisotropy and cross-section area of biomaterials and bio-specimens such as trabecular bone, polymer scaffold, bio-ceramics and dental restorative were evaluated through imaging and computer aided manipulation of the object scan data sets.

  11. A computerized tomography system for transcranial ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sai Chun; Clement, Gregory T

    Hardware for tomographic imaging presents both challenge and opportunity for simplification when compared with traditional pulse-echo imaging systems. Specifically, point diffraction tomography does not require simultaneous powering of elements, in theory allowing just a single transmit channel and a single receive channel to be coupled with a switching or multiplexing network. In our ongoing work on transcranial imaging, we have developed a 512-channel system designed to transmit and/or receive a high voltage signal from/to arbitrary elements of an imaging array. The overall design follows a hierarchy of modules including a software interface, microcontroller, pulse generator, pulse amplifier, high-voltage power converter, switching mother board, switching daughter board, receiver amplifier, analog-to-digital converter, peak detector, memory, and USB communication. Two pulse amplifiers are included, each capable of producing up to 400Vpp via power MOSFETS. Switching is based around mechanical relays that allow passage of 200V, while still achieving switching times of under 2ms, with an operating frequency ranging from below 100kHz to 10MHz. The system is demonstrated through ex vivo human skulls using 1MHz transducers. The overall system design is applicable to planned human studies in transcranial image acquisition, and may have additional tomographic applications for other materials necessitating a high signal output.

  12. A computerized tomography study of the morphological interrelationship between the temporal bones and the craniofacial complex

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Helder Nunes; Slavicek, Rudolf; Sato, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis that the temporal bones are at the center of the dynamics of the craniofacial complex, directly influencing facial morphology, has been put forward long ago. This study examines the role of the spatial positioning of temporal bones (frontal and sagittal inclination) in terms of influencing overall facial morphology. Several 3D linear, angular and orthogonal measurements obtained through computerized analysis of virtual models of 163 modern human skulls reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography images were analyzed and correlated. Additionally, the sample was divided into two subgroups based on the median value of temporal bone sagittal inclination [anterior rotation group (n = 82); posterior rotation group (n = 81)], and differences between groups evaluated. Correlation coefficients showed that sagittal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly (P < 0.01) related to midline flexion, transversal width and anterior–posterior length of the basicranium, to the anterior–posterior positioning of the mandible and maxilla, and posterior midfacial height. Frontal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly related (P < 0.01) to basicranium anterior–posterior and transversal dimensions, and to posterior midfacial height. In comparison with the posterior rotation group, the anterior rotation group presented a less flexed and anterior–posteriorly longer cranial base, a narrower skull, porion and the articular eminence located more superiorly and posteriorly, a shorter posterior midfacial height, the palatal plane rotated clockwise, a more retrognathic maxilla and mandible, and the upper posterior occlusal plane more inclined and posteriorly located. The results suggest that differences in craniofacial morphology are highly integrated with differences in the positional relationship of the temporal bones. The sagittal inclination of the temporal bone seems to have a greater impact on the 3D morphology of the craniofacial complex than

  13. Intracranial Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Three Cases from Breast Cancer Demonstrated on F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ortapamuk, Hulya; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is an uncommon late manifestation of non-central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors. With prolonged survival in solid tumors, an increased frequency of metastases is noted in these tumors too. The detection of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remains the gold standard. Noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used for the diagnosis of LC. Although its low sensitivity of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) on demonstrating CNS lesions, it could be useful in identifying the possibility of LC of breast carcinoma by giving high attention to the meninges. We discuss here three cases all of them having intracranial LC; where (18)F-FDG PET/CT study helped us in the diagnosis of LC. To our knowledge, this is the second report about intracranial LC from breast cancer demonstrating on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  14. Intracranial Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in Three Cases from Breast Cancer Demonstrated on F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ortapamuk, Hulya; Demir, Mustafa Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LC) is an uncommon late manifestation of non-central nervous system (CNS) solid tumors. With prolonged survival in solid tumors, an increased frequency of metastases is noted in these tumors too. The detection of tumor cells in the cerebrospinal fluid remains the gold standard. Noninvasively, magnetic resonance imaging is frequently used for the diagnosis of LC. Although its low sensitivity of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) on demonstrating CNS lesions, it could be useful in identifying the possibility of LC of breast carcinoma by giving high attention to the meninges. We discuss here three cases all of them having intracranial LC; where 18F-FDG PET/CT study helped us in the diagnosis of LC. To our knowledge, this is the second report about intracranial LC from breast cancer demonstrating on 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:28242978

  15. Asymptomatic Emphysematous Pyelonephritis - Positron Emission Tomography Computerized Tomography Aided Diagnostic and Therapeutic Elucidation

    PubMed Central

    Pathapati, Deepti; Shinkar, Pawan Gulabrao; kumar, Satya Awadhesh; Jha; Dattatreya, Palanki Satya; Chigurupati, Namrata; Chigurupati, Mohana Vamsy; Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    The authors report an interesting coincidental unearthing by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) of a potentially serious medical condition of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The management by conservative ureteric stenting and antibiotics was done with gratifying clinical outcome. PMID:28242985

  16. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, José Martins; Germano Martins, Antonio César

    2010-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 μm was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  17. Non-Conventional Applications of Computerized Tomography: Analysis of Solid Dosage Forms Produced by Pharmaceutical Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Martins de Oliveira, Jose Jr.; Germano Martins, Antonio Cesar

    2010-05-21

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe a non-conventional application of computerized tomography: visualization and improvements in the understanding of some internal structural features of solid dosage forms. A micro-CT X-ray scanner, with a minimum resolution of 30 mum was used to characterize some pharmaceutical tablets, granules, controlled-release osmotic tablet and liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules. The analysis presented in this work are essentially qualitative, but quantitative parameters, such as porosity, density distribution, tablets dimensions, etc. could also be obtained using the related CT techniques.

  18. Central representation of phantom limb phenomenon in amputees studied with single photon emission computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Liaw, M Y; You, D L; Cheng, P T; Kao, P F; Wong, A M

    1998-01-01

    To explore the possible mechanisms of phantom limb discomfort after amputation, three amputees with phantom limb pain were studied. This study examined the change of regional cerebral blood flow using technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime-single photon emission computerized tomography, which was arranged at the time of severe phantom limb discomfort and after the discomfort subsided or was completely relieved. Nine representative transverse slices parallel to the orbitomeatal line were selected for quantification. The cortical ribbon (2-cm thickness) was equally subdivided into 12 symmetrical pairs of sector regions of interest in each slice. The irregularly shaped regions of interest were drawn manually around the right thalamus and basal ganglion and then mirrored to the left thalamus and basal ganglion. The contralateral to ipsilateral ratio of regional cerebral blood flow for each area was calculated. The intensity of phantom limb pain was evaluated on a 0 to 10 visual analog scale. In Cases 1 and 2, the contralateral to ipsilateral regional cerebral blood flow ratios of multiple areas of the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes were increased at the time of more severe phantom limb pain, and the ratios were normalized or even decreased when the phantom limb pain subsided. In Case 3, increased contralateral to ipsilateral regional cerebral blood flow ratios were also found over the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobe. However, most of the increased regional cerebral blood flow ratios of regions of interest in the first study persisted in the follow-up study. Also, the regional cerebral blood flow ratios of greater number of regions of interest of the same gyrus and new gyrus were increased. There was no significant right-left difference of regional cerebral blood flow over bilateral thalami and basal ganglia in all three cases. The results suggested that phantom limb pain might be associated with cortical activation involving the frontal, temporal, or

  19. The role of renal scintigraphy and unenhanced helical computerized tomography in patients with ureterolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Lorberboym, M; Kapustin, Z; Elias, S; Nikolov, G; Katz, R

    2000-04-01

    Unenhanced helical computerized tomography (UHCT) has recently evolved as an accurate imaging modality for determination of the presence or absence of ureterolithiasis in patients with acute flank pain. Functional renal scintigraphy is considered the gold standard for urinary tract obstruction. The objective of this study was to correlate the secondary signs of urinary obstruction on UHCT with findings of functional renal scintigraphy. UHCT was performed in 30 patients admitted to the emergency room with acute flank pain. All patients had a calcified urinary stone identified on UHCT. The location of each urinary stone was classified as ureteral or in the ureterovesical junction. The presence of secondary CT signs of ureteral obstruction was determined for each patient. After oral or intravenous hydration, a technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid renal scan was performed in all patients within 12 h of the CT scan. Follow-up delayed scintigraphic images were obtained at 2 h and 24 h in patients with evidence of ureteral obstruction. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of each possible combination of CT findings were determined by comparison with the scintigraphic results. The distal ureter was the most common location for a calculus on UHCT, followed in frequency by the ureterovesical junction, proximal ureter and mid-ureter. The renograms showed high-grade, unilateral obstruction in 12 patients, indeterminate scans in five patients and normal renograms in 13 patients. The sensitivities and specificities of individual CT findings ranged from 50% to 75% and from 8% to 69%, respectively. Perinephric stranding gave the highest positive predictive value (PPV) for obstruction (69% including indeterminate renograms). None of the individual CT findings showed a statistically significant correlation with scintigraphic findings. A combination of one or two positive CT findings had a PPV of only 25% for obstruction. A combination of three or four

  20. Computerized Tomography-Guided Paracentesis: An Effective Alternative to Bedside Paracentesis?

    PubMed Central

    Gaduputi, Vinaya; Tariq, Hassan; Chandrala, Chaitanya; Sakam, Sailaja; Abbas, Naeem; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Background Ascites remains the most common cause of hospitalization among patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Paracentesis is a relatively safe procedure with low complication rates. Computerized tomography (CT)-guided therapeutic paracentesis could be a safe and effective alternative to unaided or aided (ultrasonogram-guided) bedside paracentesis. In this retrospective study, we aimed to compare the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of CT-guided paracentesis with bedside paracentesis. Methods The period of study was from 2002 to 2012. All patients with cirrhosis who underwent therapeutic paracentesis were included in the study. These patients were divided into two groups. Group I consisted of patients who underwent CT-guided pigtail catheter insertion with ascitic fluid drainage. Group II consisted of patients who underwent beside therapeutic paracentesis after localization of fluid either by physical examination or sonographic localization. We measured the efficacy of CT-guided paracentesis and bedside paracentesis in terms of volume of fluid removed, length of stay, discharge doses of diuretics (spironolactone and furosemide) and number of days to readmission for symptomatic ascites. We also computed the cost-effectiveness of CT-guided therapeutic paracentesis when compared to a bedside procedure. Fischer exact test was used to analyze the distribution of categorical data and unpaired t-test was used for comparison of means. Results There were a total of 546 unique patients with diagnosed cirrhosis who were admitted to the hospital with symptomatic ascites and underwent therapeutic paracentesis. Two hundred and forty-seven patients underwent CT-guided paracentesis, while 272 patients underwent bedside paracentesis. There was significant inverse correlation between the amount of ascitic fluid removed and total length of stay in the hospital. We found that the volume of fluid removed via a CT-guided pigtail insertion and drainage (2.72 ± 2.02 L) is

  1. [Computerized axial tomography of the skull - diagnostic possibilities and clinical results (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kazner, E; Lanksch, W; Steinhoff, H; Wilske, J

    1975-10-01

    Computerized axial tomography is a new method of tissue examination with x-rays whereby a picture can be produced which is a representation of a slice of the skull. This is done by irradiating the skull from 180 or 225 incremental angles and measuring the absorption at each of these angles. Then with the aid of a computer a tomogram is produced which can be displayed on a screen. These tomograms are representations of a cross-section of the skull composed of 160 X 160 points showing the various intracranial structures with great detail. The present study demonstrates the diagnostic possibilities of the high definition matrix with reference to brain disorders in a large sample of patients for the first time. Some tumours are shown as areas of decreased absorption compared with normal brain tissue. Others, however, have been found to have higher absorption values. With glioblastomas very contrasting pictures are produced with coexistng areas of decreased, increased and similar values to brain tissue. The most important finding is the visualization of brain oedema which appears as a low density area. A grading system of brain oedemas is proposed. The brain oedema associated with tumours has been found to propagate mainly in the white matter producing finger-like shapes. Out of 209 intracranial tumours 203 were recognized in the plain scan, a further five after contrast enhancement. In patients who have suffered from a stroke the differentiation between haemorrhage and infarction is made simple due to the contrasting appearance between the two types of lesion. Location, size and propagation direction of a haematoma as well as rupture of a haemorrhage into the ventricular system can be defined exactly. With brain infarction the hypoxically damaged tissue is well delineated and readily attributable to a given vascular area. In head injuries, for the first time it is possible to differentiate brain contusion with oedema from intracerebral haematoma. Coup and contre

  2. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in detecting neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, N C; Hellman, R S; Tikofsky, R S; Prost, R W; Mark, L P; Elejalde, B R; Lebel, R; Hamsher, K S; Swanson, S; Benezra, E E

    2002-01-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies were performed on 34 manifest Huntington's disease (HD) patients at various stages of clinical pathology ranging from early chorea to late dystonia with or without signs of dementia and 12 pre-symptomatic patients with abnormal terminal CAG expansions. Thirty HD patients with obvious clinical signs and seven pre-symptomatic patients without signs or symptoms of HD displayed selective caudate hypoperfusion by direct visual inspection. Such qualitative, selective striatal hypoperfusion patterns can be indicative of early and persistent metabolic changes in striatal neuropathology. SPECT studies can be useful in documenting early pre-clinical changes in patients with abnormal terminal CAG expansions and in confirming the presence of caudate pathology in patients with clinical signs of HD.

  3. Square wave cone beam scanning trajectory for data completeness in three-dimensional computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hedengren, K.H.V.

    1991-12-17

    This paper describes a scanning and data acquisition method for three-dimensional computerized tomography (CT) imaging of a field of view containing at least a portion of an object illuminated by a cone beam source. It comprises: defining a source scanning trajectory as a path traversed by the source; employing the cone beam source fixed with reference to a two-dimensional array detector with both source and detector movably positioned relative to the object in order to scan about the object; specifying the source scanning trajectory as a square wave on a cylindrical surface surrounding the field of view such that each plane passing through the field of view intersects the scanning trajectory in at lease one point; and scanning at a plurality of positions along the source scanning trajectory to obtain cone beam projection data.

  4. Computerized axial tomography of the chest for visualization of ''absent'' pulmonary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sondheimer, H.M.; Oliphant, M.; Schneider, B.; Kavey, R.E.W.; Blackman, M.S.; Parker, F.B. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    To expand the search for central pulmonary arteries in six patients with absence of cardiac-pulmonary continuity, computerized axial tomography (CAT) of the chest was performed. The CAT scans were compared with previous arteriograms and pulmonary vein wedge angiograms. Three patients with type IV truncus arteriosus were studied, and none had a central, right or left pulmonary artery on CAT scan. However, two patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia and a patent ductus arteriosus to the right lung demonstrated the presence of a left pulmonary artery. In addition, one child with truncus arteriosus with ''absent'' left pulmonary artery demonstrated a left pulmonary artery on the CAT scan. The CAT scan may therefore enhance our ability to search for disconnected pulmonary arteries in children with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease.

  5. Computerized tomography of pelvic osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Sokolow, J.

    1983-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) was performed in 19 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who had large pressure sores and in whom other complications were suspected. CT detected the depth, extent, and degree of undermining of the edges of the pressure sores in 19 of 27 lesions. Conventional radiography detected four cases of pelvic osteomyelitis. CT detected eight additional cases of pelvic osteomyelitis, as well as eight clinically unsuspected peripelvic and intrapelvic abscesses. Technetium-99m bone scanning was not very helpful because of localization in chronic proliferative changes of bone and widespread foci of myositis ossificans, as well as in osteomyelitis. Gallium-67 scanning detected only one of six abscesses. It was not very helpful because of confusion of abscess and osteomyelitis with intense soft tissue swelling and cellulitis, which are often associated with pressure sores in patients with chronic SCI. CT was found to be, by far, the modality of choice for detection of pelvic osteomyelitis and abscess in patients with SCI.

  6. Oral chloral hydrate vs. intranasal midazolam for sedation during computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Razieh; Nakhaei, Mohammad Hosein Ataee; Behdad, Shekofah; Moghaddam, Reza Nafisi; Shamszadeh, Ali

    2013-02-01

    We conducted this single blind randomized clinical trial to compare the efficacy and safety of oral chloral hydrate and intranasal midazolam for induction of sedation for computerized tomography scan of brain in children. Participants aged 1-10 years (n=60) were randomized to receive 100 mg/kg chloral hydrate orally with intra nasal normal saline OR intranasal midazolam 0.2 mg/kg with oral normal saline. Adequate sedation (Ramsay sedation score of four) was obtained and CT scan completed successfully in 76.7% of chloral hydrate group and in 40% of midazolam group (P=0.004). No significant difference was seen for side effects frequency between the two drugs (10% in chloral hydrate, 3.3% in midazolam group; P=0.34). We conclude that oral chloral hydrate can be considered as a safe and effective drug for sedation in children undergoing CT scan of brain.

  7. The mobile hospital technology industry: focus on the computerized tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Hartley, D; Moscovice, I

    1996-01-01

    This study of firms offering mobile hospital technology to rural hospitals in eight northwestern states found that several permanently parked computerized tomography (CT) units were found where mobile routes had atrophied due to the purchase of fixed units by former mobile CT hospital clients. Based on a criterion of 140 scans per month per unit as a threshold of profitable production, units owned by larger firms (those that operate five or more units) were more likely to be profitable than units owned by smaller firms (71% versus 20%, P = 0.03). A substantial number of rural hospitals lose money on mobile CT due to low Medicare reimbursement. In some areas, mobile hospital technology is a highly competitive industry. Evidence was found that several firms compete in some geographic areas and that some firms have lost hospital clients to competing vendors.

  8. Weight-based contrast administration in the computerized tomography evaluation of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Lisa; Zamfirova, Ina; Sulo, Suela; Baral, Pesach

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Compare individualized contrast protocol, or weight-based protocol, to standard methodology in evaluating acute pulmonary embolism. Retrospective chart review was performed on patients undergoing computed tomography angiography with standard contrast protocol (n = 50) or individualized protocol (n = 50). Computerized tomography images were assessed for vascular enhancement and image quality. Demographics were comparable, however, more patients in the individualized group were admitted to intensive care unit (48% vs 16%, P = 0.004). Vascular enhancement and image quality were also comparable, although individualized protocol had significantly fewer contrast and motion artifact limitations (28% vs 48%, P = 0.039). Fifteen percent decrease in intravenous contrast volume was identified in individualized group with no compromise in image quality. Individualized contrast protocol provided comparable vascular enhancement and image quality to the standard, yet with fewer limitations and lower intravenous contrast volume. Catheter-gauge flow rate restrictions resulting in inconsistent technologist exam execution were identified, supporting the need for further investigation of this regimen. PMID:28151887

  9. Compact cold stage for micro-computerized tomography imaging of chilled or frozen samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hullar, Ted; Paige, David F.; Rowland, Douglas J.; Anastasio, Cort

    2014-04-01

    High resolution X-ray microCT (computerized tomography) can be used to image a variety of objects, including temperature-sensitive materials. In cases where the sample must be chilled or frozen to maintain sample integrity, either the microCT machine itself must be placed in a refrigerated chamber, or a relatively expensive commercial cold stage must be purchased. We describe here the design and construction of a low-cost custom cold stage suitable for use in a microCT imaging system. Our device uses a boron nitride sample holder, two-stage Peltier cooler, fan-cooled heat sink, and electronic controller to maintain sample temperatures as low as -25 °C ± 0.2 °C for the duration of a tomography acquisition. The design does not require modification to the microCT machine, and is easily installed and removed. Our custom cold stage represents a cost-effective solution for refrigerating CT samples for imaging, and is especially useful for shared equipment or machines unsuitable for cold room use.

  10. Compact cold stage for micro-computerized tomography imaging of chilled or frozen samples

    SciTech Connect

    Hullar, Ted; Anastasio, Cort; Paige, David F.; Rowland, Douglas J.

    2014-04-15

    High resolution X-ray microCT (computerized tomography) can be used to image a variety of objects, including temperature-sensitive materials. In cases where the sample must be chilled or frozen to maintain sample integrity, either the microCT machine itself must be placed in a refrigerated chamber, or a relatively expensive commercial cold stage must be purchased. We describe here the design and construction of a low-cost custom cold stage suitable for use in a microCT imaging system. Our device uses a boron nitride sample holder, two-stage Peltier cooler, fan-cooled heat sink, and electronic controller to maintain sample temperatures as low as −25 °C ± 0.2 °C for the duration of a tomography acquisition. The design does not require modification to the microCT machine, and is easily installed and removed. Our custom cold stage represents a cost-effective solution for refrigerating CT samples for imaging, and is especially useful for shared equipment or machines unsuitable for cold room use.

  11. Application of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and computerized tomography in the diagnosis and treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Dong, Hui; Wei, Shichao; Lu, Fuer

    2008-06-01

    In order to investigate the application of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and computerized tomography (CT) in the quantitative diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and evaluation of therapeutic effects, 22 patients with NAFLD were selected according to the Chinese Medical Association's (CMA) standard of the NAFLD in comparison with 20 healthy volunteers (as control group). Blood samples for biochemistry were collected. The severity of hepatosteatosis was evaluated by (1)H-MRS scan and CT scan of liver. The intrahepatic content of lipid (IHCL) and CT value ratio of liver to spleen were calculated. The patients in NAFLD group were treated with Ganzhixiao Capsule for 8 weeks. The changes in IHCL and CT value ratio of liver to spleen were observed before and after treatment. In NAFLD group serum ALT, TG, IHCL calculated by (1)HMRS were increased and CT value ratio of liver to spleen decreased significantly as compared with control group. After treatment for 8 weeks serum ALT, TG, IHCL were decreased significantly, while CT value ratio of liver to spleen increased significantly in NAFLD group. It was suggested that IHCL could be measured precisely by (1)HMRS. NAFLD was treated effectively by Ganzhixiao capsule.

  12. Computerized tomography technique for reconstruction of obstructed temperature field in infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, F. C.; Huang, Y. H.; Liu, L.; Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.; Lo, T. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a rapid, non-invasive and full-field technique for non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). With all the achievements on IR instrumentation and image processing techniques attained, it has been extended far beyond simple hot-spot detection and becomes one of the most promising NDT&E techniques in the last decades. It has achieved increasing acceptance in different sectors include medical imaging, manufacturing component fault detection and buildings diagnostic. However, one limitation of IR thermography is that the testing results are greatly affected by object surface emissivity. Surface with various emissivities may lead to difficult discrimination between area of defect and area with different emissivity. Therefore, many studies have been carried out on eliminating emissivity, for example, the time derivative approach, lock-in processing and differential contrast measurements. In these methods, sequence of themo-data/images are recorded and being processed in order to eliminate differences of emissivity. Another problem of IR thermography is that any obstruction may limit stimulations and imaging which leads to the observation of unclear defect image. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an algorithm based on the principle of computerized tomography which permits the reconstruction of unavailable/partially available temperature distribution of the affected area using the measured surrounding temperature field. In the process, a set of imaginary rays are projected from many different directions across the area. For each ray, integration of the temperature derivatives along the ray is equals to the temperature difference between the boundary points intercepted by the ray. Therefore, a set of linear equations can be established by considering the multiple rays. Each equation expresses the unknown temperature derivatives in the affected area in terms of the measured boundary temperature data. Solution of the set of simultaneous

  13. Cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging of the oral and maxillofacial region: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    De Vos, W; Casselman, J; Swennen, G R J

    2009-06-01

    This study reviewed the literature on cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging of the oral and maxillofacial (OMF) region. A PUBMED search (National Library of Medicine, NCBI; revised 1 December 2007) from 1998 to December 2007 was conducted. This search revealed 375 papers, which were screened in detail. 176 papers were clinically relevant and were analyzed in detail. CBCT is used in OMF surgery and orthodontics for numerous clinical applications, particularly for its low cost, easy accessibility and low radiation compared with multi-slice computerized tomography. The results of this systematic review show that there is a lack of evidence-based data on the radiation dose for CBCT imaging. Terminology and technical device properties and settings were not consistent in the literature. An attempt was made to provide a minimal set of CBCT device-related parameters for dedicated OMF scanners as a guideline for future studies.

  14. Kidney Stone Volume Estimation from Computerized Tomography Images Using a Model Based Method of Correcting for the Point Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Qu, Mingliang; Leng, Shuai; Liu, Yu; Krambeck, Amy; McCollough, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We propose a method to improve the accuracy of volume estimation of kidney stones from computerized tomography images. Materials and Methods The proposed method consisted of 2 steps. A threshold equal to the average of the computerized tomography number of the object and the background was first applied to determine full width at half maximum volume. Correction factors were then applied, which were precalculated based on a model of a sphere and a 3-dimensional Gaussian point spread function. The point spread function was measured in a computerized tomography scanner to represent the response of the scanner to a point-like object. Method accuracy was validated using 6 small cylindrical phantoms with 2 volumes of 21.87 and 99.9 mm3, and 3 attenuations, respectively, and 76 kidney stones with a volume range of 6.3 to 317.4 mm3. Volumes estimated by the proposed method were compared with full width at half maximum volumes. Results The proposed method was significantly more accurate than full width at half maximum volume (p <0.0001). The magnitude of improvement depended on stone volume with smaller stones benefiting more from the method. For kidney stones 10 to 20 mm3 in volume the average improvement in accuracy was the greatest at 19.6%. Conclusions The proposed method achieved significantly improved accuracy compared with threshold methods. This may lead to more accurate stone management. PMID:22819107

  15. Volumetric computerized tomography as a measurement of periprosthetic acetabular osteolysis and its correlation with wear

    PubMed Central

    Looney, R John; Boyd, Allen; Totterman, Saara; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Campbell, Debbie; Novotny, Leonore; Olcott, Christopher; Martell, John; Hayes, F Ann; O'Keefe, Regis J; Schwarz, Edward M

    2002-01-01

    Osteolysis, which is considered to be a major source of morbidity following total hip joint replacement, has been notoriously difficult to measure accurately, particularly in the acetabular area. In order to study periacetabular osteolysis, specialized software for computerized tomography (CT) scan image analysis has been developed. This software (3D-CT) eliminates metal artifacts, allows three-dimensional segmentation of the CT image, and reconstructs the segmented image to provide an accurate representation and measurement of volume for osteolytic lesions. In the present study, 20 patients underwent periacetabular osteolytic volume determination using 3D-CT, functional assessment (using the Harris Hip Scale, the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index, and the short form 36 questionnaire), and two-dimensional analysis of volumetic polyethylene wear using digitalized plain films. Periacetabular osteolysis correlated directly with the polyethylene wear rate (relative risk [RR] = 0.494, P = 0.027). If one patient with an acetabular revision, one patient with recurrent dislocation, and one patient with a Biomet prosthesis are excluded, then the correlation between wear and osteolysis is improved (RR = 0.685, P = 0.002). In summary, the current study demonstrates both the feasibility of CT imaging of periacetabular osteolysis and the correlation between polyethylene wear and osteolytic volume, providing a potential outcome measure for clinical trials that are designed to examine interventions in this complex disease process. PMID:11879538

  16. Numerical Modeling of Jointed Rock Under Compressive Loading Using X-ray Computerized Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinglei; Yang, Shengqi; Ranjith, P. G.; Zhu, Wancheng; Yang, Tianhong

    2016-03-01

    As jointed rocks consist of joints embedded within intact rock blocks, the presence and geometrical fabric of joints have a great influence on the mechanical behavior of rock. With consideration of the actual spatial shape of joints, a numerical model is proposed to investigate the fracture evolution mechanism of jointed rocks. In the proposed model, computerized tomography (CT) scanning is first used to capture the microstructure of a jointed sandstone specimen, which is artificially fabricated by loading the intact sample until the residual strength, and then digital image processing (DIP) techniques are applied to characterize the geometrical fabric of joints from the CT images. A simple vectorization method is used to convert the microstructure based on a cross-sectional image into a layer of 3-D vectorized microstructure and the overall 3-D model of the jointed sandstone including the real spatial shape of the joints is established by stacking the layers in a specific sequence. The 3-D model is then integrated into a well-established code [three-dimensional Rock Failure Process Analysis, (RFPA3D)]. Using the proposed model, a uniaxial compression test of the jointed sandstone is simulated. The results show that the presence of joints can produce tensile stress zones surrounding them, which result in the fracture of jointed rocks under a relatively small external load. In addition, the spatial shape of the joints has a great influence on the fracture process of jointed rocks.

  17. Diagnostic Value of Dual-Source Computerized Tomography Combined with Perfusion Imaging for Peripheral Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xijin; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Xingyue; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism has become the third most common cardiovascular disease, which can seriously harm human health. Objectives To investigate the diagnostic value of dual-source computerized tomography (CT) and perfusion imaging for peripheral pulmonary embolism. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent dual-source CT exams. To compare the ability of pulmonary embolism detection software (PED) with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in determining the presence, numbers, and locations of pulmonary emboli, the subsequent images were reviewed by two radiologists using both imaging modalities. Also, the diagnostic consistency between PED and CTPA images and dual-energy pulmonary perfusion imaging (DEPI) for segmental pulmonary embolism was compared. Results CTPA images revealed 50 (7.81%) segmental and 56 (4.38%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms, while the PED images showed 68 (10.63%) segmental and 94 (7.34%) sub-segmental pulmonary embolisms. Thus, the detection rate on PED images for peripheral pulmonary embolism was significantly higher than that of the CTPA images (P < 0.05). There was good consistency for diagnosing segmental pulmonary embolism between PED and CTPA and DEPI (kappa = 0.85). The sensitivity and specificity of DEPI images for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism were 91.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Conclusion PED software of dual-source CT combined with perfusion imaging can significantly improve the detection rate of peripheral pulmonary embolism. PMID:27703656

  18. Diagnostic value of unenhanced computerized tomography urography in the evaluation of acute renal colic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Hwia; Lin, Wen-Chiung; Wei, Chao-Jung; Chang, Cheng-Yen

    2003-10-01

    This study prospectively evaluated the diagnostic value of unenhanced computerized tomography (CT) urography in patients with acute renal colic. Fifty-nine patients with clinical manifestations of acute renal colic underwent unenhanced helical CT to evaluate urinary tract abnormalities. Reformatted three-dimensional CT urography was performed in all patients. The findings were correlated with ureteroscopy, surgical findings, histopathologic findings, and clinical course. CT urography detected urinary abnormalities in 57 of 59 patients with the clinical manifestation of acute renal colic, including 45 cases of urolithiasis, three urinary malignancies, one congenital abnormality, and eight ureteral strictures (due to chronic inflammation or fibrosis). CT urography showed negative findings in the urinary system in two patients, and after clinical follow-up, urinary abnormality was excluded in these patients. Incidental findings of extrarenal disease were noted in six patients (pulmonary abnormalities, n = 2; gallstones, n = 4). Only one patient with urolithiasis was misdiagnosed as having a renal tumor by CT urography. The sensitivity and specificity of CT urography in diagnosing urolithiasis was 97.8% (44/45) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Three-dimensional CT urography is a newly developed modality to evaluate anomalies of the urinary tract. The highly accurate diagnostic value of CT urography makes it a suitable alternative or substitutive modality in patients with acute flank pain.

  19. Combining ultrasonography and noncontrast helical computerized tomography to evaluate Holmium laser lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jia; Li, Jie; Zhang, Qinglu; Wang, Xing; Liu, Hongyu; Cao, Yanlu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Xiao; Shang, Mengmeng; Liu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the study was to establish a mathematical model for correlating the combination of ultrasonography and noncontrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT) with the total energy of Holmium laser lithotripsy. In this study, from March 2013 to February 2014, 180 patients with single urinary calculus were examined using ultrasonography and NCHCT before Holmium laser lithotripsy. The calculus location and size, acoustic shadowing (AS) level, twinkling artifact intensity (TAI), and CT value were all documented. The total energy of lithotripsy (TEL) and the calculus composition were also recorded postoperatively. Data were analyzed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, with the SPSS 17.0 software package. Multiple linear regression was also used for further statistical analysis. A significant difference in the TEL was observed between renal calculi and ureteral calculi (r = –0.565, P < 0.001), and there was a strong correlation between the calculus size and the TEL (r = 0.675, P < 0.001). The difference in the TEL between the calculi with and without AS was highly significant (r = 0.325, P < 0.001). The CT value of the calculi was significantly correlated with the TEL (r = 0.386, P < 0.001). A correlation between the TAI and TEL was also observed (r = 0.391, P < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the location, size, and TAI of the calculi were related to the TEL, and the location and size were statistically significant predictors (adjusted r2 = 0.498, P < 0.001). A mathematical model correlating the combination of ultrasonography and NCHCT with TEL was established; this model may provide a foundation to guide the use of energy in Holmium laser lithotripsy. The TEL can be estimated by the location, size, and TAI of the calculus. PMID:27930563

  20. Toward a new insight of calcium oxalate stones in Drosophila by micro-computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Liao, Po-Chi; Wang, Shih-Jing; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Yong

    2017-03-04

    We previously developed an animal model of calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition on the Malphigian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster as a model of urolithiasis. Here, we introduce a new tool for the study of anatomical structure for Drosophila. As a consequence of technical development, the invention of micro-computerized tomography (CT) has been introduced to the small animal, such as rat and mice. We used Drosophila as a model organism and fed the flies 0.5% lithogenic agent ethylene glycol for 3 weeks. Samples were simply prepared for further scanned by micro-CT to scan samples at 800 nm resolution. CT scanning was performed at 40 kVp of voltage, 250 μA of current, and 1750 ms of exposure time and without filter. Reconstruction of sections was carried out with the GPU-based scanner software. Specific region of interests was further analyzed by DataViewer software. Area with high radiologic density level was defined as CaOx deposition for further 3D analysis. Image of whole lithogenic Drosophila was compared with control. High radiologic density level was detected in the region of Malphigian tubules which can be identified as CaOx stones. There was no stone image in the control group. The image was the same as human non-contrast CT for the diagnosis of stone disease. Micro-CT clearly demonstrated the calcium oxalate calcifications in the Malphigian tubules of fruit fly. The image system provides that a new vision on study animal will facilitate further study of stone disease. With the development of new technology on micro-CT, more delicate and advanced image will be presented in the future.

  1. The lymph drainage pattern of the mammary glands in the cat: a lymphographic and computerized tomography lymphographic study.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, P L; Patsikas, M N; Charitanti, A; Kazakos, G M; Papazoglou, L G; Karayannopoulou, M; Chrisogonidis, I; Tziris, N; Dimitriadis, A

    2009-08-01

    Seventy-three clinically normal, lactating cats were used to investigate the lymph drainage of 73 mammary glands. In 50 cats of the first group, the number of lymphatic vessels emerging from the examined mammary gland, their course and the lymph nodes into which they are drained were studied by indirect lymphography (IL) after intramammary injection of an oily contrast medium. In 23 cats of the second group, the lymph drainage of the mammary glands was studied by computerized tomography indirect lymphography (CT-IL) after intramammary injection of a water soluble contrast medium. The following day, the lymph drainage of the mammary gland examined by CT-IL was studied by IL, as it was described in the first group, for comparison purposes. The main conclusions drawn after this study were as follows: lymph drains from the first and second mammary glands with one or rarely two or three lymphatic vessels to the accessory axillary lymph nodes. Lymph drains from the third mammary gland with one or two and rarely three lymphatic vessels usually to the accessory inguinal lymph nodes or to the accessory axillary lymph nodes. In some cases, it drains to both lymph nodes simultaneously or it may rarely drain only to the medial iliac lymph nodes. The fourth mammary gland with one or two and rarely three lymphatic vessels usually drains to the accessory inguinal lymph nodes. It may rarely drain only to the medial iliac lymph nodes. Mammary lymphatic vessels that cross the midline and lymphatic connection between the mammary glands were not demonstrated. No differences in the mammary lymph drainage pattern between IL and CT-IL were found.

  2. X-ray computerized tomography analysis and density estimation using a sediment core from the Challenger Mound area in the Porcupine Seabight, off Western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Akiko; Nakano, Tsukasa; Ikehara, Ken

    2011-02-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (CT) analysis was used to image a half-round core sample of 50 cm long recovered from near Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Seabight, off western Ireland during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307. This allowed three-dimensional examination of complex shapes of pebbles and ice-rafted debris in sedimentary sequences. X-ray CT analysis was also used for the determination of physical properties; a comparison between bulk density by the mass-volume method and estimated density based on linear attenuation coefficients of X-ray CT images provides insight into a spatially detailed and precise map of density variation in samples through the distribution of CT numbers.

  3. Computerized Tomography-Based Morphologic and Morphometric Features of the Coccyx Among Arab Adults.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Yousef Abbas; Al-Saeed, Osama Mhawes; Esmaeel, Ali Abdulla; Ahmad Kombar, Osama Rabie; Bendary, Abdulla Mohammad; Abdul Azeem, Mokhtar Elsayed

    2014-07-09

    Study Design. Cross-sectional, retrospective.Objective. To identify morphologic and morphometric features of the coccyx among adult Arabs.Summary of Background Data. Different sacrococcygeal morphologic features were found to be associated with coccydynia.Methods. Review of 202 computerized tomography scans of adult Arab subjects was done (mean age: 47.98 ± 16.46 years). Sacrococcygeal morphologic features including number of coccygeal segments, type of coccyx, joint fusion, joint subluxation, coccygeal spicule, coccygeal sacralization, ventral angulation of the terminal sacral segment (S5), and lateral deviation of coccygeal tip were recorded. Moreover, morphometric measurements including lengths and angles of the sacrococcygeal region were measured. Analysis of data was carried out using p-value of <0.05 as the cut-off level of significance.Results. Three coccygeal segments were present in 138 (68.3%) of individuals. The majority of the subjects had coccyx type I (96; 47.5%), II (70; 34.7%) or III (31; 15.3%); type I being more common among males (p = 0.004). Bony spicule was present in 109 (54.0%) individuals. Joint fusion, joint subluxation, coccygeal sacralization, ventral angulation of S5 and lateral deviation of coccygeal tip were present in 38.6%, 31.7%, 34.2%, 38.1% and 38.6% of the subjects respectively. Joint subluxation and ventral angulation of S5 were significantly more present among females (p = 0.015, p = 0.014 respectively). The mean straight and curved lengths of the coccyx were 3.3 ± 0.7 cm and 3.7 ± 0.8 cm respectively. The sacrococcygeal structures were longer in men than women. The mean sacrococcygeal joint angle was 149.2° ± 28.1°. Based on the morphometric measurements, the coccyx was more ventrally angulated among females.Conclusions. The coccygeal morphology and morphometry of Arab adults share some similarities and differences with individuals of other ethnic backgrounds. Future studies should investigate the relation between these

  4. Using computerized tomography to determine ionospheric structures. Part 1, Notivation and basic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1993-08-01

    Properties of the ionosphere are reviewed along with its correlations with other geophysical phenomena and with applications of ionospheric studies to communication, navigation, and surveillance systems. Computer tomography is identified as a method to determine the detailed, three-dimensional distribution of electron density within the ionosphere. Several tomography methods are described, with a basic approach illustrated by an example. Limitations are identified.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography in relation to the neurobehavioral sequelae of mild and moderate head injuries.

    PubMed

    Levin, H S; Amparo, E; Eisenberg, H M; Williams, D H; High, W M; McArdle, C B; Weiner, R L

    1987-05-01

    Twenty patients admitted for minor or moderate closed-head injury were studied to investigate the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurobehavioral sequelae. The MRI scans demonstrated 44 more intracranial lesions than did concurrent computerized tomography (CT) scans in 17 patients (85%); most of these lesions were located in the frontal and temporal regions. Estimates of lesion volume based on MRI were frequently greater than with CT; however, MRI disclosed no additional lesions that required surgical evacuation. Neuropsychological assessment during the initial hospitalization revealed deficits in frontal lobe functioning and memory that were related to the size and localization of the lesions as defined by MRI. Follow-up MRI and neuropsychological testing at 1 month (13 cases) and 3 months (six cases) disclosed marked reduction of lesion size paralleled by improvement in cognition and memory. These findings encourage further investigation of the prognostic utility of MRI for the clinical management and rehabilitation of mild or moderate head injury.

  6. Diagnosis and management decisions in infections of the deep fascial spaces of the head and neck utilizing computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Endicott, J N; Nelson, R J; Saraceno, C A

    1982-06-01

    Infections of the deep spaces of the head and neck may still result in major consequences despite the advent of antibiotics. Abscesses in these areas merit special consideration by today's head and neck surgeon because of their relative rarity and the life-threatening complications that may follow inadequate treatment. Diagnosis and management decisions are enhanced by use of computerized tomography (CT) as an adjunctive study. The EMI scan may demonstrate either cellulitis of the neck requiring no surgery or a space abscess displacing the adjacent structures thus requiring surgical drainage. Anatomy of the significant fascial planes and spaces of the neck will reviewed employing CT utilizing 3 mm cuts. Specific case presentations feature early diagnosis and management.

  7. [Role of computeric tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis of inflammatory diseases of sacro-ileal joint].

    PubMed

    Baĭramov, R B

    2012-05-01

    Sensitivity of computeric tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for sacroileitis diagnosis was studied, optimal for MRI investigation was established. In 31 patients, owing obvious clinical signs of inflammatory sacroileitis (at average more than 5 mo duration of a low back pain) MRI of sacroiliac joint was conducted in a T1, T2 FS, 2D T2 FLASH regimes and after intravenous infusion of a contrast substance (gadolinium) - in a T1 FS regime, using system, owing a 1,5 T magnetic field intensity. The data obtained were compared with results of CT. Sacroileitis signs were revealed in 27 patients - according to CT data, and in 22 - MRI. CT have demonstrated as a more sensitive method of the bone erosion and sclerosis diagnosis, than MRI. MRI is more sensitive while revealing an active inflammatory process in the bone and joint space. While T1 FS application no additional information for sacroileitis diagnosis was obtained.

  8. An evaluation of the condylar position of the temporomandibular joint by computerized tomography in Class III malocclusions: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Seren, E; Akan, H; Toller, M O; Akyar, S

    1994-05-01

    The position of the condyle within the glenoid fossa was investigated in 21 adult patients with untreated skeletal Class III relationships and 18 adult patients with normal occlusions as controls. Axial computerized tomography (CT) was used for precise measurements of the bony structures of the temporamandibular joints. In horizontal sections, the mediolateral dimensions of the condyles of the patient group were found to be statistically higher in the fossa. The anteroposterior glenoid fossa dimensions were found to be smaller in Class III malocclusions. The smaller anterior joint space dimensions in the Class III relationships were also found to be statistically significant. The analysis of the measurements suggests that relative condylar protrusion with a relative mediolateral elongation of the condyle within a relatively smaller glenoid fossa are correlated with the anterior mandibular displacement in skeletal Class III malocclusions.

  9. Evaluation of the accuracy of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT): medical imaging technology in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the introduction, development and commercialization of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) technologies in the field of head and neck reconstruction, clinicians now have increased access to the technology. Given the growth of this new user group, there is an increasing concern regarding proper use, understanding, quality and patient safety. Methods The present study was carried out to evaluate data acquisition of CBCT medical imaging technology and the accuracy of the scanning at three different machine warming times. The study also compared the accuracy of CBCT at 0.2 mm slice thickness and Computerized Tomography (CT) at 1 mm slice thickness. A control model was CT scanned at five random intervals, at 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanned at specialized intervals, at 0.2 mm slice thickness. The data was then converted and imported into a software program where a digital registration procedure was used to compare the average deviations of the scanned models to the control. Results The study found that there was no statistically significant difference amongst the three CBCT machine warming times. There was a statistically significant difference between CT scanning with 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanning with 0.2 mm slice thickness. Conclusions The accuracy of the i-CAT CBCT scans used in the present study with a parameter at voxel size 0.2, will remain consistent and reliable at any warming stage. Also the difference between the CBCT i-CAT scans and the CT scans was not clinically significant based on suggested requirements of clinicians in head and neck reconstruction. PMID:23672880

  10. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography for tumor response assessment—a review of clinical practices and radiomics studies

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Chen, Wengen

    2016-01-01

    Even with recent advances in cancer diagnosis and therapy, treatment outcomes for many cancers remain dismal. Patients often show different response to the same therapy regimen, supporting the development of personalized medicine. 18F-FDG PET/CT has been used routinely in the assessment of tumor response, in prediction of outcomes, and in guiding personalized treatment. These assessments are mainly based on physician’s subjective or semi-quantitative evaluation. Recent development in Radiomics provides a promising objective way for tumor response assessment, which uses computerized tools to extract a large number of image features that capture additional information not currently used in clinic that has prognostic value. In this review, we summarized the clinical use of PET/CT and the PET/CT Radiomics studies for tumor response assessment. Finally, we discussed some challenges and future perspectives. PMID:27904837

  11. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography for tumor response assessment-a review of clinical practices and radiomics studies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Chen, Wengen

    2016-08-01

    Even with recent advances in cancer diagnosis and therapy, treatment outcomes for many cancers remain dismal. Patients often show different response to the same therapy regimen, supporting the development of personalized medicine. 18F-FDG PET/CT has been used routinely in the assessment of tumor response, in prediction of outcomes, and in guiding personalized treatment. These assessments are mainly based on physician's subjective or semi-quantitative evaluation. Recent development in Radiomics provides a promising objective way for tumor response assessment, which uses computerized tools to extract a large number of image features that capture additional information not currently used in clinic that has prognostic value. In this review, we summarized the clinical use of PET/CT and the PET/CT Radiomics studies for tumor response assessment. Finally, we discussed some challenges and future perspectives.

  12. Tumor volume, luxury perfusion, and regional blood volume changes in man visualized by subtraction computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Penn, R D; Walser, R; Kurtz, D; Ackerman, L

    1976-04-01

    Computer and photographic methods for producing subtractions of computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scans have been developed. By subtracting point for point a normal scan from one taken after intravenous infusion of contrast material, a picture of the contrast in the cerebral vessels is created. By this method, tumor size and degree of vascularity may be assessed. Furthermore, abnormalities in perfusion and changes in blood volume due to mass effects and edema may be detected. Subtracting scans should add to the diagnostic potential of CAT and provide a noninvasive way to study vascular changes in cerebral disease.

  13. Three-Dimensional Planning in Maxillofacial Fracture Surgery: Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacture Surgical Splints by Integrating Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Images Into Multislice Computerized Tomography Images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiayin; Zhou, Zhongwei; Li, Peng; Tang, Wei; Guo, Jixiang; Wang, Hu; Tian, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an innovative workflow for maxillofacial fracture surgery planning and surgical splint designing. The maxillofacial multislice computerized tomography (MSCT) data and dental cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) data both were obtained from 40 normal adults and 58 adults who suffered fractures. The each part of the CBCT dentition image was registered into MSCT image by the use of the iterative closest point algorithm. Volume evaluation of the virtual splints that were designed by the registered MSCT images and MSCT images of the same object was performed. Eighteen patients (group 1) were operated without any splint. Twenty-one (group 2) and 19 patients (group 3) used the splints designed according to the MSCT images and registered MSCT images, respectively. The authors' results showed that the mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.53 to 0.92 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.38 to 0.69 mm in fracture patients. The mean errors between the 2 models ranged from 0.47 to 0.85 mm and the RMS errors ranged from 0.33 to 0.71 mm in normal adults. 72.22% patients in group 1 recovered occlusion. 85.71% patients in group 2, and 94.73% patients in group 3 reconstructed occlusion. There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients (P <0.05). The MSCT images based splints' volume was statistically significantly distinct from the registered MSCT splints' volume in normal adults (P <0.05). There was a statistically significant difference between the MSCT images based splints' volume and the registered MSCT splints' volume in patients and normal adults (P <0.05). The occlusion recovery rate of group 3 was better than that of group 1 and group 2. The way of integrating CBCT images into MSCT images for splints designing was feasible. The volume of the splints designed by MSCT images tended to be smaller than the splints designed by

  14. Computerized X-ray reconstruction tomography in stereometric analysis of cardiovascular dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robb, R. A.; Harris, L. D.; Ritman, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A computerized technique is proposed for obtaining cross-sectional images of the dynamic spatial distribution of X-ray attenuation covering the entire anatomic extent of the thorax and its contents in living dogs with a resolution of 1 mm and at time intervals of 1/60 sec. Use is made of an X-ray imaging chain which is a new high-performance video-fluoroscopic system, unique in its design and construction and called SSDSR for single source dynamic spatial reconstructor. This dynamic spatial reconstruction system is shown to provide the temporally and spatially coherent multiple cross sections required to obtain the full three-dimensional anatomic and simultaneous hemodynamic information necessary for detailed quantitative analyses of regional cardiopulmonary and vascular functions in both basic investigations of animals and clinical diagnostic applications to patients. Numerous photographs supplement the text.

  15. [A quantitative evaluation of brain computerized tomography in children using color image analyzer].

    PubMed

    Yamatani, M; Naganuma, Y; Hongoh, K; Murakami, M; Konishi, T; Okada, T

    1989-11-01

    We attempted the quantitative analysis of brain computerized tomographic scans in children using Color Image Analyzer. A consecutive series of 167 computerized tomographic scans were reviewed. Areas of subarachnoid spaces, cavums, ventricles and cerebellums were measured on three slices: A slice is at the level of head of caudate nucleus, anterior horn of lateral ventricle and third ventricle. B slice is at the level of body of lateral ventricle. C slice is at the level of sella turcica and pons. We investigated these values compared with Evans ratio, Cella Media Index, cerebellar atrophy score and visually evaluations. Serial brain CT scans of eight patient with infantile spasms were also evaluated for the assessment of the brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy. 1) The ratios of the subarachnoid space/the intracranial area on A and B slices (SAS A%, SAS B%) were significantly higher in the patients of severe brain atrophy. 2) There were linear relationship between Evans ratio and SAS A% (r = 0.405, p less than 0.001), Cella Media Index and the ratio of the lateral ventricles/the intracranial areas on B slice (r = -0.501, p less than 0.001), and the cerebellar atrophy score by Une and SAS C% (r = 0.369, p less than 0.001). 3) In the normal patients, the values of SAS A% and SAS B% were much greater in less than 1.5 years old children. These results suggest that the trend of CT findings related to age may reflect physiological changes of the space between the skull and the brain with age. 4) Brain shrinkage after ACTH therapy was more pronounced in the subarachnoid space than the ventricle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Computerized tomography versus perfusion lung scanning in canine radiation lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, I.H.; Logus, J.W.; El-Khatib, E.; Battista, J.J.; Ferri, H.; Lentle, B.C.; Man, G.C.; Man, S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Computerized tomographic (CT) measurements of lung density were obtained before and serially after thoracic irradiation in dogs to detect the alterations caused by radiation therapy. Fourteen mongrel dogs were given either 2000 cGy (Group A, 10 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), 1000 cGy (Group B, 2 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), or 500 cGy (Group C, 2 dogs, right lung irradiation) in one fraction. Once before and bi-weekly after irradiation, the anesthetized dogs had thoracic CT scans. CT numbers for the irradiated area were compared to their preirradiation control values. Macro-aggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scans were also obtained before and at weekly intervals after irradiation and were evaluated visually and quantitatively for abnormalities. When both these tests were abnormal, or at the end of the scheduled study, the dogs were sacrificed to confirm radiation lung injury histologically. Our results showed that CT numbers (as a measure of tissue density) were higher with higher doses of radiation. Among all the techniques used, only the quantitative assessment of macro-aggregated albumin perfusion scan detected abnormalities in all the dogs given 2000 cGy. Their abnormalities correlated well with the presence of radiation lung damage histologically, however, the applicability of these methods in the detection of early injury has to be further evaluated.

  17. A novel three-dimensional image reconstruction method for near-field coded aperture single photon emission computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhiping; Hong, Baoming; Li, Shimin; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging for two-dimensional (2D) planar objects has been investigated extensively in the past, whereas little success has been achieved in imaging 3D objects using this technique. In this article, the authors present a novel method of 3D single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) reconstruction for near-field coded aperture imaging. Multiangular coded aperture projections are acquired and a stack of 2D images is reconstructed separately from each of the projections. Secondary projections are subsequently generated from the reconstructed image stacks based on the geometry of parallel-hole collimation and the variable magnification of near-field coded aperture imaging. Sinograms of cross-sectional slices of 3D objects are assembled from the secondary projections, and the ordered subset expectation and maximization algorithm is employed to reconstruct the cross-sectional image slices from the sinograms. Experiments were conducted using a customized capillary tube phantom and a micro hot rod phantom. Imaged at approximately 50 cm from the detector, hot rods in the phantom with diameters as small as 2.4 mm could be discerned in the reconstructed SPECT images. These results have demonstrated the feasibility of the authors’ 3D coded aperture image reconstruction algorithm for SPECT, representing an important step in their effort to develop a high sensitivity and high resolution SPECT imaging system. PMID:19544769

  18. [Evidence of otospongiosis obtained by computerized tomography. Does it compromise the post-stapedectomy auditory gain?].

    PubMed

    Montaño Velázquez, B B; Bello Mora, A; Zepeda López, E G; Ramírez Martínez, J; Hernández Goribar, M; Jáuregui-Renaud, K

    2002-01-01

    To study the influence of tomographic otospongiosis/otosclerosis on the audiometric gain after stapedectomy, we evaluated 34 patients (mean age 39.9 years, S.D. 9.8) with otosclerosis and mixed hearing loss. We performed Computed Tomography (CT) with densitometry before stapedectomy and audiometry before and 4 weeks after the surgery. CT results were classified as compatible or not for otospongiosis (< 1000 UH) or for otosclerosis (> 2000 UH). According to the affected turns of the cochlea, the studies were classified in 3 groups. In 43% of the patients the CT showed otospongiosis. After stapedectomy, air conduction thresholds of the low (125-500 Hz), middle (500-2000 Hz) and high frequency bands (2000-8000 Hz) and for the air/bone gap were similar for the ears with or without otospongiosis (p > 0.05, ANOVA). However, patients with otospongiosis in all the cochlea showed the lowest audiometric gain for the high frequency band (p < 0.05 ANOVA). Evidence of otospongiosis evaluated just by CT has a low impact on the audiometric outcome after stapedectomy.

