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Sample records for computing technology client-server

  1. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is ``client-server.`` There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  2. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is client-server.'' There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  3. Implementing a Physician's Workstation using client/server technology and the distributed computing environment.

    PubMed Central

    Pham, T. Q.; Young, C. Y.; Tang, P. C.; Suermondt, H. J.; Annevelink, J.

    1994-01-01

    PWS is a physician's workstation research prototype developed to explore the use of information management tools by physicians in the context of patient care. The original prototype was implemented in a client/server architecture using a broadcast message server. As we expanded the scope of the prototyping activities, we identified the limitations of the broadcast message server in the areas of scalability, security, and interoperability. To address these issues, we reimplemented PWS using the Open Software Foundation's Distributed Computing Environment (DCE). We describe the rationale for using DCE, the migration process, and the benefits achieved. Future work and recommendations are discussed. PMID:7950003

  4. Client-Server Connection Status Monitoring Using Ajax Push Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamongie, Julien R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how simple client-server connection status monitoring can be implemented using Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), JSF (Java Server Faces) and ICEfaces technologies. This functionality is required for NASA LCS (Launch Control System) displays used in the firing room for the Constellation project. Two separate implementations based on two distinct approaches are detailed and analyzed.

  5. Client/server technology: Is it beneficial in the engineering information and information technology environment?

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    Client/server systems have been touted as the next step in the advance of the computer into modern, computer-aided drafting (CAD), computer-aided engineering (CAE), geographical information systems (GIS), engineering information (EI) technology, and information technology (IT) society, but they are not a solution to every organizations problems when it comes to advanced computer technology. Some of the ideas that are presented here are {open_quotes}old hat.{close_quotes} Then I ask you, why don`t we follow there {open_quotes}old hat{close_quotes} principles? This paper attempts and explores the advantages and disadvantages of these popular systems. The client/server architecture, apart from its ability to manage CAD/CAE/GIS and EI/IT and deliver it to decision makers in a timely fashion, offers many compelling advantages. There is, however, a downside to the widespread acceptance of the client/server environment. Users who expect to save money may be very disappointed. This paper provides a set of guidelines to help senior managers determine whether client/server computing is right for their CAD/CAE/GIS and IT organizations. From this point on, the abbreviations, CAD/CAE/GIS and EI/IT will be jointly referred to as {open_quotes}EI/IT{close_quotes} systems.

  6. Usage of Thin-Client/Server Architecture in Computer Aided Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimen, Caghan; Kavurucu, Yusuf; Aydin, Halit

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology, thin-client/server architecture has become popular in multi-user/single network environments. Thin-client is a user terminal in which the user can login to a domain and run programs by connecting to a remote server. Recent developments in network and hardware technologies (cloud computing, virtualization, etc.)…

  7. Client-server technology meets operational-planning challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.A.; Stansberry, C.J. Jr.; Le, K.D.; Ma, H.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities are starting to find that it is rather difficult to upgrade their proprietary energy management system, which was designed for real-time operations, fast enough to keep pace with rapidly changing business needs. To solve this problem, many utilities are building a data warehouse to store real-time data and using the data warehouse to launch client-server applications to meet their pressing business requirements. This article describes a client-server implementation launched at Tennessee Valley Authority in 1994 to meet the utility`s operational-planning needs. The article summarizes some of the lessons learned and outlines future development plans.

  8. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition to…

  9. Group-oriented coordination models for distributed client-server computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Hughes, Craig S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes group-oriented control models for distributed client-server interactions. These models transparently coordinate requests for services that involve multiple servers, such as queries across distributed databases. Specific capabilities include: decomposing and replicating client requests; dispatching request subtasks or copies to independent, networked servers; and combining server results into a single response for the client. The control models were implemented by combining request broker and process group technologies with an object-oriented communication middleware tool. The models are illustrated in the context of a distributed operations support application for space-based systems.

  10. Client/Server Architecture Promises Radical Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Grey; York, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses the emergence of the client/server paradigm for the delivery of computer applications, its emergence in response to the proliferation of microcomputers and local area networks, the applicability of the model in academic institutions, and its implications for college campus information technology organizations. (Author/DB)

  11. Client/server study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dezhgosha, Kamyar; Marcus, Robert; Brewster, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project is to find cost-effective and efficient strategies/solutions to integrate existing databases, manage network, and improve productivity of users in a move towards client/server and Integrated Desktop Environment (IDE) at NASA LeRC. The project consisted of two tasks as follows: (1) Data collection, and (2) Database Development/Integration. Under task 1, survey questionnaires and a database were developed. Also, an investigation on commercially available tools for automated data-collection and net-management was performed. As requirements evolved, the main focus has been task 2 which involved the following subtasks: (1) Data gathering/analysis of database user requirements, (2) Database analysis and design, making recommendations for modification of existing data structures into relational database or proposing a common interface to access heterogeneous databases(INFOMAN system, CCNS equipment list, CCNS software list, USERMAN, and other databases), (3) Establishment of a client/server test bed at Central State University (CSU), (4) Investigation of multi-database integration technologies/ products for IDE at NASA LeRC, and (5) Development of prototypes using CASE tools (Object/View) for representative scenarios accessing multi-databases and tables in a client/server environment. Both CSU and NASA LeRC have benefited from this project. CSU team investigated and prototyped cost-effective/practical solutions to facilitate NASA LeRC move to a more productive environment. CSU students utilized new products and gained skills that could be a great resource for future needs of NASA.

  12. Implementing a secure client/server application

    SciTech Connect

    Kissinger, B.A.

    1994-08-01

    There is an increasing rise in attacks and security breaches on computer systems. Particularly vulnerable are systems that exchange user names and passwords directly across a network without encryption. These kinds of systems include many commercial-off-the-shelf client/server applications. A secure technique for authenticating computer users and transmitting passwords through the use of a trusted {open_quotes}broker{close_quotes} and public/private keys is described in this paper.

