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Sample records for computerized whiteboard system

  1. Supporting Patient Care in the Emergency Department with a Computerized Whiteboard System

    PubMed Central

    Aronsky, Dominik; Jones, Ian; Lanaghan, Kevin; Slovis, Corey M.

    2008-01-01

    Efficient information management and communication within the emergency department (ED) is essential to providing timely and high-quality patient care. The ED whiteboard (census board) usually serves as an ED’s central access point for operational and patient-related information. This article describes the design, functionality, and experiences with a computerized ED whiteboard, which has the ability to display relevant operational and patient-related information in real time. Embedded functionality, additional whiteboard views, and the integration with ED and institutional information system components, such as the computerized patient record or the provider order entry system, provide rapid access to more detailed information. As an information center, the computerized whiteboard supports our ED environment not only for providing patient care, but also for operational, educational, and research activities. PMID:18096913

  2. A Study of Multi-Representation of Geometry Problem Solving with Virtual Manipulatives and Whiteboard System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han; Huang, Yueh-Min; Dong, Jian-Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the development of an innovative Virtual Manipulatives and Whiteboard (VMW) system is described. The VMW system allowed users to manipulate virtual objects in 3D space and find clues to solve geometry problems. To assist with multi-representation transformation, translucent multimedia whiteboards were used to provide a virtual 3D…

  3. A Study of Multi-Representation of Geometry Problem Solving with Virtual Manipulatives and Whiteboard System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Su, Jia-Han; Huang, Yueh-Min; Dong, Jian-Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the development of an innovative Virtual Manipulatives and Whiteboard (VMW) system is described. The VMW system allowed users to manipulate virtual objects in 3D space and find clues to solve geometry problems. To assist with multi-representation transformation, translucent multimedia whiteboards were used to provide a virtual 3D…

  4. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  5. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Harold B.; McNair, Robert C.; White, Kenneth; Maugeri, Terry

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base.RTM., an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches.

  6. Computerized training management system

    DOEpatents

    Rice, H.B.; McNair, R.C.; White, K.; Maugeri, T.

    1998-08-04

    A Computerized Training Management System (CTMS) is disclosed for providing a procedurally defined process that is employed to develop accreditable performance based training programs for job classifications that are sensitive to documented regulations and technical information. CTMS is a database that links information needed to maintain a five-phase approach to training-analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation independent of training program design. CTMS is designed using R-Base{trademark}, an-SQL compliant software platform. Information is logically entered and linked in CTMS. Each task is linked directly to a performance objective, which, in turn, is linked directly to a learning objective; then, each enabling objective is linked to its respective test items. In addition, tasks, performance objectives, enabling objectives, and test items are linked to their associated reference documents. CTMS keeps all information up to date since it automatically sorts, files and links all data; CTMS includes key word and reference document searches. 18 figs.

  7. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  8. Multiple Representation Skills and Creativity Effects on Mathematical Problem Solving Using a Multimedia Whiteboard System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chen, Nian-Shing; Dung, Jian-Jie; Yang, Yi-Lun

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore student multiple representation skills and creativity in solving mathematical problems when supported by a multimedia whiteboard system. The subjects were 6th grade primary school students that were tested and selected as excellent students in mathematics. Twenty-one numerical and geometry problems were given to…

  9. Distributed Computerized Catalog System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.; Wagner, David A.

    1995-01-01

    DarkStar Distributed Catalog System describes arbitrary data objects in unified manner, providing end users with versatile, yet simple search mechanism for locating and identifying objects. Provides built-in generic and dynamic graphical user interfaces. Design of system avoids some of problems of standard DBMS, and system provides more flexibility than do conventional relational data bases, or object-oriented data bases. Data-collection lattice partly hierarchical representation of relationships among collections, subcollections, and data objects.

  10. Intelligent Computerized Training System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Baffes, Paul; Loftin, R. Bowen; Hua, Grace C.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent computer-aided training system gives trainees same experience gained from best on-the-job training. Automated system designed to emulate behavior of experienced teacher devoting full time and attention to training novice. Proposes challenging training scenarios, monitors and evaluates trainee's actions, makes meaningful comments in response to errors, reponds to requests for information, gives hints when appropriate, and remembers strengths and weaknesses so it designs suitable exercises. Used to train flight-dynamics officers in deploying satellites from Space Shuttle. Adapted to training for variety of tasks and situations, simply by modifying one or at most two of its five modules. Helps to ensure continuous supply of trained specialists despite scarcity of experienced and skilled human trainers.

  11. Intelligent Computerized Training System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Baffes, Paul; Loftin, R. Bowen; Hua, Grace C.

    1991-01-01

    Intelligent computer-aided training system gives trainees same experience gained from best on-the-job training. Automated system designed to emulate behavior of experienced teacher devoting full time and attention to training novice. Proposes challenging training scenarios, monitors and evaluates trainee's actions, makes meaningful comments in response to errors, reponds to requests for information, gives hints when appropriate, and remembers strengths and weaknesses so it designs suitable exercises. Used to train flight-dynamics officers in deploying satellites from Space Shuttle. Adapted to training for variety of tasks and situations, simply by modifying one or at most two of its five modules. Helps to ensure continuous supply of trained specialists despite scarcity of experienced and skilled human trainers.

  12. A computerized hospital maintenance system.

    PubMed

    Kresch, E; Katz, P; Schwartz, H; Hamarman, H

    1985-01-01

    The Biomedical Instrumentation Department at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital maintains most of the clinical equipment owned by the hospital and provides support to six other hospitals, as well. In order to document these services, a computerized support system has been developed. This system maintains the inventory of equipment, documents the occurrence of repair and preventive maintenance procedures, generates lists of items due for maintenance and inspection, and prints reports and summaries of all activities performed by department staff. The system was designed for ease of use and requires a minimum of training for personnel who use it.

  13. Computerized system for corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper reports that computerization of basic corrosion measurements to provide record-keeping and graphical output has been used by pipeline companies over the lst decade. Northwest Pipeline Corp. has embarked on an ambition project to expand well beyond the scope of standard computer record-keeping by integrating data analysis and management with computer-aided advanced corrosion engineering practices. Most maturing pipeline systems require immense capital and maintenance expenditures to maintain regulatory levels of cathodic protection consistent with traditional corrosion control methods. Major pipeline coating rehabilitation programs and the installation of numerous anode-bed systems will continue in the absence of sophisticated computer-aided corrosion control methods.

  14. Whiteboards at Your Service: Interactive Whiteboards Can Assist Teachers, Students, Trainers, and District Office Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards have made quite a splash in classrooms in recent years. When a computer image is projected on the whiteboard using an LCD projector, users can directly control the computer from the whiteboard. In some systems such as Smart and Mimio, the finger is used in place of a mouse to open and run programs or move windows around. In…

  15. Whiteboards at Your Service: Interactive Whiteboards Can Assist Teachers, Students, Trainers, and District Office Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards have made quite a splash in classrooms in recent years. When a computer image is projected on the whiteboard using an LCD projector, users can directly control the computer from the whiteboard. In some systems such as Smart and Mimio, the finger is used in place of a mouse to open and run programs or move windows around. In…

  16. Using a Voting System in Conjunction with Interactive Whiteboard Technology to Enhance Learning in the English Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutrim, Euline Schmid

    2008-01-01

    This study discusses the pedagogical potential of an interactive voting system used in conjunction with interactive whiteboard technology. The data discussed here are drawn from a qualitative study, carried out in the context of a British university pre-sessional programme in English for Academic Purposes and Study Skills for international…

  17. The Auditing of Computerized Accounting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an investigation undertaken to indicate the curricular content (knowledge and skills) needed to prepare the accounting student to audit computerized accounting systems. Areas studied included programing languages, data processing, desired course training, and computer audit techniques. (CT)

  18. Computerized Information Storage and Retrieval Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azubuike, Abraham A.; Umoh, Jackson S.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the concept of maximum indexing, a system aimed at achieving maximum recall and maximum precision in computerized information retrieval. The indexing strategies used to achieve maximum indexing and the problems that arise are discussed. (9 references) (CLB)

  19. The Auditing of Computerized Accounting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an investigation undertaken to indicate the curricular content (knowledge and skills) needed to prepare the accounting student to audit computerized accounting systems. Areas studied included programing languages, data processing, desired course training, and computer audit techniques. (CT)

  20. Three Ontario Boards Testing Computerized Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sch Progr, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Pilot for computerizing financial information may also be used for personnel, students, facilities, curriculum and instruction. The project uses the Generalized Education Management System software (GEMS) developed by Oregon Total Information System (OTIS) and modified by AGT Data Systems Ltd. of Toronto. (DE)

  1. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  2. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  3. Implementation of a Computerized Maintenance Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yong-Hong; Askari, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    A primer Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) has been established for NASA Ames pressure component certification program. The CMMS takes full advantage of the latest computer technology and SQL relational database to perform periodic services for vital pressure components. The Ames certification program is briefly described and the aspects of the CMMS implementation are discussed as they are related to the certification objectives.

  4. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  5. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  6. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  7. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computerized Meter Resetting System. 501.15... AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.15 Computerized Meter Resetting System. (a) Description. The Computerized Meter Resetting System (CMRS) permits customers to reset their postage meters...

  8. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  9. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  10. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  11. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800... Devices § 884.2800 Computerized Labor Monitoring System. (a) Identification. A computerized labor monitoring system is a system intended to continuously measure cervical dilation and fetal head descent...

  12. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hardware, operational system software, and electronic linkages with the separate components of an... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support...

  13. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hardware, operational system software, and electronic linkages with the separate components of an... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized support...

  14. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... plans to use and how they will interface with the base system; (3) Provide documentation that the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized...

  15. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... plans to use and how they will interface with the base system; (3) Provide documentation that the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.5 Mandatory computerized...

  16. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  17. Metropolitan Orlando area computerized signal system

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, F.R. ); Allen, T.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Florida's Orlando metropolitan area, which has a population measuring 1 million, is among the fastest growing areas in the nation. The city's weather and popular attractions draw 9 to 10 million tourists annually, half of them arriving in their own cars. Add to this the 1.1 million automobiles already on the streets, and the traffic problems become a nightmare. The Orlando metropolitan area has approximately 550 operational traffic signals, with an increasing number of new signals added each year to control the city's expanding growth. A central, computerized signal system has been conceived as one of the solutions necessary to cope with this tremendous traffic growth. The system is flexible, expandable, and capable of meeting future technical challenges. This article describes the steps that led to the feasibility study, design, and implementation of the Orlando area computerized signal system.

  18. The NASA/LRC Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. Kirk; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    A new testing package, including apparatus and tasks for the behavioral study of a number of species in a variety of experiments is presented. The package is described with respect to the kinds of comparative psychological investigations for which it is best suited. The preliminary data generated within this new testing paradigm demonstrate that the NASA/LRC Computerized Test System provides a flexible yet powerful environment for the investigation of behavioral and psychological processes.

  19. The NASA/LRC Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, W. Kirk; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    A new testing package, including apparatus and tasks for the behavioral study of a number of species in a variety of experiments is presented. The package is described with respect to the kinds of comparative psychological investigations for which it is best suited. The preliminary data generated within this new testing paradigm demonstrate that the NASA/LRC Computerized Test System provides a flexible yet powerful environment for the investigation of behavioral and psychological processes.

  20. Computerized acoustical characterization system of medical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazihah, M. D.; Kadri, S.; Yaacob, M. I. H.; Rosly, J.

    2013-05-01

    The development of a computerized acoustical characterization system of medical phantoms is described in this paper. The system employs the insertion technique and it was developed using LabView 2011 where the ultrasound signal was acquired through the interfacing scheme of an oscilloscope to a personal computer. The system performance was validated by comparing measured acoustical properties with values obtained from the previous studies. Other than faster measurement time, the developed system carried percentage difference at less than 1.00% for all of the acoustical properties measurements at 23.0°C to 25.0°C respectively.

  1. Computerized documentation systems: blessings or curse?

    PubMed

    Vlasses, F R

    1993-01-01

    This article considers the possibility that computerized documentation systems will negatively impact knowledge development in nursing. Ideas from three vantage points is presented. First, systems are being developed from theoretical frameworks that are not necessarily grounded in nursing, and these systems, in turn, influence the nurses's ability to process and conceptualize information. Second, computer systems may support the retrieval of empirical data to the elimination of other types of data necessary to the development of nursing knowledge. Third, computers may decrease opportunities for collegial dialogue. These factors together create an atmosphere of "technologic determinism" (Robinson & Robinson, 1990), which can inhibit the development of new ideas in nursing.

  2. Computerized ultrasound risk evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Duric, Nebojsa; Littrup, Peter J.; Holsapple, III, Earle; Barter, Robert Henry; Moore, Thomas L.; Azevedo, Stephen G.; Ferguson, Sidney W.

    2007-10-23

    A method and system for examining tissue are provided in which the tissue is maintained in a position so that it may be insonified with a plurality of pulsed spherical or cylindrical acoustic waves. The insonifying acoustic waves are scattered by the tissue so that scattered acoustic radiation including a mix of reflected and transmitted acoustic waves is received. A representation of a portion of the tissue is then derived from the received scattered acoustic radiation.

  3. Using the Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Explain the Degree of English Teachers' Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards in the Modern Systems School in Jordan: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jwaifell, Mustafa; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explain the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by English female teachers in Modern Systems School in Jordan. Viewed from the lens of Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory, the study examined and reported teachers' use of IWB and its features that have impact on their decisions to adopt it in Modern Systems School . The…

  4. Medical high-resolution image sharing and electronic whiteboard system: A pure-web-based system for accessing and discussing lossless original images in telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Ying; Chen, Xin; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hongjun; Feng, Zhengquan; Nian, Yongjian; Qiu, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    There are various medical image sharing and electronic whiteboard systems available for diagnosis and discussion purposes. However, most of these systems ask clients to install special software tools or web plug-ins to support whiteboard discussion, special medical image format, and customized decoding algorithm of data transmission of HRIs (high-resolution images). This limits the accessibility of the software running on different devices and operating systems. In this paper, we propose a solution based on pure web pages for medical HRIs lossless sharing and e-whiteboard discussion, and have set up a medical HRI sharing and e-whiteboard system, which has four-layered design: (1) HRIs access layer: we improved an tile-pyramid model named unbalanced ratio pyramid structure (URPS), to rapidly share lossless HRIs and to adapt to the reading habits of users; (2) format conversion layer: we designed a format conversion engine (FCE) on server side to real time convert and cache DICOM tiles which clients requesting with window-level parameters, to make browsers compatible and keep response efficiency to server-client; (3) business logic layer: we built a XML behavior relationship storage structure to store and share users' behavior, to keep real time co-browsing and discussion between clients; (4) web-user-interface layer: AJAX technology and Raphael toolkit were used to combine HTML and JavaScript to build client RIA (rich Internet application), to meet clients' desktop-like interaction on any pure webpage. This system can be used to quickly browse lossless HRIs, and support discussing and co-browsing smoothly on any web browser in a diversified network environment. The proposal methods can provide a way to share HRIs safely, and may be used in the field of regional health, telemedicine and remote education at a low cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  6. A computerized data analysis system for electrogastrogram.

    PubMed

    Chen, J

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive computerized data analysis system for the electrogastrogram is presented in this paper. The electrogastrogram (EGG) is a cutaneous measurement of electrical activity of the stomach by positioning electrodes on the abdominal skin. Since the signal-to-noise ratio of the EGG is very low, visual analysis is impossible. The data analysis system presented in this paper contains a series of PC programs to perform: (a) data acquisition and real-time A/D conversion; (b) digital filter design and digital filtering; (c) adaptive cancellation of respiratory artifact; (d) smoothed power spectral analysis; (e) adaptive running spectral analysis; (f) two- or three-dimensional display of the EGG and analysis results. The basic principles of the system and sample results are presented.

  7. Computerization of a nosocomial infection system.

    PubMed

    Etersque, S; Carter, M J; Gordon, K R; Sutherland, J G

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a computerized nosocomial infection control system for a 500-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital. It is implemented on a minicomputer that uses the relational data base management system INGRES, which is marketed by Relational Technology, Inc. This system, which replaces a manual one that depended on "needle sort" data cards, is designed to provide for entry of infection data that have been collected onto abstracting forms; decision support in the prospective analysis of suspicious infection rates or trends; generation of monthly, on-demand, and annual infection rate reports; retrospective interrogation and analysis of infection data for rates and trends that may explain or clearly indicate the sources of in-hospital (nosocomial) infections; updating of infection records as additional infection-related data become available and known to the hospital's infection control team; and ad hoc analysis and comparisons between data on control and infected patients, both prospectively and retrospectively.

  8. Computerized training of cryosurgery - a system approach.

    PubMed

    Keelan, R; Yamakawa, S; Shimada, K; Rabin, Y

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study is to provide the foundation for a computerized training platform for cryosurgery. Consistent with clinical practice, the training process targets the correlation of the frozen region contour with the target region shape, using medical imaging and accepted criteria for clinical success. The current study focuses on system design considerations, including a bioheat transfer model, simulation techniques, optimal cryoprobe layout strategy, and a simulation core framework. Two fundamentally different approaches were considered for the development of a cryosurgery simulator, based on a finite-elements (FE) commercial code (ANSYS) and a proprietary finite-difference (FD) code. Results of this study demonstrate that the FE simulator is superior in terms of geometric modeling, while the FD simulator is superior in terms of runtime. Benchmarking results further indicate that the FD simulator is superior in terms of usage of memory resources, pre-processing, parallel processing, and post-processing. It is envisioned that future integration of a human-interface module and clinical data into the proposed computer framework will make computerized training of cryosurgery a practical reality.

  9. Automatic Data Processing System and Procedures, Computerized Academic Counseling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagorski, Henry J.; And Others

    The Computerized Academic Counseling System (CACS) designed by the System Development Corporation is reviewed. Aspects of the system, constructed to assist counselors in guiding undergraduates in the selection of academic majors, which are discussed include: problem definition, system analysis, design rationale, methodology, measurement…

  10. Computerized physician order entry systems: the right prescription?

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ross

    2005-03-01

    Policymakers increasingly urge the use of information technology to improve the quality and efficiency of health care. In particular, computerized physician order entry (CPOE) is emphasized for its ability to reduce prescribing errors inherent in paper-based systems. This Issue Brief summarizes research that sounds a cautionary note about the potential for computerized systems to facilitate medication errors, as well as reduce them.

  11. Interactive Whiteboards: Interactive or Just Whiteboards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcote, Maria; Mildenhall, Paula; Marshall, Linda; Swan, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, interactive whiteboards have become popular teaching and learning tools, especially in primary school classrooms. Research studies from recent literature report on high levels of student motivation, teacher enthusiasm and whole-school support associated with these technological tools. Much research to date has reported on the…

  12. Computerized feature systems for identifying suspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric; Whalen, Thom; McCarthy, Andrew; Sakalauskas, John; Wotton, Cynthia

    1995-09-01

    In suspect identification, witnesses examine photos of known offenders in mugshot albums. The probability of correct identification deteriorates rapidly, however, as the number of mugshots examined increases. Feature approaches, where mugshots are displayed in order of similarity to witness descriptions of suspects, increase identification success by reducing this number. In our computerized feature system, both police raters and witnesses describe facial features of suspects on rating scales such as nose size: small 1 2 3 4 5 large. Feature users consistently identify more target suspects correctly than do album users. Previous experimental tests have failed, however, to examine the effects of feature system performance of the use of live targets as suspects rather than photos, the use of realistic crime scenarios, the number of police raters/mugshot, and differences among raters in their effect on system perfomance. In three experiments, we investigated those four issues. The first experiment used photos as target suspects but with multiple distractors, the second tested live suspects, while the third tested live suspects in a realistic crime scenario. The database contained the official mugshots of 1,000 offenders. Across the three experiments, a second and sometimes a third rater/mugshot significantly reduced the number of photos examined. More raters/mugshot did not affect performance further. Raters differed significantly in their effect on system perfomance. Significantly, our feature system performed well both with target suspects seen live and with live suspects in realistic crime scenarios (performance was comparable to that in previous experiments for photos of target suspects). These results strongly support our contention that feature systems are superior to album systems.

  13. Integer Operations Using a Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Delise R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are somewhat unimpressive at first and look like the whiteboards that already hang on the walls of many classrooms. However, integrating interactive whiteboard technology in a unit on adding and subtracting integers enhances student engagement and understanding. In this article, the author describes how she used an…

  14. Integer Operations Using a Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Delise R.

    2011-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are somewhat unimpressive at first and look like the whiteboards that already hang on the walls of many classrooms. However, integrating interactive whiteboard technology in a unit on adding and subtracting integers enhances student engagement and understanding. In this article, the author describes how she used an…

  15. Computerized Systems for Collecting Real-Time Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 15 developers of computerized real-time observation systems found many systems have incorporated laptop or handheld computers as well as bar-code scanners. Most systems used IBM-compatible software, and ranged from free to complete systems costing more than $1,500. Data analysis programs were included with most programs. (Author/CR)

  16. Computerized Systems for Collecting Real-Time Observational Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 15 developers of computerized real-time observation systems found many systems have incorporated laptop or handheld computers as well as bar-code scanners. Most systems used IBM-compatible software, and ranged from free to complete systems costing more than $1,500. Data analysis programs were included with most programs. (Author/CR)

  17. A Comparison of Computerized Job Matching Systems. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botterbusch, Karl F.

    This publication describes and compares 15 nationally available computerized job matching systems. The first section discusses job matching systems in general and provides an outline and a summary comparison table of the systems. The second section, which makes up the major part of the document, contains descriptions of 15 systems. For each…

  18. Inspiring Ways with Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Having an interactive whiteboard (IWB), how does a teacher integrate it into his/her lessons? This article shares one school's story of how to integrate IWBs into the curriculum. Ten ideas teachers can try in integrating IWB into their lessons are also offered.

  19. Experience with the use of the COM computerized conferencing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palme, J.

    1981-12-01

    Studies of the effect of the system are summarized. Similar computerized conferencing systems were also investigated. Information about how much KOM (the Swedish language version of COM) is used, what it is used for, which people use it, the user opinions about the advantages and disadvantages of the system, and a comparison of its cost with other communication media is presented.

  20. Unesco Integrated Documentation Network; Computerized Documentation System (CDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Documentation, Libraries, and Archives.

    Intended for use by the Computerized Documentation System (CDS), the Unesco version of ISIS (Integrated Set of Information Systems)--originally developed by the International Labour Organization--was developed in 1975 and named CDS/ISIS. This system has a comprehensive collection of programs for input, management, and output, running in batch or…

  1. Unesco Integrated Documentation Network; Computerized Documentation System (CDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Documentation, Libraries, and Archives.

    Intended for use by the Computerized Documentation System (CDS), the Unesco version of ISIS (Integrated Set of Information Systems)--originally developed by the International Labour Organization--was developed in 1975 and named CDS/ISIS. This system has a comprehensive collection of programs for input, management, and output, running in batch or…

  2. 45 CFR 307.5 - Mandatory computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... enforcement systems. (a) Basic requirement. (1) By October 1, 1997, each State must have in effect an... October 1, 2000, each State must have in effect an operational computerized support enforcement system... certify that these requirements are met. (b) Waiver option. A State may apply for a waiver of any...

  3. Development of a Computerized System to Catalog and Book Videotapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunk, Richard Lee

    The purpose of this project was to develop a computerized videotape catalog and booking system to serve school personnel in the 109 schools of Pinellas County, Florida. This system was designed to eliminate manual file maintenance, decrease time spent in booking, shipping, and receiving videotapes, and reduce the cost of producing and updating…

  4. The Effects of Computerized Information Systems on Juvenile Courts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Gary L.

    1976-01-01

    Organizational theorists alternatively hypothesized that computerized information systems (CIS) will produce no necessary changes, centralization, or decentralization in juvenile courts. This hypothesis is supported by the results of a four year study on the phenomenon. Suggestions are offered for improving the juvenile judicial system through…

  5. Oakton Community College Computerized Vocational Information System, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, James E.

    The Computerized Vocational Information System (CVIS) at Oakton Community College (OCC) is an integrated set of guidance systems designed to help students expand their awareness of the various career and educational opportunities available to them. Terminals are available for student use every weekday from 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. The Career…

  6. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  7. 21 CFR 884.2800 - Computerized Labor Monitoring System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: “Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computerized Labor Monitoring System. 884.2800 Section 884.2800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. 39 CFR 501.15 - Computerized Meter Resetting System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... customer's Computerized Meter Resetting System account, after such time as the customer provides a written request to the provider, as long as the request meets the Postal Service approved minimum and time frame... all reasonable times. At its discretion, the Postal Service may continue to fund inspections as it has...

  9. The Development and Evaluation of a Computerized Adaptive Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de-la-Torre, Roberto; Vispoel, Walter P.

    The development and preliminary evaluation of the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS), a new testing package for IBM-compatible microcomputers, are described. CATSYS can be used to administer and score operational adaptive tests or to conduct on-line computer simulation studies. The package incorporates several innovative features,…

  10. Wilderness Management... A Computerized System for Summarizing Permit Information

    Treesearch

    Gary H. Elsner

    1972-01-01

    Permits were first needed for visits to wilderness areas in California during summer 1971. A computerized system for analyzing these permits and summarizing information from them has been developed. It produces four types of summary tables: point-of-origin of visitors; daily variation in total number of persons present; variations in group size; and variations in...

  11. A Computerized Clinical Support System and Psychological Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Advocating "holistic" medicine, this article details the benefits to be derived from using a computerized clinical support system in a psychological laboratory focusing on internal healing where the client/patient becomes a committed partner utilizing biofeedback equipment, gaming, and simulation to achieve self-understanding and…

  12. Guidelines for the Development of Computerized Student Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armes, Nancy, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to provide guidelines for the development of computerized student information systems, this report raises policy issues and questions to be resolved at the campus level and describes a variety of computer-generated reports and records that can assist in educational decision making and planning. Introductory material discusses the…

  13. Exploration of Career Information Delivery Systems Via Computerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Rod; And Others

    Based on research conducted by Southwest Virginia Community College, this monograph presents information in a variety of formats on seven computerized career information systems: (1) microcomputers, which have the advantage of low cost, amenability to the production of locally generated databases, and portability; (2) the Coordinated Occupational…

  14. A Computerized System for Workplace Design for Visually Impaired Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, J-G; Hou, C-A

    1991-01-01

    VITAL (Vision Impaired Task and Assignment Lexicon) is an integrated computerized system that performs workplace design tasks for visually impaired workers. VITAL consists of three modules: ergonomics consultation, disability index, and work measurement. Evaluation indicated that VITAL could be used as a tool to help nonprofessional vocational…

  15. A Computerized System for Follow-Up of Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Gustave G.; Corson, Hal

    Miami-Dade Community College has conducted an annual survey of its graduates for nearly a decade. In the past, the processing and tabulation of results were essentially manual operations. This paper describes a recently-developed computerized system which carries out most of the processing of this survey up through the tabulation of results. The…

  16. The Power of Interactive Whiteboards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of interactive whiteboards, a new type of instructional presentation technology that allows users to control computer applications from the board. Highlights include vendors; multimedia online instruction; rear-projection models; examples of classroom uses; contests and opportunities for schools to obtain interactive whiteboards;…

  17. The Power of Interactive Whiteboards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia

    2002-01-01

    Describes the use of interactive whiteboards, a new type of instructional presentation technology that allows users to control computer applications from the board. Highlights include vendors; multimedia online instruction; rear-projection models; examples of classroom uses; contests and opportunities for schools to obtain interactive whiteboards;…

  18. The Wonders of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the advantages of using interactive whiteboards in the classroom. Developed by Smart Technologies, the Smart Board is one of several interactive whiteboards on the market today. Through Smart Board, starters can write, erase, and perform mouse functions with their finger, a pen, or anything with a maneuverable, firm surface.…

  19. The Wonders of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the advantages of using interactive whiteboards in the classroom. Developed by Smart Technologies, the Smart Board is one of several interactive whiteboards on the market today. Through Smart Board, starters can write, erase, and perform mouse functions with their finger, a pen, or anything with a maneuverable, firm surface.…

  20. An Integrated Computerized Triage System in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Aronsky, Dominik; Jones, Ian; Raines, Bill; Hemphill, Robin; Mayberry, Scott R; Luther, Melissa A; Slusser, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) triage is a fast-paced process that prioritizes the allocation of limited health care resources to patients in greatest need. This paper describes the experiences with an integrated, computerized triage application. The system exchanges information with other information systems, including the ED patient tracking board, the longitudinal electronic medical record, the computerized provider order entry, and the medication reconciliation application. The application includes decision support capabilities such as assessing the patient’s acuity level, age-dependent alerts for vital signs, and clinical reminders. The browser-based system utilizes the institution’s controlled vocabulary, improves data completeness and quality, such as compliance with capturing required data elements and screening questions, initiates clinical processes, such as pneumococcal vaccination ordering, and reminders to start clinical pathways, issues alerts for clinical trial eligibility, and facilitates various reporting needs. The system has supported the triage documentation of >290,000 pediatric and adult patients. PMID:18999190

  1. THE ESC COMPUTERIZED CIRCULATION SYSTEM MODEL II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAWVER, W.; STRAIN, P.M.

    A NEW CIRCULATION SYSTEM NOW IN USE AT THE ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS CENTER (ESC) LIBRARY, PART OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION, IS BASED UPON A PREVIOUS SYSTEM WHICH USED TABULATING CARDS, UNIT RECORD MACHINES, AND A SMALL COMPUTER. THE NEW SYSTEM IS A TRANSACTION CARD SYSTEM, IN WHICH ONE BASIC TYPE OF CARD FORMAT IS USED FOR CHARGING,…

  2. A Computerized Resource Retrieval System for a Comprehensive Psychiatric Facility

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Joy A.; Evanczuk, Karen J.; Coffman, Gerald A.

    1984-01-01

    The need to systematize the disposition process for psychiatric patients referred from the Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic after an initial evaluation or treatment episode resulted in the development of a Computerized Resource Retrieval System. The system is designed to provide, through on-line displays, a listing of all outpatient treatment programs within WPIC and outside agencies providing social and mental health care services as well as information necessary to complete the referral with a minimum of confusion and red tape.

  3. A PC based computerized maintenance system

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, D.P.; Walker, G.D.; Imel, G.R.

    1990-03-01

    The present regulatory climate in the research reactor community has made an easily manageable and auditable maintenance system a necessity. We at NRAD have developed a computer-based system that is easy to implement and use, meets all our regulatory and reporting requirements, and is extremely useful to us in our daily operations. The system, developed at the NRAD reactor facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, Idaho, uses DBASE-III coupled with C language routines, written for specific purposes. It is a menu-driven system that can be mastered in a short period of time and maintained with only a few hours of computer operation per month. It uses three computer processes: job scheduling, file updating, and report preparation, to produce schedules, work orders, and miscellaneous report forms. The heart of the system is an IBM PC with a 10 MB hard disk, providing adequate data storage capacity for a facility the size of NRAD. The computer is totally dedicated to the maintenance system, thus guarding against inadvertent loss of, or damage to, data files. Computer operator training time is minimized by the menu driven program. Multiple operators can share the computer operation responsibilities, and maintain the system with only 12 to 16 hours of computer operation per month. The system is adaptable to almost any facility, and can be altered and expanded to satisfy changing requirements. 7 figs.

  4. Computerized Tracking System for Underprepared Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smittle, Pat; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes Santa Fe Community College's (Florida) computer-based system for assessing students' basic skills, placing them into appropriate courses, and tracking their subsequent academic progress. Considers ways in which the college's tracking system has been modified in response to state mandates. (DMM)

  5. The optimal planning of computerized manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, W. C., Jr.; Barash, M. M.; Solberg, J. J.

    1980-12-01

    A new class of control algorithms for computer operated manufacturing systems (CMS) was defined and tested. The definition is sufficient to permit construction of any element of the new class by a practitioner with backgrounds in electronic devices, NC machine tools, computer operating systems, and data flow. Reliability, repairability, and extensibility were considered. The test applied the new class to control two simulated systems-one similar to existing systems, the other using adaptive machine tools. For each system, the new class functioned successfully. Non-failing machine tool utilization exceeded 95 percent for failure rates from 3-16 percent per machine tool. The batch weights had a strong effect on relative flow time.

  6. Computerized systems to provide materials selection advice

    SciTech Connect

    Krisher, A.S.

    1996-07-01

    The rapid advance of computer science has increased the ability to store and retrieve information. These new capabilities are beginning to be applied to the problem of providing sound advice to non-specialist engineers who make materials selection decisions. This paper presents an overview of the large scale systems which exist in finished or near finished form and are (or may soon be) available for use by the public. The paper focuses on systems which transfer knowledge taking into account the many qualifications which enter into the reasoning processes of materials/corrosion specialists. The paper discusses both the strengths and limitations of each system.

  7. [Computerized system validation of clinical researches].

    PubMed

    Yan, Charles; Chen, Feng; Xia, Jia-lai; Zheng, Qing-shan; Liu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Validation is a documented process that provides a high degree of assurance. The computer system does exactly and consistently what it is designed to do in a controlled manner throughout the life. The validation process begins with the system proposal/requirements definition, and continues application and maintenance until system retirement and retention of the e-records based on regulatory rules. The objective to do so is to clearly specify that each application of information technology fulfills its purpose. The computer system validation (CSV) is essential in clinical studies according to the GCP standard, meeting product's pre-determined attributes of the specifications, quality, safety and traceability. This paper describes how to perform the validation process and determine relevant stakeholders within an organization in the light of validation SOPs. Although a specific accountability in the implementation of the validation process might be outsourced, the ultimate responsibility of the CSV remains on the shoulder of the business process owner-sponsor. In order to show that the compliance of the system validation has been properly attained, it is essential to set up comprehensive validation procedures and maintain adequate documentations as well as training records. Quality of the system validation should be controlled using both QC and QA means.

  8. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  9. Infrared system with computerized image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. P.; Rex, J. D.; Schummers, J. H.

    1985-05-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a system in which detected signals from an infrared scanner can be used to provide a calibrated display, and by which the data can be stored for later use. In the system according to the invention, image signals originating from an infrared scanner are transformed into a digitized form for storage in a computer and manipulated to produce a calibrated display. This transforms the merely qualitative utility of such a scanner into a quantitative capability allowing analysis of heat energy losses from structures of interest with only modest investments in capital equipment.

  10. The Washington Library Network's Computerized Bibliographic System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jane Pobst

    The Washington Library Network is developing a computer assisted bibliographic system to speed and expand library operations throughout the state. Features include Machine Readable Cataloging (MARC) format with all content designators, subject and name authority files, sorting by Library of Congress rules, and stringent quality control. Future…

  11. Computerized ultrasonic test inspection enhancement system for aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, R. G.

    Attention is given to the computerized ultrasonic test inspection enhancement (CUTIE) system which was designed to meet the following program goals: (1) automation of the inspection technique and evaluation of the discontinuities for aircraft components while maintaining reasonable implementation costs and reducing the overall inspection costs; and (2) design of a system which would allow for easy modification so that new concepts could be implemented. The system's ultrasonic test bridge, C-scan recorder, computer control, and ultrasonic flaw detector are described. Consideration is also given to the concurrent development of an eight element array transducer (for increasing the inspection rate) and a high-speed data acquisition system (for signature analysis).

  12. An Augmented Computerized Readability Editing System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    comprehensibility %. problems. Altnough neither artificial intelligence nor cognitive modelling has yet arrived at a truly comprehensive language processing system...network grammars. In L. Bolc (Ed.), Natural language communication with computers. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. . Forgy, C. L. (1979). On the efficient...USARCRO-RS Ft. Sheridan. IL 6C037 I Chief, ARI Field Unit P. 0. Box 5787 Presidio of Monterey Monterey, CA 93944 I Dr. Milton S. Katz U.S. Army

  13. Computerized waste-accountability shipping and packaging system. [WASP

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.A.; Baston, M. Jr.; DeVer, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Waste Accountability, Shipping and Packaging System (WASP) is a real-time computerized system designed and implemented by Mound Facility to meet the stringent packaging and reporting requirements of radioactive waste being shipped to burial sites. The system stores packaging data and inspection results for each unit and prepares all necessary documents at the time of shipment. Shipping data specific for each burial site are automatically prepared on magnetic tape for transmission to the computing center at that site. WASP has enabled Mound Facility to effectively meet the requirements of the burial sites, diminishing the possibility of being rejected from a site because of noncompliance.

  14. Computerized system for hospital engineering service management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, C. A.; Gonzalez, E. A.; Cagnolo, F. J.; Olmos, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    When a Hospital Engineering Service (HES) is implemented within a health care environment, the idea is to improve service conditions and costs as well as to provide timely responses to equipment preventive maintenance and infrastructure requirements. An HES must, within the shortest possible period of time, meet the above requirements at the cost necessary to provide the service quality sought. In many cases there is a lack of minimal materials and staff who are qualified to attain the objectives that have been set. Therefore, external assistance becomes necessary. In this context, actions are often taken which, because they are not recorded, cannot be assessed in order to evaluate the HES. Since all action taken is appraised from the purely economic point of view, in the final analysis the contributions from staff remain invisible. This situation works against the possibility of quantifying the convenience of possessing an internal HES. The software support system we have developed here is oriented toward providing all the necessary data to address this issue.

  15. Development of computerized masticatory force measurement system.

    PubMed

    Rane, Vivek; Hamde, Satish; Agrawal, Ankush

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Maximum Voluntary Bite Force (MVBF) in Indian population with normal occlusion and after treatment of mandibular angle fracture. This paper discusses the development of a sensor fork with modified load cell and computer-based bite force measuring system that generates force profile on the computer. This is a powerful diagnostic tool in response to the needs of dentists seeking an accurate way to dynamically measure occlusion. This study was carried out to evaluate the maximum voluntary bite force generated by the patients after the treatment of mandibular angle fracture. The in vivo measurements were repeated on the following day, week and two months later. The measurements of the device were highly repeatable. This development provides the cost effective and handy equipment for bite force measurement further, if again sensor thickness reduced, we will be able to get more close results of forces that are exactly generated during the mastication process. Our study shows a significant difference in mean bite force efficiency between the all the treatment weeks and increased with time at α = 0.05 level. The gender difference was statistically significant in the male and female.

  16. CRRIS: a computerized radiological risk-investigation system

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for regulating radioactive airborne effluents in the US. A comprehensive, integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) is being developed to support EPA's radiation standards development. This modular system consists primarily of five computer codes and their supporting data bases for estimating environmental transport and radiation doses and risks. Health effects are estimated on the basis of a life-table methodology developed by EPA. CRRIS is designed to provide EPA with a reasonable and flexible way of assessing the risk to man associated with radionuclide releases to the atmosphere.

  17. Thirty Simple Ideas for Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents thirty simple ideas for interactive whiteboards and how IWB can make one's teaching life easier. These teaching ideas for the interactive whiteboard can be used by teachers every day. Tips for classroom management are also presented.

  18. A computerized record and verify system for radiation treatments.

    PubMed

    Mohan, R; Podmaniczky, K C; Caley, R; Lapidus, A; Laughlin, J S

    1984-10-01

    We have developed a general purpose, comprehensive, and highly reliable computerized Record and Verify System to detect and prevent mistakes in the delivery of external beam radiation therapy. This system helps prevent accidental delivery of dangerous dose, improves quality control, and provides invaluable record keeping and report generating capabilities. Currently, treatment machine and couch parameter settings of four different machines are monitored by the system and compared with prescribed values. The system inhibits a machine from being turned on if the settings do not agree with the prescribed values to within specified maximum permissible deviations. The system is user-friendly and provides useful, complete, and easily accessible data. We describe many aspects of the system including hardware, software, data, and operation, and we conclude with a brief discussion of clinical experience and preliminary data.