  19. Computerized comparison of the protein compositions of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae and Erysipelothrix tonsillarum strains.

    PubMed

    Bernáth, S; Német, L; Tóth, K; Morovján, G

    2001-02-01

    Protein profiles of six Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains, five Erysipelothrix tonsillarum strains and three Erysipelothrix strains of uncertain taxonomic position were studied by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyactylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In a computerized comparison of the protein patterns of the strains, the level of similarity between the strains was determined. The SDS-PAGE protein bands were divided into 14 groups based on molecular weight. The relative distribution of proteins within these groups was used to characterize the strains. These distribution patterns were analysed by computing Pearson's correlation coefficient between strains, and by cluster analysis based on Euclidean distances and the unweighted pair-group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA). The geometric mean of the similarities calculated by Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.980 +/- 0.018 between the E. rhusiopathiae strains and 0.979 +/- 0.013 for E. tonsillarum strains. The value was 0.932 +/- 0.036 between the strains belonging to different species. However, a threshold value applicable for identification of a given strain to a species could not be established. Of the three strains of uncertain taxonomic position, the strains designated Rotzunge and Iszap 4 had a protein composition more similar to that of E. tonsillarum than to that of the E. rhusiopathiae type strain. The strain designated Pécs 56, which may be a member of a new species according to literature data, gave inconsistent results by the two methods used. The computerized evaluation method developed here is suitable for the comparison of the protein composition of the strains and for the construction of the protein similarity tree by cluster analysis.

  20. Interfraction Prostate Rotation Determined from In-Room Computerized Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian

    2011-07-01

    Fiducial markers (FMs) are commonly used as a correction technique for interfraction translations of the prostate. The aim of this investigation was to determine the magnitude of prostate rotations using 2 methods: FM coordinates and the anatomical border of the prostate and rectum. Daily computed tomography (CT) scans (n = 346) of 10 prostate cancer patients with 3 implanted FMs were acquired using the CT on rails. FM coordinates were used to determine rotation in the sagittal, transverse, and coronal planes, and CT contours of the prostate and rectum were used to determine rotation along the sagittal plane. An adaptive technique based on a subset of images (n = 6; planning and first 5 treatment CTs) to reduce systematic rotation errors in the sagittal plane was tested. The standard deviation (SD) of systematic rotation from FM coordinates was 7.6{sup o}, 7.7{sup o}, and 5.0{sup o} in the sagittal, transverse and coronal planes. The corresponding SD of random error was 10.2{sup o}, 15.8{sup o}, and 6.5{sup o}. Errors in the sagittal plane, determined from prostate and rectal contours, were 10.1{sup o} (systematic) and 7.7{sup o} (random). These results did not correlate with rotation computed from FM coordinates (r = -0.017; p = 0.753, n = 337). The systematic error could be reduced by 43% to 5.6{sup o} when the mean prostate position was estimated from 6 CT scans. Prostate rotation is a significant source of error that appears to be more accurately determined using the anatomical border of the prostate and rectum rather than FMs, thus highlighting the utility of CT image guidance.

  1. Tympanic membrane boundary deformations derived from static displacements observed with computerized tomography in human and gerbil.

    PubMed

    Gea, Stefan L R; Decraemer, Willem F; Funnell, W Robert J; Funnell, Robert W J; Dirckx, Joris J J; Maier, Hannes

    2010-03-01

    The middle ear is too complex a system for its function to be fully understood with simple descriptive models. Realistic mathematical models must be used in which structural elements are represented by geometrically correct three-dimensional (3D) models with correct physical parameters and boundary conditions. In the past, the choice of boundary conditions could not be based on experimental evidence as no clear-cut data were available. We have, therefore, studied the deformation of the tympanic membrane (TM) at its boundaries using X-ray microscopic computed tomography in human and gerbil while static pressure was applied to the ear canal. The 3D models of the TM and its bony attachments were carefully made and used to measure the deformation of the TM with focus on the periphery and the manubrium attachment. For the pars flaccida of the gerbil, the boundary condition can, for the most part, be described as simply supported. For the human pars flaccida, the situation is more complicated: superiorly, the membrane contacts the underlying bone more and more when pushed further inward, and it gradually detaches from the wall when sucked outward. In gerbil, the attachment of the TM to the manubrium can be described as simply supported. In human, the manubrium is attached underneath the TM via the plica mallearis and the contact of the TM with the bone is indirect. For both human and gerbil, a simple boundary condition for the peripheral edge of the pars tensa is not appropriate due to the intricate structure at the edge: the TM thickens rapidly before continuing into the annulus fibrosis which finally makes contact with the bone.

  2. [Digital angiography and lipiodol computerized tomography in the anatomopathological framework of hepatocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pozzi-Mucelli, R; Pozzi-Mucelli, R; Pagnan, L; Dalla Palma, L

    1994-12-01

    The introduction of therapies other than conventional surgery of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires an accurate pathologic classification, which is important because it is well known that HCC may have multicentric growth. The Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan has proposed a classification dividing HCCs into three macroscopic forms from the pathologic point of view: nodular, massive and infiltrating HCCs. The nodular type is subdivided into four types: single nodular type, single nodular type with surrounding proliferation, multinodular fused type and multinodular type. Forty-six HCC patients were examined with Lipiodol Computed Tomography (LCT) to investigate the agreement between pathologic and imaging findings. LCT proved to be in close agreement with pathologic findings. Sixteen cases were classified as type I (single nodular type), 8 as type II (single nodular type with limited foci), 1 as type III (multinodular fused type), 18 as type IV (multiple nodular type with diffuse foci) and 3 cases as type V (massive form). No cases of infiltrative forms were observed in our series. Based on LCT findings, the capabilities of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were studied in the pathologic classification of HCCs. DSA exhibited some limitations in the pathologic classification of HCCs in 5 of 16 patients with type I lesions. In these cases DSA suggested false-positive diagnoses because of regenerative nodules in cirrhotic liver in 3 cases and of daughter nodules (not confirmed at LCT) in 2 cases. In 7 of 8 patients with type II HCCs, DSA failed to show the daughter nodules surrounding the main nodule. In the 18 patients with multiple distant nodules (type IV), DSA was less sensitive in defining nodule number and site. In the massive form, the information obtained with LCT and DSA was comparable. In conclusion, LCT should be considered a basic examination in the study of HCC extent. Based on LCT findings, the most appropriate treatment can be selected, be it

  3. Laparoscopic vs computerized tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Jian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Ke, Shan; Niu, Hai-Gang; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare safety and therapeutic efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency (RF) ablation vs computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience of treating 51 large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm in 51 patients by CT-guided or laparoscopic RF ablation due to either the presence of symptoms and/or the enlargement of hemangioma. Altogether, 24 hemangiomas were ablated via a CT-guided percutaneous approach (CT-guided ablation group), and 27 hemangiomas were treated via a laparoscopic approach (laparoscopic ablation group). RESULTS: The mean diameter of the 51 hemangiomas was 9.6 ± 1.8 cm (range, 6.0-12.0 cm). There was no difference in the diameter of hemangiomas between the two groups (P > 0.05). RF ablation was performed successfully in all patients. There was no difference in ablation times between groups (P > 0.05). There were 23 thoracic complications in 17 patients: 15 (62.5%, 15/24) in the CT-guided ablation group and 2 (7.4%, 2/27) in the laparoscopic ablation group (P < 0.05). According to the Dindo-Clavien classification, two complications (pleural effusion and diaphragmatic rupture grade III) were major in two patients. All others were minor (grade I). Both major complications occurred in the CT-guided ablation group. The minor complications were treated successfully with conservative measures, and the two major complications underwent treatment by chest tube drainage and thoracoscopic surgery, respectively. Complete ablation was achieved in 91.7% (22/24) and 96.3% (26/27) in the CT-guided and the laparoscopic ablation groups, respectively (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic RF ablation therapy should be used as the first-line treatment option for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm. It avoids thermal injury to the diaphragm and reduces thoracic complications. PMID:26019459

  4. Metal Artifact Reduction and Segmentation of Dental Computerized Tomography Images Using Least Square Support Vector Machine and Mean Shift Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mortaheb, Parinaz; Rezaeian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of teeth in dental computerized tomography (CT) images are of dentists' requirements for both abnormalities diagnosis and the treatments such as dental implant and orthodontic planning. On the other hand, dental CT image segmentation is a difficult process because of the specific characteristics of the tooth's structure. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of dental CT images. We present a multi-step method, which starts with a preprocessing phase to reduce the metal artifact using the least square support vector machine. Integral intensity profile is then applied to detect each tooth's region candidates. Finally, the mean shift algorithm is used to partition the region of each tooth, and all these segmented slices are then applied for 3D visualization of teeth. Examining the performance of our proposed approach, a set of reliable assessment metrics is utilized. We applied the segmentation method on 14 cone-beam CT datasets. Functionality analysis of the proposed method demonstrated precise segmentation results on different sample slices. Accuracy analysis of the proposed method indicates that we can increase the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the segmentation results by 83.24%, 98.35%, 72.77%, and 97.62% and decrease the error rate by 2.34%. The experimental results show that the proposed approach performs well on different types of CT images and has better performance than all existing approaches. Moreover, segmentation results can be more accurate by using the proposed algorithm of metal artifact reduction in the preprocessing phase.

  5. Computerized wheeze detection in young infants: comparison of signals from tracheal and chest wall sensors.

    PubMed

    Puder, Lia C; Wilitzki, Silke; Bührer, Christoph; Fischer, Hendrik S; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Computerized wheeze detection is an established method for objective assessment of respiratory sounds. In infants, this method has been used to detect subclinical airway obstruction and to monitor treatment effects. The optimal location for the acoustic sensors, however, is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of respiratory sound recordings in young infants, and to determine whether the position of the sensor affected computerized wheeze detection. Respiratory sounds were recorded over the left lateral chest wall and the trachea in 112 sleeping infants (median postmenstrual age: 49 weeks) on 129 test occasions using an automatic wheeze detection device (PulmoTrack(®)). Each recording lasted 10 min and the recordings were stored. A trained clinician retrospectively evaluated the recordings to determine sound quality and disturbances. The wheeze rates of all undisturbed tracheal and chest wall signals were compared using Bland-Altman plots. Comparison of wheeze rates measured over the trachea and the chest wall indicated strong correlation (r  ⩾  0.93, p  <  0.001), with a bias of 1% or less and limits of agreement of within 3% for the inspiratory wheeze rate and within 6% for the expiratory wheeze rate. However, sounds from the chest wall were more often affected by disturbances than sounds from the trachea (23% versus 6%, p  <  0.001). The study suggests that in young infants, a better quality of lung sound recordings can be obtained with the tracheal sensor.

  6. Clinical comparison of pain perception rates between computerized local anesthesia and conventional syringe in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    San Martin-Lopez, Alma Luz; Garrigos-Esparza, Luis David; Torre-Delgadillo, Gabriela; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio; Hernandez-Sierra, Juan Francisco; de Pozos-Guillen, Amaury Jesus

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate pain perception rates in pediatric patients by comparing computerized injection device and traditional injection procedure. In a clinical trial, by using a crossover design, sixty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive, in consecutive sessions, dental anesthetic techniques with either traditional or computerized device. Visual Analogue Scale qualification and heart rate monitoring as physiologic indicator of pain response were used for the evaluation. Results showed that traditional syringe injections were more painful than computerized injection device (p < 0.001). Results suggested that computerized injection device reduces pain perception compared to the traditional syringe during the dental anesthetic management.

  7. Post transplant urinary tract infection in Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease a perpetual diagnostic dilema - 18-fluorodeoxyglucose - Positron emission computerized tomography - A valuable tool.

    PubMed

    Sainaresh, Vv; Jain, Sh; Patel, Hv; Shah, Pr; Vanikar, Av; Trivedi, Hl

    2011-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection contracted by renal allograft recipients. In patients of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), cyst infection presents a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge especially in the post transplant period. Accurate diagnosis forms the cornerstone in salvaging the graft from potentially catastrophic outcome. We describe a case of xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XPN) in the native kidney in a patient of post transplant ADPKD which presented as frequently relapsing UTI with graft dysfunction where in accurate diagnosis was made possible with the aid of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - Positron emission computerized tomography (PET/CT).

  8. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Glick, Stephen J; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion

  9. Quantification of Soil Physical Properties by Using X-Ray Computerized Tomography (CT) and Standard Laboratory (STD) Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Maria Ambert

    2003-12-12

    The implementation of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) on agricultural soils has been used in this research to quantify soil physical properties to be compared with standard laboratory (STD) methods. The overall research objective was to more accurately quantify soil physical properties for long-term management systems. Two field studies were conducted at Iowa State University's Northeast Research and Demonstration Farm near Nashua, IA using two different soil management strategies. The first field study was conducted in 1999 using continuous corn crop rotation for soil under chisel plow with no-till treatments. The second study was conducted in 2001 and on soybean crop rotation for the same soil but under chisel plow and no-till practices with wheel track and no-wheel track compaction treatments induced by a tractor-manure wagon. In addition, saturated hydraulic (K{sub s}) conductivity and the convection-dispersion (CDE) model were also applied using long-term soil management systems only during 2001. The results obtained for the 1999 field study revealed no significant differences between treatments and laboratory methods, but significant differences were found at deeper depths of the soil column for tillage treatments. The results for standard laboratory procedure versus CT method showed significant differences at deeper depths for the chisel plow treatment and at the second lower depth for no-till treatment for both laboratory methods. The macroporosity distribution experiment showed significant differences at the two lower depths between tillage practices. Bulk density and percent porosity had significant differences at the two lower depths of the soil column. The results obtained for the 2001 field study showed no significant differences between tillage practices and compaction practices for both laboratory methods, but significant differences between tillage practices with wheel track and no-wheel compaction treatments were found along the soil profile for

  10. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in

  11. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in the

  12. [Validity of modified radiological views to detect screw protrusion at the distal radius. A comparative study with computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Mora-Pascual, F E; Aguilella-Fernández, L

    2013-01-01

    Volar fixed-angle plates (VFAP) are currently widely used for the treatment of extra-articular distal radius fractures. Using these plates has a high risk of articular and dorsal screw protrusion due to their special configuration. The aim of this study is to assess the validity of the standard X-rays, performed with the help of wedged supports, in order to detect articular and dorsal screw protrusion. A comparison with computed tomography (CT) scan imaging has been made. The outcome of 26 patients with distal radius articular fracture, treated with a VFAP, is reported. Good correlation between modified X-rays and CT scan was observed. A sensitivity of 100% for articular protrusion and 66% for dorsal have been obtained. When detecting screw protrusion at the distal radius, the use of wedged supports to perform special X-rays intraoperatively is an effective tool.

  13. NOTE: Cone beam computerized tomography: the effect of calibration of the Hounsfield unit number to electron density on dose calculation accuracy for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Joan; McCurdy, Boyd; Greer, Peter B.

    2009-08-01

    The availability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images at the time of treatment has opened possibilities for dose calculations representing the delivered dose for adaptive radiation therapy. A significant component in the accuracy of dose calculation is the calibration of the Hounsfield unit (HU) number to electron density (ED). The aim of this work is to assess the impact of HU to ED calibration phantom insert composition and phantom volume on dose calculation accuracy for CBCT. CBCT HU to ED calibration curves for different commercial phantoms were measured and compared. The effect of the scattering volume of the phantom on the HU to ED calibration was examined as a function of phantom length and radial diameter. The resulting calibration curves were used at the treatment planning system to calculate doses for geometrically simple phantoms and a pelvic anatomical phantom to compare against measured doses. Three-dimensional dose distributions for the pelvis phantom were calculated using the HU to ED curves and compared using Chi comparisons. The HU to ED calibration curves for the commercial phantoms diverge at densities greater than that of water, depending on the elemental composition of the phantom insert. The effect of adding scatter material longitudinally, increasing the phantom length from 5 cm to 26 cm, was found to be up to 260 HU numbers for the high-density insert. The change in the HU value, by increasing the diameter of the phantom from 18 to 40 cm, was found to be up to 1200 HU for the high-density insert. The effect of phantom diameter on the HU to ED curve can lead to dose differences for 6 MV and 18 MV x-rays under bone inhomogeneities of up to 20% in extreme cases. These results show significant dosimetric differences when using a calibration phantom with materials which are not tissue equivalent. More importantly, the amount of scattering material used with the HU to ED calibration phantom has a significant effect on the dosimetric

  14. [Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computerized tomography, angiography and lipiodol CT in defining extent of hepatocarcinoma. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Sponza, M; Bartolozzi, C; De Santis, M; Gandini, G; Mannella, P; Matricardi, L; Rossi, C; Simonetti, G

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the results of a multicentric trial on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, whose lesions were confirmed with biopsy or by high (> 400 ng/ml) alpha-fetoprotein levels. The series consisted of 149 patients examined in 8 different centers and submitted to ultrasonography (US), Computed Tomography (CT) before and after contrast agent administration, angiography and Lipiodol CT. According to lesion size and number, the patients were divided with each imaging modality into three groups: a) group 1: unifocal HCC < 5 cm diameter; b) group 2: multifocal HCC with 2-3 nodules and/or tumor mass < 80 ml; c) multifocal HCC with more than 3 nodules (with total tumor mass not exceeding 40% of liver volume) or with total tumor mass > 80 ml. In 77 patients all the examinations were available for comparison. US and CT diagnosed more patients as belonging to group 1 than angiography and Lipiodol CT, while more patients were classified as groups 2 and 3 with angiography and Lipiodol CT, meaning that US and CT may understage some HCC cases (about 15%) because they show a lower number of nodules. This observation was confirmed by the direct comparison between US and Lipiodol CT (in 114 patients), CT and Lipiodol CT (in 103 patients) and angiography and Lipiodol CT (in 116 patients). US and Lipiodol CT were in disagreement in 18 cases, CT and Lipiodol CT in 16 cases and angiography and Lipiodol CT in 13 cases. In most of these cases, Lipiodol CT showed more lesions than the other techniques. The size of the undetected lesions was small, ranging few mm to 2 cm in nearly all cases. To conclude, the results of this multicentric trial show that Lipiodol CT is a fundamental tool to evaluate HCC extent. In contrast, conventional CT appeared not to add any significant piece of information and can therefore be excluded from the diagnostic protocol of HCC.

  15. Comparison of Deconvolution Filters for Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Sasportas, Laura S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we compare the merits of three temporal data deconvolution methods for use in the filtered backprojection algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). We evaluate the standard Fourier division technique, the Wiener deconvolution filter, and a Tikhonov L-2 norm regularized matrix inversion method. Our experiments were carried out on subjects of various appearances, namely a pencil lead, two man-made phantoms, an in vivo subcutaneous mouse tumor model, and a perfused and excised mouse brain. All subjects were scanned using an imaging system with a rotatable hemispherical bowl, into which 128 ultrasound transducer elements were embedded in a spiral pattern. We characterized the frequency response of each deconvolution method, compared the final image quality achieved by each deconvolution technique, and evaluated each method’s robustness to noise. The frequency response was quantified by measuring the accuracy with which each filter recovered the ideal flat frequency spectrum of an experimentally measured impulse response. Image quality under the various scenarios was quantified by computing noise versus resolution curves for a point source phantom, as well as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of selected image features such as dots and linear structures in additional imaging subjects. It was found that the Tikhonov filter yielded the most accurate balance of lower and higher frequency content (as measured by comparing the spectra of deconvolved impulse response signals to the ideal flat frequency spectrum), achieved a competitive image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio, and yielded the greatest robustness to noise. While the Wiener filter achieved a similar image resolution, it tended to underrepresent the lower frequency content of the deconvolved signals, and hence of the reconstructed images after backprojection. In addition, its robustness to noise was poorer than that of the Tikhonov filter. The

  16. A Comparison of Ultrasound Tomography Methods in Circular Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Berryman, J G; Bertete-Aquirre, H R; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Littrup, P; Duric, N; Johnson, S A; Wuebbeling, F

    2002-01-24

    Extremely high quality data was acquired using an experimental ultrasound scanner developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2D ring geometry with up to 720 transmitter/receiver transducer positions. This unique geometry allows reflection and transmission modes and transmission imaging and quantification of a 3D volume using 2D slice data. Standard image reconstruction methods were applied to the data including straight-ray filtered back projection, reflection tomography, and diffraction tomography. Newer approaches were also tested such as full wave, full wave adjoint method, bent-ray filtered back projection, and full-aperture tomography. A variety of data sets were collected including a formalin-fixed human breast tissue sample, a commercial ultrasound complex breast phantom, and cylindrical objects with and without inclusions. The resulting reconstruction quality of the images ranges from poor to excellent. The method and results of this study are described including like-data reconstructions produced by different algorithms with side-by-side image comparisons. Comparisons to medical B-scan and x-ray CT scan images are also shown. Reconstruction methods with respect to image quality using resolution, noise, and quantitative accuracy, and computational efficiency metrics will also be discussed.

  17. Comparison of ultrasound tomography methods in circular geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard, Jr.; Azevedo, Steve G.; Berryman, James G.; Bertete-Aguirre, Hugo; Chambers, David H.; Mast, Jeffrey E.; Littrup, Peter J.; Duric, Nebojsa; Johnson, Steven A.; Wuebbeling, Frank

    2002-04-01

    Extremely high quality data was acquired using an experimental ultrasound scanner developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a 2D ring geometry with up to 720 transmitter/receiver transducer positions. This unique geometry allows reflection and transmission modes and transmission imaging and quantification of a 3D volume using 2D slice data. Standard image reconstruction methods were applied to the data including straight-ray filtered back projection, reflection tomography, and diffraction tomography. Newer approaches were also tested such as full wave, full wave adjoint method, bent-ray filtered backprojection, and full-aperture tomography. A variety of data sets were collected including a formalin-fixed human breast tissue sample, a commercial ultrasound complex breast phantom, and cylindrical objects with and without inclusions. The resulting reconstruction quality of the images ranges from poor to excellent. The method and results of this study are described including like-data reconstructions produced by different algorithms with side-by-side image comparisons. Comparisons to medical B-scan and x-ray CT scan images are also shown. Reconstruction methods with respect to image quality using resolution, noise, and quantitative accuracy, and computational efficiency metrics will also be discussed.

  18. Scattering-related contrast signals in neutron computerized tomography and the new V12 instrument at HMI Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, Markus; Treimer, Wolfgang; Hilger, André

    2006-11-01

    Double-crystal diffractometers (DCD) are widely used for structural investigations at the limit between macroscopic and microscopic inner structures of sample materials. Operating in an ultra-small-angle scattering q-range between 10 -4 and 10 -1 nm -1 structures between 50 nm and nearly 100 μm can be resolved. Hence the DCD connects the resolvable ranges of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instruments and neutron tomography facilities. However, the DCD does not only link the resolvable size ranges but can also be operated to yield both, q-space information on microscopic structures combined with real space information in the range of macroscopic inner structures. This method was developed in recent years at the V12 DCD at HMI by introducing refraction and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS) contrast for tomography. The new V12 DCD set-up has now been optimized to exploit all the opportunities of USANS, refraction and USANS contrast tomography and conventional attenuation contrast tomography with an intense monochromatic neutron beam. The new contrast methods will be introduced as well as the final set-up of the V12 instrument. Additionally, several examples and results achieved by the new techniques and instrument will be given.

  19. The potential for non-invasive study of mummies: validation of the use of computerized tomography by post factum dissection and histological examination of a 17th century female Korean mummy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Do-Seon; Lee, In Sun; Choi, Ki-Ju; Lee, Soong Deok; Oh, Chang Seok; Kim, Yi-Suk; Bok, Gi Dae; Kim, Myeung Ju; Yi, Yang Su; Lee, Eun-Joo; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2008-10-01

    The socio-cultural antipathies of some descendants with regard to invasive examinations of age-old human remains make permission for dissection of Korean mummies of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) difficult to obtain. Overcoming this obstacle necessitated the use of non-invasive techniques, such as multi-detector computerized tomography (MDCT) and endoscopic examination, enabling determination of the preservation status of internal organs of mummies without significantly damaging the mummies themselves. However, MDCT alone cannot clearly differentiate specific mummified organs. Therefore, in much the same way as diagnostic radiologists make their MDCT readings on living patients more reliable by means of comparison with accumulated post-factum data from autopsies or histological studies, examinations of mummies by invasive techniques should not be decried as mere destruction of age-old human remains. Rather, providing that due permission from descendants and/or other relevant authorities can be obtained, dissection and histological examination should be performed whenever opportunities arise. Therefore, in this study, we compared the radiological data acquired from a 17th century mummy with our dissection results for the same subject. As accumulation of this kind of data could be very crucial for correct interpretation of MDCT findings on Korean mummies, we will perform similar trials on other Korean mummies found in forthcoming days if conditions permit.

  20. The potential for non-invasive study of mummies: validation of the use of computerized tomography by post factum dissection and histological examination of a 17th century female Korean mummy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do-Seon; Lee, In Sun; Choi, Ki-Ju; Lee, Soong Deok; Oh, Chang Seok; Kim, Yi-Suk; Bok, Gi Dae; Kim, Myeung Ju; Yi, Yang Su; Lee, Eun-Joo; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The socio-cultural antipathies of some descendants with regard to invasive examinations of age-old human remains make permission for dissection of Korean mummies of the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1910) difficult to obtain. Overcoming this obstacle necessitated the use of non-invasive techniques, such as multi-detector computerized tomography (MDCT) and endoscopic examination, enabling determination of the preservation status of internal organs of mummies without significantly damaging the mummies themselves. However, MDCT alone cannot clearly differentiate specific mummified organs. Therefore, in much the same way as diagnostic radiologists make their MDCT readings on living patients more reliable by means of comparison with accumulated post-factum data from autopsies or histological studies, examinations of mummies by invasive techniques should not be decried as mere destruction of age-old human remains. Rather, providing that due permission from descendants and/or other relevant authorities can be obtained, dissection and histological examination should be performed whenever opportunities arise. Therefore, in this study, we compared the radiological data acquired from a 17th century mummy with our dissection results for the same subject. As accumulation of this kind of data could be very crucial for correct interpretation of MDCT findings on Korean mummies, we will perform similar trials on other Korean mummies found in forthcoming days if conditions permit. PMID:19014355

  1. A comparison of paper-and-pencil and computerized forms of Line Orientation and Enhanced Cued Recall Tests.

    PubMed

    Aşkar, Petek; Altun, Arif; Cangöz, Banu; Cevik, Vildan; Kaya, Galip; Türksoy, Hasan

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether a computerized battery of neuropsychological tests could produce similar results as the conventional forms. Comparisons on 77 volunteer undergraduates were carried out with two neuropsychological tests: Line Orientation Test and Enhanced Cued Recall Test. Firstly, students were assigned randomly across the test medium (paper-and-pencil versus computerized). Secondly, the groups were given the same test in the other medium after a 30-day interval between tests. Results showed that the Enhanced Cued Recall Test-Computer-based did not correlate with the Enhanced Cued Recall Test-Paper-and-pencil results. Line Orientation Test-Computer-based scores, on the other hand, did correlate significantly with the Line Orientation Test-Paper-and-pencil version. In both tests, scores were higher on paper-and-pencil tests compared to computer-based tests. Total score difference between modalities was statistically significant for both Enhanced Cued Recall Tests and for the Line Orientation Test. In both computer-based tests, it took less time for participants to complete the tests.

  2. Independent comparison of CogState computerized testing and a standard cognitive battery with neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Michelle M.; Weigand, Stephen D.; Wiste, Heather J.; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Machulda, Mary M.; Knopman, Davis S.; Lowe, Val; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Kantarci, Kejal; Rocca, Walter A.; Jack, Clifford R.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inexpensive, non-invasive tools for assessing Alzheimer-type pathophysiologies are needed. Computerized cognitive assessments are prime candidates. Methods Cognitively normal participants, aged 51-71, with MRI, FDG-PET, amyloid PET, CogState computerized cognitive assessment, and standard neuropsychological tests were included. We first examined the association between the CogState battery and neuroimaging measures. We then compared that association to the one between standard neuropsychological z-scores and neuroimaging. Results Slower reaction times for CogState Identification and One Back, and lower memory and attention z-scores, were associated (P<.05) with FDG-PET hypometabolism. Slower time on the Groton Maze Learning Task and worse One Card Learning accuracy were associated (P<.05) with smaller hippocampal volumes. There were no associations with amyloid PET. Associations of CogState and neuropsychological z-scores with neuroimaging were small and of a similar magnitude. Conclusions CogState subtests were cross-sectionally comparable to standard neuropsychological tests in their relatively weak associations with neurodegeneration imaging markers. PMID:25458308

  3. Circular gratings' moiré effect for projection measurement in volume optical computerized tomography with two-step phase-shifting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia; Song, Yang; Li, Zhen-hua; He, An-zhi

    2012-11-01

    Volume optical computerized tomography (VOCT), which can realize real 3D measurement rather than traditional 2D OCT, has great superiority in quantitatively measuring the thermo physical parameters of transient flow field. Among the refractive index reconstruction techniques, filtered back-projection (FBP) method performs better than algebraic reconstruction techniques (ARTs) with higher accuracy and computationally efficient. In order to apply FBP to VOCT, the radial second-order derivative of projection wave front passes through the tested phase object should be obtained firstly. In this paper, a projection device with two circular gratings is established. In particular, owing to an inherent phase shift exists between moiré fringes of +1 and -1 diffraction orders, a two-step phase-shifting algorithm is utilized to extract the wave front's radial first-order derivative which is contained in the moiré fringes. The reliability of the two-step phase-shifting algorithm is proved by a computer simulation. Finally, the radial first-order derivative of wave front passing through a propane flame is measured and retrieved by these methods.

  4. A Family with Von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome: The Findings of Indium-111 Somatostatin Receptor Scintigraphy, Iodine-123 Metaiodobenzylguanidine Scintigraphy and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Arıcan, Pelin; Okudan Tekin, Berna; Naldöken, Seniha; Şefizade, Rıza; Berker, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHLS) is an autosomal dominant hereditary familial disorder characterized by development of malignant and benign neoplasms. Differential diagnosis of the adrenal and pancreatic masses are difficult in patients with VHLS. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-123 MIBG) and indium-111 somatostatin receptor scintigraphies (In-111 SRS) have important roles in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and pancreatic masses in those patients. In this case report, we present the findings of I-123 MIBG single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT/CT) and In-111 SRS SPECT/CT in three members of a family with VHLS. In case 1, a residual neuroendocrine tumor (NET) was detected in the head of pancreas on In-111 SRS SPECT/CT images. In case 2 and 3, I-123 MIBG SPECT/CT confirmed the adrenal masses as pheochromocytoma, and the extra-adrenal mass as NET, before surgery. We thought that In-111 SRS and I-123 MIBG scan might be helpful in the routine work up of VHLS patients for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Hybrid SPECT/CT system may improve diagnostic accuracy of planar images since it assesses morphologic and functional information together. PMID:28291009

  5. Accuracy of cone beam computerized tomography and a three-dimensional stereolithographic model in identifying the anterior loop of the mental nerve: a study on cadavers.

    PubMed

    Santana, Ruben R; Lozada, Jaime; Kleinman, Alejandro; Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Herford, Alan; Chen, Jung-Wei

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this ex vivo cadaver study was to determine the accuracy of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) and a 3-dimensional stereolithographic (STL) model in identifying and measuring the anterior loop length (ANLL) of the mental nerve. A total of 12 cadavers (24 mental nerve plexus) were used for this study. Standardized CBCT scans of each mandible were obtained both with and without radiographic contrast tracer injected into the mental nerve plexus, and STL models of the two acquired CBCT images were made. The ANLL were measured using CBCT, STL model, and anatomy. The measurements obtained from the CBCT images and STL models were then analyzed and compared with the direct anatomic measurements. A paired sample t test was used, and P values less than .05 were considered statistically significant. The mean difference between CBCT and anatomic measurement was 0.04 mm and was not statistically significant (P = .332), whereas the mean difference between STL models and anatomic measurement was 0.4 mm and was statistically significant (P = .042). There was also a statistical significant difference between CBCT and the STL model (P = .048) with the mean difference of 0.35 mm. Therefore, CBCT is an accurate and reliable method in determining and measuring the ANLL but the STL model over- or underestimated the ANLL by as much as 1.51 mm and 1.83 mm, respectively.

  6. A comparison of stopping rules for computerized adaptive screening measures using the rating scale model.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Audrey J; Dodd, Barbara G

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates three stopping rules for computerized adaptive testing (CAT): the predicted standard error reduction (PSER), the fixed-length, and the minimum SE using Andrich's rating scale model with a survey to identify at-risk students. PSER attempts to reduce the number of items administered and increase measurement precision of the trait. Several variables are manipulated, such as trait distribution and item pool size, in order to evaluate how these conditions interact and potentially help improve the correct classification of students. The findings indicate that the PSER stopping rule may be preferred when wanting to correctly diagnose or classify students at-risk and at the same time alleviate test burden for those taking screening measures based on the rating scale model with smaller item pools.

  7. Comparison of individual follow-up and computerized record linkage using the Canadian Mortality Data Base.

    PubMed

    Shannon, H S; Jamieson, E; Walsh, C; Julian, J A; Fair, M E; Buffet, A

    1989-01-01

    We compared two methods of ascertaining mortality in a historical prospective mortality study. Computerized Record Linkage (CRL) with the centralized historical Canadian Mortality Data Base (CMDB) was carried out on 2469 men and an attempt was also made to trace the subjects by individual follow-up (IFU). All but 88 were traced and 60 were reported to be dead. CRL was able to locate the deaths of three men who had been untraced by IFU. Contradictory information on vital status was obtained on 5 subjects--in 4 of them, the discrepancy was resolved in favour of CRL. Overall, CRL using the CMDB performed very well. We also consider factors that affect the relative costs of the two methods, which should be balanced against the accuracy of information obtained.

  8. Computerized lung nodule detection: comparison of performance for low-dose and standard-dose helical CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armato, Samuel G., III; Giger, Maryellen L.; Doi, Kunio; Bick, Ulrich; MacMahon, Heber

    2001-07-01

    The vast amount of image data acquired during a computed tomography (CT) scan makes lung nodule detection a burdensome task. Moreover, the growing acceptance of low-dose CT for lung cancer screening promises to further impact radiologists' workloads. Therefore, we have developed a computerized method to automatically analyze structures within a CT scan and identify those structures that represent lung nodules. Gray-level thresholding is performed to segment the lungs in each section to produce a segmented lung volume, which is then iteratively thresholded. At each iteration, remaining voxels are grouped into contiguous three-dimensional structures. Structures that satisfy a volume criterion then become nodule candidates. The set of nodule candidates is subjected to feature analysis. To distinguish candidates representing nodule and non-nodule structures, a rule-based approach is combined with an automated classifier. This method was applied to 43 standard-dose (diagnostic) CT scans and 13 low-dose CT scans. The method achieved an overall detection sensitivity of 71% with 1.5 false-positive detections per section on the standard-dose database and 71% sensitivity with 1.2 false-positive detections per section on the low-dose database. This automated method demonstrates promising performance in its ability to accurately detect lung nodules in standard-dose and low-dose CT images.

  9. [Computerized tomography in craniocerebral, maxillofacial, cervical, and spinal gunshot wounds. Part II--Clinical contribution and medico- legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Scialpi, M; Boccuzzi, F; Romeo, F; Ax, G; Scapati, C; Rotondo, A; Angelelli, G

    1996-12-01

    To assess the diagnostic and medicolegal contribution of Computed Tomography (CT) in patients with craniocerebral, maxillofacial, neck and spine gunshot wounds, we submitted to CT 106 patients with gunshot wounds examined over a 7-year period (February, 1988 to December, 1994). Twenty-four of them had craniocerebral injuries (23%), 9 maxillofacial (8%), 8 neck (8%) and 10 vertebral (9%) injuries. Emergency CT demonstrated the mechanism of the injury, the bullet path and site, the site of bone and/or metallic fragments, and damage extent. In all perforating cranioencephalic injuries (n = 7) intracerebral or extrathecal bone fragments were demonstrated adjacent to the bullet entrance and exit holes, respectively. In injury monitoring. CT showed injury evolution, retained fragments and complications, thus enabling damage extent assessment. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) was useful in locating minute orbitary retrobulbar and intraspinal fragments. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging in postoperative patients proved a valuable tool to assess the extent of spinal cord damage. To conclude, CT is a useful technique to examine the patients with gunshot wounds, which helps plan adequate treatment and solve complex medicolegal problems.

  10. Comparison of Computerized Sway Referencing and Standing on a Compliant Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, S. Lance; Paloski, William H.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: By removing vision and altering somatosensory inputs, we can examine the contributions of the vestibular system on balance control. Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) systems accomplish this by using a dynamic plate that moves in proportion to the sway of the subject. A potential alternative to CDP is the use of a compliant foam surface. The goal of this study was to compare postural sway during each condition. Methods: Thirty-two healthy subjects (16 male and 16 female) were tested on a Equitest computerized posturography system and on a 5 inch thick block of foam (NeuroCom International; Clackamas, OR). Subjects performed three trials with their head erect and five trials with dynamic head tilts ( 20 at 0.33Hz) in the anterior-posterior (AP) plane. Subjects were instructed to stand quietly with their arms folded and eyes closed for each trial lasting 20 seconds. The sway in both AP and medial-lateral (ML) planes was calculated for each trial, as well as the total sway path length. Results: In general, AP sway tended to be greater on the Equitest than on foam and greater during the head movement trials than the head erect. The ML sway was consistently higher on foam and did not vary between head erect and moving conditions. Sway path length was consistently greater for head erect trials on foam and tended to be greater for head movement trials on the Equitest. The addition of head movements increases AP sway and the total path length. Conclusions: Based on the increase of sway in the ML direction, it is important to quantify sway in all directions when on a compliant foam surface.

  11. Clinical significance of mesenteric panniculitis-like abnormalities on abdominal computerized tomography in patients with malignant neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D; Roginsky, Grigory; Gore, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the association of malignancy with mesenteric panniculitis-like changes on computed tomography (CT). METHODS All abdominal CT scans performed at NorthShore University HealthSystem showing mesenteric panniculitis from January 2005 to August 2010 were identified in the Radnet (RadNet Corporation, Los Angeles, CA) database. Patients with a new or known diagnosis of a malignancy were included for this analysis. Longitudinal clinical histories were obtained from electronic medical records. RESULTS In total, 147794 abdominal CT scans were performed during the study period. Three hundred and fifty-nine patients had mesenteric panniculitis (MP)-like abnormalities on their abdominal CT. Of these patients, 81 patients (22.6%) had a known history of cancer at the time of their CT scan. Nineteen (5.3%) had a new diagnosis of cancer in concurrence with their CT, but the majority of these (14/19, 74%) were undergoing CT as part of a malignancy evaluation. Lymphomas were the most common cancers associated with MP-like findings on CT (36 cases, 36%), with follicular lymphoma being the most frequent subtype (17/36). A variety of solid tumors, most commonly prostate (7) and renal cell cancers (6) also were seen. CT follow up was obtained in 56 patients. Findings in the mesentery were unchanged in 45 (80%), worsened in 6 (11%), and improved in 5 patients (9%). Positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed in 44 patients only showed a positive uptake in the mesenteric mass in 2 patients (5%). CONCLUSION A new diagnosis of cancer is uncommon in patients with CT findings suggestive of MP. MP-like mesenteric abnormalities on CT generally remain stable in patients with associated malignancies. PET scanning is not recommended in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis-like findings on CT. PMID:28082812

  12. Computerized Automated Quantification of Subcutaneous and Visceral Adipose Tissue From Computed Tomography Scans: Development and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Jae; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Jong Wan; Park, Chan-Soo; Gonzalez, John Paul S; Lee, Seung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is often viewed as one of the most accurate methods for measuring visceral adipose tissue (VAT). However, measuring VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) from CT is a time-consuming and tedious process. Thus, evaluating patients’ obesity levels during clinical trials using CT scans is both cumbersome and limiting. Objective To describe an image-processing-based and automated method for measuring adipose tissue in the entire abdominal region. Methods The method detects SAT and VAT levels using a separation mask based on muscles of the human body. The separation mask is the region that minimizes the unnecessary space between a closed path and muscle area. In addition, a correction mask, based on bones, corrects the error in VAT. Results To validate the method, the volume of total adipose tissue (TAT), SAT, and VAT were measured for a total of 100 CTs using the automated method, and the results compared with those from manual measurements obtained by 2 experts. Dice’s similarity coefficients (DSCs) between the first manual measurement and the automated result for TAT, SAT, and VAT are 0.99, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. The DSCs between the second manual measurement and the automated result for TAT, SAT, and VAT are 0.98, 0.98, and 0.97, respectively. Moreover, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the automated method and the results of the manual measurements indicate high reliability as the ICCs for the items are all .99 (P<.001). Conclusions The results described in this paper confirm the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method. The method is expected to be both convenient and useful in the clinical evaluation and study of obesity in patients who require SAT and VAT measurements. PMID:26846251

  13. Computerized tomography based “patient specific blocks” improve postoperative mechanical alignment in primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul; Birla, Vikas P; Agarwal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the postoperative mechanical alignment achieved after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) using computer tomography (CT) based patient specific blocks (PSB) to conventional instruments (CI). METHODS: Total 80 knees were included in the study, with 40 knees in both the groups operated using PSB and CI. All the knees were performed by a single surgeon using the same cruciate sacrificing implants. In our study we used CT based PSB to compare with CI. Postoperative mechanical femoro-tibial angle (MFT angle) was measured on long leg x-rays using picture archiving and communication system (PACS). We compared mechanical alignment achieved using PSB and CI in TKA using statistical analysis. RESULTS: The PSB group (group 1) included 17 females and seven males while in CI group (group 2) there were 15 females and eight males. The mean age of patients in group 1 was 60.5 years and in group 2 it was 60.2 years. The mean postoperative MFT angle measured on long-leg radiographs in group 1 was 178.23° (SD = 2.67°, range: 171.9° to 182.5°) while in group 2, the mean MFT angle was 175.73° (SD = 3.62°, range: 166.0° to 179.8°). There was significant improvement in postoperative mechanical alignment (P value = 0.001), in PSB group compared to CI. Number of outliers were also found to be less in group operated with PSB (7 Knee) compared to those operated with CI (17 Knee). CONCLUSION: PSB improve mechanical alignment after total knee arthroplasty, compared to CI. This may lead to lower rates of revision in the PSB based TKA as compared to the conventional instrumentation. PMID:27458553

  14. Computerized prediction of breast cancer risk: comparison between the global and local bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and preliminarily tested a new breast cancer risk prediction model based on computerized bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. In this study, we investigated and compared the performance difference of our risk prediction model when the bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetrical features were extracted in two different methods namely (1) the entire breast area and (2) the mirror-matched local strips between the left and right breast. A testing dataset including bilateral craniocaudal (CC) view images of 100 negative and 100 positive cases for developing breast abnormalities or cancer was selected from a large and diverse full-field digital mammography (FFDM) image database. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry, a set of 20 initial "global" features were extracted from the entire breast areas of two bilateral mammograms in CC view and their differences were computed. Meanwhile, a pool of 16 local histogram-based statistic features was computed from eight mirror-matched strips between the left and right breast. Using a genetic algorithm (GA) to select optimal features, two artificial neural networks (ANN) were built to predict the risk of a test case developing cancer. Using the leave-one-case-out training and testing method, two GAoptimized ANNs yielded the areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.754+/-0.024 (using feature differences extracted from the entire breast area) and 0.726+/-0.026 (using the feature differences extracted from 8 pairs of local strips), respectively. The risk prediction model using either ANN is able to detect 58.3% (35/60) of cancer cases 6 to 18 months earlier at 80% specificity level. This study compared two methods to compute bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry and demonstrated that bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry was a useful breast cancer risk indicator with high discriminatory power.

  15. Value of Computerized Tomography Enterography in Predicting Crohn’s Disease Activity: Correlation with Crohn’s Disease Activity Index and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Kyung; Han, Na Yeon; Park, Beom Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Cho, Sung Beom; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Keum, Bora; Kim, Min Ju

    2016-01-01

    Background The accurate evaluation of Crohn’s disease activity is important for the treatment of the disease and for monitoring the response. Computerized tomography (CT) enterography is a useful imaging modality that reflects enteric inflammation, as well as extramural complications. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between CT enterographic (CTE) findings of active Crohn’s disease and the Crohn’s disease activity index (CDAI) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Patients and Methods Fifty CT enterographies of 39 patients with Crohn’s disease in the small bowel were used in our study. The CDAI was assessed through clinical and laboratory variables. Multiple CT parameters, including mural hyperenhancement, mural thickness, mural stratification, comb sign, and mesenteric fat attenuation, were evaluated with a four-point scale. The presence or absence of enhanced lymph nodes, fibrofatty proliferation, sinus or fistula, abscess, and stricture were also assessed. Two gastrointestinal radiologists independently reviewed all CT images, and inter-observer agreement was examined. Correlations between CT findings, CRP, and CDAI were assessed using Spearman’s rank correlation and logistic regression analysis. To assess the predictive accuracy of the model, a receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis for the sum of CT enterographic scores was used. Results Mural hyperenhancement, mural thickness, comb sign, mesenteric fat density, and fibrofatty proliferation were significantly correlated with CDAI and CRP (P < 0.05). The binary logistic regression model demonstrated that mesenteric fat density, mural stratification, and the presence of enhanced lymph nodes (P < 0.05) had an influence on CDAI severity. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the CTE index for predicting disease activity was 0.85. Using a cut-off value of 8, the sensitivity and negative predictive values were 95% and 94%, respectively

  16. Dosimetry of Three Cone Beam Computerized Tomography Scanners at Different Fields of View in Terms of Various Head and Neck Organs

    PubMed Central

    Nikneshan, Sima; Aghamiri, Mahmood Reza; Moudi, Ehsan; Bahemmat, Nika; Hadian, Hoora

    2016-01-01

    Background Marketing new radiography devices necessitates documenting their absorbed X-ray doses. Since the current literature lacks studies on new devices, we assessed the doses of two new devices that had not previously been assessed. Objectives The new devices were compared to the Promax three dimensional (3D) scanner at two fields of view (FOV) in nine critical head and neck tissues and organs. Materials and Methods Seventeen thermoluminescence dosimeters positioned in an average-sized male RANDO phantom were used to determine the dosimetry of the three cone beam computerized tomography devices (NewTom VGi, NewTom 5G, and Promax 3D) at two field of views (FOVs), one small and one large. The exposure by each device per FOV was performed five times (30 exposures). The absorbed and effective doses were calculated for the thyroid, parotid, submandibular gland, sublingual gland, calvarium, cervical vertebra, trunk of the mandible, and mandibular ramus. The doses pertaining to the different devices, the FOVs, and the tissues were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon tests. Results The average absorbed doses, respectively, for the large and small FOVs were 17.19 and 28.89 mGy in the Promax 3D, 19.25 and 35.46 mGy in the NewTom VGi, and 18.85 and 30.63 mGy in the NewTom 5G. The absorbed doses related to the FOVs were not significantly different (P value = 0.1930). However, the effective doses were significantly greater at the smaller FOVs / higher resolutions (P = 0.0039). The doses of the three devices were not significantly different (P = 0.8944). The difference among the nine organs/tissues was significant (Kruskal-Wallis P=0.0000). Conclusion The absorbed doses pertaining to the devices and the FOVs were not significantly different, although the organs/tissues absorbed considerably different doses. PMID:27853498

  17. Comparison of optical coherence tomography imaging of cataracts with histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Cox, Ann B.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) captured cataract images to subsequent histopathological examination of the lenticular opacities. OCT imaging was performed on anesthetized Rhesus monkeys, known as the delayed effects colony (DEC), with documented cataracts. These monkeys were exposed to several types of radiation during the mid and late 1960s. The radiation and age related cataracts in these animals were closely monitored using a unique grading system developed specifically for the DEC. In addition to this system, a modified version of a common cataract grading scheme for use in humans was applied. Of the original 18 monkeys imaged, lenses were collected at necropsy from seven of these animals, processed, and compared to OCT images. Results showed a direct correlation between the vertical OCT images and the cataractous lesions seen on corresponding histopathological sections of the lenses. Based on the images obtained and their corresponding documented comparison to histopathology, OCT showed tremendous potential to aid identification and characterization of cataracts. There can be artifactual problems with the images related to movement and shadows produced by opacities. However, with the advent of increased speed in imaging and multiplanar imaging, these disadvantages may easily be overcome.

  18. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population.

  19. Comparison of Automated Scoring Methods for a Computerized Performance Assessment of Clinical Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harik, Polina; Baldwin, Peter; Clauser, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Growing reliance on complex constructed response items has generated considerable interest in automated scoring solutions. Many of these solutions are described in the literature; however, relatively few studies have been published that "compare" automated scoring strategies. Here, comparisons are made among five strategies for…

  20. Computerized assessment of body image in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: comparison with standardized body image assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Asaf; Amiaz, Revital; Davidson, Noa; Czerniak, Efrat; Gur, Eitan; Kiryati, Nahum; Harari, Daniel; Furst, Miriam; Stein, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Body image disturbances are a prominent feature of eating disorders (EDs). Our aim was to test and evaluate a computerized assessment of body image (CABI), to compare the body image disturbances in different ED types, and to assess the factors affecting body image. The body image of 22 individuals undergoing inpatient treatment with restricting anorexia nervosa (AN-R), 22 with binge/purge AN (AN-B/P), 20 with bulimia nervosa (BN), and 41 healthy controls was assessed using the Contour Drawing Rating Scale (CDRS), the CABI, which simulated the participants' self-image in different levels of weight changes, and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2-Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-2-BD) scale. Severity of depression and anxiety was also assessed. Significant differences were found among the three scales assessing body image, although most of their dimensions differentiated between patients with EDs and controls. Our findings support the use of the CABI in the comparison of body image disturbances in patients with EDs vs.