  13. Client-server, distributed database strategies in a healthcare record system for a homeless population.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H. C.; Barnett, G. O.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-based healthcare record system being developed for Boston's Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) uses client-server and distributed database technologies to enhance the delivery of healthcare to patients of this unusual population. The needs of physicians, nurses and social workers are specifically addressed in the application interface so that an integrated approach to healthcare for this population can be facilitated. These patients and their providers have unique medical information needs that are supported by both database and applications technology. To integrate the information capabilities with the actual practice of providers of care to the homeless, this computer-based record system is designed for remote and portable use over regular phone lines. An initial standalone system is being used at one major BHCHP site of care. This project describes methods for creating a secure, accessible, and scalable computer-based medical record using client-server, distributed database design. PMID:8130445

  14. Sharing limited Ethernet resources with a client-server model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownless, D. M.; Burton, P. D.

    1994-12-01

    The new control system proposed for the ISIS facility at Rutherford uses an Ethernet spine to provide mutual communications between disparate equipment, including the control computers. This paper describes the limitations imposed on the use of Ethernet in Local/Wide Area Networks and how a client-server based system can be used to circumvent them. The actual system we developed is discussed with particular reference to the problems we have faced, implementing data standards and the performance statistics attained.

  15. Client-server, distributed database strategies in a health-care record system for a homeless population.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H C; Barnett, G O

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and develop a computer-based health-care record system to address the needs of the patients and providers of a homeless population. DESIGN: A computer-based health-care record system being developed for Boston's Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) uses client-server technology and distributed database strategies to provide a common medical record for this transient population. The differing information requirements of physicians, nurses, and social workers are specifically addressed in the graphic application interface to facilitate an integrated approach to health care. This computer-based record system is designed for remote and portable use to integrate smoothly into the daily practice of providers of care to the homeless. The system uses remote networking technology and regular phone lines to support multiple concurrent users at remote sites of care. RESULTS: A stand-alone, pilot system is in operation at the BHCHP medical respite unit. Information on 129 patient encounters from 37 unique sites has been entered. A full client-server system has been designed. Benchmarks show that while the relative performance of a communication link based upon a phone line is 0.07 to 0.15 that of a local area network, optimization permits adequate response. CONCLUSION: Medical records access in a transient population poses special problems. Use of client-server and distributed database strategies can provide a technical foundation that provides a secure, reliable, and accessible computer-based medical record in this environment. PMID:7719799

  16. Client/server approach to image capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris; Stokes, Earle

    1998-01-01

    The diversity of the digital image capturing devices on the market today is quite astonishing and ranges from low-cost CCD scanners to digital cameras (for both action and stand-still scenes), mid-end CCD scanners for desktop publishing and pre- press applications and high-end CCD flatbed scanners and drum- scanners with photo multiplier technology. Each device and market segment has its own specific needs which explains the diversity of the associated scanner applications. What all those applications have in common is the need to communicate with a particular device to import the digital images; after the import, additional image processing might be needed as well as color management operations. Although the specific requirements for all of these applications might differ considerably, a number of image capturing and color management facilities as well as other services are needed which can be shared. In this paper, we propose a client/server architecture for scanning and image editing applications which can be used as a common component for all these applications. One of the principal components of the scan server is the input capturing module. The specification of the input jobs is based on a generic input device model. Through this model we make abstraction of the specific scanner parameters and define the scan job definitions by a number of absolute parameters. As a result, scan job definitions will be less dependent on a particular scanner and have a more universal meaning. In this context, we also elaborate on the interaction of the generic parameters and the color characterization (i.e., the ICC profile). Other topics that are covered are the scheduling and parallel processing capabilities of the server, the image processing facilities, the interaction with the ICC engine, the communication facilities (both in-memory and over the network) and the different client architectures (stand-alone applications, TWAIN servers, plug-ins, OLE or Apple-event driven

  17. Client-Server: What Is It and Are We There Yet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenfeld, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses client-server architecture in dumb terminals, personal computers, local area networks, and graphical user interfaces. Focuses on functions offered by client personal computers: individualized environments; flexibility in running operating systems; advanced operating system features; multiuser environments; and centralized data…

  18. High performance medical image processing in client/server-environments.

    PubMed

    Mayer, A; Meinzer, H P

    1999-03-01

    As 3D scanning devices like computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) become more widespread, there is also an increasing need for powerful computers that can handle the enormous amounts of data with acceptable response times. We describe an approach to parallelize some of the more frequently used image processing operators on distributed memory architectures. It is desirable to make such specialized machines accessible on a network, in order to save costs by sharing resources. We present a client/server approach that is specifically tailored to the interactive work with volume data. Our image processing server implements a volume visualization method that allows the user to assess the segmentation of anatomical structures. We can enhance the presentation by combining the volume visualizations on a viewing station with additional graphical elements, which can be manipulated in real-time. The methods presented were verified on two applications for different domains. PMID:10094225

  19. UNIX based client/server hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Sakurai, K; Uchiyama, M; Yoshii, Y; Tachibana, N

    1995-01-01

    SMILE (St. Luke's Medical Center Information Linkage Environment) is a HIS which is a client/server system using a UNIX workstation under an open network, LAN(FDDI&10BASE-T). It provides a multivendor environment, high performance with low cost and a user-friendly GUI. However, the client/server architecture with a UNIX workstation does not have the same OLTP environment (ex. TP monor) as the mainframe. So, our system problems and the steps used to solve them were reviewed. Several points that are necessary for a client/server system with a UNIX workstation in the future are presented.

  20. Architecture: client/server moves into managed healthcare.

    PubMed

    Worthington, R

    1997-01-01

    The healthcare industry is in transition from indemnity-based products to managed care during a period marked by consolidation, competitiveness and increasingly demanding consumers. This powerful combination of industry change and customer interest requires more efficient operations and flexible information systems. Host-based managed care systems are running into limitations meeting business needs, creating a demand for client/server architectures. PMID:10164671

  1. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1997-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  2. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, A.M.

    1997-12-09

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  3. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1996-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  4. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1999-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  5. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, A.M.