  19. Installation of Computerized Procedure System and Advanced Alarm System in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Le Blanc, Katya Lee; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Rice, Brandon Charles

    2016-04-01

    This report describes the installation of two advanced control room technologies, an advanced alarm system and a computerized procedure system, into the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Installation of these technologies enables future phases of this research by providing a platform to systematically evaluate the effect of these technologies on operator and plant performance.

  20. Development of a computerized patient classification and staffing system.

    PubMed

    Park, H A; Park, J H

    1997-01-01

    Korean health care agencies are trying to find ways to survive amid strong competition within the health care industry and pressure to open health care market from abroad. One way to survive is to improve health care quality at present or reduced expenditure. Nursing is the largest manpower in health care agencies and plays an important role in determining quality of care through direct interaction with patients., thus, nursing manpower management is an essential part of survival strategies. If the nursing department can adapt to dynamic changes in the health care environment in terms of quality and quantity of service needed, health care agencies' quality and efficient management will be achieved at the same time. A computerized prototype patient classification and nursing staffing system was developed using Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0. This system allows a user to use GUI(Graphic User Interface) with an icon and a mouse. By applying this computerized system to clinical practice, nursing managers will receive accurate information regarding nursing manpower management at nursing unit level as well as departmental levels. Then nursing managers can achieve effective nursing manpower management, which will improve nursing care by allocating more nursing staff time to direct patient care.

  1. The computerized OMAHA system in microsoft office excel.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaobin; Wong, Frances K Y; Zhang, Peiqiang; Leung, Carenx W Y; Lee, Lai H; Wong, Jessica S Y; Lo, Yim F; Ching, Shirley S Y

    2014-01-01

    The OMAHA System was adopted as the documentation system in an interventional study. To systematically record client care and facilitate data analysis, two Office Excel files were developed. The first Excel file (File A) was designed to record problems, care procedure, and outcomes for individual clients according to the OMAHA System. It was used by the intervention nurses in the study. The second Excel file (File B) was the summary of all clients that had been automatically extracted from File A. Data in File B can be analyzed directly in Excel or imported in PASW for further analysis. Both files have four parts to record basic information and the three parts of the OMAHA System. The computerized OMAHA System simplified the documentation procedure and facilitated the management and analysis of data.

  2. Study of on-line computerized procedures system of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhijian; Peng Minjun

    2006-07-01

    An on-line computerized procedures system (OCPS) for normal operation is developed. The system makes use of the advantages of computerized procedures system and provides the detailed and comprehensible procedures. The configuration is introduced. OCPS has been built on Embedded real-time operation system VxWorks using C language. Computerized procedures are described exampled with cold start-up in this paper, helping operators to know about the state of plants during the complex operating course. After adopting the computerized procedures, the labor intensity and mental pressure of operators will be reduced. (authors)

  3. The DAISEY Data System: A Computerized System to Support Longitudinal Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Garrett K.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a computerized system for collecting test scores and other data that are useful in gauging the performance of children as they progress through the South Carolina public schools. Draws implications for research best addressed with longitudinal data bases. (RH)

  4. Electronic whiteboard construction using whiteboard and image-locating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Jing-Wein; Chung, Chin-Ho

    2009-11-01

    We use image-locating techniques and a traditional whiteboard with two cameras to construct an electronic whiteboard (EWB) with a size of 88×176 cm corresponding to 1280-×1024-pixel resolution. We employ two strategies achieve the goal: (1) we develope a modified scale and bilinear interpolation (MSBI) method for pen locating and acceleration operation, and obtain high accuracy detection; and (2) a block parameter database (BPD) is created to improve the accuracy. For the BPD, we divide the whiteboard image into several blocks and record each block parameter (the X and Y coordinates) to follow pen position calculation. Experimental results demonstrate that the MSBI method can correctly calculate the pen position. Additionally, the BPD strategy is better than the traditional method as it improves the accuracy and decreases the maximum detection error from 6 to 3 pixels. The simulation results prove our method is an effective and low-cost EWB technique.

  5. GENTIC: a computerized medical genetic case record system.

    PubMed

    Aymé, S; Aurran, Y; Gouvernet, J; Mattei, J F; Giraud, F

    1982-01-01

    Gentic is a computerized system for the storage, recall, and analysis of data collected by the Medical Genetics Center in Marseille, France. It is based on a standard case report file that includes a full clinical description of all patients, results of cytogenetic investigations, and details of the genetic counseling provided. GENTIC has been used since 1975, and data on more than 5,000 families are accessible for study. This system has improved the quality of consultations, follow-up, and research. It provides data for epidemiological studies and for syndrome identification. This system is maintained at an annual cost of $3,000, salary costs not included, after an initial investment of $40,000.

  6. A computerized welder qualification record and tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.N.; Etzler, D.J.; Fletcher, D.R.; Jessee, R.M.; Wilson, L.O.; Evans, J.C.; Whited, V.B.

    1994-04-27

    Accurately tracking welder qualification and assigning welders to jobs for which they are qualified is becoming more important as customers increasingly demand improved quality and conformance to industry standards. A computerized welder qualification records and tracking system (WPQ) was developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to assist the user in this process. The system enables the user to consistently generate welder qualification records with minimal effort and increased accuracy, relate the welder qualification limits with the limits of the welding procedure specification, generate a printout which reports essential information for selecting qualified welders, and provide a method for updating welders based on process usage as permitted by the codes. Codes addressed by the system include American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX, American Welding Society (AWS) D1.1, AWS D1.3 and AWS D9.1

  7. 45 CFR 307.13 - Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.13 Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security and confidentiality for computerized support enforcement systems in operation after October 1, 1997. 307.13 Section 307.13 Public...

  8. Evaluation of a Computerized Clinical Information System (Micromedex).

    PubMed

    Lundsgaarde, H P; Moreshead, G E

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes data collected as part of a project designed to identify and assess the technical and organizational problems associated with the implementation and evaluation of a Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS), Micromedex, in three U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The study began in 1987 as a national effort to implement decision support technologies in the Veterans Administration Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). The specific objectives of this project were to (1) examine one particular decision support technology, (2) identify the technical and organizational barriers to the implementation of a CCIS in the VA host environment, (3) assess the possible benefits of this system to VA clinicians in terms of therapeutic decision making, and (4) develop new methods for identifying the clinical utility of a computer program designed to provide clinicians with a new information tool. The project was conducted intermittently over a three-year period at three VA medical centers chosen as implementation and evaluation test sites for Micromedex. Findings from the Kansas City Medical Center in Missouri are presented to illustrate some of the technical problems associated with the implementation of a commercial database program in the DHCP host environment, the organizational factors influencing clinical use of the system, and the methods used to evaluate its use. Data from 4581 provider encounters with the CCIS are summarized. Usage statistics are presented to illustrate the methodological possibilities for assessing the "benefits and burdens" of a computerized information system by using an automated collection of user demographics and program audit trails that allow evaluators to monitor user interactions with different segments of the database.

  9. 45 CFR 307.20 - Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submittal of advance planning documents for... CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.20 Submittal of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems. The State...

  10. Teaching astronomy with dry erase whiteboards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-09-01

    In the quest to become a great astronomy teacher, one carefully considers what might be the best textbook, what might be the best homework collection and grading system, which classroom policies promote an active learning environment, and which teaching inclinations and strategies might work best with this year's students. But what about teaching equipment? As you are thinking about next year's teaching hardware needs, a surprisingly effective tool to consider adding to your cabinet that consistently encourages more active learning is a stack of small dry erase whiteboards.

  11. Design of a computerized provider order entry system for ordering of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, SunHee; Lee, KiHyuk; Cho, Eun-Young; Hwang, Hee; Kim, KiDong; Cho, Young-Jae; Kim, Jungeun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Baek, Rong Min; Jeon, YoungSik

    2012-01-01

    With the developments in medical information systems and the widespread establishment of medical information systems that include computerized order communication systems (OCSs), there has been an increase in the establishment of computerized chemotherapy order systems. In this study, we aim to design an improved computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system that integrates a chemotherapy ordering system that can issue a customized order in response to a provider's diverse chemotherapy prescription needs with an automated issuance of dosage, treatment schedule, and treatment method. We expect the newly designed system to be able to prevent the common errors in complex chemotherapy ordering systems and reduce the time required for ordering.

  12. Comparing the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.; Meissner, Marion C.; Tohme, Walid G.; Winchester, James F.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    How should hospital administrators compare the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems. There is a general tendency to assume that because computer networks potentially provide broad access to hospital archives, computerized patient records are less secure than paper records and increase the risk of breaches of patient confidentiality. This assumption is ill-founded on two grounds. Reasons exist to say that the computerized patient record provides better access to patient information while enhancing overall information system security. A range of options with different trade-offs between access and security exist in both paper-based and computerized records management systems. The relative accessibility and security of any particular patient record management system depends, therefore, on administrative choice, not simply on the intrinsic features of paper or computerized information management systems.

  13. Computerized interactive measurement control system at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, P.A.; Hunt, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Traditionally measurement control for the Rocky Flats Plant Analytical Laboratories has been administered by the Chemistry Standards Laboratory (CSL); both groups are under the jurisdiction of the Quality Engineering and Control Department. In the past, control samples were prepared by CSL, submitted to an Analytical Laboratory, and results were compiled by hand and submitted to the plant's central computing center which then generated a statistical report. The old paper-driven system has been replaced by the IMECS, an acronym for ''Interactive Measurement Evaluation and Control System''. The IMECS is a computerized, interactive measurement control system developed in-house with the cooperation of computer programmers., statisticians, analytical chemists, and standards engineers. The software is structured in three parts: (1) a data base section; (2) a statistical analysis section; and (3) supporting routines used for file maintenance, updating, scheduling, and control. This paper will describe how the system was conceived and designed. The paper will also detail the implementation of the system (scheduled for January 1985), and how it compares to the previous measurement control system. Examples will be given on how individual measurement control programs are designed and how control data is entered into the system. Also discussed will be the types of statistical reporting performed by the system.

  14. Computerized commodity management system in Thailand and Brazil.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Thailand's National Family Planning Program is testing a computerized contraceptive commodity reporting management in 4 provinces with 104 National Family Planning Program (NFPP) reporting entities. Staff in the Brazilian Association of Family Planning Entities (ABEPF) and CPAIMC, a major family planning service agency, have been trained in the use of a computerized commodity distribution management system and are ready to initiate test use. The systems were designed in response to specific commodity management needs of the concerned organizations. Neither distribution program functions as a contraceptive social marketing (CSM) program, but each system reviewed has aspects that are relevant to CSM commodity management needs. Both the Thai and Brazilian systems were designed to be as automatic and user friendly as possible. Both have 3 main databases and perform similar management and reporting functions. Differing program configurations and basic data forms reflect the specific purposes of each system. Databases for the logistics monitoring system in Thailand arethe reporting entity (or ID) file; the current month's data file; and the master balance file. The data source is the basic reporting form that also serves as a Request and Issue Voucher for commodities. Editing functions in the program check to see that the current "beginning balance" equals the previous month's ending balance. Indexing functions in the system allow direct access to the records of any reporting entity via the ID number, as well as the sequential processing of records by ID number. 6 reports can be generated: status report by issuing entity; status report by dispensing entity; aggregate status report; out of compliance products report; out of compliance outlets report; and suggested shipment to regional warehouse report. Databases for the distribution management system in Brazil are: the name-ID (client institution) file; the product file; and the data file. The data source is an order form

  15. Computerized system for the performance of environmental impact assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.; Hodges, M.

    1997-12-31

    A wide range of techniques and methods are employed in the performance of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) worldwide. There is currently a great need for consistency in approach, so that predicted impacts from project to project, and region to region can be readily compared. A systematic approach has been developed and computerized so as to provide for a consistent, rapid and cost-effective means of performing EIAs for a wide variety of projects. The system also facilitates iterative, least-cost gaming to arrive at the most appropriate project design and location. The system is supported by custom developed knowledge bases and a geographic information system (GIS). The system was originally developed under contract to the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The system has been distributed to all ADB-member countries. Current applications also include US Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded conversion of the system to support performance of EIAs in Russia, to satisfy Russian regulatory requirements, and the requirements of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). The World Bank (WB) is also current testing the system for applications on WB-financed or funded projects.

  16. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  17. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  18. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Funding for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.25 What conditions apply...

  19. Interactive Whiteboards in Japanese Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liversidge, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    The use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) is widespread in the United Kingdom, Australia, and to some extent in the United States and Canada. However, this potentially learning enhancing technology has been adopted very little in Japan at any level of education, apart from some international schools. Furthermore, one of the world's two leading IWB…

  20. Students and the Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biró, Piroska

    2011-01-01

    The spread of Interactive Whiteboards in Hungary has made students more curious, interested and motivated. The new digital generation claims reform and besides the traditional education they need digital material, extra knowledge since it is much easier to access extra information in connection with a particular curriculum. They spend a lot of…

  1. How Interactive Is Your Whiteboard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Howard; Jones, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors question the assumption that interactive whiteboards (IWBs) automatically lead to interactive teaching. The authors contend that although IWBs have features that offer great potential for the development of highly interactive teaching approaches, it may be the case that teachers must have made the transition from…

  2. May the Force Be Whiteboard!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Lee; Jones, David; King, Julia; Nicholson, Claire; Pinks, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    As final year BA and Qulified Teacher Status students, the authors thought they had already realised the power of using an interactive whiteboard (IWB). The use of information and communications technology is something they have to consider in the planning in every one of their lessons, including PE. However, the challenge of planning a maths…

  3. Computerized parts list system coordinates engineering releases, parts control, and manufacturing planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, W.; Kinsey, M.

    1967-01-01

    Computerized parts list system compiles and summarize all pertinent and available information on complex new systems. The parts list system consists of three computer subroutines - list of parts, parts numerical sequence list, and specifications list.

  4. 75 FR 8508 - Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation AGENCY: Office of Child Support Enforcement... of installing, operating, maintaining, and enhancing automated data processing systems. DATES...) that we had begun consideration with stakeholders of appropriate minimum Tribal systems...

  5. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  6. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  7. Considering the Language of Computerized Order Entry Systems.

    PubMed

    Diemert, Simon; Weber, Jens; Price, Morgan

    2017-01-01

    Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems have been shown to introduce new problems into clinical environments. Given the communication intensive nature of these systems considering the language(s) of communication can provide insight into their function and subsequent problems. The current (as November 2015) CPOE literature was reviewed using the language concepts of syntax, semantics, and pragmatics as a lens. In total, 202 articles were considered, of these only 46 received a full review. 145 results related to language concepts were extracted from these articles. These were categorized into five categories: syntax, semantics, system-pragmatics, syntax-pragmatics, and semantic-pragmatics. In total key themes were synthesized. The themes identified can be used to direct further research in the area of CPOE systems. It was found that current literature heavily favors pragmatics concerns of language at the expense of considering underlying factors (syntax and semantics). The results support the use of language as a means of analyzing interactions between actors in communication intensive systems.

  8. Clinical experience with a computerized record and verify system.

    PubMed

    Podmaniczky, K C; Mohan, R; Kutcher, G J; Kestler, C; Vikram, B

    1985-08-01

    To improve the quality of patient care by detecting and preventing many types of treatment mistakes, we have implemented a computerized system for recording and verifying external beam radiation treatments on our therapy machines. It inhibits the radiation beam if treatment machine settings do not agree with prescribed values to within maximum permissible deviations (tolerances). The tolerances are determined from experience and adjusted when necessary to make the system more effective and less susceptible to "false alarms." The system uses a common data base for all treatment machines. As a result, it permits statistical analysis and generation of reports based on data encompassing the entire patient population as well as verification of treatments of patients transferred from one machine to another. Reports of verification failures reveal patterns of mistakes. Knowing these, attempts can be made to reduce the frequency of verification failures. "Significant" mistakes that were prevented are extracted by treatment planning personnel from these reports. Analysis of data indicates a rate of approximately 150 "significant" mistakes detected and prevented per machine per year, representing 1.0% of all fields treated. We present and discuss our experiences with the system and with the frequency, patterns, and significance of verification failures. We selected a few of the patients for whose treatments significant set-up mistakes were made, and were detected and prevented by the Record and Verify System. We include discussions of the overall effect these mistakes would have had on dose distribution had they not been prevented.

  9. The Initial Development of a Computerized Operator Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Lew; Ronald L Boring; Thomas A Ulrich; Ken Thomas

    2014-08-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is a collection of resilient software technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall nuclear power plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. The COSS provides rapid assessments, computations, and recommendations to reduce workload and augment operator judgment and decision-making during fast- moving, complex events. A prototype COSS for a chemical volume control system at a nuclear power plant has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The development process identified four underlying elements necessary for the prototype, which consist of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. An operational prototype resides at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Several human-machine interface (HMI) considerations are identified and incorporated in the prototype during this initial round of development.

  10. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  11. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized...

  12. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  13. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized...

  14. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  15. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized...

  16. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  17. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized...

  18. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this...

  19. 45 CFR 310.5 - What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IV-D Systems and office automation? 310.5 Section 310.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... AUTOMATION Requirements for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation § 310.5 What options are available for Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and office automation? (a) Allowable computerized support...

  20. 45 CFR 310.40 - What requirements apply for accessing systems and records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... records for monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? 310.40 Section 310.40... COMPUTERIZED TRIBAL IV-D SYSTEMS AND OFFICE AUTOMATION Accountability and Monitoring Procedures for... monitoring Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems and Office Automation? In accordance with Part 95 of this title...

  1. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The results are plotted automatically and a user-friendly graphical user interface is developed that can control the MySQL database. Case studies show breast cancer incidence rate is highest among Malay women, followed by Chinese and Indian. The peak age for breast cancer incidence is from 50 to 59 years old. Results suggest that the chance of developing breast cancer is increased in older women, and reduced with breastfeeding practice. The weight status might affect the breast cancer risk differently. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  2. Design of a computerized, temperature-controlled, recirculating aquaria system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widmer, A.M.; Carveth, C.J.; Keffler, J.W.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    We built a recirculating aquaria system with computerized temperature control to maintain static temperatures, increase temperatures 1 ??C/day, and maintain diel temperature fluctuations up to 10 ??C. A LabVIEW program compared the temperature recorded by thermocouples in fish tanks to a desired set temperature and then calculated the amount of hot or cold water to add to tanks to reach or maintain the desired temperature. Intellifaucet?? three-way mixing valves controlled temperature of the input water and ensured that all fish tanks had the same turnover rate. The system was analyzed over a period of 50 days and was fully functional for 96% of that time. Six different temperature treatments were run simultaneously in 18, 72 L fish tanks and temperatures stayed within 0.5 ??C of set temperature. We used the system to determine the upper temperature tolerance of fishes, but it could be used in aquaculture, ecological studies, or other aquatic work where temperature control is required. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Computerized system for managing nursing care indicators at Hospital São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Labbadia, Lilian Lestingi; D'Innocenzo, Maria; Fogliano, Rosana Rodrigues Figueira; Silva, Gabriela Eneida Françolin; de Queiroz, Rita Marina Ribeiro Melo; Carmagnani, Maria Isabel Sampaio; Salvador, Maria Elisabete

    2011-08-01

    Indicators are tools that permit to define parameters that will be used to make comparisons between a result and its expected value, as well as to add a value of judgement in this regard. The purpose of this study is to describe the experience of a group of nurses in the development of a computerized system to manage nursing care indicators at Hospital São Paulo. Four stages were used to implement the indicator management system: developing a nursing care indicator handbook; performing a manually registered pilot test; developing the computerized system; and performing the pilot test of the computerized system in eleven units at the hospital.

  4. Stabilometer Computerized Analog Recording System for Studying Gross Motor Skill Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasey, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The stabilometer computerized analog recording system (SCARS) provides for storing analog and digital information on a single channel audio tape recorder at lower cost and greater versatility than other systems. (MB)

  5. Stabilometer Computerized Analog Recording System for Studying Gross Motor Skill Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasey, William C., Jr.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The stabilometer computerized analog recording system (SCARS) provides for storing analog and digital information on a single channel audio tape recorder at lower cost and greater versatility than other systems. (MB)

  6. A computerized system to monitor resilience indicators in organizations.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor Rodrigues; de Souza, Alan Pinheiro; Gomes, Jose Orlando

    2012-01-01

    The concepts developed by resilience engineering allow the understanding and monitoring the functioning of organizations and, particularly, to map the role of human activities, in success or in failure, enabling a better comprehension about how people make decisions in unexpected situations. The capture of information about human activities in the various organization levels gives managers a deeper real-time understanding of what is influencing the people performance, providing awareness of the factors that influence positively or negatively the organizational goals initially projected. The monitoring is important because the correct functioning of complex systems depends on the knowledge that people have to perform their activities and how the system environment provides tools that actually support the human performance. Therefore, organizations should look forward through precursors in operating signals to identify possible problems or solutions in the structure of tasks and activities, safety, quality, schedule, rework, and maintenance. We apply the concepts of resilience engineering to understand the organization by the analysis of cognitive tasks and activities. The aim is the development of a computerized system to monitor human activities to produce indicators to access system resilience. The validation of the approach was made in a real organization and the results show the successful applicability of the system. Based on findings obtained after the experiment of the system in a real organization, and managers and workers opinions, it was possible to show that the use of system provided an anticipated (real-time) perception about how activities are effectively being performed, allowing managers and workers to make decisions more consistent with daily problems, and also to anticipate solutions to cope with unexpected situations.

  7. Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulation System (Version 1. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Winsor, M.; Pelletier, J.; Randall, R.; Bertling, J.

    1991-11-01

    The Computerized Risk And Bioaccumulation System (CRABS, Version 1.0) is an expert system that predicts tissue residues of fifteen neutral organic pollutants in sediment-dwelling organisms and the human cancer risk from consumption of the contaminated shellfish. Bioaccumulation from bedded sediment can be predicted from the thermodynamic partitioning, first-order kinetic, or toxicokinetic model. All the models can predict steady-state tissue residues while the two kinetic models can predict non-steady-state uptake or elimination. CRABS then predicts the lifetime human cancer risk from consumption of clams and other non-mobile sediment-dwelling organisms containing the predicted (or measured) tissue residue. The linearized multistage model is used to predict cancer risk for a single pollutant from a single species diet. The program guides the user in estimating shellfish consumption rates if no site-specific rates are available. CRABS is designed to promote thorough documentation of the assumptions and data as well as to error check the entered values.

  8. Evaluation and certification of computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    Classen, David C; Avery, Anthony J; Bates, David W

    2007-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) is an application that is used to electronically write physician orders either in the hospital or in the outpatient setting. It is used in about 15% of U.S. Hospitals and a smaller percentage of ambulatory clinics. It is linked with clinical decision support, which provides much of the value of implementing it. A number of studies have assessed the impact of CPOE with respect to a variety of parameters, including costs of care, medication safety, use of guidelines or protocols, and other measures of the effectiveness or quality of care. Most of these studies have been undertaken at CPOE exemplar sites with homegrown clinical information systems. With the increasing implementation of commercial CPOE systems in various settings of care has come evidence that some implementation approaches may not achieve previously published results or may actually cause new errors or even harm. This has lead to new initiatives to evaluate CPOE systems, which have been undertaken by both vendors and other groups who evaluate vendors, focused on CPOE vendor capabilities and effective approaches to implementation that can achieve benefits seen in published studies. In addition, an electronic health record (EHR) vendor certification process is ongoing under the province of the Certification Commission for Health Information Technology (CCHIT) (which includes CPOE) that will affect the purchase and use of these applications by hospitals and clinics and their participation in public and private health insurance programs. Large employers have also joined this focus by developing flight simulation tools to evaluate the capabilities of these CPOE systems once implemented, potentially linking the results of such programs to reimbursement through pay for performance programs. The increasing role of CPOE systems in health care has invited much more scrutiny about the effectiveness of these systems in actual practice which has the potential to improve

  9. A Case-Study of One Teacher's Use of an Interactive Whiteboard System to Support Knowledge Co-Construction in the History Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaney, Rosemary; Chapman, Arthur; Hennessy, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have rapidly become an integral feature of many classrooms across the UK and elsewhere, but debate continues regarding the pedagogical implications of their use. This article reports on an in-depth case-study from the wider T-MEDIA project (Teacher Mediation of Subject Learning with ICT: a Multimedia Approach). A key…

  10. A Case-Study of One Teacher's Use of an Interactive Whiteboard System to Support Knowledge Co-Construction in the History Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaney, Rosemary; Chapman, Arthur; Hennessy, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have rapidly become an integral feature of many classrooms across the UK and elsewhere, but debate continues regarding the pedagogical implications of their use. This article reports on an in-depth case-study from the wider T-MEDIA project (Teacher Mediation of Subject Learning with ICT: a Multimedia Approach). A key…

  11. [Computerized decision support systems: EBM at the bedside].

    PubMed

    Capobussi, Matteo; Banzi, Rita; Moja, Lorenzo; Bonovas, Stefanos; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Polo Friz, Hernan; Nanni, Oriana; Mangia, Massimo; Ruggiero, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    One of the aims of Evidence-Based Medicine is to improve quality and appropriateness of care by the expedition of the knowledge transfer process. Computerized Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) are computer programs that provide alerts to the prescribing doctor directly at the moment of medical examination. In fact, alerts are integrated within the single patient electronic health record. CDSS based on the best available and updated evidence and guidelines may be an efficient tool to facilitate the transfer of the latest results from clinical research directly at the bedside, thus supporting decision-making. The CODES (COmputerized DEcision Support) trial is a research program funded by the Italian Ministry of Health and the Lombardy Region. It aims to evaluate the feasibility of the implementation of a CDSS at the hospital level and to assess its efficacy in daily clinical practice. The CODES project includes two pragmatic RCTs testing a CDSS (i.e. the EBMeDS - MediDSS) in two large Italian hospitals: the first is a general hospital in Vimercate (Lombardy), the second is an oncologic research center in Meldola (Emilia Romagna). The CDSS supports a full spectrum of decisions: therapy, drug interactions, diagnosis, and management of health care services are covered by a hundreds of reminders. However only few reminders are activated per patient, highlighting crucial problems in the delivery of high-quality care. The two trials have similar design and primary outcome, the rate at which alerts detected by the software are resolved by a decision of the clinicians. The project also includes the assessment of barriers and facilitators in the adoption of these new technologies by hospital staff members and the retrospective evaluation of the repeated risks in prescription habits. The trials are ongoing and currently more than 10,000 patients have been randomized. The qualitative analysis revealed a progressive shift in the perception of the tool. Doctors are now seeing it

  12. Aiming for a fully integrated computerized procedure system

    SciTech Connect

    Marron, J. E.

    2006-07-01

    A fully integrated Computerized Procedure System must provide, at a minimum, a) Specification: access to design basis procedures, b) Monitoring: incorporation of real-time plant status, c) Advise: highlighting likely decision paths, and d) Reporting: logging conditions and actions taken. The CPS plays a critical role in overcoming the human factors that lead to accidents. At the same time it can be an essential tool in providing the information and automation to augment what humans do best, identify patterns and make associative leaps in the presence of ambiguous data. Timeliner and TaskGuide are examples of CPS that have evolved from projects in the aerospace industry. They illustrate certain common characteristics of a CPS, namely the knowledge base, user interface, and traceability features. The complexity and number of procedures for a current nuclear project has led to the development of two tools, the Power Generation Control System (PGCS) and the Online Procedure System (OLPS). Together, these systems address the knowledge-base and user interface aspects of a CPS and go a long way in addressing other areas. PGCS and OLPS contain full configuration management capabilities for procedures and the operating recipe. They include administrative functions for online and offline management of documents and data. Some lessons learned from this pair of programs developed by Invensys is the need for more integrated recording mechanisms. The future of CPS is likely to see higher integration of the document access, system status, decision support and logging capabilities. The CPS may evolve into the standard operational interface. Internet technologies that are common-place today have made the possibility of the Active Document a reality. The OPC Foundation is pursuing standards that may accelerate such developments. (authors)

  13. The ABC's required for establishing a practical computerized plant engineering management data base system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiocco, F. R.; Hume, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A system's approach is outlined in the paper to assist facility and Plant Engineers improve their organization's data management system. The six basic steps identified may appear somewhat simple; however, adequate planning, proper resources, and the involvement of management will determine the success of a computerized facility management data base. Helpful suggestions are noted throughout the paper to insure the development of a practical computerized data management system.

  14. The ABC's required for establishing a practical computerized plant engineering management data base system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiocco, F. R.; Hume, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A system's approach is outlined in the paper to assist facility and Plant Engineers improve their organization's data management system. The six basic steps identified may appear somewhat simple; however, adequate planning, proper resources, and the involvement of management will determine the success of a computerized facility management data base. Helpful suggestions are noted throughout the paper to insure the development of a practical computerized data management system.

  15. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  16. A Computerized Advisement Support-System and Research Data Base for Colleges of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Rebhun, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    The College of Education at Florida State University has developed, tested, and implemented a comprehensive, computerized student information management system (SIMS) for the undergraduate teacher education program. (Author/WM)

  17. The Effect of Occupational Information on a Computerized Vocational Counseling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharf, Richard S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the effect of giving or withholding occupational information in terms of impact on reliability and concurrent validity of a computerized vocational counseling system (Exploring Careers), used with 141 high school students. Results showed students found the program helpful. (JAC)

  18. Impact of a computerized physician order-entry system.

    PubMed

    Stone, William M; Smith, Benn E; Shaft, Judd D; Nelson, Richard D; Money, Samuel R

    2009-05-01

    The Institute of Medicine has urged the adoption of electronic prescribing systems in all health-care organizations by 2010. Accordingly, computerized physician order entry (CPOE) warrants detailed evaluation. Mixed results have been reported about the benefit of this system. No review of its application in surgical patients has been reported to date. We present the implementation of CPOE in the management of surgical patients within an academic multispecialty practice. Retrospective and prospective analyses of patient-safety measures were done pre- and post-CPOE institution, respectively. Other metrics evaluated included medication errors, order-implementation times, efficiencies, personnel requirements, and physician time. Sampling of time span for the order placement process was assessed with direct hidden observation of the provider. A total of 15 (0.22%) medication errors were discovered in 6,815 surgical procedures performed during the 6 months before CPOE use. After implementation, 10 medication errors were found (5,963 surgical procedures [0.16%]) in the initial 6 months and 13 (0.21%) in the second 6 months (6,106 surgical procedures) (p = NS). Mean total time from placement of order to nurse receipt before implementation was 41.2 minutes per order (2.05 minutes finding chart, 0.72 minutes writing order, 38.4 minutes for unit secretary transcription) compared with 27 seconds per order using CPOE (p < 0.01). Four additional informational technology specialists were temporarily required for assistance in implementing CPOE. After CPOE adoption, 11 of 56 (19.6%) ancillary personnel positions were eliminated related to order-entry efficiencies. Present CPOE technology can allow major efficiency gains, but refinements will be required for improvements in patient safety.

  19. Can computerized clinical decision support systems improve diabetes management? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, R; Iserman, E; Haynes, R B

    2013-06-01

    To systematically review randomized trials that assessed the effects of computerized clinical decision support systems in ambulatory diabetes management compared with a non-computerized clinical decision support system control. We included all diabetes trials from a comprehensive computerized clinical decision support system overview completed in January 2010, and searched EMBASE, MEDLINE, INSPEC/COMPENDEX and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR) from January 2010 to April 2012. Reference lists of related reviews, included articles and Clinicaltrials.gov were also searched. Randomized controlled trials of patients with diabetes in ambulatory care settings comparing a computerized clinical decision support system intervention with a non-computerized clinical decision support system control, measuring either a process of care or a patient outcome, were included. Screening of studies, data extraction, risk of bias and quality of evidence assessments were carried out independently by two reviewers, and discrepancies were resolved through consensus or third-party arbitration. Authors were contacted for any missing data. Fifteen trials were included (13 from the previous review and two from the current search). Only one study was at low risk of bias, while the others were of moderate to high risk of bias because of methodological limitations. HbA1c (3 months' follow-up), quality of life and hospitalization (12 months' follow-up) were pooled and all favoured the computerized clinical decision support systems over the control, although none were statistically significant. Triglycerides and practitioner performance tended to favour computerized clinical decision support systems although results were too heterogeneous to pool. Computerized clinical decision support systems in diabetes management may marginally improve clinical outcomes, but confidence in the evidence is low because of risk of bias, inconsistency and imprecision. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine

  20. The Effects of Computerized Clinical Decision Support Systems on Laboratory Test Ordering: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Delvaux, Nicolas; Van Thienen, Katrien; Heselmans, Annemie; de Velde, Stijn Van; Ramaekers, Dirk; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2017-04-01

    - Inappropriate laboratory test ordering has been shown to be as high as 30%. This can have an important impact on quality of care and costs because of downstream consequences such as additional diagnostics, repeat testing, imaging, prescriptions, surgeries, or hospital stays. - To evaluate the effect of computerized clinical decision support systems on appropriateness of laboratory test ordering. - We used MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Library, and Inspec through December 2015. Investigators independently screened articles to identify randomized trials that assessed a computerized clinical decision support system aimed at improving laboratory test ordering by providing patient-specific information, delivered in the form of an on-screen management option, reminder, or suggestion through a computerized physician order entry using a rule-based or algorithm-based system relying on an evidence-based knowledge resource. Investigators extracted data from 30 papers about study design, various study characteristics, study setting, various intervention characteristics, involvement of the software developers in the evaluation of the computerized clinical decision support system, outcome types, and various outcome characteristics. - Because of heterogeneity of systems and settings, pooled estimates of effect could not be made. Data showed that computerized clinical decision support systems had little or no effect on clinical outcomes but some effect on compliance. Computerized clinical decision support systems targeted at laboratory test ordering for multiple conditions appear to be more effective than those targeted at a single condition.

  1. How Interactive Is the Interactive Whiteboard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quashie, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    An interactive whiteboard (IWB) is simply a surface onto which a computer screen can be displayed, via a projector. It is touch-sensitive and lets one use a pen like a mouse, controlling the computer from the board itself. Everything that can be displayed on a computer can be displayed onto the whiteboard and, if the computer is linked to speakers…

  2. A Computerized Decision Support System for Depression in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Benji T.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Claassen, Cynthia A.; Daly, Ella J.; Sunderajan, Prabha

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In 2004, results from The Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) showed better clinical outcomes for patients whose physicians adhered to a paper-and-pencil algorithm compared to patients who received standard clinical treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). However, implementation of and fidelity to the treatment algorithm among various providers was observed to be inadequate. A computerized decision support system (CDSS) for the implementation of the TMAP algorithm for depression has since been developed to improve fidelity and adherence to the algorithm. Method: This was a 2-group, parallel design, clinical trial (one patient group receiving MDD treatment from physicians using the CDSS and the other patient group receiving usual care) conducted at 2 separate primary care clinics in Texas from March 2005 through June 2006. Fifty-five patients with MDD (DSM-IV criteria) with no significant difference in disease characteristics were enrolled, 32 of whom were treated by physicians using CDSS and 23 were treated by physicians using usual care. The study's objective was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of implementing a CDSS to assist physicians acutely treating patients with MDD compared to usual care in primary care. Primary efficacy outcomes for depression symptom severity were based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) evaluated by an independent rater. Results: Patients treated by physicians employing CDSS had significantly greater symptom reduction, based on the HDRS17, than patients treated with usual care (P < .001). Conclusions: The CDSS algorithm, utilizing measurement-based care, was superior to usual care for patients with MDD in primary care settings. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00551083 PMID:19750065

  3. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  4. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  5. Perinatal computerized patient record and archiving systems: pitfalls and enhancements for implementing a successful computerized medical record.

    PubMed

    Kelly, C S

    1999-03-01

    Interest in purchasing and installing a perinatal computerized patient record (CPR) and archiving system is growing in the United States as a result of increased patient satisfaction demands, cost containment, and quality improvement. Perinatal nurses are commonly charged with researching available computer software and hardware, making purchasing decisions, developing menus and forms, orienting users, and maintaining and upgrading systems. The decision to chart and archive by computer as well as installation and maintenance issues mandate that nurses increase their computer-related knowledge. The article reviews information related to CPR capabilities and rationales for purchase decisions, implementation and staff development issues, ergonomic and maintenance considerations, and realistic expectations of a CPR to provide perinatal nurses who are involved in purchasing, implementing, and maintaining these systems with a timely understanding of important elements that they need to know to make this effort successful.

  6. Application of a computerized environmental information system to master and sector planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized composite mapping system developed as an aid in the land use decision making process is described. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the environment in urban planning. The presence of alluvium, shallow bedrock, surface water, and vegetation growth are among the environmental factors considered. An analysis of the Shady Grove Sector planning is presented as an example of the use of computerized composite mapping for long range planning.

  7. Application of a computerized environmental information system to master and sector planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A computerized composite mapping system developed as an aid in the land use decision making process is described. Emphasis is placed on consideration of the environment in urban planning. The presence of alluvium, shallow bedrock, surface water, and vegetation growth are among the environmental factors considered. An analysis of the Shady Grove Sector planning is presented as an example of the use of computerized composite mapping for long range planning.

  8. Image selection system. [computerized data storage and retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knutson, M. A.; Hurd, D.; Hubble, L.; Kroeck, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    An image selection (ISS) was developed for the NASA-Ames Research Center Earth Resources Aircraft Project. The ISS is an interactive, graphics oriented, computer retrieval system for aerial imagery. An analysis of user coverage requests and retrieval strategies is presented, followed by a complete system description. Data base structure, retrieval processors, command language, interactive display options, file structures, and the system's capability to manage sets of selected imagery are described. A detailed example of an area coverage request is graphically presented.

  9. Implementing a computerized text-management system: an editor's view

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The advent of sophisticated function-key-driven programs for handling text on a video-display terminal enables the editorial staff of a publications department to take an active role on a computerized text-management team, along with compositors and other keyboard operators. Although there are still many things that editors cannot do on a computer terminal, the bulk of manipulating straight text can be speeded, and the problems of rekeyboarding and interpretation of editorial markings can be largely bypassed. The computer also gives editors new tools that open the way for greater control over both the editorial process and the quality of technical publishing. 5 figures.

  10. Redefining the sonography workflow through the application of a departmental computerized workflow management system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Feng; Tsai, Jerry Ch; Chen, Wei-Juhn; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Pan, Huay-Ben; Yang, Tsung-Lung

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate and evaluate the effective application of a computerized workflow management system (WMS) into sonography workflow in order to reduce patient exam waiting time, number of waiting patients, sonographer stress level, and to improve patient satisfaction. A computerized WMS was built with seamless integration of an automated patient sorting algorithm, a real-time monitoring system, exam schedules fine-tuning, a tele-imaging support system, and a digital signage broadcasting system of patient education programs. The computerized WMS was designed to facilitate problem-solving through continuous customization and flexible adjustment capability. Its effects on operations, staff stress, and patient satisfaction were studied. After implementation of the computerized WMS, there is a significant decrease in patient exam waiting time and sonographer stress level, significant increase in patient satisfaction regarding exam waiting time and the number of examined patients, and marked decrease in the number of waiting patients at different time points in a day. Through multidisciplinary teamwork, the computerized WMS provides a simple and effective approach that can overcome jammed exams associated problems, increase patient satisfaction level, and decrease staff workload stress under limited resources, eventually creating a win-win situation for both the patients and radiology personnel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of a self-administered computerized system to detect cognitive impairment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Samuel D; Reese, Robert J; Norsworthy, Larry A; Dellaria, Donna K; Kinkade, Jacob W; Benge, Jared; Brown, Kimberly; Ratka, Anna; Simpkins, James W

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of economical and accurate approaches to identifying persons in the community who have mild, undetected cognitive impairments. Computerized assessment systems have been suggested as a viable approach to identifying these persons. The validity of a computerized assessment system for identification of memory and executive deficits in older individuals was evaluated in the current study. Volunteers (N = 235) completed a 3-hr battery of neuropsychological tests and a computerized cognitive assessment system. Participants were classified as impaired (n = 78) or unimpaired (n = 157) on the basis of the Mini Mental State Exam, Wechsler Memory Scale-III and the Trail Making Test (TMT), Part B. All six variables (three memory variables and three executive variables) derived from the computerized assessment differed significantly between groups in the expected direction. There was also evidence of temporal stability and concurrent validity. Application of computerized assessment systems for clinical practice and for identification of research participants is discussed in this article. © The Author(s) 2012.