  1. Massive training artificial neural network (MTANN) for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Armato, Samuel G; Li, Feng; Sone, Shusuke; Doi, Kunio

    2003-07-01

    In this study, we investigated a pattern-recognition technique based on an artificial neural network (ANN), which is called a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN), for reduction of false positives in computerized detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography (CT) images. The MTANN consists of a modified multilayer ANN, which is capable of operating on image data directly. The MTANN is trained by use of a large number of subregions extracted from input images together with the teacher images containing the distribution for the "likelihood of being a nodule." The output image is obtained by scanning an input image with the MTANN. The distinction between a nodule and a non-nodule is made by use of a score which is defined from the output image of the trained MTANN. In order to eliminate various types of non-nodules, we extended the capability of a single MTANN, and developed a multiple MTANN (Multi-MTANN). The Multi-MTANN consists of plural MTANNs that are arranged in parallel. Each MTANN is trained by using the same nodules, but with a different type of non-nodule. Each MTANN acts as an expert for a specific type of non-nodule, e.g., five different MTANNs were trained to distinguish nodules from various-sized vessels; four other MTANNs were applied to eliminate some other opacities. The outputs of the MTANNs were combined by using the logical AND operation such that each of the trained MTANNs eliminated none of the nodules, but removed the specific type of non-nodule with which the MTANN was trained, and thus removed various types of non-nodules. The Multi-MTANN consisting of nine MTANNs was trained with 10 typical nodules and 10 non-nodules representing each of nine different non-nodule types (90 training non-nodules overall) in a training set. The trained Multi-MTANN was applied to the reduction of false positives reported by our current computerized scheme for lung nodule detection based on a database of 63 low-dose CT scans (1765

  2. Injections of Intravenous Contrast for Computerized Tomography Scans Precipitate Migraines in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Subjects at Risk of Paradoxical Emboli: Implications for Right‐to‐Left Shunt Risks

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Trishan; Elphick, Amy; Jackson, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if injection of intravenous particles may provoke migraines in subjects with right‐to‐left shunts due to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Background Migraine headaches commonly affect people with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), especially those with pulmonary AVMs that provide right‐to‐left shunts. In our clinical practice, patients occasionally reported acute precipitation of migraine headaches following injection of technetium‐labeled albumin macroaggregates for nuclear medicine scans. Methods Self‐reported migraine features and exacerbations were examined in HHT subjects with and without pulmonary AVMs, for a series of noninvasive and invasive investigations, using an unbiased online survey. Results One hundred and sixty‐six subjects were classified as having both HHT and migraines. HHT subjects with migraines were more likely to have pulmonary AVMs (P < .0001). HHT subjects with pulmonary AVMs were more likely to report photophobia (P = .010), “flashes of light” (P = .011), or transient visual loss (P = .040). Pulse oximetry, x‐rays, ultrasound, and computerized tomography (CT) scans without intravenous contrast medium rarely, if ever, provoked migraines, but unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was reported to exacerbate migraines by 14/124 (11.2%) subjects. One hundred and fourteen subjects had both enhanced and unenhanced CT examinations: studies with contrast media were more commonly reported to start (9/114 [7.8%]), and/or worsen migraines (18/114 [15.7%]), compared to those undertaken without contrast medium (P < .01), or after simple blood tests (P < .05). Additionally, migraine exacerbation was reported by 9/90 (10%) after contrast echocardiography, 2/44 (4.5%) after nuclear medicine scans, and 10/154 (6.5%) after blood tests. Conclusions HHT subjects frequently report migraine exacerbation following blood tests, contrast echocardiograms, MRI imaging, and

  3. Helical computerized tomography and NT-proBNP for screening of right ventricular overload on admission and at long term follow-up of acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) can be assessed with helical computerized tomography (CT) and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Signs of RVD and elevated natriuretic peptides like NT-proBNP and cardiac troponin (TnT) are associated with increased risk of mortality. However, the prognostic role of both initial diagnostic strategy and the use of NT-proBNP and TnT for screening for long-term probability of RVD remains unknown. The aim of the study was to determine the role of helical CT and NT-proBNP in detection of RVD in the acute phase. In addition, the value of NT-proBNP for ruling out RVD at long-term follow-up was assessed. Methods Sixty-three non-high risk APE patients were studied. RVD was assessed at admission in the emergency department by CT and TTE, and both NT-proBNP and TnT samples were taken. These, excepting CT, were repeated seven months later. Results At admission RVD was detected by CT in 37 (59 %) patients. RVD in CT correlated strongly with RVD in TTE (p < 0.0001). NT-proBNP was elevated (≥ 350 ng/l) in 32 (86 %) patients with RVD but in only seven (27 %) patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). All the patients survived until the 7-month follow-up. TTE showed persistent RVD in 6 of 63 (10 %) patients who all had RVD in CT at admission. All of them had elevated NT-proBNP levels in the follow-up compared with 5 (9 %) of patients without RVD (p < 0.0001). Conclusions TTE does not confer further benefit when helical CT is used for screening for RVD in non-high risk APE. All the patients who were found to have RVD in TTE at seven months follow-up had had RVD in the acute phase CT as well. Thus, patients without RVD in diagnostic CT do not seem to require further routine follow-up to screen for RVD later. On the other hand, persistent RVD and thus need for TTE control can be ruled out by assessment of NT-proBNP at follow-up. A follow-up protocol based on these findings is suggested. PMID:22559861

  4. A computerized tomography scan method for calculating the hernia sac and abdominal cavity volume in complex large incisional hernia with loss of domain.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E Y; Yoo, J H; Rodrigues, A J; Utiyama, E M; Birolini, D; Rasslan, S

    2010-02-01

    Preoperative progressive pneumoperitoneum (PPP) is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of large incisional hernia (size > 10 cm in width or length) with loss of domain (LIHLD). There is no consensus in the literature on the amount of gas that must be insufflated in a PPP program or even how long it should be maintained. We describe a technique for calculating the hernia sac volume (HSV) and abdominal cavity volume (ACV) based on abdominal computerized tomography (ACT) scanning that eliminates the need for subjective criteria for inclusion in a PPP program and shows the amount of gas that must be insufflated into the abdominal cavity in the PPP program. Our technique is indicated for all patients with large or recurrent incisional hernias evaluated by a senior surgeon with suspected LIHLD. We reviewed our experience from 2001 to 2008 of 23 consecutive hernia surgical procedures of LIHLD undergoing preoperative evaluation with CT scanning and PPP. An ACT was required in all patients with suspected LIHLD in order to determine HSV and ACV. The PPP was performed only if the volume ratio HSV/ACV (VR = HSV/ACV) was >or=25% (VR >or= 25%). We have performed this procedure on 23 patients, with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 31-83). There were 16 women and 7 men with an average age of 55.6 years (range 31-83), and a mean BMI of 38.5 kg/m(2) (range 23-55.2). Almost all patients (21 of 23 patients-91.30%) were overweight; 43.5% (10 patients) were severely obese (obese class III). The mean calculated volumes for ACV and HSV were 9,410 ml (range 6,060-19,230 ml) and 4,500 ml (range 1,850-6,600 ml), respectively. The PPP is performed by permanent catheter placed in a minor surgical procedure. The total amount of CO(2) insufflated ranged from 2,000 to 7,000 ml (mean 4,000 ml). Patients required a mean of 10 PPP sessions (range 4-18) to achieve the desired volume of gas (that is the same volume that was calculated for the hernia sac). Since PPP sessions were performed

  5. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computerized tomography--cerebral blood flow in a case of pure sensory stroke and mild dementia owing to subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    De Chiara, S.; Lassen, N.A.; Andersen, A.R.; Gade, A.; Lester, J.; Thomsen, C.; Henriksen, O.

    1987-01-01

    Pure sensory stroke (PSS) is typically caused by a lacunar infarct located in the ventral-posterior (VP) thalamic nucleus contralateral to the paresthetic symptoms. The lesion is usually so small that it cannot be seen on computerized tomography (CT), as illustrated by our case. In our moderately hypertensive, 72-year-old patient with PSS, CT scanning and conventional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) scanning using a 7-mm-thick slice on a 1.5 Tesla instrument all failed to visualize the thalamic infarct. Using the high-resolution mode with 2-mm slice thickness it was, however, clearly seen. In addition, NMRI unexpectedly showed diffuse periventricular demyelinization as well as three other lacunar infarcts, i.e., findings characteristic of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE). This prompted psychometric testing, which revealed signs of mild (subclinical) dementia, in particular involving visiospatial apraxia; this pointed to decreased function of the right parietal cortex, which was structurally intact on CT and NMRI. Single photon emission computerized tomography by Xenon-133 injection and by hexamethyl-propyleneamine-oxim labeled with Technetium-99m showed asymmetric distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF), with an 18% lower value in the right parietal cortex compared to the left side; this indicated asymmetric disconnection of the cortex by the SAE. Thus, the tomograms of the functional parameter, CBF, correlated better with the deficits revealed by neuropsychological testing than by CT or NMRI.

  6. Research review: A comparison of levels of job satisfaction between traditional hospital coders and coders using computerized encoders.

    PubMed

    Osborn, C E; Zale, K E

    1996-08-01

    Computerized encoders that assist medical record department coders in making ICD-9-CM disease and operative code selections have been available for approximately 10 years but there have been no studies to evaluate job satisfaction among coders using this technology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference in job satisfaction between coders who use computerized encoders and those who do not. The Job Descriptive Index was mailed to hospital medical record departments in Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati, Ohio; the return rate was 93.5 percent. Results indicated that individuals in these three cities coding by the traditional manual method were more satisfied with their jobs than those who used computer technology. The coders in the traditional group were more challenged by their jobs and had more positive interactions with their peers and supervisors. Also traditional coders were satisfied with the pay they received; coders using computerized encoders believed that their pay was inadequate.

  7. Comparison between Dichotomous and Polytomous Scoring of Innovative Items in a Large-Scale Computerized Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Hong; Liu, Junhui; Haynie, Kathleen; Woo, Ada; Gorham, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of partial credit scoring of one type of innovative items (multiple-response items) in a computerized adaptive version of a large-scale licensure pretest and operational test settings. The impacts of partial credit scoring on the estimation of the ability parameters and classification decisions in operational test…

  8. A Comparison of an Expert Systems Approach to Computerized Adaptive Testing and an Item Response Theory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    Expert systems can be used to aid decisionmaking. A computerized adaptive test is one kind of expert system, although not commonly recognized as such. A new approach, termed EXSPRT, was devised that combines expert systems reasoning and sequential probability ratio test stopping rules. Two versions of EXSPRT were developed, one with random…

  9. A Computerized System for the Development, Analysis, and Comparison of Diamond Jubilee and Century 21 Shorthand Dictation Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavan, C. Bruce; Gallion, Leona M.

    The document describes System 2, a computerized system for analyzing controlled vocabulary material and for comparing the Diamond Jubilee and Century 21 shorthand systems. Background information on three other computer systems for shorthand dictation are briefly described: (1) Reese and Smith Program (University of Tennessee), (2) Kavan and…

  10. Comparison of computed tomography and pluridirectional tomography of the temporal bone

    SciTech Connect

    Lufkin, R.; Barni, J.J.; Glen, W.; Mancuso, A.; Canalis, R.; Hanafee, W.

    1982-06-01

    During pluridirectional tomography dense bone creates ghost shadows that simulate chronic disease and soft-tissue masses within the middle ear cavity. This effect was demonstrated in three dried skulls. Cholesteatomas were simulated in three more temporal bones with a mixture of 2% iodine in paraffin. Three different high-resolution computed tomographic scanners clearly demonstrated middle ear anatomy and the simulated soft-tissue masses in the skulls.

  11. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke: a study of regional cerebral blood flow by /sup 133/Xe inhalation and single photon emission computerized tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, G.; Vorstrup, S.; Mickey, B.; Lindewald, H.; Lassen, N.A.

    1984-06-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by /sup 133/Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow depression was evident in five patients with severe hemispheric low flow areas, which correlated with large, hypodense lesions on the computerized tomographic scan. In a sixth patient with a small, deep infarct, a transient crossed cerebellar low flow was observed, while the clinical symptoms persisted. It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes in the infarcted hemisphere, in which a period of relative hyperemia is frequently seen.

  12. Computerized image analysis as a tool to quantify infiltrating leukocytes: a comparison between high- and low-magnification images.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A C; Visse, E; Widegren, B; Sjögren, H O; Siesjö, P

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a rapid and reproducible method for quantification of tissue-infiltrating leukocytes using computerized image analysis. To achieve this, the staining procedure, the image acquisition, and the image analysis method were optimized. Because of the adaptive features of the human eye, computerized image analysis is more sensitive to variations in staining compared with manual image analysis. To minimize variations in staining, an automated immunostainer was used. With a digital scanner camera, low-magnification images could be sampled at high resolution, thus making it possible to analyze larger tissue sections. Image analysis was performed by color thresholding of the digital images based on values of hue, saturation, and intensity color mode, which we consider superior to the red, green, and blue color mode for analysis of most histological stains. To evaluate the method, we compared computerized analysis of images with a x100 or a x12.5 magnification to assess leukocytes infiltrating rat brain tumors after peripheral immunizations with tumor cells genetically modified to express rat interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or medium controls. The results generated by both methods correlated well and did not show any significant differences. The method allows efficient and reproducible processing of large tissue sections that is less time-consuming than conventional methods and can be performed with standard equipment and software.(J Histochem Cytochem 49:1073-1079, 2001)

  13. Comparing non contrast computerized tomography criteria versus dual X-ray absorptiometry as predictors of radio-opaque upper urinary tract stone fragmentation after electromagnetic shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Diaa A; Elgammal, Mohammed A; ElGanainy, Ehab O; Hageb, Adel; Mohammed, Khaled; El-Taher, Ahmed Mohamed; Mostafa, Mostafa Mohamed; Ahmed, Abdelfatah Ibrahim

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in comparison to non contrast computed tomography (NCCT) density as possible predictors of upper urinary tract stone disintegration by shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). This study included 100 consecutive patients, with solitary renal stone 0.5-2 cm or upper ureteral stone up to 1 cm. DXA to calculate stone mineral density (SMD) and stone mineral content (SMC) was done. NCCT was performed to measure Hounsfield units (HU). SWL was performed with an electromagnetic lithotripsy, plain X-ray documented disintegration after SWL. Successful treatment was defined as stone free or complete fragmentation after 1 or 2 sessions of SWL. The impact of patients age, sex, body mass index, stone laterality, location, volume, length, mean SMC and SMD, HU and Hounsfield density (HD), skin to stone distance (SSD) and number of shock waves were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Only 76 patients were available for follow-up. Success of disintegration was observed in 50 out of 76 patients (65.8 %). On multivariate analysis, SMC and number of shock wave were the significant independent factors affecting SWL outcome (p = 0.04 and p = 0.000, respectively). SMC as detected by DXA is a significant predictor of success of stone disintegration by SWL. SMC measured by DXA is more accurate than HU measured by CT. Patients with high stone mineral content (SMC greater than 0.65 g) should be directly offered another treatment option.

  14. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  15. Comparison of optical projection tomography and optical coherence tomography for assessment of murine embryonic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manmohan; Nair, Achuth; Vadakkan, Tegy; Piazza, Victor; Udan, Ryan; Frazier, Michael V.; Janecek, Trevor; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    The murine model is a common model for studying developmental diseases. In this study, we compare the performance of the relatively new method of Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) to the well-established technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to assess murine embryonic development at three stages, 9.5, 11.5, and 13.5 days post conception. While both methods can provide spatial resolution at the micrometer scale, OPT can provide superior imaging depth compared to OCT. However, OPT requires samples to be fixed, placed in an immobilization media such as agar, and cleared before imaging. Because OCT does not require fixing, it can be used to image embryos in vivo and in utero. In this study, we compare the efficacy of OPT and OCT for imaging murine embryonic development. The data demonstrate the superior capability of OPT for imaging fine structures with high resolution in optically-cleared embryos while only OCT can provide structural and functional imaging of live embryos ex vivo and in utero with micrometer scale resolution.

  16. Comparison of Tissue Density in Hounsfield Units in Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Varshowsaz, Masoud; Goorang, Sepideh; Ehsani, Sara; Azizi, Zeynab; Rahimian, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bone quality and quantity assessment is one of the most important steps in implant treatment planning. Different methods such as computed tomography (CT) and recently suggested cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with lower radiation dose and less time and cost are used for bone density assessment. This in vitro study aimed to compare the tissue density values in Hounsfield units (HUs) in CBCT and CT scans of different tissue phantoms with two different thicknesses, two different image acquisition settings and in three locations in the phantoms. Materials and Methods: Four different tissue phantoms namely hard tissue, soft tissue, air and water were scanned by three different CBCT and a CT system in two thicknesses (full and half) and two image acquisition settings (high and low kVp and mA). The images were analyzed at three sites (middle, periphery and intermediate) using eFilm software. The difference in density values was analyzed by ANOVA and correction coefficient test (P<0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between density values in CBCT and CT scans in most situations, and CBCT values were not similar to CT values in any of the phantoms in different thicknesses and acquisition parameters or the three different sites. The correction coefficients confirmed the results. Conclusions: CBCT is not reliable for tissue density assessment. The results were not affected by changes in thickness, acquisition parameters or locations. PMID:27928239

  17. Comparison of double crosshole and fanbeam Lamb wave ultrasonic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.

    2001-04-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves, Lamb waves, allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. The work discussed here focuses on a variety of different tomographic reconstruction techniques to graphically represent the Lamb wave data in quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the traveltimes of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. This paper describes two potentially practical implementations of Lamb wave tomographic imaging techniques that can be optimized for in-the-field testing of large-area aircraft structures. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using either a ring of transducers with fan beam reconstructions, or a square array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography, is appropriate for detecting flaws in multilayer aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this presentation.

  18. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging comparisons in boxers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, B.D. ); Zimmerman, R.D. )

    1990-03-23

    The efficacy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying traumatic injuries of the brain was compared in a referred population of 21 amateur and professional boxers. Three boxers displayed CT scans with equivocal findings that were verified as artifacts by MRI. Eleven boxers had both CT and MRI scans with normal findings, and 7 boxers had both CT and MRI scans with abnormal findings. There were no instances where abnormalities demonstrated on CT scanning were not detected by MRI. However, some abnormalities detected on MRI were not detected on CT scans. These included a subdural hematoma, white-matter changes, and a focal contusion. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be the neuroradiodiagnostic test of choice compared with CT.

  19. Noninvasive quantification of the extent of jeopardized myocardium in patients with single-vessel coronary disease by stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computerized rotational tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Prigent, F.; Maddahi, J.; Garcia, E.; Van Train, K.; Friedman, J.; Berman, D.

    1986-03-01

    In 22 patients with single-vessel coronary artery disease and no history of infarction, stress Tl-201 rotational tomography was used to quantify the extent of jeopardized myocardium. The vertical long- and short-axis tomograms were quantified by means of maximum-count circumferential profile analysis. The scintigraphic extent of jeopardized myocardium was expressed as the percentage of profile points falling 2.5 standard deviations below a previously established mean normal profile and was correlated to a quantitatively expressed angiographic extent of jeopardized myocardium. The extent of jeopardized myocardium varied from 1% to 55% by tomography and 8% to 50% by angiography and correlated with an r = 0.79 and a 10% standard error of the estimate. Defect intensity, reflecting the mean depth by which the abnormal points fell below the normal value of greater than or equal to 10%, was 100% specific for a coronary stenosis of greater than or equal to 70%. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that: patients with single-vessel disease have highly variable extents of hypoperfused myocardium defined by Tl-201 tomography and coronary arteriography, there is a fair relationship between angiographic jeopardy score and perfusion defects by Tl-201 tomography during exercise, and Tl-201 tomography may be used to noninvasively determine the extent of hypoperfused myocardium in coronary artery disease.

  20. Use of computerized tests to evaluate psychomotor performance in children with specific learning disabilities in comparison to normal children

    PubMed Central

    Taur, Santosh; Karande, Sunil; Saxena, Akriti A.; Gogtay, Nithya J.; Thatte, Urmila M.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Children with specific learning disabilities (SpLD) have an unexplained difficulty in acquiring basic academic skills resulting in a significant discrepancy between their academic potential and achievements. This study was undertaken to compare the performance on a battery of six psychomotor tests of children with SpLD and those without any learning disabilities (controls) using computerized tests. Methods: In this study, 25 children with SpLD and 25 controls (matched for age, socio-economic status and medium of instruction) were given three training sessions over one week. Then children were asked to perform on the six computerized psychomotor tests. Results were compared between the two groups. Results: Children with SpLD fared significantly worse on finger tapping test, choice reaction test, digit picture substitution test and card sorting test compared to the controls (P<0.05). Interpretation & conclusions: Children with SpLD have impairment of psychomotor skills like attention, sensory-motor coordination and executive functioning. Further research is needed to evaluate if the remedial education plan results in improvement in psychomotor performance of children with SpLD on these selected tests. PMID:25579146

  1. Solitary pulmonary metastases in high-risk melanoma patients: a prospective comparison of conventional and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Heaston, D.K.; Putman, C.E.; Rodan, B.A.; Nicholson, E.; Ravin, C.E.; Korobkin, M.; Chen, J.T.; Seigler, H.F.

    1983-07-01

    A prospective comparison of chest radiography, conventional tomography, and computed tomography (CT) in the detection or confirmation of solitary pulmonary nodules was made in 42 patients with high propensity for pulmonary metastases due to advanced local (Clark level IV or V) or regional malignant melanoma. Unequivocal nodules were revealed by chest radiography in 11 patients, conventional tomograhy in 16, and computed tomography in 20 patients. Both plain films and tomography in three of these 20 were normal, but follow-up verified pulmonary metastases. Computed tomography detected more pulmonary nodules than conventional tomography in 11 patients in addition to identifying lesions in extrapulmonary sites. Therefore, chest CT is recommended before institution of immunotherapy or surgical removal of a solitary pulmonary melanoma metastasis. Once chemotherapy had been instituted for bulky regional or cutaneous involvement, however, the findings of either conventional or computed tomography were comparable in this study.

  2. Comparison of denture models by means of micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vögtlin, Christoph; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Jäger, Kurt; Liebrich, Thomas; Weikert, Sascha; Müller, Bert

    2012-10-01

    The production of dental inlays and crowns requires precise information on patients' teeth morphology. The conventional method is the preparation of impressions using mold materials, e.g. a silicone impression material. The disadvantage of this technique is the human choke impulse and the flavor of the material. These discomforts can be avoided by methods where a three-dimensional scanner is used for recording the teeth morphology. The present study reveals the accuracy of three model types, namely conventional impression, rapid prototyping using an oral scanner C.O.S., 3M (Schweiz) AG and milling from a proprietary resin using the oral scanner iTero, Straumann Holding AG. For each method five models were fabricated from a steel reference (standard). Using a nanotom m (phoenixǀx-ray, GE Sensing and Inspection Technologies GmbH), three-dimensional micro computed tomography data sets of the standard and the 15 models were recorded and landmark distances within the data sets were measured with sub-pixel accuracy. To verify these results a coordinate measuring machine (Leitz PMM 864, Hexagon Metrology GmbH) based on tactile detection was used for the measurement of the landmark distances, and a correction of the distances measured by the nanotom m was arranged. The nanotom data sets of the 15 models were also compared to the standard by means of a non-rigid registration algorithm. The calculated deformation field exhibited mean pixel displacement values of (0.19 +/- 0.09) mm for the C.O.S. models, (0.12 +/- 0.07) mm for the gypsum models and (0.19 +/- 0.12) mm for the i-Tero models.

  3. Research on ionospheric tomography based on variable pixel height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dunyong; Li, Peiqing; He, Jie; Hu, Wusheng; Li, Chaokui

    2016-05-01

    A novel ionospheric tomography technique based on variable pixel height was developed for the tomographic reconstruction of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The method considers the height of each pixel as an unknown variable, which is retrieved during the inversion process together with the electron density values. In contrast to conventional computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT), which parameterizes the model with a fixed pixel height, the variable-pixel-height computerized ionospheric tomography (VHCIT) model applies a disturbance to the height of each pixel. In comparison with conventional CIT models, the VHCIT technique achieved superior results in a numerical simulation. A careful validation of the reliability and superiority of VHCIT was performed. According to the results of the statistical analysis of the average root mean square errors, the proposed model offers an improvement by 15% compared with conventional CIT models.

  4. Pain Experience and Behavior Management in Pediatric Dentistry: A Comparison between Traditional Local Anesthesia and the Wand Computerized Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    D'Antò, Vincenzo; Fauxpoint, Gabriel; De Rosa, Sara; Vallogini, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the pain experience and behavior during dental injection, using the Wand computerized delivery system versus conventional local anesthesia in children and adolescents. Methods. An observational crossover split mouth study was performed on 67 patients (aged 7 to 15 years), requiring local anesthesia for dental treatments in both sides of the dental arch. Patients received both types of injections in two separate appointments, one with the use of a Computer Delivery System (the Wand STA system) and one with the traditional syringe. The following data were recorded: pain rating; changes in heart rate; level of collaboration; patient satisfaction. The data were analyzed using ANOVA for quantitative outcomes and nonparametric analysis (Kruskal–Wallis) for qualitative parameters. Results. The use of the Wand system determined significantly lower pain ratings and lower increase of heart rate than the traditional syringe. During injection, the number of patients showing a relaxed behavior was higher with the Wand than with the traditional local anesthesia. The patient level of satisfaction was higher with the Wand compared to the conventional local anesthesia. Conclusions. The Wand system may provide a less painful injection when compared to the conventional local anesthesia and it seemed to be better tolerated with respect to a traditional syringe. PMID:28293129

  5. A comparison of computerized dynamic posturography therapy to standard balance physical therapy in individuals with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Qutubuddin, Abu A; Cifu, David X; Armistead-Jehle, Patrick; Carne, William; McGuirk, Theresa E; Baron, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    Postural instability is a common impairment in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). People with PD are prone to balance and walking difficulties. This study analyzed the feasibility of a prospective investigation of Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP) and standard Physical Therapy (PT) treatments in individuals with mild-moderate PD. Treatment took place at two sites: 1) CDP therapy at the Southeast Parkinson's Disease Research Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC) within a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and 2) standard physical therapy at a community outpatient rehabilitation center. Final analysis compared 15 patients randomly assigned for therapy to either the CDP or PT treatments. Therapy time was eight weeks (four weeks of CPD or PT followed by home therapy for four weeks). The CDP therapy included gradually intensified closed chain and mobility training. Standard PT consisted of upright, mat, and theraball exercises and gait training. The home exercise phase was identical for both groups. The pilot data demonstrated treatment was tolerated by 68 percent of the sample despite the occurrence of a progressive neurological condition and medical comorbidities. While results failed to reveal any differences between treatment groups, both groups demonstrated improvement on selected outcome measures. An expanded prospective study with methodological improvements appears warranted.

  6. Comparison of computerized image analysis with traditional semiquantitative scoring of Perls' Prussian Blue stained hepatic iron deposition.

    PubMed

    Hall, A Peter; Davies, Wendy; Stamp, Katie; Clamp, Isabel; Bigley, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Image analysis is now routinely employed as a tool in toxicologic pathology to help quantitate end points of efficacy and safety. It is regarded as a proficient and a sensitive technique to generate numerical data that can be easily interrogated for statistical evaluation. Traditional semiquantitative pathology scoring on the other hand is sometimes regarded as less accurate due to the limitations of the scoring systems employed and the day-to-day variations often noted between pathologists. We therefore decided to generate an optimized histochemical staining and image analysis protocol to compare the accuracy of semiquantitative scoring with computerized image analysis. In order to achieve this, we describe a standardized protocol for staining and image analysis that eliminates or minimizes as many sources of error as possible. The results of this experiment demonstrate that despite consistent variations in scoring between two independent pathologists, correlation with image analysis data of 0.91 to 0.95 (Spearman's Rho test) was achieved. These data indicate that either image analysis or traditional semiquantitative scoring can generate accurate data. As a result of this, it appears that it is equally safe to employ either method dependent upon the complexity and the practicality of the task at hand provided that the experimental conditions are rigorously optimized and rigidly adhered to.

  7. Computerized and Paper-and-Pencil Versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: A Comparison of Psychometric Features and Respondent Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vispoel, Walter P.; Boo, Jaeyool; Bleiler, Timothy

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the characteristics of computerized and paper-and-pencil versions of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES) using scores for 224 college students. Results show that mode of administration has little effect on the psychometric properties of the SES although the computerized version took longer and was preferred by examinees. (SLD)

  8. Technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid scan in evaluation of renal cortical scarring: Is it mandatory to do single photon emission computerized tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Saleh Farghaly, Hussein Rabie; Mohamed Sayed, Mohamed Hosny

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Renal cortical scintigraphy with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is the method of choice to detect acute pyelonephritis and cortical scarring. Different acquisition methods have been used: Planar parallel-hole or pinhole collimation and single photon emission tomography (SPECT). This study compared planar parallel-hole cortical scintigraphy and dual-head SPECT for detection of cortical defects. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 190 consecutive patients with 380 kidneys and 200 DMSA scans referred to rule out renal cortical scarring. The diagnoses were 52 vesicoureteric reflux, 61 recurrent urinary tract infection, 39 hydronephrosis, 20 renal impairment, and 18 hypertension. All patients were imaged 3 h after injection of Tc-99m DMSA with SPECT and planar imaging (posterior, anterior, left, and right posterior oblique views). For each patient, planar and SPECT images were evaluated at different sittings, in random order. Each kidney was divided into three cortical segments (upper, middle and lower) and was scored as normal or reduced uptake. The linear correlation coefficient for the number of abnormal segments detected between planner and SPECT techniques was calculated. Results: From 200 DMSA scans, 100 scans were positive for scar in SPECT images, from which only 95 scans were positive for scar in planner imaging. Out of the five mismatched scans, three scans were for patients with renal impairment and high background activity and two scans were for very small scars. No significant difference was seen in the average number of abnormal segments detected by planar versus SPECT imaging (P = 0.31). The average correlation coefficient between was high (r = 0.91 – 0.92). Conclusions: Tc-99m DMSA renal cortical scanning using SPECT offers no statistically significant diagnostic advantage over multiple views planar imaging for detection of cortical defect. PMID:25589802

  9. Predictive value of excretory urography, ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and liver and bone scan in the staging of bilharzial bladder cancer in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Hanash, K.A.; Bissada, N.K.; Abla, A.; Esmail, D.; Dowling, A.

    1984-07-01

    The role of ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and radioisotopic scanning in the staging of bilharzial bladder cancer has not been reported previously. Forty patients with invasive bladder cancer seen at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre between January 1978 and June 1981 underwent complete preoperative workup for staging of their tumors prior to radical cystectomy. The preoperative radiologic investigations included excretory urography (IVP), ultrasonography (US), CT of the pelvis, and liver and bone scans. The results of these investigations were compared with the operative and pathologic staging. Ninety-three percent of the patients with bilharzial cancer had evidence of ureteric obstruction on IVP compared with 22% of the nonbilharzial cancer patients. The presence of ureteric obstruction in these patients did not correlate with the stage of the disease with 83% of the patients with superficial tumors (T1 and T2) having hydroureteronephrosis. Ultrasonography and CT had an 83% accuracy in the staging of superficial tumors. Stage T3 tumors were understaged in 14% of the cases. Ultrasonography did not differentiate Stages T3 and T4 tumors while CT scan differentiated these two stages in 57% of the cases. Bone scan failed to reveal evidence of metastatic disease in any of the bilharzial cancer patients. Liver scan was suspicious for liver metastases in two patients with bilharzial cancers in whom open liver biopsy revealed only hepatic bilharziasis. Of all the radiographic studies, US or preferably CT scan seem to be of some value in the staging of bilharzial tumors localized to the bladder. Bone and liver scans are probably of no cost effective benefit.

  10. Association of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio with the Severity and Morphology of Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques Detected by Multidetector Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ateş, Ahmet Hakan; Aytemir, Kudret; Koçyiğit, Duygu; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Yorgun, Hikmet; Canpolat, Uğur; Hazırolan, Tuncay; Özer, Necla

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have demonstrated a consistent relationship between white blood cell (WBC) counts and coronary artery disease (CAD). The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been considered as a potential marker for identifying individuals under risk of CAD and associated events. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether NLR was associated with the severity and morphology of coronary atherosclerotic plaques shown by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Methods Our study population consisted of 684 patients who underwent dual-source 64 slice MDCT for the assessment of CAD. Coronary arteries were evaluated on a 16-segment basis and critical coronary plaque was described as luminal narrowing > 50%, whereas plaque morphology was assessed on a per segment basis. Total WBC, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were determined using commercially available assay kits. Results WBC count [7700 (6400-8800) vs. 6800 (5700-7900), p < 0.05] and NLR [2.40 (1.98-3.07) vs. 1.86 (1.50-2.38), p < 0.001] were found to be higher in patients with critical stenosis than in those without. In the binary logistic regression analysis, NLR was a predictor of critical stenosis (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.39-2.03, p < 0.001). NLR levels differed among plaque morphology subtypes (p < 0.05) and was significantly higher in non-calcified plaque (NCP) compared to mixed plaque (MP) and calcified plaque (CP) (p < 0.05). In the multinomial logistic regression analysis, NLR was found to be an independent predictor of NCP, MP and CP (p < 0.001). Conclusions These data show that NLR is associated with both the severity and morphology of coronary atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27899854

  11. Use of computerized tomography and chest x-rays in evaluating efficacy of aerosolized recombinant human DNase in cystic fibrosis patients younger than age 5 years: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Nasr, S Z; Kuhns, L R; Brown, R W; Hurwitz, M E; Sanders, G M; Strouse, P J

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) of the chest and chest x-rays (CXR) to determine efficacy of inhaled recombinant human DNase (rhDNase) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients younger than 5 years of age. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of 12 patients with CF younger than 5 years of age, attending the University of Michigan Cystic Fibrosis Center (Ann Arbor, MI) was conducted. The changes in the HRCT and CXR score from baseline to day 100 of therapy were assessed using a previously validated scoring system. The mean changes of HRCT scores between the rhDNase and placebo groups were found to be significant at the 95% level, with mean change +/- SE mean of - 1.00 +/- 0.53 and 0.58 +/- 0.24 for rhDNase and placebo groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The difference in CXR score was not significant between the two groups. An analysis was performed to relate HRCT subscores to CXR score; only thickening of the intra-interlobular septae was significantly correlated with the total CXR score (r = - 0.7, P < 0.01). There was improvement in the parents' assessments of the patients' well-being, with improvement in physical activity, decreased cough, sleep quality, and appetite in those subjects receiving rhDNase. We conclude that the administration of rhDNase was associated with improvement in the HRCT scan in CF patients younger than 5 years of age. Findings indicate that HRCT of the chest is useful and sensitive in studying responses to therapy in patients with CF lung disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of HRCT to assess the effectiveness of a therapeutic modality in so young a CF patient population.

  12. Imaging-based assessment of the mineral composition of urinary stones: an in vitro study of the combination of hounsfield unit measurement in noncontrast helical computerized tomography and the twinkling artifact in color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Hakim; Raynal, Gauthier; Spie, Romain; Daudon, Michel; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the value of combining noncontrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT) and color Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of the composition of urinary stones. In vitro, we studied 120 stones of known composition, that separate into the five main types: 18 calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, 41 calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) stones, 24 uric acid stones, 25 calcium phosphate stones and 12 cystine calculi. Stones were characterized in terms of their Hounsfield density (HU) in NCHCT and the presence of a twinkling artifact (TA) in color Doppler ultrasound. There were statistically significant HU differences between calcium and non-calcium stones (p < 0.001), calcium oxalate stones and calcium phosphate stones (p < 0.001) and uric acid stones and cystine calculi (p < 0.001) but not between COM and COD stones (p = 0.786). Hence, the HU was a predictive factor of the composition of all types of stones, other than for COM and COD stones within the calcium oxalate class (p > 0.05). We found that the TA does not enable differentiation between calcium and non-calcium stones (p > 0.999), calcium oxalate stones and calcium phosphate stones (p = 0.15), or uric acid stones and cystine calculi (p = 0.079). However, it did reveal a significant difference between COM and COD stones (p = 0.002). The absence of a TA is a predictive factor for the presence of COM stones (p = 0.008). Hence, the association of NCHCT and Doppler enables the accurate classification of the five types of stones in vitro.

  13. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Study Design: The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in 3 different sizes using round diamond bur and bone chips, respectively. Panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography were used in defect detection. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. The reliability and degrees of agreement between two observers were also determined by the mean of Cohen’s Kappa analysis. Results: CBCT had a statistically significant superiority than other studied techniques in detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with different sizes. There were significant differences between tomography and panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 1mm and 1.5 mm in size. However, there were no significant differences between Tomography and Panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 0.5 mm in size. Conclusions: CBCT images provide a greater diagnostic accuracy than spiral tomography and panoramic radiography in the detection of condylar bone erosions and osteophytes. Key words:Bone defect, Condyle, CBCT, Panoramic, radiography. PMID:25810839

  14. The combined evaluation of interim contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and FDG-PET/CT predicts the clinical outcomes and may impact on the therapeutic plans in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deok-Hwan; Min, Jung-Joon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Cho, Sang-Hee; Chung, Ik-Joo; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the concomitant interim response of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) using multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) and (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for prediction of clinical outcomes. One hundred six newly diagnosed patients with aggressive NHL were enrolled. Both the CT and PET/CT were serially performed at the time of diagnosis and after three to four cycles of chemotherapy (interim). The patients were categorized into four different responsive groups according to the interim PET/CT and CT: (1) complete metabolic response (CMR)-complete response unconfirmed (CRu), (2) CMR-partial response (PR), (3) partial metabolic response (PMR)-Cru, and (4) PMR-PR. Fifty-five patients with CMR-CRu, 20 patients with CMR-PR, seven patients with PMR-Cru, and 23 patients with PMR-PR were distributed. In addition, one patient experienced a disease progression. There was a significant difference in relapse rates between PET/CT-positive (67.3%) and PET/CT-negative patients (17.3%; P < 0.01). Also, there was a significant difference between patients with PMR-PR (32.0% and 26.1%) and CMR-CRu (89.3% and 80.0%) for 3-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS), respectively. A multivariate analysis revealed that high international prognostic index (> or =3) at diagnosis, T-cell phenotype, and PMR-PR in interim PET/CT and CT were independent prognostic significances for OS. Moreover, bulky disease (>10 cm), T-cell phenotype, and PMR-PR showed significant associations for EFS. PMR-PR in interim response was the predictive prognostic determinant for both OS and EFS, with a hazard ratio of 3.93 (1.61-9.60) and 3.60 (1.62-7.98), respectively. The combined evaluation of interim PET/CT and CT was found to be a significant predictor of disease progression, OS, and EFS.

  15. A new computerized ionosphere tomography model using the mapping function and an application to the study of seismic-ionosphere disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jian; Yao, Yibin; Liu, Lei; Zhai, Changzhi; Wang, Zemin

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm for ionosphere tomography using the mapping function is proposed in this paper. First, the new solution splits the integration process into four layers along the observation ray, and then, the single-layer model (SLM) is applied to each integration part using a mapping function. Next, the model parameters are estimated layer by layer with the Kalman filtering method by introducing the scale factor (SF) γ to solve the ill-posed problem. Finally, the inversed images of different layers are combined into the final CIT image. We utilized simulated data from 23 IGS GPS stations around Europe to verify the estimation accuracy of the new algorithm; the results show that the new CIT model has better accuracy than the SLM in dense data areas and the CIT residuals are more closely grouped. The stability of the new algorithm is discussed by analyzing model accuracy under different error levels (the max errors are 5TECU, 10TECU, 15TECU, respectively). In addition, the key preset parameter, SFγ , which is given by the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI2012). The experiment is designed to test the sensitivity of the new algorithm to SF variations. The results show that the IRI2012 is capable of providing initial SF values. Also in this paper, the seismic-ionosphere disturbance (SID) of the 2011 Japan earthquake is studied using the new CIT algorithm. Combined with the TEC time sequence of Sat.15, we find that the SID occurrence time and reaction area are highly related to the main shock time and epicenter. According to CIT images, there is a clear vertical electron density upward movement (from the 150-km layer to the 450-km layer) during this SID event; however, the peak value areas in the different layers were different, which means that the horizontal movement velocity is not consistent among the layers. The potential physical triggering mechanism is also discussed in this paper. Compared with the SLM, the RMS of the new CIT model is improved by

  16. Comparison of approaches based on optimization and algebraic iteration for binary tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Lin

    2010-12-01

    Binary tomography represents a special category of tomographic problems, in which only two values are possible for the sought image pixels. The binary nature of the problems can potentially lead to a significant reduction in the number of view angles required for a satisfactory reconstruction, thusly enabling many interesting applications. However, the limited view angles result in a severely underdetermined system of equations, which is challenging to solve. Various approaches have been proposed to address such a challenge, and two categories of approaches include those based on optimization and those based on algebraic iteration. However, the relative strengths, limitations, and applicable ranges of these approaches have not been clearly defined in the past. Therefore, it is the main objective of this work to conduct a systematic comparison of approaches from each category. This comparison suggested that the approaches based on algebraic iteration offered both superior reconstruction fidelity and computation efficiency at low (two or three) view angles, and these advantages diminished at high view angles. Meanwhile, this work also investigated the application of regularization techniques, the selection of optimal regularization parameter, and the use of a local search technique for binary problems. We expect the results and conclusions reported in this work to provide valuable guidance for the design and development of algorithms for binary tomography problems.

  17. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  18. Occurrence of Medication Errors and Comparison of Manual and Computerized Prescription Systems in Public Sector Hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad Kashif; Hashmi, Furqan Khurshid; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Riaz, Mohammad; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of medication errors is an essential prerequisite for better healthcare delivery. The present study investigated prescribing errors in prescriptions from outpatient departments (OPDs) and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan. A manual prescription system was followed in Hospital A. Hospital B was running a semi-computerised prescription system in the OPD and a fully computerised prescription system in the emergency ward. A total of 510 prescriptions from both departments of these two hospitals were evaluated for patient characteristics, demographics and medication errors. The data was analysed using a chi square test for comparison of errors between both the hospitals. The medical departments in OPDs of both hospitals were the highest prescribers at 45%–60%. The age group receiving the most treatment in emergency wards of both the hospitals was 21–30 years (21%–24%). A trend of omitting patient addresses and diagnoses was observed in almost all prescriptions from both of the hospitals. Nevertheless, patient information such as name, age, gender and legibility of the prescriber’s signature were found in almost 100% of the electronic-prescriptions. In addition, no prescribing error was found pertaining to drug concentrations, quantity and rate of administration in e-prescriptions. The total prescribing errors in the OPD and emergency ward of Hospital A were found to be 44% and 60%, respectively. In hospital B, the OPD had 39% medication errors and the emergency department had 73.5% errors; this unexpected difference between the emergency ward and OPD of hospital B was mainly due to the inclusion of 69.4% omissions of route of administration in the prescriptions. The incidence of prescription overdose was approximately 7%–19% in the manual system and approximately 8% in semi and fully electronic system. The omission of information and incomplete information are contributors of prescribing errors in both manual and

  19. Occurrence of medication errors and comparison of manual and computerized prescription systems in public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Muhammad Kashif; Hashmi, Furqan Khurshid; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Riaz, Mohammad; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of medication errors is an essential prerequisite for better healthcare delivery. The present study investigated prescribing errors in prescriptions from outpatient departments (OPDs) and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals in Lahore, Pakistan. A manual prescription system was followed in Hospital A. Hospital B was running a semi-computerised prescription system in the OPD and a fully computerised prescription system in the emergency ward. A total of 510 prescriptions from both departments of these two hospitals were evaluated for patient characteristics, demographics and medication errors. The data was analysed using a chi square test for comparison of errors between both the hospitals. The medical departments in OPDs of both hospitals were the highest prescribers at 45%-60%. The age group receiving the most treatment in emergency wards of both the hospitals was 21-30 years (21%-24%). A trend of omitting patient addresses and diagnoses was observed in almost all prescriptions from both of the hospitals. Nevertheless, patient information such as name, age, gender and legibility of the prescriber's signature were found in almost 100% of the electronic-prescriptions. In addition, no prescribing error was found pertaining to drug concentrations, quantity and rate of administration in e-prescriptions. The total prescribing errors in the OPD and emergency ward of Hospital A were found to be 44% and 60%, respectively. In hospital B, the OPD had 39% medication errors and the emergency department had 73.5% errors; this unexpected difference between the emergency ward and OPD of hospital B was mainly due to the inclusion of 69.4% omissions of route of administration in the prescriptions. The incidence of prescription overdose was approximately 7%-19% in the manual system and approximately 8% in semi and fully electronic system. The omission of information and incomplete information are contributors of prescribing errors in both manual and electronic

  20. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Saffer, Janet R.; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S.; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions. PMID:18383664

  1. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Konecky, Soren D; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M; Saffer, Janet R; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G

    2008-02-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions.

  2. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the attenuation of sound speed secondary to breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data

  3. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices.

    PubMed

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-03-20

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the sound speed of breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data. However, the discrepancy

  4. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the sound speed of breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data. However, the discrepancy

  5. Prognostic Contribution of Exercise Capacity, Heart Rate Recovery, Chronotropic Incompetence, and Myocardial Perfusion Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography in the Prediction of Cardiac Death and All-Cause Mortality.

    PubMed

    Arbit, Boris; Azarbal, Babak; Hayes, Sean W; Gransar, Heidi; Germano, Guido; Friedman, John D; Thomson, Louise; Berman, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    Chronotropic incompetence, measured by the percentage (%) of heart rate (HR) reserve achieved (%HR reserve), abnormal HR recovery, reduced exercise capacity (EC), and myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT MPS) abnormalities are known predictors of all-cause mortality (ACM) and cardiac death (CD). The aim of this study was to determine if EC, %HR reserve, and HR recovery add incremental value to MPS in the prediction of ACM and CD. A total of 11,218 patients without valvular disease and not on β blockers underwent symptom-limited exercise MPS. %HR reserve was (peak HR - rest HR)/(220 - age - rest HR) × 100, with %HR reserve <80 defined as low. HR recovery was peak HR - recovery HR. An HR recovery <22 beats/min at 2 minutes after peak exercise was considered abnormal. Poor EC was defined as exercise duration ≤6 minutes (7 metabolic equivalents). Summed stress scores (SSSs) were calculated using a 20-segment, 5-point MPS model. Statistical analysis was performed using Cox regression models. There were 445 deaths (148 CD) during a mean follow-up of 3.2 ± 2.5 years. In multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of ACM were age, χ(2) = 154.81; EC, χ(2) = 74.00; SSS, χ(2) = 32.99; %HR reserve, χ(2) = 24.74; abnormal electrocardiogram at rest, χ(2) = 23.13; HR recovery, χ(2) = 18.45; diabetes, χ(2) = 17.75; and previous coronary artery disease, χ(2) = 11.85 (p ≤0.0006). The independent predictors of CD were SSS, χ(2) = 54.25; EC, χ(2) = 49.34; age, χ(2) = 46.45; abnormal electrocardiogram at rest, χ(2) = 30.60; previous coronary artery disease, χ(2) = 20.69; Duke treadmill score, χ(2) = 19.50; %HR reserve, χ(2) = 11.43; diabetes, χ(2) = 10.23 (all p ≤0.0014); and HR recovery, χ(2) = 5.30 (p = 0.0214). The exercise variables showed increases in Harrell's C static and net improvement reclassification, with EC showing the strongest incremental improvement in predicting ACM and CD (respective C-index 76

  6. [Patient dose optimization in pediatric computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Verdun, F R; Schnyder, P; Gutièrrez, D; Gudinchet, F

    2006-07-12

    The development of CT applications might become a public health problem if no effort is made on the justification and the optimisation of the examinations. This paper presents some hints to assure that the risk-benefit compromise remains in favour of the patient, especially when one deals with the examinations of young patients. In this context a particular attention has to be made on the justification of the examination. When performing the acquisition one needs to optimise the extension of the volume investigated together with the number of acquisition sequences used. Finally, the use of automatic exposure systems, now available on all the units, and the use of the Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) should allow help radiologists to control the exposure of their patients.

  7. A Comparison of Content-Balancing Procedures for Estimating Multiple Clinical Domains in Computerized Adaptive Testing: Relative Precision, Validity, and Detection of Persons with Misfitting Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Barth B.; Dennis, Michael L.; Conrad, Kendon J.

    2010-01-01

    This simulation study sought to compare four different computerized adaptive testing (CAT) content-balancing procedures designed for use in a multidimensional assessment with respect to measurement precision, symptom severity classification, validity of clinical diagnostic recommendations, and sensitivity to atypical responding. The four…

  8. Learning Complex Grammar in the Virtual Classroom: A Comparison of Processing Instruction, Structured Input, Computerized Visual Input Enhancement, and Traditional Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of processing instruction (PI) and structured input (SI) on the acquisition of the subjunctive in adjectival clauses by 92 second-semester distance learners of Spanish. Computerized visual input enhancement (VIE) was combined with PI and SI in an attempt to increase the salience of the targeted grammatical form…

  9. Reliability and Validity of the Computerized Revised Token Test: Comparison of Reading and Listening Versions in Persons with and without Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Malcolm R.; Pratt, Sheila R.; Szuminsky, Neil; Sung, Jee Eun; Fossett, Tepanta R. D.; Fassbinder, Wiltrud; Lim, Kyoung Yuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the reliability and validity of intermodality associations and differences in persons with aphasia (PWA) and healthy controls (HC) on a computerized listening and 3 reading versions of the Revised Token Test (RTT; McNeil & Prescott, 1978). Method: Thirty PWA and 30 HC completed the test versions, including a…

  10. Computerized Construction Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moucka, Jan; Piskova, Vera

    1971-01-01

    Two Czechoslovakian architects describe how they scheduled construction projects on a statewide scale by computerizing the priority for projects, the resource capacity, the time coordination, and the construction schedules. (Author)

  11. Computerized Interactive Harness Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized interactive harness engineering program inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically data-base system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records.

  12. Comparison of optical coherence tomography, microcomputed tomography, and histology at a three-dimensionally imaged trabecular bone sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasseck, Christoph; Kratz, Marita; Torcasio, Antonia; Gerhardt, Nils C.; van Lenthe, G. Harry; Gambichler, Thilo; Hoffmann, Klaus; Jones, David B.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a method for imaging bone. The OCT images are compared directly to those of the standard methods of bone histology and microcomputed tomography (μCT) on a single, fixed human femoral trabecular bone sample. An advantage of OCT over bone histology is its noninvasive nature. OCT also images the lamellar structure of trabeculae at slightly higher contrast than normal bone histology. While μCT visualizes the trabecular framework of the whole sample, OCT can image additionally cells with a penetration depth limited approximately to 1 mm. The most significant advantage of OCT, however, is the absence of toxic effects (no ionizing radiation), i.e., continuous images may be made and individual cell tracking may be performed. The penetration depth of OCT, however, limits its use to small animal models and small bone organ cultures.

  13. Comparison of computed tomography dose index in polymethyl methacrylate and nylon dosimetry phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Sookpeng, Supawitoo; Cheebsumon, Patsuree; Pengpan, Thanyawee; Martin, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) scanning has been growing steadily. Therefore, CT dose measurement is becoming increasingly important for patient protection and optimization. A phantom is an important tool for dose measurement. This paper focuses on the evaluation of a CT dosimetry phantom made from nylon, instead of the standard polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), which is not readily available or is too expensive in some countries. Comparison between phantoms made from the two materials is made in terms of measurements of the CT dose indices (CTDI). These were measured for four different beam widths and kVp settings at the center and periphery in head and body phantoms made from both materials and weighted CTDIs (CTDIw) were calculated. CT numbers along the z-axis of the phantom were also measured at the center and four peripheral positions of each scanned slice to check phantom homogeneity. Results showed that values for the CTDIw measured in the nylon phantoms were slightly higher than those from the PMMA while CT numbers for nylon were lower than those of PMMA. This is because the mass attenuation coefficient of the nylon is higher. Nylon could be used as a substitute material for CT dosimetry phantom to enable measurements and adjustment factors are given which could be used to estimate PMMA values for making comparisons with displayed values. PMID:27051170

  14. Comparison of optoacoustic tomography with ultrasound and x-ray imaging for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Hartrumpf, O.; Larina, Irina V.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2001-06-01

    This paper is devoted to comparison new optoacoustic tomography with conventional breast tumors diagnostic techniques such as ultrasonography and X-ray radiography. Experiments were performed in phantoms simulating breast with tumors. The fundamental harmonic of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) was used to generate optoacoustic pressure waves. Laser induced pressure waves were detected by a wide-band acoustic transducer. Digital oscilloscope controlled by PC was used to store and process optoacoustic signals. Gelatin phantoms with controlled optical parameters were prepared to simulate breast with tumors. Absorbing volumes colored with naphthol green and hemoglobin were embedded in the gelatin phantoms to model the breast tumors with increased optical absorption. Optoacoustic pressure waves form the phantoms were detected at different angles and 2D images were reconstructed. Comparison of optoacoustic images with images obtained with ultrasound and X-ray techniques proved that optoacoustic method has substantially higher contrast and resolution. Obtained results confirm that laser optoacoustic imaging technique can be an important tool for early breast cancer detection with tumors less than 5 mm in diameter.

  15. Digital tomosynthesis and high resolution computed tomography as clinical tools for vertebral endplate topography measurements: Comparison with microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oravec, Daniel; Quazi, Abrar; Xiao, Angela; Yang, Ellen; Zauel, Roger; Flynn, Michael J; Yeni, Yener N

    2015-12-01

    Endplate morphology is understood to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of vertebral bone as well as degenerative processes in spinal tissues; however, the utility of clinical imaging modalities in assessment of the vertebral endplate has been limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of two clinical imaging modalities (digital tomosynthesis, DTS; high resolution computed tomography, HRCT) to assess endplate topography by correlating the measurements to a microcomputed tomography (μCT) standard. DTS, HRCT, and μCT images of 117 cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae (T10-L1; 23 male, 19 female; ages 36-100 years) were segmented, and inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Both DTS and HRCT showed statistically significant correlations with μCT approaching a moderate level of correlation at the superior endplate for all measured parameters (R(2)Adj=0.19-0.57), including averages, variability, and higher order statistical moments. Correlation of average depths at the inferior endplate was comparable to the superior case for both DTS and HRCT (R(2)Adj=0.14-0.51), while correlations became weak or nonsignificant for higher moments of the topography distribution. DTS was able to capture variations in the endplate topography to a slightly better extent than HRCT, and taken together with the higher speed and lower radiation cost of DTS than HRCT, DTS appears preferable for endplate measurements.

  16. Assessment of natural enamel lesions with optical coherence tomography in comparison with microfocus x-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Espigares, Jorge; Sadr, Alireza; Hamba, Hidenori; Shimada, Yasushi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A technology to characterize early enamel lesions is needed in dentistry. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive method that provides high-resolution cross-sectional images. The aim of this study is to compare OCT with microfocus x-ray computed tomography (μCT) for assessment of natural enamel lesions in vitro. Ten human teeth with visible white spot-like changes on the enamel smooth surface and no cavitation (ICDAS code 2) were subjected to imaging by μCT (SMX-100CT, Shimadzu) and 1300-nm swept-source OCT (Dental SS-OCT, Panasonic Health Care). In μCT, the lesions appeared as radiolucent dark areas, while in SS-OCT, they appeared as areas of increased signal intensity beneath the surface. An SS-OCT attenuation coefficient based on Beer–Lambert law could discriminate lesions from sound enamel. Lesion depth ranged from 175 to 606  μm in SS-OCT. A correlation between μCT and SS-OCT was found regarding lesion depth (R=0.81, p<0.001) and also surface layer thickness (R=0.76, p<0.005). The images obtained clinically in real time using the dental SS-OCT system are suitable for the assessment of natural subsurface lesions and their surface layer, providing comparable images to a laboratory high-resolution μCT without the use of x-ray. PMID:26158079

  17. Assessment of natural enamel lesions with optical coherence tomography in comparison with microfocus x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Espigares, Jorge; Sadr, Alireza; Hamba, Hidenori; Shimada, Yasushi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    A technology to characterize early enamel lesions is needed in dentistry. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive method that provides high-resolution cross-sectional images. The aim of this study is to compare OCT with microfocus x-ray computed tomography ([Formula: see text]) for assessment of natural enamel lesions in vitro. Ten human teeth with visible white spot-like changes on the enamel smooth surface and no cavitation (ICDAS code 2) were subjected to imaging by μCT (SMX-100CT, Shimadzu) and 1300-nm swept-source OCT (Dental SS-OCT, Panasonic Health Care). In [Formula: see text], the lesions appeared as radiolucent dark areas, while in SS-OCT, they appeared as areas of increased signal intensity beneath the surface. An SS-OCT attenuation coefficient based on Beer-Lambert law could discriminate lesions from sound enamel. Lesion depth ranged from 175 to [Formula: see text] in SS-OCT. A correlation between [Formula: see text] and SS-OCT was found regarding lesion depth ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) and also surface layer thickness ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). The images obtained clinically in real time using the dental SS-OCT system are suitable for the assessment of natural subsurface lesions and their surface layer, providing comparable images to a laboratory high-resolution [Formula: see text] without the use of x-ray.