    1996-08-06

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  6. Solid Waste Information and Tracking System Client Server Conversion Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    2000-02-10

    The Project Management Plan governing the conversion of SWITS to a client-server architecture. The PMP describes the background, planning and management of the SWITS conversion. Requirements and specification documentation needed for the SWITS conversion

  7. Client/Server data serving for high performance computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Chris

    1994-01-01

    This paper will attempt to examine the industry requirements for shared network data storage and sustained high speed (10's to 100's to thousands of megabytes per second) network data serving via the NFS and FTP protocol suite. It will discuss the current structural and architectural impediments to achieving these sorts of data rates cost effectively today on many general purpose servers and will describe and architecture and resulting product family that addresses these problems. The sustained performance levels that were achieved in the lab will be shown as well as a discussion of early customer experiences utilizing both the HIPPI-IP and ATM OC3-IP network interfaces.

  8. A client/server system for remote diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Tong, D A; Gajjala, V; Widman, L E

    1995-01-01

    Health care practitioners are often faced with the task of interpreting complex heart rhythms from electrocardiograms (ECGs) produced by 12-lead ECG machines, ambulatory (Holter) monitoring systems, and intensive-care unit monitors. Usually, the practitioner caring for the patient does not have specialized training in cardiology or in ECG interpretation; and commercial programs that interpret 12-lead ECGs have been well-documented in the medical literature to perform poorly at analyzing cardiac rhythm. We believe that a system capable of providing comprehensive ECG interpretation as well as access to online consultations will be beneficial to the health care system. We hypothesized that we could develop a client-server based telemedicine system capable of providing access to (1) an on-line knowledge-based system for remote diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias and (2) an on-line cardiologist for real-time interactive consultation using readily available resources on the Internet. Furthermore, we hypothesized that Macintosh and Microsoft Windows-based personal computers running an X server could function as the delivery platform for the developed system. Although we were successful in developing such a system that will run efficiently on a UNIX-based work-station, current personal computer X server software are not capable of running the system efficiently.

  9. Developing and Marketing a Client/Server-Based Data Warehouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Michele; And Others

    1993-01-01

    To provide better access to information, the University of Arizona information technology center has designed a data warehouse accessible from the desktop computer. A team approach has proved successful in introducing and demonstrating a prototype to the campus community. (Author/MSE)

  10. Distributed analysis with CRAB: The client-server architecture evolution and commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Codispoti, G.; Cinquilli, M.; Fanfani, A.; Fanzago, F.; Farina, F.; Lacaprara, S.; Miccio, V.; Spiga, D.; Vaandering, E.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) is the tool used by CMS to enable running physics analysis in a transparent manner over data distributed across many sites. It abstracts out the interaction with the underlying batch farms, grid infrastructure and CMS workload management tools, such that it is easily usable by non-experts. CRAB can be used as a direct interface to the computing system or can delegate the user task to a server. Major efforts have been dedicated to the client-server system development, allowing the user to deal only with a simple and intuitive interface and to delegate all the work to a server. The server takes care of handling the users jobs during the whole lifetime of the users task. In particular, it takes care of the data and resources discovery, process tracking and output handling. It also provides services such as automatic resubmission in case of failures, notification to the user of the task status, and automatic blacklisting of sites showing evident problems beyond what is provided by existing grid infrastructure. The CRAB Server architecture and its deployment will be presented, as well as the current status and future development. In addition the experience in using the system for initial detector commissioning activities and data analysis will be summarized.

  11. Analysis of Java Client/Server and Web Programming Tools for Development of Educational Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muldner, Tomasz

    This paper provides an analysis of old and new programming tools for development of client/server programs, particularly World Wide Web-based programs. The focus is on development of educational systems that use interactive shared workspaces to provide portable and expandable solutions. The paper begins with a short description of relevant terms.…

  12. Advanced 3-D analysis, client-server systems, and cloud computing—Integration of cardiovascular imaging data into clinical workflows of transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Mathis; Falkner, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis is highly prevalent in the aging populations of industrialized countries and is associated with poor prognosis. Surgical valve replacement has been the only established treatment with documented improvement of long-term outcome. However, many of the older patients with aortic stenosis (AS) are high-risk or ineligible for surgery. For these patients, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has emerged as a treatment alternative. The TAVR procedure is characterized by a lack of visualization of the operative field. Therefore, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for patient selection, pre-procedural planning, and intra-operative decision-making. Incremental to conventional angiography and 2-D echocardiography, multidetector computed tomography (CT) has assumed an important role before TAVR. The analysis of 3-D CT data requires extensive post-processing during direct interaction with the dataset, using advance analysis software. Organization and storage of the data according to complex clinical workflows and sharing of image information have become a critical part of these novel treatment approaches. Optimally, the data are integrated into a comprehensive image data file accessible to multiple groups of practitioners across the hospital. This creates new challenges for data management requiring a complex IT infrastructure, spanning across multiple locations, but is increasingly achieved with client-server solutions and private cloud technology. This article describes the challenges and opportunities created by the increased amount of patient-specific imaging data in the context of TAVR. PMID:24282750

  13. Visualization of roaming client/server connection patterns during a wirelessly enabled disaster response drill.

    PubMed

    Calvitti, Alan; Lenert, Leslie A; Brown, Steven W

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of how well a multiple client server system is functioning is a difficult task. In this poster we present visualization tools for such assessments. Arranged on a timeline, UDP client connection events are point-like. TCP client events are structured into intervals. Informative patterns and correlations are revealed by both sets. For the latter, comparison of two visualization schemes on the same timeline yields additional insights.

  14. The Fermilab experience: Integration of UNIX systems in a HEP computing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pabrai, U.

    1991-03-01

    There is an increased emphasis within organizations to migrate to a distributed computing environment. Among the factors responsible for this migration are: (1) a proliferation of high performance systems based on processors such as the Intel 80{times}86, Motorola 680{times}0, RISC architecture CPU's such as MIPS R{times}000, Sun SPARC, Motorola 88000 and Intel 860 series; (2) a significant reduction in hardware costs; (3) configuration based on existing local area network technology; and (4) the same (to a large extent) operating system on all platforms. A characteristic of distributed computing is that communication takes the form of request-reply pairs. This is also referred to as the client-server model. The client-server model is rapidly growing in popularity and in many scientific and engineering environments is replacing transaction-based and mainframe systems. Over the last few years, Fermilab has been in the process of migrating to a client-server model of computing.

  15. Association of Small Computer Users in Education (ASCUE) Summer Conference. Proceedings (27th, North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, June 12-16, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huston, Rick, Ed.; Armel, Donald, Ed.