  12. SYN-OP-SYS™: A Computerized Management Information System for Quality Assurance and Risk Management

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David J.; Weiner, Jayne; Lippincott, Ronald C.

    1985-01-01

    SYN·OP·SYS™ is a computerized management information system for quality assurance and risk management. Computer software for the efficient collection and analysis of “occurrences” and the clinical data associated with these kinds of patient events is described. The system is evaluated according to certain computer design criteria, and the system's implementation is assessed.

  13. Developing a County-Wide Computerized Information and Referral (I&R) System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Irene

    1993-01-01

    Describes a county library system's experience with a computerized information and referral system and highlights strengths and weaknesses of the systems. Strengths included the library maintaining control, with other agencies participating; using existing programs and databases where possible; and establishing copyright. Problems included not…

  14. A closer look at nursing documentation on paper forms: preparation for computerizing a nursing documentation system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoneui; Dykes, Patricia C; Thomas, Debra; Winfield, Linda A; Rocha, Roberto A

    2011-04-01

    A small scale documentation analysis was conducted to explore the medical and surgical nursing content of the patient record at a large teaching hospital affiliated with Partners Healthcare System (PHS), in preparation for a computerized documentation system. Through this study, we identified a number of problems associated with the paper record that require resolution in the new computerized system, including elimination of documentation redundancy, areas where more structure is needed to properly capture data on nursing practice, and various design considerations to support a more complete and accurate documentation of nursing care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Translation and interpretation: the hidden processes and problems revealed by computerized physician order entry systems.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Reid W

    2004-12-01

    Even the most basic computerized physician order entry systems can reduce medication error rates, improve the quality, and decrease the costs of medical care. Routine tasks such as decryption, triage, transcription, and transmission are eliminated or streamlined, reducing the source and likelihood of human errors. Translation of physician intent into actual orders requires more advanced computer systems with sophisticated algorithms built-in. Further, adding an interpretative function to understand and transmit orders that could have subtly different meanings will be challenging. Extensive analysis and the cooperative efforts of multidisciplinary teams will be required to add incremental value to computerized physician order entry systems.

  16. Electronic whiteboards: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Randell, Rebecca; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Wyatt, Jeremy; Gardner, Peter; Pearman, Alan; Honey, Stephanie; Dowding, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Electronic whiteboards are being introduced into hospitals to communicate real-time patient information instantly to staff. This paper provides a preliminary review of the current state of evidence for the effect of electronic whiteboards on care processes and patient outcomes. A literature search was performed for the dates 1996 to 2014 on MEDLINE, EMBASE, IEEE Xplore, Science Direct, and the ACM Digital Library. Thirteen papers, describing 11 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. The majority of studies took place in the Emergency Department. While studies looked at the impact of electronic whiteboards on the process of care, there is an absence of evidence concerning impact on patient outcomes. There is a need for robust research measuring the impact of electronic whiteboards on inpatient care.

  17. A new cone beam computerized tomography system for use in endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsurumachi, T; Honda, K

    2007-03-01

    To present a newly developed cone beam computerized tomography system (3DX Micro-CT) and its application in endodontic surgery. Cone beam CT has attracted considerable attention as a new diagnostic imaging technique in dentistry. The assessment of fractured endodontic instruments and the planning of endodontic surgery present challenges that conventional radiography cannot meet successfully. In this report, the value of the 3DX cone beam computerized radiography system is illustrated by the case of a fractured endodontic instrument protruding into the maxillary sinus.

  18. A Computerized System for In-Service Formative Evaluation in Primary Care Residencies

    PubMed Central

    Beaujon, H. Jan

    1980-01-01

    A computerized system for in-service formative evaluation in primary care residencies is described. Used by three primary care residency programs at the Medical University of South Carolina, the system includes among its applications: ongoing evaluations of and by residents (rotations, monitoring, chart audits), annual in-service examinations, annual faculty and resident evaluations, and alumni surveys.

  19. The Impacts of a Computerized Information System on the Integration and Coordination of Human Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    Examines the impacts of a computerized information system on eight neighborhood service organizations and their funding sources. Discusses how the new system changed interorganizational relationships and what effect those changes had on the integration of services. (Available from American Society for Public Administration, 1225 Connecticut…

  20. The Development of COBOL and RPG Instructional Modules to Audit Computerized Accounting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1982-01-01

    Details steps involved (as found in the literature) in the systems approach to design and develop instruction in order to provide a rationale for the development of instructional modules in COBOL and RPG to teach accounting students how to audit computerized accounting systems. Outlines of two modules are appended. (EAO)

  1. A computerized tree growth projection system for forest resource evaluation in the lake states

    Treesearch

    Allen L. Lundgren; Burton L. Essex

    1978-01-01

    A computerized tree growth projection system has been developed for the Lake States Region as part of a larger Forest Resources Evaluation Program (FREP). Incorporating data from more than 1500 permanent growth plots throughout the Lake States, this system projects tree growth, mortality, regeneration, and removals in stands with any mixture of tree species and sizes,...

  2. Wood transportation systems-a spin-off of a computerized information and mapping technique

    Treesearch

    William W. Phillips; Thomas J. Corcoran

    1978-01-01

    A computerized mapping system originally developed for planning the control of the spruce budworm in Maine has been extended into a tool for planning road net-work development and optimizing transportation costs. A budgetary process and a mathematical linear programming routine are used interactively with the mapping and information retrieval capabilities of the system...

  3. Design of computerized maintenance management system for the chilean naval hospital biomedical engineering department.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Francisco; Fuentes, Jose; Enderle, John

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design and implement a computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) to be used at the Chilean Naval Hospital Biomedical Engineering Department. It is designed to meet the specific needs of this military facility and follows the generic clinical engineering maintenance management system suggested by Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI).

  4. The Development of COBOL and RPG Instructional Modules to Audit Computerized Accounting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1982-01-01

    Details steps involved (as found in the literature) in the systems approach to design and develop instruction in order to provide a rationale for the development of instructional modules in COBOL and RPG to teach accounting students how to audit computerized accounting systems. Outlines of two modules are appended. (EAO)

  5. Combining an Exciting Classroom Learning Environment with an Effective Computerized Learning Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Teresa A.; Hallam, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Imagine a computerized learning management system that enables teachers to deliver pertinent learning materials to students. Lectures are prerecorded and made available to download from the learning management system. If all their lectures were prerecorded, what would teachers do in the classroom? Classroom time could be used to coordinate…

  6. Converting a School District's Manual Business Operation to a Computerized System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, David H.; LeVan, Donald D.

    1983-01-01

    The first in a series of three articles highlighting some of the experiences of the Deptford Township Public Schools (New Jersey) in transforming the business operations from a manual process into a computerized system. Describes procedures for acquiring hardware and software and setting up a district accounting system. (MLF)

  7. Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: Culcidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGE.M) TO KEDICALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) Annual Report Terry L. Erwin June...GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Annual--1 September 1979- (SEIGEM) TO MEDICALLY ThWORTANT ARTHROPODS 30 May 1980 (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) 6

  8. Computerized performance monitoring systems: learning and living with its limitations.

    PubMed

    Luchins, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Computer technology now allows clinical administrators to collect and analyze large data sets for performance monitoring. Despite the obvious usefulness of this technology, there are limitations. The indices that we can measure are at best proxies that might correlate with good clinical care but can also become dissociated from it in a variety of ways. First, there may not be a relationship throughout the entire continuum between the indicator and what we really value. Second, change in an indicator may not be associated with comparable change in the underlying value. Thirdly, the valence of an indicator can change depending on the context. Fourth, the very act of measuring an indicator can change its valence. Although, from a research perspective there may be technical solutions to these problems, in the real world where clinical care and politics meet, this may not be possible. Indices become reified. Measures become benchmarks and benchmarks quotas. Average is not a statistical phrase but a judgment and below average a term of approbation. To maximize the benefits of computerized monitoring, administrators need to be sensitive to this political dimension.

  9. ECAT: A New Computerized Tomographic Imaging System for Position-Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The ECAT was designed and developed as a complete computerized positron radionuclide imaging system capable of providing high contrast, high resolution, quantitative images in 2 dimensional and tomographic formats. Flexibility, in its various image mode options, allows it to be used for a wide variety of imaging problems.

  10. Validation of a Computerized Cognitive Assessment System for Persons with Stroke: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Chi Kwong; Man, David W. K.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the validity of a newly developed computerized cognitive assessment system (CCAS) that is equipped with rich multimedia to generate simulated testing situations and considers both test item difficulty and the test taker's ability. It is also hypothesized that better predictive validity of the CCAS in self-care of persons…

  11. Validation of a Computerized Cognitive Assessment System for Persons with Stroke: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Chi Kwong; Man, David W. K.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the validity of a newly developed computerized cognitive assessment system (CCAS) that is equipped with rich multimedia to generate simulated testing situations and considers both test item difficulty and the test taker's ability. It is also hypothesized that better predictive validity of the CCAS in self-care of persons…

  12. Informap... a computerized information system for fire planning and fire control

    Treesearch

    Theodore G. Storey; Ross D. Carder; Ernest T. Tolin

    1969-01-01

    INFORMAP (Information Necessary for Optimum Resource Management and Protection) is a computerized system under development for storing, manipulating, retrieving, and displaying data for fire planning and fire control. A prototype for planning applications has been developed and tested. It is programed in Fortran IV for the IBM 7040 computer, and displays information in...

  13. The Effect of Computerized System Feedback Availability during Executive Function Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuviler-Gavish, Nirit; Krisher, Hagit

    2016-01-01

    Computerized training systems offer a promising new direction in the training of executive functions, in part because they can easily be designed to offer feedback to learners. Yet, feedback is a double-edged sword, serving a positive motivational role while at the same time carrying the risk that learners may become dependent on the feedback they…

  14. The Development of a Computerized Curriculum Monitoring System To Ensure Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heard, Frank B.

    A computerized curriculum monitoring system (CMS) was developed at Shelby State Community College (SSCC) in Tennessee to restrict student registration to courses for which they have completed the prerequisites and corequisites. The CMS is a subroutine of the on-line registration program, which matches students' course selections against their…

  15. International Demographic Data Director. A Computerized Information Retrieval System for Demographic and Family Planning Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargar, Martha

    Announced in this booklet is the availability of the International Demographic Data Directory (IDDD). The IDDD is designed to expedite the retrieval of demographic and family planning statistics for use by administrators, planners, and researchers. This guide describes the computerized system indicating the geographic scope of the data, subject…

  16. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopf-Weichel, Rosemarie; And Others

    This report describes results of the first year of a three-year program to develop and evaluate a new Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS) for electronics maintenance training. (ACTS incorporates an adaptive computer program that learns the student's diagnostic and decision value structure, compares it to that of an expert, and adapts the…

  17. The Effect of Computerized System Feedback Availability during Executive Function Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuviler-Gavish, Nirit; Krisher, Hagit

    2016-01-01

    Computerized training systems offer a promising new direction in the training of executive functions, in part because they can easily be designed to offer feedback to learners. Yet, feedback is a double-edged sword, serving a positive motivational role while at the same time carrying the risk that learners may become dependent on the feedback they…

  18. Development and Implementation of Computerized Monitoring System in Mathematics Grades 4, 5, 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Raymond H.

    A computerized monitoring system was developed for grades 4-6. Objectives and corresponding test items were stored on computer. Instructors selected objectives for each monitoring period. Stdents were tested frequently using interchangeable forms of tests covering these objectives. Tests were computer scored and interpreted by teachers. These…

  19. 45 CFR 307.15 - Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... capacity planning services. (F) Develop performance metrics which allow tracking project completion against... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approval of advance planning documents for... § 307.15 Approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems....

  20. A computerized faculty time-management system in an academic family medicine department.

    PubMed

    Daugird, Allen J; Arndt, Jane E; Olson, P Richard

    2003-02-01

    The authors describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a computerized faculty time-management system (FTMS) in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. The FTMS is presented as an integrated set of computerized spreadsheets used annually to allocate faculty time across all mission activities of the department. It was first implemented in 1996 and has been continuously developed since then. An iterative approach has been used to gain consensus among faculty about time resources needed for various tasks of all missions of the department. These time-resource assumptions are used in the computerized system. Faculty time is allocated annually by the department vice chair in negotiation with individual faculty, making sure that the activities planned do not exceed the work time each faculty member has available for the year. During this process, faculty preferences are balanced against department aggregate needs to meet mission commitments and obligations. The authors describe how the computerized FTMS is used for faculty time management and career development, department planning, budget planning, clinical scheduling, and mission cost accounting. They also describe barriers and potential abuses and the challenge of building an organizational culture willing to discuss faculty time openly and committed to developing a system perceived as fair and accurate. The spreadsheet file is available free from the authors for use in other departments.

  1. 45 CFR 307.40 - Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension of approval of advance planning...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT SYSTEMS § 307.40 Suspension of approval of advance planning documents for computerized support...

  2. Manual and computerized cumulative reporting systems for the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Lupovitch, A; Memminger, J J; Corr, R M

    1979-11-01

    A manual and a computerized system that produce cumulative updated reports from the clinical microbiology laboratory are described. Each system gives the physician a report that is clearly formatted, cumulative, readily updated, and written in conversational terms with minimal abbreviations. The report formats and updating sequences are nearly identical, so that one system can easily replace or back up the other. The cost and complexity of the hardware and software for the computerized system are modest, so that these are suitable for the moderate-sized hospital laboratory processing fewer than 10,000 specimens per year. Also, the laboratory personnel in our community-based nonteaching hospital were able to develop, set up, and support these systems without external consultation or purchased services. Therefore, the improved quality of reporting based on these types of systems can now be available to all laboratories without regard to size or workload.

  3. Crew/computer communications study. Volume 1: Final report. [onboard computerized communications system for spacecrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannes, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques, methods, and system requirements are reported for an onboard computerized communications system that provides on-line computing capability during manned space exploration. Communications between man and computer take place by sequential execution of each discrete step of a procedure, by interactive progression through a tree-type structure to initiate tasks or by interactive optimization of a task requiring man to furnish a set of parameters. Effective communication between astronaut and computer utilizes structured vocabulary techniques and a word recognition system.

  4. A computerized system for tracking practice and prescriptive patterns of family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Fontana, S A; Kelber, S T; Devine, E C

    2001-03-01

    Decisions about the fit between advanced practice nursing curricula and the real world of primary care practice should be based on data and not on intuition. The purpose of this article is to describe a computerized database system that can be used to: 1) track practice (including prescribing) patterns of nurse practitioner (NP) students; 2) address data issues that commonly arise; and 3) describe NP students' practice during their education to prospective employers. The database system uses both the Family Nurse Practitioners Log (FNPLOG), a faculty-developed software program, and Epi Info, a companion public domain software program. Variables are categorized as being related to sociodemographic, diagnostic, or prescriptive components of primary care. The system provides a simple, efficient, and feasible way of computerizing, analyzing, and evaluating students' clinical experience and practice patterns. The implications for advanced practice nursing education will be illustrated along with other potential uses of the database system.

  5. Costs of implementing a computerized prescription system in a public mental health agency.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Eri; Hadley, Trevor R; Rothbard, Aileen B

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this case report is to inform decision makers about costs associated with adding a computerized prescription component to an existing information system in specialty mental health agencies. A computerized prescription system was implemented in four not-for-profit mental health agencies in an urban setting as part of a larger study looking at reducing racial disparities. This brief report describes the implementation costs at one agency with ten full-time-equivalent psychiatrists for which information was available on time devoted to implementation by the management information system personnel. The financial costs of the computer network hardware and software were also documented. The total initial cost was $27,607: preimplementation cost, $3,720; technology and system integration cost, $10,148; and training cost, $13,739. Annual ongoing cost was expected to be $14,725. The technology expenditure itself is not prohibitive for initial implementation as well as for ongoing support.

  6. Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) (SELf-GEnerating Master) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: Culicidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    APPLICATION OF A COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO MEDICALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) I’ Annual Report...Bailey. 1981. Application of a com- puterized information management system (SELGEM) to medically important arthropods (National Museum Mosquito

  7. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair; Veers, Paul S.

    2009-09-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and gives specific recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines. This report is intended to help the reader develop a basic understanding of what data are needed from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems, for reliability analysis. The report provides: (1) a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis; and (2) specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and a wider variety of analysis and reporting needs.

  8. Evaluating the use of a computerized clinical decision support system for asthma by pediatric pulmonologists.

    PubMed

    Lomotan, Edwin A; Hoeksema, Laura J; Edmonds, Diana E; Ramírez-Garnica, Gabriela; Shiffman, Richard N; Horwitz, Leora I

    2012-03-01

    To investigate use of a new guideline-based, computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) system for asthma in a pediatric pulmonology clinic of a large academic medical center. We conducted a qualitative evaluation including review of electronic data, direct observation, and interviews with all nine pediatric pulmonologists in the clinic. Outcome measures included patterns of computer use in relation to patient care, and themes surrounding the relationship between asthma care and computer use. The pediatric pulmonologists entered enough data to trigger the decision support system in 397/445 (89.2%) of all asthma visits from January 2009 to May 2009. However, interviews and direct observations revealed use of the decision support system was limited to documentation activities after clinic sessions ended. Reasons for delayed use reflected barriers common to general medical care and barriers specific to subspecialty care. Subspecialist-specific barriers included the perceived high complexity of patients, the impact of subject matter expertise on the types of decision support needed, and unique workflow concerns such as the need to create letters to referring physicians. Pediatric pulmonologists demonstrated low use of a computerized decision support system for asthma care because of a combination of general and subspecialist-specific factors. Subspecialist-specific factors should not be underestimated when designing guideline-based, computerized decision support systems for the subspecialty setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oncology Outpatient and Provider Responses to a Computerized Symptom Assessment System

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Janet S.; Rawl, Susan; Porter, Jennifer; Schmidt, Karen; Tornatta, Jennifer; Ojewole, Foluso; Helft, Paul; Potter, David A.; Sweeney, Christopher; Giesler, R. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To assess patient and provider responses to a computerized symptom assessment system. Design Descriptive, longitudinal study with retrospective, longitudinal medical records review. Setting University-based National Cancer Institute–designated outpatient cancer center. Sample 80 oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy, 8 providers, and 30 medical records. Methods Patients completed the computerized assessment during three chemotherapy follow-up clinic appointments (times 1, 2, and 3). Patient usability was recorded via an observer checklist (ease of use) and the computer (completion time). Patient satisfaction and impact were assessed during telephone interviews two to three days after times 1 and 3 only. Provider usability and impact were assessed at the end of the study using a questionnaire and focus groups, whereas effect on provider documentation was assessed through chart audits. Main Research Variables Patient usability (ease of use, completion time), satisfaction, and impact; provider usability and impact. Findings Patients reported good usability, high satisfaction, and modest impact on discussions with their providers. Providers reported modest usability, modest impact on discussions with patients, and had varied reactions as to how the system affected practice. Documentation of symptoms was largely absent before and after implementation. Conclusions This system demonstrated good usability and satisfaction but had only a modest impact on symptom-related discussions and no impact on documentation. Implications for Nursing A computerized system can help address barriers to symptom assessment but may not improve documentation unless it can be integrated into existing medical records systems. PMID:18591170

  10. Now You Can Micro-Computerize Your Personnel System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Larry E.

    1979-01-01

    Pinpoints problems associated with personnel operations' inclusion in large complex information systems: personnel information system redesign requirements, potential confidentiality loss, reduced information accessibility, awkward data format requirements, and psychological problems. Discusses single chip micro-processor and micro-computer…

  11. Description of a Computerized, On-Line Interlibrary Loan System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Frederick G.

    This paper describes the first two months of operation of the OCLC interlibrary loan system, an online system designed to increase speed and effectiveness in obtaining interlibrary loans. This system provides (1) bibliographic verification of interlibrary loan records and location of materials by using online union catalog records, (2) automatic…

  12. The nursing case management computerized system: meeting the challenge of health care delivery through technology.

    PubMed

    DiJerome, L

    1992-01-01

    Does nursing case management compute? In this article, the author attempts to explain how computerizing the team plan of care and critical pathways decreases paperwork, makes it easier to develop standardized team care plans, enhances quality improvement trending, and is flexible enough to update the plan of care according to the patient's changing needs. The Nurse Case Management Computerized System puts the patient care team plan into an interactive computer program. The computer does the work of presenting the nurse with care plan options and printing a hard copy ready to implement. Use of the computer program enhances the health care team's ability to individualize the team plan of care while maintaining patient care standards. The system is also used to collect patient care data automatically and to trend for quality improvement.

  13. An Application of Human Factors Concepts to an Interactive Computerized Personnel Record-Keeping System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    l’t,& - l~lF’ l, 1 - . . ...." " . .. V , **. , ,.-q , , . A. . ,-. " • r" 4 %. * UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (IPhn Pace...DOITRIUTIONNSTATEME (o tADl ieot IOfc) 1 .SCRT LS.(fti eot Approved for public release; distributio, unlimited. 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract entered...CONCEPTS TO AN INTERACTIVE COMPUTERIZED PERSONNEL RECORD-KEEPING SYSTEM CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ........... . ........................... 1 SIDPERS

  14. Computerized Interpretive Approach for the Exner Comprehensive Rorschach System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, William G.

    This paper provides a description of an online Rorschach interpretation algorithm for the Exner comprehensive system, as well as a study conducted to evaluate the validity of the online interpretive algorithm. The user, systems, and equipment specifications for the algorithm are explained, and the potential advantages of its use to enhance…

  15. Experiments with a Computerized Response System: A Favorable Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garg, Devendra P.

    In order to obtain student feedback in computer programing courses at Duke University, a computer-based anonymous audience response system was used. This system consisted of a minicomputer, voting consoles, and a large electronic display. Students set their voting consoles in response to the question and the minicomputer interrogated the consoles.…

  16. Improving Medication Safety Based on Reports in Computerized Patient Safety Systems.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Teuho, Susanna; Uusitalo, Marjo; Kaunonen, Marja

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, patient safety has been a serious concern internationally. Medication in particular is a significant area in improving patient safety because medication errors are a crucial clinical problem. This study aimed to explore suggestions to improve medication safety reported via computerized patient safety systems in hospitals. The research data were retrospectively collected from the computerized patient safety incident reporting systems in one university hospital and two regional hospitals in Finland. Open-ended records concerning prescribing medicines (n = 136), dispensing medicines (n = 362), administering medicines to patients (n = 538), and documenting medication (n = 434) were included in the analysis. The data were analyzed by using inductive content analysis. Based on the study findings, there is a need to develop and standardize procedures related to all four parts of medication management process. Moreover, working environment, multiprofessional collaboration, and knowledge and skills of the professionals should be developed. Promoting medication safety in hospitals is an urgent challenge. The study results indicated that computerized patient safety incident reporting systems can provide important qualitative information to improve medication process to be safer.

  17. Computerized management report system for monitoring manpower and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bullington, V.R.; Stephenson, R.L.; Cardwell, R.G.

    1980-04-01

    Although most cost systems offer complete detail and traceability, not all provide timely detail in a concise form useful to senior management. This system was developed for a multifunction research organization funded from many sources. It extracts cost and manpower data from the general cost systems, summarizes it, compares it by program with previous cost periods, and presents it with minimum detail yet with maximum overview. The system monitors the basic manpower distribution of effort at the source, that is, the division time-card input. Cost data are taken from the central computer ahead of the print-out and report-distribution steps; thus, the summary information is available several days ahead of the detailed reports. This procedure has been regularly used for several months, and has proven to be a valuable tool in management action and planning. 9 figures.

  18. 75 FR 81635 - Privacy Act of 1974: Notice of New System of Records, Single Family Computerized Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... receives CHUMS data for statistical research. The Computerized Homes Underwriting Management System... other Federal agencies, including the Federal Reserve, for purposes of statistical research, not... Enterprise (MBE) Code, and sex, for statistical tracking purposes) of builders, fee appraisers, and...

  19. The Interactive Whiteboard: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Derek; Miller, David; Averis, Doug; Door, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    There has been an increasing awareness of the need to understand the match between technology and pedagogy in the development of interactive learning supported by the interactive whiteboard in schools in the United Kingdom. There is evidence that teachers are seeking some understanding of the research background and to this end a team from Keele…

  20. Interactive Whiteboards: Real Beauty or Just "Lipstick"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slay, Hannah; Sieborger, Ingrid; Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    There has been extensive investment by governments and individual schools in interactive whiteboard technology in developed countries premised on the assumption that their use in education will impact positively on learners' achievements. Developing countries, such as South Africa, keen to raise attainment among their learners are following suit.…

  1. Using Interactive Whiteboards to Orchestrate Classroom Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Neil; Hennessy, Sara; Warwick, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) as a tool for encouraging and supporting classroom dialogue. The authors' concern here is with the promotion of "dialogic" communication between teachers and students, which is now widely recognised as educationally valuable. In this study they investigated how teachers…

  2. Using Interactive Whiteboards in Teaching Retail Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Marla; Kirpalani, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate marketing students have sometimes been found to lack mathematical skills. It can therefore be challenging for instructors to effectively teach courses that depend on mathematical problem-solving skills. This paper discusses the use of interactive whiteboards as an innovative way to teach retail mathematics effectively. The authors…

  3. Using Interactive Whiteboards to Enhance Mathematics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Over the past three years, Richardson Primary School has transformed its entire educational program based around the widespread introduction of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) into the school. A review of this initiative states that "Richardson is the first school in the ACT, and probably Australia, where the total school community, the…

  4. Primary School Students' Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ian; Higgins, S

    2005-01-01

    Students involved in the interactive whiteboard (IWB) evaluation, sponsored by the Centre for British Teachers (CfBT), were interviewed in regard to their perceptions about IWBs. Twelve group interviews (72 students) were conducted between January and Easter 2004 with Year 6 students (between 10 and 11 years of age) in six Local Education…

  5. Interactive Whiteboards: Real Beauty or Just "Lipstick"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slay, Hannah; Sieborger, Ingrid; Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    There has been extensive investment by governments and individual schools in interactive whiteboard technology in developed countries premised on the assumption that their use in education will impact positively on learners' achievements. Developing countries, such as South Africa, keen to raise attainment among their learners are following suit.…

  6. Talking about Science in Interactive Whiteboard Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murcia, Karen; Sheffield, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Teachers using interactive whiteboards (IWB) effectively can engage and motivate students with a range of digital resources to explore science's role in making sense of our world and to construct knowledge of key scientific concepts. The case study research described in this paper illustrates how interactive pedagogies in the IWB classroom were…

  7. Interactive Whiteboards and Schooling: The Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mal

    2010-01-01

    This paper seeks to set the scene for the ensuing articles in this themed issue by placing the recent developments with interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in their historical context. It argues that use of this instructional technology has already had a profound impact upon teaching and highlights the importance of educational researchers considering…

  8. Using Interactive Whiteboards in Teaching Retail Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Marla; Kirpalani, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate marketing students have sometimes been found to lack mathematical skills. It can therefore be challenging for instructors to effectively teach courses that depend on mathematical problem-solving skills. This paper discusses the use of interactive whiteboards as an innovative way to teach retail mathematics effectively. The authors…

  9. Efficient computerized model for dynamic analysis of energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Khan, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    In searching for the optimum parameters that minimize the total life cycle cost of an energy conversion system, various combinations of components are examined and the resulting system performance and associated economics are studied. The systems performance and economics simulation computer program (SPECS) was developed to fill this need. The program simulates the fluid flow, thermal, and electrical characteristics of a system of components on a quasi-steady state basis for a variety of energy conversion systems. A unique approach is used in which the set of characteristic equations is solved by the Newton-Raphson technique. This approach eliminates the tedious iterative loops which are found in comparable programs such as TRNSYS or SOLTES-1. Several efficient features were also incorporated such as the centralized control and energy management scheme, and analogous treatment of energy flow in electrical and mechanical components, and the modeling of components of similar fundamental characteristics using generic subroutines. Initial tests indicate that this model can be used effectively with a relatively small number of time steps and low computer cost.

  10. Efficient computerized model for dynamic analysis of energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Khan, I. R.

    1983-02-01

    In searching for the optimum parameters that minimize the total life cycle cost of an energy conversion system, various combinations of components are examined and the resulting system performance and associated economics are studied. The systems performance and economics simulation computer program (SPECS) was developed to fill this need. The program simulates the fluid flow, thermal, and electrical characteristics of a system of components on a quasi-steady state basis for a variety of energy conversion systems. A unique approach is used in which the set of characteristic equations is solved by the Newton-Raphson technique. This approach eliminates the tedious iterative loops which are found in comparable programs such as TRNSYS or SOLTES-1. Several efficient features were also incorporated such as the centralized control and energy management scheme, and analogous treatment of energy flow in electrical and mechanical components, and the modeling of components of similar fundamental characteristics using generic subroutines. Initial tests indicate that this model can be used effectively with a relatively small number of time steps and low computer cost.

  11. Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) - Video-formatted tasks for comparative primate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.; Hopkins, William D.; Richardson, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    Automation of a computerized test system for comparative primate research is shown to improve the results of learning in standard paradigms. A mediational paradigm is used to determine the degree to which criterion in the learning-set testing reflects stimulus-response associative or mediational learning. Rhesus monkeys are shown to exhibit positive transfer as the criterion levels are shifted upwards, and the effectiveness of the computerized testing system is confirmed.

  12. An automated computerized auscultation and diagnostic system for pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ali; Fahim, Atef

    2010-12-01

    Respiratory sounds are of significance as they provide valuable information on the health of the respiratory system. Sounds emanating from the respiratory system are uneven, and vary significantly from one individual to another and for the same individual over time. In and of themselves they are not a direct proof of an ailment, but rather an inference that one exists. Auscultation diagnosis is an art/skill that is acquired and honed by practice; hence it is common to seek confirmation using invasive and potentially harmful imaging diagnosis techniques like X-rays. This research focuses on developing an automated auscultation diagnostic system that overcomes the limitations inherent in traditional auscultation techniques. The system uses a front end sound signal filtering module that uses adaptive Neural Networks (NN) noise cancellation to eliminate spurious sound signals like those from the heart, intestine, and ambient noise. To date, the core diagnosis module is capable of identifying lung sounds from non-lung sounds, normal lung sounds from abnormal ones, and identifying wheezes from crackles as indicators of different ailments.

  13. Systemic Model for Examination of Countrywide School Computerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Egoza; Millgram, Yitzchak

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study whose purpose was to examine how the educational system functions following the assimilation of a technological environment and how the relationships between the subsystems are affected and affect each other following this change. The study took place over the course of three years in schools in the State of Israel…

  14. Systemic Model for Examination of Countrywide School Computerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Egoza; Millgram, Yitzchak

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study whose purpose was to examine how the educational system functions following the assimilation of a technological environment and how the relationships between the subsystems are affected and affect each other following this change. The study took place over the course of three years in schools in the State of Israel…

  15. A computerized system for portrayal of landscape alterations

    Treesearch

    A. E. Stevenson; J. A. Conley; J. B. Carey

    1979-01-01

    The growing public awareness of and participation in the visual resource decision process has stimulated interest to find improved means of accurately and realistically displaying proposed alterations. The traditional artist renderings often lack the accuracy and objectivity needed for critical decisions. One approach, using computer graphics, led to the MOSAIC system...

  16. MAPS - a computerized management analysis and planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packe, D. R.; Raffaeli, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Program lists work structure of projects at all levels. System integrates work item, its schedule, its status against the schedule, responsible personnel, and explanatory comments. structure of MAPS promotes natural organization of project work elements, project features and uses are given.

  17. A computerized tomography system for transcranial ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sai Chun; Clement, Gregory T

    Hardware for tomographic imaging presents both challenge and opportunity for simplification when compared with traditional pulse-echo imaging systems. Specifically, point diffraction tomography does not require simultaneous powering of elements, in theory allowing just a single transmit channel and a single receive channel to be coupled with a switching or multiplexing network. In our ongoing work on transcranial imaging, we have developed a 512-channel system designed to transmit and/or receive a high voltage signal from/to arbitrary elements of an imaging array. The overall design follows a hierarchy of modules including a software interface, microcontroller, pulse generator, pulse amplifier, high-voltage power converter, switching mother board, switching daughter board, receiver amplifier, analog-to-digital converter, peak detector, memory, and USB communication. Two pulse amplifiers are included, each capable of producing up to 400Vpp via power MOSFETS. Switching is based around mechanical relays that allow passage of 200V, while still achieving switching times of under 2ms, with an operating frequency ranging from below 100kHz to 10MHz. The system is demonstrated through ex vivo human skulls using 1MHz transducers. The overall system design is applicable to planned human studies in transcranial image acquisition, and may have additional tomographic applications for other materials necessitating a high signal output.

  18. Effectiveness and acceptability of a computerized decision support system using modified Wells criteria for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Frank S; Chandrika, Sharad; Weir, Ian D; Weintraub, Jeffrey T; Berman, Lewis; Lee, Ronald; Van Buskirk, Patricia D; Wang, Yun; Adewunmi, Adeshola; Fine, Jonathan M

    2011-06-01

    Ready availability of computed tomography (CT) angiography for evaluation of pulmonary embolism in emergency departments (EDs) is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of CT angiography tests. The aims of this study are to determine whether a validated prediction algorithm embedded in a computerized decision support system improves the positive yield rate of CT angiography for pulmonary embolism and is acceptable to emergency physicians. This study was conducted as a prospective interventional study with a retrospective preinterventional comparison group. The implementation of the computerized physician order entry-based computerized decision support system was associated with an overall increase in the positivity rate of from 8.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9% to 12.9%) preintervention to 12.7% (95% CI 8.6% to 17.7%) postintervention, with a difference of 4.4% (95% CI -1.4% to 10.1%). A total of 404 patients were eligible for inclusion. Physician nonadherence to the computerized decision support system occurred in 105 (26.7%) cases. Fifteen patients underwent CT angiography despite low Wells score and negative D-dimer result, all of whose results were negative for pulmonary embolism. Emergency physicians did not order CT angiography for 44 patients despite high pretest probability, with one receiving a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism on a subsequent visit and another, of DVT. When emergency physicians adhered to the computerized decision support system for the evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism, a higher yield of CT angiography for pulmonary embolism occurred, with 28 positive results of 168 CT angiography tests (16.7%; 95% CI 11.4% to 23.2%) and a difference compared with preintervention of 8.4% (95% CI 1.7% to 15.4%). Physicians cited the time required to apply the computerized decision support system and a preference for intuitive judgment as reasons for not adhering to the computerized decision support system. Use of an evidence

  19. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements. In a study made to define a set of generic information requirements of mental health providers that can be supported by an MHIS, it was found that basic data needs can be defined and classified in functional terms: clinical, management, and consultation/education requirements. A basic set of data to support these needs was defined: demographic, financial, clinical, programmatic, and service delivery data.

  20. FAFTRCS: an experiment in computerized reactor safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant availability and reliability could be improved by the integration of computers into the control environment. However, computer-based systems are historically viewed as being unreliable. This places a burden upon the designer to demonstrate adequate reliability and availability for the computer. The complexity associated with computers coupled with the manual nature of these demonstrations results in a high cost which typically has been justified for critical applications only. This paper investigates a methodology for automating this process and discusses a project which intends to apply this methodology to design verification and validation for a control system which will be installed and tested in an actual reactor control environment. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Electret Acoustic Transducer Array For Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation System

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Thomas L.; Fisher, Karl A.

    2005-08-09

    An electret-based acoustic transducer array is provided and may be used in a system for examining tissue. The acoustic transducer array is formed with a substrate that has a multiple distinct cells formed therein. Within each of the distinct cells is positioned an acoustic transducing element formed of an electret material. A conductive membrane is formed over the distinct cells and may be flexible.

  2. The Experiences of Using a Computerized Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, Mariann; Ehnfors, Margareta; Fruhling, Ann; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to describe the facilitators and barriers influencing the ability of nursing personnel to effectively use a CDSS for planning and treating pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes. Usability evaluations and group interviews were conducted. Facilitators were ease of use, usefulness and a supportive work environment. Lack of training, resistance to using computers and limited integration of the CDSS with the electronic health record system were reported. PMID:24199144

  3. Passive optical computerized tracking system with graphic replay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Donald R.

    1993-01-01

    The system has been designed for instant sports replay. The passive unit utilizes two video cameras, an image processor, and a graphics computer to track the baseball pitch and provide an instant graphic replay of the pitch, showing the ball's trajectory, speed, and movement. Shown on the 1991 World Series, it has applications for both team training and game broadcasting as well as other sports.

  4. Bandlimited computerized improvements in characterization of nonlinear systems with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, Albert H.; Katz, Richard A.; Hughes, Derke R.; Koch, Robert M.

    2016-05-01

    The present article discusses some inroads in nonlinear signal processing made by the prime algorithm developer, Dr. Albert H. Nuttall and co-authors, a consortium of research scientists from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport, RI. The algorithm, called the Nuttall-Wiener-Volterra 'NWV' algorithm is named for its principal contributors [1], [2],[ 3] over many years of developmental research. The NWV algorithm significantly reduces the computational workload for characterizing nonlinear systems with memory. Following this formulation, two measurement waveforms on the system are required in order to characterize a specified nonlinear system under consideration: (1) an excitation input waveform, x(t) (the transmitted signal); and, (2) a response output waveform, z(t) (the received signal). Given these two measurement waveforms for a given propagation channel, a 'kernel' or 'channel response', h= [h0,h1,h2,h3] between the two measurement points, is computed via a least squares approach that optimizes modeled kernel values by performing a best fit between measured response z(t) and a modeled response y(t). New techniques significantly diminish the exponential growth of the number of computed kernel coefficients at second and third order in order to combat and reasonably alleviate the curse of dimensionality.

  5. A flexible computerized system for environmental data acquisition and transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.