  18. Digital Tomosynthesis and High Resolution Computed Tomography as Clinical Tools for Vertebral Endplate Topography Measurements: Comparison with Microcomputed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oravec, Daniel; Quazi, Abrar; Xiao, Angela; Yang, Ellen; Zauel, Roger; Flynn, Michael J.; Yeni, Yener N.

    2015-01-01

    Endplate morphology is understood to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of vertebral bone as well as degenerative processes in spinal tissues; however, the utility of clinical imaging modalities in assessment of the vertebral endplate has been limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of two clinical imaging modalities (digital tomosynthesis, DTS; high resolution computed tomography, HRCT) to assess endplate topography by correlating the measurements to a microcomputed tomography (µCT) standard. DTS, HRCT, and µCT images of 117 cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae (T10-L1; 23 male, 19 female; ages 36–100 years) were segmented, and inferior and superior endplate surface topographical distribution parameters were calculated. Both DTS and HRCT showed statistically significant correlations with µCT approaching a moderate level of correlation at the superior endplate for all measured parameters (R2Adj=0.19–0.57), including averages, variability, and higher order statistical moments. Correlation of average depths at the inferior endplate was comparable to the superior case for both DTS and HRCT (R2Adj=0.14–0.51), while correlations became weak or nonsignificant for higher moments of the topography distribution. DTS was able to capture variations in the endplate topography to a slightly better extent than HRCT, and taken together with the higher speed and lower radiation cost of DTS than HRCT, DTS appears preferable for endplate measurements. PMID:26220145

  19. Nondestructive observation of teeth post core-space using optical coherence tomography: comparison with microcomputed tomography and live images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Takuya; Mine, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Mariko; Sugawa, Yoshihiko; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Higashi, Mami; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Ohmi, Masato; Awazu, Kunio; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-10-01

    No previous reports have observed inside the root canal using both optical coherence tomography (OCT) and x-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) for the same sample. The purpose of this study was to clarify both OCT and μCT image properties from observations of the same root canal after resin core build-up treatment. As OCT allows real-time observation of samples, gap formation may be able to be shown in real time. A dual-cure, one-step, self-etch adhesive system bonding agent, and dual-cure resin composite core material were used in root canals in accordance with instructions from the manufacturer. The resulting OCT images were superior for identifying gap formation at the interface, while μCT images were better to grasp the tooth form. Continuous tomographic images from real-time OCT observation allowed successful construction of a video of the resin core build-up procedure. After 10 to 12 s of light curing, a gap with a clear new signal occurred at the root-core material interface, proceeding from the coronal side (6 mm from the cemento-enamel junction) to the apical side of the root.

  20. Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE): First Clinical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duric, N.; Littrup, P.; Rama, O.; Holsapple, E.

    The Karmanos Cancer Institute has developed an ultrasound (US) tomography system, known as Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE), for detecting and evaluating breast cancer, with the eventual goal of providing improved differentiation of benign masses from cancer. We report on our first clinical findings with CURE.

  1. Accuracy of Linear Measurements Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Comparison with Clinical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Hashemi, Kazem; Akbari, Solmaz; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad; Barikani, Hamidreza; Panjnoosh, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to evaluate the accuracy and errors of linear measurements of mesiodistal dimensions of Kennedy Class III edentulous space using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in comparison with clinical measurements. Materials and Methods: Nineteen Kennedy Class III dental arches were evaluated. An impression was made of each dental arch and poured with dental stone. The distance was measured on dental cast using a digital Vernier caliper with an accuracy of 0.1mm and on CBCT scans. Finally, the linear mesiodistal measurements were compared and the accuracy of CBCT technique was evaluated by calculating absolute value of errors, intra-class correlation coefficient and simple linear regression model. Results: In comparison with the cast method, estimation of size on CBCT scans had an error of −8.46% (underestimation) to 5.21% (overestimation). In 26.5% of the cases, an accepted error of ±1% was found. The absolute value of errors was found to be in the range of 0.21–8.46mm with an average value of 2.86 ±2.30mm. Conclusions: Although the measurements revealed statistically significant differences, this does not indicate a lower accuracy for the CBCT technique. In fact, CBCT can provide some information as a paraclinical tool and the clinician can combine these data with clinical data and achieve greater accuracy. Undoubtedly, calibration of data collected by clinical and paraclinical techniques and the clinician’s expertise in use of CBCT software programs can increase the accuracy of implant placement. PMID:28127327

  2. A comparison of sensors for minimizing the primary signal in planar-array magnetic induction tomography.

    PubMed

    Watson, S; Igney, C H; Dössel, O; Williams, R J; Griffiths, H

    2005-04-01

    In magnetic induction tomography reducing the influence of the primary excitation field on the sensors can provide a significant improvement in SNR and/or allow the operating frequency to be reduced. For the purposes of imaging, it would be valuable if all, or a useful subset, of the detection coils could be rendered insensitive to the primary field for any excitation coil activated. Suitable schemes which have been previously suggested include the use of axial gradiometers and coil-orientation methods (Bx sensors). This paper examines the relative performance of each method through computer simulation of the sensitivity profiles produced by a single sensor, and comparison of reconstructed images produced by sensor arrays. A finite-difference model was used to determine the sensitivity profiles obtained with each type of sensor arrangement. The modelled volume was a cuboid of dimensions 50 cmx50 cmx12 cm with a uniform conductivity of 1 S m-1. The excitation coils were of 5 cm diameter and the detection coils of 5 mm diameter. The Bx sensors provided greater sensitivity than the axial gradiometers at all depths, other than on the surface layer of the volume. Images produced using a single-planar array were found to contain distortion which was reduced by the addition of a second array.

  3. Comparison of diffraction-enhanced computed tomography and monochromatic synchrotron radiation computed tomography of human trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Connor, D M; Hallen, H D; Lalush, D S; Sumner, D R; Zhong, Z

    2009-10-21

    Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) is an x-ray-based medical imaging modality that, when used in tomography mode (DECT), can generate a three-dimensional map of both the apparent absorption coefficient and the out-of-plane gradient of the index of refraction of the sample. DECT is known to have contrast gains over monochromatic synchrotron radiation CT (SRCT) for soft tissue structures. The goal of this experiment was to compare contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and resolution in images of human trabecular bone acquired using SRCT with images acquired using DECT. All images were acquired at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Upton, NY, USA) at beamline X15 A at an x-ray energy of 40 keV and the silicon [3 3 3] reflection. SRCT, apparent absorption DECT and refraction DECT slice images of the trabecular bone were created. The apparent absorption DECT images have significantly higher spatial resolution and CNR than the corresponding SRCT images. Thus, DECT will prove to be a useful tool for imaging applications in which high contrast and high spatial resolution are required for both soft tissue features and bone.

  4. Psychosocial Communication and Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Gunilla; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the effect of computerization of the work environment on psychosocial communication. The RAM program, developed at Stockholm University to explore the effect of computers on the structure of organizations and the psychosocial work environment, is described; theoretical models are explained; and the future use of knowledge-based systems…

  5. The History Computerization Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Description of the History Computerization Project, which is being developed for the exchange of information between researchers, librarians, archivists, museum curators, preservation groups, and historical societies, focuses on workshops that teach the use of computer database management for historical cataloging and research. (LRW)

  6. Computerizing the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jeanie; Whelan, Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of a computerized high school library which uses CD-ROM optical storage systems. Describes hardware and software, setting up the system, preparing the online catalog, teaching information retrieval skills, and project evaluation. Notes prices of CD-ROM disks and equipment purchased. 4 references. (SV)

  7. Seven Myths of Computerism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of computerism (i.e., blind faith in the inherent good of computers) focuses on seven myths about computer anxiety, including the relationship between computer use and math skills; fear of breaking computers; the need for keyboarding skills; and gender differences. An annotated bibliography of 21 sources of further information is…

  8. Computerized Language Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Steven

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a computerized language analysis system that produces a detailed description and summary statistics to track language growth within student populations. This microcomputer-based language assessment system simplifies identification of deficits in productive language, enabling the teacher or clinician to spend more time…

  9. Computerized Drug Information Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  10. Value of image fusion using single photon emission computed tomography with integrated low dose computed tomography in comparison with a retrospective voxel-based method in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Amthauer, H; Denecke, T; Rohlfing, T; Ruf, J; Böhmig, M; Gutberlet, M; Plöckinger, U; Felix, R; Lemke, A J

    2005-07-01

    The objective was the evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with integrated low dose computed tomography (CT) in comparison with a retrospective fusion of SPECT and high-resolution CT and a side-by-side analysis for lesion localisation in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Twenty-seven patients were examined by multidetector CT. Additionally, as part of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), an integrated SPECT-CT was performed. SPECT and CT data were fused using software with a registration algorithm based on normalised mutual information. The reliability of the topographic assignment of lesions in SPECT-CT, retrospective fusion and side-by-side analysis was evaluated by two blinded readers. Two patients were not enrolled in the final analysis because of misregistrations in the retrospective fusion. Eighty-seven foci were included in the analysis. For the anatomical assignment of foci, SPECT-CT and retrospective fusion revealed overall accuracies of 91 and 94% (side-by-side analysis 86%). The correct identification of foci as lymph node manifestations (n=25) was more accurate by retrospective fusion (88%) than from SPECT-CT images (76%) or by side-by-side analysis (60%). Both modalities of image fusion appear to be well suited for the localisation of SRS foci and are superior to side-by-side analysis of non-fused images especially concerning lymph node manifestations.

  11. Comparisons of the diagnostic accuracies of optical coherence tomography, micro-computed tomography, and histology in periodontal disease: an ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that may be useful for both qualitative and quantitative analyses of the periodontium. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is another noninvasive imaging technique capable of providing submicron spatial resolution. The purpose of this study was to present periodontal images obtained using ex vivo dental OCT and to compare OCT images with micro-CT images and histologic sections. Methods Images of ex vivo canine periodontal structures were obtained using OCT. Biologic depth measurements made using OCT were compared to measurements made on histologic sections prepared from the same sites. Visual comparisons were made among OCT, micro-CT, and histologic sections to evaluate whether anatomical details were accurately revealed by OCT. Results The periodontal tissue contour, gingival sulcus, and the presence of supragingival and subgingival calculus could be visualized using OCT. OCT was able to depict the surface topography of the dentogingival complex with higher resolution than micro-CT, but the imaging depth was typically limited to 1.2–1.5 mm. Biologic depth measurements made using OCT were a mean of 0.51 mm shallower than the histologic measurements. Conclusions Dental OCT as used in this study was able to generate high-resolution, cross-sectional images of the superficial portions of periodontal structures. Improvements in imaging depth and the development of an intraoral sensor are likely to make OCT a useful technique for periodontal applications. PMID:28261522

  12. Assessing apical transportation in curved canals: comparison between cross-sections and micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Freire, Laila Gonzales; Gavini, Giulio; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Santos, Marcelo dos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two methods of assessing apical transportation in curved canals after rotary instrumentation, namely, cross-sections and micro-computed tomography (µCT). Thirty mandibular molars were divided into two groups and prepared according to the requirements of each method. In G1 (cross-sections), teeth were embedded in resin blocks and sectioned at 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 mm from the anatomic apex. Pre- and postoperative sections were photographed and analyzed. In G2 (µCT), teeth were embedded in a rubber-base impression material and scanned before and after instrumentation. Mesiobuccal canals were instrumented with the Twisted File (TF) system (SybronEndo, Orange, USA), and mesiolingual canals, with the EndoSequence (ES) system (Brasseler, Savannah, USA). Images were reconstructed, and sections corresponding to distances 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 mm from the anatomic apex were selected for comparison. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney's test at a 5% significance level. The TF and ES instruments produced little deviation from the root canal center, with no statistical difference between them (P > 0.05). The canal transportation results were significantly lower (0.056 mm) in G2 than in G1 (0.089 mm) (p = 0.0012). The µCT method was superior to the cross-section method, especially in view of its ability to preserve specimens and provide results that are more closely related to clinical situations.

  13. LUNGx Challenge for computerized lung nodule classification.

    PubMed

    Armato, Samuel G; Drukker, Karen; Li, Feng; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Tourassi, Georgia D; Engelmann, Roger M; Giger, Maryellen L; Redmond, George; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin S; Clarke, Laurence P

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to describe the LUNGx Challenge for the computerized classification of lung nodules on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans as benign or malignant and report the performance of participants' computerized methods along with that of six radiologists who participated in an observer study performing the same Challenge task on the same dataset. The Challenge provided sets of calibration and testing scans, established a performance assessment process, and created an infrastructure for case dissemination and result submission. Ten groups applied their own methods to 73 lung nodules (37 benign and 36 malignant) that were selected to achieve approximate size matching between the two cohorts. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values for these methods ranged from 0.50 to 0.68; only three methods performed statistically better than random guessing. The radiologists' AUC values ranged from 0.70 to 0.85; three radiologists performed statistically better than the best-performing computer method. The LUNGx Challenge compared the performance of computerized methods in the task of differentiating benign from malignant lung nodules on CT scans, placed in the context of the performance of radiologists on the same task. The continued public availability of the Challenge cases will provide a valuable resource for the medical imaging research community.

  14. LUNGx Challenge for computerized lung nodule classification

    SciTech Connect

    Armato, Samuel G.; Drukker, Karen; Li, Feng; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Engelmann, Roger M.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Redmond, George; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin S.; Clarke, Laurence P.

    2016-12-19

    The purpose of this work is to describe the LUNGx Challenge for the computerized classification of lung nodules on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans as benign or malignant and report the performance of participants’ computerized methods along with that of six radiologists who participated in an observer study performing the same Challenge task on the same dataset. The Challenge provided sets of calibration and testing scans, established a performance assessment process, and created an infrastructure for case dissemination and result submission. We present ten groups that applied their own methods to 73 lung nodules (37 benign and 36 malignant) that were selected to achieve approximate size matching between the two cohorts. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values for these methods ranged from 0.50 to 0.68; only three methods performed statistically better than random guessing. The radiologists’ AUC values ranged from 0.70 to 0.85; three radiologists performed statistically better than the best-performing computer method. The LUNGx Challenge compared the performance of computerized methods in the task of differentiating benign from malignant lung nodules on CT scans, placed in the context of the performance of radiologists on the same task. Lastly, the continued public availability of the Challenge cases will provide a valuable resource for the medical imaging research community.

  15. LUNGx Challenge for computerized lung nodule classification

    DOE PAGES

    Armato, Samuel G.; Drukker, Karen; Li, Feng; ...

    2016-12-19

    The purpose of this work is to describe the LUNGx Challenge for the computerized classification of lung nodules on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans as benign or malignant and report the performance of participants’ computerized methods along with that of six radiologists who participated in an observer study performing the same Challenge task on the same dataset. The Challenge provided sets of calibration and testing scans, established a performance assessment process, and created an infrastructure for case dissemination and result submission. We present ten groups that applied their own methods to 73 lung nodules (37 benign and 36 malignant) thatmore » were selected to achieve approximate size matching between the two cohorts. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values for these methods ranged from 0.50 to 0.68; only three methods performed statistically better than random guessing. The radiologists’ AUC values ranged from 0.70 to 0.85; three radiologists performed statistically better than the best-performing computer method. The LUNGx Challenge compared the performance of computerized methods in the task of differentiating benign from malignant lung nodules on CT scans, placed in the context of the performance of radiologists on the same task. Lastly, the continued public availability of the Challenge cases will provide a valuable resource for the medical imaging research community.« less

  16. Comparison of a Novel Weightbearing Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanner Versus a Conventional Computed Tomography Scanner for Measuring Patellar Instability

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, John; Kluczynski, Melissa; Notino, Anthony; Bisson, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional computed tomography (CT) images are routinely used for diagnosing patellofemoral instability and are obtained with the patient in a supine position, nonweightbearing, with the knee in full extension, and with leg muscles relaxed. A new portable extremity cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner has been developed that may allow for more accurate diagnosis, as imaging can be performed with the patient standing, the knee flexed, and with leg muscles active. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare CT measurements of patellar alignment on a prototype scanner versus conventional scanner in patients with known patellar instability. The hypothesis was that the measurements obtained with the knee flexed and the patient weightbearing would be less than those obtained from the conventional CT scan. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Twenty patients with a diagnosis of lateral patellar instability were imaged on both a conventional CT scanner and on a prototype CBCT scanner. Objective measures of patellofemoral alignment (tilt angle, congruence angle, tibial tuberosity–trochlear groove [TT-TG] offset) were assessed on images obtained from the prototype and conventional CT scans by 2 independent reviewers. Paired t tests were calculated to compare the mean measurement of patellofemoral alignment obtained from the prototype versus conventional CT. Interrater reliability was assessed using a 2-way mixed-effects model intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for tilt angle, congruence angle, and TT-TG offset on the prototype and conventional CT scans. Results: Measurements of patellofemoral alignment were significantly less when acquired by the new prototype CBCT scanner while subjects were weightbearing on a flexed knee. On the images from the prototype CBCT scan, the tilt angle averaged 18.2° ± 11.6° compared with 28.1° ± 7.1° on the conventional CT scan (P < .0001). The congruence angle was 3.0° ± 30

  17. Computerized operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, E.; Teigen, J.

    1994-12-31

    A number of observed and potential problems in the nuclear industry are related to the quality of operating procedures. Many of the problems identified in operating procedure preparation, implementation, and maintenance have a technical nature, which can be directly addressed by developing computerized procedure handling tools. The Halden Reactor Project (HRP) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has since 1985 performed research work within this field. A product of this effort is the development of a second version of the computerized operation manuals (COPMA) system. This paper summarizes the most important characteristics of the COPMA-II system and discusses some of the experiences in using a system like COPMA-II.

  18. Comparison of Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Multi Slice Computed Tomography Image Quality of Human Dried Mandible using 10 Anatomical Landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Saati, Samira; Kaveh, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) has gained a broad acceptance in dentomaxillofacial imaging. Computed Tomography (CT) is another imaging modality for diagnosis and preoperative assessments of the head and neck region. Aim Considering the increased radiation exposure and high cost of CT, this study sought to subjectively assess the image quality of CBCT and Multi Slice CT (MSCT). Materials and Methods A dry human mandible was scanned by five CBCT systems (New Tom 3G, Scanora, CRANEX 3D, Promax and Galileos) and one MSCT system. Three independent oral and maxillofacial radiologists reviewed the CBCT and MSCT scans for the quality of 10 landmarks namely mental foramen, trabecular bone, Periodontal Ligament (PDL), dentin, incisive canal, mandibular canal, dental pulp, enamel, lamina dura and cortical bone using a five-point scale. Results Significant differences were found between MSCT and CBCT and among the five CBCT systems (p<0.05) in visualization of different anatomical structures. A fine structure such as the incisive canal was significantly less visible and more variable among the systems in comparison with other anatomical landmarks such as the mental foramen, mandibular canal, cortical bone, dental pulp, enamel and dentin (p<0.05). The Cranex 3D and Promax systems were superior to MSCT and all other CBCT systems in visualizing anatomical structures. Conclusion The CBCT image quality was superior to that of MSCT even though some variability existed among different CBCT systems in visualizing fine structures. Considering the low radiation dose and high resolution, CBCT may be beneficial for dentomaxillofacial imaging. PMID:28384972

  19. Blow-out fractures of the orbit: a comparison of computed tomography and conventional radiography with anatomic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Hammeschlag, S.B.; Hughes, S.; O'Reilly, G.V.; Naheedy, M.H.; Rumbaugh, C.L.

    1982-05-01

    Orbital blow-out fractures were experimentally created in eight human cadavers. Each orbit underwent conventional radiographic studies, complex motion tomography, and computed tomographic examinations. A comparison of the three modalities was made. Anatomical correlation was obtained by dissecting the orbits. The significance of medial-wall fractures and enophthalmos is discussed. Limitation of inferior rectus muscle mobility is thought to be a result of muscle kinking associated with orbital fat-pad prolapse at the fracture site, rather than muscle incarceration. Blow-out fractures should be evaluated by computed tomographic computer reformations in the oblique sagittal plane.

  20. Comparison of hydraulic tomography with traditional methods at a highly heterogeneous site.

    PubMed

    Berg, Steven J; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several decades, different groundwater modeling approaches of various complexities and data use have been developed. A recently developed approach for mapping hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss ) heterogeneity is hydraulic tomography, the performance of which has not been compared to other more "traditional" methods that have been utilized over the past several decades. In this study, we compare seven methods of modeling heterogeneity which are (1) kriging, (2) effective parameter models, (3) transition probability/Markov Chain geostatistics models, (4) geological models, (5) stochastic inverse models conditioned to local K data, (6) hydraulic tomography, and (7) hydraulic tomography conditioned to local K data using data collected in five boreholes at a field site on the University of Waterloo (UW) campus, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. The performance of each heterogeneity model is first assessed during model calibration. In particular, the correspondence between simulated and observed drawdowns is assessed using the mean absolute error norm, (L1 ), mean square error norm (L2 ), and correlation coefficient (R) as well as through scatterplots. We also assess the various models on their ability to predict drawdown data not used in the calibration effort from nine pumping tests. Results reveal that hydraulic tomography is best able to reproduce these tests in terms of the smallest discrepancy and highest correlation between simulated and observed drawdowns. However, conditioning of hydraulic tomography results with permeameter K data caused a slight deterioration in accuracy of drawdown predictions which suggests that data integration may need to be conducted carefully.

  1. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  2. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  3. A Comparison of Shadowgraphy and X-ray Computed Tomography in Liquid Spray Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-14

    fuel efficiency, increase heat release, and decrease pollutant emissions. To improve the design of fuel injection nozzles, the ability to conduct...tomography (CT). Atomization has key applications in combustion as it can improve fuel efficiency, increase heat release, and decrease pollutant ...efficiency, increase heat release, and decrease pollutant emissions. To improve the design of fuel injection nozzles, the ability to conduct accurate

  4. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  5. The effect of nodule segmentation on the accuracy of computerized lung nodule detection on CT scans: comparison on a data set annotated by multiple radiologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Shi, Jiazheng; Way, Ted; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2007-03-01

    In computerized nodule detection systems on CT scans, many features that are useful for classifying whether a nodule candidate identified by prescreening is a true positive depend on the shape of the segmented object. We designed two segmentation algorithms for detailed delineation of the boundaries for nodule candidates. The first segmentation technique was a three-dimensional (3D) region-growing (RG) method which grew the object across multiple CT sections. The second technique was based on a 3D active contour (AC) model. A training set of 94 CT scans was used for algorithm design. An independent set of 62 scans, each read by multiple radiologists, was used for testing. Thirty-three scans were collected from patient files at the University of Michigan and 29 scans by the Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC). In this study, we concentrated on the detection of internal lung nodules having a size >=3 mm that were not pure ground-glass opacities. Of the lesions marked by one or multiple radiologists, 124 nodules satisfied these criteria and were considered true nodules. The performance of the detection system in the AC feature space, RG feature space, and the combined feature space were compared using free-response receiver operating curves (FROC). The FROC curve using the combined feature space was significantly higher than that using the RG feature space or the AC feature space alone (p=0.02 and 0.03, respectively). At a sensitivity of 70% for internal non-GGO nodules, the FP rates were 2.2, 2.2, and 1.5 per scan, respectively, for the RG, AC, and the combined methods. Our results indicate that the 3D AC algorithm can provide useful features to improve nodule detection on CT scans.

  6. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  7. Computed tomography status

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  8. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  9. Implementation and comparison of reconstruction algorithms for two-dimensional optoacoustic tomography using a linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Dimple; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2009-07-01

    Our goal is to compare and contrast various image reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic tomography (OAT) assuming a finite linear aperture of the kind that arises when using a linear-array transducer. Because such transducers generally have tall, narrow elements, they are essentially insensitive to out-of-plane acoustic waves, and the usually 3-D OAT problem reduces to a 2-D problem. Algorithms developed for the 3-D problem may not perform optimally in 2-D. We have implemented and evaluated a number of previously described OAT algorithms, including an exact (in 3-D) Fourier-based algorithm and a synthetic-aperture-based algorithm. We have also implemented a 2-D algorithm developed by Norton for reflection mode tomography that has not, to the best of our knowledge, been applied to OAT before. Our simulation studies of resolution, contrast, noise properties, and signal detectability measures suggest that Norton's approach-based algorithm has the best contrast, resolution, and signal detectability.

  10. Comparison tomography relocation hypocenter grid search and guided grid search method in Java island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdian, S. W.; Adu, N.; Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.

    2016-11-01

    The main data in this research is earthquake data recorded from 1952 to 2012 with 9162 P wave and 2426 events are recorded by 30 stations located around Java island. Relocation hypocenter processed using grid search and guidded grid search method. Then the result of relocation hypocenter become input for tomography pseudo bending inversion process. It can be used to identification the velocity distribution in subsurface. The result of relocation hypocenter by grid search and guided grid search method after tomography process shown in locally and globally. In locally area grid search method result is better than guided grid search according to geological reseach area. But in globally area the result of guided grid search method is better for a broad area because the velocity variation is more diverse than the other one and in accordance with local geological research conditions.

  11. Reconstruction in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy: comparison with optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Colin J R; Kou, Shan Shan; Depeursinge, Christian

    2012-03-01

    It is shown that the spatial frequencies recorded in interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy do not correspond to exact backscattering [as they do in unistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR)] and that the reconstruction process based on SAR is therefore based on an approximation. The spatial frequency response is developed based on the three-dimensional coherent transfer function approach and compared with that in optical coherence tomography and digital holographic microscopy.

  12. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  13. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B.; McNair, Robert C.; White, Kenneth; Maugeri, Terry

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  14. Computerizing natural history collections.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-09-01

    Computers are ubiquitous in the life sciences and are associated with many of the practical and conceptual changes that characterize biology's twentieth-century transformation. Yet comparatively little has been written about how scientists use computers. Despite this relative lack of scholarly attention, the claim that computers revolutionized the life sciences by making the impossible possible is widespread, and relatively unchallenged. How did the introduction of computers into research programs shape scientific practice? The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at the University of California, Berkeley provides a tractable way into this under-examined question because it is possible to follow the computerization of data in the context of long-term research programs.

  15. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S.; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers.

  16. Comparison Between Perfusion Computed Tomography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kierkels, Roel G.J.; Backes, Walter H.; Janssen, Marco H.M.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To compare pretreatment scans with perfusion computed tomography (pCT) vs. dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients diagnosed with rectal cancer were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent both pCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a dedicated 40-slice CT-positron emission tomography system and a 3-T MRI system. Dynamic contrast enhancement was measured in tumor tissue and the external iliac artery. Tumor perfusion was quantified in terms of pharmacokinetic parameters: transfer constant K{sup trans}, fractional extravascular-extracellular space v{sub e}, and fractional plasma volume v{sub p}. Pharmacokinetic parameter values and their heterogeneity (by 80% quantile value) were compared between pCT and DCE-MRI. Results: Tumor K{sup trans} values correlated significantly for the voxel-by-voxel-derived median (Kendall's tau correlation, tau = 0.81, p < 0.001) and 80% quantile (tau = 0.54, p = 0.04), as well as for the averaged uptake (tau = 0.58, p = 0.03). However, no significant correlations were found for v{sub e} and v{sub p} derived from the voxel-by-voxel-derived median and 80% quantile and derived from the averaged uptake curves. Conclusions: This study demonstrated for the first time that pCT provides K{sup trans} values comparable to those of DCE-MRI. However, no correlation was found for the v{sub e} and v{sub p} parameters between CT and MRI. Computed tomography can serve as an alternative modality to MRI for the in vivo evaluation of tumor angiogenesis in terms of the transfer constant K{sup trans}.

  17. Comparison between diffraction contrast tomography and high-energy diffraction microscopy on a slightly deformed aluminium alloy.

    PubMed

    Renversade, Loïc; Quey, Romain; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Menasche, David; Maddali, Siddharth; Suter, Robert M; Borbély, András

    2016-01-01

    The grain structure of an Al-0.3 wt%Mn alloy deformed to 1% strain was reconstructed using diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) and high-energy diffraction microscopy (HEDM). 14 equally spaced HEDM layers were acquired and their exact location within the DCT volume was determined using a generic algorithm minimizing a function of the local disorientations between the two data sets. The microstructures were then compared in terms of the mean crystal orientations and shapes of the grains. The comparison shows that DCT can detect subgrain boundaries with disorientations as low as 1° and that HEDM and DCT grain boundaries are on average 4 µm apart from each other. The results are important for studies targeting the determination of grain volume. For the case of a polycrystal with an average grain size of about 100 µm, a relative deviation of about ≤10% was found between the two techniques.

  18. Comparison of diffusion approximation and higher order diffusion equations for optical tomography of osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhen; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-09-01

    In this study, a simplified spherical harmonics approximated higher order diffusion model is employed for 3-D diffuse optical tomography of osteoarthritis in the finger joints. We find that the use of a higher-order diffusion model in a stand-alone framework provides significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy over the diffusion approximation model. However, we also find that this is not the case in the image-guided setting when spatial prior knowledge from x-rays is incorporated. The results show that the reconstruction error between these two models is about 15 and 4%, respectively, for stand-alone and image-guided frameworks.

  19. Comparison of ultrasound and computed tomography in the detection of pancreatic malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamin, P.D.; Bernardino, M.E.; Wallace, S.; Jing, B.S.

    1980-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 102 patients who were examined by both ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) for known or possible carcinoma of the pancreas. In 38% of the patients, ultrasonography was unsatisfactory due to overlying interfering intestinal gas or ascites, whereas only 2% of CT studies were unsatisfactory due to technical considerations. In comparing the two modalities, CT was found to be more accurate (96% CT vs. 84% US), and this became more significant when nondiagnostic studies were considered in evaluating accuracy (95% CT vs. 54% US). Because of the findings in this analysis, CT is recommended as the initial diagnostic imaging modality for the evaluation of possible pancreatic neoplasm.

  20. Thyroid imaging: comparison of high-resolution real-time ultrasound and computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Radecki, P.D.; Arger, P.H.; Arenson, R.L.; Jennings, A.S.; Coleman, B.G.; Mintz, M.C.; Kressel, H.Y.

    1984-10-01

    High-resolution real-time ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) were compared in 48 patients with a clinical diagnosis of thyroid abnormality and also correlated with biopsy or surgery. The modalities were considered comparable in 38 cases (79%), while CT was superior in 5 and US in 5. Both techniques lacked histopathological specificity. CT appears to be advantageous in detecting substernal thyroid extension and confirming thyroiditis, while the ability of US to detect small nodules makes it the procedure of choice in evaluating suspected intrinsic thyroid abnormalities.

  1. Physician Order Entry Or Nurse Order Entry? Comparison of Two Implementation Strategies for a Computerized Order Entry System Aimed at Reducing Dosing Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Fors, Uno GH; Tofighi, Shahram; Tessma, Mesfin; Ellenius, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the significant effect of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) in reducing nonintercepted medication errors among neonatal inpatients, only a minority of hospitals have successfully implemented such systems. Physicians' resistance and users' frustration seem to be two of the most important barriers. One solution might be to involve nurses in the order entry process to reduce physicians’ data entry workload and resistance. However, the effect of this collaborative order entry method in reducing medication errors should be compared with a strictly physician order entry method. Objective To investigate whether a collaborative order entry method consisting of nurse order entry (NOE) followed by physician verification and countersignature is as effective as a strictly physician order entry (POE) method in reducing nonintercepted dose and frequency medication errors in the neonatal ward of an Iranian teaching hospital. Methods A four-month prospective study was designed with two equal periods. During the first period POE was used and during the second period NOE was used. In both methods, a warning appeared when the dose or frequency of the prescribed medication was incorrect that suggested the appropriate dosage to the physicians. Physicians’ responses to the warnings were recorded in a database and subsequently analyzed. Relevant paper-based and electronic medical records were reviewed to increase credibility. Results Medication prescribing for 158 neonates was studied. The rate of nonintercepted medication errors during the NOE period was 40% lower than during the POE period (rate ratio 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI] .50, .71;P < .001). During the POE period, 80% of nonintercepted errors occurred at the prescription stage, while during the NOE period, 60% of nonintercepted errors occurred in that stage. Prescription errors decreased from 10.3% during the POE period to 4.6% during the NOE period (P < .001), and the number of warnings

  2. Comparison of methods for the reduction of reconstructed layers in atmospheric tomography.

    PubMed

    Saxenhuber, Daniela; Auzinger, Günter; Louarn, Miska Le; Helin, Tapio

    2017-04-01

    For the new generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs), the computational effort for adaptive optics (AO) systems is demanding even for fast reconstruction algorithms. In wide-field AO, atmospheric tomography, i.e., the reconstruction of turbulent atmospheric layers from wavefront sensor data in several directions of view, is the crucial step for an overall reconstruction. Along with the number of deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors and their resolution, as well as the guide star separation, the number of reconstruction layers contributes significantly to the numerical effort. To reduce the computational cost, a sparse reconstruction profile which still yields good reconstruction quality is needed. In this paper, we analyze existing methods and present new approaches to determine optimal layer heights and turbulence weights for the tomographic reconstruction. Two classes of methods are discussed. On the one hand, we have compression methods that downsample a given input profile to fewer layers. Among other methods, a new compression method based on discrete optimization of collecting atmospheric layers to subgroups and the compression by means of conserving turbulence moments is presented. On the other hand, we take a look at a joint optimization of tomographic reconstruction and reconstruction profile during atmospheric tomography, which is independent of any a priori information on the underlying input profile. We analyze and study the qualitative performance of these methods for different input profiles and varying fields of view in an ELT-sized multi-object AO setting on the European Southern Observatory end-to-end simulation tool OCTOPUS.

  3. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  4. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  5. Experience with the use of the COM computerized conferencing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palme, J.

    1981-12-01

    Studies of the effect of the system are summarized. Similar computerized conferencing systems were also investigated. Information about how much KOM (the Swedish language version of COM) is used, what it is used for, which people use it, the user opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of the system, and a comparison of its cost with other communication media is presented.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal glands: a comparison with computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, C.L.; Haaga, J.R.; Fletcher, B.D.; Alfidi, R.J.; Schultz, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    This investigation compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of normal and abnormal adrenal glands. Thirty normal volunteers were studied with MRI, and the results were compared with a retrospective review of 30 normal CT examinations. CT identified both adrenal glands in all 30 patients. MRI identified both glands in 29 of 30 volunteers. There were no statistically significant differences between the two imaging techniques using chi-square analysis. Twenty-one patients with abnormal adrenal gland(s) detected with CT were also studied with MRI. The abnormalities studied included bilateral hyperplasia (three patients), adenoma (two), myelolipoma (one), adrenal metastases (six), adrenal hemorrhage (two), and neuroblastoma (seven). MRI detected the abnormal adrenal gland(s) in 20 of 21 patients. The CT and MRI features of the adrenal lesions are discussed.

  7. Renal trauma: radiological studies - comparison of urography, computed tomography, angiography, and radionuclide studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; Sullivan, J.; Frentz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Excretory urography, computed radionuclide urography, angiography, and both conventional and dynamic computed tomography (CT) were compared with regard to accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in 388 patients with renal trauma. Used as the triage examination, urography established the absence of significant renal injury with an accuracy of 87%, obviating further evaluation. Dynamic CT proved to be the best methods of assessing parenchymal injuries, establishing the correct diagnosis in 129 out of 130 cases compared to 116/130 for conventional CT. Angiography was the procedure of choice for diagnosis and categorization of renal artery injuries, which were diagnosed correctly in all 43 cases. The choice between dynamic CT and angiography as the second examination rests upon careful evaluation of clinical and urographic findings for signs of renal artery injury which would mandate angiographic assessment.

  8. Tomographic imaging of incipient dental-caries using optical coherence tomography and comparison with various modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jihoon; Baek, Jae Ho; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Changsu; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-07-01

    We present the optical coherence tomography (OCT) made to investigate the early dental caries in human teeth and compare its results with those taken by conventional imaging modalities including light illuminating examination (LIE), digital intra-oral radiography (DIOR), and electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA). Morphological features and caries-involved areas of the dental structure were mainly investigated by LIE, DIOR, and OCT to study the infection of the caries lesion in pits and fissures. The biochemical information acquired with EPMA and the morphological features taken with OCT in the early stage of caries were compared and analyzed to present an objective and practical index for the degree of caries. The experimental results allow us to conclude that OCT could be used to provide quantitative analysis of caries based on the reflectivity difference in the specimen.

  9. Three-dimensional transient hydraulic tomography and comparison to other heterogeneity imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, S. J.; Illman, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    Delineating the subsurface distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) and specific storage (Ss) is of great importance in many areas of hydrogeology, especially for water supply and contaminant transport investigations. However, acquiring reliable distributions of such hydraulic parameters is often difficult and expensive. Hydraulic tomography has recently been proposed as an alternative to various heterogeneity delineation methods for imaging subsurface K and Ss distributions. The technique has been tested by various researchers throughout the world using synthetic simulations and laboratory experiments. It has also been evaluated in the field at a number of sites in different geologic settings. Recently, we conducted a detailed hydraulic tomography survey at the North Campus Research Site (NCRS) situated at the University of Waterloo in a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial aquifer-aquitard sequence. A plot measuring 15 m by 15 m and approximately 18 m deep was instrumented with four, 7-channel Continuous Multichannel Tubing (CMT) wells consisting of a total of 28 observation ports. Each observation port was instrumented with a pressure transducer to record the response of the system to pumping. Additionally, 4 multi-screen/nested wells are placed at the corners of the plot and 1 multi-screen well is placed in the center of the plot. Using a straddle-packer system, 10 locations have been pumped to date, yielding a detailed record of drawdown curves which are currently being analyzed with the SSLE code developed by Zhu and Yeh (2005). The analysis consists of utilizing approximately half of the drawdown records while the others are reserved for validation purposes. We are also comparing the results of these inversions to various heterogeneity interpolation methods such as kriging and T-PROGS.

  10. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Farzad; Johari, Masume; Haddadi, Pezhman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT) scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis) were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT) CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance (P < 0.05). Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections (P = 0.299). In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners (P < 0.001), with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners (P < 0.001), with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants. PMID:24019808

  11. Comparison of magmatic structures beneath Redoubt (Alaska) and Toba (Northern Sumatra) volcanoes derived from local earthquake tomography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Koulakov, Ivan; West, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of seismic tomography studies of two different volcanoes - Mt. Redoubt and Toba caldera. These two subduction related volcanoes have different ages and scales of eruption activity. Velocity model beneath the Redoubt volcano is based on tomographic inversion of P- and S- arrival time data from over 4000 local earthquakes recorded by 19 stations since 1989 to 2012 provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory (University of Fairbanks). Just below the volcano edifice we observe an anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio reaching 2.2 which is seen down to 2- 3 km depth. This indicates a presence of partially molten substance or fluid filled rocks. We can suggest that anomaly area matches with volcano magma chamber. One of the previous velocity models of Toba caldera was obtained by Koulakov et al. (2009) and was based on data recorded by temporary network from January to May 1995. In this study this "old" dataset was supplemented with "new" data recorded by a temporary network deployed in approximately same area by GFZ-Potsdam from May to November 2008. We have manually picked the arrival times from the local events recorded by the later experiment and then performed the tomography inversion for the combined dataset using the LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009). In the uppermost layers we observe strong low-velocity P- and S- anomalies within the Caldera which can be interpreted by the presence of think sediments filling the caldera. In the lower crust and uppermost mantle we observe a vertical anomaly of low P- and S-velocities which probably represent the path of conduits which link the caldera area with the slab. Similar to Redoubt volcano, resulting velocity model of Toba has an increased value of Vp/Vs ratio that indicates a presence of magma reservoir. Comparison of the tomographic results obtained for the completely different volcanic systems helps in understanding some basic principles of feeding the volcanoes. This study was partly supported by the Project #7

  12. Comparison of two regularization methods for soft x-ray tomography at Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, A.; Mazon, D.; Bielecki, J.

    2016-04-01

    Soft x-ray (SXR) emission in the range 0.1-20 keV is widely used to obtain valuable information on tokamak plasma physics, such as particle transport, magnetic configuration or magnetohydrodynamic activity. In particular, 2D tomography is the usual plasma diagnostic to access the local SXR emissivity. The tomographic inversion is traditionally performed from line-integrated measurements of two or more cameras viewing the plasma in a poloidal cross-section, like at Tore Supra (TS). Unfortunately, due to the limited number of measured projections and presence of noise, the tomographic reconstruction of SXR emissivity is a mathematical ill-posed problem. Thus, obtaining reliable results of the tomographic inversion is a very challenging task. In order to perform the reconstruction, inversion algorithms implemented in present tokamaks use a priori information as additional constraints imposed on the plasma SXR emissivity. Among several potential inversion methods, some of them have been identified as well suited to tokamak plasmas. The purpose of this work is to compare two promising inversion methods, i.e. the minimum fisher information method already used at TS and planned for WEST configuration, and the alternative 2nd order Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with smoothness constraints imposed on the second derivative norm. Respective accuracy of both reconstruction methods as well as overall robustness and computational time are studied, using several synthetic SXR emissivity profiles. Finally, a real case is studied through tomographic reconstruction from TS SXR database.

  13. Modelling Random Coincidences in Positron Emission Tomography by Using Singles and Prompts: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Random coincidences degrade the image in Positron Emission Tomography, PET. To compensate for their degradation effects, the rate of random coincidences should be estimated. Under certain circumstances, current estimation methods fail to provide accurate results. We propose a novel method, “Singles–Prompts” (SP), that includes the information conveyed by prompt coincidences and models the pile–up. The SP method has the same structure than the well-known “Singles Rate” (SR) approach. Hence, SP can straightforwardly replace SR. In this work, the SP method has been extensively assessed and compared to two conventional methods, SR and the delayed window (DW) method, in a preclinical PET scenario using Monte–Carlo simulations. SP offers accurate estimates for the randoms rates, while SR and DW tend to overestimate the rates (∼10%, and 5%, respectively). With pile-up, the SP method is more robust than SR (but less than DW). At the image level, the contrast is overestimated in SR-corrected images, +16%, while SP produces the correct value. Spill–over is slightly reduced using SP instead of SR. The DW images values are similar to those of SP except for low-statistic scenarios, where DW behaves as if randoms were not compensated for. In particular, the contrast is reduced, −16%. In general, the better estimations of SP translate into better image quality. PMID:27603143

  14. Comparison of three image segmentation techniques for target volume delineation in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Drever, Laura A; Roa, Wilson; McEwan, Alexander; Robinson, Don

    2007-03-09

    Incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) data into radiotherapy planning is currently under investigation for numerous sites including lung, brain, head and neck, breast, and prostate. Accurate tumor-volume quantification is essential to the proper utilization of the unique information provided by PET. Unfortunately,target delineation within PET currently remains a largely unaddressed problem. We therefore examined the ability of three segmentation methods-thresholding, Sobel edge detection, and the watershed approach-to yield accurate delineation of PET target cross-sections. A phantom study employing well-defined cylindrical and spherical volumes and activity distributions provided an opportunity to assess the relative efficacy with which the three approaches could yield accurate target delineation in PET. Results revealed that threshold segmentation can accurately delineate target cross-sections, but that the Sobel and watershed techniques both consistently fail to correctly identify the size of experimental volumes. The usefulness of threshold-based segmentation is limited, however, by the dependence of the correct threshold (that which returns the correct area at each image slice) on target size.

  15. Methods and algorithms for optical coherence tomography-based angiography: a review and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Anqi; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based angiography is increasingly becoming a clinically useful and important imaging technique due to its ability to provide volumetric microvascular networks innervating tissue beds in vivo without a need for exogenous contrast agent. Numerous OCT angiography algorithms have recently been proposed for the purpose of contrasting microvascular networks. A general literature review is provided on the recent progress of OCT angiography methods and algorithms. The basic physics and mathematics behind each method together with its contrast mechanism are described. Potential directions for future technical development of OCT based angiography is then briefly discussed. Finally, by the use of clinical data captured from normal and pathological subjects, the imaging performance of vascular networks delivered by the most recently reported algorithms is evaluated and compared, including optical microangiography, speckle variance, phase variance, split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography, and correlation mapping. It is found that the method that utilizes complex OCT signal to contrast retinal blood flow delivers the best performance among all the algorithms in terms of image contrast and vessel connectivity. The purpose of this review is to help readers understand and select appropriate OCT angiography algorithm for use in specific applications.

  16. Comparison of different metrics for analysis and visualization in spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jaedicke, Volker; Agcaer, Semih; Robles, Francisco E.; Steinert, Marian; Jones, David; Goebel, Sebastian; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Welp, Hubert; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (S-OCT) extracts depth resolved spectra that are inherently available from OCT signals. The back scattered spectra contain useful functional information regarding the sample, since the light is altered by wavelength dependent absorption and scattering caused by chromophores and structures of the sample. Two aspects dominate the performance of S-OCT: (1) the spectral analysis processing method used to obtain the spatially-resolved spectroscopic information and (2) the metrics used to visualize and interpret relevant sample features. In this work, we focus on the second aspect, where we will compare established and novel metrics for S-OCT. These concepts include the adaptation of methods known from multispectral imaging and modern signal processing approaches such as pattern recognition. To compare the performance of the metrics in a quantitative manner, we use phantoms with microsphere scatterers of different sizes that are below the system’s resolution and therefore cannot be differentiated using intensity based OCT images. We show that the analysis of the spectral features can clearly separate areas with different scattering properties in multi-layer phantoms. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of our approach for contrast enhancement in bovine articular cartilage. PMID:24409393

  17. Methods and algorithms for optical coherence tomography-based angiography: a review and comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anqi; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based angiography is increasingly becoming a clinically useful and important imaging technique due to its ability to provide volumetric microvascular networks innervating tissue beds in vivo without a need for exogenous contrast agent. Numerous OCT angiography algorithms have recently been proposed for the purpose of contrasting microvascular networks. A general literature review is provided on the recent progress of OCT angiography methods and algorithms. The basic physics and mathematics behind each method together with its contrast mechanism are described. Potential directions for future technical development of OCT based angiography is then briefly discussed. Finally, by the use of clinical data captured from normal and pathological subjects, the imaging performance of vascular networks delivered by the most recently reported algorithms is evaluated and compared, including optical microangiography, speckle variance, phase variance, split-spectrum amplitude decorrelation angiography, and correlation mapping. It is found that the method that utilizes complex OCT signal to contrast retinal blood flow delivers the best performance among all the algorithms in terms of image contrast and vessel connectivity. The purpose of this review is to help readers understand and select appropriate OCT angiography algorithm for use in specific applications. PMID:26473588

  18. Structural Comparison between the Right and Left Atrial Appendages Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Koichi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Torii, Ryo; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of the right atrial appendage (RAA) and left atrial appendage (LAA) were compared to clarify why thrombus formation less frequently occurs in RAA than in LAA. Morphological differences between RAA and LAA of 34 formalin-preserved cadaver hearts were investigated. Molds of RAA and LAA specimens were made and the neck areas, volumes of the atrial appendages (AA), and amount of pectinate muscles (PMs) were analyzed using multidetector computed tomography. In RAA, most PMs were connected to one another and formed a “dendritic” appearance and the inner surface area was smaller than in LAA. RAA had smaller volumes and larger neck areas than LAA. The ratios of the neck area/volume were larger and the amounts of PMs were smaller in RAA than in LAA. The volumes, neck areas, and amount of PMs of RAA were significantly correlated with those of LAA. According to the 3D structure, RAA appears to be suited for a more favorable blood flow, which may explain why the thrombus formation is less common in RAA than in LAA. Examining not only LAA but also RAA by transesophageal echocardiography may be useful in high-risk patients of thrombus formation in LAA because the volume, neck area, and amount of PMs of LAA reflect the shape of RAA. PMID:27900330

  19. Comparison of rotational imaging optical coherence tomography and selective plane illumination microscopy for embryonic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Ran, Shihao; Le, Henry H.; Singh, Manmohan; Larina, Irina V.; Mayerich, David; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    The mouse is a common model for studying developmental diseases. Different optical techniques have been developed to investigate mouse embryos, but each has its own set of limitations and restrictions. In this study, we imaged the same E9.5 mouse embryo with rotational imaging Optical Coherence Tomography (RI-OCT) and Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM), and compared the two techniques. Results demonstrate that both methods can provide images with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. The RI-OCT technique was developed to increase imaging depth of OCT by performing traditional OCT imaging at multiple sides and co-registering the images. In SPIM, optical sectioning is achieved by illuminating the sample with a sheet of light. In this study, the images acquired from both techniques are compared with each other to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each technique for embryonic imaging. Since 3D stacks can be obtained by SPIM from different angles by rotating the sample, it might be possible to build a hybrid setup of two imaging modalities to combine the advantages of each technique.

  20. Comparison of three-dimensional optical coherence tomography and high resolution photography for art conservation studies.

    PubMed

    Adler, Desmond C; Stenger, Jens; Gorczynska, Iwona; Lie, Henry; Hensick, Teri; Spronk, Ron; Wolohojian, Stephan; Khandekar, Narayan; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G

    2007-11-26

    Gold punchwork and underdrawing in Renaissance panel paintings are analyzed using both three-dimensional swept source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) and high resolution digital photography. 3D-OCT can generate en face images with micrometer-scale resolutions at arbitrary sectioning depths, rejecting out-of-plane light by coherence gating. Therefore 3D-OCT is well suited for analyzing artwork where a surface layer obscures details of interest. 3D-OCT also enables cross-sectional imaging and quantitative measurement of 3D features such as punch depth, which is beneficial for analyzing the tools and techniques used to create works of art. High volumetric imaging speeds are enabled by the use of a Fourier domain mode locked (FDML) laser as the 3D-OCT light source. High resolution infrared (IR) digital photography is shown to be particularly useful for the analysis of underdrawing, where the materials used for the underdrawing and paint layers have significantly different IR absrption properties. In general, 3D-OCT provides a more flexible and comprehensive analysis of artwork than high resolution photography, but also requires more complex instrumentation and data analysis.

  1. Diabetic Macular Ischemia Diagnosis: Comparison between Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography and Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Talita Toledo; Louzada, Ricardo Noguera; Rassi, Alessandra Thome; Isaac, David Leonardo Cruvinel; Avila, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) images of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) with and without diabetic macular ischemia (DMI). Methods. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare area measurements and p values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. FA and OCTA images were independently graded by 2 observers that reached agreement regarding quantitative DMI according established protocols. The ischemic area was divided into “large” macular ischemia (superior to 0.32 mm2) and “small” (inferior to 0.32 mm2) groups. Quantitative analyses of the FAZ were performed using custom software. Results. Thirty-four eyes from 34 diabetic patients were enrolled. Subjects with DMI presented a mean area on FA and OCTA of 0.68 ± 0.53 mm2 and 0.58 ± 0.35 mm2, respectively (p = 0.1374). Patients without DMI presented a mean area on FA and OCTA of 0.19 ± 0.67 mm2 and 0.20 ± 0.79 mm2, respectively (p = 0.9594). The ICC for the FAZ measurements between the 2 observers on FA and OCTA was 0.96 and 0.92, respectively. Conclusion. OCTA represents a novel technique for the diagnosis of DMI and it may become an alternative to FA for this purpose. PMID:27891250

  2. Comparison of Ga-67 planar imaging and single photon emission computed tomography in malignant chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Rosenthal, D.; Kaplan, W.D.; English, R.E.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the value of Ga-67 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients (pts) with malignant chest disease, the authors compared Ga-67 planar scans (ps) and SPECT with the medical records in twenty-five consecutive patients. Twenty-three examinations were performed on 17 pts with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and three pts with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Five examinations were performed on 5 pts with bronchogenic carcinoma (BC). The two modalities were evaluated for (1) presence or absence of disease, (2) number of foci of abnormal uptake and (3) extent of disease. In pts with lymphoma, SPECT defined the extent of disease better than planar imaging in eight examinations; it demonstrated para-cardial involvement in one pt, separated hilar from mediastinal disease in 4, and demonstrated posterior mediastinal disease in 3. SPECT clarified suspicious foci on planar images in seven examinations, correctly ruled out disease in two pts with equivocal planar images and did not exchange planar image findings in six examinations. In pts with bronchogenic carcinoma, both medalities correctly ruled out mediastinal involvement in three pts. SPECT detected mediastinal lymph node involvement in one pt with equivocal planar images. Both SPECT and planar imaging missed direct tumor extension to the mediastinum in one pt. They conclude that Ga-67 with SPECT is better than planar images for staging of chest lymphoma and BC. Since it defines different lymph node groups it carries a good potential for staging as well as follow up of those pts.

  3. Use of optical coherence tomography in delineating airways microstructure: comparison of OCT images to histopathological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Whiteman, Suzanne; Gey van Pittius, Daniel; He, Yonghong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Spiteri, Monica A.

    2004-04-01

    An ideal diagnostic system for the human airways should be able to detect and define early development of premalignant pathological lesions, to facilitate optimal curative treatment and prevent irreversible and/or invasive lung disease. There is great need for exploration of safe, repeatable imaging techniques which can run at real-time and with high spatial resolution. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) was utilized to acquire cross-sectional images of upper and lower airways using fresh pig lung resections as a model system. Obtained OCT images were compared with parallel tissue characterization by conventional histological analysis. Our objective was to determine whether OCT differentiates the composite structural layers and inherent anatomical variations along different airway locations. The data show that OCT can clearly display the multilayered structure of the airways. The subtle architectural differences in three separate anatomical locations including trachea, main bronchus and tertiary bronchus were clearly delineated. Images of the appropriate anatomical profiles, with depth of up to 2 mm and 10 µm spatial resolution were obtained by our current OCT system, which was sufficient for recognition of the epithelium, subepithelial tissues and cartilage. In addition, the relative thickness of individual structural components was accurately reflected and comparable to histological sections. These data support OCT as a highly feasible, optical biopsy tool, which merits further exploration for early diagnosis of human airway epithelial pathology.