    Topics addressed by 40 papers from a conference on microcomputers include: developing a campus wide computer ethics policy; integrating new technologies into professional education; campus computer networks; computer assisted instruction; client/server architecture; competencies for entry-level computing positions; auditing and professional…

  16. PhenoDB: an integrated client/server database for linkage and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K H; Nadkarni, P; Silverstein, S; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; Miller, P; Kidd, K K

    1996-08-01

    In this paper we describe PhenoDB, an Internet-accessible client/server database application for population and linkage genetics. PhenoDB stores genetic marker data on pedigrees and populations. A database for population and linkage genetics requires two core functions: data management tasks, such as interactive validation during data entry and editing, and data analysis tasks, such as generating summary population statistics and performing linkage analyses. In PhenoDB we attempt to make these tasks as easy as possible. The client/server architecture allows efficient management and manipulation of large datasets via an easy-to-use graphical interface. PhenoDB data (73 populations, 34 pedigrees, approximately 4200 individuals, and close to 80,000 typings) are stored in a generic format that can be readily exported to (or imported from) the file formats required by various existing analysis programs such as LIPED and Lathrop and Lalouel's Multipoint Linkage. PhenoDB allows performance of complex ad-hoc queries and can generate reports for use in project management. Finally, PhenoDB can produce statistical summaries such as allele frequencies, phenotype frequencies, and Chi-square tests of Hardy-Weinberg ratios of population/pedigree data. PMID:8812078

  17. PhenoDB: an integrated client/server database for linkage and population genetics.

    PubMed

    Cheung, K H; Nadkarni, P; Silverstein, S; Kidd, J R; Pakstis, A J; Miller, P; Kidd, K K

    1996-08-01

    In this paper we describe PhenoDB, an Internet-accessible client/server database application for population and linkage genetics. PhenoDB stores genetic marker data on pedigrees and populations. A database for population and linkage genetics requires two core functions: data management tasks, such as interactive validation during data entry and editing, and data analysis tasks, such as generating summary population statistics and performing linkage analyses. In PhenoDB we attempt to make these tasks as easy as possible. The client/server architecture allows efficient management and manipulation of large datasets via an easy-to-use graphical interface. PhenoDB data (73 populations, 34 pedigrees, approximately 4200 individuals, and close to 80,000 typings) are stored in a generic format that can be readily exported to (or imported from) the file formats required by various existing analysis programs such as LIPED and Lathrop and Lalouel's Multipoint Linkage. PhenoDB allows performance of complex ad-hoc queries and can generate reports for use in project management. Finally, PhenoDB can produce statistical summaries such as allele frequencies, phenotype frequencies, and Chi-square tests of Hardy-Weinberg ratios of population/pedigree data.

  18. Student Information Systems Demystified: The Increasing Demand for Accurate, Timely Data Means Schools and Districts Are Relying Heavily on SIS Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Todd

    2004-01-01

    Student information systems, one of the first applications of computer technology in education, are undergoing a significant transition yet again. The first major shift in SIS technologies occurred about 15 years ago when they evolved from mainframe programs to client-server solutions. Now, vendors across the board are offering centralized…

  19. Whisker: a client-server high-performance multimedia research control system.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Rudolf N; Aitken, Michael R F

    2010-11-01

    We describe an original client-server approach to behavioral research control and the Whisker system, a specific implementation of this design. The server process controls several types of hardware, including digital input/output devices, multiple graphical monitors and touchscreens, keyboards, mice, and sound cards. It provides a way to access this hardware for client programs, communicating with them via a simple text-based network protocol based on the standard Internet protocol. Clients to implement behavioral tasks may be written in any network-capable programming language. Applications to date have been in experimental psychology and behavioral and cognitive neuroscience, using rodents, humans, nonhuman primates, dogs, pigs, and birds. This system is flexible and reliable, although there are potential disadvantages in terms of complexity. Its design, features, and performance are described. PMID:21139173

  20. Solid waste information and tracking system client-server conversion project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    May, D.L.

    1998-04-15

    This Project Management Plan is the lead planning document governing the proposed conversion of the Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) to a client-server architecture. This plan presents the content specified by American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards for software development, with additional information categories deemed to be necessary to describe the conversion fully. This plan is a living document that will be reviewed on a periodic basis and revised when necessary to reflect changes in baseline design concepts and schedules. This PMP describes the background, planning and management of the SWITS conversion. It does not constitute a statement of product requirements. Requirements and specification documentation needed for the SWITS conversion will be released as supporting documents.

  1. A Rich Client-Server Based Framework for Convenient Security and Management of Mobile Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badan, Stephen; Probst, Julien; Jaton, Markus; Vionnet, Damien; Wagen, Jean-Frédéric; Litzistorf, Gérald

    Contact lists, Emails, SMS or custom applications on a professional smartphone could hold very confidential or sensitive information. What could happen in case of theft or accidental loss of such devices? Such events could be detected by the separation between the smartphone and a Bluetooth companion device. This event should typically block the applications and delete personal and sensitive data. Here, a solution is proposed based on a secured framework application running on the mobile phone as a rich client connected to a security server. The framework offers strong and customizable authentication and secured connectivity. A security server manages all security issues. User applications are then loaded via the framework. User data can be secured, synchronized, pushed or pulled via the framework. This contribution proposes a convenient although secured environment based on a client-server architecture using external authentications. Several features of the proposed system are exposed and a practical demonstrator is described.