    2009-04-01

    In recent years increasing importance has been addressed to the knowledge of the marine environment, either to help detecting and understanding global climate change phenomena, or to protect and preserve those coastal areas, where multiple interests converge (linked to the tourism, recreational or productive activities…) and which suffer greater impact from anthropogenic activities; this has in turn stimulated the start of research programs devoted to the monitoring and surveillance of these particular zones, coupling the needs for knowledge, sustainable development and exploitation of natural resources. There is an increasing need to have data available in real time or near real time in order to intervene in emergency situations. Cabled or wireless data transmission can be used. The first allows the transmission of a higher amount of data only in coastal sites, while the second gives a bigger flexibility in terms of application to different environments; more, using mobile phone services (either terrestrial or satellite), it is possible to allocate the data centre in the most convenient place, without any need of proximity to the sea. Traditional oceanographic techniques, based on ship surveys, hardly fit the needs of operational oceanography, because of their high cost and fragmentary nature, both in spatial and temporal domains. To obtain a good synopticity, it is necessary to complement traditional ship observations with measurements from fixed stations (buoys moored in sites chosen to be representative of wider areas, or to constitute a sentinel against the arrival of pollutants), satellite observations, use of ships of opportunity and of newly developed instruments, like the gliders, or towed sliding devices, like the SAVE. Modern instruments rely on an electronic heart; an integrated hardware-software system developed in Messina is here presented, used in various versions to control data acquisition and transmission on buoys or on ship

  6. Developing and testing a computerized decision support system for nurse-to-patient assignment: a multimethod study.

    PubMed

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Braaksma, Aleida; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-06-01

    Nurse-to-patient assignment is a frequently recurring, time-consuming, and complex process owing to the many considerations involved. Creating well-balanced, high-quality assignments is crucial to ensuring patient safety, quality of care, and job satisfaction for nurses. A computerized decision support system can assist (charge) nurses in the nurse-to-patient assignment process. In this two-phase multimethod study, a computerized decision support system was developed and evaluated. Three nursing wards in a 1000-bed Dutch university hospital participated. In the first phase of this study, considerations relevant to the assignment process--and their relative importance--were investigated in a literature review, focus group sessions with nurses, and a survey among nurses. Using information from the first phase, the computerized decision support system was developed based on an integer linear program. In the second phase, a before-and-after study was conducted to test and evaluate the computerized decision support system both quantitatively (duration of the assignment process) and qualitatively (survey on workload). Thirty-six measurements were performed to test the computerized decision support system. After implementation, a 30% time reduction was achieved in the nurse-to-patient assignments, and nurses (N = 138) experienced a lower workload. Therefore, the implementation of computerized decision support system would increase both the quality and safety of care as well as the nurses' job satisfaction and should be investigated rigorously in the coming years.

  7. A computerized system for detecting signals due to drug–drug interactions in spontaneous reporting systems

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yifeng; Ye, Xiaofei; Du, Wenmin; Ren, Jingtian; Sun, Yalin; Wang, Hainan; Luo, Baozhang; Gao, Qingbin; Wu, Meijing; He, Jia

    2010-01-01

    AIMS In spontaneous reporting systems (SRS), there is a growing need for the automated detection of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) resulting from drug–drug interactions. In addition, special attention is also needed for systems facilitating automated data preprocessing. In our study, we set up a computerized system to signal possible drug–drug interactions by which data acquisition and signal detection could be carried out automatically and the process of data preprocessing could also be facilitated. METHODS This system was developed with Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 and Microsoft Access was used as the database. Crude ADR reports submitted to Shanghai SRS from January 2007 to December 2008 were included in this study. The logistic regression method, the Ω shrinkage measure method, an additive model and a multiplicative model were used for automatic detection of drug–drug interactions where two drugs were used concomitantly. RESULTS A total of 33 897 crude ADR reports were acquired from the SRS automatically. The 10 drug combinations most frequently reported were found and the 10 most suspicious drug–drug ADR combinations for each method were detected automatically after the performance of the system. CONCLUSIONS Since the detection of drug–drug interaction depends upon the skills and memory of the professionals involved, is time consuming and the number of reports is increasing, this system might be a promising tool for the automated detection of possible drug–drug interactions in SRS. PMID:20078614

  8. Features of computerized clinical decision support systems supportive of nursing practice: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seonah

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to organize the system features of decision support technologies targeted at nursing practice into assessment, problem identification, care plans, implementation, and outcome evaluation. It also aimed to identify the range of the five stage-related sequential decision supports that computerized clinical decision support systems provided. MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE were searched. A total of 27 studies were reviewed. The system features collected represented the characteristics of each category from patient assessment to outcome evaluation. Several features were common across the reviewed systems. For the sequential decision support, all of the reviewed systems provided decision support in sequence for patient assessment and care plans. Fewer than half of the systems included problem identification. There were only three systems operating in an implementation stage and four systems in outcome evaluation. Consequently, the key steps for sequential decision support functions were initial patient assessment, problem identification, care plan, and outcome evaluation. Providing decision support in such a full scope will effectively help nurses' clinical decision making. By organizing the system features, a comprehensive picture of nursing practice-oriented computerized decision support systems was obtained; however, the development of a guideline for better systems should go beyond the scope of a literature review.

  9. The Development of a Computerized System for the Estimation of Reliability for Measurement Systems Employing Interval or Ratio Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, D. Thomas

    Critical to precise quantitative research is reliability estimation. Researchers have limited tools, however, to assess the reliability of evolving instruments. Consequently, cursory assessment is typical and in-depth evaluation is rare. This paper presents a rationale for and description of PIAS, a computerized instrument analysis system. PIAS…

  10. Review of the IEEE Standard for Computerized Operating Procedure Systems

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, J.; Higgins, J.

    2010-02-26

    Increasingly nuclear power plant procedures, such as emergency operating procedures, are being presented in computer form with functionality to support operator use and management of the procedures. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently has guidance for the review of computer-based procedures (CBPs); however, there remain CBP functions and human performance issues for which up-to-date guidance is lacking. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has initiated a standard development effort to address the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of CBP systems. When completed, it may provide guidance to supplement the NRC staff's review criteria. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the suitability of the IEEE Standard for use in the NRC's HFE safety reviews of CBP systems and to ensure that the guidance meets the NRC's standard for scientific and engineering rigor used in its own guidance development efforts. We established the following criteria with which to evaluate the Standard: (1) it should meet an existing need of NRC reviewers, (2) it should be based in sound HFE principles, (3) it should be thoroughly peer-reviewed, and (4) it should address CBP-related human performance issues identified in the literature. This report describes the methodology we used to evaluate each criterion. Our evaluation concluded that the Standard generally does meet these criteria, however several areas were identified for which additional clarifications are needed. Thus consideration of the Standard's use by the NRC is supported. The standard evaluation methodology developed in this study can be generally applied to the review of other HFE standards being considered for possible use or endorsement by the NRC.

  11. Production diagnostics of geothermal wells by means of a computerized expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, Victor M.; Iglesias, Eduardo R.

    1992-01-01

    Diagnostic of production problems in geothermal wells is a complex inferential task, which requires considerable knowledge of its possible causes, careful assessment of (sometimes bewildering) multidisciplinary evidence, and, of course, enough experience. These characteristics make this task a good candidate for a computerized expert system. On this conviction, we have developed the first version of WELL-DR, an expert system for geothermal-well production diagnostics. Though still in a rapid stage of evolution, this expert system already provides a convenient and useful tool for geothermal field development, operation and management.

  12. Computerized assessment of the mastoid air cell system.

    PubMed

    Isono, M; Murata, K; Azuma, H; Ishikawa, M; Ito, A

    1999-04-01

    There have been many arguments on the development of pneumatization of temporal bone. However, a technique for direct volume measurement from high resolution computed tomography has never been reported. The aim of this paper is to develop a technique by using digital image processing to measure the volume of the mastoid air cell system. Forty three ears of 26 healthy subjects (13 males and 13 females) without a history of chronic or exudative otitis media, clear signs of Meniere's disease, severe sensorineural hearing impairment or malformation of temporal bone were eligible for enrolment in this study. Using a digital image processing technique, only the black air cells and tympanic cavity on the CT films are easily selected. Then, after image processing, only areas of these extracted black pneumatized parts are calculated. Consequently, the volume of pneumatized parts of temporal bone could be calculated separately as total volume and as partial volume that divided by several CT planes. The average volume of pneumatization in 43 temporal bones was 5.97 ml. However, since the volume of pneumatization in the temporal bone has traditionally been estimated by analyzing areas on X-ray films, the new method described in this study is significant for its ability to directly measure the volume of pneumatization in the temporal bone.

  13. Satisfaction with a computerized practitioner order-entry system at two military health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J P; Bulatao, P T; Rascati, K L

    2000-12-01

    User satisfaction with a computerized practitioner order-entry (POE) system at two military health care facilities was studied. A survey was mailed in May 1998 to providers authorized to enter drug orders into the Composite Health Care System (CHCS) (including two clinical pharmacists) and pharmacy staff members at two department of defense (DOD) medical treatment facilities. Of 189 questionnaires with the potential to be returned completed, 112 were usable, for a net response rate of 59.3%. The internal consistency of the survey items measuring user satisfaction (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.86. The typical respondent was male, was employed by the DOD, had fair to excellent computer and typing skills, had received eight hours or less of training on the CHCS POE system, had been using the system for two years or less, and had been a health care practitioner for 10 years or less. Overall, users were satisfied with the POE system (mean +/- S.D. rating of 3.78 +/- 0.87 on a 5-point scale where 5 represented the highest satisfaction level). Satisfaction was correlated most strongly with ratings of the POE system's efficiency. Nonphysicians were more satisfied, on average, than physicians. No significant relationship was found between other individual characteristics and satisfaction. Qualitative analysis reinforced the finding that users were interested in efficiency issues. Overall, users at two military health care facilities were satisfied with a computerized POE system. Satisfaction was most strongly correlated with the perceived efficiency of the system.

  14. The role of computerized modeling and simulation in the development of life support system technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modell, Michael; Evanich, Peggy; Chen, Chau-Chyun; Anavi, Selim; Mai, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    Computerized modeling and simulation (CMAS) is a tool that can greatly reduce both the time and cost of technology development. CMAS refers to computer methods for correlating, storing, and retrieving property data for chemical species and for solving the phenomenological equations of physical/chemical processes. Furthermore, process conditions based on properties of materials, mass, and energy balances; equipment sizing based on rate processes; and the governing equations for unit operations can be determined using CMAS. CMAS systems can be used to evaluate an LSS process with minimal requirements for laboratory experimentation. A CMAS model is presented for a vapor compression distillation system(VCD) for reclaiming water from urine.

  15. The role of computerized modeling and simulation in the development of life support system technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modell, Michael; Evanich, Peggy; Chen, Chau-Chyun; Anavi, Selim; Mai, Jeff

    1989-01-01

    Computerized modeling and simulation (CMAS) is a tool that can greatly reduce both the time and cost of technology development. CMAS refers to computer methods for correlating, storing, and retrieving property data for chemical species and for solving the phenomenological equations of physical/chemical processes. Furthermore, process conditions based on properties of materials, mass, and energy balances; equipment sizing based on rate processes; and the governing equations for unit operations can be determined using CMAS. CMAS systems can be used to evaluate an LSS process with minimal requirements for laboratory experimentation. A CMAS model is presented for a vapor compression distillation system(VCD) for reclaiming water from urine.

  16. Upper limb functions regained in quadriplegia: a hybrid computerized neuromuscular stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Nathan, R H; Ohry, A

    1990-05-01

    A new, computerized neuromuscular stimulation system was applied to the upper limbs of two patients with complete quadriplegia below the C4 level. The stimulation-generated movements were integrated and augmented by residual, voluntary shoulder girdle movements and mechanical splinting. Up to 12 muscles were stimulated individually with high-resolution surface electrodes; coordination and control of the stimulation was effected by microcomputer. Simple vocal commands to the computer triggered preprogrammed hand prehensions, arm motion, and other functions, giving the patient complete control over the system. In pilot clinical trials of six weeks, writing, eating, and drinking, including picking up and replacing the pen or cup, were achieved.

  17. Computerized Interactive Harness Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billitti, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized interactive harness engineering program inexpensive, interactive system for learning and using engineering approach to interconnection systems. Basically data-base system that stores information as files of individual connectors and handles wiring information in circuit groups stored as records.

  18. SU-F-P-03: Management of Time to Treatment Inititation: Case for An Electronic Whiteboard

    SciTech Connect

    Adnani, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if data mining of an electronic whiteboard improves the management of the Time to Treatment Initiation (TTI) in radiation oncology. Methods: An electronic whiteboard designed to help in managing the planning workflow and improves communication regarding patient planning progress was used to record the dates at which each phase of the planning process began or completed. These are CT Sim date, Plan Start, Physician Review, Physicist Review, Approval for Treatment Delivery, Setup or Verification of Simulation. Results: During clinical implementation, the electronic whiteboard was able to fulfill its primary objective of providing a transparent account of the planning progress of each patient. Peer pressure also meant that individual tasks, such as contouring, were easily brought to the attention of the responsible party and prioritized accordingly. Data mining to analyze the electronic whiteboard per patient (figure 1), per diagnosis (figure 2), per treatment modality (figure 3), per physician (figure 4), per planner (figure 5), etc., added another sophisticated tool in the management of Time to Treatment Initiation without compromising quality of the plans being generated. A longer than necessary time between CT Sim and Plan Start can be discussed among the members of the treatment team as an indication of inadequate/outdated CT Simulator, Contouring Tools, Image Fusion Tools, Other Imaging Studies (MRI, PET/CT) performed, etc. The same for the Plan Start to Physician Review where an extended time than expected may be due unrealistic planning goals, limited planning system features, etc. Conclusion: An Electronic Whiteboard in radiation oncology is not only helping with organizing planning workflow, it is also a potent tool that can be used to reduce the Time to Treatment Initiation by providing the clinic with hard data about the duration of each phase treatment planning as a function of different variable affecting the planning process. The

  19. A computerized order entry system was adopted with high user satisfaction at an orthopedic teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Murray-Weir, Mary; Magid, Steven; Robbins, Laura; Quinlan, Patricia; Sanchez-Villagomez, Pamela; Shaha, Steven H

    2014-02-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) has been considered essential for the reduction of medical errors and increased patient safety. Assessment of staff perception regarding a CPOE system is important for satisfaction and adoption. Incorporation of user feedback can greatly improve the functionality of a system and promote user satisfaction. This study aims to develop an informatics staff satisfaction survey instrument and to understand what components of computerized prescriber order entry (CPOE) contribute to staff satisfaction and its variability over time. The 22-question survey was developed by a multidisciplinary group and focused on patient data including demographics, orders, medications, laboratory, and radiology data. The questions were designed to understand if clinicians (1) could easily access the information needed to properly take care of patients, (2) could act upon the information once acquired, (3) could obtain the information clearly, and (4) were alerted to potential errors. The survey was distributed just prior to "go-live," 6 and 12 months after go-live. Responses were given on a five-point Likert scale. The survey results post-implementation showed user satisfaction with CPOE. Satisfaction regarding the ease of obtaining orders, medication, and lab data had a significant improvement at 6 and 12 months post-implementation, p < 0.001. Satisfaction that the computerized order entry system provided information needed to take care of their patients improved, p < 0.01. At 1 year post-implementation, user satisfaction declined from 6 months earlier but still demonstrated an overall increase in satisfaction from pre-implementation. Compared prior to go-live, clinicians are satisfied or very satisfied across multiple spheres and multiple disciplines. At all time points, clinicians were able to obtain information required to take care of their patients. However, post-go-live, it was easier to obtain and act upon as well as more clear

  20. Organizational Benefits of Computerized Physican Order Entry (CPOE) System in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Atique, Suleman; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Electronic prescribing is also known as Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE). It is a computer-aided system which offers the health professionals a robust platform for entering the prescription electronically. Due to paucity of facilities in Pakistan which are available around the world, there is an observable overburden on the health professionals and practitioners. CPOE system has shown to be very effective in minimizing medication errors. CPOE is beneficial for both patient and health organizations. There is great deal of interest in the adoption of this system in our healthcare system. The results state clearly that this system is equally beneficial for organizations who want to adopt this system as perceived by the health professionals. It supports the idea of adoption and implementation of CPOE in healthcare facilities healthcare institutes. CPOE must be adopted to ease and optimize nursing services in Pakistani healthcare system.

  1. Developing an evidence base of best practices for integrating computerized systems into the exam room: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minal R; Vichich, Jennifer; Lang, Ian; Lin, Jessica; Zheng, Kai

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of health information technology systems, electronic health records in particular, is changing the nature of how clinicians interact with patients. Lack of knowledge remains on how best to integrate such systems in the exam room. The purpose of this systematic review was to (1) distill "best" behavioral and communication practices recommended in the literature for clinicians when interacting with patients in the presence of computerized systems during a clinical encounter, (2) weigh the evidence of each recommendation, and (3) rank evidence-based recommendations for electronic health record communication training initiatives for clinicians. We conducted a literature search of 6 databases, resulting in 52 articles included in the analysis. We extracted information such as study setting, research design, sample, findings, and implications. Recommendations were distilled based on consistent support for behavioral and communication practices across studies. Eight behavioral and communication practices received strong support of evidence in the literature and included specific aspects of using computerized systems to facilitate conversation and transparency in the exam room, such as spatial (re)organization of the exam room, maintaining nonverbal communication, and specific techniques that integrate the computerized system into the visit and engage the patient. Four practices, although patient-centered, have received insufficient evidence to date. We developed an evidence base of best practices for clinicians to maintain patient-centered communications in the presence of computerized systems in the exam room. Further work includes development and empirical evaluation of evidence-based guidelines to better integrate computerized systems into clinical care.

  2. Introduction to CRRIS: a computerized radiological risk investigation system for assessing atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Murphy, B.D.

    1985-08-01

    The CRRIS is a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System consisting of eight fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport of atmospheric releases of radionuclides and resulting doses and health risks to individuals or populations. Each code may also be used alone for various assessment applications. Radionuclides are handled by the CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or the exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and decay products that grow in during environmental transport. The CRRIS is not designed to simulate short-term effects. 51 refs.

  3. Computerized Civil Works Construction Cost Index System: User’s Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    that another commodity is added to this cost index - gold faucets. The revised figures are shown in Table A3. Now the construction cost index reads ...minute rather than per hour. So the cost index would read : t 18.6 x 100 - 133.2, 13.62 instead of 129.3. The results shown in Tables A3 and A4 indicate...omengineering *A."m"r research MMCIi, REPORT ,.,ss Octob., 1U COMPUTERIZED CIVIL WORKS CONSTRUCTION COST INDEX SYSTEM: USERS’ MANUAL D. Ganu Bhgby DTIC S

  4. Computerized literature reference system: use of an optical scanner and optical character recognition software.

    PubMed

    Lossef, S V; Schwartz, L H

    1990-09-01

    A computerized reference system for radiology journal articles was developed by using an IBM-compatible personal computer with a hand-held optical scanner and optical character recognition software. This allows direct entry of scanned text from printed material into word processing or data-base files. Additionally, line diagrams and photographs of radiographs can be incorporated into these files. A text search and retrieval software program enables rapid searching for keywords in scanned documents. The hand scanner and software programs are commercially available, relatively inexpensive, and easily used. This permits construction of a personalized radiology literature file of readily accessible text and images requiring minimal typing or keystroke entry.

  5. Design techniques for developing a computerized instrumentation test plan. [for wind tunnel test data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, S. Kay; Forsyth, Theodore J.; Maynard, Everett E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computerized instrumentation test plan (ITP) for the NASA/Ames Research Center National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) is discussed. The objective of the ITP program was to aid the instrumentation engineer in documenting the configuration and calibration of data acquisition systems for a given test at any of four low speed wind tunnel facilities (Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility, 7 x 10, 40 x 80, and 80 x 120) at the NFAC. It is noted that automation of the ITP has decreased errors, engineering hours, and setup time while adding a higher level of consistency and traceability.

  6. A computerized on-line key word indexing system for drug information retrieval.

    PubMed

    Sasich, L; Morris, H A

    1981-03-01

    The Idaho Drug Information Service has been in operation since 1972. During this time, five different files and manual methods of filing have evolved. As a result of confusion over indexing terms, information became lost within the filing systems, and the files fell into disuse. A reorganization of the files was undertaken in an attempt to develop a filing system that would be functional and efficient. Methods of manual filing are briefly reviewed. A computerized on-line key word indexing system for information storage and retrieval was initiated. The development and operation of the Drug Information Retrieval Terminal System (DIRTS) is described completely. At this time, DIRTS is fully operational. The system has eliminated the previous problems encountered with the manual filing systems, and user response has been good.

  7. A Computerized System for the Development, Analysis, and Comparison of Diamond Jubilee and Century 21 Shorthand Dictation Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavan, C. Bruce; Gallion, Leona M.

    The document describes System 2, a computerized system for analyzing controlled vocabulary material and for comparing the Diamond Jubilee and Century 21 shorthand systems. Background information on three other computer systems for shorthand dictation are briefly described: (1) Reese and Smith Program (University of Tennessee), (2) Kavan and…

  8. Wind energy Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) : data collection recommendations for reliability analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Valerie A.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.

    2012-01-01

    This report addresses the general data requirements for reliability analysis of fielded wind turbines and other wind plant equipment. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific data recommendations for a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) to support automated analysis. This data collection recommendations report was written by Sandia National Laboratories to address the general data requirements for reliability analysis of operating wind turbines. This report is intended to help develop a basic understanding of the data needed for reliability analysis from a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and other data systems. The report provides a rationale for why this data should be collected, a list of the data needed to support reliability and availability analysis, and specific recommendations for a CMMS to support automated analysis. Though written for reliability analysis of wind turbines, much of the information is applicable to a wider variety of equipment and analysis and reporting needs. The 'Motivation' section of this report provides a rationale for collecting and analyzing field data for reliability analysis. The benefits of this type of effort can include increased energy delivered, decreased operating costs, enhanced preventive maintenance schedules, solutions to issues with the largest payback, and identification of early failure indicators.

  9. [Performances of an automated dispensing system combined with a computerized prescription order entry].

    PubMed

    Le Gonidec, P; Diallo, M L; Djoussa-Kambou, S; Guizard, M

    2009-03-01

    Performances of an automated dispensing system Pillpick (Swisslog) coupled with the computerized-prescribing - order-entry software and dispensing software Pharma (Computer Engineering) implemented at the opening of a new prison facility in Meaux were quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated. Pillpick allows the treatment of different and varied pharmaceutical forms without imposing bulk handling or depackaging. This study conducted between July and September 2006 focused on the performances of the automated dispensing system in terms of single dose packaging, single dose dispensing, dispensing error rate and security of the medication circuit. Seventy-six plus or minus five percent of the prescribed medications were automated dispensed. Packaging working flow rate was 377 units doses per hour, dispensing working flow rate was 537 doses per hour. Dispensing error rate was 0.5%, due to wrong delivery orders mainly generated by the Pharma computer-order entry software. Automated dispensing systems Pillpick ensure safe drug dispensing. Potential drug errors can possibly be generated by the computerized-prescribing - order-entry software and dispensing software. The robot-software combination constitutes the key performance parameter.

  10. Pilot study on the feasibility of a computerized speech recognition charting system.

    PubMed

    Feldman, C A; Stevens, D

    1990-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of developing and using a voice recognition computerized charting system to record dental clinical examination data. More specifically, the study was designed to analyze the time and error differential between the traditional examiner/recorder method (ASSISTANT) and computerized voice recognition method (VOICE). DMFS examinations were performed twice on 20 patients using the traditional ASSISTANT and the VOICE charting system. A statistically significant difference was found when comparing the mean ASSISTANT time of 2.69 min to the VOICE time of 3.72 min (P less than 0.001). No statistically significant difference was found when comparing the mean ASSISTANT recording errors of 0.1 to VOICE recording errors of 0.6 (P = 0.059). 90% of the patients indicated they felt comfortable with the dentist talking to a computer and only 5% of the sample indicated they opposed VOICE. Results from this pilot study indicate that a charting system utilizing voice recognition technology could be considered a viable alternative to traditional examiner/recorder methods of clinical charting.

  11. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  12. Teacher Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosevear, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This case study investigated the process of adopting and integrating interactive whiteboards into the daily practice of teachers and compared the findings to relevant theoretical models. Participants were drawn from a small international school in Damascus, Syria, where interactive whiteboards were introduced for the first time. The findings…

  13. Teachers' Remarks on Interactive Whiteboard with LCD Panel Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçak, Ömer; Gülcü, Aslan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the opinions of teachers about using interactive whiteboards with an LCD panel that was installed in classrooms within the FATIH educational project. The study was conducted at six high schools in which installation of interactive whiteboards with an LCD panel in classrooms was completed and teachers who received training…

  14. Interactive Whiteboards for Teaching and Learning Science: Ascertaining Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Liliana; Lazar, Gabriel; Lazar, Iuliana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze of latest research focused on the investigation of interactive whiteboards used in teaching and learning Science. In the theoretical framework the main objectives are: a) the identification of specific research regarding the integration of interactive whiteboards in teaching and learning Science and b) the…

  15. Teachers' Remarks on Interactive Whiteboard with LCD Panel Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçak, Ömer; Gülcü, Aslan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the opinions of teachers about using interactive whiteboards with an LCD panel that was installed in classrooms within the FATIH educational project. The study was conducted at six high schools in which installation of interactive whiteboards with an LCD panel in classrooms was completed and teachers who received training…

  16. Pathological Diagnosis of Gastric Cancers with a Novel Computerized Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Kosuke; Saito, Akira; Kiyuna, Tomoharu; Graf, Hans Peter; Cosatto, Eric; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent studies of molecular biology have provided great advances for diagnostic molecular pathology. Automated diagnostic systems with computerized scanning for sampled cells in fluids or smears are now widely utilized. Automated analysis of tissue sections is, however, very difficult because they exhibit a complex mixture of overlapping malignant tumor cells, benign host-derived cells, and extracellular materials. Thus, traditional histological diagnosis is still the most powerful method for diagnosis of diseases. Methods: We have developed a novel computer-assisted pathology system for rapid, automated histological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained sections. It is a multistage recognition system patterned after methods that human pathologists use for diagnosis but harnessing machine learning and image analysis. The system first analyzes an entire H and E-stained section (tissue) at low resolution to search suspicious areas for cancer and then the selected areas are analyzed at high resolution to confirm the initial suspicion. Results: After training the pathology system with gastric tissues samples, we examined its performance using other 1905 gastric tissues. The system's accuracy in detecting malignancies was shown to be almost equal to that of conventional diagnosis by expert pathologists. Conclusions: Our novel computerized analysis system provides a support for histological diagnosis, which is useful for screening and quality control. We consider that it could be extended to be applicable to many other carcinomas after learning normal and malignant forms of various tissues. Furthermore, we expect it to contribute to the development of more objective grading systems, immunohistochemical staining systems, and fluorescent-stained image analysis systems. PMID:28400994

  17. Whiteboard sharing: capture, process, and print or email

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormish, Michael; Erol, Berna; Van Olst, Daniel G.; Li, Tim; Mariotti, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Whiteboards support face to face meetings by facilitating the sharing of ideas, focusing attention, and summarizing. However, at the end of the meeting participants desire some record of the information from the whiteboard. While there are whiteboards with built-in printers, they are expensive and relatively uncommon. We consider the capture of the information on a whiteboard with a mobile phone, improving the image quality with a cloud service, and sharing the results. This paper describes the algorithm for improving whiteboard image quality, the user experience for both a web widget and a smartphone application, and the necessary adaptations for providing this as a web service. The web widget, and mobile apps for both iPhone and Android are currently freely available, and have been used by more than 50,000 people.

  18. Computerized pharmacy surveillance and alert system for drug-related problems.

    PubMed

    Ferrández, O; Urbina, O; Grau, S; Mateu-de-Antonio, J; Marin-Casino, M; Portabella, J; Mojal, S; Riu, M; Salas, E

    2017-04-01

    Because of the impact of drug-related problems (DRPs) on morbidity and mortality, there is a need for computerized strategies to increase drug safety. The detection and identification of the causes of potential DRPs can be facilitated by the incorporation of a pharmacy warning system (PWS) in the computerized prescriber order entry (CPOE) and its application in the routine validation of inpatient drug therapy. A limited number of studies have evaluated a clinical decision support system to monitor drug treatment. Most of these applications have utilized a small range of drugs with alerts and/or types of alert. The objective of this study was to describe the implementation of a PWS integrated in the electronic medical record (EMR). The PWS was developed in 2003-2004. Pharmacological information to generate drug alerts was entered on demographic data, drug dosage, laboratory tests related to the prescribed drug and drug combinations (interactions, duplications and necessary combinations). The PWS was applied in the prescription reviews conducted in patients admitted to the hospital in 2012. Information on 83% of the drugs included in the pharmacopeia was introduced into the PWS, allowing detection of 2808 potential DRPs, representing 79·1% of all potential DRPs detected during the study period. Twenty per cent of PWS DRPs were clinically relevant, requiring pharmacist intervention. The PWS detected most potential DRPs, thus increasing inpatient safety. The detection ability of the PWS was higher than that reported for other tools described in the literature. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. An Analysis of the Usability of Inpatient Insulin Ordering in Three Computerized Provider Order Entry Systems

    PubMed Central

    Neinstein, Aaron; Cucina, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin is a highly scrutinized drug in hospitals since it is both frequently used and high risk. As the insulin ordering process makes a transition from pen and paper to computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, the effective design of these systems becomes critical. There are fundamental usability principles in the field of human–computer interaction design, which help make interfaces that are effective, efficient, and satisfying. To our knowledge, there has not been a study that specifically looks at how these principles have been applied in the design of insulin orders in a CPOE system. Method We analyzed the usability of inpatient insulin ordering in three widely deployed CPOE systems—two commercially marketed systems and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs VistA Computerized Patient Record System. We performed a usability analysis using aspects of three different methods. Our first goal was to note each instance where a usability principle was either upheld or not upheld. Our second goal was to discover ways in which CPOE designers could exploit usability principles to make insulin ordering safer and more intuitive in the future. Results Commonly encountered usability principles included constraints, obviousness/self-evidence, natural mapping, feedback, and affordance. The three systems varied in their adherence to these principles, and each system had varying strengths and weaknesses. Conclusion Adherence to usability principles is important when building a CPOE system, yet designers observe them to varying degrees. A well-designed CPOE interface allows a clinician to focus more of his or her mental energy on clinical decisions rather than on deciphering the system itself. In the future, intelligent design of CPOE insulin orders can be used to help optimize and modernize management of hyperglycemia in the hospital. PMID:22226260

  20. A Comparison of an Expert Systems Approach to Computerized Adaptive Testing and an Item Response Theory Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    Expert systems can be used to aid decisionmaking. A computerized adaptive test is one kind of expert system, although not commonly recognized as such. A new approach, termed EXSPRT, was devised that combines expert systems reasoning and sequential probability ratio test stopping rules. Two versions of EXSPRT were developed, one with random…

  1. A computerized test system for thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computerized testing system to measure fatigue crack growth under thermal-mechanical fatigue conditions is described. Built around a servohydraulic machine, the system is capable of a push-pull test under stress-controlled or strain-controlled conditions in the temperature range of 25 to 1050 C. Temperature and mechanical strain are independently controlled by the closed-loop system to simulate the complex inservice strain-temperature relationship. A d-c electrical potential method is used to measure crack growth rates. The correction procedure of the potential signal to take into account powerline and RF-induced noises and thermal changes is described. It is shown that the potential drop technique can be used for physical mechanism studies and for modelling crack tip processes.

  2. Efficacy of a Computerized Sensor System for Evaluation and Training of Dizzy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Hsieh, Wan-Ling; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Shih-Jen; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Patients with vestibular hypofunction often experience dizziness and unsteadiness while moving their heads. Appropriate sensors can effectively detect a patient’s dynamic visual acuity and associated body balance control. Forty-one vestibular-deficit patients and 10 normal individuals were invited to participate in this study. Questionnaires, clinical assessment scales and objective measures were evaluated on participants’ first visits. After 12 sessions of training, all scales were evaluated again on vestibular-deficit patients. The computerized system was composed of sensors, including a gyro and strain gauges, data acquisition accessories and LabVIEW software. Results revealed that the system could effectively distinguish normal subjects from subjects with vestibular deficits. In addition, after a rehabilitation program, subjects’ subjective and objective performances were significantly improved. Based on our results, we concluded that the present system, which uses a gyro and strain gauges, may provide an effective method for assessing and treating vestibular-deficit patients. PMID:22163617

  3. A computerized test system for thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    A computerized testing system to measure fatigue crack growth under thermal-mechanical fatigue conditions is described. Built around a servohydraulic machine, the system is capable of a push-pull test under stress-controlled or strain-controlled conditions in the temperature range of 25 to 1050 C. Temperature and mechanical strain are independently controlled by the closed-loop system to simulate the complex inservice strain-temperature relationship. A d-c electrical potential method is used to measure crack growth rates. The correction procedure of the potential signal to take into account powerline and RF-induced noises and thermal changes is described. It is shown that the potential drop technique can be used for physical mechanism studies and for modelling crack tip processes.

  4. ARMDAT: A brief description of a computerized test system for burst transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albinsson, M.

    1994-08-01

    This report briefly presents a test system for burst transmission on the high frequency (HF) channel. The system employs the HF radio Ra 195 and the modulation and demodulation is performed in a computerized radio modem. The purpose of this work is to design a burst transmission system for tests with effective modulation and coding techniques. The radio modem is a personal computer (PC) plug-in card, based on a digital signal processor (DSP). The transmitted signal is created in the radio modem and the information is processed in the computer. The program for the DSP is stored in the computer and is easy to change or configurate. The protocol contains an error correcting code and the user interface is designed to simplify tests of the message error probability. Further, the work shows the advantages of using modern digital technology.

  5. Imaging results of multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system designed for breast diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Opieliński, Krzysztof J; Pruchnicki, Piotr; Gudra, Tadeusz; Podgórski, Przemysław; Kurcz, Jacek; Kraśnicki, Tomasz; Sąsiadek, Marek; Majewski, Jarosław

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, in the era of common computerization, transmission and reflection methods are intensively developed in addition to improving classical ultrasound methods (US) for imaging of tissue structure, in particular ultrasound transmission tomography UTT (analogous to computed tomography CT which uses X-rays) and reflection tomography URT (based on the synthetic aperture method used in radar imaging techniques). This paper presents and analyses the results of ultrasound transmission tomography imaging of the internal structure of the female breast biopsy phantom CIRS Model 052A and the results of the ultrasound reflection tomography imaging of a wire sample. Imaging was performed using a multi-modal ultrasound computerized tomography system developed with the participation of a private investor. The results were compared with the results of imaging obtained using dual energy CT, MR mammography and conventional US method. The obtained results indicate that the developed UTT and URT methods, after the acceleration of the scanning process, thus enabling in vivo examination, may be successfully used for detection and detailed characterization of breast lesions in women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Design and Development of a Computerized Attention-Training Game System for School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tsui-Ying; Huang, Ho-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    A computerized attention-training game system has been developed to support attention training for school-aged children. The present system offers various types of computer games that provide training in different aspects of attention, such as selective attention, sustained attention, and divided attention. The N-tier architecture of the Web-based…

  7. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT..., developed, installed or enhanced under this section subject to the Department of Health and Human Services... system in accordance with the OCSE guideline entitled “Automated Systems for Child Support Enforcement: A...

  8. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT..., developed, installed or enhanced under this section subject to the Department of Health and Human Services... system in accordance with the OCSE guideline entitled “Automated Systems for Child Support Enforcement: A...

  9. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT..., developed, installed or enhanced under this section subject to the Department of Health and Human Services... system in accordance with the OCSE guideline entitled “Automated Systems for Child Support Enforcement: A...

  10. 45 CFR 307.31 - Federal financial participation at the 80 percent rate for computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED SUPPORT..., developed, installed or enhanced under this section subject to the Department of Health and Human Services... system in accordance with the OCSE guideline entitled “Automated Systems for Child Support Enforcement: A...

  11. g--Acceleration of Gravity: Its Measurement from the Shape of Water by Using a Computerized Rotational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintao, Carlos A. F.; de Souza Filho, Moacir P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a different experimental setup compared with the traditional ones, in order to determine the acceleration of gravity, which is carried out by using a fluid at a constant rotation. A computerized rotational system--by using a data acquisition system with specific software, a power amplifier and a rotary motion sensor--is…

  12. g--Acceleration of Gravity: Its Measurement from the Shape of Water by Using a Computerized Rotational System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pintao, Carlos A. F.; de Souza Filho, Moacir P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a different experimental setup compared with the traditional ones, in order to determine the acceleration of gravity, which is carried out by using a fluid at a constant rotation. A computerized rotational system--by using a data acquisition system with specific software, a power amplifier and a rotary motion sensor--is…

  13. Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) (SELf-GEnerating Master) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: Culicidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO MEDICALLY 0 IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) oAnnual Report Terry L. Erwin July...APPLICATION OF A COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE Annual Report INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO July 1981 to June 1982 MEDICALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS

  14. A generic, computerized nuclear materials accountability system (NucMAS) and its layered products

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jr, J M

    1989-01-01

    NucMAS provides a material balance area with a computerized data management system for nuclear materials accountability. NucMAS is a generic application. It handles the data management and reporting functions for different processing facilities by storing all process-specific information as data rather than procedure. A NucMAS application is configured for each facility it supports. NucMAS and its layered products are compatible with three types of data clients. Core NucMAS has a screen-oriented user interface to support the accountability clerk as a client. Accountability clerks enter data from operating logs and laboratory analyses one to three days after actual processing. Layered products support process operators and automated systems as near-real-time and real-time data clients. The core and layered products use a data-driven approach which results in software that is configurable and maintainable. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  15. End-user perceptions of a computerized medication system: is there resistance to change?

    PubMed

    Malato, Larry Allen; Kim, Soonhee

    2004-01-01

    Public mandate to control cost, while improving quality of service, leads health care administrators to look to information technology for innovative solutions. This case study of acute care registered nurses in a public hospital focuses on experiences of the end-users of a computerized medication system. Data was obtained by in-depth interviews and observation performed in the clinical setting. Findings fell into five challenging issues to the end-user and health care administration: end-user perceptions of inadequate training, negative experiences of implementation, perceived deficiencies in quality of technology, perceptions of lack of participatory design and a ensuing circumvention of the new system. Emphasis is on the relationship of the findings to the quality of public health care administration.

  16. The impact of computerized provider order entry systems on medical-imaging services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prgomet, Mirela; Markewycz, Andrew; Adams, Edwina; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been strongly promoted as a means to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare. Methods This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence of the impact of CPOE on medical-imaging services and patient outcomes. Results Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria, most of which (10/14) used a pre-/postintervention comparison design. Eight studies demonstrated benefits, such as decreased test utilization, associated with decision-support systems promoting adherence to test ordering guidelines. Three studies evaluating medical-imaging ordering and reporting times showed statistically significant decreases in turnaround times. Conclusions The findings reveal the potential for CPOE to contribute to significant efficiency and effectiveness gains in imaging services. The diversity and scope of the research evidence can be strengthened through increased attention to the circumstances and mechanisms that contribute to the success (or otherwise) of CPOE and its contribution to the enhancement of patient care delivery. PMID:21385821

  17. The impact of computerized provider order entry systems on medical-imaging services: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Andrew; Prgomet, Mirela; Markewycz, Andrew; Adams, Edwina; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2011-05-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been strongly promoted as a means to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence of the impact of CPOE on medical-imaging services and patient outcomes. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria, most of which (10/14) used a pre-/postintervention comparison design. Eight studies demonstrated benefits, such as decreased test utilization, associated with decision-support systems promoting adherence to test ordering guidelines. Three studies evaluating medical-imaging ordering and reporting times showed statistically significant decreases in turnaround times. The findings reveal the potential for CPOE to contribute to significant efficiency and effectiveness gains in imaging services. The diversity and scope of the research evidence can be strengthened through increased attention to the circumstances and mechanisms that contribute to the success (or otherwise) of CPOE and its contribution to the enhancement of patient care delivery.

  18. 45 CFR 307.25 - Review and certification of computerized support enforcement systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES... planning, design, development, installation, enhancement and operation of computerized support enforcement...