  4. Blockface histology with optical coherence tomography: a comparison with Nissl staining.

    PubMed

    Magnain, Caroline; Augustinack, Jean C; Reuter, Martin; Wachinger, Christian; Frosch, Matthew P; Ragan, Timothy; Akkin, Taner; Wedeen, Van J; Boas, David A; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a high resolution imaging technique that generates excellent contrast based on intrinsic optical properties of the tissue, such as neurons and fibers. The SD-OCT data acquisition is performed directly on the tissue block, diminishing the need for cutting, mounting and staining. We utilized SD-OCT to visualize the laminar structure of the isocortex and compared cortical cytoarchitecture with the gold standard Nissl staining, both qualitatively and quantitatively. In histological processing, distortions routinely affect registration to the blockface image and prevent accurate 3D reconstruction of regions of tissue. We compared blockface registration to SD-OCT and Nissl, respectively, and found that SD-OCT-blockface registration was significantly more accurate than Nissl-blockface registration. Two independent observers manually labeled cortical laminae (e.g. III, IV and V) in SD-OCT images and Nissl stained sections. Our results show that OCT images exhibit sufficient contrast in the cortex to reliably differentiate the cortical layers. Furthermore, the modalities were compared with regard to cortical laminar organization and showed good agreement. Taken together, these SD-OCT results suggest that SD-OCT contains information comparable to standard histological stains such as Nissl in terms of distinguishing cortical layers and architectonic areas. Given these data, we propose that SD-OCT can be used to reliably generate 3D reconstructions of multiple cubic centimeters of cortex that can be used to accurately and semi-automatically perform standard histological analyses.

  5. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography & gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-01

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil & gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil & gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 & 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 & 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  6. A comparison of methods for in situ discrimination of imaged phase boundaries using electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. J.; Tsoligkas, A. N.; Simmons, M. J. H.; Robbins, P. T.; Stitt, E. H.

    2016-02-01

    The detection of hard boundaries using tomographic techniques is challenging due to the measurement resolution inherent in the hardware and smoothing effects created during image reconstruction. This paper is concerned with the development of data processing approaches which enable the use of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) in real-time applications to visualise interfaces in liquid/liquid and solid/liquid systems based upon phase permittivity differences in media with a high di-electric continuum. The methodologies developed were applied to a series of phantoms to investigate their validity as a tool for imaging phase boundaries in two and three phase systems. In an ECT based tomogram, the interface between phases is exhibited as a transition region; by applying a threshold technique based upon known areas of each respective phase within the system, the transient region can be resolved into a sharp interface. The image error of a tomogram, defined as the deviation of all pixels from their theoretical value, has been calculated using a pixel-by-pixel approach; however this requires exact a priori knowledge and is unsuitable for in-line application; the areal method used in this paper requires global phase distribution information thereby allowing for real-time application. A range of threshold values were applied to tomograms of phantoms of varying geometry and the corresponding image error for each threshold value calculated using both the areal and pixel-by-pixel approaches given above. The threshold value yielding lowest image error from this range is further used in the binary images giving improved tomograms with approximately 40% increase in image accuracy when compared with a default threshold value. Close to the sensor wall, the image becomes distorted due to reconstruction errors arising from decreased density in the electrical field lines, resulting in a circular phantom appearing elongated by approximately 10% when positioned near the wall.

  7. Comparison of mesiodistal root angulation with posttreatment panoramic radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bouwens, Daniel G.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Ludlow, John B.; Phillips, Ceib

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Orthodontists assess mesiodistal root angulations before, during, and after orthodontic treatment as an aid in establishing proper root position. Panoramic imaging has been useful for this purpose and is a valuable screening tool in diagnosis and planning treatment of orthodontic patients. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for imaging of the craniofacial complex creates the opportunity to evaluate 3-dimensional images compared with traditional 2-dimensional images. The purpose of this project was to compare mesiodistal root angulations by using posttreatment panoramic radiographic images and CBCT scans. Methods Mesiodistal root angulations from panoramic images and CBCT scans of 35 orthognathic surgery patients after orthodontic treatment were compared. The panoramic images were measured by using VixWin (Gendex Dental Systems, Des Plaines, Ill), and the CBCT scans by using InvivoDental 3D (version 4.1, Anatomage, San Jose, Calif). The mesiodistal root angulation of each maxillary and mandibular tooth was measured by using the occlusal plane as the reference line. With an intercept-only linear regression for correlated data (with an unstructured covariance structure), the global test of whether the mean vector of all differences for the teeth is zero was performed separately for the 2 arches. Results The global test for both arches was statistically significant (P<0.001), indicating an overall difference in root angulation between measurements from panoramic and CBCT images. There was no discernible pattern in the average differences between panoramic and CBCT measurements. Conclusions The assessment of mesiodistal tooth angulation with panoramic radiography should be approached with caution and reinforced by a thorough clinical examination of the dentition. PMID:21195286

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography in Mice: Comparison with Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy and Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Giannakaki-Zimmermann, Helena; Kokona, Despina; Wolf, Sebastian; Ebneter, Andreas; Zinkernagel, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) allows noninvasive visualization of retinal vessels in vivo. OCT-A was used to characterize the vascular network of the mouse retina and was compared with fluorescein angiography (FA) and histology. Methods In the present study, OCT-A based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used to investigate the vascular network in mice. Data was compared with FA and confocal microscopy of flat-mount histology stained with isolectin IB4. For quantitative analysis the National Cancer Institute's AngioTool software was used. Vessel density, the number of vessel junctions, and endpoints were measured and compared between the imaging modalities. Results The configuration of the superficial capillary network was comparable with OCT-A and flat-mount histology in BALBc mice. However, vessel density and the number of vessel junctions per region of interest (P = 0.0161 and P = 0.0015, respectively) in the deep vascular network of BALBc mice measured by OCT-A was significantly higher than with flat-mount histology. In C3A.Cg-Pde6b+Prph2Rd2/J mice, where the deep capillary plexus is absent, analysis of the superficial network provided similar results for all three imaging modalities. Conclusion OCT-A is a helpful imaging tool for noninvasive, in vivo imaging of the vascular plexus in mice. It may offer advantages over FA and confocal microscopy especially for imaging the deep vascular plexus. Translational Relevance The present study shows that OCT-A can be employed for small animal imaging to assess the vascular network and offers advantages over flat-mount histology and FA. PMID:27570710

  9. The comparison of manual vs automated disc margin delineation using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, S M; Sehi, M

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the impact of manual vs automated disc margin delineation on optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) parameters using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Methods A prospective cohort study consisting of normal, glaucoma suspect (GS) and glaucoma patients who underwent ONH and RNFL measurements using SDOCT technology (RTVue; Optovue Inc.). The retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane (RPE/BM) complex end points were automatically determined first, and were manually redefined subsequently. Analysis of variance, coefficient of variation (COV), concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), and Bland–Altman plots were used for the analyses. Results Ninety-nine eyes of 50 subjects (age 68±10 years) consisting of 36 glaucoma, 56 GS, and 7 normal eyes were included. The RNFL thickness measurements were similar (P>0.05) between the two methods of demarcation, except for the inferior-nasal sector (P=0.04). For the ONH measurements, the cup-to-disc (C/D) ratio and rim area showed significant differences between the two methods (P<0.001). COV/CCC values for the ONH parameters were as follows: cup area 17.6%/0.88; cup volume 7.4%/0.91; average C/D ratio 18.1%/0.78; rim area 25.3%/0.69; and rim volume 42.6%/0.71, respectively. CCC/COV values for the RNFL parameters were as follows: average 2.1%/0.98; inferior-temporal quadrant 8.1%/0.79; inferior-nasal quadrant INQ quadrant 12.6%/0.67; SNQ quadrant 7.8%/0.83; and STQ quadrant 7.8%/0.88, respectively. Conclusion An overall high agreement and moderate–substantial concordance was observed between the demarcation methods. Automated disc margin delineation of SDOCT can be used reliably in clinical practice. PMID:23907624

  10. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures: a comparison with conventional radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Woo, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Yu Li; Song, Jong Woon; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography (US) with radiography and multi-detector computed tomography (CT) for the detection of nasal bone fractures. Forty-one patients with a nasal bone fracture who underwent prospective US examinations were included. Plain radiographs and CT images were obtained on the day of trauma. For US examinations, radiologist used a linear array transducer (L17-5 MHz) in 24 patients and hockey-stick probe (L15-7 MHz) in 17. The bony component of the nose was divided into three parts (right and left lateral nasal walls, and midline of nasal bone). Fracture detection by three modalities was subjected to analysis. Furthermore, findings made by each modality were compared with intraoperative findings. Nasal bone fractures were located in the right lateral wall (n = 28), midline of nasal bone (n = 31), or left lateral wall (n = 31). For right and left lateral nasal walls, CT had greater sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, and better agreed with intraoperative findings. However, for midline fractures of nasal bone, US had higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than CT. Although two US evaluations showed good agreements at all three sites, US findings obtained by the hockey-stick probe showed closer agreement with intraoperative findings for both lateral nasal wall and midline of nasal bone. Although CT showed higher sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, US found to be helpful for evaluating the midline of nasal bone. Furthermore, for US examinations of the nasal bone, a smaller probe and higher frequency may be required.

  11. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  12. Comparison of the marginal adaptation of direct and indirect composite inlay restorations with optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    TÜRK, Ayşe Gözde; SABUNCU, Metin; ÜNAL, Sena; ÖNAL, Banu; ULUSOY, Mübin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of the study was to use the photonic imaging modality of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to compare the marginal adaptation of composite inlays fabricated by direct and indirect techniques. Material and Methods Class II cavities were prepared on 34 extracted human molar teeth. The cavities were randomly divided into two groups according to the inlay fabrication technique. The first group was directly restored on cavities with a composite (Esthet X HD, Dentsply, Germany) after isolating. The second group was indirectly restored with the same composite material. Marginal adaptations were scanned before cementation with an invisible infrared light beam of OCT (Thorlabs), allowing measurement in 200 µm intervals. Restorations were cemented with a self-adhesive cement resin (SmartCem2, Dentsply), and then marginal adaptations were again measured with OCT. Mean values were statistically compared by using independent-samples t-test and paired samples t-test (p<0.05), before and after cementation. Results Direct inlays presented statistically smaller marginal discrepancy values than indirect inlays, before (p=0.00001442) and after (p=0.00001466) cementation. Marginal discrepancy values were increased for all restorations after cementation (p=0.00008839, p=0.000000952 for direct and indirect inlays, respectively). The mean marginal discrepancy value of the direct group increased from 56.88±20.04 µm to 91.88±31.7 µm, whereas the indirect group increased from 107.54±35.63 µm to 170.29±54.83 µm. Different techniques are available to detect marginal adaptation of restorations, but the OCT system can give quantitative information about resin cement thickness and its interaction between tooth and restoration in a nondestructive manner. Conclusions Direct inlays presented smaller marginal discrepancy than indirect inlays. The marginal discrepancy values were increased for all restorations that refer to cement thickness after cementation

  13. [Filmless magnetic resonance tomography. Advantages and disadvantages in comparison with film reports].

    PubMed

    Vorbeck, F; al-Zayer, F; Jung, B; Breitenseher, M; Imhof, H

    1999-04-01

    At our hospital, an average MRI examination comprises 170 images. These examinations were evaluated exclusively on digital reporting systems with two high-resolution monitors for a period of 1 year. A retrospective analysis of this reporting method in comparison with films on a conventional viewing wall was performed with subjective and objective data. Radiologists and technicians were requested to evaluate the system on a subjective scale from 1 to 5 for seven topics (image analysis, inspection, time for reporting, handling, comparison with previous reports, quality of PC laser prints, training period). Moreover, personal interviews were conducted and protocols taken. Patient and image frequency, film costs, data transfer time and amount of system failures were evaluated as objective data. The most important results were: Two thirds of the film checking radiologists prefer the conventional viewing walls over the computer monitors. However, 70% of the residents prefer using the computer monitor for reporting. Seventy percent of the interviewed radiologists considered comparison with former examinations on film very difficult. Digitizing of former MRI examinations was not a convincing method; printing on a standard PC laser printer was considered to yield insufficient quality. The different acceptance between radiologists and residents seems to be related to different experiences. The reduction in film costs (48.6%) will improve further with complete PACS installation in the whole hospital. Data transfer rates are still poor; further improvement of network performance is necessary for convenient work. One whole MRI examination and report could be stored on CD-ROM for a cost of less than 2 euros. This could be a future means of cheap archiving and documentation suitable for viewing on any PC with DICOM III viewer. Images and reports could stay with the patients as in the past.

  14. Comparison of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC radio occultation measurements with radio tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Lin, Charles; Liu, Huixin

    2011-05-01

    The paper reports a comparison between the continuous tomographic observations of the ionosphere during July-August 2008 and radio occultation (RO) measurements made by the Formosa Satellite 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC or F3/C). The two sets of observations agree well qualitatively and bring out the main features of the low-latitude to midlatitude ionosphere: (1) The electron density enhancements observed at ˜26°N-31°N geographic (˜16°N-21°N magnetic) latitudes during daytime are related to the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), and (2) the enhancements observed at night at latitudes poleward of ˜35°N geographic are related to the midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly. The comparison shows that the EIA crest densities are highly underestimated in the RO inversions that use F3/C data. It is also seen that the agreement is better in the midlatitude region, with overall features represented quite well in the RO data, highlighting its usefulness as the two techniques capture similar electron density structure, although there are some magnitude differences.

  15. Color Doppler Ultrasound in Diagnosis and Assessment of Carotid Body Tumors: Comparison with Computed Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhan-Qiang; He, Wen; Wu, Dong-Fang; Lin, Mei-Ying; Jiang, Hua-Tang

    2016-09-01

    A carotid body tumor (CBT) is a rare, non-chromaffin paraganglioma, and its diagnosis mainly depends on imaging modalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) in the diagnosis and assessment of CBT based on computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively reviewed the CDU and CT features of 49 consecutive CBTs and 23 schwannomas from 67 patients and compared these findings with surgical resection specimens. The mean size of CBT lesions on ultrasound scans and CT angiography (CTA) was 3.24 cm ± 0.82 cm (range, 1.6-5.2 cm) and 3.84 cm ± 1.08 cm (range, 1.8-6.8 cm), respectively, which had statistically significant difference (t = 9.815, p = 0.000). The vascularity of CBT lesions was richer than that of schwannoma lesions (p < 0.05). Intra-lesional vascularities feeding CBT mostly arose from the external carotid artery and had spectrum characteristics including low velocity and resistance. Peak systolic velocity (PSV) and resistance index (RI) of the vasa vasorum were 39.8 cm/s ± 19.8 cm/s and 0.54 ± 0.06, respectively. There was the correlation between CTA and CDU in identifying Shamblin type I CBT lesions, while CTA technique was superior for CDU, identifying Shamblin type II and III CBT lesions. Accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of CDU in diagnosing CBTs were 87.5% (63 of 72), 82.6% (19 of 23) and 89.8% (44 of 49), respectively. Both accuracy and sensitivity of CTA in diagnosing CBTs were 100%. CDU can be useful for assessment of Shamblin's type and intra-lesional blood flow of CBTs before its metastases, while CT imaging can reveal the relationship between lesions and adjacent arteries, as well as the involvement of the skull base. CDU combined with CT imaging can be used as an optimal detection modality for the assessment and management of CBT.

  16. Comparison of North America Lithospheric Thickness from Seismic Tomography & Thermo-Dynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; van der Lee, S.

    2009-12-01

    To better understand the longevity of continental lithosphere and the origin of its strength, it is necessary to understand how seismic observations of lithosphere structure are related to the thermal and mechanical structure of the lithosphere. In addition, while the strength of tectonic plates is commonly compared in terms of the effective elastic thickness, it is not clear what portion of the lithosphere contributes to the elastic thickness. We have compared predicted lithosphere thickness for North America from the surface wave tomography model NA04 [1] with the thermal lithosphere thickness predicted by converting the seismic velocity structure to a temperature structure using the predicted seismic velocities for a pyrolitic mantle composition [2] corrected for attenuation [3], and the mechanical lithosphere thickness resulting from instantaneous dynamic flow models with either a composite (Newtonian, non-Newtonian & plastic yielding) or Newtonian-only viscosity structure [4]. We find that the predicted thermal lithosphere thickness (depth to 900C), which is consistent with observed heat-flow, is 100-125 km in cratonic regions, but less than 75 km in the Basin & Range Province (BRP). The mechanical thickness (depth to the maximum strain-rate gradient) is consistently deeper in cratonic regions (175-200 km), but similar to the thermal thickness in the BPR. However, if the mechanical thickness is defined in terms of a strain-rate cut-off for deformation at time-scales longer than 1 billion years, then predicted lithosphere thickness is only 25-50 km in the BPR. We find that these estimates of lithosphere thickness are not strongly dependent on the assumed yield stress of cold lithosphere because the base of the mechanical lithosphere is deforming viscously. However, models with a composite viscosity structure predict 20% thicker lithosphere in the cratonic regions compared to Newtonian viscosity models, consistent with the expectation that mantle flow is less

  17. COMPARISON OF QUANTITATIVE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY-BASED MEASURES IN PREDICTING VERTEBRAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jenni M.; Loo, Kenneth; Motherway, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Patient-specific measures derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans are currently being developed as a clinical tool for vertebral strength prediction. QCT-based measurement techniques vary greatly in structural complexity and generally fall into one of three categories: 1) bone mineral density (BMD), 2) “mechanics of solids” (MOS) models, such as minimum axial rigidity (the product of axial stiffness and vertebral height), or 3) three dimensional finite element (FE) models. There is no clear consensus as to the relative performance of these measures due to differences in experimental protocols, sample sizes and demographics, and outcome metrics. The goal of this study was to directly compare the performance of QCT-based assessment techniques of varying degrees of structural sophistication in predicting experimental vertebral compressive strength. Eighty-one human thoracic vertebrae (T6 – T10) from 44 donors cadavers (F = 32, M = 12; 85 + 8 y.o., max = 97 y.o., min = 54 y.o.) were QCT scanned and destructively tested in uniaxial compression. The QCT scans were processed to generate FE models and various BMD and MOS measures, including trabecular bone mineral density (tBMD), integral bone mineral density (iBMD), and axial rigidity. Bone mineral density was weakly to moderately predictive of compressive strength (R2 = 0.16 and 0.62 for tBMD and iBMD, respectively). Ex vivo vertebral strength was strongly correlated with both axial rigidity (R2 = 0.81) and FE strength measurements (R2 = 0.80), and the predictive capabilities of these two metrics were statistically equivalent (p > 0.05 for differences between FE and axial rigidity). The results of this study indicate that non-invasive predictive measures of vertebral strength should include some level of structural sophistication, specifically, gross geometric and material property distribution information. However, for uniaxial compression of isolated vertebrae, which is the current biomechanical

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in emergency assessment of patients with suspected acute stroke: a prospective comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chalela, Julio A; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Nentwich, Lauren M; Luby, Marie; Butman, John A; Demchuk, Andrew M; Hill, Michael D; Patronas, Nicholas; Latour, Lawrence; Warach, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background Although the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of acute stroke is increasing, this method has not proved more effective than computed tomography (CT) in the emergency setting. We aimed to prospectively compare CT and MRI for emergency diagnosis of acute stroke. Methods We did a single-centre, prospective, blind comparison of non-contrast CT and MRI (with diffusion-weighted and susceptibility weighted images) in a consecutive series of patients referred for emergency assessment of suspected acute stroke. Scans were independently interpreted by four experts, who were unaware of clinical information, MRI-CT pairings, and follow-up imaging. Results 356 patients, 217 of whom had a final clinical diagnosis of acute stroke, were assessed. MRI detected acute stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic), acute ischaemic stroke, and chronic haemorrhage more frequently than did CT (p<0.0001, for all comparisons). MRI was similar to CT for the detection of acute intracranial haemorrhage. MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 164 of 356 patients (46%; 95% CI 41-51%), compared with CT in 35 of 356 patients (10%; 7-14%). In the subset of patients scanned within 3 h of symptom onset, MRI detected acute ischaemic stroke in 41 of 90 patients (46%; 35-56%); CT in 6 of 90 (7%; 3-14%). Relative to the final clinical diagnosis, MRI had a sensitivity of 83% (181 of 217; 78-88%) and CT of 26% (56 of 217; 20-32%) for the diagnosis of any acute stroke. Interpretation MRI is better than CT for detection of acute ischaemia, and can detect acute and chronic haemorrhage; therefore it should be the preferred test for accurate diagnosis of patients with suspected acute stroke. Because our patient sample encompassed the range of disease that is likely to be encountered in emergency cases of suspected stroke, our results are directly applicable to clinical practice. PMID:17258669

  19. Comparison of cone-beam computed tomography cephalometric measurements using a midsagittal projection and conventional two-dimensional cephalometric measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Pil-Kyo; Lee, Gung-Chol

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether it is possible to use a two-dimensional (2D) standard in three-dimensional (3D) analysis, by comparing the angles and lengths measured from a midsagittal projection in 3D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with those measured by 2D lateral cephalometric radiography (LCR). Methods Fifty patients who underwent both LCR and CBCT were selected as subjects. CBCT was reoriented in 3 different methods and the measuring-points were projected onto the midsagittal plane. Twelve angle values and 8 length values were measured on both LCR and CBCT and compared. Results Repeated measures analysis of the variance revealed statistically significant differences in 7 angular and 5 linear measurements among LCR and 3 types of CBCT (p < 0.05). Of these 12 measurements, multiple comparisons showed that 6 measurements (ANB, AB to FH, IMPA, FMA, Co-Gn, Go-Me) were not significantly different in pairwise comparisons. LCR was significantly different from 3 types of CBCT in 3 angular (SN to FH, interincisal angle, FMIA) and 2 linear (S-Go, Co-ANS) measurements. The CBCT method was similar for all measurements, except for 1 linear measurement, i.e., S-N. However, the disparity between the mean values for all parameters was within the range of clinical measurement error. Conclusions 3D-CBCT analysis, using midsagittal projection, is a useful method in which the 2D-LCR normative values can be used. Although the measurements changed with reorientation, these changes were not clinically significant. PMID:26629474

  20. A Comparison of Wavelet-Based and Ridgelet-Based Texture Classification of Tissues in Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semler, Lindsay; Dettori, Lucia

    The research presented in this article is aimed at developing an automated imaging system for classification of tissues in medical images obtained from Computed Tomography (CT) scans. The article focuses on using multi-resolution texture analysis, specifically: the Haar wavelet, Daubechies wavelet, Coiflet wavelet, and the ridgelet. The algorithm consists of two steps: automatic extraction of the most discriminative texture features of regions of interest and creation of a classifier that automatically identifies the various tissues. The classification step is implemented using a cross-validation Classification and Regression Tree approach. A comparison of wavelet-based and ridgelet-based algorithms is presented. Tests on a large set of chest and abdomen CT images indicate that, among the three wavelet-based algorithms, the one using texture features derived from the Haar wavelet transform clearly outperforms the one based on Daubechies and Coiflet transform. The tests also show that the ridgelet-based algorithm is significantly more effective and that texture features based on the ridgelet transform are better suited for texture classification in CT medical images.

  1. Comparison of Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Derived Alveolar Bone Density Between Subjects with and without Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zahrani, Mohammad S.; Elfirt, Eman Y.; Al-Ahmari, Manea M.; Yamany, Ibrahim A.; Alabdulkarim, Maher A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Understanding the changes in bone density of patients affected by aggressive periodontitis could be useful in early disease detection and proper treatment planning. Aim The aim of this study was to compare alveolar bone density in patients affected with aggressive periodontitis and periodontally healthy individuals using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis. Twenty periodontally healthy patients attending the dental clinics for implant placement or extraction of impacted third molars served as controls. Alveolar bone density was measured using CBCT scanning. Comparisons between aggressive periodontitis group and controls for age and alveolar bone density of the anterior and posterior regions were performed using an independent sample t-test. Multivariable linear regression models were also performed. Results The differences between groups in regard to age, anterior and posterior alveolar bone density was not statistically significant (p<0.05). In the posterior region, the multivariable regression model showed that bone density was not associated with age, gender or the study groups. Whereas, in the anterior region, patient’s age was found to be significantly associated with bone density, p=0.014. Conclusion Alveolar bone density as measured by CBCT in aggressive periodontitis patients was not different from periodontally healthy individuals. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28274060

  2. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Cineangiography in the Demonstration of Central Pulmonary Arteries in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Karuna; Sharma, Sanjiv; Kumar, Krishan; Rajani, Mira

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for central pulmonary artery pathology in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) and right ventricular outflow obstruction. Methods: We compared contrast-enhanced CT and cine pulmonary arteriography in 24 patients with CCHD to assess central pulmonary arteries including the confluence. Both investigations were interpreted by a cardiac radiologist in a double-blinded manner at an interval of 3 weeks. Angiography was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The sensitivity for visualization of main pulmonary artery (MPA), right pulmonary artery (RPA), left pulmonary artery (LPA), and confluence on CT was 94%, 100%, 92.8%, and 92.8%, respectively. Diagnostic specificity for the same entities was 28.5%, 100%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. The positive predictive value for each was 76.2%, 100%, 94.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. The low specificity of CT in the evaluation of the MPA and the confluence is perhaps due to distorted right ventricular outflow anatomy in CCHD. Large aortopulmonary collaterals in this region were mistaken for the MPA in some patients with pulmonary atresia. Conclusion: CT is a useful, relatively noninvasive, imaging technique for the central pulmonary arteries in selected patients. It can supplement diagnostic information from angiography but cannot replace it. LPA demonstration on axial images alone is inadequate.

  3. Comparison among GPR measurements and ultrasonic tomographies with different inversion strategies applied to the basement of an ancient egyptian sculpture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambuelli, Luigi; Bohm, Gualtiero; Capizzi, Patrizia; Cardarelli, Ettore; Cosentino, Pietro; D'Onofrio, Laurent; Marchisio, Mario

    2010-05-01

    By the late 2008 one of the most important pieces of the "Museo delle Antichità Egizie" in Turin, the sculpture of the Pharaoh with god Amun, was planned to be one of the masterpieces of a travelling exhibition in Japan. The "Fondazione Museo delle Antichità Egizie di Torino", managing the museum, was concerned with the integrity of the basement of the statue which actually presents visible signs of restorations dating back to the early IXX century. The questions put by the museum managers were to estimate the internal extension of some visible fractures, to search for unknown internal ones and to provide information about the overall mechanical strength of the basement. In order to tackle the first and second questions a GPR reflection survey of the basement along three sides was performed and the results were assembled in a 3D rendering. As far as the third question is concerned, two parallel, horizontal ultrasonic 2D tomographies across the basement were made with a source-receiver layout able to acquire, for each section, 723 ultrasonic signals correspondent to different transmitter and receiver positions. The ultrasonic tomographic data were inverted using different software based upon different algorithms. The obtained velocity images were then compared with the GPR results and with the visible joints on the basement. A critical analysis of the comparisons is finally presented.

  4. Comparison of Very High-Frequency Ultrasound and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Corneal and Epithelial Thickness Maps

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Raksha; Lloyd, Harriet O.; Reinstein, Dan Z.; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare measurements of corneal thickness (CT) and epithelial thickness (ET) in maps obtained by the RTVue spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system with those obtained from the Artemis 2 immersion arc-scanning very high-frequency ultrasound system. Setting Department of Ophthalmology of the Columbia University Medical Center Design A method-comparison study design to examine the agreement between two systems for measurement and mapping of CT and ET. Methods Both eyes of 12 normal volunteers were scanned with RTVue followed by Artemis and then by repeated RTVue. For each map, the minimum CT and mean values of CT and ET in the 3 mm radius zone and in 0.5 mm-wide concentric annuli of up to 3 mm radius around the corneal vertex were determined. Results The CT values from both devices were highly correlated and in the 3-mm radius zone (R>0.96) they were not statistically significantly different. There was no statistically significant change in ET or CT in RTVue measurements made before versus after immersion ultrasound. While highly correlated (R>0.76), RTVue ET values were systematically thinner (1.7 ± 2.1 µm) than Artemis 2 measurements (p<0.01) in the 3 mm radius zone. Conclusions Artemis and RTVue CT measurements in the 3 mm radius zone are equivalent in normal eyes. While correlated, Artemis ET measurements were systemically thicker than RTVue values. PMID:26948783

  5. Computerized proof techniques for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-12-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete mathematics. We demonstrate by examples how one can use these computerized proof techniques to raise students' interests in the discovery and proof of mathematical identities and enhance their problem-solving skills.

  6. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  8. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  9. FEV1/FEV6 to Diagnose Airflow Obstruction. Comparisons with Computed Tomography and Morbidity Indices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-il; Wells, James M.; Bailey, William C.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Jensen, Robert L.; Stinson, Douglas S.; Wilson, Carla G.; Lynch, David A.; Make, Barry J.; Dransfield, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: FVC is a difficult maneuver for many patients, and forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been proposed as a surrogate for FVC for the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have performed head-to-head comparisons of these thresholds but did not examine their relationships with structural lung disease, symptoms, or exacerbations. Objectives: To compare FEV1/FEV6 with FEV1/FVC in the diagnosis of COPD-related morbidity and structural lung disease as assessed by CT. Methods: We analyzed data from a large multicenter cohort study (COPDGene) that included current and former smokers (age 45–80 yr). Accuracy and concordance between the two ratios in diagnosing structural COPD was compared using CT measures of emphysema and airway disease and COPD-related morbidity to assess how the two ratios compare in defining disease. Results: A total of 10,018 subjects were included. FEV1/FEV6 showed excellent accuracy in diagnosing airflow obstruction using FEV1/FVC < 0.70 as a reference (area under curve, 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.989–0.992; P < 0.001). FEV1/FEV6 < 0.73 had the best sum of sensitivity (92.1%; 95% CI, 90.8–92.4) and specificity (97.3%; 95% CI, 97.3–98.1). There was excellent agreement between the two diagnostic cutoffs (κ = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80–0.91; P < 0.001). In comparison with control subjects and those positive by FEV1/FVC alone, subjects positive by FEV1/FEV6 alone had greater gas trapping and airway wall thickness, worse functional capacity, and a greater number of exacerbations on follow-up. These relationships held true when disease definitions were made using the lower limits of normal. Conclusions: FEV1/FEV6 can be substituted for FEV1/FVC in diagnosing airflow obstruction and may better predict COPD-related pathology and morbidity. PMID:24450777

  10. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  11. Computerizing a High School Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Errol A.; Chan, Jeanie

    1988-01-01

    Describes how the Swift-Current Comprehensive High School (Saskatchewan) library computerized to create an online catalog, provide access to remote databases, and acquire CD-ROM reference systems. Objectives, hardware and software selection and costs, implementation, and evaluation are discussed. Seven references are listed, and a directory of…

  12. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  13. Student Perceptions of Computerized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino-Silva, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The challenge to test small groups by means of microcomputers demands appropriate software design and sound test design. To comply with this demand, students' beliefs or perceptions on the advantages and disadvantages of a computerized test were tapped. Overall, self-reported advantages outnumbered disadvantages to a significant degree. This was…

  14. Computerized Adaptive Testing in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smittle, Pat

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the use of computerized placement testing at Santa Fe Community College to enable students needing only a short review of reading skills to exit early from a College Preparatory Reading Class (CPRC). Describes CPRC placement, structure, curriculum, and exit criteria; the Early Exit Reading Project; and project results. (DMM)

  15. Total Library Computerization for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Joseph, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a general review of features of version 2.1 of Total Library Computerization (TLC) for Windows from On Point, Inc. Includes information about pricing, hardware and operating systems, modules/functions available, user interface, security, on-line catalog functions, circulation, cataloging, and documentation and online help. A table…

  16. Computed tomography in supratentorial hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Rovira, M; Ortega, A; Ibarra, B

    1984-01-01

    Supratentorial hemangioblastomas are rare. A 28-yr-old man with a solid tumor in the left temporal region is described. There was neither meningeal connection nor associated polycythemia or Von Hippel-Lindau disease. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography showed a hyperdense, homogeneous lesion and cerebral angiography demonstrated a nodular tumor blush. The microscopic appearance of the lesion is described with a review of previously reported cases.

  17. COMPARISONS AMONG RADIOGRAPHY, ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR EX VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF STIFLE OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    PubMed

    De Lasalle, Julie; Alexander, Kate; Olive, Julien; Laverty, Sheila

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of imaging characteristics of equine stifle osteoarthritis (OA) may allow earlier detection and improve prognosis. Objectives of this ex vivo, prospective, methods comparison study were to (1) describe the location and severity of naturally acquired OA lesions in the equine stifle using ultrasound (US), radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT), and macroscopic evaluation (ME); (2) compare the diagnostic performance of each imaging modality with ME; and (3) describe subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) in equine stifle joints with OA using CT. Radiographic, CT, and US evaluations were performed on 23 equine cadaver stifles and compared with ME. Significant associations were found between osteophyte global scores for all imaging modalities (CT, P ˂ 0.0001; XR, P = 0.005; US, P = 0.04) vs. ME osteophyte global scores. Osteophytes were detected most frequently in the medial femorotibial (MFT) joint. A specific pattern of osteophytes was observed, with a long ridge of new bone at the insertion of the MFT joint capsule cranially on the medial femoral condyle. A novel caudo-10°proximo-5°lateral-cranio-disto-medial oblique radiographic projection was helpful for detection of intercondylar osteophytes. Multiplanar CT reformatted images were helpful for characterizing all osteophytes. Osteophyte grades at most sites did not differ among modalities. Low sensitivity/specificity for subchondral bone sclerosis and flattening of femoral condyles suggested that these signs may not be reliable radiographic and CT indicators of equine stifle OA. Equine stifle OA was associated with a decrease in BMD and specific sites of focal subchondral bone resorption/cyst formation were found in some specimens.

  18. Automated segmentation of porcine airway wall layers using optical coherence tomography: comparison with manual segmentation and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Miranda; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Candido, Tara; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre; Lam, Stephen; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to develop an automated optical coherence tomography (OCT) segmentation method. We evaluated three ex-vivo porcine airway specimens; six non-sequential OCT images were selected from each airway specimen. Histology was also performed for each airway and histology images were co-registered to OCT images for comparison. Manual segmentation of the airway luminal area, mucosa area, submucosa area and the outer airway wall area were performed for histology and OCT images. Automated segmentation of OCT images employed a despecking filter for pre-processing, a hessian-based filter for lumen and outer airway wall area segmentation, and K-means clustering for mucosa and submucosa area segmentation. Bland-Altman analysis indicated that there was very little bias between automated OCT segmentation and histology measurements for the airway lumen area (bias=-6%, 95% CI=-21%-8%), mucosa area, (bias=-4%, 95% CI=-14%-5%), submucosa area (bias=7%, 95% CI=-7%-20%) and outer airway wall area segmentation results (bias=-5%, 95% CI=-14%-5%). We also compared automated and manual OCT segmentation and Bland-Altman analysis indicated that there was negligible bias between luminal area (bias=4%, 95% CI=1%-8%), mucosa area (bias=-3%, 95% CI=-6%-1%), submucosa area (bias=-2%, 95% CI=-10%-6%) and the outer airway wall (bias=-3%, 95% CI=-13%-6%). The automated segmentation method for OCT airway imaging developed here allows for accurate and precise segmentation of the airway wall components, suggesting that translation of this method to in vivo human airway analysis would allow for longitudinal and serial studies.

  19. Comparison of Ethnic-specific Databases in Heidelberg Retina Tomography-3 to Discriminate Between Early Glaucoma and Normal Chinese Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiu Ling; Yap, Sae Cheong; Li, Xiang; Yip, Leonard W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of the 3 race-specific normative databases in Heidelberg Retina Tomography (HRT)-3, in differentiating between early glaucomatous and healthy normal Chinese eyes. Method: 52 healthy volunteers and 25 glaucoma patients were recruited for this prospective cross-sectional study. All underwent standardized interviews, ophthalmic examination, perimetry and HRT optic disc imaging. Area under the curve (AUC) receiver operating characteristics, sensitivity and specificity were derived to assess the discriminating abilities of the 3 normative databases, for both Moorfields Regression Analysis (MRA) and Glaucoma Probability Score (GPS). Results: A significantly higher percentage (65%) of patients were classified as “within normal limits” using the MRA-Indian database, as compared to the MRA-Caucasian and MRA-African-American databases. However, for GPS, this was observed using the African-American database. For MRA, the highest sensitivity was obtained with both Caucasian and African-American databases (68%), while the highest specificity was from the Indian database (94%). The AUC for discrimination between glaucomatous and normal eyes by MRA-Caucasian, MRA-African-American and MRA-Indian databases were 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67-0.88), 0.79 (0.69-0.89) and 0.73 (0.63-0.84) respectively. For GPS, the highest sensitivity was obtained using either Caucasian or Indian databases (68%). The highest specificity was seen with the African-American database (98%). The AUC for GPS-Caucasian, GPS-African-American and GPS-Indian databases were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.66-0.87), 0.77 (0.67-0.87) and 0.76 (0.66-0.87) respectively. Conclusion: Comparison of the 3 ethnic databases did not reveal significant differences to differentiate early glaucomatous from normal Chinese eyes.

  20. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  1. Water content dynamics at plot scale - comparison of time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography monitoring and pore pressure modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieher, Thomas; Markart, Gerhard; Ottowitz, David; Römer, Alexander; Rutzinger, Martin; Meißl, Gertraud; Geitner, Clemens

    2017-01-01

    Physically-based dynamic modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility rests on several assumptions and simplifications. However, the applicability of physically-based models is only rarely tested in the field at the appropriate scale. This paper presents results of a spray irrigation experiment conducted on a plot of 100 m2 on an Alpine slope susceptible to shallow landsliding. Infiltrating precipitation applied at a constant rate (27.5 mm/h for 5.3 h) was monitored by means of 2D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography, combined with time-domain reflectometry sensors installed at various depths. In addition, regolith characteristics were assessed by dynamic cone penetration tests using a light-weight cone penetrometer. The spray irrigation experiment resulted in a vertically progressing wetting front to a depth of 80-100 cm. Below that, the unconsolidated material was already saturated by rainfall in the previous days. The observed mean resistivity reduction attributed to infiltrating water during irrigation was scaled to pressure head. Mean variations in pore pressure were reproduced by a linear diffusion model also used in physically-based dynamic landslide susceptibility modelling. Sensitive parameters (hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) were tested over selected value ranges and calibrated. Calibrated parameter values are within published and experimentally derived ranges. The results of the comparison of observations and model results suggest that the model is capable of reproducing mean changes of pore pressure at a suitable scale for physically-based modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility. However, small-scale variations in pore pressure that may facilitate the triggering of shallow landslides are not captured by the model.

  2. [Computerized system for managing nursing care indicators at Hospital São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Labbadia, Lilian Lestingi; D'Innocenzo, Maria; Fogliano, Rosana Rodrigues Figueira; Silva, Gabriela Eneida Françolin; de Queiroz, Rita Marina Ribeiro Melo; Carmagnani, Maria Isabel Sampaio; Salvador, Maria Elisabete

    2011-08-01

    Indicators are tools that permit to define parameters that will be used to make comparisons between a result and its expected value, as well as to add a value of judgement in this regard. The purpose of this study is to describe the experience of a group of nurses in the development of a computerized system to manage nursing care indicators at Hospital São Paulo. Four stages were used to implement the indicator management system: developing a nursing care indicator handbook; performing a manually registered pilot test; developing the computerized system; and performing the pilot test of the computerized system in eleven units at the hospital.

  3. F-18 fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gayana, Shankaramurthy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Paramjeet; Prakash, Mahesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Femoral head avascular necrosis (FHAVN) is one of the increasingly common causes of musculoskeletal disability and poses a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been widely used in the diagnosis of FHAVN, positron emission tomography (PET) has recently been evaluated to assess vascularity of the femoral head. In this study, the authors compared F-18 fluoride PET/CT with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN. Patients and Methods: We prospectively studied 51 consecutive patients with a high clinical suspicion of FHAVN. All patients underwent MRI and F-18 fluoride PET/CT, the time interval between the two scans being 4–10 (mean 8) days. Two nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the MRI report read the PET/CT scans. Clinical assessment was also done. Final diagnoses were made by surgical pathology or clinical and radiologic follow-up. Results: A final diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) was made in 40 patients. MRI was 96.5% sensitive, 100% specific, and 98.03% accurate while PET/CT was 100% sensitive, specific, and accurate in diagnosing FHAVN. The agreement between the two imaging modalities for the diagnosis of AVN was 96.07%. Conclusion: F-18 fluoride PET/CT showed good agreement with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN and can be better than MRI in detecting early disease. PMID:26917886

  4. Computerized PET/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Zhang, H H

    2015-01-01

    Current cancer therapy strategy is mostly population based, however, there are large differences in tumour response among patients. It is therefore important for treating physicians to know individual tumour response. In recent years, many studies proposed the use of computerized positron emission tomography/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response. Results showed that computerized analysis overcame some major limitations of current qualitative and semiquantitative analysis and led to improved accuracy. In this review, we summarize these studies in four steps of the analysis: image registration, tumour segmentation, image feature extraction and response evaluation. Future works are proposed and challenges described. PMID:25723599

  5. [Computerized EEG and personality].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Pérez, A; Martínez López-Coterilla, M; Fajardo López, A; Lardelli Claret, A

    1989-01-01

    The ordinary EEG, on only showing qualitative malfunction of abnormal graphoelements in the tracings, proves itself insufficient to go into the analysis of psychological and psycho-pathological problems. Since computerised studies of EEG permit quantitative comparisons, we tried to apply them in correlation with the characteristics of the personality classified also with quantitative criteria, such as those offered in the personality inventory 16 PF; from which have been chosen the so-called factors of the second order, and the subjectivity-objectivity factors. The test was carried out on 100 voluntary subjects from Almeria (Spain), all with High School grades, between 18 and 40 years of age, of both sexes, all right-handed, without neuro-psychiatric history, and with normal ordinary EEGs. From the statistical analysis of the results one could deduce that there are significant specific relationships from the computerised EEG, with those secondary polar values of 16 PF: high and low anxiety, extroversion-introversion. Subjects with low anxiety presented a significant increase of the alpha band opposed to the subjects with high anxiety. There is a significant differences in power of the frontal areas between extrovert and introvert subjects. The extroverted subjects have a greater power of the right side and the introverted subjects a greater power of the left.

  6. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  7. Dementia screening using computerized tests.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, C Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The preclinical phase of dementia usually precedes the clinical diagnosis by many years. Early detection of dementing conditions during this preclinical phase may provide opportunities for treatments that may slow or mitigate progression. Conventional assessment tools usually can only detect dementia when the symptoms are overt and the disease is well-established. Computerized neurocognitive screening tools hold promise for diagnosing dementia in its early phase. The use, performance and development of several computerized screening tools to diagnose and monitor patients with pre-dementias and dementia are reviewed. The ability to accurately assess the presence of dementia clearly has direct relevance to insurance risk assessment and risk management. As new treatments appear, their role in clinical management of dementia patients will increase as well. In a future issue, the differential diagnosis of dementias related to the findings on these screening tools will be reviewed.

  8. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Chen, Ching-Fong; Hogan, Gary E.; Hunter, James F.; Kwiatkowski, Kris K.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morley, Deborah J.; Saunders, Alexander

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomography on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.

  9. Comparison of Physical Examination and Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography 4-6 Months After Radiotherapy to Assess Residual Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zundel, M. Tracy; Michel, Michelle A.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Blumin, Joel; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang, Dian

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and physical examination 4-6 months after radiotherapy for assessing residual head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 through March 2006, 52 HNC patients underwent definitive radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Categoric assessments of residual tumor by PET/CT and physical examination 4-6 months after therapy were correlated and compared with clinical outcomes. Pretreatment data, including tumor stage and primary site standardized uptake value, were also gathered retrospectively and correlated with clinical outcomes. Median follow-up time was 58 months. Results: Twenty-one patients had either locoregionally 'positive' (17 of 21) or 'equivocal' (4 of 21) PET/CT scans, whereas 31 patients had locoregionally negative scans. Four patients failed treatment and had biopsy-confirmed residual or recurrent local disease. All patients, including patients with locally suspicious scans or examinations who refused biopsies, were followed clinically for a minimum of 29 months after therapy, with no other cases of treatment failure detected during this time. No patient had residual nodal disease after therapy. Sensitivities of PET/CT vs. physical examination for early detection of treatment failure were 100% vs. 50%, whereas the specificities of the two modalities were 64.6% vs. 89.6%, respectively. Higher initial T stage and American Joint Commission on Cancer stage correlated with increased incidence of positive/equivocal PET/CT results and treatment failure. Maximal standardized uptake value was not predictive of any clinical outcome. Conclusions: A negative result on PET/CT obtained 4-6 months after radiotherapy is highly sensitive and correlates with successful locoregional control. Patients with negative scans may reasonably be spared invasive diagnostic procedures, such as biopsy and neck dissection, unless recurrent disease is suspected

  10. Computerized accounting methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the research performed under the Task Order on computerized accounting methods in a period from 03 August to 31 December 1994. Computerized nuclear material accounting methods are analyzed and evaluated. Selected methods are implemented in a hardware-software complex developed as a prototype of the local network-based CONMIT system. This complex has been put into trial operation for test and evaluation of the selected methods at two selected ``Kurchatov Institute`` Russian Research Center (``KI`` RRC) nuclear facilities. Trial operation is carried out since the beginning of Initial Physical Inventory Taking in these facilities that was performed in November 1994. Operation of CONMIT prototype system was demonstrated in the middle of December 1994. Results of evaluation of CONMIT prototype system features and functioning under real operating conditions are considered. Conclusions are formulated on the ways of further development of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. The most important conclusion is a need to strengthen computer and information security features supported by the operating environment. Security provisions as well as other LANL Client/Server System approaches being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory are recommended for selection of software and hardware components to be integrated into production version of CONMIT system for KI RRC.

  11. Contribution of diffusion weighted MRI to diagnosis and staging in gastric tumors and comparison with multi-detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fatih Özbay, Mehmet; Çallı, İskan; Doğan, Erkan; Çelik, Sebahattin; Batur, Abdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Özgökçe, Mesut; Çetin Kotan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Diagnostic performance of Diffusion-Weighted magnetic resonance Imaging (DWI) and Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) for TNM (Tumor, Lymph node, Metastasis) staging of gastric cancer was compared. Patients and methods We used axial T2-weighted images and DWI (b-0,400 and b-800 s/mm2) protocol on 51 pre-operative patients who had been diagnosed with gastric cancer. We also conducted MDCT examinations on them. We looked for a signal increase in the series of DWI images. The depth of tumor invasion in the stomach wall (tumor (T) staging), the involvement of lymph nodes (nodal (N) staging), and the presence or absence of metastases (metastatic staging) in DWI and CT images according to the TNM staging system were evaluated. In each diagnosis of the tumors, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative accuracy rates of DWI and MDCT examinations were found through a comparison with the results of the surgical pathology, which is the gold standard method. In addition to the compatibilities of each examination with surgical pathology, kappa statistics were used. Results Sensitivity and specificity of DWI and MDCT in lymph node staging were as follows: N1: DWI: 75.0%, 84.6%; MDCT: 66.7%, 82%;N2: DWI: 79.3%, 77.3%; MDCT: 69.0%, 68.2%; N3: DWI: 60.0%, 97.6%; MDCT: 50.0%, 90.2%. The diagnostic tool DWI seemed more compatible with the gold standard method (surgical pathology), especially in the staging of lymph node, when compared to MDCT. On the other hand, in T staging, the results of DWI and MDCT were better than the gold standard when the T stage increased. However, DWI did not demonstrate superiority to MDCT. The sensitivity and specificity of both imaging techniques for detecting distant metastasis were 100%. Conclusions The diagnostic accuracy of DWI for TNM staging in gastric cancer before surgery is at a comparable level with MDCT and adding DWI to routine protocol of evaluating lymph nodes metastasis might increase diagnostic accuracy

  12. Comparison of anterior section parameters using anterior segment optical coherence tomography and ultrasound biomicroscopy in myopic patients after ICL implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hui-Hui; Zhuang, Jing; Yu, Ke-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the agreement of anterior chamber depth (ACD) and central vault measurements obtained by anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) of post surgical high myopic eyes with posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (Visian ICL; STAAR Surgical) implantation. METHODS Fifty-two phakic eyes of 28 high myopic patients who underwent implantable Collamer lens (ICL) surgery for the correction of high myopia were studied. The postoperative ACD, the distance between the corneal endothelium and the anterior surface of ICL (cornea-ICL) and the central vault were measured with the AS-OCT system and the UBM system. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman plot were used to evaluate the repeatability and agreement of two devices. RESULTS The mean ACD, cornea-ICL and central vault in the 52 phakic eyes after ICL surgery was 3.19±0.28 mm, 2.47±0.28 mm, 0.50±0.19 mm by AS-OCT and 3.13±0.25 mm, 2.49±0.25 mm, 0.44±0.19 mm by UBM, respectively. Pairwise comparison of ACD and central vault measurements showed significant differences between AS-OCT and UBM (P<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was found between these imaging techniques in cornea-ICL (P>0.05). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) between AS-OCT and UBM measurements for ACD, cornea-ICL and vault was 0.88, 0.80 and 0.89, respectively (P<0.001). The ICC was 0.89-0.94 for the measurements of AS-OCT and UBM. Bland-Altman analysis showed the 95% limits of agreement of ACD, cornea-ICL, central vault measurements between these two devices were -0.20 to 0.32 mm, -0.36 to 0.32 mm and -0.12 to 0.24 mm, respectively. CONCLUSION Central ACD and vault measurements using AS-OCT demonstrated a slight significantly higher value than using UBM in phakic eyes after ICL surgery. These two devices should not be used interchangeably for measurements of central ACD and vault in patients after phakic intraocular lens implantation. PMID

  13. Evaluation of Visibility of Foreign Bodies in the Maxillofacial Region: Comparison of Computed Tomography, Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Solmaz; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Kiani, Leila; Safi, Yaser; Alibakhshi, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background Detection of foreign bodies (FBs) is challenging. Selection of a fast and affordable imaging modality to locate the FB with minimal patient radiation dose is imperative. Objectives This study sought to compare four commonly used imaging modalities namely cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US) for detection of FBs in the head and neck region. Materials and Methods In this in vitro study, iron, glass, stone, wood, asphalt, and tooth samples measuring 0.1 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm were placed in the tongue muscle, soft tissue-bone interface and nasal cavity in a fresh sheep’s head and subjected to MRI, US, CT and CBCT. A total of 20 images were captured by each imaging system from the six materials in the afore-mentioned locations. The images were observed by an expert oral and maxillofacial radiologist and a general radiologist. To assess reliability, 20 images were randomly observed by the observers in two separate sessions. The images were classified into three groups of good visibility, bad visibility and invisible. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 18, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, Pearson chi square, and Fisher’s exact tests. Results All FBs in the tongue and at the soft tissue-bone interface had good visibility on US (P = 1.00). Also, CBCT and CT had significantly different performance regarding FB detection (P < 0.001). All wooden samples in the nasal cavity were invisible on CT scans; while, only 20% of them were invisible on CBCT scans. MRI showed significant differences for detection of FBs in the three locations (P < 0.001). MRI could not locate iron samples due to severe artifacts and only showed their presence (bad visibility) but other FBs except for wood and tooth in the nasal cavity (100% invisible) had good visibility on MRI. Conclusions Ultrasound is recommended as the first choice when FB is located within the superficial soft tissues with no bone around it. In

  14. A comparison study of 11C-methionine and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in evaluation of patients with recurrent brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajnish; D’Souza, Maria; Jaimini, Abhinav; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Saw, Sanjeev; Pandey, Santosh; Singh, Dinesh; Solanki, Yachna; Kumar, Nitin; Mishra, Anil K.; Mondal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: 11C-methonine ([11C]-MET) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a well-established technique for evaluation of tumor for diagnosis and treatment planning in neurooncology. [11C]-MET reflects amino acid transport and has been shown to be more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in stereotactic biopsy planning. This study compared fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT and MET PET-CT in the detection of various brain tumors. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four subjects of brain tumor treated by surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiotherapy were subjected to [18F]-FDG, [11C]-MET, and MRI scan. The lesion was analyzed semiquantitatively using tumor to normal contralateral ratio. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery, stereotactic biopsy, clinical follow-up, MRI, or CT scans. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 5 out of 22 patients on [F-18] FDG scan while [11C]-MET was able to detect recurrence in 18 out of 22 patients in low-grade gliomas. Two of these patients were false positive for the presence of recurrence of tumor and later found to be harboring necrosis. Among oligodendroglioma, medulloblastoma and high-grade glioma out of 42 patients 39 were found to be concordant MET and FDG scans. On semiquantitative analysis, mean T/NT ratio was found to be 2.96 ± 0.94 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 1.18 ± 0.74 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumor on [11C]-MET scan. While the ratio for FDG scan on semiquantitative analysis was found to be 2.05 ± 1.04 for lesions positive for recurrence of tumors and 0.52 ± 0.15 for lesions negative for recurrence of tumors. Conclusion: The study highlight that [11C]-MET is superior to [18F]-FDG PET scans to detect recurrence in low-grade glioma. A cut-off value of target to nontarget value of 1.47 is a useful parameter to distinguish benign from malignant lesion on an [11C]-MET Scan. Both [18F]-FDG and [11C]-MET scans were found to be useful in high-grade astrocytoma

  15. Application of computerized tomography techniques to tokamak diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalker, K. T.; Kelly, J. G.