  2. FRIEND Engine Framework: a real time neurofeedback client-server system for neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Rodrigo; Garrido, Griselda J.; Sato, João R.; Hoefle, Sebastian; Melo, Bruno R. P.; Pamplona, Fabricio A.; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In this methods article, we present a new implementation of a recently reported FSL-integrated neurofeedback tool, the standalone version of “Functional Real-time Interactive Endogenous Neuromodulation and Decoding” (FRIEND). We will refer to this new implementation as the FRIEND Engine Framework. The framework comprises a client-server cross-platform solution for real time fMRI and fMRI/EEG neurofeedback studies, enabling flexible customization or integration of graphical interfaces, devices, and data processing. This implementation allows a fast setup of novel plug-ins and frontends, which can be shared with the user community at large. The FRIEND Engine Framework is freely distributed for non-commercial, research purposes. PMID:25688193

  3. ANTHEPROT: an integrated protein sequence analysis software with client/server capabilities.

    PubMed

    Deléage, G; Combet, C; Blanchet, C; Geourjon, C

    2001-07-01

    Programs devoted to the analysis of protein sequences exist either as stand-alone programs or as Web servers. However, stand-alone programs can hardly accommodate for the analysis that involves comparisons on databanks, which require regular updates. Moreover, Web servers cannot be as efficient as stand-alone programs when dealing with real-time graphic display. We describe here a stand-alone software program called ANTHEPROT, which is intended to perform protein sequence analysis with a high integration level and clients/server capabilities. It is an interactive program with a graphical user interface that allows handling of protein sequence and data in a very interactive and convenient manner. It provides many methods and tools, which are integrated into a graphical user interface. ANTHEPROT is available for Windows-based systems. It is able to connect to a Web server in order to perform large-scale sequence comparison on up-to-date databanks. ANTHEPROT is freely available to academic users and may be downloaded at http://pbil.ibcp.fr/ANTHEPROT.

  4. A client-server software for the identification of groundwater vulnerability to pesticides at regional level.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, Andrea; Finizio, Antonio

    2015-10-15

    The groundwater VULnerability to PESticide software system (VULPES) is a user-friendly, GIS-based and client-server software developed to identify vulnerable areas to pesticides at regional level making use of pesticide fate models. It is a Decision Support System aimed to assist the public policy makers to investigate areas sensitive to specific substances and to propose limitations of use or mitigation measures. VULPES identify the so-called Uniform Geographical Unit (UGU) which are areas characterised by the same agro-environmental conditions. In each UGU it applies the PELMO model obtaining the 80th percentile of the substance concentration at 1 metre depth; then VULPES creates a vulnerability map in shapefile format which classifies the outputs comparing them with the lower threshold set to the legal limit concentration in groundwater (0.1 μg/l). This paper describes the software structure in details and a case study with the application of the terbuthylazine herbicide on the Lombardy region territory. Three zones with different degrees of vulnerabilities has been identified and described. PMID:26047858

  5. A client-server software for the identification of groundwater vulnerability to pesticides at regional level.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, Andrea; Finizio, Antonio

    2015-10-15

    The groundwater VULnerability to PESticide software system (VULPES) is a user-friendly, GIS-based and client-server software developed to identify vulnerable areas to pesticides at regional level making use of pesticide fate models. It is a Decision Support System aimed to assist the public policy makers to investigate areas sensitive to specific substances and to propose limitations of use or mitigation measures. VULPES identify the so-called Uniform Geographical Unit (UGU) which are areas characterised by the same agro-environmental conditions. In each UGU it applies the PELMO model obtaining the 80th percentile of the substance concentration at 1 metre depth; then VULPES creates a vulnerability map in shapefile format which classifies the outputs comparing them with the lower threshold set to the legal limit concentration in groundwater (0.1 μg/l). This paper describes the software structure in details and a case study with the application of the terbuthylazine herbicide on the Lombardy region territory. Three zones with different degrees of vulnerabilities has been identified and described.

  6. Prototype client/server application for biomedical text/image retrieval on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Berman, Lewis E.; Thoma, George R.

    1996-03-01

    At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), a prototype image database retrieval system has been built. This medical information retrieval system (MIRS) is a client/server application which provides Internet access to biomedical databases, including both text search/retrieval and retrieval/display of medical images associated with the text records. The MIRS graphical user interface (GUI) allows a user to formulate queries by simple, intuitive interactions with screen buttons, list boxes, and edit boxes; these interactions create structured query language (SQL) queries, which are submitted to a database manager running at NLM. The result of a MIRS query is a display showing both scrollable text records and scrollable images returned for all of the 'hits' of the query. MIRS is designed as an information-delivery vehicle intended to provide access to multiple collections of medical text and image data. The database used for initial MIRS evaluation consists of national survey data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics, including 17,000 spinal x-ray images. This survey, conducted on a sample of 27,801 persons, collected demographic, socioeconomic, and medical information, including both interview results and results acquired by direct examination by physician.

  7. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  8. Reviews of computing technology: Software overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorn, W.R.; Johnson, A.L.

    1994-01-05

    The Savannah River Site Computing Architecture states that the site computing environment will be standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented. Larger server systems deliver needed information to users in a client-server relationship. Goals of the Architecture include utilizing computing resources effectively, maintaining a high level of data integrity, developing a robust infrastructure, and storing data in such a way as to promote accessibility and usability. This document describes the current storage environment at Savannah River Site (SRS) and presents some of the problems that will be faced and strategies that are planned over the next few years.

  9. Telematics-based online client-server/client collaborative environment for radiotherapy planning simulations.

    PubMed

    Kum, Oyeon

    2007-11-01

    Customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient is very useful for both a patient and a doctor because it provides the ability to deliver higher doses to a more accurately defined tumor and at the same time lower doses to organs at risk and normal tissues. This can be realized by building an accurate planning simulation system to provide better treatment strategies based on each patient's tomographic data such as CT, MRI, PET, or SPECT. In this study, we develop a real-time online client-server/client collaborative environment between the client (health care professionals or hospitals) and the server/client under a secure network using telematics (the integrated use of telecommunications and medical informatics). The implementation is based on a point-to-point communication scheme between client and server/client following the WYSIWIS (what you see is what I see) paradigm. After uploading the patient tomographic data, the client is able to collaborate with the server/client for treatment planning. Consequently, the level of health care services can be improved, specifically for small radiotherapy clinics in rural/remote-country areas that do not possess much experience or equipment such as a treatment planning simulator. The telematics service of the system can also be used to provide continued medical education in radiotherapy. Moreover, the system is easy to use. A client can use the system if s/he is familiar with the Windows(TM) operating system because it is designed and built based on a user-friendly concept. This system does not require the client to continue hardware and software maintenance and updates. These are performed automatically by the server.