  19. Validation of a computerized cognitive assessment system for persons with stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yip, Chi Kwong; Man, David W K

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates the validity of a newly developed computerized cognitive assessment system (CCAS) that is equipped with rich multimedia to generate simulated testing situations and considers both test item difficulty and the test taker's ability. It is also hypothesized that better predictive validity of the CCAS in self-care of persons with stroke can be obtained. The CCAS has been constructed and validated by an expert review panel. The system was pilot-tested with 14 patients who had suffered a stroke and fulfilled specific selection criteria. In addition, data on patients' performances in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Neurobehavioral Cognitive State Examination (NCSE) or Cognistat, Modified Barthel Index, Functional Test for the Hemiplegic Upper Extremity were collected. Their demographic characteristics were also collected. Correlation coefficients of the scores among the CCAS, MMSE, and NCSE were used to show the concurrent validity of the former. With regard to the content validity, the intraclass correlation coefficient [model 2, ICC(2,k)] among the panel members was 0.972 with a P value of less than 0.01. The scores of the CCAS correlate with MMSE (r = 0.676, P = 0.011) and with the four subtests of the NCSE (repetition, naming, construction, and calculation). The content and concurrent validity as well as the predictive abilities in self-care function of the CCAS were initially established. The degree of the usefulness and accuracy of the new computerized system in measuring the cognitive performance in persons with stroke remains to be determined.

  20. Radiation levels in cyclotron-radiochemistry facility measured by a novel comprehensive computerized monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishani, E.; Lifshits, N.; Osavistky, A.; Kaufman, J.; Ankry, N.; Tal, N.; Chisin, R.

    1999-04-01

    Radiation levels in a cyclotron-radiochemistry facility were measured during the production of commonly used PET radiopharmaceuticals by a comprehensive computerized monitoring system. The system consists of three major components: on-line radiation monitoring channels, an area control unit, and a gas waste management unit. During production the radiation levels were measured in the cyclotron vault, inside automatic chemistry production and research shielded cells, in the radiochemistry room, in the gas waste decay tank, in the chimney filters, and at the top of the cells chimney. Each detector was calibrated in a known radiation field, and a special detector dead time correction was performed in order to achieve detected signal-to-radiation linearity for the Geiger tubes located in the radiochemistry production and research cells. During production of C-11 and O-15 PET radiopharmaceuticals, high radiation levels were measured in the gas waste decay tank (240 and 80 mR/h, respectively). In contrast, the radiation levels at the chimney filters and at the top of the cells chimney did not exceed the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Drive Air Concentration (DAC) recommended for C-11 or O-15. During production of FDG, high radiation levels were measured at the chimney filters, however the radiation level at the top of the chimney (3.7 μCi/m 3) did not exceed the F-18 DAC recommendation (27 μCi/m 3). Low radiation levels of approximately 0.5-1 mR/h were measured in the radiochemistry room during production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In the cyclotron vault, 2 min after bombardment the radiation levels at 2 m from the cyclotron decreased to 1-2 mR/h. The addition of a gas waste decay system to computerized monitoring channels located near each strategic point of the site allows for a comprehensive survey of the radiochemical processes.

  1. A computerized, pictorial representation of sensor status for intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Computerized intrusion detection systems, called the Alarm Monitoring System (AMS), have been in place at multiple Hanford Sites for approximately 10 years. These systems can monitor more than one thousand individual or group data points. The data points are arranged into logical areas called zones. The software for the AMS has the ability to define up to 400 zones. Physical changes to the data points and their locations, buildings, and surrounding areas during the life of the systems make it necessary to update the displays and the maps attached to the systems. The Alarm Display Map (ADM) project is the first of the planned updates. The ADM project provides a cost-effective, state-of-the-art enhancement and replacement for the static display colored LED maps and for obsolete display monitor subsystems. It consists of multiple color monitors connected to a signal dedicated processor (Apple Macintosh IIfx, Figure 1). The displays include an aerial photograph overlaid dynamically with pertinent alarm data along with interchangeable displays of sensor status, alarm zones, and building floor-level details. The system combines object-oriented concepts and intrinsic Macintosh system functions to provide a maintenance environment that nonprogrammers may use. The ADM is a stand-alone display subsystem, easily integrated into any other monitoring application by changing map and sensor designations and adjusting the message protocol. The system is programming maintenance free and adaptable as a display subsystem to almost any existing detection system. 6 figs.

  2. Qualification of computerized monitoring systems in a cell therapy facility compliant with the good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Del Mazo-Barbara, Anna; Mirabel, Clémentine; Nieto, Valentín; Reyes, Blanca; García-López, Joan; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Vives, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    Computerized systems (CS) are essential in the development and manufacture of cell-based medicines and must comply with good manufacturing practice, thus pushing academic developers to implement methods that are typically found within pharmaceutical industry environments. Qualitative and quantitative risk analyses were performed by Ishikawa and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis, respectively. A process for qualification of a CS that keeps track of environmental conditions was designed and executed. The simplicity of the Ishikawa analysis permitted to identify critical parameters that were subsequently quantified by Failure Mode Effects Analysis, resulting in a list of test included in the qualification protocols. The approach presented here contributes to simplify and streamline the qualification of CS in compliance with pharmaceutical quality standards.

  3. Ellipsis and Coreference Resolution in a Computerized Virtual Patient Dialogue System.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuan-Jie; Pao, Chien-Wei; Chen, Yen-Heng; Liu, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Hui-Huang

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design of an ellipsis and coreference resolution module integrated in a computerized virtual patient dialogue system. Real medical diagnosis dialogues have been collected and analyzed. Several groups of diagnosis-related concepts were defined and used to construct rules, patterns, and features to detect and resolve ellipsis and coreference. The best F-scores of ellipsis detection and resolution were 89.15 % and 83.40 %, respectively. The best F-scores of phrasal coreference detection and resolution were 93.83 % and 83.40 %, respectively. The accuracy of pronominal anaphora resolution was 92 % for the 3rd-person singular pronouns referring to specific entities, and 97.31 % for other pronouns.

  4. Brief Report: Learning via the Electronic Interactive Whiteboard for Two Students with Autism and a Student with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention (a self-operated video modeling and self-monitoring delivered via an electronic interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a system of least prompts) on skill acquisition and interaction behavior of two students with autism and one student with moderate intellectual disability were examined using a multi-probe…

  5. Revealing the Whiteboard to Blind Students: An Inclusive Approach to Provide Mediation in Synchronous E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Andre P.; Linhalis, Flavia; Bianchini, Sandro L.; Fortes, Renata P. M.; Pimentel, Maria de Graca C.

    2010-01-01

    Promoting the inclusion of students with disabilities in e-learning systems has brought many challenges for researchers and educators. The use of synchronous communication tools such as interactive whiteboards has been regarded as an obstacle for inclusive education. In this paper, we present the proposal of an inclusive approach to provide blind…

  6. Brief Report: Learning via the Electronic Interactive Whiteboard for Two Students with Autism and a Student with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakubova, Gulnoza; Taber-Doughty, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a multicomponent intervention (a self-operated video modeling and self-monitoring delivered via an electronic interactive whiteboard (IWB) and a system of least prompts) on skill acquisition and interaction behavior of two students with autism and one student with moderate intellectual disability were examined using a multi-probe…

  7. Computerized decision support system improves fluid resuscitation following severe burns: an original study.

    PubMed

    Salinas, José; Chung, Kevin K; Mann, Elizabeth A; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Kramer, George C; Serio-Melvin, Maria L; Renz, Evan M; Wade, Charles E; Wolf, Steven E

    2011-09-01

    Several formulas have been developed to guide resuscitation in severely burned patients during the initial 48 hrs after injury. These approaches require manual titration of fluid that may result in human error during this process and lead to suboptimal outcomes. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of a computerized open-loop decision support system for burn resuscitation compared to historical controls. Fluid infusion rates and urinary output from 39 severely burned patients with >20% total body surface area burns were recorded upon admission (Model group). A fluid-response model based on these data was developed and incorporated into a computerized open-loop algorithm and computer decision support system. The computer decision support system was used to resuscitate 32 subsequent patients with severe burns (computer decision support system group) and compared with the Model group. Burn intensive care unit of a metropolitan Level 1 Trauma center. Acute burn patients with >20% total body surface area requiring active fluid resuscitation during the initial 24 to 48 hours after burn. We found no significant difference between the Model and computer decision support system groups in age, total body surface area, or injury mechanism. Total crystalloid volume during the first 48 hrs post burn, total crystalloid intensive care unit volume, and initial 24-hr crystalloid intensive care unit volume were all lower in the computer decision support system group. Infused volume per kilogram body weight (mL/kg) and per percentage burn (mL/kg/total body surface area) were also lower for the computer decision support system group. The number of patients who met hourly urinary output goals was higher in the computer decision support system group. Implementation of a computer decision support system for burn resuscitation in the intensive care unit resulted in improved fluid management of severely burned patients. All measures of crystalloid fluid volume were reduced

  8. Computerized Analytical Data Management System and Automated Analytical Sample Transfer System at the COGEMA Reprocessing Plants in La Hague

    SciTech Connect

    Flament, T.; Goasmat, F.; Poilane, F.

    2002-02-25

    Managing the operation of large commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, such as UP3 and UP2-800 in La Hague, France, requires an extensive analytical program and the shortest possible analysis response times. COGEMA, together with its engineering subsidiary SGN, decided to build high-performance laboratories to support operations in its plants. These laboratories feature automated equipment, safe environments for operators, and short response times, all in centralized installations. Implementation of a computerized analytical data management system and a fully automated pneumatic system for the transfer of radioactive samples was a key factor contributing to the successful operation of the laboratories and plants.

  9. Documentation--A Computerized Instructional Resource Management System. The Illinois Series on Educational Application of Computers, No. 26e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockard, Henry; Cox, John

    This paper, which describes a computerized appointment scheduling system for individualized instruction from the point of view of the teachers and students who will use it, also includes more technical data for those readers who are familiar with the BASIC language. A guide to the logic, possible modifications, and a program listing are included,…

  10. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Acquisition Threshold; (c) Software and ownership rights. (1) All procurement and contract instruments must... Computerized Tribal IV-D System software or enhancements thereof and all associated documentation designed... use and to authorize others to use for Federal Government purposes, such software, modifications...

  11. 45 CFR 310.25 - What conditions apply to acquisitions of Computerized Tribal IV-D Systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Acquisition Threshold; (c) Software and ownership rights. (1) All procurement and contract instruments must... Computerized Tribal IV-D System software or enhancements thereof and all associated documentation designed... use and to authorize others to use for Federal Government purposes, such software, modifications...

  12. A Computerized System for Benefit-Cost Analysis in Vocational Education. Final Report, June 15, 1978 through June 30, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern; And Others

    A computerized system for analysis of the cost/benefits of public investment in vocational education program in the state of Florida was developed and pilot tested. The Bobitt procedure, developed at the University of Florida to assess the economic benefits of selected vocational programs, was revised and expanded to permit determination of…

  13. Development of the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement System to Measure Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    PubMed

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Tsai, Shu-Ling; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yu, Wei-Chieh; Chu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Critical thinking skills and clinical competence are for providing quality patient care. The purpose of this study is to develop the Computerized Model of Performance-Based Measurement system based on the Clinical Reasoning Model. The system can evaluate and identify learning needs for clinical competency and be used as a learning tool to increase clinical competency by using computers. The system includes 10 high-risk, high-volume clinical case scenarios coupled with questions testing clinical reasoning, interpersonal, and technical skills. Questions were sequenced to reflect patients' changing condition and arranged by following the process of collecting and managing information, diagnosing and differentiating urgency of problems, and solving problems. The content validity and known-groups validity was established. The Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 was 0.90 and test-retest reliability was supported (r = 0.78). Nursing educators can use the system to understand students' needs for achieving clinical competence, and therefore, educational plans can be made to better prepare students and facilitate their smooth transition to a future clinical environment. Clinical nurses can use the system to evaluate their performance-based abilities and weakness in clinical reasoning. Appropriate training programs can be designed and implemented to practically promote nurses' clinical competence and quality of patient care.

  14. Integrating computerized clinical decision support systems into clinical work: A meta-synthesis of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anne; Moon, Brian; Anders, Shilo; Walden, Rachel; Brown, Steven; Montella, Diane

    2015-12-01

    Computerized clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are an emerging means for improving healthcare safety, quality and efficiency, but meta-analyses findings are mixed. This meta-synthesis aggregates qualitative research findings as possible explanations for variable quantitative research outcomes. Qualitative studies published between 2000 and 2013 in English, involving physicians, registered and advanced practice nurses' experience of CDSS use in clinical practice were included. PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched. Study titles and abstracts were screened against inclusion criteria. Retained studies were appraised against quality criteria. Findings were extracted iteratively from studies in the 4th quartile of quality scores. Two reviewers constructed themes inductively. A third reviewer applied the defined themes deductively achieving 92% agreement. 3798 unique records were returned; 56 met inclusion criteria and were reviewed against quality criteria. 9 studies were of sufficiently high quality for synthetic analysis. Five major themes (clinician-patient-system integration; user interface usability; the need for better 'algorithms'; system maturity; patient safety) were defined. Despite ongoing development, CDSS remains an emerging technology. Lack of understanding about and lack of consideration for the interaction between human decision makers and CDSS is a major reason for poor system adoption and use. Further high-quality qualitative research is needed to better understand human-system interaction issues. These issues may continue to confound quantitative study results if not addressed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Interoperable computerized smart card based system for health insurance and health services applied in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Cocei, Horia-Delatebea; Stefan, Livia; Dobre, Ioana; Croitoriu, Mihai; Sinescu, Crina; Ovricenco, Eduard

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 Romania started its health care reform by promulgating the Health Insurance Law. A functional and efficient health care system needs procedures for monitoring and evaluation of the medical services, communication between different service providers and entities involved in the system, integration and availability of the information. The final goal is a good response to the needs and demands of the patients and of the real life. For this project we took into account, on one hand, the immediate need for computerized systems for the health care providers and, on the other hand, the large number of trials and experiments with health smart cards across Europe. Our project will implement a management system based on electronic patient records to be used in all cardiology clinics and will experiment the health smart cards, will promote and demonstrate the capabilities of the smart card technology. We focused our attention towards a specific and also critical category of patients, those with heart diseases, and also towards a critical sector of the health care system--the emergency care. The patient card was tested on a number of 150 patients at a cardiology clinic in Bucharest. This was the first trial of a health smart card in Romania.

  16. A template-based computerized instruction entry system helps the comunication between doctors and nurses.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshihiro; Mihara, Naoki; Nakagawa, Rie; Manabe, Shiro; Shimai, Yoshie; Teramoto, Kei; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In a hospital, doctors and nurses shares roles in treating admitted patients. Communication between them is necessary and communication errors become the problem in medical safety. In Japan, verbal instruction is prohibited and doctors write their instruction on paper instruction slips. However, because it is difficult to ascertain revision history and the active instructions on instruction slips, human errors can occur. We developed template-based computerized instruction entry system to reduce ward workloads and contribute to medical safety. Templates enable us to input the instructions easily and standardize the descriptions of instructions. By standardizing and combine the instruction into one template for one instruction item, the systems could prevent instructions overlap. We created sets of templates (e.g., admission set, preoperative set), so that doctors could enter their instructions easily. Instructions entered via any of the sets can be subdivided into separate items by the system before being submitted, and can also be changed on a per-item basis. The instructions were displayed as calendar form. Calendar form represents the instruction shift and current active instructions. We prepared 382 standardized instruction templates. In our system, 66% of instructions were entered via templates, and 34% were entered as free-text comments. Our system prevents communication errors between medical staff.

  17. Development and evaluation of a computerized Mandarin speech test system in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wufang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jianyong; Lin, Changyan

    2011-03-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a Computerized Mandarin Speech Test System (CMSTS). Taking into account the rules for developing speech materials and the unique linguistic characteristics of Mandarin, we designed and digitally recorded a set of materials comprised of seven lists of monosyllabic words, nine lists of disyllabic words, and fifteen lists of sentences with a high degree of subject familiarity. The CMSTS was developed with Visual Studio 2008, Access 2003 and DirectX 9. The system included five functions: listener management, a speech test, list management, data management, and system settings. We used the system to measure the speech recognition threshold (SRT) of 76 participants with normal hearing (age range: 20-28 years), and measured performance-intensity functions (PI) for all stimuli. The SRT results were in accord with pure-tone results obtained by pure-tone audiometry. In a speech recognition score (SRS) test, changing the presentation level had the strongest effect on sentence recognition, followed by the presence of disyllabic words. Monosyllabic words were least affected by changes in presentation level. The slopes of the linear portion of the PI using the system were in accord with the findings of previous studies using audiometers and CDs with similar materials. The CMSTS has sufficient sensitivity, and can facilitate the wider use of speech audiometry in Chinese audiology clinics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Financial management using a computerized system for evaluating health care invoices.

    PubMed

    Magnezi, Racheli; Ashkenazi, Isaac

    2005-02-01

    The Medical Corps of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) provides health care services for hundreds of thousands of soldiers in IDF clinics and by purchasing services from civilian institutes. Monthly invoices from civilian institutes are so numerous that most are paid with insufficient scrutiny and valuable information regarding soldiers' health care is lost. Our objective was to develop a computerized system for reviewing invoices and gathering data. Based on Oracle software (Oracle, Redwood Shores, California), the system stores the terms of agreements with medical institutes, enters billing data, calculates invoice totals, manages information, and generates reports. It automatically checks for duplicate invoices and confirms payment. The system allows users to view data for decision-making, creates insurance claim files, identifies incorrect charges, assists in quality assurance, and maintains personal patient records. With the system in operation since 2001, savings significantly increased, to approximately 5% of the IDF health care budget. On the basis of information gathered by the system, changes in medical procedures were implemented that are expected to generate even greater savings.

  19. Acetic Acid Production by an Electrodialysis Fermentation Method with a Computerized Control System

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Iwahara, Masayoshi; Hongo, Motoyoshi

    1988-01-01

    In acetic acid fermentation by Acetobacter aceti, the acetic acid produced inhibits the production of acetic acid by this microorganism. To alleviate this inhibitory effect, we developed an electrodialysis fermentation method such that acetic acid is continuously removed from the broth. The fermentation unit has a computerized system for the control of the pH and the concentration of ethanol in the fermentation broth. The electrodialysis fermentation system resulted in improved cell growth and higher productivity over an extended period; the productivity exceeded that from non-pH-controlled fermentation. During electrodialysis fermentation in our system, 97.6 g of acetic acid was produced from 86.0 g of ethanol; the amount of acetic acid was about 2.4 times greater than that produced by non-pH-controlled fermentation (40.1 g of acetic acid produced from 33.8 g of ethanol). Maximum productivity of electrodialysis fermentation in our system was 2.13 g/h, a rate which was 1.35 times higher than that of non-pH-controlled fermentation (1.58 g/h). PMID:16347520

  20. Design and validation of a questionnaire to evaluate the usability of computerized critical care information systems.

    PubMed

    von Dincklage, Falk; Lichtner, Gregor; Suchodolski, Klaudiusz; Ragaller, Maximilian; Friesdorf, Wolfgang; Podtschaske, Beatrice

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of computerized critical care information systems (CCIS) can improve the quality of clinical care and staff satisfaction, but also holds risks of disrupting the workflow with consecutive negative impacts. The usability of CCIS is one of the key factors determining their benefits and weaknesses. However, no tailored instrument exists to measure the usability of such systems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to design and validate a questionnaire that measures the usability of CCIS. Following a mixed-method design approach, we developed a questionnaire comprising two evaluation models to assess the usability of CCIS: (1) the task-specific model rates the usability individually for several tasks which CCIS could support and which we derived by analyzing work processes in the ICU; (2) the characteristic-specific model rates the different aspects of the usability, as defined by the international standard "ergonomics of human-system interaction". We tested validity and reliability of the digital version of the questionnaire in a sample population. In the sample population of 535 participants both usability evaluation models showed a strong correlation with the overall rating of the system (multiple correlation coefficients ≥0.80) as well as a very high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha ≥0.93). The novel questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument to measure the usability of CCIS and can be used to study the influence of the usability on their implementation benefits and weaknesses.

  1. A Computerized Data-Capture System for Animal Biosafety Level 4 Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Bente, Dennis A; Friesen, Jeremy; White, Kyle; Koll, Jordan; Kobinger, Gary P

    2011-01-01

    The restrictive nature of an Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL4) laboratory complicates even simple clinical evaluation including data capture. Typically, clinical data are recorded on paper during procedures, faxed out of the ABSL4, and subsequently manually entered into a computer. This system has many disadvantages including transcriptional errors. Here, we describe the development of a highly customizable, tablet-PC-based computerized data-capture system, allowing reliable collection of observational and clinical data from experimental animals in a restrictive biocontainment setting. A multidisciplinary team with skills in containment laboratory animal science, database design, and software engineering collaborated on the development of this system. The goals were to design an easy-to-use and flexible user interface on a touch-screen tablet PC with user-supportable processes for recovery, full auditing capabilities, and cost effectiveness. The system simplifies data capture, reduces the necessary time in an ABSL4 environment, offers timely reporting and review of data, facilitates statistical analysis, reduces potential of erroneous data entry, improves quality assurance of animal care, and advances the use and refinement of humane endpoints. PMID:22330712

  2. A computerized recognition system for the home-based physiotherapy exercises using an RGBD camera.

    PubMed

    Ar, Ilktan; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-11-01

    Computerized recognition of the home based physiotherapy exercises has many benefits and it has attracted considerable interest among the computer vision community. However, most methods in the literature view this task as a special case of motion recognition. In contrast, we propose to employ the three main components of a physiotherapy exercise (the motion patterns, the stance knowledge, and the exercise object) as different recognition tasks and embed them separately into the recognition system. The low level information about each component is gathered using machine learning methods. Then, we use a generative Bayesian network to recognize the exercise types by combining the information from these sources at an abstract level, which takes the advantage of domain knowledge for a more robust system. Finally, a novel postprocessing step is employed to estimate the exercise repetitions counts. The performance evaluation of the system is conducted with a new dataset which contains RGB (red, green, and blue) and depth videos of home-based exercise sessions for commonly applied shoulder and knee exercises. The proposed system works without any body-part segmentation, bodypart tracking, joint detection, and temporal segmentation methods. In the end, favorable exercise recognition rates and encouraging results on the estimation of repetition counts are obtained.

  3. A computerized data-capture system for animal biosafety level 4 laboratories.

    PubMed

    Bente, Dennis A; Friesen, Jeremy; White, Kyle; Koll, Jordan; Kobinger, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    The restrictive nature of an Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL4) laboratory complicates even simple clinical evaluation including data capture. Typically, clinical data are recorded on paper during procedures, faxed out of the ABSL4, and subsequently manually entered into a computer. This system has many disadvantages including transcriptional errors. Here, we describe the development of a highly customizable, tablet-PC-based computerized data-capture system, allowing reliable collection of observational and clinical data from experimental animals in a restrictive biocontainment setting. A multidisciplinary team with skills in containment laboratory animal science, database design, and software engineering collaborated on the development of this system. The goals were to design an easy-to-use and flexible user interface on a touch-screen tablet PC with user-supportable processes for recovery, full auditing capabilities, and cost effectiveness. The system simplifies data capture, reduces the necessary time in an ABSL4 environment, offers timely reporting and review of data, facilitates statistical analysis, reduces potential of erroneous data entry, improves quality assurance of animal care, and advances the use and refinement of humane endpoints.

  4. Lessons from a Successful Implementation of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brian R.; Hallstrom, Craig K.; Hart, Kim Ward; Mahoney, Daniela; Lykowski, Gayle

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The electronic health record (EHR) can improve patient safety, care efficiency, cost effectiveness and regulatory compliance. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has successfully implemented an Integrating Clinical Information System (ICIS) that includes Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE). This review describes some of the unanticipated challenges and solutions identified during the implementation of ICIS. METHODS Data for this paper was derived from user-generated feedback within the ICIS. Feedback reports were reviewed and placed into categories based on root cause of the issue. Recurring issues or problems which led to potential or actual patient injury are included. RESULTS Nine distinct challenges were identified: 1) Deterioration in communication; 2) Excessive system alerts to users; 3) Unrecognized discontinuation of medications; 4) Unintended loss of orders; 5) Loss of orders during implementation; 6) Amplification of errors; 7) Unintentional generation of patient care orders by system analysts; 8) Persistence of specific patient care order instructions; 9) Verbal orders entered under the incorrect clinician. CONCLUSIONS Unanticipated challenges are expected when implementing EHRs. The implementation plan for any EHR should include methods to identify, evaluate and repair problems quickly. While continued challenges with this complex system are expected, we believe that the EHR will continue to facilitate improved patient care and safety. The lessons learned at CCHMC will permit other institutions to avoid some of these challenges and design robust processes to detect and respond to problems in a timely fashion to ensure implementation success. PMID:23055847

  5. The Whiteboard Revolution: Illuminating Science Communication in the Digital Age.

    PubMed

    Mar, Florie Anne; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Oksenberg, Nir; Olson, Alexander M

    2016-04-01

    Journal-based science communication is not accessible or comprehensible to a general public curious about science and eager for the next wave of scientific innovation. We propose an alternative medium for scientists to communicate their work to the general public in an engaging and digestible way through the use of whiteboard videos. We describe the process of producing science whiteboard videos and the benefits and challenges therein.

  6. Analysis of variations in the display of drug names in computerized prescriber-order-entry systems.

    PubMed

    Quist, Arbor J L; Hickman, Thu-Trang T; Amato, Mary G; Volk, Lynn A; Salazar, Alejandra; Robertson, Alexandra; Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Phansalkar, Shobha; Lambert, Bruce L; Schiff, Gordon D

    2017-04-01

    The variations in how drug names are displayed in computerized prescriber-order-entry (CPOE) systems were analyzed to determine their contribution to potential medication errors. A diverse set of 10 inpatient and outpatient CPOE system vendors and self-developed CPOE systems in 6 U.S. healthcare institutions was evaluated. A team of pharmacists, physicians, patient-safety experts, and informatics experts created a CPOE assessment tool to standardize the assessment of CPOE features across the systems studied. Hypothetical scenarios were conducted with test patients to study the medication ordering workflow and ways in which medications were displayed in each system. Brand versus generic drug name ordering was studied at 1 large outpatient system to understand why prescribers ordered both brand and generic forms of the same drug. Widespread variations in the display of drug names were observed both within and across the 6 study sites and 10 systems, including the inconsistent display of brand and generic names. Some displayed drugs differently even on the same screen. Combination products were often displayed inconsistently, and some systems required prescribers to know the first drug listed in the combination in order for the correct product to appear in a search. It also appeared that prescribers may have prescribed both brand and generic forms of the same medication, creating the potential for drug duplication errors. A review of 10 CPOE systems revealed that medication names were displayed inconsistently, which can result in confusion or errors in reviewing, selecting, and ordering medications. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. User satisfaction with computerized order entry system and its effect on workplace level of stress.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Lendel, Irina; Haque, Rehan; Sawruk, Kathryn

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) on workplace stress and overall job performance, as perceived by medical students, housestaff, attending physicians and nurses, after CPOE implementation at Penn State-Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, an academic tertiary care facility, in 2005. Using an online survey, the authors studied attitudes towards CPOE among 862 health care professionals. The main outcome measures were job performance and perceived stress levels. Statistical analyses were conducted using the Statistical Analytical Software (SAS Inc, Carey, NC). A total of413 respondents completed the entire survey (47.9 % response rate). Respondents in the younger age group were more familiar with the system, used it more frequently, and were more satisfied with it. Interns and residents were the most satisfied groups with the system, while attending physicians expressed the least satisfaction. Attending physicians and fellows found the system least user friendly compared with other groups, and also tended to express more stress and frustration with the system. Participants with previous CPOE experience were more familiar with the system, would use the system more frequently and were more likely to perceive the system as user friendly. User satisfaction with CPOE increases by familiarity and frequent use of the system. Improvement in system characteristics and avoidance of confusing terminology and inconsistent display of data is expected to enhance user satisfaction. Training in the use of CPOE should start early, ideally integrated into medical and nursing school curricula and form a continuous, long-term and user-specific process. This is expected to increase familiarity with the system, reducing stress and leading to improved user satisfaction and to subsequent enhanced safety and efficiency.

  8. The vulnerabilities of computerized physician order entry systems: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Slight, Sarah P; Eguale, Tewodros; Amato, Mary G; Seger, Andrew C; Whitney, Diana L; Bates, David W; Schiff, Gordon D

    2016-03-01

    To test the vulnerabilities of a wide range of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems to different types of medication errors, and develop a more comprehensive qualitative understanding of how their design could be improved. The authors reviewed a random sample of 63,040 medication error reports from the US Pharmacopeia (USP) MEDMARX reporting system where CPOE systems were considered a "contributing factor" to errors and flagged test scenarios that could be tested in current CPOE systems. Testers entered these orders in 13 commercial and homegrown CPOE systems across 16 different sites in the United States and Canada, using both usual practice and where-needed workarounds. Overarching themes relevant to interface design and usability/workflow issues were identified. CPOE systems often failed to detect and prevent important medication errors. Generation of electronic alert warnings varied widely between systems, and depended on a number of factors, including how the order information was entered. Alerts were often confusing, with unrelated warnings appearing on the same screen as those more relevant to the current erroneous entry. Dangerous drug-drug interaction warnings were displayed only after the order was placed rather than at the time of ordering. Testers illustrated various workarounds that allowed them to enter these erroneous orders. The authors found high variability in ordering approaches between different CPOE systems, with major deficiencies identified in some systems. It is important that developers reflect on these findings and build in safeguards to ensure safer prescribing for patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effect of computerized prescriber order entry on pharmacy: experience of one health system.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Carmit K; Macey, Tara A; Pope, Jill; Gugerty, Brian; Slot, Marti; Lundeen, Peter; Ash, Joan; Carlson, Neil

    2015-01-15

    Pharmacists' satisfaction with a computerized prescriber order-entry (CPOE) system and the impact of CPOE on pharmacy workflows and order verification were investigated. A mixed-method study was conducted to evaluate the implementation of a CPOE system in three hospitals of a large Michigan-based health system and early user experience with the system. Surveys of pharmacists before (n = 54) and after (n = 42) CPOE implementation indicated that they held generally positive expectations about CPOE prior to and during system implementation and continued to hold positive views about CPOE after several months of system use. In interviews and focus group discussions, pharmacists reported a number of important CPOE benefits, but they also cited challenges related to CPOE provider alerts, uncertainty about medication timing, and the need to support providers by serving as informal CPOE system trainers. Direct observation of pharmacists before and after CPOE implementation indicated decreases in both the rate of order clarification events (from 0.89 to 0.35 per hour, p < 0.001) and the average time spent per hour clarifying orders (from 4.75 to 2.11 minutes, p = 0.008). Several months after CPOE implementation, pharmacists indicated that several aspects of their workload had improved, including the process of medication order clarification, their ability to prioritize work, and their ability to move around within the hospital to respond to demand. However, pharmacists also noted that order ambiguity still existed and that the system needed to be optimized to gain efficiencies and increase clarity. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric [San Francisco, CA; Riot, Vincent [Oakland, CA; Coffee, Keith [Diablo Grande, CA; Woods, Bruce [Livermore, CA; Tobias, Herbert [Kensington, CA; Birch, Jim [Albany, CA; Weisgraber, Todd [Brentwood, CA

    2011-11-22

    A computerized method and system for designing an aerodynamic focusing lens stack, using input from a designer related to, for example, particle size range to be considered, characteristics of the gas to be flowed through the system, the upstream temperature and pressure at the top of a first focusing lens, the flow rate through the aerodynamic focusing lens stack equivalent at atmosphere pressure; and a Stokes number range. Based on the design parameters, the method and system determines the total number of focusing lenses and their respective orifice diameters required to focus the particle size range to be considered, by first calculating for the orifice diameter of the first focusing lens in the Stokes formula, and then using that value to determine, in iterative fashion, intermediate flow values which are themselves used to determine the orifice diameters of each succeeding focusing lens in the stack design, with the results being output to a designer. In addition, the Reynolds numbers associated with each focusing lens as well as exit nozzle size may also be determined to enhance the stack design.

  11. FDDI information management system for centralizing interactive, computerized multimedia clinical experiences in pediatric rheumatology/Immunology.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, R; Cronenberger, H; Stein, L; Hannum, W; Reed, A M; Wilhelm, C; Hsiao, H

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design, authoring, and development of interactive, computerized, multimedia clinical simulations in pediatric rheumatology/immunology and related musculoskeletal diseases, the development and implementation of a high speed information management system for their centralized storage and distribution, and analytical methods for evaluating the total system's educational impact on medical students and pediatric residents. An FDDI fiber optic network with client/server/host architecture is the core. The server houses digitized audio, still-image video clips and text files. A host station houses the DB2/2 database containing case-associated labels and information. Cases can be accessed from any workstation via a customized interface in AVA/2 written specifically for this application. OS/2 Presentation Manager controls, written in C, are incorporated into the interface. This interface allows SQL searches and retrievals of cases and case materials. In addition to providing user-directed clinical experiences, this centralized information management system provides designated faculty with the ability to add audio notes and visual pointers to image files. Users may browse through case materials, mark selected ones and download them for utilization in lectures or for editing and converting into 35mm slides.

  12. Evaluation of computerized physician order entry system-a satisfaction survey in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yui, Bey-Hwa; Jim, Wai-Tim; Chen, Marcelo; Hsu, Jong-Ming; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2012-12-01

    In the rapidly developing world of information technology, computers have been used in various settings for clinical medicine application. Studies have focused on computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system interface design and functional development to achieve a successful technology adoption process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate physician satisfaction with the CPOE system. This survey included user attitude toward interface design, operation functions/usage effectiveness, interface usability, and user satisfaction. We used questionnaires for data collection from June to August 2008, and 225 valid questionnaires were returned with a response rate of 84.5 %. Canonical correlation was applied to explore the relationship of personal attributes and usability with user satisfaction. The results of the data analysis revealed that certain demographic groups showed higher acceptance and satisfaction levels, especially residents, those with less pressure when using computers or those with less experience with the CPOE systems. Additionally, computer use pressure and usability were the best predictors of user satisfaction. Based on the study results, it is suggested that future CPOE development should focus on interface design and content links, as well as providing educational training programs for the new users; since a learning curve period should be considered as an indespensible factor for CPOE adoption.

  13. Computerized Ultrasonic Testing System (CUTS) for in-process thickness determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, J.; Doxbeck, M.; Schroeder, S. C.; Abbate, A.

    1994-01-01

    A Computerized Ultrasonic Testing System (CUTS) was developed to measure, in real-time, the rate of deposition and thickness of chromium plated on the inside of thick steel tubes. The measurements are made from the outside of the tubes with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The resolution of the system is 2.5 micron. (0.0001 in.) and the accuracy is better than 10 micron (0.0004 in.). The thickness is measured using six transducers mounted at different locations on the tube. In addition, two transducers are mounted on two reference standards, thereby allowing the system to be continuously calibrated. The tube temperature varies during the process, thus the input from eight thermocouples, located at the measurement sites, is used to calculate and compensate for the change in return time of the ultrasonic echo due to the temperature dependence of the sound velocity. CUTS is applicable to any commercial process where real-time change of thickness of a sample has to be known, with the advantage of facilitating increased efficiency and of improving process control.

  14. The role of computerized modeling and simulation in the development of life support system technologies.

    PubMed

    Modell, M; Evanich, P; Chen, C C; Anavi, S; Mai, J

    1989-01-01

    Using conventional means of process development, it would take decades and hundreds of millions of dollars to develop technology for recycling of water and solid waste for lunar missions within the next thirty years. Since we anticipate neither that amount of time nor level of funding, new methodologies for developing life support systems (LSS) technologies are essential. Computerized modeling and simulation (CMAS) is a tool that can greatly reduce both the time and cost of technology development. By CMAS, we refer to computer methods for correlating, storing and retrieving property data for chemical species and for solving the phenomenological equations of physical/chemical processes (i.e., process conditions based on properties of materials and mass and energy balances, equipment sizing based on rate processes and the governing equations for unit operations). In particular, CMAS systems can be used to evaluate a LSS process design with minimal requirements for laboratory experimentation. A CMAS model using ASPEN PLUS is presented for a vapor compression distillation (VCD) system designed for reclaiming water from urine.

  15. The role of computerized modeling and simulation in the development of life support system technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modell, Michael; Evanich, Peggy; Chen, Chau-Chyun; Anavi, Selim; Mai, Jeff

    Using conventional means of process development, it would take decades and hundreds of millions of dollars to develop technology for recycling of water and solid waste for lunar missions within the next thirty years. Since we anticipate neither that amount of time nor level of funding, new methodologies for developing life support systems (LSS) technologies are essential. Computerized modeling and simulation (CMAS) is a tool that can greatly reduce both the time and cost of technology development. By CMAS, we refer to computer methods for correlating, storing and retrieving property data for chemical species and for solving the phenomenological equations of physical/chemical processes (i.e., process conditions based on properties of materials and mass and energy balances, equipment sizing based on rate processes and the governing equations for unit operations). In particular, CMAS systems can be used to evaluate a LSS process design with minimal requirements for laboratory experimentation. A CMAS model using ASPEN PLUS is presented for a vapor compression distillation (VCD) system designed for reclaiming water from urine.

  16. Investigation of the Usability of Computerized Critical Care Information Systems in Germany.

    PubMed

    von Dincklage, Falk; Suchodolski, Klaudiusz; Lichtner, Gregor; Friesdorf, Wolfgang; Podtschaske, Beatrice; Ragaller, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    The term "usability" describes how effectively, efficiently, and with what level of user satisfaction an information system can be used to accomplish specific goals. Computerized critical care information systems (CCISs) with high usability increase quality of care and staff satisfaction, while reducing medication errors. Conversely, systems lacking usability can interrupt clinical workflow, facilitate errors, and increase charting time. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare usability across CCIS currently used in Germany. In this study, German intensive care unit (ICU) nurses and physicians completed a specialized, previously validated, web-based questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed CCIS usability based on three rating models: an overall rating of the systems, a model rating technical usability, and a model rating task-specific usability. We analyzed results from 535 survey participants and compared eight different CCIS commonly used in Germany. Our results showed that usability strongly differs across the compared systems. The system ICUData had the best overall rating and technical usability, followed by the platforms ICM and MetaVision. The same three systems performed best in the rating of task-specific usability without significant differences between each other. Across all systems, overall ratings were more dependent on ease-of-use aspects than on aspects of utility/functionality, and the general scope of the functions offered was rated better than how well the functions are realized. Our results suggest that manufacturers should shift some of their effort away from the development of new features and focus more on improving the ease-of-use and quality of existing features.

  17. Economic assessment of pressure sore prevention using a computerized mattress system in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Catz, Amiram; Zifroni, Avi; Philo, Ora

    2005-11-15

    To assess the economic profitability of a new computerized mattress system in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) by comparison with two other alternatives, as an example of the use of a quantitative approach for decision-making in choosing between alternatives for sore prevention. The cost of achieving one day without signs of impending pressure sore was compared between the alternative options using cost minimization analysis. Savings in nursing costs for the three options were calculated for cost-benefit analysis. A foam mattress system is significantly cheaper than the other examined alternatives, and if the nursing manpower cost is constant and the nursing staff is capable of performing sufficient repositioning, this system would achieve the desired medical outcome at a minimal cost. However, if the nursing staff cannot perform sufficient repositioning, or if the use of nursing manpower can be adjusted to the actual need, then it is the computerized mattress system that achieves the desired outcome at the minimal cost. In this case, less than 20 New Israeli Shekels (NIS) per day spent on the equipment save NIS 45 per day in labor costs. The economic evaluation indicates that the computerized mattress system is advisable for patients with SCI who require assistance for repositioning, but its profitability depends on the employment terms of the nursing manpower. In addition, other possible alternative pressure management systems should be examined, and additional research may be needed to determine the optimal combination of such systems for a spinal cord rehabilitation department.