    1980-08-01

    A Coded Aperture Imaging System (CAIS) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to image the motion of nuclear fuel rods undergoing tests simulating accident conditions within a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The tests require that the motion of the test fuel be monitored while it is immersed in a liquid sodium coolant precluding the use of normal optical means of imaging. However, using the fission gamma rays emitted by the fuel itself and coded aperture techniques, images with 1.5 mm radial and 5 mm axial resolution have been attained. Using an electro-optical detection system coupled to a high speed motion picture camera a time resolution of one millisecond can be achieved. This paper will discuss the application of coded aperture imaging to the problem, including the design of the one-dimensional Fresnel zone plate apertures used and the special problems arising from the reactor environment and use of high energy gamma ray photons to form the coded image. Also to be discussed will be the reconstruction techniques employed and the effect of various noise sources on system performance. Finally, some experimental results obtained using the system will be presented.

  16. Multiple-energy Techniques in Industrial Computerized Tomography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schneberk, D.; Martz, H.; Azevedo, S.

    1990-08-01

    Considerable effort is being applied to develop multiple-energy industrial CT techniques for materials characterization. Multiple-energy CT can provide reliable estimates of effective Z (Z{sub eff}), weight fraction, and rigorous calculations of absolute density, all at the spatial resolution of the scanner. Currently, a wide variety of techniques exist for CT scanners, but each has certain problems and limitations. Ultimately, the best multi-energy CT technique would combine the qualities of accuracy, reliability, and wide range of application, and would require the smallest number of additional measurements. We have developed techniques for calculating material properties of industrial objects that differ somewhat from currently used methods. In this paper, we present our methods for calculating Z{sub eff}, weight fraction, and density. We begin with the simplest case -- methods for multiple-energy CT using isotopic sources -- and proceed to multiple-energy work with x-ray machine sources. The methods discussed here are illustrated on CT scans of PBX-9502 high explosives, a lexan-aluminum phantom, and a cylinder of glass beads used in a preliminary study to determine if CT can resolve three phases: air, water, and a high-Z oil. In the CT project at LLNL, we have constructed several CT scanners of varying scanning geometries using {gamma}- and x-ray sources. In our research, we employed two of these scanners: pencil-beam CAT for CT data using isotopic sources and video-CAT equipped with an IRT micro-focal x-ray machine source.

  17. Impact of dynamic specimen shape evolution on the atom probe tomography results of doped epitaxial oxide multilayers: Comparison of experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Nandasiri, Manjula; Devaraj, Arun; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and sideways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was compared with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-simulation comparison explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction, leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the importance of comparing experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using APT to study oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  18. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  19. Comparison of retinal thickness by Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and OCT retinal image analysis software segmentation analysis derived from Stratus optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tátrai, Erika; Ranganathan, Sudarshan; Ferencz, Mária; Debuc, Delia Cabrera; Somfai, Gábor Márk

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare thickness measurements between Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and time-domain OCT images analyzed with a custom-built OCT retinal image analysis software (OCTRIMA). Methods: Macular mapping (MM) by StratusOCT and MM5 and MM6 scanning protocols by an RTVue-100 FD-OCT device are performed on 11 subjects with no retinal pathology. Retinal thickness (RT) and the thickness of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) obtained with the MM6 protocol are compared for each early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS)-like region with corresponding results obtained with OCTRIMA. RT results are compared by analysis of variance with Dunnett post hoc test, while GCC results are compared by paired t-test. Results: A high correlation is obtained for the RT between OCTRIMA and MM5 and MM6 protocols. In all regions, the StratusOCT provide the lowest RT values (mean difference 43 +/- 8 μm compared to OCTRIMA, and 42 +/- 14 μm compared to RTVue MM6). All RTVue GCC measurements were significantly thicker (mean difference between 6 and 12 μm) than the GCC measurements of OCTRIMA. Conclusion: High correspondence of RT measurements is obtained not only for RT but also for the segmentation of intraretinal layers between FD-OCT and StratusOCT-derived OCTRIMA analysis. However, a correction factor is required to compensate for OCT-specific differences to make measurements more comparable to any available OCT device.

  20. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  1. Computerized system for corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports that computerization of basic corrosion measurements to provide record-keeping and graphical output has been used by pipeline companies over the lst decade. Northwest Pipeline Corp. has embarked on an ambition project to expand well beyond the scope of standard computer record-keeping by integrating data analysis and management with computer-aided advanced corrosion engineering practices. Most maturing pipeline systems require immense capital and maintenance expenditures to maintain regulatory levels of cathodic protection consistent with traditional corrosion control methods. Major pipeline coating rehabilitation programs and the installation of numerous anode-bed systems will continue in the absence of sophisticated computer-aided corrosion control methods.

  2. A computerized hospital maintenance system.

    PubMed

    Kresch, E; Katz, P; Schwartz, H; Hamarman, H

    1985-01-01

    The Biomedical Instrumentation Department at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital maintains most of the clinical equipment owned by the hospital and provides support to six other hospitals, as well. In order to document these services, a computerized support system has been developed. This system maintains the inventory of equipment, documents the occurrence of repair and preventive maintenance procedures, generates lists of items due for maintenance and inspection, and prints reports and summaries of all activities performed by department staff. The system was designed for ease of use and requires a minimum of training for personnel who use it.

  3. Anatomy of the cranioencephalic structures of the goat (Capra hircus L.) by imaging techniques: a computerized tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Arencibia, A; Vázquez, J M; Ramirez, J A; Sandoval, J A; Ramirez, G; Sosa, C

    1997-09-01

    A topographic study of the cranioencephalic structure was carried out by computerized tomography on Canarian breed adult goats of medium size and weight, with similar cephalic parameters. In this way, transversal, sagittal and horizontal tomographic images were obtained. Identification of the observed anatomic structures represents the basis of this work from which applicable specie data are derived.

  4. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, S.; Schulz, G.; Müller, B.; Zanette, I.; Dominietto, M.; Langer, M.; Rack, A.; Le Duc, G.; David, C.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Weitkamp, T.

    2014-10-21

    When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.

  5. Comparison of peripheral quantitative computed tomography forearm bone density versus DXA in rheumatoid arthritis patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Juhász, B; Gulyás, K; Horváth, Á; Pethő, Z; Bhattoa, H P; Váncsa, A; Szekanecz, É; Horváth, C; Kocsis, J; Horváth, Z; Hodosi, K; Szántó, S; Szűcs, G; Szekanecz, Z

    2017-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with osteoporosis. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is capable of assessing bone density and composition. We found lower bone density in RA compared to controls. Age and RA duration influenced bone density. QCT may be useful to assess bone metabolism in RA.

  6. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, S.; Zanette, I.; Dominietto, M.; Langer, M.; Rack, A.; Schulz, G.; Le Duc, G.; David, C.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Müller, B.; Weitkamp, T.

    2014-10-01

    When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.

  7. The Incremental Prognostic Value of Cardiac Computed Tomography in Comparison with Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heesun; Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Park, Jun-Bean; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Park, Hyo Eun; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Choi, Su-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Jin; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Zo, Joo-Hee; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) facilitates comprehensive evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD), including plaque characterization, and can provide additive diagnostic value to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, data regarding the incremental prognostic value of CCTA to SPECT remain sparse. We evaluated the independent and incremental prognostic value of CCTA, as compared with clinical risk factors and SPECT. Materials and methods A total of 1,077 patients with suspected CAD who underwent both SPECT and cardiac CT between 2004 and 2012 were enrolled retrospectively. Presence of reversible or fixed perfusion defect (PD) and summed stress score were evaluated on SPECT. Presence, extent of coronary atherosclerosis and diameter stenosis (DS) were evaluated on CCTA. Plaque composition was categorized as non-calcified, mixed, or calcified according to the volume of calcified component (>130 Hounsfield Units). Patients were followed up for the occurrence of adverse cardiac events including cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and late revascularization (>90 days after imaging studies). Results During follow-up (median 23 months), adverse cardiac events were observed in 71 patients (6.6%). When adjusted for clinical risk factors and SPECT findings, the presence of any coronary plaque, any plaque in ≥3 segments, coronary artery calcium score (CACS) ≥400, a plaque ≥50% DS, presence of non-calcified plaque (NCP) or mixed plaque (MP), and NCP/MP in ≥2 segments were independent predictors of adverse cardiac events; however, the presence of calcified plaque (CP) was not. Conventional CCTA findings, including CACS ≥400 and a plaque ≥50% DS, demonstrated incremental prognostic value over clinical risk factors and SPECT (χ² 54.19 to 101.03; p <0.001). Addition of NCP/MP in ≥2 segments resulted in further significantly improved prediction (χ² 101.03 to 113.29; p <0

  8. Accuracy in contouring of small and low contrast lesions: Comparison between diagnostic quality computed tomography scanner and computed tomography simulation scanner-A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Yick Wing; Wong, Wing Kei Rebecca; Yu, Siu Ki; Lam, Wai Wang; Geng Hui

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy in detection of small and low-contrast regions using a high-definition diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner compared with a radiotherapy CT simulation scanner. A custom-made phantom with cylindrical holes of diameters ranging from 2-9 mm was filled with 9 different concentrations of contrast solution. The phantom was scanned using a 16-slice multidetector CT simulation scanner (LightSpeed RT16, General Electric Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and a 64-slice high-definition diagnostic CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, General Electric Healthcare). The low-contrast regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated automatically upon their full width at half maximum of the CT number profile in Hounsfield units on a treatment planning workstation. Two conformal indexes, CI{sub in}, and CI{sub out}, were calculated to represent the percentage errors of underestimation and overestimation in the automated contours compared with their actual sizes. Summarizing the conformal indexes of different sizes and contrast concentration, the means of CI{sub in} and CI{sub out} for the CT simulation scanner were 33.7% and 60.9%, respectively, and 10.5% and 41.5% were found for the diagnostic CT scanner. The mean differences between the 2 scanners' CI{sub in} and CI{sub out} were shown to be significant with p < 0.001. A descending trend of the index values was observed as the ROI size increases for both scanners, which indicates an improved accuracy when the ROI size increases, whereas no observable trend was found in the contouring accuracy with respect to the contrast levels in this study. Images acquired by the diagnostic CT scanner allow higher accuracy on size estimation compared with the CT simulation scanner in this study. We recommend using a diagnostic CT scanner to scan patients with small lesions (<1 cm in diameter) for radiotherapy treatment planning, especially for those pending for stereotactic radiosurgery in which accurate delineation of small

  9. DOE transporation programs - computerized techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.; Fore, C.S.; Peterson, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    One of the major thrusts of the transportation programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been the development of a number of computerized transportation programs and data bases. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting these efforts through the Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories and the Tranportation Operations and Traffic Management (TOTM) organization at DOE Headquarters. Initially this project was centered upon research activities. However, since these tools provide traffic managers and key personnel involved in preshipment planning with a unique resource for ensuring that the movement of radioactive materials can be properly accomplished, additional interest and support is coming from the operational side of DOE. The major accomplishments include the development of two routing models (one for rail shipments and the other for highway shipments), an emergency response assistance program, and two data bases containing pertinent legislative and regulatory information. This paper discusses the mose recent advances in, and additions to, these computerized techniques and provides examples of how they are used.

  10. Pulmonary Ventilation Imaging Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography: Comparison With Pulmonary Function Tests and SPECT Ventilation Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kabus, Sven; Lorenz, Cristian; Mittra, Erik; Hong, Julian C.; Chung, Melody; Eclov, Neville; To, Jacqueline; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT)-based pulmonary ventilation imaging is an emerging functional imaging modality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological significance of 4D-CT ventilation imaging by comparison with pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation images, which are the clinical references for global and regional lung function, respectively. Methods and Materials: In an institutional review board–approved prospective clinical trial, 4D-CT imaging and PFT and/or SPECT ventilation imaging were performed in thoracic cancer patients. Regional ventilation (V{sub 4DCT}) was calculated by deformable image registration of 4D-CT images and quantitative analysis for regional volume change. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were compared with the PFT measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}; % predicted) and FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity (FVC; %). V{sub 4DCT} was also compared with SPECT ventilation (V{sub SPECT}) to (1) test whether V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions is significantly lower than in nondefect regions by using the 2-tailed t test; (2) to quantify the spatial overlap between V{sub 4DCT} and V{sub SPECT} defect regions with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC); and (3) to test ventral-to-dorsal gradients by using the 2-tailed t test. Results: Of 21 patients enrolled in the study, 18 patients for whom 4D-CT and either PFT or SPECT were acquired were included in the analysis. V{sub 4DCT} defect parameters were found to have significant, moderate correlations with PFT measurements. For example, V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} defect volume increased significantly with decreasing FEV{sub 1}/FVC (R=−0.65, P<.01). V{sub 4DCT} in V{sub SPECT} defect regions was significantly lower than in nondefect regions (mean V{sub 4DCT}{sup HU} 0.049 vs 0.076, P<.01). The average DSCs for the spatial overlap with SPECT ventilation defect regions were only moderate (V

  11. Resources for Improving Computerized Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an annotated review of human factors literature that discusses computerized environments. Topics discussed include the application of office automation practices to educational environments; video display terminal (VDT) workstations; health and safety hazards; planning educational facilities; ergonomics in computerized offices; and…

  12. Computerized Diagnostic Testing: Problems and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David L.

    The use of computers to build diagnostic inferences is explored in two contexts. In computerized monitoring of liquid oxygen systems for the space shuttle, diagnoses are exact because they can be derived within a world which is closed. In computerized classroom testing of reading comprehension, programs deliver a constrained form of adaptive…

  13. A First Life with Computerized Business Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the theoretical lens, origins, and environment of his work on computerized business simulations. Key ideas that inform his work include the two dimensions (control and interaction) of computerized simulation, the two ways of representing a natural process (phenotypical and genotypical) in a simulation, which he defines as a…

  14. Computerized Sociometric Assessment for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endedijk, Hinke M.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In preschool classes, sociometric peer ratings are used to measure children's peer relationships. The current study examined a computerized version of preschool sociometric ratings. The psychometric properties were compared of computerized sociometric ratings and traditional peer ratings for preschoolers. The distributions, inter-item…

  15. The Evaluation of SISMAKOM (Computerized SDI Project).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Science, Penang (Malaysia).

    A survey of 88 users of SISMAKOM, a computerized selective dissemination of information (SDI) and document delivery service provided by the Universiti Sains Malaysia and four other Malaysian universities, was conducted in August 1982 in order to collect data about SISMAKOM and to assess the value of a computerized SDI service in a developing…

  16. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  17. Computerized Classification Testing with the Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.

    2011-01-01

    If classification in a limited number of categories is the purpose of testing, computerized adaptive tests (CATs) with algorithms based on sequential statistical testing perform better than estimation-based CATs (e.g., Eggen & Straetmans, 2000). In these computerized classification tests (CCTs), the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) (Wald,…

  18. Qualitative comparison of bremsstrahlung X-rays and 800 MeV protons for tomography of urania fuel pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Morris, Christopher L.; Bourke, Mark A.; Byler, Darrin D.; ...

    2013-02-11

    We present an assessment of x-rays and proton tomography as tools for studying the time dependence of the development of damage in fuel rods. Also, we show data taken with existing facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory that support this assessment. Data on surrogate fuel rods has been taken using the 800 MeV proton radiography (pRad) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), and with a 450 keV bremsstrahlung X-ray tomography facility. The proton radiography pRad facility at LANSCE can provide good position resolution (<70 μm has been demonstrate, 20 μm seems feasible with minor changes) for tomographymore » on activated fuel rods. Bremsstrahlung x-rays may be able to provide better than 100 μm resolution but further development of sources, collimation and detectors is necessary for x-rays to deal with the background radiation for tomography of activated fuel rods.« less

  19. Psychometrics behind Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The paper provides a survey of 18 years' progress that my colleagues, students (both former and current) and I made in a prominent research area in Psychometrics-Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). We start with a historical review of the establishment of a large sample foundation for CAT. It is worth noting that the asymptotic results were derived under the framework of Martingale Theory, a very theoretical perspective of Probability Theory, which may seem unrelated to educational and psychological testing. In addition, we address a number of issues that emerged from large scale implementation and show that how theoretical works can be helpful to solve the problems. Finally, we propose that CAT technology can be very useful to support individualized instruction on a mass scale. We show that even paper and pencil based tests can be made adaptive to support classroom teaching.

  20. Computerized atlas for functional stereotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Tyrone L.; Brynildson, L. R. D.

    1993-09-01

    Our original brain mapping techniques have been expanded so that MR and CT images can be displayed in a three-dimensionally simulated localization environment. Various combinations of MR images as well as CT images (or combinations of both and angiography) can be selectively displayed and viewed in three-dimensional stereotactic space. Data from the Talairach anatomical library, the architectonics of the atlases of Van Buren and Borke, Schaltenbrand and Bailey, Schaltenbrand and Wahren, and Brodmann's cortico-architectonics have been used to develop a detailed anatomical atlas library and brain mapping system based on brain reference structures common to each of these databases. The data in this mapping and imaging environment can be interrogated to create computerized anatomical displays showing any given functional anatomical region in two-dimensional displays or three-dimensional relief. This composite mapping system allows the interrogation and cross referencing of data from virtually any other brain mapping or localization system.

  1. Comparison of cerebral blood flow data obtained by computed tomography (CT) perfusion with that obtained by xenon CT using 320-row CT.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Tanizaki, Yoshio; Kimura, Hiroaki; Akaji, Kazunori; Kano, Tadashige; Suzuki, Kentaro; Takayama, Youhei; Kanzawa, Takao; Shidoh, Satoka; Nakazawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mihara, Ban

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) data obtained by computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging have been shown to be qualitative data rather than quantitative, in contrast with data obtained by other imaging methods, such as xenon CT (XeCT) imaging. Thus, interpatient comparisons of CBF values themselves obtained by CTP may be inaccurate. In this study, we have compared CBF ratios as well as CBF values obtained from CTP-CBF data to those obtained from XeCT-CBF data for the same patients to determine CTP-CBF parameters that can be used for interpatient comparisons. The data used in the present study were obtained as volume data using 320-row CT. The volume data were applied to an automated region of interest-determining software (3DSRT, version 3.5.2 ) and converted to 59 slices of 2 mm interval standardized images. In the present study, we reviewed 10 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs) undergoing both CTP and XeCT in the same period. Our study shows that ratios of CBF measurements, such as hemodynamic stress distribution (perforator-to-cortical flow ratio of middle cerebral artery [MCA] region) or the left/right ratio for the region of the MCA, calculated using CTP data have been shown to correlate well with the same ratios calculated using XeCT data. These results suggest that such CBF ratios could be useful for generating interpatient comparisons of CTP-CBF data obtained by 320-row CT among patients with occlusive CVD.

  2. Teaching social studies to high school students with academic handicaps in a mainstreamed setting: effects of a computerized study guide.

    PubMed

    Horton, S V; Lovitt, T C; Givens, A; Nelson, R

    1989-02-01

    This research investigated the effectiveness of a computerized study guide, in comparison to a notetaking condition, as a method to increase textbook comprehension among students with learning disabilities and remedial education pupils enrolled in a ninth-grade world geography class. Results indicated that the computerized study guide produced significantly higher performance than notetaking for both groups of students. There was no significant difference in the performance of the two groups within treatments. Several practical issues concerning the implementation of computerized study guides in secondary programs serving students with academic handicaps are discussed.

  3. SPECT imaging of Moyamoya disease using /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO. Comparison with computed tomography findings

    SciTech Connect

    Mountz, J.M.; Foster, N.L.; Ackermann, R.J.; Bluemlein, L.; Petry, N.A.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1988-10-01

    /sup 99m/Tc-HM-PAO was used to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in a 26-year-old woman with Moyamoya disease. This patient had an 18-month history of recurrent neurologic deficits and had angiographic evidence of Moyamoya disease. She had used oral contraceptives and cigarettes, but had no other risk factors for stroke. Single photon emission computed tomographic images showed bilateral and asymmetric reductions in blood flow to anterior and lateral brain regions. These findings correlated better with clinical symptomatology and suggested more extensive brain involvement than did computed tomography.

  4. Diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia: a preliminary comparison of positron emission tomography and proton magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, R.P.; Budinger, T.F.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Jagust, W.J.

    1984-11-16

    The use of positron emission tomography with (18F)-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to study glucose metabolism in dementia is described and compared with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. These studies suggest that physiological imaging with PET may be superior to MR as it is currently used in the diagnosis of dementia-like diseases. Pet is currently limited to a few centers; however, single photon emission CT can provide regional physiological data without the need for a local cyclotron. 15 references, 2 tables.

  5. Comparisons of hybrid radiosity-diffusion model and diffusion equation for bioluminescence tomography in cavity cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Qu, Xiaochao; Hu, Hao; Liang, Jimin; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been successfully applied to the detection and therapeutic evaluation of solid cancers. However, the existing BLT reconstruction algorithms are not accurate enough for cavity cancer detection because of neglecting the void problem. Motivated by the ability of the hybrid radiosity-diffusion model (HRDM) in describing the light propagation in cavity organs, an HRDM-based BLT reconstruction algorithm was provided for the specific problem of cavity cancer detection. HRDM has been applied to optical tomography but is limited to simple and regular geometries because of the complexity in coupling the boundary between the scattering and void region. In the provided algorithm, HRDM was first applied to three-dimensional complicated and irregular geometries and then employed as the forward light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. Combining HRDM with the sparse reconstruction strategy, the cavity cancer cells labeled with bioluminescent probes can be more accurately reconstructed. Compared with the diffusion equation based reconstruction algorithm, the essentiality and superiority of the HRDM-based algorithm were demonstrated with simulation, phantom and animal studies. An in vivo gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse experiment was conducted, whose results revealed the ability and feasibility of the HRDM-based algorithm in the biomedical application of gastric cancer detection.

  6. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  7. In vitro comparison of cone beam computed tomography with different voxel sizes for detection of simulated external root resorption.

    PubMed

    Neves, Frederico S; de Freitas, Deborah Q; Campos, Paulo S F; de Almeida, Solange M; Haiter-Neto, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of cone beam computed tomography using different voxel sizes in the diagnosis of simulated external root resorption. The presence or absence of simulated defects on buccal, mesial and distal root surfaces of 20 premolars was evaluated. The defects were small (0.26 mm in diameter and 0.08 mm deep), medium (0.62 mm in diameter and 0.19 mm deep) and large (1.05 mm in diameter and 0.24 mm deep), equally distributed on each root surface. Images were obtained using Classic i-CAT cone beam computed tomography with different voxel sizes: 0.12, 0.20, 0.25 and 0.30 mm. Five oral radiologists evaluated the images. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were determined. The sensitivity decreased and specificity increased as voxel size increased. Accuracy values were the highest for the smallest voxel size (0.12 mm). The results for voxel sizes 0.20 mm and 0.25 mm were similar. Positive and negative predictive values were similar in all protocols, except with 0.30 mm, in which they were the lowest. In conclusion, external root resorption was more easily diagnosed when a smaller voxel size was used.

  8. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J; Gonchukov, S A; Koenig, K

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  9. Evaluation of dose from kV cone-beam computed tomography during radiotherapy: a comparison of methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, J.; Wilkinson, D.; Malaroda, A.; Metcalfe, P.

    2017-01-01

    Three alternative methodologies to the Computed-Tomography Dose Index for the evaluation of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography dose are compared, the Cone-Beam Dose Index, IAEA Human Health Report No. 5 recommended methodology and the AAPM Task Group 111 recommended methodology. The protocols were evaluated for Pelvis and Thorax scan modes on Varian® On-Board Imager and Truebeam kV XI imaging systems. The weighted planar average dose was highest for the AAPM methodology across all scans, with the CBDI being the second highest overall. A 17.96% and 1.14% decrease from the TG-111 protocol to the IAEA and CBDI protocols for the Pelvis mode and 18.15% and 13.10% decrease for the Thorax mode were observed for the XI system. For the OBI system, the variation was 16.46% and 7.14% for Pelvis mode and 15.93% to the CBDI protocol in Thorax mode respectively.

  10. Local tomography and focal mechanisms in the south-western Alps: Comparison of methods and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicole, Béthoux; Christian, Sue; Anne, Paul; Jean, Virieux; Julien, Fréchet; François, Thouvenot; Marco, Cattaneo

    2007-03-01

    We investigate how focal solutions and hypocenter locations may depend on the ray tracing algorithm and the strategy of velocity inversion. Using arrival times from a temporary seismological network in the south-western Alps, a local earthquake tomography has been performed by Paul et al. [Paul, A., Cattaneo, M., Thouvenot, F., Spallarossa, D., Béthoux, N., and Fréchet, J., 2001. A three-dimensional crustal velocity model of the south-western Alps from local earthquake tomography. J. Geophys. Res. 106, 19367-19390.] with the method developed by Thurber [Thurber, C.H., 1993. Local earthquake tomography: velocity and Vp/Vs-Theory, in Seismic Tomography: Theory and practice, Iyer, H.M., and Irahara eds., Chapman and Hall, New York, 563-583.]. Another inversion of the same data set is performed here using a different tomography code relying on a shooting paraxial method and cubic interpolation of velocities. The resulting images display the same main features, although Thurber's code appears to be more robust in regions with scarce ray coverage and strong velocity contrasts. Concerning hypocenter location in Piemont units, one major result is the concentration of hypocenters at the boundary between the mantle wedge of the Ivrea body and the European crust. Forty-six focal mechanisms are shown that were computed using both the take-off angles in the minimum 1-D model and in the 3-D velocity structures resulting from the two inversions. The sets of focal solutions are very similar, proving the reliability and the coherency of the focal solutions. The widespread extension in the core of the western Alps is confirmed whereas a few compressive solutions are found east of the Piemont units. These results constrain the sharp change of stress tensor and evidence a decoupling of strain beneath the east of Dora Maira massif up to beneath the north of Argentera massif. On a geodynamical point of view seismicity and focal mechanism distribution are compatible with the present

  11. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Russell G.; Mislevy, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Considers computerized adaptive testing from the perspective of graphical modeling (GM). GM provides methods for making inferences about multifaceted skills and knowledge and for extracting data from complex performances. Provides examples from language-proficiency assessment. (SLD)

  12. Solving Infeasibility Problems in Computerized Test Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timminga, Ellen

    1998-01-01

    Discusses problems of diagnosing and repairing infeasible linear-programming models in computerized test assembly. Demonstrates that it is possible to localize the causes of infeasibility, although this is not always easy. (SLD)

  13. The Auditing of Computerized Accounting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an investigation undertaken to indicate the curricular content (knowledge and skills) needed to prepare the accounting student to audit computerized accounting systems. Areas studied included programing languages, data processing, desired course training, and computer audit techniques. (CT)

  14. Computerized Anatomy Atlas Of The Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Taylor; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Karp, Peter; Stein, Alan

    1981-10-01

    A software for developing, editing and displaying a 3-D computerized anatomic atlas of a human brain is described. The objective of this atlas is to serve as a reference in identifying various structures in CT scans.

  15. HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

  16. Computerizing a house organ: recharting familiar territory

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Computerization can offer great advantages. But one publication ideally suited to computerization was slow to take advantage of the new technology. The main reason was reluctance to try an unfamiliar way of doing things. Having now switched to computerization, the publication has reaped many benefits. Among them: production time is faster; costs are lower; errors are fewer. Computerization has not been without minor problems. The most obvious is vulnerability to the rarity of a system failure. Others include the technology's potential reinforcement of overediting and of excessive reliance on extremely rapid response. Such problems, however, do not indicate weaknesses in the technology itself; rather, they reflect an incomplete adaption to it and the need for more realistic expectations. An unwarranted reluctance to innovate can slow advances in communication. Technical communicators must be willing to rechart their own familiar territory.

  17. Modified Head Shake Computerized Dynamic Posturography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    form of dizziness (in- cluding complaints of lightheadedness, vertigo , or un- steadiness) lasting longer than 1 hr or recurring for greater than 1...noted limitations. Method: Forty participants ranging in age from 20 to 79 years with no history of dizziness completed Conditions 2 and 5 of the SOT...shake, Sensory Organization Test, computerized dynamic posturography, dizziness Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) is anassessment of an

  18. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Liquid Nozzle Spray with Comparison to Shadowgraphy and X-Ray Computed Tomography Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Poppel, Bret; Owkes, Mark; Nelson, Thomas; Lee, Zachary; Sowell, Tyler; Benson, Michael; Vasquez Guzman, Pablo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Eaton, John; Kurman, Matthew; Kweon, Chol-Bum; Bravo, Luis

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we present high-fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results of liquid fuel injection from a pressure-swirl atomizer and compare the simulations to experimental results obtained using both shadowgraphy and phase-averaged X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The CFD and experimental results focus on the dense near-nozzle region to identify the dominant mechanisms of breakup during primary atomization. Simulations are performed using the NGA code of Desjardins et al (JCP 227 (2008)) and employ the volume of fluid (VOF) method proposed by Owkes and Desjardins (JCP 270 (2013)), a second order accurate, un-split, conservative, three-dimensional VOF scheme providing second order density fluxes and capable of robust and accurate high density ratio simulations. Qualitative features and quantitative statistics are assessed and compared for the simulation and experimental results, including the onset of atomization, spray cone angle, and drop size and distribution.

  20. Whole body magnetic resonance angiography and computed tomography angiography in the vascular mapping of head and neck: an intraindividual comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare the detectability of neck vessels with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the setting of a whole-body MRA and multislice computed tomography angiography (CTA) for preoperative vascular mapping of head and neck. Methods In 20 patients MRA was performed prior to microvascular reconstruction of the mandible with osteomyocutaneous flaps. CTA of the neck served as the method of reference. 1.5 T contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiograms were acquired to visualize the vascular structures of the neck in the setting of a whole-body MRA examination. 64-slice spiral computed tomography was performed with a dual-phase protocol, using the arterial phase images for 3D CTA reconstruction. Maximum intensity projection was employed to visualize MRA and CTA data. To retrieve differences in the detectability of vessel branches between MRA and CTA, a McNemar test was performed. Results All angiograms were of diagnostic quality. There were no statistically significant differences between MRA and CTA for the detection of branches of the external carotid artery that are relevant host vessels for microsurgery (p = 0.118). CTA was superior to MRA if all the external carotid artery branches were included (p < 0.001). Conclusions MRA is a reliable alternative to CTA in vascular mapping of the cervical vasculature for planning of microvascular reconstruction of the mandible. In the setting of whole-body MRA it could serve as a radiation free one-stop-shop tool for preoperative assessment of the arterial system, potentially covering both, the donor and host site in one single examination. PMID:24884580

  1. Unexplained heterochromia. Intraocular foreign body demonstrated by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Barr, C C; Vine, A K; Martonyi, C L

    1984-01-01

    Standard radiographic techniques are often inadequate in demonstrating the presence and location of intraocular foreign bodies. Computerized axial tomography was used to confirm the presence of a metallic foreign body in a patient with heterochromia iridis and suspected ocular siderosis in whom no foreign material was found by conventional examination methods.

  2. A Randomized Experiment to Compare Conventional, Computerized, and Computerized Adaptive Administration of Ordinal Polytomous Attitude Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hol, A. Michiel; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Mellenbergh, Gideon J.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 520 high school students were randomly assigned to a paper-and-pencil test (PPT), a computerized standard test (CST), or a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Dutch School Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ), consisting of ordinal polytomous items. The CST administered items in the same order as the PPT. The CAT administered all…

  3. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  4. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    PubMed Central

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  5. Comparison Between Spectral-Domain and Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography Angiographic Imaging of Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew R.; Roisman, Luiz; Zhang, Qinqin; Zheng, Fang; Rafael de Oliveira Dias, Joao; Yehoshua, Zohar; Schaal, Karen B.; Feuer, William; Gregori, Giovanni; Chu, Zhongdi; Chen, Chieh-Li; Kubach, Sophie; An, Lin; Stetson, Paul F.; Durbin, Mary K.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Rosenfeld, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare imaging of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) using swept-source (SS) and spectral-domain (SD) optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Methods Optical coherence tomography angiography was performed using a 100-kHz SS-OCT instrument and a 68-kHz SD-OCTA instrument (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc.). Both 3 × 3- and 6 × 6-mm2 scans were obtained on both instruments. The 3 × 3-mm2 SS-OCTA scans consisted of 300 A-scans per B-scan at 300 B-scan positions, and the SD-OCTA scans consisted of 245 A-scans at 245 B-scan positions. The 6 × 6-mm2 SS-OCTA scans consisted of 420 A-scans per B-scan at 420 B-scan positions, and the SD-OCTA scans consisted of 350 A-scans and 350 B-scan positions. B-scans were repeated four times at each position in the 3 × 3-mm2 scans and twice in the 6 × 6-mm2 scans. Choroidal neovascularization was excluded if not fully contained within the 3 × 3-mm2 scans. The same algorithm was used to detect CNV on both instruments. Two graders outlined the CNV, and the lesion areas were compared between instruments. Results Twenty-seven consecutive eyes from 23 patients were analyzed. For the 3 × 3-mm2 scans, the mean lesion areas for the SS-OCTA and SD-OCTA instruments were 1.17 and 1.01 mm2, respectively (P = 0.047). For the 6 × 6-mm2 scans, the mean lesion areas for the SS-OCTA and SD-OCTA instruments were 1.24 and 0.74 mm2 (P = 0.003). Conclusions The areas of CNV tended to be larger when imaged with SS-OCTA than with SD-OCTA, and this difference was greater for the 6 × 6-mm2 scans. PMID:28273316

  6. A Comparison between the hp-version of Finite Element Method with EIDORS for Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Saeedizadeh, N; Kermani, S; Rabbani, H

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a hp-version of Finite Element Method (FEM) was applied for forward modeling in image reconstruction of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The EIT forward solver is normally based on the conventional Finite Element Method (h-FEM). In h-FEM, the polynomial order (p) of the element shape functions is constant and the element size (h) is decreasing. To have an accurate simulation with the h-FEM, a mesh with large number of nodes and elements is usually needed. In order to overcome this problem, the high order finite element method (p-FEM) was proposed. In the p-version, the polynomial order is increasing and the mesh size is constant. Combining the advantages of two previously mentioned methods, the element size (h) was decreased and the polynomial order (p) was increased, simultaneously, which is called the hp-version of Finite Element Method (hp-FEM). The hp-FEM needs a smaller number of nodes and consequently, less computational time and less memory to achieve the same or even better accuracy than h-FEM. The SNR value is 42db for hp-FEM and is 9db for h-FEM. The numerical results are presented and verified that the performance of the hp-version is better than of the h-version in image reconstruction of EIT.

  7. [Auditory and verbal agnosia in the left-handed patient: comparison of neuropsychological data, magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Khrakovskaia, M G; Vorob'ev, V A; Korotkov, A D; Matveeva, T S; Brodskaia, Z L

    2000-01-01

    A case of the post-traumatic auditory-and-speech agnosia in a left-handed female patient is presented. The patient (a professional painter) showed satisfactory recovery in painting, speech production, reading and writing, whereas a severe deficit in auditory recognition of speech, melodies and rhythms persisted over time. She was also impaired in some aspects of visual recognition including prosopagnosia. To study this patient comprehensively, a neuropsychological assessment was combined with structural (magnetic resonance imaging-MRI) and metabolic (positron emission tomography--PET) data. Both PET and MRI revealed a large bilateral cortical damage in the medial basal cortex of the frontal, temporal and occipital lobes along with the anterior half of the lateral temporal cortex. In the left hemisphere the damaged area involved the whole temporal lobe, a large part of the occipital lobe and the opercular frontal and parietal regions. The relationship of the symptoms with the brain damage extension is discussed taking into account the left-handedness of the patient.

  8. Estimation of lesion progress in artificial root caries by swept source optical coherence tomography in comparison to transverse microradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsume, Yuko; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) could estimate the lesion depth and mineral loss quantitatively without the use of polarization sensitivity, and to examine a relationship between OCT data and transverse microradiography (TMR) lesion parameters. Twenty-four bovine root dentin specimens were allocated to three groups of 4-, 7-, and 14-day demineralization. Cross-sectional images of the specimens before and after the demineralization were captured by OCT at 1319 nm center wavelength. Following the demineralization, these specimens were cut into sections for TMR analysis. Correlations between the OCT data and TMR lesion parameters were examined. TMR images of the specimens showed cavitated lesions (lesion depth or LDTMR: 200 to 500 μm, ΔZ or mineral loss: 10,000 to 30,000 vol % μm). The OCT images showed ``boundaries,'' suggesting the lesion front. Integrated dB values before and after the demineralization and their difference (RD, RS, and ΔR, respectively) were calculated from the lesion surface to the corrected depth of boundary (LDOCT). A statistically significant correlation was found between LDOCT and LDTMR (p < 0.05, r = 0.68). Similarly, statistically significant correlations were found between ΔZ and RD or ΔR. The OCT showed a potential for quantitative estimation of lesion depth and mineral loss with cavitated dentin lesions in vitro.

  9. Quantitative assessment on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) image quality: comparisons between genders and different tube voltage settings

    PubMed Central

    Chian, Teo Chee; Nassir, Norziana Mat; Ibrahim, Mohd Izuan; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2017-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to quantify and compare the quantitative image quality of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) between genders as well as between different tube voltages scan protocols. Methods Fifty-five cases of CCTA were collected retrospectively and all images including reformatted axial images at systolic and diastolic phases as well as images with curved multi planar reformation (cMPR) were obtained. Quantitative image quality including signal intensity, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of right coronary artery (RCA), left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCx) and left main artery (LM) were quantified using Analyze 12.0 software. Results Six hundred and fifty-seven coronary arteries were evaluated. There were no significant differences in any quantitative image quality parameters between genders. 100 kilovoltage peak (kVp) scanning protocol produced images with significantly higher signal intensity compared to 120 kVp scanning protocol (P<0.001) in all coronary arteries in all types of images. Higher SNR was also observed in 100 kVp scan protocol in all coronary arteries except in LCx where 120 kVp showed better SNR than 100 kVp. Conclusions There were no significant differences in image quality of CCTA between genders and different tube voltages. Lower tube voltage (100 kVp) scanning protocol is recommended in clinical practice to reduce the radiation dose to patient. PMID:28275559

  10. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F.; Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng

    2014-08-15

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  11. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: a comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Bergen, Michael; Egerton, Ray F; Li, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  12. Comparison of deconvolution techniques using a distribution mixture parameter estimation: application in single photon emission computed tomography imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignotte, Max; Meunier, Jean; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Janicki, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to its ability to yield functionally rather than anatomically-based information, the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imagery technique has become a great help in the diagnostic of cerebrovascular diseases which are the third most common cause of death in the USA and Europe. Nevertheless, SPECT images are very blurred and consequently their interpretation is difficult. In order to improve the spatial resolution of these images and then to facilitate their interpretation by the clinician, we propose to implement and to compare the effectiveness of different existing 'blind' or 'supervised' deconvolution methods. To this end, we present an accurate distribution mixture parameter estimation procedure which takes into account the diversity of the laws in the distribution mixture of a SPECT image. In our application, parameters of this distribution mixture are efficiently exploited in order to prevent overfitting of the noisy data for the iterative deconvolution techniques without regularization term, or to determine the exact support of the object to be restored when this one is needed. Recent blind deconvolution techniques such as the NAS--RIF algorithm, combined with this estimation procedure, can be efficiently applied in SPECT imagery and yield promising results.

  13. Comparison between Computed Tomography and Ultrasonography in Detecting Foreign Bodies Regarding Their Composition and Depth: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Abdolaziz; Shakibafard, Alireza; Khosravifard, Negar

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Impaction of foreign bodies in the soft tissues is a sequela of traumatic and penetrating injuries. Such foreign bodies should be removed due to the complications they cause. Patient’s history, clinical evaluation and imaging examinations aid in the proper detection and localization of the foreign bodies.   Purpose The aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography for detecting foreign bodies in in-vitro models simulating facial soft tissues. Materials and Method Fifty foreign particles with five different compositions including wood, glass, metal, plastic, and stone were embedded in five calf tongues at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm depths. CT and ultrasonography were compared regarding their capability of detecting and localizing the foreign bodies. Results Wood and plastic foreign bodies were demonstrated more clearly on ultrasonography images. High density materials such as metal, stone, and glass were detected with almost the same accuracy on CT and ultrasonography examinations. Visibility of the foreign bodies deteriorated on ultrasonography images as their depth increased; however, CT appearances of the foreign particles were not influenced by their depths. Conclusion Ultrasonography is an appropriate technique for detection of foreign bodies especially the ones with low density. Therefore, it seems logical to perform ultrasonography in combination with CT in cases with the suspicion of foreign body impaction. PMID:27602392

  14. Dimensional metrology of lab-on-a-chip internal structures: a comparison of optical coherence tomography with confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Reyes, D R; Halter, M; Hwang, J

    2015-07-01

    The characterization of internal structures in a polymeric microfluidic device, especially of a final product, will require a different set of optical metrology tools than those traditionally used for microelectronic devices. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging is a promising technique to characterize the internal structures of poly(methyl methacrylate) devices where the subsurface structures often cannot be imaged by conventional wide field optical microscopy. The structural details of channels in the devices were imaged with OCT and analyzed with an in-house written ImageJ macro in an effort to identify the structural details of the channel. The dimensional values obtained with OCT were compared with laser-scanning confocal microscopy images of channels filled with a fluorophore solution. Attempts were also made using confocal reflectance and interferometry microscopy to measure the channel dimensions, but artefacts present in the images precluded quantitative analysis. OCT provided the most accurate estimates for the channel height based on an analysis of optical micrographs obtained after destructively slicing the channel with a microtome. OCT may be a promising technique for the future of three-dimensional metrology of critical internal structures in lab-on-a-chip devices because scans can be performed rapidly and noninvasively prior to their use.

  15. Lambdoid Synostosis Versus Positional Posterior Plagiocephaly, a Comparison of Skull Base and Shape of Calvarium Using Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hurmerinta, Kirsti; Kiukkonen, Anu; Hukki, Jyri; Saarikko, Anne; Leikola, Junnu

    2015-09-01

    The differential diagnostics between the common positional posterior plagiocephaly and relatively rare lambdoid synostosis is important due to the differences in their treatment plan and clinical management. However, the clinical criteria for the diagnosis of lambdoid synostosis are not clear since there is a considerable overlap in the features of positional posterior plagiocephaly and unilateral lambdoid synostosis. To systematically evaluate the clinical findings in these 2 patient groups, we quantitatively compared the characteristics of endocranial skull base and ectocranial calvarium in 3D computed tomography, in 9 children (mean age 2.9 years) with unilateral lambdoid synostosis and 9 children with positional posterior plagiocephaly. The groups were sex and age matched. Our results show that the skull bases in the lambdoid synostosis are posteriorly shorter and more twisted than in positional posterior plagiocephaly. Anterior twisting was mild in both skull types. Our study confirmed earlier suggested diagnostic feature: prominent ipsilateral mastoidal bossing downward and laterally in all lambdoid skulls. In positional posterior plagiocephaly the bossing was typically not detected. Interestingly, there was a great variation in the position of the ipsilateral ear and external auditory meatus in both patient groups. Thus, neither antero-posterior nor vertical position of ear is a reliable differential diagnostic feature between lambdoid synostosis or positional posterior plagiocephaly.

  16. Comparison of lp-regularization-based reconstruction methods for time domain fluorescence molecular tomography on early time gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lingling; Yang, He; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge; Intes, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    Time domain florescence molecular tomography (TD-FMT) allows 3D visualization of multiple fluorophores based on lifetime contrast and provides a unique data set for enhanced quantification and spatial resolution. The time-gate data set can be divided into two groups around the maximum gate, which are early gates and late gates. It is well-established that early gates allow for improved spatial resolution of reconstruction. However, photon counts are inherently very low at early gates due to the high absorption and scattering of tissue. It makes image reconstruction highly susceptible to the effects of noise and numerical errors. Moreover, the inverse problem of FMT is the ill-posed and underdetermined. These factors make reconstruction difficult for early time gates. In this work, lp (0

  17. Comparison of drug-induced sleep endoscopy and upper airway computed tomography in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ye, Jingying; Pan, Chuxiong; Xian, Junfang; Sun, Nian; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuhuan; Kang, Dan

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the associations between the findings of drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) and upper airway computed tomography (UACT) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. This study was a non-randomized, prospective, clinical trial. We used DISE to identify the obstruction pattern according to VOTE classification. All 62 study subjects (all men) showed velum-related obstruction; 47 (75.8%) had lateral oropharyngeal obstruction, 45 (72.6%) had tongue-base-related obstruction, and 6 (9.7%) had epiglottal obstruction. The following UACT measurements significantly differed between subjects with and without lateral oropharyngeal obstruction (P < 0.05): airway length, laryngopharynx length, mandibular plane to hyoid distance, minimum lateral dimension of the retroglossal airway, retropalatal anteroposterior/lateral dimension, and retroglossal anteroposterior/lateral dimension. None of the UACT measurements significantly differed between subjects with and without tongue-base-related or epiglottal obstruction. These results indicate that in OSA patients, obstruction related to the lateral oropharyngeal walls can be identified using these UACT measurements. Thus, UACT, which is performed during wakefulness, can partially replace DISE, which is both time consuming and costly.

  18. Comparison between dental and basal arch forms in normal occlusion and Class III malocclusions utilizing cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Kyung Eun; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Nam, Young-Ok; Sameshima, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mandibular dental and basal arch forms in subjects with normal occlusion and compare them with those of Class III malocclusion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods CBCT images of 32 normal occlusion (19 males, 13 females; 24.3 years) and 33 Class III malocclusion subjects (20 males, 13 females, 22.2 years) were selected. Facial axis and root center points were identified from the left to right mandibular first molars. Distances between the facial axis and root center points for each tooth were calculated, and 4 linear and 2 ratio variables were measured and calculated for each arch form. The variables were compared between groups by independent t-test. Pearson correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationships between dental and basal variables within each group. Results The mandibular dental and basal intercanine widths were significantly greater in the Class III group than in normal occlusion subjects (p < 0.05). The dental and basal intercanine widths as well as the dental and basal intermolar widths were strongly correlated in normal occlusion and moderately correlated in Class III malocclusion. Conclusions The dental arch form demon strated a strong positive correlation with the basal arch form in the normal occlusion group and moderate correlation in the Class III malocclusion group. These results might be helpful for clinicians to have a better understanding of the importance of basal arch form in the alveolar bone. PMID:23504406

  19. Temporal comparison of functional brain imaging with diffuse optical tomography and fMRI during rat forepaw stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Andrew M.; Culver, Joseph P.; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Boas, David A.

    2003-05-01

    The time courses of oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO2]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HbR]) and total haemoglobin ([HbT]) concentration changes following cortical activation in rats by electrical forepaw stimulation were measured using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and compared to similar measurements performed previously with fMRI at 2.0 T and 4.7 T. We also explored the qualitative effects of varying stimulus parameters on the temporal evolution of the hemodynamic response. DOT images were reconstructed at a depth of 1.5 mm over a 1 cm square area from 2 mm anterior to bregma to 8 mm posterior to bregma. The measurement set included 9 sources and 16 detectors with an imaging frame rate of 10 Hz. Both DOT [HbR] and [HbO2] time courses were compared to the fMRI BOLD time course during stimulation, and the DOT [HbT] time course was compared to the fMRI cerebral plasma volume (CPV) time course. We believe that DOT and fMRI can provide similar temporal information for both blood volume and deoxyhaemoglobin changes, which helps to cross-validate these two techniques and to demonstrate that DOT can be useful as a complementary modality to fMRI for investigating the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity.

  20. Evaluation of stability after pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery using cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison with conventional treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Hye-Rim; Jung, Young-Soo; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dental changes after intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) with and without presurgical orthodontics by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods This retrospective cohort study included 24 patients (mean age, 22.1 years) with skeletal Class III malocclusion who underwent bimaxillary surgery with IVRO. The patients were divided into the preorthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS) group (n = 12) and conventional surgery (CS) group (n = 12). CBCT images acquired preoperatively, 1 month after surgery, and 1 year after surgery were analyzed to compare the intergroup differences in postoperative three-dimensional movements of the maxillary and mandibular landmarks and the changes in lateral cephalometric variables. Results Baseline demographics (sex and age) were similar between the two groups (6 men and 6 women in each group). During the postsurgical period, the POGS group showed more significant upward movement of the mandible (p < 0.05) than did the CS group. Neither group showed significant transverse movement of any of the skeletal landmarks. Moreover, none of the dental and skeletal variables showed significant intergroup differences 1 year after surgery. Conclusions Compared with CS, POGS with IVRO resulted in significantly different postsurgical skeletal movement in the mandible. Although both groups showed similar skeletal and dental outcomes at 1 year after surgery, upward movement of the mandible during the postsurgical period should be considered to ensure a more reliable outcome after POGS. PMID:27668193

  1. Comparison of ultrasonography, radiography and a single computed tomography slice for fluid identification within the feline tympanic bulla.

    PubMed

    King, A M; Weinrauch, S A; Doust, R; Hammond, G; Yam, P S; Sullivan, M

    2007-05-01

    Evaluation of the tympanic bulla (TB) in cases of acute feline otitis media can be a diagnostic challenge, although a feature often associated with this condition is the accumulation of fluid or material within the middle ear cavity. A technique is reported allowing optimum imaging of the feline TB using ultrasound (US) and recording of the appearance of gas and fluid-filled TB. A random number of bullae in 42 feline cadavers were filled with lubricant and rostroventral-caudodorsal oblique radiographs, single slice computed tomography (CT) images and US images were created and interpreted by blinded operators. The content (fluid or gas) of each TB was determined using each technique and the cadavers were then frozen and sectioned for confirmation. CT remained the most accurate diagnostic method, but US produced better results than radiology. Given the advantages of US over other imaging techniques, these results suggest that further work is warranted to determine applications of this modality in the evaluation of clinical cases of feline otitis media.

  2. Human-eye versus computerized color matching.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U; Sim, C P; Loh, W L; Teo, J H

    1999-01-01

    This project compared the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry. Fifty dental personnel were asked to color match Vita Lumin shade tabs to seven different randomly arranged test tabs from the Z100 shade guide. All evaluators were blinded to the shades of the test tabs and were asked to match only body shade of the Vita Lumin tab to the middle third or body of each test tab. The results obtained were subsequently computed into L*a*b* values and compared with results obtained by computerized colorimetry. Results indicate that the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry is shade dependent. Discrepancy was significant for b* coordinates for shades A1 and B2 and L* and b* coordinates for shade C4. For all shades evaluated, color difference between human-eye and computerized color matching is perceivable under clinical settings, as delta E values are greater than 3. There is a need for correction factors in the formal specification of the color-matching software due to the discrepancy between human-eye and computerized colorimetric color matching.

  3. Computerized microtomography for new applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.; Thompson, A.

    1996-09-01

    The advent of high brilliance synchrotron sources has stimulated the development of advanced x-ray microtomography. However, materials research problems challenge existing tomographic techniques. High spatial resolution is required to identify and characterize microstructure in real materials. Good elemental sensitivity is required to study the effects of microalloying. Three-dimensional crystal texture, strain and phase information is required to understand advanced materials. Materials samples can include a wide range of elements, can come in unfavorable geometries, and sometimes require dynamic measurements of their three-dimensional structure. One challenge for x-ray microtomography is the measurement of low concentrations with good spatial resolution and high elemental sensitivity. Another challenge to standard x-ray microtomography is the study of elemental distributions in planar structures where elemental sensitivity is required in one or two dimensions, but the spatial sensitivity in all three dimensions is not required. For a large class of materials, crystalline structure, strain and texture are critical to the materials properties. Recent work has now demonstrated the possibility of extending X-ray microdiffraction to the study of three dimensional crystallographic distributions. Efforts are now underway at the APS, ALS, SSRL and NSLS to further develop x-ray microdiffraction and x-ray microdiffraction tomography. The measurement of strain and texture in three dimensions will have important applications to the study of high J{sub c} high {Tc} superconductors, the study of second phase distributions and texture in composite materials, and the study of crack and void evolution in structural and electronic materials. Another frontier for x-ray tomography is the development of dynamic, real-time measurements.

  4. Quantitative comparison of dose distribution in radiotherapy plans using 2D gamma maps and X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background The advanced dose calculation algorithms implemented in treatment planning system (TPS) have remarkably improved the accuracy of dose calculation especially the modeling of electrons transport in the low density medium. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of 2D gamma (γ) index to quantify and evaluate the impact of the calculation of electrons transport on dose distribution for lung radiotherapy. Methods X-ray computed tomography images were used to calculate the dose for twelve radiotherapy treatment plans. The doses were originally calculated with Modified Batho (MB) 1D density correction method, and recalculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), using the same prescribed dose. Dose parameters derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) and target coverage indices were compared. To compare dose distribution, 2D γ-index was applied, ranging from 1%/1 mm to 6%/6 mm. The results were displayed using γ-maps in 2D. Correlation between DVH metrics and γ passing rates was tested using Spearman’s rank test and Wilcoxon paired test to calculate P values. Results the plans generated with AAA predicted more heterogeneous dose distribution inside the target, with P<0.05. However, MB overestimated the dose predicting more coverage of the target by the prescribed dose. The γ analysis showed that the difference between MB and AAA could reach up to ±10%. The 2D γ-maps illustrated that AAA predicted more dose to organs at risks, as well as lower dose to the target compared to MB. Conclusions Taking into account of the electrons transport on radiotherapy plans showed a significant impact on delivered dose and dose distribution. When considering the AAA represent the true cumulative dose, a readjusting of the prescribed dose and an optimization to protect the organs at risks should be taken in consideration in order to obtain the better clinical outcome. PMID:27429908

  5. Comparison between computed tomography and (99m)TC- pertechnetate scintigraphy characteristics of the thyroid gland in cats with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlaeger, Ines E; Hartmann, Antje; Sicken, Julia; Mohrs, Sabrina; Scholz, Volkher B; Neiger, Reto; Kramer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Scintigraphy is currently the reference standard for diagnosing feline hyperthyroidism; however, computed tomography (CT) is more widely available in veterinary practice. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe the CT appearance of thyroid glands in cats with hyperthyroidism and compare CT findings with findings from (99m) Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy. Twenty-five adult hyperthyroid cats were included. Plain CT images were acquired for each cat and the following characteristics recorded for each thyroid lobe: visibility, delineation, position, attenuation, shape, and subjective size. Scintigraphic images were also acquired and the following characteristics recorded: radiopharmaceutical uptake, delineation, ectopic foci, shape, and subjective size. In CT images, thyroid lobes were most commonly found between the second and fourth cervical vertebrae, dorsolateral to the trachea. Affected thyroid lobes (based on scintigraphy reference standard) were most commonly oval and moderately enlarged in CT images. A heterogeneous attenuation pattern (isoattenuating to adjacent soft tissues with hypo- and hyperattenuating foci) was most commonly found in affected thyroid lobes. A positive correlation (P < 0.01) was identified between CT and scintigraphy for left-to-right thyroid lobe size relationship and subjective size of the larger thyroid lobe. The CT estimated mass was significantly higher (median = 148.8; range = [0;357.6]) for the more active thyroid lobe compared to the less active thyroid lobe (median = 84.6; range = [0;312.3]); (W = 154; P < 0.01). Findings indicated that CT may not reliably differentiate unilateral vs. bilateral hyperthyroidism in cats; however, CT may be a reliable alternative test for correctly identifying the more active thyroid lobe.