  10. A Client-Server Computational Tool for Integrated Artificial Intelligence Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder, Lawrence B.; Cook, Diane J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of a Web-based multimedia delivery method of increasing students' interest in artificial intelligence (AI). The course material features an integrated simulation environment that allows students to develop and test AI algorithms in a dynamic and uncertain visual environment. Evaluated the effect of the simulation on the…

  11. Managing attribute--value clinical trials data using the ACT/DB client-server database system.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, P M; Brandt, C; Frawley, S; Sayward, F G; Einbinder, R; Zelterman, D; Schacter, L; Miller, P L

    1998-01-01

    ACT/DB is a client-server database application for storing clinical trials and outcomes data, which is currently undergoing initial pilot use. It stores most of its data in entity-attribute-value form. Such data are segregated according to data type to allow indexing by value when possible, and binary large object data are managed in the same way as other data. ACT/DB lets an investigator design a study rapidly by defining the parameters (or attributes) that are to be gathered, as well as their logical grouping for purposes of display and data entry. ACT/DB generates customizable data entry. The data can be viewed through several standard reports as well as exported as text to external analysis programs. ACT/DB is designed to encourage reuse of parameters across multiple studies and has facilities for dictionary search and maintenance. It uses a Microsoft Access client running on Windows 95 machines, which communicates with an Oracle server running on a UNIX platform. ACT/DB is being used to manage the data for seven studies in its initial deployment.

  12. Surfing for Data: A Gathering Trend in Data Storage Is the Use of Web-Based Applications that Make It Easy for Authorized Users to Access Hosted Server Content with Just a Computing Device and Browser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, the widespread availability of networks and the flexibility of Web browsers have shifted the industry from a client-server model to a Web-based one. In the client-server model of computing, clients run applications locally, with the servers managing storage, printing functions, and network traffic. Because every client is…

  13. Verifying the secure setup of Unix client/servers and detection of network intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, R.; Bruestle, H.R.; Bartoletti, T.; Saroyan, A.; Fisher, J.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes our technical approach to developing and delivering Unix host- and network-based security products to meet the increasing challenges in information security. Today`s global ``Infosphere`` presents us with a networked environment that knows no geographical, national, or temporal boundaries, and no ownership, laws, or identity cards. This seamless aggregation of computers, networks, databases, applications, and the like store, transmit, and process information. This information is now recognized as an asset to governments, corporations, and individuals alike. This information must be protected from misuse. The Security Profile Inspector (SPI) performs static analyses of Unix-based clients and servers to check on their security configuration. SPI`s broad range of security tests and flexible usage options support the needs of novice and expert system administrators alike. SPI`s use within the Department of Energy and Department of Defense has resulted in more secure systems, less vulnerable to hostile intentions. Host-based information protection techniques and tools must also be supported by network-based capabilities. Our experience shows that a weak link in a network of clients and servers presents itself sooner or later, and can be more readily identified by dynamic intrusion detection techniques and tools. The Network Intrusion Detector (NID) is one such tool. NID is designed to monitor and analyze activity on an Ethernet broadcast Local Area Network segment and produce transcripts of suspicious user connections. NID`s retrospective and real-time modes have proven invaluable to security officers faced with ongoing attacks to their systems and networks.

  14. Development of an integrated modelling framework: comparing client-server and demand-driven control flow for model execution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Karssenberg, Derek; de Jong, Kor; de Kok, Jean-Luc; de Jong, Steven M.

    2014-05-01

    The construction of hydrological models at the catchment or global scale depends on the integration of component models representing various environmental processes, often operating at different spatial and temporal discretisations. A flexible construction of spatio-temporal model components, a means to specify aggregation or disaggregation to bridge discretisation discrepancies, ease of coupling these into complex integrated models, and support for stochastic modelling and the assessment of model outputs are the desired functionalities for the development of integrated models. These functionalities are preferably combined into one modelling framework such that domain specialists can perform exploratory model development without the need to change their working environment. We implemented an integrated modelling framework in the Python programming language, providing support for 1) model construction and 2) model execution. The framework enables modellers to represent spatio-temporal processes or to specify spatio-temporal (dis)aggregation with map algebra operations provided by the PCRaster library. Model algebra operations can be used by the modeller to specify the exchange of data and therefore the coupling of components. The framework determines the control flow for the ordered execution based on the time steps and couplings of the model components given by the modeller. We implemented two different control flow mechanisms. First, a client-server approach is used with a central entity controlling the execution of the component models and steering the data exchange. Second, a demand-driven approach is used that triggers the execution of a component model when data is requested by a coupled component model. We show that both control flow mechanisms allow for the execution of stochastic, multi-scale integrated models. We examine the implications of each control flow mechanism on the terminology used by the modeller to specify integrated models, and illustrate the

  15. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In this age of the computer, more and more business firms are automating their operations for increased efficiency in a great variety of jobs, from simple accounting to managing inventories, from precise machining to analyzing complex structures. In the interest of national productivity, NASA is providing assistance both to longtime computer users and newcomers to automated operations. Through a special technology utilization service, NASA saves industry time and money by making available already developed computer programs which have secondary utility. A computer program is essentially a set of instructions which tells the computer how to produce desired information or effect by drawing upon its stored input. Developing a new program from scratch can be costly and time-consuming. Very often, however, a program developed for one purpose can readily be adapted to a totally different application. To help industry take advantage of existing computer technology, NASA operates the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC)(registered TradeMark),located at the University of Georgia. COSMIC maintains a large library of computer programs developed for NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and other technology-generating agencies of the government. The Center gets a continual flow of software packages, screens them for adaptability to private sector usage, stores them and informs potential customers of their availability.

  16. Computers boost structural technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.

    1989-01-01

    Derived from matrix methods of structural analysis and finite element methods developed over the last three decades, computational structures technology (CST) blends computer science, numerical analysis, and approximation theory into structural analysis and synthesis. Recent significant advances in CST include stochastic-based modeling, strategies for performing large-scale structural calculations on new computing systems, and the integration of CST with other disciplinary modules for multidisciplinary analysis and design. New methodologies have been developed at NASA for integrated fluid-thermal structural analysis and integrated aerodynamic-structure-control design. The need for multiple views of data for different modules also led to the development of a number of sophisticated data-base management systems. For CST to play a role in the future development of structures technology and in the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles, major advances and computational tools are needed in a number of key areas.