  18. Implementation and evaluation of vancomycin nomogram guidelines in a computerized prescriber-order-entry system.

    PubMed

    McCluggage, Lauren; Lee, Kimberly; Potter, Teresa; Dugger, Richard; Pakyz, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The implementation and evaluation of vancomycin nomogram guidelines in a computerized prescriber-order-entry (CPOE) system are described. Initial vancomycin orders for patients over age 18 years who received vancomycin between August 1 and September 30, 2006 (preimplementation), and between March 1 and April 30, 2007 (postimplementation), were compared with vancomycin nomogram recommendations to determine if the vancomycin regimen ordered coincided with the nomogram recommendation. The numbers of regimen changes and vancomycin serum concentrations measured during the first five days of therapy were also assessed. A multivariate logistic regression model assessed independent predictors of an initial vancomycin order that met the nomogram recommendation A total of 522 vancomycin orders were included in the analysis (279 in the preimplementation group and 243 in the postimplementation group). A significant difference was observed in the percentage of initial vancomycin orders that met nomogram recommendations in the postimplementation group compared with the preimplementation group (36% versus 24%, p = 0.0028). No difference was noted between the two groups in the number of regimen changes or serum vancomycin concentrations measured during the first five days of therapy. In a multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.02) and weight (p < 0.0001) were negatively associated with a vancomycin order that met nomogram recommendations, while the postimplementation group was positively associated with an order that met nomogram recommendations (p = 0.001). A vancomycin nomogram implemented into a CPOE system increased the likelihood of patients receiving an initial vancomycin regimen that coincided with the nomogram's recommendations.

  19. Human Factors and Technical Considerations for a Computerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas; Medema, Heather Dawne; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    A prototype computerized operator support system (COSS) has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment. A COSS demonstration scenario has been developed for the prototype involving the Chemical & Volume Control System (CVCS) of the PWR simulator. It involves a primary coolant leak outside of containment that would require tripping the reactor if not mitigated in a very short timeframe. The COSS prototype presents a series of operator screens that provide the needed information and soft controls to successfully mitigate the event.

  20. A computerized self-compensating system for ultrasonic inspection of airplane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Komsky, I.N.; Achenbach, J.D.; Hagemaier, D.

    1993-12-31

    Application of a self-compensating technique for ultrasonic inspection of airplane structures makes it possible not only to detect cracks in the different layers of joints but also to obtain information on crack sizes. A prototype computerized ultrasonic system, which utilizes the self-compensating method, has been developed for non-destructive inspection of multilayered airplane structures with in-between sealants, such as bolted joints in tail connections. Industrial applications of the system would require deployment of commercially available portable modules for data acquisition and processing. A portable ultrasonic flaw detector EPOCH II manual scanners and HandiScan, and SQL and FCS software modules form the PC-based TestPro system have been selected for initial tests. A pair of contact angle-beam transducers were used to generate shear waves in the material. Both hardware and software components of the system have been modified for the application in conjunction with the self-compensating technique. The system has bene tested on two calibration specimens with artificial flaws of different sizes in internal layers of multilayered structures. Ultrasonic signals transmitted through and reflected from the artificial flaws have bene discriminated and characterized using multiple time domain amplitude gates. Then the ratios of the reflection and transmission coefficients, R/T, were calculated for several positions of the transducers. Inspection of measured R/T curves shows it is difficult to visually associate curve shapes with corresponding flaw sizes and orientation. Hence for online classification of these curve shapes, application of an adaptive signal classifier was considered. Several different types and configurations of the classifiers, including a neural network, have been tested. Test results showed that improved performance of the classifier can be achieved by combination of a back-propagation neural network with a signal pre-processing module.

  1. Building a Diabetes Registry from the Veterans Health Administration's Computerized Patient Record System

    PubMed Central

    F. O. Kern, Elizabeth; Beischel, Scott; Stalnaker, Randal; Aron, David C.; Kirsh, Susan R.; Watts, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Little information is available describing how to implement a disease registry from an electronic patient record system. The aim of this report is to describe the technology, methods, and utility of a diabetes registry populated by the Veterans Health Information Systems Architecture (VistA), which underlies the computerized patient record system of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in Veteran Affairs Integrated Service Network 10 (VISN 10). Methods VISN 10 data from VistA were mapped to a relational SQL-based data system using KB_SQL software. Operational definitions for diabetes, active clinical management, and responsible providers were used to create views of patient-level data in the diabetes registry. Query Analyzer was used to access the data views directly. Semicustomizable reports were created by linking the diabetes registry to a Web page using Microsoft asp.net2. A retrospective observational study design was used to analyze trends in the process of care and outcomes. Results Since October 2001, 81,227 patients with diabetes have enrolled in VISN 10: approximately 42,000 are currently under active management by VISN 10 providers. By tracking primary care visits, we assigned 91% to a clinic group responsible for diabetes care. In the Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), the frequency of mean annual hemoglobin A1c levels ≥9% has declined significantly over 5 years. Almost 4000 patients have been seen in diabetes intervention programs in the Cleveland VAMC over the past 4 years. Conclusions A diabetes registry can be populated from the database underlying the VHA electronic patient record database system and linked to Web-based and ad hoc queries useful for quality improvement. PMID:19885172

  2. Don't Erase that Whiteboard! Archiving Student Work on a Photo-Sharing Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Edward; Tsui, Stephen; Hart, Alicia; Saucedo, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Students in physics courses often use whiteboards to brainstorm, solve problems, and present results to the rest of the class, particularly in courses involving collaborative small group work and whole class discussions. The whiteboards contain a valuable record of students' collaborative work. Once a whiteboard is erased, however, its contents…

  3. Don't Erase that Whiteboard! Archiving Student Work on a Photo-Sharing Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Edward; Tsui, Stephen; Hart, Alicia; Saucedo, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Students in physics courses often use whiteboards to brainstorm, solve problems, and present results to the rest of the class, particularly in courses involving collaborative small group work and whole class discussions. The whiteboards contain a valuable record of students' collaborative work. Once a whiteboard is erased, however, its contents…

  4. Interactive Whiteboard for Primary Schools in Mauritius: An Effective Tool or Just Another Trend?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahadur, Goonesh Kumar; Oogarah, Deorani

    2013-01-01

    Mauritius is among the few African countries where the interactive whiteboard has been implemented in all primary schools. The interactive whiteboard is an important tool in the classroom as it changes the mode of instruction. Many researches have been carried out in many countries to investigate the effectiveness of the interactive whiteboard.…

  5. WindoWorks: A flexible program for computerized testing of accelerator control system electronic circuit boards

    SciTech Connect

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    Since most accelerator control system circuit boards reside in a commercial bus architecture, such as CAMAC or VMEbus, a computerized test station is needed for exercising the boards. This test station is needed for the development of newly designed prototypes, for commissioning newly manufactured boards, for diagnosing boards which have failed in service, and for long term testing of boards with intermittent failure problems. WindoWorks was created to address these needs. It is a flexible program which runs on a PC compatible computer and uses a PC to bus crate interface. WindoWorks was designed to give the user a flexible way to test circuit boards. Each test is incapsulated into a window. By bringing up several different windows the user can run several different tests simultaneously. The windows are sizable, and moveable. They have data entry boxes so that the test can be customized to the users preference. The windows can be used in conjunction with each other in order to create supertests. There are several windows which are generic. They can be used to test basic functions on any VME (or CAMAC) board. There are other windows which have been created to test specific boards. New windows for testing specific boards can be easily created by a Pascal programmer using the WindoWorks framework.

  6. Comments by a peer review panel on the computerized radiological risk investigation system (CRRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    This document represents the comprehensive review by experts of the documents describing the models, computer programs, and data bases making up the Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS). The CRRIS methodology has been produced for the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) by the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the significance of releases of radioactive material from facilities handling such materials. The comments covered a wide range of aspects of the CRRIS models. Special review topics covered were uncertainty, validation, verification, and health effects. The reports making up the CRRIS documentation were reviewed in detail. The following are some of the more frequent comments about the methodology. This is a very comprehensive work, but too complex and hard to use. Too little explanation of some of the assumptions taken such as variance from standard ICRP organ weighting factors. Overly complex model for soil to root transfer and interception fraction. Gaussian plume model was used, when more state-of-art models are available. 35 refs.

  7. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Javad; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, hospitals in Iran - similar to those in other countries - have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs), which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran. This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts' opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health. Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals. Information security risk management is not followed by Iran's hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran's Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security risk management in the hospitals of Iran.

  8. Computerized Adaptive Test vs. decision trees: Development of a support decision system to identify suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Gomez, D; Baca-Garcia, E; Aguado, D; Courtet, P; Lopez-Castroman, J

    2016-12-01

    Several Computerized Adaptive Tests (CATs) have been proposed to facilitate assessments in mental health. These tests are built in a standard way, disregarding useful and usually available information not included in the assessment scales that could increase the precision and utility of CATs, such as the history of suicide attempts. Using the items of a previously developed scale for suicidal risk, we compared the performance of a standard CAT and a decision tree in a support decision system to identify suicidal behavior. We included the history of past suicide attempts as a class for the separation of patients in the decision tree. The decision tree needed an average of four items to achieve a similar accuracy than a standard CAT with nine items. The accuracy of the decision tree, obtained after 25 cross-validations, was 81.4%. A shortened test adapted for the separation of suicidal and non-suicidal patients was developed. CATs can be very useful tools for the assessment of suicidal risk. However, standard CATs do not use all the information that is available. A decision tree can improve the precision of the assessment since they are constructed using a priori information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Briscoe, G.J.

    1993-06-07

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS) is a comprehensive data base containing more than 50,000 investigation reports of injury/illness, property damage and vehicle accident cases representing safety data from 1975 to the present for more than 150 DOE contractor organizations. A special feature is that the text of each accident report is translated using a controlled dictionary and rigid sentence structure called Factor Relationship and Sequence of Events (FRASE) that enhances the ability to retrieve specific types of information and to perform detailed analyses. DOE summary and individual contractor reports are prepared quarterly and annually. In addition, ``Safety Performance Profile`` reports for individual organizations are prepared to provide advance information to appraisal teams, and special topical reports are prepared for areas of concern such as an increase in the number of security injuries or environmental releases. The data base is open to all DOE and Contractor registered users with no access restrictions other than that required by the Privacy Act.

  10. Information security risk management for computerized health information systems in hospitals: a case study of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Javad; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, hospitals in Iran – similar to those in other countries – have experienced growing use of computerized health information systems (CHISs), which play a significant role in the operations of hospitals. But, the major challenge of CHIS use is information security. This study attempts to evaluate CHIS information security risk management at hospitals of Iran. Materials and methods This applied study is a descriptive and cross-sectional research that has been conducted in 2015. The data were collected from 551 hospitals of Iran. Based on literature review, experts’ opinion, and observations at five hospitals, our intensive questionnaire was designed to assess security risk management for CHISs at the concerned hospitals, which was then sent to all hospitals in Iran by the Ministry of Health. Results Sixty-nine percent of the studied hospitals pursue information security policies and procedures in conformity with Iran Hospitals Accreditation Standards. At some hospitals, risk identification, risk evaluation, and risk estimation, as well as risk treatment, are unstructured without any specified approach or methodology. There is no significant structured approach to risk management at the studied hospitals. Conclusion Information security risk management is not followed by Iran’s hospitals and their information security policies. This problem can cause a large number of challenges for their CHIS security in future. Therefore, Iran’s Ministry of Health should develop practical policies to improve information security risk management in the hospitals of Iran. PMID:27313481

  11. Reduction in medication errors in hospitals due to adoption of computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    Radley, David C; Wasserman, Melanie R; Olsho, Lauren Ew; Shoemaker, Sarah J; Spranca, Mark D; Bradshaw, Bethany

    2013-05-01

    Medication errors in hospitals are common, expensive, and sometimes harmful to patients. This study's objective was to derive a nationally representative estimate of medication error reduction in hospitals attributable to electronic prescribing through computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems. We conducted a systematic literature review and applied random-effects meta-analytic techniques to derive a summary estimate of the effect of CPOE on medication errors. This pooled estimate was combined with data from the 2006 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Annual Survey, the 2007 American Hospital Association Annual Survey, and the latter's 2008 Electronic Health Record Adoption Database supplement to estimate the percentage and absolute reduction in medication errors attributable to CPOE. Processing a prescription drug order through a CPOE system decreases the likelihood of error on that order by 48% (95% CI 41% to 55%). Given this effect size, and the degree of CPOE adoption and use in hospitals in 2008, we estimate a 12.5% reduction in medication errors, or ∼17.4 million medication errors averted in the USA in 1 year. Our findings suggest that CPOE can substantially reduce the frequency of medication errors in inpatient acute-care settings; however, it is unclear whether this translates into reduced harm for patients. Despite CPOE systems' effectiveness at preventing medication errors, adoption and use in US hospitals remain modest. Current policies to increase CPOE adoption and use will likely prevent millions of additional medication errors each year. Further research is needed to better characterize links to patient harm.

  12. Functionality test for drug safety alerting in computerized physician order entry systems.

    PubMed

    van der Sijs, Heleen; Bouamar, Rachida; van Gelder, Teun; Aarts, Jos; Berg, Marc; Vulto, Arnold

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the functionality of drug safety alerting in hospital computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems by a newly developed comprehensive test. Comparative evaluation of drug safety alerting quality in 6 different CPOEs used in Dutch hospitals, by means of 29 test items for sensitivity and 19 for specificity in offices of CPOE system vendors. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the complete test, and for the categories "within-order checks", "patient-specific checks", and "checks related to laboratory data and new patient conditions". Qualitative interviews with 16 hospital pharmacists evaluating missing functionality and corresponding pharmacy checks. Sensitivity ranged from 0.38 to 0.79 and specificity from 0.11 to 0.84. The systems achieved the same ranking for sensitivity as for specificity. Within-order checks and patient-specific checks were present in all systems; alert generation or suppression due to laboratory data and new patient conditions was largely absent. Hospital pharmacists unanimously rated checks on contra-indications (absent in 2 CPOEs) and dose regimens less than once a day (absent in 4 CPOEs) as important. Pharmacists' opinions were more divergent for other test items. A variety of pharmacy checks were used, and clinical rules developed, to address missing functionality. Our test revealed widely varying functionality and appeared to be highly discriminative. Basic clinical decision support was partly absent in two CPOEs. Hospital pharmacists did not rate all test items as important and tried to accommodate the lacking functionality by performing additional checks and developing clinical rules. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of an innovative computerized virtual planning system in acetabular fracture surgery: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huixiang; Wang, Fang; Newman, Simon; Lin, Yanping; Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiugen

    2016-08-01

    Acetabular fracture surgery is amongst the most challenging tasks in the field of trauma surgery and careful preoperative planning is crucial for success. The aim of this paper is to describe the preliminary outcome of the utilization of an innovative computerized virtual planning system for acetabular fractures. 3D models of acetabular fractures and surrounding soft tissues from six patients were constructed from preoperative CT scans. A novel highly-automatic segmentation technique was performed on the 3D model to separate each fracture fragment, then 3D virtual reduction was performed. Additionally, the models were used to assess potential surgical approaches with reference to both the fracture and the surrounding soft tissues. The time required for virtual planning was recorded. After surgery, the virtual plan was compared to the real surgery with respect to surgical approach and reduction sequence. A Likert scale questionnaire was completed by the surgeons to evaluate their satisfaction with the system. Virtual planning was successfully completed in all cases. The planned surgical approach was followed in all cases with the planned reduction sequence followed completely in five cases and partially in one. The mean time required for virtual planning was 38.7min (range 21-57, SD=15.5). The mean time required for planning of B-type fractures was 25.0min (range 21-30, SD=4.6), of C-type fracture 52.3min (range 49-57, SD=4.2). The results of the questionnaire demonstrated a high level of satisfaction with the planning system. This study demonstrates that the virtual planning system is feasible in clinical settings with high satisfaction and acceptability from the surgeons. It provides a viable option for the planning of acetabular fracture surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effectiveness of a computerized alert system based on re-testing intervals for limiting the inappropriateness of laboratory test requests.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Marco; Bonelli, Patrizia; Aloe, Rosalia; Balestrino, Antonio; Nardelli, Anna; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Fabi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    There is consolidated evidence that the burden of inappropriate laboratory test requests is very high, up to 70%. We describe here the function of a computerized alert system linked to the order entry, designed to limit the number of potentially inappropriate laboratory test requests. A computerized alert system based on re-testing intervals and entailing the generation of pop-up alerts when preset criteria of appropriateness for 15 laboratory tests were violated was implemented in two clinical wards of the University Hospital of Parma. The effectiveness of the system for limiting potentially inappropriate tests was monitored for 6months. Overall, 765/3539 (22%) test requests violated the preset criteria of appropriateness and generated the appearance of electronic alert. After alert appearance, 591 requests were annulled (17% of total tests requested and 77% of tests alerted, respectively). The total number of test requests violating the preset criteria of inappropriateness constantly decreased over time (26% in the first three months of implementation versus 17% in the following period; p<0.001). The total financial saving of test withdrawn was 3387 Euros (12.8% of the total test cost) throughout the study period. The results of this study suggest that a computerized alert system may be effective to limit the inappropriateness of laboratory test requests, generating significant economic saving and educating physicians to a more efficient use of laboratory resources. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Testing primates with joystick-based automated apparatus - Lessons from the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhuman primates provide useful models for studying a variety of medical, biological, and behavioral topics. Four years of joystick-based automated testing of monkeys using the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) are examined to derive hints and principles for comparable testing with other species - including humans. The results of multiple parametric studies are reviewed, and reliability data are presented to reveal the surprises and pitfalls associated with video-task testing of performance.

  16. Testing primates with joystick-based automated apparatus - Lessons from the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Nonhuman primates provide useful models for studying a variety of medical, biological, and behavioral topics. Four years of joystick-based automated testing of monkeys using the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) are examined to derive hints and principles for comparable testing with other species - including humans. The results of multiple parametric studies are reviewed, and reliability data are presented to reveal the surprises and pitfalls associated with video-task testing of performance.

  17. City public service learns to speed read. [Computerized routing system for meter reading

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, E.L.

    1994-02-01

    City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio, TX is a municipally owned utility that serves a densely populated 1,566 square miles in and around San Antonio. CPS's service area is divided into 21 meter reading districts, each of which is broken down into no more than 99 regular routes. Every day, a CPS employee reads one of the districts, following one or more routes. In 1991, CPS began using handheld computers to record reads for regular routes, which are stored on the devices themselves. In contrast, rereads and final reads occur at random throughout the service area. Because they change every day, the process of creating routes that can be loaded onto a handheld device is difficult. Until recently, rereads and final reads were printed on paper orders, and route schedulers would spend close to two hours sorting the paper orders into routes. Meter readers would then hand-sequence the orders on their routes, often using a city map, before taking them into the field in stacks. When the meter readers returned, their completed orders had to be separated by type of reread, and then keyed into the mainframe computer before bill processing could begin. CPS's data processing department developed a computerized routing system of its own that saves time and labor, as well as paper. The system eliminates paper orders entirely, enabling schedulers to create reread and final read routes graphically on a PC. Information no longer needs to be keyed from hard copy, reducing the margin of error and streamlining bill processing by incorporating automated data transfer between systems.

  18. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  19. Understanding the Nature of Medication Errors in an ICU with a Computerized Physician Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Insook; Park, Hyeok; Choi, Youn Jeong; Hwang, Mi Heui; Bates, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated incidence rates to understand the nature of medication errors potentially introduced by utilizing a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system in the three clinical phases of the medication process: prescription, administration, and documentation. Methods Overt observations and chart reviews were employed at two surgical intensive care units of a 950-bed tertiary teaching hospital. Ten categories of high-risk drugs prescribed over a four-month period were noted and reviewed. Error definition and classifications were adapted from previous studies for use in the present research. Incidences of medication errors in the three phases of the medication process were analyzed. In addition, nurses' responses to prescription errors were also assessed. Results Of the 534 prescriptions issued, 286 (53.6%) included at least one error. The proportion of errors was 19.0% (58) of the 306 drug administrations, of which two-thirds were verbal orders classified as errors due to incorrectly entered prescriptions. Documentation errors occurred in 205 (82.7%) of 248 correctly performed administrations. When tracking incorrectly entered prescriptions, 93% of the errors were intercepted by nurses, but two-thirds of them were recorded as prescribed rather than administered. Conclusion The number of errors occurring at each phase of the medication process was relatively high, despite long experience with a CPOE system. The main causes of administration errors and documentation errors were prescription errors and verbal order processes. To reduce these errors, hospital-level and unit-level efforts toward a better system are needed. PMID:25526059

  20. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  1. Effect of a computerized online grading system on patient satisfaction in a military primary health care setting.

    PubMed

    Levy, Gad; Goldstein, Liav; Barenboim, Erez; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2007-04-01

    Patient satisfaction is gaining recognition as an important determinant of the quality of medical care. We conducted an analysis to evaluate the effect of a computerized online system that comparatively displays grades of patient satisfaction among primary care military infirmaries. Fifteen Israel Air Force primary care infirmaries served as the intervention group, and 130 Israel Defense Force infirmaries were the control group. Baseline patient satisfaction was surveyed in all infirmaries. In the intervention group only, infirmaries were resurveyed at 3-month intervals during a 1-year period. Satisfaction scores were continuously displayed on an intranet site in a comparative graphical manner by using the computerized system, available only to the intervention group. At the endpoint, patient satisfaction improved in both groups. However, the magnitude of improvement in the intervention group was significantly greater, in comparison with the control group. The most pronounced improvement was noted in availability of service (intervention group, 57.9% at baseline vs. 66.0% at endpoint, p < 0.001; control group, 67.5% vs. 69.6%, p < 0.025). We conclude that the use of this computerized system in conjunction with promotional efforts resulted in significant improvements in patient satisfaction.

  2. Computerizing the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jeanie; Whelan, Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of a computerized high school library which uses CD-ROM optical storage systems. Describes hardware and software, setting up the system, preparing the online catalog, teaching information retrieval skills, and project evaluation. Notes prices of CD-ROM disks and equipment purchased. 4 references. (SV)

  3. Computerized Language Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Steven

    1985-01-01

    The article describes a computerized language analysis system that produces a detailed description and summary statistics to track language growth within student populations. This microcomputer-based language assessment system simplifies identification of deficits in productive language, enabling the teacher or clinician to spend more time…

  4. Is there a link between the hospital-acquired injurious fall rates in US acute care hospitals and these institutions' implementation levels of computerized systems?

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Hu, Hsou Mei; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2011-12-01

    Medicare no longer reimburses acute care hospitals for the costs of additional care required due to hospital-acquired injuries. Consequently, this study explored the effective computerized systems to inform practice for better interventions to reduce fall risk. It provided a correlation between type of computerized system and hospital-acquired injurious fall rates at acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York. It used multiple publicly available data sets, with the hospital as the unit of analysis. Descriptive and Pearson correlation analyses were used. The analysis included 462 hospitals. Significant correlations could be categorized into two groups: (1) meaningful computerized systems that were associated with lower injurious fall rates: the decision support systems for drug allergy alerts, drug-drug interaction alerts, and drug-laboratory interaction alerts; and (2) computerized systems that were associated with higher injurious fall rates: the decision support system for drug-drug interaction alerts and the computerized provider order entry system for radiology tests. Future research may include additional states, multiple years of data, and patient-level data to validate this study's findings. This effort may further inform policy makers and the public about effective clinical computerized systems provided to clinicians to improve their practice decisions and care outcomes.

  5. Build Your Own Inventory System. Annual Cost: $100.00 (Approximate). Fixed Assets, Materials and Supplies. The Practical Elements for a Computerized, Continuing Inventory System in Schools and Use in Determining a Measure for Instructional Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Arnold, Comp.

    This publication presents performance flow charts and other accompanying forms that are elements of an economical computerized continuing inventory system. The system described here is intended to serve school systems as an adequate fixed asset system and to provide a computerized inventory model that offers support for costs of future educational…

  6. Computerized Numerical Control Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide is intended for use in a course in programming and operating a computerized numerical control system. Addressed in the course are various aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with computerized numerical control, including selecting manual or computer-assigned programs and matching them with…

  7. Computerized Placement Tests: Background Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This document is a compilation of background readings for the user of Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs) developed by the College Board for student placement purposes. CPTs are computerized adaptive tests that test the individual abilities and backgrounds of examinees. CPTs are part of the ACCUPLACER student information management system. The…

  8. Effectiveness of computerized risk assessment system on enhancing workers' occupational health and attitudes towards occupational health.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan-Yi; Sung, Connie Y Y; Yu, Qiu-Hua; Chan, Chetwyn C H

    2014-01-01

    Efforts have been paid to lower the health risks associated with use of computers at the workplace. Computerized risk assessment systems are available in the market for adoption by companies. The Display Screen Equipment Risk Assessment and Management System was designed for conducting risk assessment and providing intelligent-driven solutions for DSE-related occupational health problems. This report summarizes two consecutive research work conducted on evaluating its effect in reducing body discomfort and mental fatigue, and enhancing sedentary workers' occupational health. Convenience sampling was adopted to recruit participants (111 participants for Study 1 and 75 participants for Study 2 who were randomly assigned to an immediate or a delayed intervention group. The intervention was using DSE RAM System to perform a risk assessment followed by an immediate modification of participant's workstation based on the recommendations generated by the System. Face to face interview was conducted and participants completed three sets of questionnaires right before the assessment and two weeks after the intervention. The results of Study 1 revealed that the DSE RAM System was effective for alleviating the discomfort and fatigue levels by rectifying the workstation-worker match. These mismatches were identified to be the heights of monitor, keyboard and chair with the workers. The results of Study 2 indicate that the System was specific for promoting participants to take more frequent rest breaks (OR: 3.65) and pay more attention to occupational safety and health information (OR: 3.90). In particular, the take frequent rest breaks behavior was found to predict decrease in discomfort in the eyes and mental fatigue (lack of energy). Nevertheless, there was no strong evidence on the use of the System can lead to immediate attitudinal changes towards occupational health and safety. The findings support the notion that workers' participation and integration of ergonomics into

  9. Intercepting Wrong-Patient Orders in a Computerized Provider Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Green, Robert A; Hripcsak, George; Salmasian, Hojjat; Lazar, Eliot J; Bostwick, Susan B; Bakken, Suzanne R; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective We evaluated the short- and long-term impact of a computerized provider entry (CPOE)-based patient verification intervention to reduce wrong-patient orders in five emergency departments. Methods A patient verification dialog appeared at the beginning of each ordering session, requiring providers to confirm the patient's identity after a mandatory 2.5–second delay. Using the retract-and-reorder technique, we estimated the rate of wrong-patient orders before and after the implementation of the intervention to intercept these errors. We conducted a short- and long-term quasi-experimental study with both historical and parallel controls. We also measured the amount of time providers spent addressing the verification system, and reasons for discontinuing ordering sessions as a result of the intervention. Results Wrong-patient orders were reduced by 30% immediately after implementation of the intervention. This reduction persisted when using inpatients as a parallel control. After two years, the rate of wrong-patient orders remained 24.8% less than before intervention. The mean viewing time of the patient verification dialog was 4.2 seconds (SD = 4.0), and was longer when providers indicated they placed the order for the wrong patient (4.9 versus 4.1 seconds). Although the display of each dialog took only seconds, the large number of display episodes triggered meant that the physician time to prevent each retract-and-reorder event was 1.5 hours. Conclusion A CPOE-based patient verification system led to a moderate reduction in wrong-patient orders that was sustained over time. Interception of wrong-patient orders at the time of entry is an important step in reducing these errors. PMID:25534652

  10. An Evaluation of the Usability of a Computerized Decision Support System for Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, M.; Ehnfors, M.; Fruhling, A.; Ehrenberg, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) have the potential to significantly improve the quality of nursing care of older people by enhancing the decision making of nursing personnel. Despite this potential, health care organizations have been slow to incorporate CDSSs into nursing home practices. Objective This study describes facilitators and barriers that impact the ability of nursing personnel to effectively use a clinical CDSS for planning and treating pressure ulcers (PUs) and malnutrition and for following the suggested risk assessment guidelines for the care of nursing home residents. Methods We employed a qualitative descriptive design using varied methods, including structured group interviews, cognitive walkthrough observations and a graphical user interface (GUI) usability evaluation. Group interviews were conducted with 25 nursing personnel from four nursing homes in southern Norway. Five nursing personnel participated in cognitive walkthrough observations and the GUI usability evaluation. Text transcripts were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Group interview participants reported that ease of use, usefulness and a supportive work environment were key facilitators of CDSS use. The barriers identified were lack of training, resistance to using computers and limited integration of the CDSS with the facility’s electronic health record (EHR) system. Key findings from the usability evaluation also identified the difficulty of using the CDSS within the EHR and the poorly designed GUI integration as barriers. Conclusion Overall, we found disconnect between two types of nursing personnel. Those who were comfortable with computer technology reported positive feedback about the CDSS, while others expressed resistance to using the CDSS for various reasons. This study revealed that organizations must invest more resources in educating nursing personnel on the seriousness of PUs and poor nutrition in the elderly, providing

  11. Implementation of a neonatal pain management module in the computerized physician order entry system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the recommended guidelines, the neonatal management of pain and discomfort often remains inadequate. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether adding a pain and discomfort module to a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system would improve pain and discomfort evaluation in premature newborns under invasive ventilation. Methods All newborns <37 weeks gestational age (GA) and requiring invasive ventilation were included in a prospective study during two 6-month periods: before and after the inclusion of the pain and discomfort evaluation module. The main outcome measure was the percentage of patients having at least one assessment of pain and discomfort per day of invasive ventilation using the COMFORT scale. Results A total of 122 patients were included: 53 before and 69 after the incorporation of the module. The mean age was 30 (3) weeks GA. After the module was included, the percentage of patients who benefited from at least one pain and discomfort assessment per day increased from 64% to 88% (p < 0.01), and the mean number (SD) of scores recorded per day increased from 1 (1) to 3 (1) (p < 0.01). When the score was not within the established range, the nursing staff adapted analgesia/sedation doses more frequently after module inclusion (53% vs. 34%, p < 0.001). Despite higher mean doses of midazolam after module introduction [47 (45) vs. 31 (18) μg/kg/hr, p < 0.05], the durations of invasive ventilation and hospital stay, and the number of nosocomial infections, were not significantly modified. Conclusions Adding a pain and discomfort tool to the CPOE system was a simple and effective way to improve the systematic evaluation of premature newborns who required ventilatory assistance. PMID:22913821

  12. Decision Support Alerts for Medication Ordering in a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System

    PubMed Central

    Beccaro, M. A. Del; Villanueva, R.; Knudson, K. M.; Harvey, E. M.; Langle, J. M.; Paul, W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the frequency and type of decision support alerts by location and ordering provider role during Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) medication ordering. Using these data we adjusted the decision support tools to reduce the number of alerts. Design Retrospective analyses were performed of dose range checks (DRC), drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy alerts from our electronic medical record. During seven sampling periods (each two weeks long) between April 2006 and October 2008 all alerts in these categories were analyzed. Another audit was performed of all DRC alerts by ordering provider role from November 2008 through January 2009. Medication ordering error counts were obtained from a voluntary error reporting system. Measurement/Results Between April 2006 and October 2008 the percent of medication orders that triggered a dose range alert decreased from 23.9% to 7.4%. The relative risk (RR) for getting an alert was higher at the start of the interventions versus later (RR= 2.40, 95% CI 2.28-2.52; p< 0.0001). The percentage of medication orders that triggered alerts for drug-drug interactions also decreased from 13.5% to 4.8%. The RR for getting a drug interaction alert at the start was 1.63, 95% CI 1.60-1.66; p< 0.0001. Alerts decreased in all clinical areas without an increase in reported medication errors. Conclusion We reduced the quantity of decision support alerts in CPOE using a systematic approach without an increase in reported medication errors PMID:23616845

  13. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    CATALOG NUMBERTechnical Report 475%; , ADAPTIVE DECISION &IDING IN OMPUTER-ASSISTED *JECHNICAL REPOT INSTRUCTION: ADAPTIVE COMPUTERIZED TRAINING )16...alternative. For example, in auto maintenance, the mechanic is trained to adjust the dis- tributor with a "feeler" guage or a dwell tachometer . He

  14. Student Persistence Patterns: A Computerized System for Monitoring Enrollment. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyk, Jane M.; Kerstein, Dianne

    The design and development of a computerized student flow model at Eastern Montana College and its use in monitoring student enrollment are considered. In addition, guidelines are presented for adapting a flow model to the dimensions of a particular institution. Particular emphasis is given to reviewing the criteria that researchers should use…

  15. Student Persistence Patterns: A Computerized System for Monitoring Enrollment. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dyk, Jane M.; Kerstein, Dianne

    The design and development of a computerized student flow model at Eastern Montana College and its use in monitoring student enrollment are considered. In addition, guidelines are presented for adapting a flow model to the dimensions of a particular institution. Particular emphasis is given to reviewing the criteria that researchers should use…

  16. Computerized breast cancer analysis system using three stage semi-supervised learning method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenqing; Tseng, Tzu-Liang Bill; Zhang, Jianying; Qian, Wei

    2016-10-01

    A large number of labeled medical image data is usually a requirement to train a well-performed computer-aided detection (CAD) system. But the process of data labeling is time consuming, and potential ethical and logistical problems may also present complications. As a result, incorporating unlabeled data into CAD system can be a feasible way to combat these obstacles. In this study we developed a three stage semi-supervised learning (SSL) scheme that combines a small amount of labeled data and larger amount of unlabeled data. The scheme was modified on our existing CAD system using the following three stages: data weighing, feature selection, and newly proposed dividing co-training data labeling algorithm. Global density asymmetry features were incorporated to the feature pool to reduce the false positive rate. Area under the curve (AUC) and accuracy were computed using 10 fold cross validation method to evaluate the performance of our CAD system. The image dataset includes mammograms from 400 women who underwent routine screening examinations, and each pair contains either two cranio-caudal (CC) or two mediolateral-oblique (MLO) view mammograms from the right and the left breasts. From these mammograms 512 regions were extracted and used in this study, and among them 90 regions were treated as labeled while the rest were treated as unlabeled. Using our proposed scheme, the highest AUC observed in our research was 0.841, which included the 90 labeled data and all the unlabeled data. It was 7.4% higher than using labeled data only. With the increasing amount of labeled data, AUC difference between using mixed data and using labeled data only reached its peak when the amount of labeled data was around 60. This study demonstrated that our proposed three stage semi-supervised learning can improve the CAD performance by incorporating unlabeled data. Using unlabeled data is promising in computerized cancer research and may have a significant impact for future CAD system

  17. Computerized platform posturography for children: test-retest reliability of the sensory test of the VSR System.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Linda S; Mu, Keli

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the consistency of scores from typically developing children on the sensory test of the NeuroCom International VSR System. Participants included 18 children between five and nine years of age. Postural sway was measured using the VSR System, a computerized platform posturography assessment tool. The sensory test protocol examines the relative contributions of the visual, somatosensory, and vestibular systems to maintain postural stability by systematically manipulating the availability and accuracy of sensory inputs. Test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients for all four sensory conditions ranged from .76 to .83.

  18. Solving the problems concerned with modernization of power unit monitoring and control systems using the distributed facilities and technologies available in the sargon computerized automation system. Part 1: Tools of PTC "sargon" for distributed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelevich, V. A.

    2013-02-01

    The first part of this article describes the tools intended to construct distributed automated process control systems for the main thermal power equipment of power stations that are available in the SARGON computerized automation system.

  19. Improving transfusion safety: implementation of a comprehensive computerized bar code-based tracking system for detecting and preventing errors.

    PubMed

    Askeland, R W; McGrane, S; Levitt, J S; Dane, S K; Greene, D L; Vandeberg, J A; Walker, K; Porcella, A; Herwaldt, L A; Carmen, L T; Kemp, J D

    2008-07-01

    To transfuse blood products safely, health care workers must accurately identify patients, blood samples, and the blood components. A comprehensive bar code-based computerized tracking system was developed and implemented to identify and prevent transfusion errors. A data network, wireless devices, and bar-coded labels were pilot tested before the system was introduced hospitalwide. The system provided a complete audit trail for all transactions. Data from before and after implementation were analyzed. Incident reports decreased from a mean of 41.5 reports per month in the 6 months before the system was implemented to a mean of 7.2 reports per month after implementation. The blood sample rejection rate decreased from 1.82 percent to a mean of 0.17 percent after implementation. Errors detected by the new system were sorted into misscans, skipped steps, wrong steps, and prevented identification errors (PIEs). Misscans and skipped steps were the most common errors in the first 10 months after implementation. During the final transfusion step, PIEs occurred at the rate of about one per month and scans were omitted approximately 1 percent of the time. Therefore, it is estimated that mistransfusions could occur about once every 100 months on average with the new system. The bar code-based computerized tracking system detected and prevented identification and matching errors, thereby reducing the proportion of blood samples rejected and increasing patient safety.