  6. MR Imaging of Pulmonary Nodules: Detection Rate and Accuracy of Size Estimation in Comparison to Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Lisowska, Antonina; Dabrowska, Marta; Korczynski, Piotr; Zukowska, Malgorzata; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P.; Pacho, Ryszard; Rowinski, Olgierd; Krenke, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to assess the sensitivity of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and to estimate the accuracy of MRI for the measurement of lesion size, as compared to computed tomography (CT). Methods Fifty patients with 113 pulmonary nodules diagnosed by CT underwent lung MRI and CT. MRI studies were performed on 1.5T scanner using the following sequences: T2-TSE, T2-SPIR, T2-STIR, T2-HASTE, T1-VIBE, and T1-out-of-phase. CT and MRI data were analyzed independently by two radiologists. Results The overall sensitivity of MRI for the detection of pulmonary nodules was 80.5% and according to nodule size: 57.1% for nodules ≤4mm, 75% for nodules >4-6mm, 87.5% for nodules >6-8mm and 100% for nodules >8mm. MRI sequences yielded following sensitivities: 69% (T1-VIBE), 54.9% (T2-SPIR), 48.7% (T2-TSE), 48.7% (T1-out-of-phase), 45.1% (T2-STIR), 25.7% (T2-HASTE), respectively. There was very strong agreement between the maximum diameter of pulmonary nodules measured by CT and MRI (mean difference -0.02 mm; 95% CI –1.6–1.57 mm; Bland-Altman analysis). Conclusions MRI yielded high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and enabled accurate assessment of their diameter. Therefore it may be considered an alternative to CT for follow-up of some lung lesions. However, due to significant number of false positive diagnoses, it is not ready to replace CT as a tool for lung nodule detection. PMID:27258047

  7. Breast Patient Setup Error Assessment: Comparison of Electronic Portal Image Devices and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Matching Results

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging fractions, EPID images of the treatment beams were recorded. Registrations of the bony anatomy for CBCT to planning CT and EPID to digitally reconstructed-radiographs (DRRs) were compared. In addition, similar measurements of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were acquired. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were performed for clinical and phantom registrations. Systematic and random setup errors were quantified for CBCT and EPID-driven correction protocols in the EPID coordinate system (U, V), with V parallel to the cranial-caudal axis and U perpendicular to V and the central beam axis. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of clinical EPID and CBCT registrations yielded 4 to 6-mm limits of agreement, indicating that both methods were not compatible. The EPID-based setup errors were smaller than the CBCT-based setup errors. Phantom measurements showed that CBCT accurately measures setup error whereas EPID underestimates setup errors in the cranial-caudal direction. In the clinical measurements, the residual bony anatomy setup errors after offline CBCT-based corrections were {Sigma}{sub U} = 1.4 mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 1.7 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.6 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 3.1 mm. Residual setup errors of EPID driven corrections corrected for underestimation were estimated at {Sigma}{sub U} = 2.2mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 3.3 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.9 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 2.9 mm. Conclusion: EPID registration underestimated the actual bony anatomy setup error in breast cancer patients by 20% to 50%. Using CBCT decreased setup uncertainties significantly.

  8. Comparison of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose and F-18 Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Recurrent Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enslow, Michael S.; Zollinger, Lauren V.; Morton, Kathryn A.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Butterfield, Regan I.; Christian, Paul E.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Heilbrun, Marta E.; Jensen, Randy L.; Hoffman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Report The objective was to compare F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) in differentiating radiation necrosis from recurrent glioma. Materials and methods Visual and quantitative analyses were derived from static FDG PET and static and dynamic FLT PET in 15 patients with suspected recurrence of treated ≥ grade II glioma with a new focus of Gd-contrast enhancement on MRI. For FDG PET, SUVmax and the ratio of lesion SUVmax to the SUVmean of contralateral white matter were measured. For FLT PET, SUVmax and Patlak-derived metabolic flux parameter Kimax were measured for the same locus. A 5-point visual confidence scale was applied to FDG PET and FLT PET. ROC analysis was applied to visual and quantitative results. Differences between recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis were tested by Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Based on follow-up Gd-MRI imaging, lesion-specific recurrent tumor was defined as a definitive increase in size of the lesion, and radiation necrosis as stability or regression. Results For FDG SUVmax, FDG ratio lesion:white matter and FLT Kimax, there was a significant difference between mean values for recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis. Recurrent tumor was best identified by FDG ratio of lesion:contralateral normal white matter (AUC 0.98, CI 0.91–1.00, sens. 100%, spec. 75% for an optimized cut-off value of 1.82). Conclusion Both quantitative and visual determinations allow accurate differentiation between recurrent glioma and radiation necrosis by both FDG and FLT PET. In this small series, FLT PET offers no advantage over FDG PET. PMID:22889774

  9. Evaluation of myocardial infarction size with three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography: a comparison with single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiushuang; Zhang, Chunhong; Huang, Dangsheng; Zhang, Liwei; Yang, Feifei; An, Xiuzhi; Ouyang, Qiaohong; Zhang, Meiqing; Wang, Shuhua; Guo, Jiarui; Ji, Dongdong

    2015-12-01

    To assess whether global and regional myocardial strains from three-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (3D-STE) correlate with myocardial infarction size (MIS) detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Fifty-seven patients with a history of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) within 3-6 months were enrolled, alongside 24 healthy volunteers. Left ventricular (LV) global area strain, global longitudinal strain (GLS), global radial strain, global circumferential strain, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and wall motion score index (WMSI) were measured and compared with the corresponding SPECT-detected MISs. Patients were sub-grouped into massive MIS group (MIS ≥ 12%) and small MIS group (MIS < 12%). Myocardial strains of all the LV segments were compared with the corresponding MIS. Global myocardial strain parameters, LVEF and WMSI of the patients were significantly different from the control group (all P < 0.05) and correlated well with MISs, most significantly for GLS (r = 0.728, P < 0.01). Significant differences in myocardial strain parameters were found between the massive and small MIS groups (all P < 0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that GLS had a highest diagnostic value and when the cutoff was -13.8%, the area under the curve was 0.84, with the 70.6% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity. Significant differences of myocardial strain parameters were observed between segments with and without transmural MIs (P < 0.01). 3D-STE myocardial strain parameters evaluated LV global MIS, 3D GLS had the highest diagnostic value. It also preliminarily gauged the degree of ischemia and necrosis of regional myocardial segments.

  10. Comparison of Pattern Electroretinography and Optical Coherence Tomography Parameters in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tiryaki Demir, Semra; Oba, Mehmet Ersin; Erdoğan, Ezgi Tuna; Odabaşı, Mahmut; Dirim, Ayşe Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Can, Efe; Kara, Orhan; Yekta Şendül, Selam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the correlation of visual field (VF), pattern electroretinography (PERG) and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) results in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and early primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Materials and Methods: The study included 72 eyes of 37 patients with early POAG, 76 eyes of 38 patients with OHT, and 60 eyes of 30 controls. All subjects underwent full ophthalmologic examination, VF assessment with 24-2 Humphrey standard automated perimetry (Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm (SITA)-Standard), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness measurement with FD-OCT, and PERG P50 and N95 wave latency and amplitude measurements with electroretinography (Nihon Kohden). Results: With the exception of the nasal quadrant, all GCC parameters and RNFL results were significantly lower in the POAG group compared to the OHT and control groups. There was no statistically significant difference between the OHT and control group. PERG amplitudes were lower in the POAG and OHT groups than in the control group. Reduction in N95 amplitude was greater than that of P50 amplitude. No difference was detected in PERG latencies among groups. GCC was significantly correlated with VF and RNFL in the POAG group. Conclusion: Significant thinning of the GCC and RNFL occurs in addition to VF pathologies in patients with early POAG, and these examinations should be concomitantly evaluated. During diagnostic assessment of patients with early POAG, GCC and RNFL analysis by FD-OCT are highly effective. GCC is as reliable as RNLF in the early diagnosis of glaucoma and there is a highly significant correlation between them. Dysfunction of ganglion cells in patients with OHT may be detected earlier using PERG amplitude analysis. PMID:27800239

  11. Comparison of two techniques for selection of master gutta-percha cone using micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, João Manoel; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; De-Bem, Samuel Henrique Câmara; Alfredo, Edson; Silva, Ricardo Gariba

    2013-01-01

    This study used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to evaluate the fit of the master gutta-percha cone at time of cone fit, gutta-percha volume in the filling material, and the filling material volume in relation to the canal at the apical limit of the working length. Root canals of 20 maxillary central incisors were prepared with rotary instruments and distributed into two groups (n=10). The gutta-percha cone tip was either plasticized (apical thermal impression technique - ATI) or not (conventional technique - CT), and its apical fit was checked. The apical 1 mm of working length was examined with a micro-CT, canals were filled with gutta-percha and sealer, and new micro-CT scans were obtained. In CT, gutta-percha filled 35.83 ± 15.05% of the canal at cone selection and 38.72 ± 11.64% after filling. In ATI, these values were 23.14 ± 7.74% and 26.98 ± 20.40%, respectively. Gutta-percha volume in the filling material, and filling material volume in relation to the canal were, respectively, 61.28 ± 11.64% and 87.76 ± 9.98% for CT, and 73.00 ± 20.41% and 89.96 ± 9.08% for ATI. No significant difference was found between cone selection and after canal filling, for either CT (p=0.593) or ATI (p=0.4975). The techniques did not differ significantly with respect to gutta-percha volume in the filling material (p=0.132) and filling material volume in relation to the canal (p=0.612). An ideal fit of the master gutta-percha cone at working length was not achieved regardless of the cone selection technique, and the material-filled area was similar for both techniques.

  12. Comparison of frequency domain optical coherence tomography and quantitative coronary angiography for the assessment of coronary lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Sharif, Faisal; Leahy, Martin J.

    2014-03-01

    Quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) has been used as a standard technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease for many years. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers higher resolution, faster image acquisition speeds and greater sensitivity than the intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Recently developed frequency domain OCT (FD-OCT) systems overcome many technical limitations of conventional time domain OCT systems (TDOCT). The main objective of this study was to compare the FD-OCT and QCA measurements for the assessment of coronary lesions. A total of 21 stenoses in 18 patients were analysed using QCA and FD-OCT. The average minimum lumen diameter (MLD) and percent lumen area stenosis (%AS) by QCA were 1.52+/-0.44 mm and 68+/-9% respectively. The average MLD and %AS by FD-OCT were 1.32+/-0.38 mm and 63+/-14% respectively. There was a moderate but significant correlation between QCA and FD-OCT measured MLD (r = 0.5, p < 0.01) and %AS (r = 0.56, p < 0.01). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the mean differences between the QCA and FD-OCT measurements were 0.18+/-0.81 (limits of agreement: -0.63 to 0.99) for MLD and 4.4+/-22.8 (limits of agreement: -18.4 to 27.2) for %AS. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the QCA and FD-OCT measured MLD and %AS was +/-0.44 mm and +/-12.1% respectively.

  13. Comparison of epicardial fat volume by computed tomography in black versus white patients with acute chest pain.

    PubMed

    Apfaltrer, Paul; Schindler, Andreas; Schoepf, U Joseph; Nance, John W; Tricarico, Francesco; Ebersberger, Ullrich; McQuiston, Andrew D; Meyer, Mathias; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Bamberg, Fabian; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2014-02-01

    Disparities in the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) between races may be influenced by differences in the thoracic adipose tissue. We compared computed tomography (CT)-derived volumes of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT), and pericoronary fat thickness (PFT) and correlations with CAD between black and white patients. This institutional review board-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study included 372 age- and gender-matched black versus white patients (186 black, 54 ± 11 years, 50% men; 186 white, 54 ± 11 years, 50% men) who underwent CT for chest pain evaluation. EAT, MAT, and PFT were measured. The amount of coronary calcium was quantified as calcium score. CAD was defined as ≥50% coronary artery narrowing. EAT and MAT volumes were significantly lower in black than white patients (59 [twenty-fifth to seventy-fifth percentile 39 to 84] vs 97 [67 to 132] cm(3) and 44 [27 to 77] vs 87 [52 to 157] cm(3), for both p <0.001). Mean PFT in black patients was slightly lower than white patients (17.2 ± 3.2 vs 18.1 ± 3.4 mm, p <0.01). The relation between race and extent of adipose tissue remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Significant correlations were observed between EAT and MAT volumes and calcium score in black and white patients (r = 0.19 to 0.26, p <0.01). For both races, the level of thoracic fat measurements was higher in present versus absent coronary calcification. A greater amount of thoracic fat was found with obstructive CAD only in white patients. In conclusion, CT-derived measurements of thoracic fat differ between symptomatic black and white patients, suggesting a differential relation between thoracic adipose tissue and CAD pathophysiology by race.

  14. Comparison between adrenal venous sampling and computed tomography in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism and in the guidance of adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Limin; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Wenlong; Shen, Zhoujun; Zheng, Fangfang; Tang, Xiaofeng; Tao, Bo; Zhang, Jin; Lu, Xiaohong; Xu, Jianzhong; Chu, Shaoli; Zhu, Dingliang; Gao, Pingjin; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In our series of patients with primary aldosteronism, we compared diagnostic concordance and clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy between adrenal venous sampling (AVS) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Our retrospective analysis included 886 patients with primary aldosteronism diagnosed in our hospital between 2005 and 2014. Of them, 269 patients with CT unilateral adrenal disease were included in the analysis on the diagnostic concordance and 126 patients with follow-up data in the analysis on clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy. Hypertension was considered cured if systolic/diastolic blood pressure (BP) was controlled (<140/90 mm Hg) without medication and improved if BP was controlled with a reduced number of antihypertensive drugs. In 269 patients with CT unilateral adrenal disease, the overall concordance rate between AVS and CT was 50.5% for lateralization on the same side. The concordance rate decreased with increasing age, with highest rate of 61% in patients aged <30 years (n = 16). In 126 patients with follow-up data after adrenalectomy, the AVS- (n = 96) and CT-guided patients (n = 30) had similar characteristics before adrenalectomy. After andrenalectomy, the AVS-guided patients had a significantly higher serum potassium concentration (4.3 ± 0.3 vs 4.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P = 0.04) and rate of cured and improved hypertension (98% vs 87%, P = 0.03). The AVS-guided patients (n = 50) had slightly higher cured rate than the CT-guided patients (n = 11) in those older than 50 years (26.0% vs 18.2%, P = 0.72). The age below which the cured rate in the CT-guided patients was 100% was 30 years. AVS guidance had moderate concordance with CT and slightly improved clinical outcomes after adrenalectomy. The age below which CT unilateralization achieved 100% cured rate was approximately 30 years. PMID:27684853

  15. Simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for 3-D ionosphere tomography in comparison to other algebraic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, T.; Minkwitz, D.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy and availability of satellite-based applications like GNSS positioning and remote sensing crucially depends on the knowledge of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The tomography of the ionosphere is one of the major tools to provide link specific ionospheric corrections as well as to study and monitor physical processes in the ionosphere. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for electron density reconstruction. Further, SMART+ is developed by combining SMART with a successive correction method. In this way, a balancing between the measurements of intersected and not intersected voxels is realised. The methods are compared with the well-known algebraic reconstruction techniques ART and SART. All the four methods are applied to reconstruct the 3-D electron density distribution by ingestion of ground-based GNSS TEC data into the NeQuick model. The comparative case study is implemented over Europe during two periods of the year 2011 covering quiet to disturbed ionospheric conditions. In particular, the performance of the methods is compared in terms of the convergence behaviour and the capability to reproduce sTEC and electron density profiles. For this purpose, independent sTEC data of four IGS stations and electron density profiles of four ionosonde stations are taken as reference. The results indicate that SMART significantly reduces the number of iterations necessary to achieve a predefined accuracy level. Further, SMART+ decreases the median of the absolute sTEC error up to 15, 22, 46 and 67 % compared to SMART, SART, ART and NeQuick respectively.

  16. Illustration of the obstacles in computerized lung segmentation using examples

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xin; Qiang, Yongqian; Zhu, Shaocheng; Fuhrman, Carl; Siegfried, Jill M.; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Automated lung volume segmentation is often a preprocessing step in quantitative lung computed tomography (CT) image analysis. The objective of this study is to identify the obstacles in computerized lung volume segmentation and illustrate those explicitly using real examples. Awareness of these “difficult” cases may be helpful for the development of a robust and consistent lung segmentation algorithm. Methods: We collected a large diverse dataset consisting of 2768 chest CT examinations acquired on 2292 subjects from various sources. These examinations cover a wide range of diseases, including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, human immunodeficiency virus, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, asthma, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). The CT acquisition protocols, including dose, scanners, and reconstruction kernels, vary significantly. After the application of a “neutral” thresholding-based approach to the collected CT examinations in a batch manner, the failed cases were subjectively identified and classified into different subgroups. Results: Totally, 121 failed examinations are identified, corresponding to a failure ratio of 4.4%. These failed cases are summarized as 11 different subgroups, which is further classified into 3 broad categories: (1) failure caused by diseases, (2) failure caused by anatomy variability, and (3) failure caused by external factors. The failure percentages in these categories are 62.0%, 32.2%, and 5.8%, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of specific lung diseases (e.g., pulmonary nodules, ILD, and pneumonia) is the primary issue in computerized lung segmentation. The segmentation failures caused by external factors and anatomy variety are relatively low but unavoidable in practice. It is desirable to develop robust schemes to handle these issues in a single pass when a large number of CT examinations need to be analyzed. PMID:22894423

  17. Comparison of synchrotron radiation and conventional x-ray microcomputed tomography for assessing trabecular bone microarchitecture of human femoral heads

    SciTech Connect

    Chappard, Christine; Basillais, Armelle; Benhamou, Laurent; Bonassie, Alexandra; Brunet-Imbault, Barbara; Bonnet, Nicolas; Peyrin, Francoise

    2006-09-15

    Microcomputed tomography ({mu}CT) produces three-dimensional (3D) images of trabecular bone. We compared conventional {mu}CT (C{mu}CT) with a polychromatic x-ray cone beam to synchrotron radiation (SR) {mu}CT with a monochromatic parallel beam for assessing trabecular bone microarchitecture of 14 subchondral femoral head specimens from patients with osteoarthritis (n=10) or osteoporosis (n=4). SR{mu}CT images with a voxel size of 10.13 {mu}m were reconstructed from 900 2D radiographic projections (angular step, 0.2 deg. ). C{mu}CT images with a voxel size of 10.77 {mu}m were reconstructed from 205, 413, and 825 projections obtained using angular steps of 0.9 deg., 0.45 deg., and 0.23 deg., respectively. A single threshold was used to binarize the images. We computed bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), bone surface/bone volume (BS/BV), trabecular number (Tb.N), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th and Tb.Th*), trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp), degree of anisotropy (DA), and Euler density. With the 0.9 deg. angular step, all C{mu}CT values were significantly different from SR{mu}CT values. With the 0.23 deg. and 0.45 deg. rotation steps, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and BS/BV by C{mu}CT differed significantly from the values by SR{mu}CT. The error due to slice matching (visual site matching {+-}10 slices) was within 1% for most parameters. Compared to SR{mu}CT, BV/TV, Tb.Sp, and Tb.Th by C{mu}CT were underestimated, whereas Tb.N and Tb.Th* were overestimated. A Bland and Altman plot showed no bias for Tb.N or DA. Bias was -0.8{+-}1.0%, +5.0{+-}1.1 {mu}m, -5.9{+-}6.3 {mu}m, and -5.7{+-}29.1 {mu}m for BV/TV, Tb.Th*, Tb.Th, and Tb.Sp, respectively, and the differences did not vary over the range of values. Although systematic differences were noted between SR{mu}CT and C{mu}CT values, correlations between the techniques were high and the differences would probably not change the discrimination between study groups. C{mu}CT provides a reliable 3D assessment of human defatted bone when working at the 0

  18. Comparison of x ray computed tomography number to proton relative linear stopping power conversion functions using a standard phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Adequate evaluation of the results from multi-institutional trials involving light ion beam treatments requires consideration of the planning margins applied to both targets and organs at risk. A major uncertainty that affects the size of these margins is the conversion of x ray computed tomography numbers (XCTNs) to relative linear stopping powers (RLSPs). Various facilities engaged in multi-institutional clinical trials involving proton beams have been applying significantly different margins in their patient planning. This study was performed to determine the variance in the conversion functions used at proton facilities in the U.S.A. wishing to participate in National Cancer Institute sponsored clinical trials. Methods: A simplified method of determining the conversion function was developed using a standard phantom containing only water and aluminum. The new method was based on the premise that all scanners have their XCTNs for air and water calibrated daily to constant values but that the XCTNs for high density/high atomic number materials are variable with different scanning conditions. The standard phantom was taken to 10 different proton facilities and scanned with the local protocols resulting in 14 derived conversion functions which were compared to the conversion functions used at the local facilities. Results: For tissues within ±300 XCTN of water, all facility functions produced converted RLSP values within ±6% of the values produced by the standard function and within 8% of the values from any other facility's function. For XCTNs corresponding to lung tissue, converted RLSP values differed by as great as ±8% from the standard and up to 16% from the values of other facilities. For XCTNs corresponding to low-density immobilization foam, the maximum to minimum values differed by as much as 40%. Conclusions: The new method greatly simplifies determination of the conversion function, reduces ambiguity, and in the future could promote

  19. Comparison of C-arm Computed Tomography and Digital Subtraction Angiography in Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichs, Jan B. Marquardt, Steffen Falck, Christian von; Hoeper, Marius M. Olsson, Karen M.; Wacker, Frank K. Meyer, Bernhard C.

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo assess the feasibility and diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced, C-arm computed tomography (CACT) of the pulmonary arteries compared to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients suffering from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).MaterialsFifty-two patients with CTEPH underwent ECG-gated DSA and contrast-enhanced CACT. Two readers (R1, R2) independently evaluated pulmonary artery segments and their sub-segmental branching using DSA and CACT for optimal image quality. Afterwards, the diagnostic findings, i.e., intraluminal filling defects, stenosis, and occlusion, were compared. Inter-modality and inter-observer agreement was calculated, and subsequently consensus reading was done and correlated to a reference standard representing the overall consensus of both modalities. Fisher’s exact test and Cohen’s Kappa were applied.ResultsA total of 1352 pulmonary segments were evaluated, of which 1255 (92.8 %) on DSA and 1256 (92.9 %) on CACT were rated to be fully diagnostic. The main causes of the non-diagnostic image quality were motion artifacts on CACT (R1:37, R2:78) and insufficient contrast enhancement on DSA (R1:59, R2:38). Inter-observer agreement was good for DSA (κ = 0.74) and CACT (κ = 0.75), while inter-modality agreement was moderate (R1: κ = 0.46, R2: κ = 0.47). Compared to the reference standard, the inter-modality agreement for CACT was excellent (κ = 0.96), whereas it was inferior for DSA (κ = 0.61) due to the higher number of abnormal consensus findings read as normal on DSA.ConclusionCACT of the pulmonary arteries is feasible and provides additional information to DSA. CACT has the potential to improve the diagnostic work-up of patients with CTEPH and may be particularly useful prior to surgical or interventional treatment.

  20. Comparison of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Nuclear Medicine Ventilation-Perfusion Imaging: A Clinical Validation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Koo, Phillip J.; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging provides lung function information for lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Before 4DCT-ventilation can be implemented clinically it needs to be validated against an established imaging modality. The purpose of this work was to compare 4DCT-ventilation to nuclear medicine ventilation, using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients with 16 sets of 4DCT and nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion (VQ) images were used for the study. The VQ-ventilation images were acquired in planar mode using Tc-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid aerosol inhalation. 4DCT data, spatial registration, and a density-change-based model were used to compute a 4DCT-based ventilation map for each patient. The percent ventilation was calculated in each lung and each lung third for both the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. A nuclear medicine radiologist assessed the VQ and 4DCT scans for the presence of ventilation defects. The VQ and 4DCT-based images were compared using regional percent ventilation and radiologist clinical observations. Results: Individual patient examples demonstrate good qualitative agreement between the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. The correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.45, using the percent ventilation in each individual lung and lung third, respectively. Using radiologist-noted presence of ventilation defects and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 4DCT-ventilation were 90%, 64%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: The current work compared 4DCT with VQ-based ventilation using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. We found good agreement between the radiologist's assessment of the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation images as well as the percent ventilation in each lung. The agreement lessened when the data were analyzed

  1. Curie temperature depths in the Alps and the Po Plain (northern Italy): Comparison with heat flow and seismic tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Fabio; Minelli, Liliana; Pignatelli, Alessandro; Gilardi, Matteo

    2016-08-01

    We report on the spectral analysis of the aeromagnetic residuals of the Alps and the Po Plain (northern Italy) to derive the Curie point depth (CPD), assumed to represent the 550 °C isotherm depth. We analysed both the aeromagnetic residuals of northern Italy gathered by Agip (now Eni) and the recent EMAG2 compilation. We used the centroid method on 44 and 96 (respectively) 100 × 100 km2 windows considering both a random and a fractal magnetization distribution, but found that, at least for the Alps, the fractal model yields unrealistically shallow CPDs. Analyses considering a random magnetization model give CPDs varying between 12 and 39 km (22 to 24 km on average considering the two data sets) in the Po Plain, representing the Adriatic-African foreland area of the Alps, in substantial agreement with recently reported heat flow values of 60-70 mW/m2. In the Alps, the Eni data set yields shallow CPDs ranging between 6 and 23 km (13 km on average). EMAG2 analysis basically confirms the "hot" Alpine crust, but reduces it to three 50-100 km wide patches elongated along the chain, where CPDs vary between 10 and 15 km. Such "hot" Alpine domains occur just north of maximum (50-55 km) crustal thickness zones of the Alps and correspond to low seismic wave velocity anomalies recently documented in the 20-22 to 35-38 km depth interval, whereas no relation is apparent with local geology. Assuming an average crustal thermal conductivity of 2.5 W/m °C and a steady-state conductive model, CPDs from the hot zones of the Alps translate into heat flow values of 110-120 mW/m2, and to a basal heat flow from the mantle exceeding 100 mW/m2 that is significantly greater than that expected in a mountain range. Thus we conclude that the steady-state conductive model does not apply for the Alps and granitic melts occur at ∼15-40 km depths, consistently with seismic tomography evidence.

  2. Autofluorescence Imaging and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Incomplete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness and Comparison with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, ROYCE W. S.; GREENBERG, JONATHAN P.; LAZOW, MARGOT A.; RAMACHANDRAN, RITHU; LIMA, LUIZ H.; HWANG, JOHN C.; SCHUBERT, CARL; BRAUNSTEIN, ALEXANDRA; ALLIKMETS, RANDO; TSANG, STEPHEN H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that the evaluation of retinal structure can have diagnostic value in differentiating between incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To compare retinal thickness differences between patients with CSNB2 and myopic controls. DESIGN Prospective cross-sectional study. METHODS Ten eyes of 5 patients diagnosed with CSNB2 (4 X-linked recessive, 1 autosomal recessive) and 6 eyes of 3 patients with RP (2 autosomal dominant, 1 autosomal recessive) were evaluated with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF). Diagnoses of CSNB2 and RP were confirmed by full-field electroretinography (ERG). Manual segmentation of retinal layers, aided by a computer program, was performed by 2 professional segmenters on SD OCT images of all CSNB2 patients and 4 age-similar, normal myopic controls. Seven patients were screened for mutations with congenital stationary night blindness and RP genotyping arrays. RESULTS Patients with CSNB2 had specific findings on SD OCT and FAF that were distinct from those found in RP. CSNB2 patients showed qualitatively normal SD OCT results with preserved photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction, whereas this junction was lost in RP patients. In addition, CSNB2 patients had normal FAF images, whereas patients with RP demonstrated a ring of increased autofluorescence around the macula. On SD OCT segmentation, the inner and outer retinal layers of both X-linked recessive and autosomal recessive CSNB2 patients were thinner compared with those of normal myopic controls, with means generally outside of normal 95% confidence intervals. The only layers that demonstrated similar thickness between CSNB2 patients and the controls were the retinal nerve fiber layer and, temporal to the fovea, the combined outer segment layer and retinal pigment epithelium. A proband and his 2 affected brothers from a family segregating X-linked recessive

  3. Quantitative assessment of electrical resistivity tomography for monitoring DNAPLs migration - Comparison with high-resolution light transmission visualization in laboratory sandbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yaping; Shi, Xiaoqing; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Wu, Jichun; Revil, André

    2017-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) migration and distribution is essential for the decision of an effective remediation strategy. Light transmission visualization (LTV) has shown its accuracy and efficiency for measuring DNAPLs saturation and water content in the laboratory, but it cannot be implemented in three dimensional sandbox or field-scale sites. Recently developed electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been applied in monitoring the migration and distribution of DNAPLs in bench- and field-scale studies. However, the evaluation of the ability of ERT for monitoring DNAPLs migration by a direct comparison of ERT with high-resolution techniques such as LTV within an experimental system is still lacking. Two sandbox experiments with different permeability conditions are conducted to quantitatively assess the capability of ERT for monitoring the DNAPLs migration. During the injections, LTV method is used to visualize the DNAPLs migration and provide high-resolution saturation data while ERT method is applied to capture the change of resistivity. The results from the comparison between LTV and ERT methods show that ERT is successful in detecting the accumulation and flow bypassing phenomenon around the low-permeability lenses, as well as the penetration through the high-permeability lenses. There is a fair correlation between the resistivity and saturation with overall correlation coefficients above 0.6, except at last stage. However, using classical regularization techniques (based on smoothness), the area of DNAPLs plume determined by ERT is commonly overestimated. Compared to the plume around the low-permeability lenses, the plume around the high-permeability lenses estimated by ERT is more extensive due to larger resistivity contrasts. In addition, ERT measurements indicate that the resistivity increase caused by the low-saturation DNAPLs is not apparent enough, which is likely to be covered up under the changing

  4. PROSPECTIVE COMPARISON OF TUMOR STAGING USING COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY VERSUS MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS IN DOGS WITH NASAL NEOPLASIA: A PILOT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Lux, Cassie N; Culp, William T N; Johnson, Lynelle R; Kent, Michael; Mayhew, Philipp; Daniaux, Lise A; Carr, Alaina; Puchalski, Sarah

    2017-02-24

    Identification of nasal neoplasia extension and tumor staging in dogs is most commonly performed using computed tomography (CT), however magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in human medicine. A prospective pilot study enrolling six dogs with nasal neoplasia was performed with CT and MRI studies acquired under the same anesthetic episode. Interobserver comparison and comparison between the two imaging modalities with regard to bidimensional measurements of the nasal tumors, tumor staging using historical schemes, and assignment of an ordinal scale of tumor margin clarity at the tumor-soft tissue interface were performed. The hypotheses included that MRI would have greater tumor measurements, result in higher tumor staging, and more clearly define the tumor soft tissue interface when compared to CT. Evaluation of bone involvement of the nasal cavity and head showed a high level of agreement between CT and MRI. Estimation of tumor volume using bidimensional measurements was higher on MRI imaging in 5/6 dogs, and resulted in a median tumor volume which was 18.4% higher than CT imaging. Disagreement between CT and MRI was noted with meningeal enhancement, in which two dogs were positive for meningeal enhancement on MRI and negative on CT. One of six dogs had a higher tumor stage on MRI compared to CT, while the remaining five agreed. Magnetic resonance imaging resulted in larger bidimensional measurements and tumor volume estimates, along with a higher likelihood of identifying meningeal enhancement when compared to CT imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging may provide integral information for tumor staging, prognosis, and treatment planning.

  5. Validation of the Australian diagnostic reference levels for paediatric multi detector computed tomography: a comparison of RANZCR QUDI data and subsequent NDRLS data from 2012 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Anna, Hayton; Wallace, Anthony; Thomas, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The national diagnostic reference level service (NDRLS), was launched in 2011, however no paediatric data were submitted during the first calendar year of operation. As such, Australian national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), for paediatric multi detector computed tomography (MDCT), were established using data obtained from a Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR), Quality Use of Diagnostic Imaging (QUDI), study. Paediatric data were submitted to the NDRLS in 2012 through 2015. An analysis has been made of the NDRLS paediatric data using the same method as was used to analyse the QUDI data to establish the Australian national paediatric DRLs for MDCT. An analysis of the paediatric NDRLS data has also been made using the method used to calculate the Australian national adult DRLs for MDCT. A comparison between the QUDI data and subsequent NDRLS data shows the NDRLS data to be lower on average for the Head and AbdoPelvis protocol and similar for the chest protocol. Using an average of NDRLS data submitted between 2012 and 2015 implications for updated paediatric DRLS are considered.

  6. The Construction and Uses of CATIA, a Computerized Mathematics Testbank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Charles R.; Marosz, Wanda A.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the construction of a computerized test bank to generate and score tests in college algebra, trigonometry, and intermediate algebra; including a discussion of uses, advantages and disadvantages of computerized testing. (JLH)

  7. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  8. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  9. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  10. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  11. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  12. 11 CFR 9033.12 - Production of computerized information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... magnetic media, such as magnetic tapes or magnetic diskettes, containing the computerized information at.... The computerized magnetic media shall be prepared and delivered at the committee's expense and shall... Commission's Computerized Magnetic Media Requirements for title 26 Candidates/Committees Receiving...

  13. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... plans to use and how they will interface with the base system; (3) Provide documentation that the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized...

  14. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... plans to use and how they will interface with the base system; (3) Provide documentation that the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized...

  15. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters at... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System....

  16. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the établissement francais du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding to recipients, blood products, blood supply of the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, the integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So, it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed to be a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks.

  17. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    PubMed

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2011-04-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the Établissement français du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding recipients, blood products, blood supply for the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed at being a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks.

  18. Computerized Testing: The Hidden Figures Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Ronald L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study adapted the Hidden Figures Test for use on PLATO and determined the reliability of the computerized version compared to the paper and pencil version. Results indicate the test was successfully adapted with some modifications, and it was judged reliable although it may be measuring additional constructs. (MBR)

  19. Principles for Creating a Computerized Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllonen, Patrick C.

    1991-01-01

    The experience of developing a set of comprehensive aptitude batteries for computer administration for the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory's Learning Abilities Measurement Program resulted in the formulation of nine principles for creation of a computerized test battery. These principles are discussed in the context of research on…

  20. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  1. MU's Early Space-Planning Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shader, Scott; Vaughn, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of the University of Missouri-Columbia's Space Planning and Management office (SPAM) and the computerization of the school's space-planning archives. Discusses SPAM's software selection for standardization as well as its manual development, placing the school's buildings and floor plans on the Web, and its space-modeling…

  2. 36 CFR 1120.52 - Computerized records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Freedom of Information Act is available to the public as follows: (1) When there is an existing printout... page rate stated in § 1120.51(a) for each 81/2 by 11 inch page. (2) When there is not an existing... information from computerized records frequently involves a minimum computer time cost of approximately...

  3. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  4. Individual Differences in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, JinGyu

    Research on the major computerized adaptive testing (CAT) strategies is reviewed, and some findings are reported that examine effects of examinee demographic and psychological characteristics on CAT strategies. In fixed branching strategies, all examinees respond to a common routing test, the score of which is used to assign examinees to a…

  5. Computerizing Maintenance Management Improves School Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Pat

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), a centralized maintenance operations database that facilitates work order procedures and staff directives, can help individual school campuses and school districts to manage maintenance. Presents the benefits of CMMS and things to consider in CMMS selection. (EV)

  6. Computerized Collective Training for Teams. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurmond, Paul; Kribs, H. Dewey

    The purpose of this investigation was to empirically demonstrate and evaluate a brassboard for computerized collective training for teams (COLT2). The underlying tasks were to (1) conduct a state of the art assessment of instructional strategies appropriate for COLT2, (2) derive a conceptual framework for COLT2 instructional strategies, (3)…

  7. Implementation of a Computerized Maintenance Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yong-Hong; Askari, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A primer Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) has been established for NASA Ames pressure component certification program. The CMMS takes full advantage of the latest computer technology and SQL relational database to perform periodic services for vital pressure components. The Ames certification program is briefly described and the aspects of the CMMS implementation are discussed as they are related to the certification objectives.

  8. Computerized Inspection Of Gear-Tooth Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.; Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, Y.; Kuan, C.

    1994-01-01

    Method of manufacturing gears with precisely shaped teeth involves computerized inspection of gear-tooth surfaces followed by adjustments of machine-tool settings to minimize deviations between real and theoretical versions of surfaces. Thus, iterated cycles of cutting gear teeth, inspection, and adjustments help increase and/or maintain precision of subsequently manufactured gears.

  9. Computerizing the Chinese International School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Marilyn

    This paper describes the computerization of the libraries in the Chinese International School in Hong Kong. The Infant, Junior and Secondary libraries, with a staff of three professional librarians, one library assistant, and one audiovisual technician, needed an automated system which could support their bilingual curriculum. Two computer systems…

  10. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  11. Item Selection in Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Several alternatives for item selection algorithms based on item response theory in computerized classification testing (CCT) have been suggested, with no conclusive evidence on the substantial superiority of a single method. It is argued that the lack of sizable effect is because some of the methods actually assess items very similarly through…

  12. Termination Criteria for Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Computerized classification testing (CCT) is an approach to designing tests with intelligent algorithms, similar to adaptive testing, but specifically designed for the purpose of classifying examinees into categories such as "pass" and "fail." Like adaptive testing for point estimation of ability, the key component is the…

  13. Strategies for Computerized Adaptive Grading Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Beiling

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated three strategies for assigning examinees to grading categories in computerized adaptive testing. The expected a posteriori-based method had more correct classifications in the middle range of grade levels and more errors for the extremes than the golden section search grading test and the Z-score grading test. (SLD)

  14. Dichotomous Search Strategies for Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Beiling

    Dichotomous search strategies (DSSs) for computerized adaptive testing are similar to golden section search strategies (GSSSs). Each middle point of successive search regions is a testing point. After each item is administered, the subject's obtained score is compared with the expected score at successive testing points. If the subject's obtained…

  15. Computerized Financial Reporting Based on GAAP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikkanen, Stan; Liljeberg, Burt

    1983-01-01

    Describes the statewide computerized system developed in Minnesota following the 1976 enactment of the Uniform Financial Accounting and Reporting Standards (UFARS) law. UFARS includes provisions for an advisory council responsible for recommending accounting and reporting procedures, and seven data processing centers to serve all 560 Minnesota…

  16. An Introduction to the Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Jian-quan; Miao, Dan-min; Zhu, Xia; Gong, Jing-jing

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has unsurpassable advantages over traditional testing. It has become the mainstream in large scale examinations in modern society. This paper gives a brief introduction to CAT including differences between traditional testing and CAT, the principles of CAT, psychometric theory and computer algorithms of CAT, the…

  17. Evaluating Content Alignment in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.; Kingsbury, G. Gage; Webb, Norman L.

    2015-01-01

    The alignment between a test and the content domain it measures represents key evidence for the validation of test score inferences. Although procedures have been developed for evaluating the content alignment of linear tests, these procedures are not readily applicable to computerized adaptive tests (CATs), which require large item pools and do…

  18. An in vitro comparison of diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and phosphor storage plate to detect simulated occlusal secondary caries under amalgam restoration

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi, Shoaleh; Zadeh, Nahal Kazerooni; Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Shahab, Shahriar; Bahrampour, Ehsan; Hamedani, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy and feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with phosphor storage plate (PSP) in detection of simulated occlusal secondary caries. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro descriptive-comparative study, a total of 80 slots of class I cavities were prepared on 80 extracted human premolars. Then, 40 teeth were randomly selected out of this sample and artificial carious lesions were created on these teeth by a round diamond bur no. 1/2. All 80 teeth were restored with amalgam fillings and radiographs were taken, both with PSP system and CBCT. All images were evaluated by three calibrated observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of two systems. SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was adopted for statistical analysis. The difference between Az value of bitewing and CBCT methods were compared by pairwise comparison method. The inter- and intra-operator agreement was assessed by kappa analysis (P < 0.05). Results: The mean Az value for bitewings and CBCT was 0.903 and 0.994, respectively. Significant differences were found between PSP and CBCT (P = 0.010). The kappa value for inter-observer agreement was 0.68 and 0.76 for PSP and CBCT, respectively. The kappa value for intra-observer agreement was 0.698 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.766 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.716 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in PSP method, and 0.816 (observer 1, P = 0.000), 0.653 (observer 2, P = 0.000) and 0.744 (observer 3, P = 0.000) in CBCT method. Conclusion: This in vitro study, with a limited number of samples, showed that the New Tom VGI Flex CBCT system was more accurate than the PSP in detecting the simulated small secondary occlusal caries under amalgam restoration. PMID:25878682

  19. Comparison of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of facet tropism and facet arthrosis in degenerative cervical spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Ding, Z H; Xu, Y K

    2014-05-30

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the assessment of facet tropism and facet arthrosis of spondylolisthesis levels in degenerative cervical spondylolisthesis as compared to computed tomography (CT). The discrepancies in the interpretation of CT and MRI data in the evaluation of facet tropism and arthrosis have given rise to questions regarding the reliability of comparisons of the two techniques. Using a 4-point scale, 3 blinded readers independently graded the severity of facet tropism and facet arthrosis of 79 cervical facet joints on axial T2-weighted and sagittal T1 and T2-weighted turbo spin echo images as well as the corresponding axial CT scans. All results were subjected to the kappa coefficient statistic for strength of agreement. In the assessment of the severity of facet arthrosis, intermethod agreement (weighted κ) between CT scanning with a moderate inter-rater reliability (range κ = 0.43-0.57) and MRI with fair inter-rater reliability (range κ = 0.23-0.38) was 0.76 and 0.43 for the severity of facet tropism and facet arthrosis, respectively. Intra-rater reliability for the severity of facet arthrosis was moderate to substantial for CT and was moderate for MRI scans. Intra-rater reliability for the severity of facet tropism was substantial to very good for CT and substantial for MRI scans. MRI can reliably determine the presence or degree of facet tropism but not facet arthrosis. Therefore, for a comprehensive assessment of cervical facet joint degeneration, both a CT and an MRI scan should be performed.

  20. A comparison between radiation therapists and medical specialists in the use of kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography scans for potential lung cancer radiotherapy target verification and adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, Sandie Carolyn; Vinod, Shalini K.; Dimigen, Marion; Descallar, Joseph; Zogovic, Branimere; Atyeo, John; Wallis, Sian; Holloway, Lois C.

    2016-04-01

    Target volume matching using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the preferred treatment verification method for lung cancer in many centers. However, radiation therapists (RTs) are trained in bony matching and not soft tissue matching. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RTs were equivalent to radiation oncologists (ROs) and radiologists (RDs) in alignment of the treatment CBCT with the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined at planning and in delineating the GTV on the treatment CBCT, as may be necessary for adaptive radiotherapy. In this study, 10 RTs, 1 RO, and 1 RD performed a manual tumor alignment and correction of the planning GTV to a treatment CBCT to generate an isocenter correction distance for 15 patient data sets. Participants also contoured the GTV on the same data sets. The isocenter correction distance and the contoured GTVs from the RTs were compared with the RD and RO. The mean difference in isocenter correction distances was 0.40 cm between the RO and RD, 0.51 cm between the RTs, and RO and 0.42 cm between the RTs and RD. The 95% CIs were smaller than the equivalence limit of 0.5 cm, indicating that the RTs were equivalent to the RO and RD. For GTV delineation comparisons, the RTs were not found to be equivalent to the RD or RO. The alignment of the planning defined GTV and treatment CBCT using soft tissue matching by the RTs has been shown to be equivalent to those by the RO and RD. However, tumor delineation by the RTs on the treatment CBCT was not equivalent to that of the RO and RD. Thus, it may be appropriate for RTs to undertake soft tissue alignment based on CBCT; however, further investigation may be necessary before RTs undertake delineation for adaptive radiotherapy purposes.

  1. The conclusive role of postmortem computed tomography (CT) of the skull and computer-assisted superimposition in identification of an unknown body.

    PubMed

    Lorkiewicz-Muszyńska, Dorota; Kociemba, Wojciech; Żaba, Czesław; Łabęcka, Marzena; Koralewska-Kordel, Małgorzata; Abreu-Głowacka, Monica; Przystańska, Agnieszka

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography is commonly used in modern medicine, and thus, it is often helpful for medicolegal purposes, especially as part of the antemortem record. The application of postmortem computed tomography and 3D reconstruction of the skull in challenging cases is reported, and its valuable contribution to positive identification is discussed. This paper presents a case in which the body of an unknown individual is identified. Positive identification had not been possible despite a multidisciplinary examination. The postmortem use of computerized tomography and 3D reconstruction of the skull followed by the comparison of individual morphological characteristics of the viscerocranium showed the concordant points between the deceased and a missing person. Finally, superimposition using a 3D-reconstructed skull instead of the skeletonized skull demonstrated an adequate degree of morphological consistency in the facial images of the analyzed individuals that lead to positive identification. It was concluded that where other methods of personal identification had failed, the use of postmortem computed tomography had proved to be instrumental in the positive identification of the deceased.

  2. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  3. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: a review.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiantao; Gu, Suicheng; Liu, Shusen; Zhu, Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M; Gur, David

    2012-05-01

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  4. Computerized analysis of pelvic incidence from 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Janssen, Michiel M. A.; Pernuš, Franjo; Castelein, René M.; Viergever, Max A.

    2012-02-01

    The sagittal alignment of the pelvis can be evaluated by the angle of pelvic incidence (PI), which is constant for an arbitrary subject position and orientation and can be therefore compared among subjects in standing, sitting or supine position. In this study, PI was measured from three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images of normal subjects that were acquired in supine position. A novel computerized method, based on image processing techniques, was developed to automatically determine the anatomical references required to measure PI, i.e. the centers of the femoral heads in 3D, and the center and inclination of the sacral endplate in 3D. Multiplanar image reformation was applied to obtain perfect sagittal views with all anatomical structures completely in line with the hip axis, from which PI was calculated. The resulting PI (mean+/-standard deviation) was equal to 46.6°+/-9.2° for male subjects (N = 189), 47.6°+/-10.7° for female subjects (N = 181), and 47.1°+/-10.0° for all subjects (N = 370). The obtained measurements of PI from 3D images were not biased by acquisition projection or structure orientation, because all anatomical structures were completely in line with the hip axis. The performed measurements in 3D therefore represent PI according to the actual geometrical relationships among anatomical structures of the sacrum, pelvis and hips, as observed from the perfect sagittal views.

  5. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gomar, Jesús J; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J; Ovejero, María R; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results.

  6. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gomar, Jesús J.; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J.; Ovejero, María R.; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M.; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. PMID:26006264

  7. Metropolitan Orlando area computerized signal system

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, F.R. ); Allen, T.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Florida's Orlando metropolitan area, which has a population measuring 1 million, is among the fastest growing areas in the nation. The city's weather and popular attractions draw 9 to 10 million tourists annually, half of them arriving in their own cars. Add to this the 1.1 million automobiles already on the streets, and the traffic problems become a nightmare. The Orlando metropolitan area has approximately 550 operational traffic signals, with an increasing number of new signals added each year to control the city's expanding growth. A central, computerized signal system has been conceived as one of the solutions necessary to cope with this tremendous traffic growth. The system is flexible, expandable, and capable of meeting future technical challenges. This article describes the steps that led to the feasibility study, design, and implementation of the Orlando area computerized signal system.

  8. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  9. Computerized flow monitors detect small kicks

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, D.; White, D. )

    1992-02-24

    This paper reports on a smart alarm system installed on a number of offshore rigs and one land rig which can detect kicks more quickly than conventional systems. This rapid kick detection improves rig safety because the smaller the detected influx, the easier it is to control the well. The extensive computerized monitoring system helps drilling personnel detect fluid influxes and fluid losses before the changes in flow would normally be apparent.

  10. Objective assessment of clinical computerized thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1991-06-01

    The efficacy of diagnostic thermal imaging, the visualization of abnormal distribution of temperature over the human skin, can be significantly augmented by computerized image processing procedures that overcome the limitations of subjective image assessment. This paper reviews diagnostic thermal imaging and describes common image processing approaches applicable to the analysis of static thermal images and of time series of images that provide diagnostic information about the dynamics of neurological regulation of skin temperature.

  11. The NASA/LRC Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. Kirk; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    A new testing package, including apparatus and tasks for the behavioral study of a number of species in a variety of experiments is presented. The package is described with respect to the kinds of comparative psychological investigations for which it is best suited. The preliminary data generated within this new testing paradigm demonstrate that the NASA/LRC Computerized Test System provides a flexible yet powerful environment for the investigation of behavioral and psychological processes.

  12. Pseudolocal tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomographic data is used to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. The relative attenuation data is input to a pseudo-local tomography function, where the difference between the internal density and the pseudo-local tomography function is computed across the discontinuity. The pseudo-local tomography function outputs the location of the discontinuity and the difference in density between the first density and the second density.

  13. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  14. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  15. 3D Imaging with Holographic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Kou, Shan Shan

    2010-04-01

    There are two main types of tomography that enable the 3D internal structures of objects to be reconstructed from scattered data. The commonly known computerized tomography (CT) give good results in the x-ray wavelength range where the filtered back-projection theorem and Radon transform can be used. These techniques rely on the Fourier projection-slice theorem where rays are considered to propagate straight through the object. Another type of tomography called `diffraction tomography' applies in applications in optics and acoustics where diffraction and scattering effects must be taken into account. The latter proves to be a more difficult problem, as light no longer travels straight through the sample. Holographic tomography is a popular way of performing diffraction tomography and there has been active experimental research on reconstructing complex refractive index data using this approach recently. However, there are two distinct ways of doing tomography: either by rotation of the object or by rotation of the illumination while fixing the detector. The difference between these two setups is intuitive but needs to be quantified. From Fourier optics and information transformation point of view, we use 3D transfer function analysis to quantitatively describe how spatial frequencies of the object are mapped to the Fourier domain. We first employ a paraxial treatment by calculating the Fourier transform of the defocused OTF. The shape of the calculated 3D CTF for tomography, by scanning the illumination in one direction only, takes on a form that we might call a 'peanut,' compared to the case of object rotation, where a diablo is formed, the peanut exhibiting significant differences and non-isotropy. In particular, there is a line singularity along one transverse direction. Under high numerical aperture conditions, the paraxial treatment is not accurate, and so we make use of 3D analytical geometry to calculate the behaviour in the non-paraxial case. This time, we

  16. A Critical Comparison Between Two Scanning Protocols of High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography at the Distal Radius in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Ka-Yee; Tam, Elisa Man-Shan; Yu, Fiona Wai-Ping; Yip, Benjamin Hon-Kei; Hung, Vivian Wing-Yin; Wang, Xiaofang; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Zhu, Tracy Y; Qin, Ling; Cheng, Jack Chun-Yiu; Lam, Tsz-Ping

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a unique technology for assessing bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. Currently, no universally accepted protocol for selecting the region of interest (ROI) at the distal radius has been established for growing subjects. This study aimed (1) to investigate the differences in HR-pQCT measurements of 2 different ROI protocols applied to the distal radius of healthy adolescents and (2) to identify the least common area of ROI (the least common ROI) between the protocols. Twenty-six boys and 26 girls aged between 13 and 16 yr old were recruited. Nondominant distal radius was scanned by 2 HR-pQCT protocols, namely, the "5-mm protocol," where the distal end of ROI started at 5 mm proximal to a reference line, and the "4% protocol," where the ROI started at 4% of the ulnar length proximal to another reference line. The least common ROI between the 2 protocols was identified and the slice numbering within the common ROI was determined. Bland-Altman plots were used to check the agreement of the least common ROIs between the 2 protocols. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for analysis. In boys, significant differences between protocols were found in most parameters with the maximum difference observed in the cortical area (25.0%, p < 0.001). In girls, differences were observed only for total volumetric bone mineral density (3.6%, p = 0.032). The number of slices in the least common ROI was 66 (60.0%) and 57 (51.8%) in boys and girls, respectively. Good agreements on all HR-pQCT parameters from the least common ROI between the 2 protocols were found. Significant differences in bone parameters were noted between the 2 protocols. When comparing the 2 protocols, observed gender differences could reflect the differences in skeletal growth at the peripubertal period between genders. Least common ROI could be useful for cross-center comparisons and when merging

  17. Computerized certification of digital ultrasonic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, M. W.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized inspection system is being set up at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to enable certification of the Krautkramer Branson ultrasonic instrumentation used extensively in Y-12 production operations. The system takes the data required to certify the linearity and frequency response of the receiver and to certify the correct operation of the pulsers, gates, and computer interface. A subset of the program will be able to verify correct instrumentation in the field by using the actual computer and instrumentation being used for production ultrasonic weld inspections. The system can reduce the certification time from approximately one week to less than an hour.