  17. The Role and Design of an Integrated Clinical Result Database within a Client-Server Networked Hospital Information System Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmak, Peter M.; Kahane, Stephen N.; Arseniev, Marina; Tolchin, Stephen G.; Lenhard, Raymond E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a central clinical result database that is being developed to support the laboratory, radiology, and surgical pathology services of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. This database will contain all the impatient and outpatient tests, and will be networked to permit viewing of patient results from any terminal, PC, or workstation. The design of the database, how it is networked, and how the system addresses the health care provider-to-computer interface are discussed in detail.

  18. Pacific Missile Test Center Information Resources Management Organization (code 0300): The ORACLE client-server and distributed processing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, A. L.; Phillips, J. T.

    1990-06-10

    Computing architectures using distributed processing and distributed databases are increasingly becoming considered acceptable solutions for advanced data processing systems. This is occurring even though there is still considerable professional debate as to what truly'' distributed computing actually is and despite the relative lack of advanced relational database management software (RDBMS) capable of meeting database and system integrity requirements for developing reliable integrated systems. This study investigates the functionally of ORACLE data base management software that is performing distributed processing between a MicroVAX/VMS minicomputer and three MS-DOS-based microcomputers. The ORACLE database resides on the MicroVAX and is accessed from the microcomputers with ORACLE SQL*NET, DECnet, and ORACLE PC TOOL PACKS. Data gathered during the study reveals that there is a demonstrable decrease in CPU demand on the MicroVAX, due to distributed processing'', when the ORACLE PC Tools are used to access the database as opposed to database access from dumb'' terminals. Also discovered were several hardware/software constraints that must be considered in implementing various software modules. The results of the study indicate that this distributed data processing architecture is becoming sufficiently mature, reliable, and should be considered for developing applications that reduce processing on central hosts. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Intelligent self-configuring client-server analysis software for high-resolution X and gamma-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Carlson, J.

    1995-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing isotopic analysis software that is constructed to be adaptable to a wide variety of applications and requirements. The MGA++ project will develop an analysis capability based on an architecture consisting of a set of tools that can be configured by an executive to perform a specific task. The software will check the results or progress of an analysis and change assumptions and methodology as required to arrive at an optimum analysis. The software is intended to address analysis needs that arise from material control and accountability, treaty verification, complex reconfiguration and environmental clean-up applications.

  20. Client-Server Password Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Łukasz; Hoepman, Jaap-Henk; van Rossum, Peter

    Human memory is not perfect - people constantly memorize new facts and forget old ones. One example is forgetting a password, a common problem raised at IT help desks. We present several protocols that allow a user to automatically recover a password from a server using partial knowledge of the password. These protocols can be easily adapted to the personal entropy setting [7], where a user can recover a password only if he can answer a large enough subset of personal questions.

  1. Roadmap to the SRS computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.

    1994-07-05

    This document outlines the major steps that must be taken by the Savannah River Site (SRS) to migrate the SRS information technology (IT) environment to the new architecture described in the Savannah River Site Computing Architecture. This document proposes an IT environment that is {open_quotes}...standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented, with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.{close_quotes} Achieving this vision will require many substantial changes in the computing applications, systems, and supporting infrastructure at the site. This document consists of a set of roadmaps which provide explanations of the necessary changes for IT at the site and describes the milestones that must be completed to finish the migration.

  2. Modern control centers and computer networking

    SciTech Connect

    Dy-Liacco, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The automation of power system operation is generally achieved with the implementation of two control centers, one for the operation of the generation-transmission system and the other for the operation of the distribution system. These control centers are referred to, respectively, as the energy management system (EMS) and the distribution management system (DMS). The EMS may consist of several control centers in a hierarchy. The DMS may be made up of several independent distribution control centers. This article features the fundamental design aspects of modern EMS and DMS control centers (computer networks, distributed processing, and distributed databases), the linking of computer networks, and the communications that support such internetworking. The extension of such networking beyond the confines of system operation to other corporate networks is now made practical by the maturing concepts of client-server architectures and by the availability of modern communication technologies.

  3. Trends in AFIS technology: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardwell, Guy; Bavarian, Behnam

    1997-01-01

    Automated Fingerprint Identification has a history of more than 20 years. In the last 5 years, there has been an explosion of technologies that have dramatically changed the face of AFIS. Few other engineering and science fields offer such a widespread use of technology as does computerized fingerprint recognition. Optics, computer vision, computer graphics, artificial intelligence, artificial neural networks, parallel processing, distributed client server applications, fault tolerant computing, scaleable architectures, local and wide area networking, mass storage, databases, are a few of the fields that have made quantum leaps in recent years. All of these improvements have a dramatic effect on the size, speed, and accuracy of automated fingerprint identification systems. ThIs paper offers a historical overview of these trends and discuss the state of the art. It culminates with an overview an educated forecast on future systems, especially those 'real time' systems for use in area of law enforcement and civil/commercial applications.

  4. Computer Technology in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slider, Patty; Hodges, Kathy; Carter, Cea; White, Barbara

    This publication provides materials to help adult educators use computer technology in their teaching. Section 1, Computer Basics, contains activities and materials on these topics: increasing computer literacy, computer glossary, parts of a computer, keyboard, disk care, highlighting text, scrolling and wrap-around text, setting up text,…

  5. Computing technology in the 1980's. [computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have been led by consistently improving semiconductor technology. The semiconductor industry has turned out ever faster, smaller, and less expensive devices since transistorized computers were first introduced 20 years ago. For the next decade, there appear to be new advances possible, with the rate of introduction of improved devices at least equal to the historic trends. The implication of these projections is that computers will enter new markets and will truly be pervasive in business, home, and factory as their cost diminishes and their computational power expands to new levels. The computer industry as we know it today will be greatly altered in the next decade, primarily because the raw computer system will give way to computer-based turn-key information and control systems.