  20. Effects of a computerized decision support system on care planning for pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes: an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Mariann; Ehnfors, Margareta; Svensson, Elisabeth; Hansen, Linda M; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Nursing documentation is essential for facilitating the flow of information to guarantee continuity, quality and safety in care. High-quality nursing documentation is frequently lacking; the implementation of computerized decision support systems is expected to improve clinical practice and nursing documentation. The present study aimed at investigate the effects of a computerized decision support system and an educational program as intervention strategies for improved nursing documentation practice on pressure ulcers and malnutrition in nursing homes. An intervention study with two intervention groups and one control group was used. Fifteen nursing homes in southern Norway were included. A convenience sample of electronic healthcare records from 46 units was included. Inclusion criteria were records with presence of pressure ulcers and/or malnutrition. The residents were assessed before and after an intervention of a computerized decision support system in the electronic healthcare records. Data were collected through a review of 150 records before (2007) and 141 records after the intervention (2009). The nurses in intervention group 1 were offered educational sessions and were trained to use the computerized decision support system, which they used for eight months in 2008 and 2009. The nurses in intervention group 2 were offered the same educational program but did not use the computerized decision support system. The nurses in the control group were not subject to any intervention. The resident records were examined for the completeness and comprehensiveness of the documentation of pressure ulcers and malnutrition with three data collection forms and the data were analyzed with non-parametric statistics. The implementation of the computerized decision support system and the educational program resulted in a more complete and comprehensive documentation of pressure ulcer- and malnutrition-related nursing assessments and nursing interventions. This study

  1. Detection of a "faked" strength task effort in volunteers using a computerized exercise testing system.

    PubMed

    Fishbain, D A; Abdel-Moty, E; Cutler, R B; Rosomoff, H L; Steele-Rosomoff, R

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an experimental method to separate a "faked" strength effort from a "best" effort in volunteers. Thirty-four pain-free volunteers (18 males, 16 females) performed a shoulder press and pull-down on an isokinetic computerized exercise testing system (CETS), giving a best effort followed by a faked effort. Two months later, a randomly selected subgroup (6 males) repeated the experiment to test the predictive validity of the derived variables. In the statistical analysis, best efforts were first compared with fake efforts by paired ttest for 80 CETS variables for males and females separately. Variables showing a strong difference between the best and faked effort were then selected for further analysis. In the second step of the analysis, the method of multiple correlations (r2 method) was used to reduce the number of redundant CETS variables to five in both the male and female groups. In the third step, a stepwise discriminant analysis was used to select predictor variables for the male and female groups. For the variables selected by the discriminant analysis for both males and females, sensitivities and specificities were calculated. Finally, the developed discriminant formula was used in the predictive validity part of the study to determine the sensitivities and specificities of the developed method. The discriminant analysis selected the following CETS variables for male and female groups, respectively: duty cycle down, work weight/down, peak value up (males); and average power up, 40% repetition down, duty cycle up (females). For males, using their three variables, the discriminant function classified 77.14% of the efforts correctly with 88.9% sensitivity and 64.7% specificity. For females, using their three variables, the discriminant function classified 90.63% of the efforts correctly with 100% sensitivity and 81.3% specificity. In the predictive validity group, the discriminant function classified 75% of the efforts

  2. Default settings of computerized physician order entry system order sets drive ordering habits.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jordan; Hollenbeak, Christopher; Donaldson, Keri; Abendroth, Thomas; Castellani, William

    2015-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems are quickly becoming ubiquitous, and groups of orders ("order sets") to allow for easy order input are a common feature. This provides a streamlined mechanism to view, modify, and place groups of related orders. This often serves as an electronic equivalent of a specialty requisition. A characteristic, of these order sets is that specific orders can be predetermined to be "preselected" or "defaulted-on" whenever the order set is used while others are "optional" or "defaulted-off" (though there is typically the option is to "deselect" defaulted-on tests in a given situation). While it seems intuitive that the defaults in an order set are often accepted, additional study is required to understand the impact of these "default" settings in an order set on ordering habits. This study set out to quantify the effect of changing the default settings of an order set. For quality improvement purposes, order sets dealing with transfusions were recently reviewed and modified to improve monitoring of outcome. Initially, the order for posttransfusion hematocrits and platelet count had the default setting changed from "optional" to "preselected." The default settings for platelet count was later changed back to "optional," allowing for a natural experiment to study the effect of the default selections of an order set on clinician ordering habits. Posttransfusion hematocrit values were ordered for 8.3% of red cell transfusions when the default order set selection was "off" and for 57.4% of transfusions when the default selection was "preselected" (P < 0.0001). Posttransfusion platelet counts were ordered for 7.0% of platelet transfusions when the initial default order set selection was "optional," increased to 59.4% when the default was changed to "preselected" (P < 0.0001), and then decreased to 7.5% when the default selection was returned to "optional." The posttransfusion platelet count rates during the two "optional" periods: 7

  3. Computerized bar code-based blood identification systems and near-miss transfusion episodes and transfusion errors.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Gregory A; Abenstein, John P; Stubbs, James R; Santrach, Paula; Ereth, Mark H; Johnson, Pamela M; Douglas, Emily; Oliver, William C

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether the use of a computerized bar code-based blood identification system resulted in a reduction in transfusion errors or near-miss transfusion episodes. Our institution instituted a computerized bar code-based blood identification system in October 2006. After institutional review board approval, we performed a retrospective study of transfusion errors from January 1, 2002, through December 31, 2005, and from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2010. A total of 388,837 U were transfused during the 2002-2005 period. There were 6 misidentification episodes of a blood product being transfused to the wrong patient during that period (incidence of 1 in 64,806 U or 1.5 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, 0.6-3.3 per 100,000 transfusions). There was 1 reported near-miss transfusion episode (incidence of 0.3 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, <0.1-1.4 per 100,000 transfusions). A total of 304,136 U were transfused during the 2007-2010 period. There was 1 misidentification episode of a blood product transfused to the wrong patient during that period when the blood bag and patient's armband were scanned after starting to transfuse the unit (incidence of 1 in 304,136 U or 0.3 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, <0.1-1.8 per 100,000 transfusions; P=.14). There were 34 reported near-miss transfusion errors (incidence of 11.2 per 100,000 transfusions; 95% CI, 7.7-15.6 per 100,000 transfusions; P<.001). Institution of a computerized bar code-based blood identification system was associated with a large increase in discovered near-miss events. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The CADSS design automation system. [computerized design language for small digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    This research was designed to implement and extend a previously defined design automation system for the design of small digital structures. A description is included of the higher level language developed to describe systems as a sequence of register transfer operations. The system simulator which is used to determine if the original description is correct is also discussed. The design automation system produces tables describing the state transistions of the system and the operation of all registers. In addition all Boolean equations specifying system operation are minimized and converted to NAND gate structures. Suggestions for further extensions to the system are also given.

  5. Can Utilizing a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System Prevent Hospital Medical Errors and Adverse Drug Events?

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians’ resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  6. Can utilizing a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system prevent hospital medical errors and adverse drug events?

    PubMed

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians' resistance to change.

  7. Development of computerized materials, protection, control and accountability systems in the former Soviet republics: a joint effort

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, R.; Ryan, R.H.; Seitz, S.; Landry, R.P.

    1996-07-01

    The laboratory-to-laboratory programs of cooperation between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Institutes of the Russian Federation and the government-to-government programs between the US and Russia have the goal of reducing the danger of nuclear weapons proliferation by strengthening systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A). As part of these programs, DOE is making available to sites in the former Soviet Republics a new-generation nuclear materials accountability system similar to one developed for DOE sites. This new system, the Core Materials Accountability System (COREMAS), is designed for international use. It is a core system to which facility-specific extensions are expected to be made. This paper describes the joint efforts of US personnel and software development teams at sites in Russia, Kazakhstan, and the Ukraine to develop sophisticated computerized MPC&A systems that are customized for the site-specific needs of each facility.

  8. Integration of Interactive Whiteboard in Swedish Preschool Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourbour, Maryam; Vigmo, Sylvi; Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring the roles preschool teachers give technologies in mathematics education and the ways they structure their mathematics learning activities using interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a technological artefact. Data collected from observations of three preschool teachers embedding IWB in a preschool practice in Sweden provided…

  9. Teachers' Attitudes toward Using Interactive Whiteboards in English Language Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gashan, Amani K.; Alshumaimeri, Yousif A.

    2015-01-01

    Educational technology plays an increasingly important role in the teaching and learning process. Successful integration is the goal of any new educational technology. The interactive whiteboard (IWB) can be effectively used by teachers to enhance the effectiveness of their lessons. This study explored the attitudes and insights of Saudi female…

  10. SMARTer Music Teaching: Interactive Whiteboard Use in Music Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Karin K.

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboard use is rapidly becoming a popular and effective teaching tool in classrooms; this article explores specific uses within music classrooms. Not only do these boards prepare students to function in a technological world, they offer myriad creative uses within the music classroom, allowing for enhanced interaction, instruction,…

  11. The Effect of Integrating Interactive Whiteboards on Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sheila Denise

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that instructional technology improves academic achievement, there is little research about the integration of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) during Success For All (SFA) reading instruction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in reading achievement between third…

  12. Interactive Whiteboards: A New Tool for Extension Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Mary M.; Burns, Connie S.; Reicks, Marla M.

    2011-01-01

    Use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in school classrooms and conference rooms is increasing. To evaluate the effectiveness of IWBs as a tool for Extension education, two groups of 3rd and 4th grade Minnesota students (n=325) were taught nutrition using traditional methods or IWBs. Significant increases in knowledge and behavior were observed in…

  13. Interactive Whiteboards: Do Teachers Really Use Them Interactively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatli, Cemal; Kiliç, Eylem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this quantitative study is to examine high school teachers' use of specific features of interactive whiteboards (IWBs). During the 2012-2013 academic school year, 535 teachers in pilot schools from 10 provinces under the FATIH Project (Movement of Enhancing Opportunities and Improving Technology) participated. Data were collected…

  14. Integration of Interactive Whiteboard in Swedish Preschool Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourbour, Maryam; Vigmo, Sylvi; Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at exploring the roles preschool teachers give technologies in mathematics education and the ways they structure their mathematics learning activities using interactive whiteboard (IWB) as a technological artefact. Data collected from observations of three preschool teachers embedding IWB in a preschool practice in Sweden provided…

  15. Lutheran School Teachers' Instructional Usage of the Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jillian R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was twofold. First, the study assessed whether Davis' (1989) Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was useful in predicting instructional usage of the interactive whiteboard (IWB), as reported by K-8 teachers. Second, the study set out to understand what motivated those teachers to use the IWB for classroom…

  16. The Interactive Whiteboard: A Transitional Technology Supporting Diverse Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winzenried, Arthur; Dalgarno, Barney; Tinkler, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the findings of a qualitative study investigating teacher perspectives on the impact of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) on their classroom teaching practice, using intensive case studies focusing on six primary and secondary teachers from two rural schools. The study found that all teachers were enthusiastic, had seen…

  17. An Interactive Whiteboard Student Survey: Development, Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turel, Yalin Kilic

    2011-01-01

    The interactive whiteboard (IWB) has become a popular technology for instructors over the last decade. Though research asserts that the IWBs facilitate learning in different ways, there is a lack of studies examining actual IWB use in classroom settings based on learners' perspectives by means of valid instruments. The purpose of this study is to…

  18. Student Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in a Third Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genesi, Deanna Joy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative project presents students' perceptions of interactive whiteboard (IWB) usage in a third grade elementary classroom. The use of the IWB was alternated with the overhead/chalkboard on an ABAB design. The study was based on semistructured interviews of 19 rural, elementary school students. The interview questions focused on the…

  19. Virtual Manipulatives on the Interactive Whiteboard: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildenhall, Paula; Swan, Paul; Northcote, Maria; Marshall, Linda

    2008-01-01

    As part of the project titled "Hands-On Heads-On: The Effective Use of Manipulatives Both Virtual and Physical" being undertaken at Edith Cowan University, there was an investigation into the use of virtual manipulatives and the interactive whiteboard (IWB). Virtual manipulatives may be defined as a virtual representation of a physical…

  20. Interactive Whiteboards and the Construction of Definitions for the Kite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Dave; Davison, Ian

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports early work from a project examining the affordances offered by Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs). Here the focus is on the teaching of the definition of quadrilaterals through the use of Cabri Geometre. We discuss the work of two 11-year-old children, who are exploring the kite. The protocol highlights the complexities inherent in…

  1. The Features of Interactive Whiteboards and Their Influence on Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennewell, Steve; Beauchamp, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In a small-scale study of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-rich primary school, interactive whiteboards (IWBs) were found to be the predominant ICT tools used by teachers. The study sought to identify how the teachers used features of ICT to enhance learning, based on a list of ICT's functions published for teacher education…

  2. Revealing Significant Learning Moments with Interactive Whiteboards in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Catherine D.; McPherson, Richard; Sabeti, Farhad Mordy; Flynn, Tara

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify when and how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) functioned as a productive tool that impacted student learning in mathematics. Using video data, field notes, and interview transcripts from 1 school year in two optimal case study classrooms, we were able to examine the unique opportunities afforded by the size of…

  3. Interactive Whiteboards and Implications for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Danita C.

    2013-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have increasingly become a technology tool used in the educational field. IWBs are touch-sensitive screens that work in conjunction with a computer and a projector, and which are used to display information from a computer. As a qualitative case study, this study investigated the SMART Board-infused instructional…

  4. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study designed to examine the dialogic processes teachers used to sustain focused discussions, using questioning techniques and Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs). IWBs and their related technologies such as plasma touch screens and projected tablets have passed through several phases of implementation as classroom objects,…

  5. Interactive Whiteboards: Creating Higher-Level, Technological Thinkers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Across the United States, many school districts are investing large sums of money to install interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in classrooms. For example, the Fort Worth Independent School District (FWISD) aims to become a "digital district" by installing IWBs into 5,000 classrooms over the next two years. This particular implementation of…

  6. SMARTer Music Teaching: Interactive Whiteboard Use in Music Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Karin K.

    2009-01-01

    Interactive whiteboard use is rapidly becoming a popular and effective teaching tool in classrooms; this article explores specific uses within music classrooms. Not only do these boards prepare students to function in a technological world, they offer myriad creative uses within the music classroom, allowing for enhanced interaction, instruction,…

  7. Revealing Significant Learning Moments with Interactive Whiteboards in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Catherine D.; McPherson, Richard; Sabeti, Farhad Mordy; Flynn, Tara

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify when and how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) functioned as a productive tool that impacted student learning in mathematics. Using video data, field notes, and interview transcripts from 1 school year in two optimal case study classrooms, we were able to examine the unique opportunities afforded by the size of…

  8. Interactive Whiteboards: Do Teachers Really Use Them Interactively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatli, Cemal; Kiliç, Eylem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this quantitative study is to examine high school teachers' use of specific features of interactive whiteboards (IWBs). During the 2012-2013 academic school year, 535 teachers in pilot schools from 10 provinces under the FATIH Project (Movement of Enhancing Opportunities and Improving Technology) participated. Data were collected…

  9. The Effect of Integrating Interactive Whiteboards on Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sheila Denise

    2012-01-01

    While it is known that instructional technology improves academic achievement, there is little research about the integration of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) during Success For All (SFA) reading instruction. The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in reading achievement between third…

  10. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  11. Interactive Whiteboards and Implications for Use in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Danita C.

    2013-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) have increasingly become a technology tool used in the educational field. IWBs are touch-sensitive screens that work in conjunction with a computer and a projector, and which are used to display information from a computer. As a qualitative case study, this study investigated the SMART Board-infused instructional…

  12. Educational Software Employing Group Competition Using an Interactive Electronic Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otsuki, Yoko; Bandoh, Hirokazu; Kato, Naoki; Indurkhya, Bipin; Nakagawa, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a design of educational software employing group competition using a large interactive electronic whiteboard, and a report on its experimental use. Group competition and collaboration are useful methods to cultivate originality and communication skills. To share the same space, the same large screen, and face-to-face…

  13. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  14. Exploring Pedagogy with Interactive Whiteboards in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Matthew; Schuck, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    This research project investigated the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in K-12 education. Exploration of the use of IWBs in six different school settings provided insights into the activities, approaches, roles and beliefs of students and teachers in a range of primary and secondary class contexts and discipline areas. The study was informed…

  15. Children's Perceptions of Learning with an Interactive Whiteboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanez, Lorena; Coyle, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in schools in Britain and other parts of the world has been accompanied by research that attempts to analyse their effects on teaching and learning processes. The majority of studies to date have been carried out in schools in England in mainstream numeracy and literacy classes. The present paper…

  16. Interactive Whiteboards: A New Tool for Extension Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Mary M.; Burns, Connie S.; Reicks, Marla M.

    2011-01-01

    Use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in school classrooms and conference rooms is increasing. To evaluate the effectiveness of IWBs as a tool for Extension education, two groups of 3rd and 4th grade Minnesota students (n=325) were taught nutrition using traditional methods or IWBs. Significant increases in knowledge and behavior were observed in…

  17. Shared Cognition Facilitated by Teacher Use of Interactive Whiteboard Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redman, Christine; Vincent, John Terence

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine questioning opportunities afforded by interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by highlighting pedagogical decisions enacted by teachers to ensure that they work with the wider affordances of the device. Design/Methodology/Approach: Three primary/elementary teachers participated in a study designed to…

  18. A Mobile Computerized Decision Support System to Prevent Hypoglycemia in Hospitalized Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Spat, Stephan; Donsa, Klaus; Beck, Peter; Höll, Bernhard; Mader, Julia K; Schaupp, Lukas; Augustin, Thomas; Chiarugi, Franco; Lichtenegger, Katharina M; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes management requires complex and interdisciplinary cooperation of health care professionals (HCPs). To support this complex process, IT-support is recommended by clinical guidelines. The aim of this article is to report on results from a clinical feasibility study testing the prototype of a mobile, tablet-based client-server system for computerized decision and workflow support (GlucoTab®) and to discuss its impact on hypoglycemia prevention. The system was tested in a monocentric, open, noncontrolled intervention study in 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The system supports HCPs in performing a basal-bolus insulin therapy. Diabetes therapy, adverse events, software errors and user feedback were documented. Safety, efficacy and user acceptance of the system were investigated. Only 1.3% of blood glucose (BG) measurements were <70 mg/dl and only 2.6% were >300 mg/dl. The availability of the system (97.3%) and the rate of treatment activities documented with the system (>93.5%) were high. Only few suggestions from the system were overruled by the users (>95.7% adherence). Evaluation of the 3 anonymous questionnaires showed that confidence in the system increased over time. The majority of users believed that treatment errors could be prevented by using this system. Data from our feasibility study show a significant reduction of hypoglycemia by implementing a computerized system for workflow and decision support for diabetes management, compared to a paper-based process. The system was well accepted by HCPs, which is shown in the user acceptance analysis and that users adhered to the insulin dose suggestions made by the system.

  19. Our experience in the diagnosis of intraocular tumours by a B-scan computerized system and angiodynography (Doppler). Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Falco, L; Esente, S; Fanfani, S; Pasarelli, N; Utari, S

    1992-01-01

    The authors compare the ultrasound diagnostic results of intraocular tumours by A/B-scans (Sonomed B 3000, Sonocare, Sonovision STT-100) with images obtained using computerized B-scan (Sonocare, Sonovision STT-100, Acoustic Tissue Typing ATT) and angiodynopgraphy systems (Quantum Philips). The Sonovision uses a computerized ultrasound spectrum analysis to assess the probability that a given lesion is a certain tumour, rather than another. The ATT system provides diagnostic probability for type B and type E melanoma, for haemangioma and metastatic carcinoma. The Quantum ultrasound equipment was developed for studying the heart and the major blood vessels. It is a colour Doppler that simplifies the Doppler technique, allowing it to study small anatomical parts such as tumour-like lesions of the eye. The Doppler technique ascertains the presence and the velocity of blood flow in the tumours. In presenting the preliminary results with the new techniques the authors are aware that the ATT system is not designed for some of the lesions under study (melanomas after conservative radiotherapy).

  20. Computerized operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, E.; Teigen, J.

    1994-12-31

    A number of observed and potential problems in the nuclear industry are related to the quality of operating procedures. Many of the problems identified in operating procedure preparation, implementation, and maintenance have a technical nature, which can be directly addressed by developing computerized procedure handling tools. The Halden Reactor Project (HRP) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has since 1985 performed research work within this field. A product of this effort is the development of a second version of the computerized operation manuals (COPMA) system. This paper summarizes the most important characteristics of the COPMA-II system and discusses some of the experiences in using a system like COPMA-II.

  1. Nurse staff allocation by nurse patient ratio vs. a computerized nurse dependency management system: a comparative cost analysis of Australian and New Zealand hospitals.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liza; Plummer, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Coding, costing, and accounting for nursing care requirements in Australian public and private hospitals lacks systematic research. Nurse costing for two nurse staffing allocation methods--nurse patient ratios and a computerized nurse dependency management system--were compared. Retrospective nursing workload management data were obtained from hospital information systems in 21 acute care public and private hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Descriptive statistics, cost analysis, and cost modeling were conducted for 103,269 shifts of nursing care. The comparison of costs for nursing staff by nurse-patient ratios and by a computerized nurse dependency management system demonstrated differences. The provision of nursing care using the computerized nurse dependency management system was, overall, lower in cost than for nurse-patient ratios.

  2. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  3. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  4. Validity and Reliability of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Computerized Adaptive Tests in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, Shanthini; Szymonifka, Jackie; Burket, Jayme C; Berman, Jessica R; Kirou, Kyriakos A; Levine, Alana B; Sammaritano, Lisa R; Mandl, Lisa A

    2017-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the construct validity and the test-retest reliability of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) computerized adaptive tests (CAT) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Adults with SLE completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, LupusQoL-US version ("legacy instruments"), and 14 selected PROMIS CAT. Using Spearman correlations, PROMIS CAT were compared with similar domains measured with legacy instruments. CAT were also correlated with the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SELENA-SLEDAI) disease activity and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI) scores. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using ICC. There were 204 outpatients with SLE enrolled in the study and 162 completed a retest. PROMIS CAT showed good performance characteristics and moderate to strong correlations with similar domains in the 2 legacy instruments (r = -0.49 to 0.86, p < 0.001). However, correlations between PROMIS CAT and the SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity and SDI were generally weak and statistically insignificant. PROMIS CAT test-retest ICC were good to excellent, ranging from 0.72 to 0.88. To our knowledge, these data are the first to show that PROMIS CAT are valid and reliable for many SLE-relevant domains. Importantly, PROMIS scores did not correlate well with physician-derived measures. This disconnect between objective signs and symptoms and the subjective patient disease experience underscores the crucial need to integrate patient-reported outcomes into clinical care to ensure optimal disease management.

  5. A computerized decision support system to predict the variations in the cerebral blood flow of mechanically ventilated infants.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Fleur T

    2013-10-01

    A computerized decision support system is described to predict the changes in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) of mechanically ventilated infants in response to different ventilatory settings. A CBF controller was developed and combined with a mathematical model of the infant's respiratory system to simulate the effects of ventilatory settings on the infant's CBF. The performance of the system was examined under various ventilatory treatments and the results were compared with available experimental data. The comparisons showed good agreement between the simulation results and experimental data for preterm infants. These included the results obtained under conditions of hypoventilation, hyperventilation, hypoxia, and hyperoxia. The presented decision support system has the potential to be used as an aide to the intensivist in choosing appropriate ventilation treatments for infants to prevent the untoward consequences of hazardous changes in CBF in mechanically ventilated infants such as hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system

  7. MOUSE (MODULAR ORIENTED UNCERTAINTY SYSTEM): A COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM. OPERATIONAL MANUAL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm) deals with the problem of uncertainties in models that consist of one or more algebraic equations. It was especially designed for use by those with little or no knowledge of computer languages or programming. It is compact (and thus can...

  8. MOUSE (MODULAR ORIENTED UNCERTAINTY SYSTEM): A COMPUTERIZED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM. OPERATIONAL MANUAL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty SystEm) deals with the problem of uncertainties in models that consist of one or more algebraic equations. It was especially designed for use by those with little or no knowledge of computer languages or programming. It is compact (and thus can...

  9. The CloudBoard Research Platform: an interactive whiteboard for corporate users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrus, John; Schwartz, Edward L.

    2013-03-01

    Over one million interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are sold annually worldwide, predominantly for classroom use with few sales for corporate use. Unmet needs for IWB corporate use were investigated and the CloudBoard Research Platform (CBRP) was developed to investigate and test technology for meeting these needs. The CBRP supports audio conferencing with shared remote drawing activity, casual capture of whiteboard activity for long-term storage and retrieval, use of standard formats such as PDF for easy import of documents via the web and email and easy export of documents. Company RFID badges and key fobs provide secure access to documents at the board and automatic logout occurs after a period of inactivity. Users manage their documents with a web browser. Analytics and remote device management is provided for administrators. The IWB hardware consists of off-the-shelf components (a Hitachi UST Projector, SMART Technologies, Inc. IWB hardware, Mac Mini, Polycom speakerphone, etc.) and a custom occupancy sensor. The three back-end servers provide the web interface, document storage, stroke and audio streaming. Ease of use, security, and robustness sufficient for internal adoption was achieved. Five of the 10 boards installed at various Ricoh sites have been in daily or weekly use for the past year and total system downtime was less than an hour in 2012. Since CBRP was installed, 65 registered users, 9 of whom use the system regularly, have created over 2600 documents.

  10. Toward multidisciplinary use of LANDSAT: Interfacing computerized LANDSAT analysis systems with geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The LANDSAT-geographic information system (GIS) interface must summarize the results of the LANDSAT classification over the same cells that serve as geographic referencing units for the GIS, and output these summaries on a cell-by-cell basis in a form that is readable by the input routines of the GIS. The ZONAL interface for cell-oriented systems consists of two primary programs. The PIXCEL program scans the grid of cells and outputs a channel of pixels. Each pixel contains not the reflectance values but the identifier of the cell in which the center of the pixel is located. This file of pixelized cells along with the results of a pixel-by-pixel classification of the scene produced by the LANDSAT analysis system are input to the CELSUM program which then outputs a cell-by-cell summary formatted according to the requirements of the host GIS. Cross-correlation of the LANDSAT layer with the other layers in the data base is accomplished with the analysis and display facilities of the GIS.

  11. Toward multidisciplinary use of LANDSAT: Interfacing computerized LANDSAT analysis systems with geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The LANDSAT-geographic information system (GIS) interface must summarize the results of the LANDSAT classification over the same cells that serve as geographic referencing units for the GIS, and output these summaries on a cell-by-cell basis in a form that is readable by the input routines of the GIS. The ZONAL interface for cell-oriented systems consists of two primary programs. The PIXCEL program scans the grid of cells and outputs a channel of pixels. Each pixel contains not the reflectance values but the identifier of the cell in which the center of the pixel is located. This file of pixelized cells along with the results of a pixel-by-pixel classification of the scene produced by the LANDSAT analysis system are input to the CELSUM program which then outputs a cell-by-cell summary formatted according to the requirements of the host GIS. Cross-correlation of the LANDSAT layer with the other layers in the data base is accomplished with the analysis and display facilities of the GIS.

  12. Macro controlling of copper oxide deposition processes and spray mode by using home-made fully computerized spray pyrolysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, Mohammed Sh.; Chiad, Bahaa T.; Shafeeq, Omer Sh.

    2017-09-01

    Thin Films of Copper Oxide (CuO) absorption layer have been deposited using home-made Fully Computerized Spray Pyrolysis Deposition system FCSPD on glass substrates, at the nozzle to substrate distance equal to 20,35 cm, and computerized spray mode (continues spray, macro-control spray). The substrate temperature has been kept at 450 °c with the optional user can enter temperature tolerance values ± 5 °C. Also that fixed molar concentration of 0.1 M, and 2D platform speed or deposition platform speed of 4mm/s. more than 1000 instruction program code, and specific design of graphical user interface GUI to fully control the deposition process and real-time monitoring and controlling the deposition temperature at every 200 ms. The changing in the temperature has been recorded during deposition processes, in addition to all deposition parameters. The films have been characterized to evaluate the thermal distribution over the X, Y movable hot plate, the structure and optical energy gap, thermal and temperature distribution exhibited a good and uniform distribution over 20 cm2 hot plate area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature and can be assigned to monoclinic CuO structure. Optical band gap varies from 1.5-1.66 eV depending on deposition parameter.

  13. Interactive whiteboards in third grade science instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Grier

    Strategies have been put into place to affect improvement in science achievement, including the use of Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs) in science instruction. IWBs enable rich resources, appropriate pacing, and multimodal presentation of content deemed as best practices. Professional development experiences, use of resources, instructional practices, and changes in professional behavior in science teachers were recorded. Also recorded were differences in the engagement and motivation of students in IWB classrooms versus IWB-free classrooms and observed differences in students' problem solving, critical thinking, and collaboration. Using a mixed-method research design quantitative data were collected to identify achievement levels of the target population on the assumption that all students, regardless of ability, will achieve greater mastery of science content in IWB classrooms. Qualitative data were collected through observations, interviews, videotapes, and a survey to identify how IWBs lead to increased achievement in third grade classrooms and to develop a record of teachers' professional practices, and students' measures of engagement and motivation. Comparative techniques determined whether science instruction is more effective in IWB classroom than in IWB-free classrooms. The qualitative findings concluded that, compared to science teachers who work in IWB-free settings, elementary science teachers who used IWBs incorporated more resources to accommodate learning objectives and the varied abilities and learning styles of their students. They assessed student understanding more frequently and perceived their classrooms as more collaborative and interactive. Furthermore, they displayed willingness to pursue professional development and employed different engagement strategies. Finally, teachers who used IWBs supported more instances of critical thinking and problem-solving. Quantitative findings concluded that students of all ability levels were more motivated

  14. Just What the Doctor Ordered. Review of the Evidence of the Impact of Computerized Physician Order Entry System on Medication Errors

    PubMed Central

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Duval, Sue; Du, Jing; Kane, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between computerization of physician orders and prescribing medication errors. Data Sources Studies published in English language were identified through MEDLINE (1990 through December 2005), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Of 252 identified in the search, 12 (4.8 percent) original investigations that compared rates of prescribing medication errors with handwritten and computerized physician orders were included. Data Collection Information on study design, participant characteristics, clinical settings, and outcomes rates were abstracted independently by two investigators using a standardized protocol. Principal Findings Compared with handwritten orders, 80 percent of studies (8/10 studies) reported a significant reduction in total prescribing errors, 43 percent in dosing errors (3/7 studies), and 37.5 percent in adverse drug events (3/8 studies). The use of computerized orders was associated with a 66 percent reduction in total prescribing errors in adults (odds ratio [OR]=0.34; 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 0.22–0.52) and a positive tendency in children (p for interaction=.028). The benefit of computerized orders was larger when the rate of errors was more than 12 percent with handwritten orders (p for interaction=.022). Significant heterogeneity in the results compromised pooled relative risks. One randomized controlled intervention demonstrated the greatest benefits of computerized orders on total prescribing errors (OR=0.02, 95 percent CI 0.01–0.02) and dosing errors (OR=0.28; 95 percent CI 0.15–0.52) with 775 avoided prescribing errors (95 percent CI 752–811) per 1,000 orders in a pediatric hospital. Conclusions Computerization of physicians' orders shows great promise. It will be more effective when linked to other computerized systems to detect and prevent prescribing errors. PMID:18211517

  15. Computerized tomography calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Herbert P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A set of interchangeable pieces comprising a computerized tomography calibrator, and a method of use thereof, permits focusing of a computerized tomographic (CT) system. The interchangeable pieces include a plurality of nestable, generally planar mother rings, adapted for the receipt of planar inserts of predetermined sizes, and of predetermined material densities. The inserts further define openings therein for receipt of plural sub-inserts. All pieces are of known sizes and densities, permitting the assembling of different configurations of materials of known sizes and combinations of densities, for calibration (i.e., focusing) of a computerized tomographic system through variation of operating variables thereof. Rather than serving as a phanton, which is intended to be representative of a particular workpiece to be tested, the set of interchangeable pieces permits simple and easy standardized calibration of a CT system. The calibrator and its related method of use further includes use of air or of particular fluids for filling various openings, as part of a selected configuration of the set of pieces.

  16. Computerized surveillance of diabetic patient/health care delivery system interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bryant, D; Van Son, A; Davis, P J; Segal, C

    1978-01-01

    DIASURV is a computerized surveillance program developed to monitor the interaction of a large cohort of diabetic patients with a tertiary care institution. The input of this simple program consists of a file of diabetic patients, the daily census of hospital inpatients, and the daily census of hospital outpatients. Written in COBOL, the program consists of edit and file-maintenance components and inpatient and outpatient search components. The output is a daily listing of all inpatient (x- = 60) and outpatient transactions (x- = 20) for the cohort of 1,800 patients. The output also summarizes previous exposures of patients to specific bedside and classroom activities in diabetes education. DIASURV has a variety of applications in terms of organization of teaching efforts and facilitated access to a limited amount of patient management information.

  17. Mosquito Information Management Project (MIMP): Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: culicidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    4 MOSQUITO INFORMATION MANAGEMENT PROJECT (MIMP): *APPLICATION OF A COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE I INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO...1983 to August 1984 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO MEDI- 6 EFRIGOG EOTNME * CALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) .v PEnRMN OG

  18. Potential impact of a computerized system to report late-arriving laboratory results in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Greenes, D S; Fleisher, G R; Kohane, I

    2000-10-01

    Results of some laboratory tests for Emergency Department (ED) patients return hours to days after the patient is discharged. Inadequate follow-up for these late-arriving results poses medical and legal risks. We have developed, but not yet implemented, a computerized system called the Automated Late-Arriving Results Monitoring System (ALARMS). ALARMS scans the hospital's laboratory and ED registration databases to generate an electronic daily log of all late-arriving abnormal laboratory results for ED patients. To determine the potential impact of ALARMS by assessing our ED's current quality of documented follow-up of late-arriving laboratory results. We applied ALARMS retrospectively, to find all abnormal late-arriving laboratory results returned between 5/1/96 and 4/30/98 for ED patients for the following three tests: serum lead levels, Chlamydia cultures, or urine pregnancy tests. Medical records were reviewed for documentation of follow-up, which was considered appropriate if a clinician noted the abnormal result and documented a follow-up plan within 1 week after the result became available. Medical records were also reviewed for any evidence of complications attributable to delayed or inadequate follow-up. Over the 2-year study period, no appropriate follow-up was documented in 6/18 (33%) cases of elevated lead levels, 3/4 (75%) cases of late-arriving positive pregnancy tests, and 23/39 (59%) cases of positive Chlamydia cultures. One case of a positive Chlamydia culture, for which there was no documented follow-up, was associated with subsequent development of pelvic inflammatory disease. Our current system of documented follow-up for late-arriving laboratory results has deficiencies. ALARMS, a computerized system of alerts for emergency physicians, has the potential to substantially improve documented follow-up of late-arriving laboratory results in the ED.

  19. Visual thinking in action: visualizations as used on whiteboards.

    PubMed

    Walny, Jagoda; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Venolia, Gina; Fawcett, Philip

    2011-12-01

    While it is still most common for information visualization researchers to develop new visualizations from a data- or taskdriven perspective, there is growing interest in understanding the types of visualizations people create by themselves for personal use. As part of this recent direction, we have studied a large collection of whiteboards in a research institution, where people make active use of combinations of words, diagrams and various types of visuals to help them further their thought processes. Our goal is to arrive at a better understanding of the nature of visuals that are created spontaneously during brainstorming, thinking, communicating, and general problem solving on whiteboards. We use the qualitative approaches of open coding, interviewing, and affinity diagramming to explore the use of recognizable and novel visuals, and the interplay between visualization and diagrammatic elements with words, numbers and labels. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on information visualization design. © 2011 IEEE

  20. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive instruction. To date, most video lectures are live lecture recordings or screencasts. The hand-animated "whiteboard" video is an alternative to these more common styles and affords unique creative opportunities such as stop-motion animation or visual "demonstrations" of phenomena that would be difficult to demo in a classroom. In the spring of 2013, a series of whiteboard-style videos were produced to provide video lecture content for Georgia Tech introductory physics instruction, including flipped courses and a MOOC. This set of videos (which also includes screencasts and live recordings) can be found on the "Your World is Your Lab" YouTube channel. In this article, we describe this method of video production, which is suitable for an instructor working solo or in collaboration with students; we explore students' engagement with these videos in a separate work. A prominent example of whiteboard animation is the "Minute Physics" video series by Henry Reich, whose considerable popularity and accessible, cartoony style were the original inspiration for our own video lectures.

  1. A Computerized System to Assess Axillary Lymph Node Malignancy from Sonographic Images.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Aneta; Dufort, Paul; Scaranelo, Anabel M

    2015-10-01

    A computational approach to classifying axillary lymph node metastasis in sonographic images is described. One hundred five ultrasound images of axillary lymph nodes from patients with breast cancer were evaluated (81 benign and 24 malignant), and each lymph node was manually segmented, delineating both the whole lymph node and internal hilum surfaces. Normalized signed distance transforms were computed from the segmented boundaries of both structures, and each pixel was then assigned coordinates in a 3-D feature space according to the pixel's intensity, its signed distance to the node boundary and its signed distance to the hilum boundary. Three-dimensional histograms over the feature space were accumulated for each node by summing over all pixels, and the bin counts served as predictor inputs to a support vector machine learning algorithm. Repeated random sampling of 80/25 train/test splits was used to estimate generalization performance and generate receiver operating characteristic curves. The optimal classifier had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.95 and sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 0.90. Our results indicate the feasibility of axillary nodal staging with computerized analysis. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a computerized decision support system in improving pharmacological management in high-risk cardiovascular patients: A cluster-randomized open-label controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mazzaglia, Giampiero; Piccinni, Carlo; Filippi, Alessandro; Sini, Giovanna; Lapi, Francesco; Sessa, Emiliano; Cricelli, Iacopo; Cutroneo, Paola; Trifirò, Gianluca; Cricelli, Claudio; Caputi, Achille Patrizio

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of computerized decision support system in improving the prescription of drugs for cardiovascular prevention. A total of 197 Italian general practitioners were randomly allocated to receive either the alerting computerized decision support system integrated into standard software (intervention arm) or the standard software alone (control arm). Data on 21230 patients with diabetes, 3956 with acute myocardial infarction, and 2158 with stroke were analysed. The proportion of patients prescribed with cardiovascular drugs and days of drug-drug interaction exposure were evaluated. Computerized decision support system significantly increased the proportion of patients with diabetes prescribed with antiplatelet drugs (intervention: +2.7% vs. +0.15%; p < 0.001) or lipidlowering drugs (+4.2% vs. +2.8%; p = 0.001). A statistically significant decrease in days of potential interactions has been observed only among patients with stroke (-1.2 vs. -0.5 days/person-year; p = 0.001). In conclusion, computerized decision support system significantly increased the use of recommended cardiovascular drugs in diabetic patients, but it did not influence the exposure to potential interactions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Computerized technology for restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2013-06-01

    Computers have had a meaningful impact on the dental office and dental practice leading to significant changes in communication, financial accounting, and administrative functions. Computerized systems have more recently generated increasing diversity of application for the delivery of patient treatment. Digital impression systems and chairside CAD/CAM systems offer opportunities to integrate digital impressions and full contour restorations in the dental office. Systems rely on single image and video cameras to record the digital file that is the foundation for an accurate outcome. This article presents key aspects of computerized technology using the CAD/CAM process.

  4. Use an Interactive Whiteboard: Get a Handle on How This Technology Can Spice up the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are desirable peripherals these days. When hooked up to a computer, the whiteboard's screen becomes a "live" computer desktop, which can be tapped to pull down menus, highlight, and move or open files. Users can also circle relevant sections on the projected image, draw geometric figures, and underline. Then they can save…

  5. Tips for Using Interactive Whiteboards to Increase Participation of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitby, Peggy J. S.; Leininger, Mark L.; Grillo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Whiteboard technology has become commonplace in the inclusive classroom and has the potential to merge traditional teaching pedagogy with the technological age. However, teachers report little training on how to incorporate whiteboards into lesson planning. The number of students with disabilities educated in the general education setting has…

  6. Use an Interactive Whiteboard: Get a Handle on How This Technology Can Spice up the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Interactive whiteboards are desirable peripherals these days. When hooked up to a computer, the whiteboard's screen becomes a "live" computer desktop, which can be tapped to pull down menus, highlight, and move or open files. Users can also circle relevant sections on the projected image, draw geometric figures, and underline. Then they can save…

  7. Exploring the Contribution of a Content-Infused Interactive Whiteboard for School Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManis, Lilla D.; Gunnewig, Susan B.; McManis, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the relationship between use of an interactive (touchscreen) whiteboard and development of school readiness skills. Over one school year, public school regular education prekindergarten classrooms used an interactive whiteboard with preloaded literacy and math activities. The children were low-income and English…

  8. Getting the Most out of Your Interactive Whiteboard: A Practical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttner, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Put your interactive whiteboard to immediate use with confidence and skill, and launch your classroom directly into the 21st-century! In this book, teacher and SMART-Certified Trainer Amy Buttner provides clear, practical steps for making the most of your interactive whiteboard, plus other multimedia tools and the web. You'll learn how to design…

  9. Tips for Using Interactive Whiteboards to Increase Participation of Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitby, Peggy J. S.; Leininger, Mark L.; Grillo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Whiteboard technology has become commonplace in the inclusive classroom and has the potential to merge traditional teaching pedagogy with the technological age. However, teachers report little training on how to incorporate whiteboards into lesson planning. The number of students with disabilities educated in the general education setting has…

  10. The Impact of Formal and Informal Professional Development Opportunities on Primary Teachers' Adoption of Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Cathy; Scrimshaw, Peter; Somekh, Bridget; Haldane, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the approaches undertaken to support the development of teachers' uses of interactive whiteboards in the Primary Schools Whiteboard Expansion project. Mixed methods were used to identify practices and staff perceptions about the extent and impact of professional development through surveys (initially from 528 schools),…

  11. The Effects of Interactive Whiteboards (IWBs) on Student Performance and Learning: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGregorio, Peter; Sobel-Lojeski, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Many K-12 and higher-ed schools in both the United States and the United Kingdom have made a substantial investment in interactive whiteboard technology. Interactive whiteboards (IWBs) are generally perceived by students and teachers as a positive addition to the classroom learning environment. While there is support for links between IWBs and…

  12. Interactive Whiteboards, Interactivity and Play in the Classroom with Children Aged Three to Seven Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Alex

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the current use of interactive whiteboards in the teaching and learning of children aged three to seven years in Wales, UK. It considers both teachers' and children's reflections regarding the use of this "novel" technology. Observations in 30 classrooms with interactive whiteboards (IWB) and interviews with teachers…

  13. [Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of computerized decision support systems in Italian hospitals: a grounded theory study].