  18. Impact of Dynamic Specimen Shape Evolution on the Atom Probe Tomography Results of Doped Epitaxial Oxide Multilayers: Comparison of Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Bao, Jie; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Devaraj, Arun

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and side-ways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was correlated with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-theory correlation explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the need and importance of correlating experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using atom probe tomography for studying oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  19. Critical review of tomography in radiology and nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Freedman, G S; Putman, C E; Potter, G D

    1975-04-01

    This review covers conventional radiographic tomography, radioisotopic tomography, and a review of computerized transaxial tomography. Simple, reproducible radiographic tomographic methods are increasing in use, and despite their complexity, the diagnostic results are superior to conventional radiographs. There are many different motions of the X-ray tube and the film which can be employed to create a tomogram. The perfect tomographic motion is partly determined by the geometric shape of the object to be imaged and the thickness of the plane of interest. The undirectional tomographic method blurs a point in a linear fashion; the pleuridirectional method blurs a point over a wider surface. Among the most popular directions used are linear, circular, elliptical, and hypocycloidal. The numerous applications of tomography described in this review are an encouraging, broad-based foundation from which the most clinically useful and economically feasible devices will emerge.

  20. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  1. Comparison of cerebral blood flow measurement with [15O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Audrey P; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cerebral blood flow provides critical information to understand normal brain physiology as well as to identify and manage patients with neurological disorders. To date, the reference standard for cerebral blood flow measurements is considered to be positron emission tomography using injection of the [(15)O]-water radiotracer. Although [(15)O]-water has been used to study brain perfusion under normal and pathological conditions, it is not widely used in clinical settings due to the need for an on-site cyclotron, the invasive nature of arterial blood sampling, and experimental complexity. As an alternative, arterial spin labeling is a promising magnetic resonance imaging technique that magnetically labels arterial blood as it flows into the brain to map cerebral blood flow. As arterial spin labeling becomes more widely adopted in research and clinical settings, efforts have sought to standardize the method and validate its cerebral blood flow values against positron emission tomography-based cerebral blood flow measurements. The purpose of this work is to critically review studies that performed both [(15)O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling to measure brain perfusion, with the aim of better understanding the accuracy and reproducibility of arterial spin labeling relative to the positron emission tomography reference standard.

  2. Comparison of left ventricular ejection fraction values obtained using invasive contrast left ventriculography, two-dimensional echocardiography, and gated single-photon emission computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Nadish; Dresser, Thomas; Aggarwal, Kul; Gupta, Vishal; Mittal, Mayank K; Alpert, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Left ventricular ejection fraction can be measured by a variety of invasive and non-invasive cardiac techniques. This study assesses the relation of three diagnostic modalities to each other in the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction: invasive contrast left ventriculography, two-dimensional echocardiography, and quantitative gated single-photon emission computed tomography. Methods: Retrospective chart review was conducted on 58 patients hospitalized with chest pain, who underwent left ventricular ejection fraction evaluation using each of the aforementioned modalities within a 3-month period not interrupted by myocardial infarction or revascularization. Results: The mean left ventricular ejection fraction values were as follows: invasive contrast left ventriculography (0.44±0.15), two-dimensional echocardiography (0.46±0.13), and gated single-photon emission computed tomography (0.37±0.10). Correlations coefficients and associated p values were as follows: invasive contrast left ventriculography versus two-dimensional echocardiography (r=0.69, p<0.001), invasive contrast left ventriculography versus gated single-photon emission computed tomography (r=0.80, p<0.0001), and gated single-photon emission computed tomography versus two-dimensional echocardiography (r=0.69, p<0.001). Conclusion: Our results indicate that strong positive correlations exist among the three techniques studied. PMID:27621804

  3. Computerized training of cryosurgery - a system approach.

    PubMed

    Keelan, R; Yamakawa, S; Shimada, K; Rabin, Y

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to provide the foundation for a computerized training platform for cryosurgery. Consistent with clinical practice, the training process targets the correlation of the frozen region contour with the target region shape, using medical imaging and accepted criteria for clinical success. The current study focuses on system design considerations, including a bioheat transfer model, simulation techniques, optimal cryoprobe layout strategy, and a simulation core framework. Two fundamentally different approaches were considered for the development of a cryosurgery simulator, based on a finite-elements (FE) commercial code (ANSYS) and a proprietary finite-difference (FD) code. Results of this study demonstrate that the FE simulator is superior in terms of geometric modeling, while the FD simulator is superior in terms of runtime. Benchmarking results further indicate that the FD simulator is superior in terms of usage of memory resources, pre-processing, parallel processing, and post-processing. It is envisioned that future integration of a human-interface module and clinical data into the proposed computer framework will make computerized training of cryosurgery a practical reality.

  4. Computerized Clinical Decision Support: Contributions from 2014

    PubMed Central

    Koutkias, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2014 in the field of computerized clinical decision support for the Decision Support section of the IMIA yearbook. Method A literature review was performed by searching two bibliographic databases for papers related to clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computerized provider order entry systems in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the editorial team was finally organized to conclude on the selection of best papers. Results Among the 1,254 returned papers published in 2014, the full review process selected four best papers. The first one is an experimental contribution to a better understanding of unintended uses of CDSSs. The second paper describes the effective use of previously collected data to tailor and adapt a CDSS. The third paper presents an innovative application that uses pharmacogenomic information to support personalized medicine. The fourth paper reports on the long-term effect of the routine use of a CDSS for antibiotic therapy. Conclusions As health information technologies spread more and more meaningfully, CDSSs are improving to answer users’ needs more accurately. The exploitation of previously collected data and the use of genomic data for decision support has started to materialize. However, more work is still needed to address issues related to the correct usage of such technologies, and to assess their effective impact in the long term. PMID:26293858

  5. Methods for validating chronometry of computerized tests.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Joshua P; Jones, Stephanie A H; Wright, Chris P; Butler, Beverly C; Klein, Raymond M; Eskes, Gail A

    2017-03-01

    Determining the speed at which a task is performed (i.e., reaction time) can be a valuable tool in both research and clinical assessments. However, standard computer hardware employed for measuring reaction times (e.g., computer monitor, keyboard, or mouse) can add nonrepresentative noise to the data, potentially compromising the accuracy of measurements and the conclusions drawn from the data. Therefore, an assessment of the accuracy and precision of measurement should be included along with the development of computerized tests and assessment batteries that rely on reaction times as the dependent variable. This manuscript outlines three methods for assessing the temporal accuracy of reaction time data (one employing external chronometry). Using example data collected from the Dalhousie Computerized Attention Battery (DalCAB) we discuss the detection, measurement, and correction of nonrepresentative noise in reaction time measurement. The details presented in this manuscript should act as a cautionary tale to any researchers or clinicians gathering reaction time data, but who have not yet considered methods for verifying the internal chronometry of the software and or hardware being used.

  6. Computerized physician order entry systems: the right prescription?

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ross

    2005-03-01

    Policymakers increasingly urge the use of information technology to improve the quality and efficiency of health care. In particular, computerized physician order entry (CPOE) is emphasized for its ability to reduce prescribing errors inherent in paper-based systems. This Issue Brief summarizes research that sounds a cautionary note about the potential for computerized systems to facilitate medication errors, as well as reduce them.

  7. Computerized Ability Testing, 1972-1975. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    Three and one-half years of research on computerized ability testing are summarized. The original objectives of the research were: (1) to develop and implement the stratified computer-based ability test; (2) to compare, on psychometric criteria, the various approaches to computer-based ability testing, including the stratified computerized test,…

  8. Computerized Adaptive Assessment of Cognitive Abilities among Disabled Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engdahl, Brian

    This study examined computerized adaptive testing and cognitive ability testing of adults with cognitive disabilities. Adult subjects (N=250) were given computerized tests on language usage and space relations in one of three administration conditions: paper and pencil, fixed length computer adaptive, and variable length computer adaptive.…

  9. 11 CFR 9033.12 - Production of computerized information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... authorized committee maintains or uses computerized information containing any of the categories of data... Funding. The data contained in the computerized magnetic media provided to the Commission shall be... materials for processing and analyzing the information requested. Upon request, the committee shall...

  10. Computerized Literature Searching of Education and Education Related Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaporozhetz, Laurene E.

    Computerized literature searching allows the educator to become familiar with resources that help develop individual teaching styles and methods, enhance awareness of pupil needs, explain educational research and evaluation, and describe curriculum materials. This document introduces the fundamentals of computerized literature searching. The…

  11. Assessment Outcomes: Computerized Instruction in a Human Gross Anatomy Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, Elaine L.

    2002-01-01

    The first of three successive classes of beginning physical therapy students (n=17) completed traditional cadaver anatomy lecture/lab; the next 17 a self-study computerized anatomy lab, and the next 20 both lectures and computer lab. No differences in study times and course or licensure exam performance appeared. Computerized self-study is a…

  12. The Reality, Direction, and Future of Computerized Publications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenstein, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Sharing information in digital form by using a computer is a growing phenomenon. Many universities are making their applications available on computer. More than one hundred and thirty-six universities have developed computerized applications on their own or through a commercial vendor. Universities developed computerized applications in order to…

  13. Shallow Ocean Bottom BRDF Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation with Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Shallow Ocean Bottom BRDF Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation with Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography G. C...Prediction, Modeling, and Inversion via Simulation with Surface/Volume Data Derived from X-ray Tomography 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...focus Xray Computerized Tomography (MXCT) instrument at NRL SSC. The MXCT instrument requires preparation of the sample by embedding it in an epoxy

  14. Comparison between 2-(18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography for measuring gross tumor volume in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Randall, Elissa K; Kraft, Susan L; Larue, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most refractory feline malignancies. Most patients succumb due to failure in local tumor control. 2-(18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG PET) is increasingly being used for veterinary oncology staging as it highlights areas with higher glucose metabolism. The goal of the current prospective study was to compare gross tumor volume measurements using (18) F-FDG PET vs. those using computed tomography (CT) for stereotactic radiation therapy planning in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twelve cats with confirmed oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent pretreatment (18) F-FDG PET/CT. Gross tumor volumes based on contrast-enhanced CT and (18) F-FDG PET were measured and compared among cats. Mean PET gross tumor volume was significantly smaller than mean CT gross tumor volume in the mandibular/maxillary squamous cell carcinoma group (n = 8, P = 0.002) and for the total number of patients (n = 12, P = 0.006), but not in the lingual/laryngeal group (n = 4, P = 0.57). Mismatch fraction analysis revealed that most of the lingual/laryngeal patients had a large region of high-(18) F-FDG activity outside of the CT gross tumor volume. This mismatch fraction was significantly greater in the lingual/laryngeal group than the mandibular/maxillary group (P = 0.028). The effect of poor spatial resolution of PET imaging was greater when the absolute tumor volume was small. Findings from this study indicated that (18) F-FDG PET warrants further investigation as a supplemental imaging modality in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma because it detected regions of possible primary tumor that were not detected on CT images.

  15. Muon tomography of the Soufrière of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles): Comparison with other geophysical imaging methods and assessment of volcanic risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, D.; Lesparre, N.; Marteau, J.; Taisne, B.; Nicollin, F.; Coutant, O.

    2011-12-01

    Density tomography of rock with muons of cosmic origin measures the attenuation of the flux of particles crossing the object of interest to derive its opacity, i.e. the quantity of matter encountered by the particles along their trajectories. Recent progress in micro-electronics and particle detectors make field measurement possible and muon density tomography is gaining a growing interest (e.g. Tanaka et al., 2010; Gibert et al., 2010). We have constructed field telescopes based on the detectors of the OPERA experiment devoted to study neutrino oscillation (Lesparre et al., 2011a). Each telescope may be equipped with a variable number of detection matrices with 256 pixels. The spatial resolution is adaptable and is typically of about 20 meters (Lesparre et al., 2010). The telescopes are portable autonomous devices able to operate in harsh field conditions encountered on tropical volcanoes. The total power consumption is less than 40W, and an Ethernet link allows data downloading and remote control of the electronic devices and on-board computers. Larger high-resolution telescopes are under construction. The instruments have been successfully tested on the Etna and Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcanoes were a telescope is operating continuously since Summer 2010. Muon radiographies of the Soufrière lava dome reveal its very heterogeneous density structure produced by an intense hydrothermal circulation of acid fluids which alters its mechanical integrity leading to a high risk level of destabilisation. Small-size features are visible on the images and provide precious informations on the structure of the upper hydrothermal systems. Joined interpretation with other geophysical data available on the Soufrière - seismic tomography, electrical resistivity tomography, gravity data - is presented and discussed. Density muon tomography of the internal structure of volcanoes like the Soufrière brings important informations for the hazard evaluation an is particularly

  16. Prospective comparison of use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the Bosniak classification of complex renal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Ragel, Matthew; Nedumaran, Anbu

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the evaluation of complex renal cysts using the Bosniak classification. Methods Forty-six patients with 51 complex renal cysts were prospectively examined using contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and images analysed by two observers using the Bosniak classification. Adverse effects and patients’ preference were assessed for both modalities. Results There was complete agreement in Bosniak classification between both modalities and both observers in six cysts (11.8%). There was agreement of Bosniak classification on both modalities in 21 of 51 cysts (41.2%) for observer 1 and in 17 of 51 cysts (33.3%) for observer 2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound gave a higher Bosniak classification than corresponding contrast-enhanced computed tomography in 31 % of cysts by both observers. Histological correlation was available in three lesions, all of which were malignant and classified as such simultaneously on both modalities by at least one observer, with remaining patients followed up with US or CT for 6–24 months. No adverse or side effects were reported following the use of US contrast, whilst 63.6% of patients suffered minor side effects following the use of CT contrast. 81.8% of the surveyed patients preferred contrast-enhanced ultrasound to contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a feasible tool in the evaluation of complex renal cysts in a non-specialist setting. Increased contrast-enhanced ultrasound sensitivity to enhancement compared to contrast-enhanced computed tomography, resulting in upgrading the Bosniak classification on contrast-enhanced ultrasound, has played a role in at best moderate agreement recorded by the observers with limited experience, but this would be overcome as the experience grows. To this end, we propose a standardised proforma for the contrast-enhanced ultrasound report. The

  17. The status of computerized cognitive testing in aging: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Katherine; Howieson, Diane; Webbe, Frank; Seelye, Adriana; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Background Early detection of cognitive decline in the elderly has become of heightened importance in parallel with the recent advances in therapeutics. Computerized assessment may be uniquely suited to early detection of changes in cognition in the elderly. We present here a systematic review of the status of computer-based cognitive testing focusing on detection of cognitive decline in the aging population. Methods All studies purporting to assess or detect age-related changes in cognition or early dementia/mild cognitive impairment (MCI) by means of computerized testing were included. Each test battery was rated on availability of normative data, level of evidence for test validity and reliability, comprehensiveness, and usability. All published studies relevant to a particular computerized test were read by a minimum of two reviewers, who completed rating forms containing the above-mentioned criteria. Results Of the 18 test batteries identified from the initial search, eleven were appropriate to cognitive testing in the elderly and were subjected to systematic review. Of those 11, five were either developed specifically for application with the elderly or have been used extensively with that population. Even within the computerized testing genre, great variability existed in manner of administration, ranging from fully examiner administered to fully self-administered. All tests had at least minimal reliability and validity data, commonly reported in peer-reviewed articles. However, level of rigor of validity testing varied widely. Conclusion All test batteries exhibited some of the strengths of computerized cognitive testing: standardization of administration and stimulus presentation, accurate measures of response latencies, automated comparison in real-time with an individual’s prior performance as well as with age-related norms, and efficiencies of staffing and cost. Some, such as the MCIS, adapted complicated scoring algorithms to enhance the information

  18. 3D cephalometric analysis obtained from computed tomography. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Giulia; Cavallini, Costanza; Cassetta, Michele; Barbato, Ersilia

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction The aim of this systematic review is to estimate accuracy and reproducibility of craniometric measurements and reliability of landmarks identified with computed tomography (CT) techniques in 3D cephalometric analysis. Methods Computerized and manual searches were conducted up to 2011 for studies that addressed these objectives. The selection criteria were: (1) the use of human specimen; (2) the comparison between 2D and 3D cephalometric analysis; (3) the assessment of accuracy, reproducibility of measurements and reliability of landmark identification with CT images compared with two-dimensional conventional radiographs. The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions was used as the guideline for this article. Results Twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Most of them demonstrated high measurements accuracy and reproducibility, and landmarks reliability, but their cephalometric analysis methodology varied widely. Conclusion These differencies among the studies in making measurements don’t permit a direct comparison between them. The future developments in the knowledge of these techniques should provide a standardized method to conduct the 3D CT cephalometric analysis. PMID:22545187

  19. Comparison between 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Regional Lymph Nodal Staging in Patients with Melanoma: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mirk, Paoletta; Treglia, Giorgio; Salsano, Marco; Basile, Pietro; Giordano, Alessandro; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Aim. to compare 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) to sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for regional lymph nodal staging in patients with melanoma. Methods. We performed a literature review discussing original articles which compared FDG-PET to SLNB for regional lymph nodal staging in patients with melanoma. Results and Conclusions. There is consensus in the literature that FDG-PET cannot replace SLNB for regional lymph nodal staging in patients with melanoma. PMID:22242204

  20. Performance of the CogState computerized battery in the Mayo Clinic Study on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Michelle M.; Machulda, Mary M.; Hagen, Clinton E.; Edwards, Kelly K.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The feasibility and validity of brief computerized cognitive batteries at the population-level are unknown. Methods Non-demented participants (n = 1660, age 50–97) in the Mayo Clinic Study on Aging completed the computerized CogState battery and standard neuropsychological battery. The correlation between tests was examined and comparisons between CogState performance on the personal computer (PC) and iPad (n = 331), and in the Clinic vs. at home (n = 194), were assessed. Results We obtained valid data on >97% of participants on each test. Correlations between the CogState and neuropsychological tests ranged from −0.462 to 0.531. While absolute differences between the PC and iPad were small and participants preferred the iPad, performance on the PC was faster. Participants performed faster on Detection, One Card Learning, and One Back at home compared to the Clinic. Conclusions The computerized CogState battery, especially the iPad, was feasible, acceptable, and valid in the population. PMID:25858683

  1. Computerized EEG: predictor of outcome in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Marasa, J; Saletu, B; Davis, S; Mucciardi, A N

    1975-03-01

    Based on a double blind cross-over study, it was determined that schizophrenic patient who have more high frequency fast activity and a lesser degree of alpha and slow waves in computerized EEG before the treatment have a better therapeutic outcome to the major tranquilizer (neuroleptic) treatment. The correlation between pretreatment high frequency computer EEG measurements and better therapeutic outcome reached the level of statistical significance. "Therapy resistant" schizophrenic patients were characterized by a lesser degree of very fast beta activity, more alpha waves and slow waves, higher amplitudes in computer EEG, and a lesser degree of acute (florid) psychotic symptomatology but more "negative" symptoms such as motor retardation and blunted affect. One of the most striking results of the study is the finding that schizophrenic patients with certain psychopathological profiles also have similar computer EEG profiles.

  2. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  3. Computerization of a telescope at secondary education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Santiago, A.; Martos Jumillas, J.

    2017-03-01

    The work we are presenting in this paper is the computerization of a refractor telescope on an EQ3 type equatorial mount through Arduino. The control of the mount is done via three different interfaces: Stellarium, an Android interface for mobile phones and a second interface for PC made with Processing. The aforementioned work was done by the authors with a double purpose: presenting the interest in astronomy in the Mathematics department, and the development of applications within the subject of Technology in 4th ESO. So, it is a collaborative project between both departments. Except for the telescope and the mount, all the resources we have used can be found in any high school: free software (Guadalinex v9), App Inventor and Processing.The project was carried out under the principle of reducing all possible costs given the economic possibilities of the institution.

  4. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.; Yucker, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized anatomical man (CAM) model, representing the most detailed and anatomically correct geometrical model of the human body yet prepared, has been developed for use in analyzing radiation dose distribution in man. This model of a 50-percentile standing USAF man comprises some 1100 unique geometric surfaces and some 2450 solid regions. Internal body geometry such as organs, voids, bones, and bone marrow are explicitly modeled. A computer program called CAMERA has also been developed for performing analyses with the model. Such analyses include tracing rays through the CAM geometry, placing results on magnetic tape in various forms, collapsing areal density data from ray tracing information to areal density distributions, preparing cross section views, etc. Numerous computer drawn cross sections through the CAM model are presented.

  5. Computerized, telephone-based stress management program.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, S. J.; Schwartz, M. D.; Fast, J.

    1993-01-01

    A stress management program that used computerized, telephone-based technology was offered to the public via a free, "800" telephone number. The program was intended to reach a very large number of persons, while requiring a minimum of staff time. The program used an interactive telephone system, employing natural sounding, digitized voice, and touch tone recognition of callers' responses. The program was available 24 hours a day. It composed each message to suit the individual needs and expectations of each caller. A controlled evaluation of the program was conducted to determine how the messages could be worded and presented most effectively. The results suggest that subjects were most likely to find the messages in the program helpful, to carry out the stress management instructions, and to continue calling when the messages were personalized and contained homework assignments. PMID:8130497

  6. The horizontal computerized rotational impulse test.

    PubMed

    Furman, Joseph M; Shirey, Ian; Roxberg, Jillyn; Kiderman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Whole-body impulsive rotations were used to overcome several limitations associated with manual head impulse testing. A computer-controlled rotational chair delivered brief, whole-body, earth-vertical axis yaw impulsive rotations while eye movements were measured using video-oculography. Results from an unselected group of 20 patients with dizziness and a group of 22 control subjects indicated that the horizontal computerized rotational head impulse test (crHIT) is well-tolerated and provides an estimate of unidirectional vestibulo-ocular reflex gain comparable to results from caloric testing. This study demonstrates that the horizontal crHIT is a new assessment tool that overcomes many of the limitations of manual head impulse testing and provides a reliable laboratory-based measure of unilateral horizontal semicircular canal function.

  7. Economic Evaluation of Computerized Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    This completed effort involved a technical and economic study of the capabilities of computer programs in the area of structural analysis. The applicability of the programs to NASA projects and to other users was studied. The applications in other industries was explored including both research and development and applied areas. The costs of several alternative analysis programs were compared. A literature search covered applicable technical literature including journals, trade publications and books. In addition to the literature search, several commercial companies that have developed computerized structural analysis programs were contacted and their technical brochures reviewed. These programs include SDRC I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, SCADA, SUPERSAP, NISA/DISPLAY, STAAD-III, MICAS, GTSTRUDL, and STARS. These programs were briefly reviewed as applicable to NASA projects.

  8. [CV-METER--a computerized objective assessment for academic promotion].

    PubMed

    Snir, Guy; Shohat, Moran; Grossman, Ehud; Shohat, Mordechai

    2008-01-01

    We describe a new web-based program developed at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel Aviv University that serves as a tool to assist the academic promotion committee. The program incorporates the sum of the candidate's publications together with the impact factor of the journals and the contribution of the candidate according to his/her place in the list of authors. The program also "weighs" other academic achievements of the candidate, such as grades in teaching, contribution to the faculty and to the academy/ profession in general, and other parameters. The program then grades the candidate according to the percentile compared to other candidates who have applied for the same promotion and who are in a similar field of research with comparable opportunities for publication. The program allows for transparency and maximal objectivity in the assessment of the candidates for promotion, taking into consideration multiple parameters, which is difficult without computerization, as well as objective comparisons between different departments and different faculties/universities.

  9. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  10. Three-dimensional computerized selection of hip prostheses in patients with congenital dislocated hips.

    PubMed

    Gelalis, L D; Xenakis, T A; Hantes, M; Vartziotis, K; Soucacos, P N

    2001-11-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the combined use of computed tomography (CT) and computer-aided design (CAD) in the preoperative evaluation and implant selection in 20 patients (20 hips) with congenital dislocation of the hip who were scheduled to undergo total hip arthroplasty. Computerized selection of the femoral implant with optimum fit and fill was made after a three-dimensional reconstruction of the femoral canal using CT data and CAD. Implantation of all sizes of 5 noncemented and 2 cemented femoral implants was simulated using CATIA software (IBM, Kingstone, NY). When patients underwent surgery, 18 of 20 preselected prostheses agreed by type and size with the prostheses implanted. The remaining 2 preselected implants agreed by type only. In patients with dislocated and dysplastic hips, combined use of CT and CAD allows effective preoperative planning by providing the surgeon with vital information about the proximal femoral canal geometry and the possible femoral implant with optimum fit and fill to be used.

  11. Problems and Solutions of Popularization of Accounting Computerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kan; Fu, YingLi; Gu, CaiDong; Zhang, Liang

    With the integration of China's economy and international markets, accounting computerization, which conducts accounting and accounting control by taking advantage of computer, has become a major component sector of accounting modernization and the main content of accounting reform. The popularization of accounting computerization is beyond question. Only this popularization can meet the requirement of knowledge economy for accounting information. It is the need to deepen accounting reform, to further enhance the level of accounting work and to achieve China's modernization of science and technology as well. This paper discusses problems and relevant solutions in the popularization process of accounting computerization so as to carry out this popularization better.

  12. Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    Ezhil, Muthuveni Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George; Bucci, M. Kara; Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 {+-} 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 {+-} 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs.

  13. Comparison of optical coherence tomography findings in a patient with central retinal artery occlusion in one eye and end-stage glaucoma in the fellow eye.

    PubMed

    Greene, Daniel P; Richards, Charles P; Ghazi, Nicola G

    2012-01-01

    This case describes a patient with chronic central retinal artery occlusion in one eye and end-stage traumatic glaucoma in the fellow eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the macula of the chronic phase of central retinal artery occlusion of the right eye indicated loss of the normal foveal depression, extensive inner retinal atrophy, and marked retinal thinning. In contrast, scans of the left eye with end-stage glaucoma demonstrated an intact foveal depression and limited retinal thinning. The pattern of macular OCT findings in this patient illustrates distinguishing features between chronic central retinal artery occlusion and chronic optic neuropathy due to end-stage glaucoma.

  14. Comparison of 64-Detector-Multislice and Cone Beam Computed Tomographies in the Evaluation of Linear Measurements in the Alveolar Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pena de Andrade, Juliana Gracinda; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; de Oliveira Monteiro, Marco Antônio; de Carvalho Machado, Vinícius; Manzi, Flávio Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of linear measurements of the alveolar ridge in images obtained using 64-detector-multislice computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT). Eight sites were selected corresponding to the regions of molars, premolars, canines, and incisors in six dry human jaws. After the completion of multislice CT and CBCT, the jaws were sectioned into specific regions. Results showed there was no statistically significant difference between the measurements obtained from the CT images and those obtained from dry jaws (actual measurements) for all the evaluated sites (molars, premolars, and anterior teeth). There was also no statistically significant difference between the measurements obtained by the two CT methods.

  15. Comparison of magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography in detection of tumor recurrence in posttreatment of glioma: A diagnostic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyue; Hu, Xudong; Xie, Peng; Li, Wanhu; Li, Xiaoling; Ma, Li

    2015-06-01

    It is important to distinguish between tumor recurrence and treatment effects in posttreatment patients with high-grade gliomas. Several imaging modalities have been reported in differentiating between tumor recurrence and treatment effects. However, there were no consistent conclusions between different studies. We performed a meta-analysis of 23 studies that compared the diagnostic values of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and (11)C-methionine ((11)C-MET) PET (positron emission tomography) or PET/CT (computed tomography) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in predicting tumor recurrence of gliomas. The pooled estimated sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios, negative likelihood ratios and summary receiver operating characteristic curves of (18)F-FDG and (11)C-MET PET or PET/CT and MRS in detecting tumor recurrence were calculated. In conclusion, MRS is highly sensitive in the detection of tumor recurrence in glioma.(18)F-FDG PET or PET/CT is highly specific in recurrence diagnosis. (11)C-MET does not have noticeable advantage over (18)F-FDG. The current evidence shows no statistical difference between MRS and PET on the accuracy.

  16. Computerized Point of Sale = Faster Service + Better Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannell, Dorothy V.

    1991-01-01

    Describes selecting and installing a computerized point of sale for a district food service program; the equipment needed and preferred; and the training of trainers, managers, and cashiers. Also discusses the direct benefits and side benefits of the system. (MLF)

  17. Computerized mouse pupil size measurement for pupillary light reflex analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Zhang, Keqing; Lei, Bo

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurement of pupil size is essential for pupillary light reflex (PLR) analysis in clinical diagnosis and vision research. Low pupil-iris contrast, corneal reflection, artifacts and noises in infrared eye imaging pose challenges for automated pupil detection and measurement. This paper describes a computerized method for pupil detection or identification. After segmentation by a region-growing algorithm, pupils are detected by an iterative randomized Hough transform (IRHT) with an elliptical model. The IRHT iteratively suppresses the effects of extraneous structures and noise, yielding reliable measurements. Experimental results with 72 images showed a mean absolute difference of 3.84% between computerized and manual measurements. The inter-run variation for the computerized method (1.24%) was much smaller than the inter-observer variation for the manual method (7.45%), suggesting a higher level of consistency of the former. The computerized method could facilitate PLR analysis and other non-invasive functional tests that require pupil size measurements.

  18. Geometric Computerized Proofs = Drawing Package + Symbolic Computation Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Witold A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper advocates the use of symbolic computation packages as another aid in teaching geometry. The need for such packages and their use in computerized proofs are demonstrated by a problem in high school planar geometry. (LZ)

  19. Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment plans using averaged computed tomography and end-exhalation computed tomography images: Evaluation of the effect of different dose-calculation algorithms and prescription methods.

    PubMed

    Mitsuyoshi, Takamasa; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Nakamura, Akira; Iizuka, Yusuke; Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to quantitatively evaluate differences in dose distributions calculated using various computed tomography (CT) datasets, dose-calculation algorithms, and prescription methods in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage lung cancer. Data on 29 patients with early-stage lung cancer treated with SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. Averaged CT (Ave-CT) and expiratory CT (Ex-CT) images were reconstructed for each patient using 4-dimensional CT data. Dose distributions were initially calculated using the Ave-CT images and recalculated (in the same monitor units [MUs]) by employing Ex-CT images with the same beam arrangements. The dose-volume parameters, including D95, D90, D50, and D2 of the planning target volume (PTV), were compared between the 2 image sets. To explore the influence of dose-calculation algorithms and prescription methods on the differences in dose distributions evident between Ave-CT and Ex-CT images, we calculated dose distributions using the following 3 different algorithms: x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC), Acuros XB (AXB), and the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA). We also used 2 different dose-prescription methods; the isocenter prescription and the PTV periphery prescription methods. All differences in PTV dose-volume parameters calculated using Ave-CT and Ex-CT data were within 3 percentage points (%pts) employing the isocenter prescription method, and within 1.5%pts using the PTV periphery prescription method, irrespective of which of the 3 algorithms (XVMC, AXB, and AAA) was employed. The frequencies of dose-volume parameters differing by >1%pt when the XVMC and AXB were used were greater than those associated with the use of the AAA, regardless of the dose-prescription method employed. All differences in PTV dose-volume parameters calculated using Ave-CT and Ex-CT data on patients who underwent lung SBRT were within 3%pts, regardless of the dose-calculation algorithm or the dose

  1. An anatomically realistic brain phantom for quantification with positron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Molliver, M.E.; Hengst, T.C.; Clifford, C.M.; Buhle, L.; Bryan, M.; Stumpf, M.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Phantom studies are useful in assessing and maximizing the accuracy and precision of quantification of absolute activity, assessing errors associated with patient positioning, and dosimetry. Most phantoms are limited by the use of simple shapes, which do not adequately reflect real anatomy. The authors have constructed an anatomically realistic life-size brain phantom for positron tomography studies. The phantom consists of separately fillable R + L caudates, R + L putamens, R + L globus passidus and cerebellum. These structures are contained in proper anatomic orientation within a fillable cerebrum. Solid ventricles are also present. The entire clear vinyl cerebrum is placed in a human skull. The internal brain structures were fabricated from polyester resin, with dimensions, shapes and sizes of the structures obtained from digitized contours of brain slices in the U.C.S.D. computerized brain atlas. The structures were filled with known concentrations of Ga-68 in water and scanned with our NeuroECAT. The phantom was aligned in the scanner for each structure, such that the tomographic slice passed through that structure's center. After calibration of the scanner with a standard phantom for counts/pixel uCi/cc conversion, the measured activity concentrations were compared with the actual concentrations. The ratio of measured to actual activity concentration (''recovery coefficient'') for the caudate was 0.33; for the putamen 0.42. For comparison, the ratio for spheres of diameters 9.5, 16,19 and 25.4 mm was 0.23, 0.54, 0.81, and 0.93. This phantom provides more realistic assessment of performance and allows calculation of correction factors.

  2. Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) refers to imaging that is based on the photoacoustic effect. Although the photoacoustic effect as a physical phenomenon was first reported on by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880 [1], PAT as an imaging technology was developed only after the advent of ultrasonic transducers, computers, and lasers [2-31]. A review on biomedical photoacoustics is available [32]. The motivation for PAT is to combine optical-absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution for deep imaging in the optical quasi-diffusive or diffusive regime. In PAT, the tissue is irradiated by usually a short-pulsed laser beam to achieve a thermal and acoustic impulse response (Fig. 19.1). Locally absorbed light is converted into heat, which is further converted to a pressure rise via thermo-elastic expansion. The initial pressure rise - determined by the local optical absorption coefficient (μ â ), fluence (ψ) and other thermal and mechanical properties - propagates as an ultrasonic wave, which is referred to as a photoacoustic wave.

  3. Comprehensive computerized medical imaging: interim hypothetical economic evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Rebecca N.; Fisher, Paul D.; Nosil, Josip

    1990-08-01

    The 422-bed Victoria General Hospital (VGH) and Siemens Electric Limited have since 1983 been piloting the implementation of comprehensive computerized medical imaging, including digital acquisition of diagnostic images, in British Columbia. Although full PACS is not yet in place at VGH, experience to date habeen used to project annual cost figures (including capital replacement) for a fully-computerized department. The resulting economic evaluation has been labelled hypothetical to emphasize that some key cost components were estimated rather than observed; this paper presents updated cost figures based on recent revisions to proposed departmental equipment configuration which raised the cost of conventional imaging equipment by 0.3 million* and lowered the cost of computerized imaging equipment by 0.8 million. Compared with conventional diagnostic imaging, computerized imaging appears to raise overall annual costs at VGH by nearly 0.7 million, or 11.6%; this is more favourable than the previous results, which indicated extra annual costs of 1 million (16.9%). Sensitivity analysis still indicates that all reasonable changes in the underlying assumptions result in higher costs for computerized imaging than for conventional imaging. Computerized imaging offers lower radiation exposure to patients, shorter waiting times, and other potential advantages, but as yet the price of obtaining these benefits remains substantial.

  4. Computerized grading of anatomy laboratory practical examinations.

    PubMed

    Krippendorf, Beth B; Bolender, David L; Kolesari, Gary L

    2008-01-01

    At the Medical College of Wisconsin, a procedure was developed to allow computerized grading and grade reporting of laboratory practical examinations in the Clinical Human Anatomy course. At the start of the course, first year medical students were given four Lists of Structures. On these lists, numbered items were arranged alphabetically; the items were anatomical structures that could be tagged on a given lab practical examination. Each lab exam featured an anatomy laboratory component and a computer laboratory component. For the anatomy lab component, students moved from one question station to another at timed intervals and identified tagged anatomical structures. As students identified a tagged structure, they referred to a copy of the list (provided with their answer sheet) and wrote the number corresponding to the structure on their answer sheet. Immediately after the anatomy lab component, students were escorted to a computer instruction laboratory where they typed their answer numbers into a secured testing component of a learning management system that recorded their answers for automatic grading. After a brief review of examination scores and item analysis by faculty, exam scores were reported to students electronically. Adding this brief computer component to each lab exam greatly reduced faculty grading time, reduced grading errors and provided faster performance feedback for students without changing overall student performance.

  5. Language networks associated with computerized semantic indices.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Serguei V S; Jones, David T; Knopman, David S

    2015-01-01

    Tests of generative semantic verbal fluency are widely used to study organization and representation of concepts in the human brain. Previous studies demonstrated that clustering and switching behavior during verbal fluency tasks is supported by multiple brain mechanisms associated with semantic memory and executive control. Previous work relied on manual assessments of semantic relatedness between words and grouping of words into semantic clusters. We investigated a computational linguistic approach to measuring the strength of semantic relatedness between words based on latent semantic analysis of word co-occurrences in a subset of a large online encyclopedia. We computed semantic clustering indices and compared them to brain network connectivity measures obtained with task-free fMRI in a sample consisting of healthy participants and those differentially affected by cognitive impairment. We found that semantic clustering indices were associated with brain network connectivity in distinct areas including fronto-temporal, fronto-parietal and fusiform gyrus regions. This study shows that computerized semantic indices complement traditional assessments of verbal fluency to provide a more complete account of the relationship between brain and verbal behavior involved organization and retrieval of lexical information from memory.

  6. The computerized medical record in action.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C R

    1994-08-01

    Before the advent of the IPS computerized medical record at Burlington, Zallen did not own a computer. Although he learned touch-typing in high school, he emphatically states that he hated it. The average age of the physicians on staff at Burlington is about 40, but few had extensive previous experience with computers. According to Zallen, all have adapted to the CPR with few tears or tirades. The physicians continue to "tweak" the system to customize their own scrapbook and templates. Lahey physicians who work at Burlington part time are using the system, although with more staff help. The CPR is alive and well at Burlington Health Center. HCHP physicians can and do use computers in their daily work, producing quality medical records that are readable and retrievable. Nonetheless, promises that computers will make records more complete and accessible and will improve quality measurement will be mere blather if the CPR doesn't make users' lives easier. My last question to Zallen was "How has this system made your life harder?" After one pensive second, he replied, "I really can't think of anything." To me, that is potent testimony that the CPR is not a techie's fantasy, but rather, a pragmatic, workable answer to the needs of 21st century medicine.

  7. Computerized assessment of dental student writing skills.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Joseph M; Elliot, Norbert; Biber, Cheryl L; Sanders, R Michael

    2005-02-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using computer-based tools for the assessment of written materials produced by dental students. Written assignments produced by three consecutive incoming dental school classes (240 students) were assessed, and the performance among and between classes was analyzed. Computerized assessment of documents produced by students in the context of their regular coursework proved to be an efficient and effective mechanism for assessing performance. Student performance, assessed as a byproduct of this research, was disappointing. The performance of all classes fell below the eleventh grade level, with some students producing written material at a level of sophistication generally expected from middle school children. Existing technology shows promise as a vehicle for enhancing the assessment of dental students' written communication skills. The ease of use and minimal training necessary to apply this technology can help mitigate the time-intensive nature of writing assessment. If this assessment information is then used to enhance instruction--a process inherently available through software such as WebCT--the distance between assessment and instruction may be more readily bridged through an increase in the use of technology.

  8. Accuracy and benefits of 3D bone surface modelling: a comparison of two methods of surface data acquisition reconstructed by laser scanning and computed tomography outputs.

    PubMed

    Brzobohatá, Hana; Prokop, Josef; Horák, Martin; Jancárek, Alexandr; Velemínská, Jana

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare two different methods of frontal bone surface model acquisition. Three dimensional models acquired by laser scanning were compared with models of the same bones acquired by virtual replicas reconstructed from a sequence of computed tomography (CT) images. The influence of volumetric CT data processing (namely thresholding), which immediately preceded the generation of the three-dimensional surface model, was also considered and explored in detail in one sample. Despite identifying certain areas where both models showed deviations across all samples, their conformity can be generally classified as satisfactory, and the differences can be regarded as minimal. The average deviation of registered surface models was 0.27 mm for 90% of the data, and its value was therefore very close to the resolution of the laser scanner used.

  9. Application of Ambient Noise Array Tomography on Geotechnical Scales and Comparison with Independent Geophysical Information: A Test for the Thessaloniki Area (Northern Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthymidis, Marios; Papazachos, Costas; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Theodoulidis, Nikos; Fikos, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    Ambient noise array tomography has been recently recognized as a promising tool for the study of the shallow 2D/3D geophysical structure. The method basis relies on the implementation of cross-correlation analysis on ambient noise data, which is able to provide the Green's Function of the medium between two spatially separated recording stations (Gouedard et al. 2008). The obtained cross-correlation trace contains information about the group and phase velocity of the surface waves that are dominant in the ambient noise wavefield. A typical application, similar to larger-scale studies, employs appropriate narrow-band Gaussian filters on the cross-correlation trace (Multiple Filter Analysis), allowing the construction of the group velocity dispersion curves for selected paths within the study area. An inversion procedure leads to tomographic images (group velocity maps for specific frequencies), which can be locally inverted to derive 1D shear wave (S-Wave) velocity profiles. The superposition of all the local 1D S-Wave velocity profiles can potentially lead to a pseudo-3D (or pseudo-2D) velocity model for the subsurface structure. In order to study the capability of the ambient noise array tomography method to provide reliable geophysical ground models on geotechnical scales in urban environments, a relative small circular array (radius of 500m approximately) incorporating 34 recording stations was installed inside the city of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece). The study area corresponds to the boundary between the geological bedrock and Quaternary/Neogene sediments, with the gneiss bedrock showing a gradual thickness increase from its NE outcrop towards the SW, to the coastline of the city. Large-scale studies in the broader Thessaloniki area (e.g. Anastasiadis et al. 2001, Panou et al. 2005) have showed that the bedrock exhibits a more or less 2D structure in the study area, gradually dipping towards the coastline realizing depths possibly exceeding 200m. Furthermore

  10. A comparison between digital radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance in the detection of gunshot residues in burnt tissues and bone.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The radiological search for GSR is crucial in burnt material although it has been rarely tested. In this study, thirty-one bovine ribs were shot at near-contact range and burnt to calcination in an oven simulating a real combustion. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed before and after carbonization and compared with former analyses with DR (digital radiography); thus comparing the assistance, the radiological methods can provide in the search for GSR in fresh and burnt bone. DR demonstrated the greatest ability in the detection of metallic residues, CT showed lower abilities, while MR showed a high sensitivity only in soft tissues. Thus, DR can be considered as the most sensitive method in the detection of GSR in charred bones, whereas CT and MR demonstrated much less reliability. Nonetheless, the MR ameliorates the analysis of gunshot wounds in other types of remains with large quantities of soft tissues.

  11. Analysis of the efficiency of hair removal by different optical methods: comparison of Trichoscan, reflectance confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, Monika; Schanzer, Sabine; Ulrich, Martina; Bartels, Natalie Garcia; Meinke, Martina C.; Fluhr, Joachim; Krah, Martin; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lademann, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Noninvasive diagnostic tools, such as Trichoscan, reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), are efficient methods of hair shaft and growth evaluation. The aim of this study was to carry out a comparative assessment of these three medical procedures by measuring the hair shaft and hair growth after hair removal for a defined period of five days. The application of these techniques was demonstrated by measuring hair growth on the lower leg of six female volunteers. After removal of the hair shaft with a shaving system, the hair follicle infundibula and the length of the growing hairs were measured with the Trichoscan, RCM, and OCT method. All three methods are reliable hair measuring tools after hair removal. Trichoscan is best suited in the implementation of hair growth measurement and RCM in the analysis of hair follicles, whereas the OCT system can be consulted as an additional measurement for the evaluation of the hair follicle and length.

  12. Automatic selection of regularization parameters for dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography: a comparison of L-curve and U-curve methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maomao; Su, Han; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising technique for the study of the metabolic process of fluorescent agents in the biological body in vivo, and the quality of the parametric images relies heavily on the accuracy of the reconstructed FMT images. In typical dynamic FMT implementations, the imaged object is continuously monitored for more than 50 minutes. During each minute, a set of the fluorescent measurements is acquired and the corresponding FMT image is reconstructed. It is difficult to manually set the regularization parameter in the reconstruction of each FMT image. In this paper, the parametric images obtained with the L-curve and U-curve methods are quantitatively evaluated through numerical simulations, phantom experiments and in vivo experiments. The results illustrate that the U-curve method obtains better accuracy, stronger robustness and higher noise-resistance in parametric imaging. Therefore, it is a promising approach to automatic selection of the regularization parameters for dynamic FMT. PMID:28018722

  13. [Potentialities of computed tomography and ultrasound in diagnosis of hormonally active adrenal diseases: results of comparison CT and US with operative adn histological data].

    PubMed

    Denisova, L B; Vorontsova, S V; Emel'ianova, L N

    2000-01-01

    The data given in the paper suggest that X-ray computed tomography (CT) is highly effective in detecting all types of hormonally active adrenal abnormalities. CT used in hormonally active adrenal diseases yielded data on major quantitative and qualitative (primarily densitometric) criteria that could be used in assessing the images of the adrenal area in these patients. Ultrasound study (USS) made at the first stage of topical diagnostic searches was of informative value in detecting adrenal tumor lesions, the technique being highly sensitive in the diagnosis of adrenal pheochromocytomas and adenocarcinomas, but less informative in the detection of hormonally active adrenocortical adenomas (aldesterone-producing ones in particular) than CT. The diagnosis of various adrenocortical hyperplasies and the differentiation of hyperplastic and tumor forms of hypercorticoidism are a prerogative of CT that substantially supplements USS findings in such cases.

  14. Composition Analysis of III-Nitrides at the Nanometer Scale: Comparison of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Atom Probe Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonef, Bastien; Lopez-Haro, Miguel; Amichi, Lynda; Beeler, Mark; Grenier, Adeline; Robin, Eric; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Mollard, Nicolas; Mouton, Isabelle; Monroy, Eva; Bougerol, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The enhancement of the performance of advanced nitride-based optoelectronic devices requires the fine tuning of their composition, which has to be determined with a high accuracy and at the nanometer scale. For that purpose, we have evaluated and compared energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) in terms of composition analysis of AlGaN/GaN multilayers. Both techniques give comparable results with a composition accuracy better than 0.6 % even for layers as thin as 3 nm. In case of EDX, we show the relevance of correcting the X-ray absorption by simultaneous determination of the mass thickness and chemical composition at each point of the analysis. Limitations of both techniques are discussed when applied to specimens with different geometries or compositions.

  15. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography based comparison of condylar position and morphology according to the vertical skeletal pattern

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Young; Kim, Ji-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare condylar position and morphology among different vertical skeletal patterns. Methods Diagnostic cone-beam computed tomography images of 60 adult patients (120 temporomandibular joints) who visited the orthodontic clinic of Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital were reviewed. The subjects were divided into three equal groups according to the mandibular plane angle: hypodivergent, normodivergent, and hyperdivergent groups. Morphology of the condyle and mandibular fossa and condylar position were compared among the groups. Results The hypodivergent and hyperdivergent groups showed significant differences in superior joint spaces, antero-posterior condyle width, medio-lateral condyle width, condyle head angle, and condylar shapes. Conclusions Condylar position and morphology vary according to vertical facial morphology. This relationship should be considered for predicting and establishing a proper treatment plan for temporomandibular diseases during orthodontic treatment. PMID:25798412

  16. Diagnosis and screening of small hepatocellular carcinomas. Comparison of radionuclide imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, hepatic angiography, and alpha 1-fetoprotein assay

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, T.; Matsui, O.; Suzuki, M.; Ida, M.

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-nine small (less than 5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas in 18 patients were examined by radionuclide imaging (RN), ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), hepatic angiography, and serum alpha 1-fetoprotein (AFP) assay. Sensitivity was 39% with RN, 50% with US, 56% with CT, and 94% with angiography, including infusion hepatic angiography (IHA). Lesions larger than 3 cm could be detected by all of these methods; those between 2 and 3 cm were generally shown by US and CT but not RN. IHA was essential for diagnosis of lesions less than 2 cm, which were otherwise difficult or impossible to detect except with angiography. As a screening method, AFP was best, followed by US and CT. The authors recommend using AFP and US to minimize expense and radiation exposure. In questionable cases, IHA should be performed.

  17. Diagnosis and screening of small hepatocellular carcinomas: comparison of radionuclide imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography, hepatic angiography, and. cap alpha. /sub 1/-fetoprotein assay

    SciTech Connect

    Takashima, T.; Matsui, O.; Suzuki, M.; Ida, M.

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-nine small (<5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas in 18 patients were examined by radionuclide imaging (RN), ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), hepatic angiography, and serum ..cap alpha../sub 1/-fetoprotein (AFP) assay. Sensitivity was 39% with RN, 50% with US, 56% with CT, and 94% with angiography, including infusion hepatic angiography (IHA). Lesions larger than 3 cm could be detected by all of these methods; those between 2 and 3 cm were generally shown by US and CT but not RN. IHA was essential for diagnosis of lesions less than 2 cm, which were otherwise difficult or impossible to detect except with angiography. As a screening method, AFP was best, followed by US and CT. The authors recommend using AFP and US to minimize expense and radiation exposure. In questionable cases, IHA should be performed.

  18. In vivo volumetric analysis of coronary stent using optical coherence tomography with a novel balloon occlusion-flushing catheter: a comparison with intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Yoshiaki; Hoshino, Kozo; Yoneyama, Ryuichi; McGregor, Jennifer; Hajjar, Roger J; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Hayase, Motoya

    2005-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is limited as an intravascular imaging tool because of interference with blood. This study tested a new balloon occlusion-flushing catheter for OCT scanning of stented coronary arteries and compared stent measurements between OCT and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Motorized pullback with OCT and IVUS was examined in coronary stents deployed in swine. Quantitative measurements were obtained and compared between both groups. In addition, stent strut thickness was compared among OCT, IVUS and actual measurement. The occlusion catheter successfully provided motorized pullback OCT images in the stented coronary arteries without any complications. There were no differences in calculated lumen volume. However, stent volumes were significantly smaller with OCT than with IVUS (p < 0.05). OCT significantly underestimated the stent strut thickness compared with the actual measurement. Although OCT underestimates the stent strut thickness, motorized pullback OCT imaging with the occlusion catheter can provide appropriate in-stent images in the porcine coronary arteries.

  19. Comparison of Radiation Dose and Image Quality of Triple-Rule-Out Computed Tomography Angiography Between Conventional Helical Scanning and a Strategy Incorporating Sequential Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric D.; Peters, M. Robert; Wolff, Steven D.; Qureshi, Mehreen A.; Atluri, Prashanth; Pearson, Gregory D.N.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Triple-rule-out computed tomography angiography (TRO CTA), performed to evaluate the coronary arteries, pulmonary arteries, and thoracic aorta, has been associated with high radiation exposure. Utilization of sequential scanning for coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) reduces radiation dose. The application of sequential scanning to TRO CTA is much less well defined. We analyzed radiation dose and image quality from TRO CTA performed in a single outpatient center, comparing scans from a period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n=35) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n=35). Sequential scanning was able to be employed in 86% of cases. The sequential-if-appropriate strategy, compared to the helical-only strategy, was associated with a 61.6% dose decrease (mean dose-length product [DLP] of 439 mGy×cm vs 1144 mGy×cm and mean effective dose of 7.5 mSv vs 19.4 mSv, respectively, p<0.0001). Similarly, there was a 71.5% dose reduction among 30 patients scanned with the sequential protocol compared to 40 patients scanned with the helical protocol under either strategy (326 mGy×cm vs 1141 mGy×cm and 5.5 mSv vs 19.4 mSv, respectively, p<0.0001). Although image quality did not differ between strategies, there was a non-statistically significant trend towards better quality in the sequential protocol compared to the helical protocol. In conclusion, approaching TRO CTA with a diagnostic strategy of sequential scanning as appropriate offers a marked reduction in radiation dose while maintaining image quality. PMID:21306693

  20. Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Between Conventional Helical Scanning and a Strategy Incorporating Sequential Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Wolff, Steven D.; Manheimer, Eric D.; Thompson, James; Terry, Sylvia; Uretsky, Seth; Pilip, Adalbert; Peters, M. Robert

    2009-01-01

    Radiation dose from coronary computed tomography angiography may be reduced using a sequential scanning protocol rather than a conventional helical scanning protocol. Here we compare radiation dose and image quality from coronary computed tomography angiography in a single center between an initial period during which helical scanning with electrocardiographically-controlled tube current modulation was used for all patients (n=138) and after adoption of a strategy incorporating sequential scanning whenever appropriate (n=261). Using the sequential-if-appropriate strategy, sequential scanning was employed in 86.2% of patients. Compared to the helical-only strategy, this strategy was associated with a 65.1% dose reduction (mean dose-length product of 305.2 vs. 875.1 and mean effective dose of 14.9 mSv vs. 5.2 mSv, respectively), with no significant change in overall image quality, step artifacts, motion artifacts, or perceived image noise. For the 225 patients undergoing sequential scanning, the dose-length product was 201.9 ± 90.0 mGy·cm, while for patients undergoing helical scanning under either strategy, the dose-length product was 890.9 ± 293.3 mGy·cm (p<0.0001), corresponding to mean effective doses of 3.4 mSv and 15.1 mSv, respectively, a 77.5% reduction. Image quality was significantly greater for the sequential studies, reflecting the poorer image quality in patients undergoing helical scanning in the sequential-if-appropriate strategy. In conclusion, a sequential-if-appropriate diagnostic strategy reduces dose markedly compared to a helical-only strategy, with no significant difference in image quality. PMID:19892048