    PubMed

    Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Galuppo, Laura; Gorli, Mara; Maraldi, Marco; Ruggiero, Francesca; Capobussi, Matteo; Banzi, Rita; Kwag, Koren; Scaratti, Giuseppe; Nanni, Oriana; Ruggieri, Pietro; Polo Friz, Hernan; Cimminiello, Claudio; Bosio, Marco; Mangia, Massimo; Moja, Lorenzo

    2015-04-01

    Computerized Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) connect health care professionals with high-quality, evidence-based information at the point-of-care to guide clinical decision-making. Current research shows the potential of CDSSs to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The mere provision of the technology, however, does not guarantee its uptake. This qualitative study aims to explore the barriers and facilitators to the use of CDSSs as identified by health providers. The study was performed in three Italian hospitals, each characterized by a different level of familiarity with the CDSS technology. We interviewed frontline physicians, nurses, information technology staff, and members of the hospital board of directors (n=24). A grounded theory approach informed our sampling criteria as well as the data collection and analysis. The adoption of CDSSs by health care professionals can be represented as a process that consists of six "positionings," each corresponding to an individual's use and perceived mastery of the technology. In conditions of low mastery, the CDSS is perceived as an object of threat, an unfamiliar tool that is difficult to control. On the other hand, individuals in conditions of high mastery view the CDSS as a helpful tool that can be locally adapted and integrated with clinicians' competences to fulfil their needs. In the first positionings, the uptake of CDSSs is hindered by representational obstacles. The last positionings, alternatively, featured technical obstacles to CDSS uptake. Our model of CDSS adoption can guide hospital administrators interested in the future integration of CDSSs to evaluate their organizational contexts, identify potential challenges to the implementation of the technology, and develop an effective strategy to address them. Our findings also allow reflections concerning the misalignment between most Italian hospitals and the current innovation trends toward the uptake of computerized decision support

  14. Implementation of a simple innovative system for postprescription antibiotic review based on computerized tools with shared access.

    PubMed

    Bouchand, F; Dinh, A; Roux, A L; Davido, B; Michelon, H; Lepainteur, M; Legendre, B; El Sayed, F; Pierre, I; Salomon, J; Lawrence, C; Perronne, C; Villart, M; Crémieux, A-C

    2017-03-01

    Controlling antibiotic use in healthcare establishments limits their consumption and the emergence of bacterial resistance. To evaluate the efficiency of an innovative antibiotic stewardship strategy implemented over three years in a university hospital. An antimicrobial multi-disciplinary team (AMT) [pharmacist, microbiologist and infectious disease specialist (IDS)] conducted a postprescription review. Specific coding of targeted antibiotics (including broad-spectrum β-lactams, glycopeptides, lipopeptides, fluoroquinolones and carbapenems) in the computerized physician order entry allowed recording of all new prescriptions. The data [patient, antibiotic(s), prescription start date, etc.] were registered on an AMT spreadsheet with shared access, where the microbiologist's opinion on the drug choice, based on available microbiology results, was entered. When the microbiologist and pharmacist did not approve the antibiotic prescribed, a same-day alert was generated and sent to the IDS. That alert led the IDS to re-evaluate the treatment. From 2012 to 2014, 2106 targeted antibiotic prescriptions were reviewed. Among them, 389 (18.5%) generated an alert and 293 (13.9%) were re-evaluated by the IDS. Recommendations (mostly de-escalation or discontinuation) were necessary for 136 (46.4%) and the prescribers' acceptance rate was 97%. The estimated intervention time was <30 min/day for each AMT member. This system allowed correct use of targeted antibiotics for 91.8% of prescriptions, but had no significant impact on targeted antibiotic consumption. This computerized, shared access, antibiotic stewardship strategy seems to be time saving, and effectively limited misuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Digital video analysis of health professionals' interactions with an electronic whiteboard: a longitudinal, naturalistic study of changes to user interactions.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Kushniruk, Andre

    2013-12-01

    As hospital departments continue to introduce electronic whiteboards in real clinical settings a range of human factor issues have emerged and it has become clear that there is a need for improved methods for designing and testing these systems. In this study, we employed a longitudinal and naturalistic method in the usability evaluation of an electronic whiteboard system. The goal of the evaluation was to explore the extent to which usability issues experienced by users change as they gain more experience with the system. In addition, the paper explores the use of a new approach to collection and analysis of continuous digital video recordings of naturalistic "live" user interactions. The method developed and employed in the study included recording the users' interactions with system during actual use using screen-capturing software and analyzing these recordings for usability issues. In this paper we describe and discuss both the method and the results of the evaluation. We found that the electronic whiteboard system contains system-related usability issues that did not change over time as the clinicians collectively gained more experience with the system. Furthermore, we also found user-related issues that seemed to change as the users gained more experience and we discuss the underlying reasons for these changes. We also found that the method used in the study has certain advantages over traditional usability evaluation methods, including the ability to collect analyze live user data over time. However, challenges and drawbacks to using the method (including the time taken for analysis and logistical issues in doing live recordings) should be considered before utilizing a similar approach. In conclusion we summarize our findings and call for an increased focus on longitudinal and naturalistic evaluations of health information systems and encourage others to apply and refine the method utilized in this study.

  16. Implementation and evaluation of an integrated computerized asthma management system in a pediatric emergency department: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dexheimer, Judith W; Abramo, Thomas J; Arnold, Donald H; Johnson, Kevin; Shyr, Yu; Ye, Fei; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Patel, Neal; Aronsky, Dominik

    2014-11-01

    The use of evidence-based guidelines can improve the care for asthma patients. We implemented a computerized asthma management system in a pediatric emergency department (ED) to integrate national guidelines. Our objective was to determine whether patient eligibility identification by a probabilistic disease detection system (Bayesian network) combined with an asthma management system embedded in the workflow decreases time to disposition decision. We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial in an urban, tertiary care pediatric ED. All patients 2-18 years of age presenting to the ED between October 2010 and February 2011 were screened for inclusion by the disease detection system. Patients identified to have an asthma exacerbation were randomized to intervention or control. For intervention patients, asthma management was computer-driven and workflow-integrated including computer-based asthma scoring in triage, and time-driven display of asthma-related reminders for re-scoring on the electronic patient status board combined with guideline-compliant order sets. Control patients received standard asthma management. The primary outcome measure was the time from triage to disposition decision. The Bayesian network identified 1339 patients with asthma exacerbations, of which 788 had an asthma diagnosis determined by an ED physician-established reference standard (positive predictive value 69.9%). The median time to disposition decision did not differ among the intervention (228 min; IQR=(141, 326)) and control group (223 min; IQR=(129, 316)); (p=0.362). The hospital admission rate was unchanged between intervention (25%) and control groups (26%); (p=0.867). ED length of stay did not differ among intervention (262 min; IQR=(165, 410)) and control group (247 min; IQR=(163, 379)); (p=0.818). The control and intervention groups were similar in regards to time to disposition; the computerized management system did not add additional wait time. The time to

  17. Implementation and Evaluation of an Integrated Computerized Asthma Management System in a Pediatric Emergency Department: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dexheimer, Judith W; Abramo, Thomas J; Arnold, Donald H; Johnson, Kevin; Shyr, Yu; Ye, Fei; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Patel, Neal; Aronsky, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Objective The use of evidence-based guidelines can improve the care for asthma patients. We implemented a computerized asthma management system in a pediatric emergency department (ED) to integrate national guidelines. Our objective was to determine whether patient eligibility identification by a probabilistic disease detection system (Bayesian network) combined with an asthma management system embedded in the workflow decreases time to disposition decision. Methods We performed a prospective, randomized controlled trial in an urban, tertiary care pediatric ED. All patients 2–18 years of age presenting to the ED between October 2010 and February 2011 were screened for inclusion by the disease detection system. Patients identified to have an asthma exacerbation were randomized to intervention or control. For intervention patients, asthma management was computer-driven and workflow-integrated including computer-based asthma scoring in triage, and time-driven display of asthma-related reminders for re-scoring on the electronic patient status board combined with guideline-compliant order sets. Control patients received standard asthma management. The primary outcome measure was the time from triage to disposition decision. Results The Bayesian network identified 1,339 patients with asthma exacerbations, of which 788 had an asthma diagnosis determined by an ED physician-established reference standard (positive predictive value 69.9%). The median time to disposition decision did not differ among the intervention (228 minutes; IQR=(141, 326)) and control group (223 minutes; IQR= (129, 316));(p=0.362). The hospital admission rate was unchanged between intervention (25%) and control groups (26%); (p=0.867). ED length of stay did not differ among intervention (262 minutes; IQR=(165, 410)) and control group (247 minutes; IQR=(163, 379));(p=0.818). Conclusions The control and intervention groups were similar in regards to time to disposition; the computerized management

  18. It's the writing on the wall: Whiteboards improve inpatient satisfaction with provider communication.

    PubMed

    Singh, Siddhartha; Fletcher, Kathlyn E; Pandl, G John; Schapira, Marilyn M; Nattinger, Ann B; Biblo, Lee A; Whittle, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Although keeping patients informed is a part of quality hospital care, inpatients often report they are not well informed. The authors placed whiteboards in each patient room on medicine wards in their hospital and asked nurses and physicians to use them to improve communication with inpatients. The authors then examined the effect of these whiteboards by comparing satisfaction with communication of patients discharged from medical wards before and after whiteboards were placed to satisfaction with communication of patients from surgical wards that did not have whiteboards. Patient satisfaction scores (0-100 scale) with communication improved significantly on medicine wards: nurse communication (+6.4, P < .001), physician communication (+4.0, P = .04), and involvement in decision making (+6.3, P = .002). Patient satisfaction scores did not change significantly on surgical wards. There was no secular trend, and the authors excluded a trend in overall patient satisfaction. Whiteboards could be a simple and effective tool to increase inpatient satisfaction with communication.

  19. Pain Experience and Behavior Management in Pediatric Dentistry: A Comparison between Traditional Local Anesthesia and the Wand Computerized Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Garret-Bernardin, Annelyse; Cantile, Tiziana; D'Antò, Vincenzo; Galanakis, Alexandros; Fauxpoint, Gabriel; Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio; De Rosa, Sara; Vallogini, Giulia; Romeo, Umberto; Galeotti, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the pain experience and behavior during dental injection, using the Wand computerized delivery system versus conventional local anesthesia in children and adolescents. Methods. An observational crossover split mouth study was performed on 67 patients (aged 7 to 15 years), requiring local anesthesia for dental treatments in both sides of the dental arch. Patients received both types of injections in two separate appointments, one with the use of a Computer Delivery System (the Wand STA system) and one with the traditional syringe. The following data were recorded: pain rating; changes in heart rate; level of collaboration; patient satisfaction. The data were analyzed using ANOVA for quantitative outcomes and nonparametric analysis (Kruskal-Wallis) for qualitative parameters. Results. The use of the Wand system determined significantly lower pain ratings and lower increase of heart rate than the traditional syringe. During injection, the number of patients showing a relaxed behavior was higher with the Wand than with the traditional local anesthesia. The patient level of satisfaction was higher with the Wand compared to the conventional local anesthesia. Conclusions. The Wand system may provide a less painful injection when compared to the conventional local anesthesia and it seemed to be better tolerated with respect to a traditional syringe.

  20. Pain Experience and Behavior Management in Pediatric Dentistry: A Comparison between Traditional Local Anesthesia and the Wand Computerized Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    D'Antò, Vincenzo; Fauxpoint, Gabriel; De Rosa, Sara; Vallogini, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the pain experience and behavior during dental injection, using the Wand computerized delivery system versus conventional local anesthesia in children and adolescents. Methods. An observational crossover split mouth study was performed on 67 patients (aged 7 to 15 years), requiring local anesthesia for dental treatments in both sides of the dental arch. Patients received both types of injections in two separate appointments, one with the use of a Computer Delivery System (the Wand STA system) and one with the traditional syringe. The following data were recorded: pain rating; changes in heart rate; level of collaboration; patient satisfaction. The data were analyzed using ANOVA for quantitative outcomes and nonparametric analysis (Kruskal–Wallis) for qualitative parameters. Results. The use of the Wand system determined significantly lower pain ratings and lower increase of heart rate than the traditional syringe. During injection, the number of patients showing a relaxed behavior was higher with the Wand than with the traditional local anesthesia. The patient level of satisfaction was higher with the Wand compared to the conventional local anesthesia. Conclusions. The Wand system may provide a less painful injection when compared to the conventional local anesthesia and it seemed to be better tolerated with respect to a traditional syringe. PMID:28293129

  1. A computerized on-line power loss testing system for the steel industry, based on the RCP compensation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Khanlou, A.; Moses, A.J.; Meydan, T.; Beckley, P.

    1995-11-01

    The design and development of a novel, non-enwrapping power loss testing system which can be used to grade electrical steels directly on the production line has been described. The developed system incorporates the use of Rogowski Chattock Potentiometer (RCP) coils. These coils function as a zero field potential indicator between two defined points along the measuring region of a single specimen of electrical steel, hence making the surface magnetic field proportional to the magnetizing current. This enables the field component necessary for power loss measurement to be obtained from the magnetizing current which is more convenient in an on-line situation. The developed system has been fully computerized and it is shown that under static laboratory conditions the system correlates well with a deviation of only 2.5% from values obtained using the current standard, the Epstein Frame. The effect of strip motion on the measurements has also been investigated and discussed to understand how the system will perform on the actual production line.

  2. Preparation and use of preconstructed orders, order sets, and order menus in a computerized provider order entry system.

    PubMed

    Payne, Thomas H; Hoey, Patty J; Nichol, Paul; Lovis, Christian

    2003-01-01

    To describe the configuration and use of the computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system used for inpatient and outpatient care at the authors' facility. Description of order configuration entities, use patterns, and configuration changes in a production CPOE system. The authors extracted and analyzed the content of order configuration entities (order dialogs, preconfigured [quick] orders, order sets, and order menus) and determined the number of orders entered in their production order entry system over the previous three years. The authors measured use of these order configuration entities over a six-month period. They repeated the extract two years later to measure changes in these entities. CPOE system configuration, conducted before and after first production use, consisted of preparing 667 order dialogs, 5,982 preconfigured (quick) orders, and 513 order sets organized in 703 order menus for particular contexts, such as admission for a particular diagnosis. Fifty percent of the order dialogs, 57% of the quick orders, and 13% of the order sets were used within a six-month period. Over the subsequent two years, the volume of order configuration entities increased by 26%. These order configuration steps were time-consuming, but the authors believe they were important to increase the ordering speed and acceptability of the order entry software. Lessons learned in the process of configuring the CPOE ordering system are given. Better understanding of ordering patterns may make order configuration more efficient because many of the order configuration entities that were created were not used by clinicians.

  3. The process of development of a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system: Experiences from St Luke's Health System.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew; Miller, Suzanne; DeJong, Doug; House, John A; Dirks, Carl; Beasley, Brent

    2016-09-01

    To establish a process for the development of a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system and concurrently to prioritize alerts for Saint Luke's Health System. The process of prioritizing clinical decision support alerts included (a) consensus sessions to establish a prioritization process and identify clinical decision support alerts through a modified Delphi process and (b) a clinical decision support survey to validate the results. All members of our health system's physician quality organization, Saint Luke's Care as well as clinicians, administrators, and pharmacy staff throughout Saint Luke's Health System, were invited to participate in this confidential survey. The consensus sessions yielded a prioritization process through alert contextualization and associated Likert-type scales. Utilizing this process, the clinical decision support survey polled the opinions of 850 clinicians with a 64.7 percent response rate. Three of the top rated alerts were approved for the pre-implementation build at Saint Luke's Health System: Acute Myocardial Infarction Core Measure Sets, Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis within 4 h, and Criteria for Sepsis. This study establishes a process for developing a prioritization tool for a clinical decision support build within a computerized provider order entry system that may be applicable to similar institutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. 45 CFR 307.11 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... violence or child abuse); (xi) Indication of an order; (xii) Locate request type (optional); (xiii) Locate... to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED...

  5. 45 CFR 307.11 - Functional requirements for computerized support enforcement systems in operation by October 1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... violence or child abuse); (xi) Indication of an order; (xii) Locate request type (optional); (xiii) Locate... to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES COMPUTERIZED...

  6. Clinical decision support systems to improve utilization of thromboprophylaxis: a review of the literature and experience with implementation of a computerized physician order entry program.

    PubMed

    Adams, Paul; Riggio, Jeff M; Thomson, Lynda; Brandell-Marino, Renee; Merli, Geno

    2012-08-01

    A literature review was conducted of studies investigating the effectiveness of paper- and computer-based clinical decision support systems (CDSS) used with or without educational programs designed to increase the use of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis. Medline was searched on August 9, 2010, without limits on publication year, but with restrictions to English-language articles only. The search terms used were "venous thromboembolism," "deep vein thrombosis," "pulmonary embolism," "prophylaxis," "thromboprophylaxis," "computerized," "computerised," "decision support," "alerts," "reminder," "paper system," "risk assessment," and "risk score." All types of studies regarding the effects of CDSS on VTE prophylaxis rates were included. Studies were included if ≥ 1 post-implementation outcome was measured, such as rates of VTE, rates of prophylaxis prescribing, or guideline-adherence measures. Studies evaluating paper-based CDSS used different strategies, including risk-assessment forms with prophylaxis recommendations, standard order sets, and preprinted sticker reminders on patient notes. Paper-based systems consistently improved prophylaxis rates; however, in most studies, there was still room for improvement. Furthermore, the effect of paper-based CDSS on VTE rates was not conclusively established. Studies evaluating computer-based systems used approaches including risk-assessment models integrated in the computerized physician order entry system, with or without alerts, and automatic reminders on operating schedules. Computerized systems are associated with substantial improvements in the prescribing of appropriate prophylaxis and reductions in VTE events, particularly in medical patients. More robust systems can be established with computer-based rather than paper-based CDSS. A drawback of computerized systems is that some hospitals may not have adequate information technology system resources.

  7. Computerized Diagnostic Testing: Problems and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, David L.

    The use of computers to build diagnostic inferences is explored in two contexts. In computerized monitoring of liquid oxygen systems for the space shuttle, diagnoses are exact because they can be derived within a world which is closed. In computerized classroom testing of reading comprehension, programs deliver a constrained form of adaptive…

  8. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  9. Cassel Psych Center Computerized Biofeedback Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Cassel Psych Center, a computerized biofeedback clinic, where the "well" patient is a major concern, and where biofeedback instruments are used with computers to form a Computerized-Biofeedback Clinical Support System. The Center's activities are designed to parallel the services of the pathologist in a medical setting. (PAS)

  10. Effectiveness of computerized decision support systems linked to electronic health records: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren H; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-12-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I(2) = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I(2) = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes.

  11. A Pilot Study of a Computerized Decision Support System to Detect Invasive Fungal Infection in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Adam; Goeman, Emma; Vedi, Aditi; Mostaghim, Mona; Trahair, Toby; O'Brien, Tracey A; Palasanthiran, Pamela; McMullan, Brendan

    2015-11-01

    Computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) can provide indication-specific antimicrobial recommendations and approvals as part of hospital antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of a CDSS for surveillance of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in an inpatient hematology/oncology cohort. Between November 1, 2012, and October 31, 2013, pediatric hematology/oncology inpatients diagnosed with an IFI were identified through an audit of the CDSS and confirmed by medical record review. The results were compared to hospital diagnostic-related group (DRG) coding for IFI throughout the same period. A total of 83 patients were prescribed systemic antifungals according to the CDSS for the 12-month period. The CDSS correctly identified 19 patients with IFI on medical record review, compared with 10 patients identified by DRG coding, of whom 9 were confirmed to have IFI on medical record review. CDSS was superior to diagnostic coding in detecting IFI in an inpatient pediatric hematology/oncology cohort. The functionality of CDSS lends itself to inpatient infectious diseases surveillance but depends on prescriber adherence.

  12. Effectiveness of Computerized Decision Support Systems Linked to Electronic Health Records: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwag, Koren H.; Lytras, Theodore; Bertizzolo, Lorenzo; Brandt, Linn; Pecoraro, Valentina; Rigon, Giulio; Vaona, Alberto; Ruggiero, Francesca; Mangia, Massimo; Iorio, Alfonso; Kunnamo, Ilkka; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of computerized decision support systems (CDSSs) featuring rule- or algorithm-based software integrated with electronic health records (EHRs) and evidence-based knowledge. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. Information on system design, capabilities, acquisition, implementation context, and effects on mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes were extracted. Twenty-eight RCTs were included. CDSS use did not affect mortality (16 trials, 37395 patients; 2282 deaths; risk ratio [RR] = 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85, 1.08; I2 = 41%). A statistically significant effect was evident in the prevention of morbidity, any disease (9 RCTs; 13868 patients; RR = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.68, 0.99; I2 = 64%), but selective outcome reporting or publication bias cannot be excluded. We observed differences for costs and health service utilization, although these were often small in magnitude. Across clinical settings, new generation CDSSs integrated with EHRs do not affect mortality and might moderately improve morbidity outcomes. PMID:25322302

  13. MANX: A System for Computerized Control of and Data Acquisition from Behavioral Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    generator , library and utility package, compiler, and source programs. The MANX system generator is a program to generate a MANX RTS tailored to the...can be made easily without going through the system generation process. At system generation time, the MANX system generator searches through the...provided and documented by Data General for use on this computer. Four major components of the MANX software system are indicated in Figure 1(B): the system

  14. Patient whiteboards as a communication tool in the hospital setting: a survey of practices and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Niraj L; Green, Adrienne; Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Blegen, Mary A; Wachter, Robert M

    2010-04-01

    Patient whiteboards can serve as a communication tool between hospital providers and as a mechanism to engage patients in their care, but little is known about their current use or best practices. We surveyed bedside nurses, internal medicine housestaff, and hospitalists from the medical service at the University of California, San Francisco. A brief survey about self-reported whiteboard practices and their impact on patient care was administered via paper and a commercial online survey tool. Surveys were collected from 104 nurse respondents (81% response rate), 118 internal medicine housestaff (74% response rate), and 31 hospitalists (86% response rate). Nurses were far more likely to use and read whiteboards than physicians. While all respondents highly valued the utility of family contact information on whiteboards, nurses valued the importance of a "goal for the day" and an "anticipated discharge date" more than physicians. Most respondents believed that nurses should be responsible for accurate and updated information on whiteboards, that goals for the day should be created by a nurse and physician together, and that unavailability of pens was the greatest barrier to use. Despite differences in practice patterns of nurses and physicians in using whiteboards, our findings suggest that all providers value their potential as a tool to improve teamwork, communication, and patient care. Successful adoption of whiteboard use may be enhanced through strategies that emphasize a patient-centered focus while also addressing important barriers to use. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  15. Computerized proof techniques for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-12-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete mathematics. We demonstrate by examples how one can use these computerized proof techniques to raise students' interests in the discovery and proof of mathematical identities and enhance their problem-solving skills.

  16. Organization-wide adoption of computerized provider order entry systems: a study based on diffusion of innovations theory.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Bahlol; Timpka, Toomas; Vimarlund, Vivian; Uppugunduri, Srinivas; Svensson, Mikael

    2009-12-31

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been introduced to reduce medication errors, increase safety, improve work-flow efficiency, and increase medical service quality at the moment of prescription. Making the impact of CPOE systems more observable may facilitate their adoption by users. We set out to examine factors associated with the adoption of a CPOE system for inter-organizational and intra-organizational care. The diffusion of innovation theory was used to understand physicians' and nurses' attitudes and thoughts about implementation and use of the CPOE system. Two online survey questionnaires were distributed to all physicians and nurses using a CPOE system in county-wide healthcare organizations. The number of complete questionnaires analyzed was 134 from 200 nurses (67.0%) and 176 from 741 physicians (23.8%). Data were analyzed using descriptive-analytical statistical methods. More nurses (56.7%) than physicians (31.3%) stated that the CPOE system introduction had worked well in their clinical setting (P < 0.001). Similarly, more physicians (73.9%) than nurses (50.7%) reported that they found the system not adapted to their specific professional practice (P = < 0.001). Also more physicians (25.0%) than nurses (13.4%) stated that they did want to return to the previous system (P = 0.041). We found that in particular the received relative advantages of the CPOE system were estimated to be significantly (P < 0.001) higher among nurses (39.6%) than physicians (16.5%). However, physicians' agreements with the compatibility of the CPOE and with its complexity were significantly higher than the nurses (P < 0.001). Qualifications for CPOE adoption as defined by three attributes of diffusion of innovation theory were not satisfied in the study setting. CPOE systems are introduced as a response to the present limitations in paper-based systems. In consequence, user expectations are often high on their relative advantages as well as on a low level of

  17. The effect of computerized provider order entry systems on clinical care and work processes in emergency departments: a systematic review of the quantitative literature.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Andrew; Prgomet, Mirela; Paoloni, Richard; Creswick, Nerida; Hordern, Antonia; Walter, Scott; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-06-01

    We undertake a systematic review of the quantitative literature related to the effect of computerized provider order entry systems in the emergency department (ED). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Inspec, CINAHL, and CPOE.org for English-language studies published between January 1990 and May 2011. We identified 1,063 articles, of which 22 met our inclusion criteria. Sixteen used a pre/post design; 2 were randomized controlled trials. Twelve studies reported outcomes related to patient flow/clinical work, 7 examined decision support systems, and 6 reported effects on patient safety. There were no studies that measured decision support systems and its effect on patient flow/clinical work. Computerized provider order entry was associated with an increase in time spent on computers (up to 16.2% for nurses and 11.3% for physicians), with no significant change in time spent on patient care. Computerized provider order entry with decision support systems was related to significant decreases in prescribing errors (ranging from 17 to 201 errors per 100 orders), potential adverse drug events (0.9 per 100 orders), and prescribing of excessive dosages (31% decrease for a targeted set of renal disease medications). There are tangible benefits associated with computerized provider order entry/decision support systems in the ED environment. Nevertheless, when considered as part of a framework of technical, clinical, and organizational components of the ED, the evidence base is neither consistent nor comprehensive. Multimethod research approaches (including qualitative research) can contribute to understanding of the multiple dimensions of ED care delivery, not as separate entities but as essential components of a highly integrated system of care. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Computerized physician order entry-based system to prevent HBV reactivation in patients treated with biologic agents: the PRESCRIB project.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Blanca; Hernández-López, Cándido; Ferrandiz, José Ramón; Illaro, Aitziber; Fábrega, Emilio; Cuadrado, Antonio; Iruzubieta, Paula; Menéndez, Susana; Cabezas, Joaquín; Crespo, Javier

    2014-07-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) applications are widely used to prevent medical errors. In our center, a CPOE system has been in use since 2009 on both the inpatient and outpatient levels. A new and simple alert was introduced in the CPOE system to notify healthcare providers of the potential risk of viral reactivation when prescribing biological therapies, thereby facilitating the request for a serological profile (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg], anti-HBc, and anti-HBs) in patients who have not had these tests. Between May 2012 and May 2013, a total of 1,076 patients undergoing biological treatment were included in the implementation of the CPOE in our hospital, resulting in the identification of 4 HBsAg-positive and 69 anti-HBc-positive/HBsAg-negative patients, two of them with positive viral loads. Since the implementation of this alert system, over 90% of patients who were prescribed a biological drug (BD) have undergone serological screening to detect hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The use of the alert system has increased the screening rate from less than 50% to 94% for HBsAg and from less than 30% to 85% for anti-HBc in patients for whom a BD is prescribed. Six patients received prophylactic antiviral therapy. No patient had HBV reactivation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of implementing a CPOE system that has allowed our hospital to increase the rate of HBV screening. Its use has facilitated the identification of patients at high risk for HBV reactivation and permitted physicians to prescribe prophylactic measures according to current guidelines. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  19. A Low-Cost Computerized Film Analysis System for Sports Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lees, Adrian; Kerwin, David

    1982-01-01

    Describes a system in which the microcomputer is used to analyze athletic performance recorded on film and provide data on body movements to athletes and their coaches. Equipment, software, and one application of the system are discussed. (JJD)

  20. A Low-Cost Computerized Film Analysis System for Sports Biomechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lees, Adrian; Kerwin, David

    1982-01-01

    Describes a system in which the microcomputer is used to analyze athletic performance recorded on film and provide data on body movements to athletes and their coaches. Equipment, software, and one application of the system are discussed. (JJD)

  1. Effect of a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System on medication orders at a community hospital and university hospital.

    PubMed

    Wess, Mark L; Embi, Peter J; Besier, James L; Lowry, Chad H; Anderson, Paul F; Besier, Chris J; Thelen, Geriann; Hegner, Catherine J

    2007-10-11

    Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) has been demonstrated to improve the medication ordering process, but most published studies have been performed at academic hospitals. Little is known about the effects of CPOE at community hospitals. With a pre-post study design, we assessed the effects of a CPOE system on the medication ordering process at both a community and university hospital. The time from provider ordering to pharmacist verification decreased by two hours with CPOE at the community hospital (p<0.0001) and by one hour at the university hospital (p<0.0001). The rate of medication clarifications requiring signature was 2.80 percent pre-CPOE and 0.40 percent with CPOE (p<0.0001) at the community hospital. The university hospital was 2.76 percent pre-CPOE and 0.46 percent with CPOE (p<0.0001). CPOE improved medication order processing at both community and university hospitals. These findings add to the limited literature on CPOE in community hospitals.

  2. Effect of a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System on Medication Orders at a Community Hospital and University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wess, Mark L.; Embi, Peter J.; Besier, James L.; Lowry, Chad H.; Anderson, Paul F.; Besier, James C.; Thelen, Geriann; Hegner, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) has been demonstrated to improve the medication ordering process, but most published studies have been performed at academic hospitals. Little is known about the effects of CPOE at community hospitals. With a pre-post study design, we assessed the effects of a CPOE system on the medication ordering process at both a community and university hospital. The time from provider ordering to pharmacist verification decreased by two hours with CPOE at the community hospital (p<0.0001) and by one hour at the university hospital (p<0.0001). The rate of medication clarifications requiring signature was 2.80 percent pre-CPOE and 0.40 percent with CPOE (p<0.0001) at the community hospital. The university hospital was 2.76 percent pre-CPOE and 0.46 percent with CPOE (p<0.0001). CPOE improved medication order processing at both community and university hospitals. These findings add to the limited literature on CPOE in community hospitals. PMID:18693946

  3. Computerized mappings of the cerebral cortex: a multiresolution flattening method and a surface-based coordinate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, H. A.; Van Essen, D. C.; Anderson, C. H.; Lee, C. W.; Coogan, T. A.; Lewis, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a new method for generating two-dimensional maps of the cerebral cortex. Our computerized, two-stage flattening method takes as its input any well-defined representation of a surface within the three-dimensional cortex. The first stage rapidly converts this surface to a topologically correct two-dimensional map, without regard for the amount of distortion introduced. The second stage reduces distortions using a multiresolution strategy that makes gross shape changes on a coarsely sampled map and further shape refinements on progressively finer resolution maps. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating flat maps of the entire cerebral cortex in the macaque monkey and by displaying various types of experimental data on such maps. We also introduce a surface-based coordinate system that has advantages over conventional stereotaxic coordinates and is relevant to studies of cortical organization in humans as well as non-human primates. Together, these methods provide an improved basis for quantitative studies of individual variability in cortical organization.

  4. Preliminary Design of a Computerized Information System for Teacher Education Centers in Greater Cleveland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gorman, David E.

    This report describes an information system designed to aid individuals within the Greated Cleveland Teacher Education Centers. Three components of the system are specified: information gathering or input, a data bank, and reports. Following an overview of the teacher education centers and information system, the primary design of the information…

  5. Exploring Kepler’s laws using an interactive whiteboard and Algodoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorcic, Bor

    2015-09-01

    Combining an interactive whiteboard with the right software, and with an appropriate instructional approach, is crucial for its productive use in physics classrooms. We describe how the interactive whiteboard can be used in combination with a physics-based sandbox software program (Algodoo) to address the topic of Kepler’s laws. The proposed activity engages students in collaborative inquiry and draws on students’ experience in using touch-screen technology. Students engage in the manipulation of virtual objects on the interactive whiteboard and investigate Kepler’s laws by actively participating in the creation of planets, sending them into orbit, and representing their motion using a wide variety of virtual tools.

  6. Data engineering systems: Computerized modeling and data bank capabilities for engineering analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopp, H.; Trettau, R.; Zolotar, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Data Engineering System (DES) is a computer-based system that organizes technical data and provides automated mechanisms for storage, retrieval, and engineering analysis. The DES combines the benefits of a structured data base system with automated links to large-scale analysis codes. While the DES provides the user with many of the capabilities of a computer-aided design (CAD) system, the systems are actually quite different in several respects. A typical CAD system emphasizes interactive graphics capabilities and organizes data in a manner that optimizes these graphics. On the other hand, the DES is a computer-aided engineering system intended for the engineer who must operationally understand an existing or planned design or who desires to carry out additional technical analysis based on a particular design. The DES emphasizes data retrieval in a form that not only provides the engineer access to search and display the data but also links the data automatically with the computer analysis codes.

  7. Automation in an Addiction Treatment Research Clinic: Computerized Contingency Management, Ecological Momentary Assessment, and a Protocol Workflow System

    PubMed Central

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H.; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2009-01-01

    Issues A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients’ treatment needs and accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining, and querying the data. Approach We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialized applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for delivery of behavioral interventions, the Transactional Electronic Diary (TED) system for management of behavioral assessments, and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerized workflow automation and guidance of each participant’s daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorized staff. Key Findings ACM and TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80-patient capacity having an annual average of 18,000 patient-visits and 7,300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarize participant-safety data for research oversight. Implications and conclusion When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment-research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff, and expansions in research methods. PMID:19320669

  8. Total Library Computerization for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Joseph, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a general review of features of version 2.1 of Total Library Computerization (TLC) for Windows from On Point, Inc. Includes information about pricing, hardware and operating systems, modules/functions available, user interface, security, on-line catalog functions, circulation, cataloging, and documentation and online help. A table…

  9. DISCOVER: A Computerized Careers Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayman, Jack R.

    Liberal arts campuses are feeling a need to provide better career education services for their undergraduate students. The DISCOVER Foundation has developed a comprehensive computerized career guidance system for grades 7 through 12 which not only provides career information, but also performs such tasks as teaching students decision-making skills…

  10. Total Library Computerization for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Joseph, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a general review of features of version 2.1 of Total Library Computerization (TLC) for Windows from On Point, Inc. Includes information about pricing, hardware and operating systems, modules/functions available, user interface, security, on-line catalog functions, circulation, cataloging, and documentation and online help. A table…

  11. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  12. Computerizing a High School Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Errol A.; Chan, Jeanie

    1988-01-01

    Describes how the Swift-Current Comprehensive High School (Saskatchewan) library computerized to create an online catalog, provide access to remote databases, and acquire CD-ROM reference systems. Objectives, hardware and software selection and costs, implementation, and evaluation are discussed. Seven references are listed, and a directory of…

  13. Computerized Proof Techniques for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete…

  14. A Computerized Phonetics Instructor: BABEL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vila, Joaquin; Pearson, Lon

    1990-01-01

    Discusses a computerized phonetics program called BABEL, which is an expert system able to animate graphically and reproduce acoustically a text in any language that uses the Latin alphabet. The program is designed to assist language learners and instructors in the nuances of phonemes. (22 references) (GLR)

  15. Computerized tomography using video recorded fluoroscopic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kak, A. C.; Jakowatz, C. V., Jr.; Baily, N. A.; Keller, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized tomographic imaging system is examined which employs video-recorded fluoroscopic images as input data. By hooking the video recorder to a digital computer through a suitable interface, such a system permits very rapid construction of tomograms.

  16. MEDSIRCH: A Computerized System for the Retrieval of Multiple Choice Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazlett, C. B.

    Medsirch (Medical Search) is an information retrieval system designed to aid in preparing examinations for medical students. There are two versions of the system: a sequential access file suitable for shallow indexing with a broad choice of search terms and a random direct access file for deep indexing with a restricted range of choices for search…

  17. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    A single-scan radiography system has been interfaced to a minicomputer, and the combined system has been used with a variety of fluoroscopic systems and image intensifiers available in clinical facilities. The system's response range is analyzed, and several applications are described. These include determination of the gray scale for typical X-ray-fluoroscopic-television chains, measurement of gallstone volume in patients, localization of markers or other small anatomical features, determinations of organ areas and volumes, computer reconstruction of tomographic sections of organs in motion, and computer reconstruction of transverse axial body sections from fluoroscopic images. It is concluded that this type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing shows excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation.

  18. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    A single-scan radiography system has been interfaced to a minicomputer, and the combined system has been used with a variety of fluoroscopic systems and image intensifiers available in clinical facilities. The system's response range is analyzed, and several applications are described. These include determination of the gray scale for typical X-ray-fluoroscopic-television chains, measurement of gallstone volume in patients, localization of markers or other small anatomical features, determinations of organ areas and volumes, computer reconstruction of tomographic sections of organs in motion, and computer reconstruction of transverse axial body sections from fluoroscopic images. It is concluded that this type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing shows excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation.

  19. Unused information: detecting and applying eye contact data in computerized healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Lepinski, G Julian; Vertegaal, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Medical computing systems rely primarily on traditional human-computer interfaces, such as the keyboard, mouse and touch screen, however future systems will incorporate vastly enhanced interaction capabilities. Some of these, such as speech control and eye contact sensing, have begun to appear on the medical computing landscape. Eye contact provides computer systems with a wealth of yet-uncollected information about user attention and attentiveness, and may allow for personalized interfaces, while requiring almost no training to use. This paper introduces an advanced prototype of a gaze-enhanced speech recognition charting system for surgical nurses. We go on to discuss the implications of our system and of gaze detection in general for medical computing.

  20. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. Design: A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent treatment of a tooth with one of the techniques, and treatment of the homologous contralateral tooth with the other technique. The treatments consisted of restorations, endodontic procedures and simple extractions. Results: The study series comprised 12 females and 18 males with a mean age of 36.8 years. The 30 subjects underwent a total of 60 anesthetic procedures. Intraosseous and conventional oral anesthesia caused discomfort during administration in 46.3% and 32.1% of the patients, respectively. The latency was 7.1±2.23 minutes for the conventional technique and 0.48±0.32 for intraosseous anesthesia – the difference being statistically significant. The depth of the anesthetic effect was sufficient to allow the patients to tolerate the dental treatments. The duration of the anesthetic effect in soft tissues was 199.3 minutes with the conventional technique versus only 1.6 minutes with intraosseous anesthesia – the difference between the two techniques being statistically significant. Most of the patients (69.7%) preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Conclusions: The described intraosseous anesthetic system is effective, with a much shorter latency than the conventional technique, sufficient duration of anesthesia to perform the required dental treatments, and with a much lesser soft tissue anesthetic effect. Most of the patients preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Key words:Anesthesia, intraosseous, oral anesthesia, infiltrating, mandibular block, Quicksleeper®. PMID