  6. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  7. Nursing Education Update: Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothler, Ann M.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of nursing faculty showed that 91 percent of nursing education programs had faculty members who had attended or participated in a conference on computers during 1983 and 1984. Other survey responses concerned computer applications integrated into nursing courses, required courses in computer technology, and computer-assisted instruction.…

  8. [Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, James (Technical Monitor); Merkey, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  9. Computer and information technology: hardware.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D

    1998-02-01

    Computers open the door to an ever-expanding arena of knowledge and technology. Most nurses practicing in perianesthesia setting were educated before the computer era, and many fear computers and the associated technology. Frequently, the greatest difficulty is finding the resources and knowing what questions to ask. The following is the first in a series of articles on computers and information technology. This article discusses computer hardware to get the novice started or the experienced user upgraded to access new technologies and the Internet. Future articles will discuss start up and usual software applications, getting up to speed on the information superhighway, and other technologies that will broaden our knowledge and expand our personal and professional world. PMID:9543967

  10. Decoding Technology: Computer Shortcuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2008-01-01

    For the typical early childhood administrator, there will never be enough hours in a day to finish the work that needs to be done. This includes numerous hours spent on a computer tracking enrollment, managing the budget, researching curriculum ideas online, and many other administrative tasks. Improving an administrator's computer efficiency can…

  11. Computers, Technology, and Disability. [Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC. HEATH Resource Center.

    This paper describes programs and resources that focus on access of postsecondary students with disabilities to computers and other forms of technology. Increased access to technological devices and services is provided to students with disabilities under the Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act (Tech Act). Section…

  12. Computers: Educational Technology Paradox?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Hajah Rugayah Hj.; Mustapha, Wan Narita

    2005-01-01

    As we move further into the new millennium, the need to involve and adapt learners with new technology have been the main aim of many institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The involvement of the government in huge technology-based projects like the Multimedia Super Corridor Highway (MSC) and one of its flagships, the Smart Schools have…

  13. "MedTRIS" (Medical Triage and Registration Informatics System): A Web-based Client Server System for the Registration of Patients Being Treated in First Aid Posts at Public Events and Mass Gatherings.

    PubMed

    Gogaert, Stefan; Vande Veegaete, Axel; Scholliers, Annelies; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    First aid (FA) services are provisioned on-site as a preventive measure at most public events. In Flanders, Belgium, the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders (BRCF) is the major provider of these FA services with volunteers being deployed at approximately 10,000 public events annually. The BRCF has systematically registered information on the patients being treated in FA posts at major events and mass gatherings during the last 10 years. This information has been collected in a web-based client server system called "MedTRIS" (Medical Triage and Registration Informatics System). MedTRIS contains data on more than 200,000 patients at 335 mass events. This report describes the MedTRIS architecture, the data collected, and how the system operates in the field. This database consolidates different types of information with regards to FA interventions in a standardized way for a variety of public events. MedTRIS allows close monitoring in "real time" of the situation at mass gatherings and immediate intervention, when necessary; allows more accurate prediction of resources needed; allows to validate conceptual and predictive models for medical resources at (mass) public events; and can contribute to the definition of a standardized minimum data set (MDS) for mass-gathering health research and evaluation. Gogaert S , Vande veegaete A , Scholliers A , Vandekerckhove P . "MedTRIS" (Medical Triage and Registration Informatics System): a web-based client server system for the registration of patients being treated in first aid posts at public events and mass gatherings. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(5):557-562.

  14. "MedTRIS" (Medical Triage and Registration Informatics System): A Web-based Client Server System for the Registration of Patients Being Treated in First Aid Posts at Public Events and Mass Gatherings.

    PubMed

    Gogaert, Stefan; Vande Veegaete, Axel; Scholliers, Annelies; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    First aid (FA) services are provisioned on-site as a preventive measure at most public events. In Flanders, Belgium, the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders (BRCF) is the major provider of these FA services with volunteers being deployed at approximately 10,000 public events annually. The BRCF has systematically registered information on the patients being treated in FA posts at major events and mass gatherings during the last 10 years. This information has been collected in a web-based client server system called "MedTRIS" (Medical Triage and Registration Informatics System). MedTRIS contains data on more than 200,000 patients at 335 mass events. This report describes the MedTRIS architecture, the data collected, and how the system operates in the field. This database consolidates different types of information with regards to FA interventions in a standardized way for a variety of public events. MedTRIS allows close monitoring in "real time" of the situation at mass gatherings and immediate intervention, when necessary; allows more accurate prediction of resources needed; allows to validate conceptual and predictive models for medical resources at (mass) public events; and can contribute to the definition of a standardized minimum data set (MDS) for mass-gathering health research and evaluation. Gogaert S , Vande veegaete A , Scholliers A , Vandekerckhove P . "MedTRIS" (Medical Triage and Registration Informatics System): a web-based client server system for the registration of patients being treated in first aid posts at public events and mass gatherings. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(5):557-562. PMID:27499102

  15. Computer Technology for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Shell Oil Company used a COSMIC program, called VISCEL to insure the accuracy of the company's new computer code for analyzing polymers, and chemical compounds. Shell reported that there were no other programs available that could provide the necessary calculations. Shell produces chemicals for plastic products used in the manufacture of automobiles, housewares, appliances, film, textiles, electronic equipment and furniture.

  16. Ubiquitous Computing Technologies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    The prosperous development of wireless communication and sensor technologies has attracted the attention of researchers from both computer and education fields. Various investigations have been made for applying the new technologies to education purposes, such that more active and adaptive learning activities can be conducted in the real world.…

  17. Breaking through with Thin-Client Technologies: A Cost Effective Approach for Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaz, Sohair W.; Stewart, Christofer

    This paper provides an overview of thin-client/server computing in higher education. Thin-clients are like PCs in appearance, but they do not house hard drives or localized operating systems and cannot function without being connected to a server. Two types of thin-clients are described: the Network Computer (NC) and the Windows Terminal (WT).…

  18. Trusted Computing Technologies, Intel Trusted Execution Technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Max Joseph; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We describe the current state-of-the-art in Trusted Computing Technologies - focusing mainly on Intel's Trusted Execution Technology (TXT). This document is based on existing documentation and tests of two existing TXT-based systems: Intel's Trusted Boot and Invisible Things Lab's Qubes OS. We describe what features are lacking in current implementations, describe what a mature system could provide, and present a list of developments to watch. Critical systems perform operation-critical computations on high importance data. In such systems, the inputs, computation steps, and outputs may be highly sensitive. Sensitive components must be protected from both unauthorized release, and unauthorized alteration: Unauthorized users should not access the sensitive input and sensitive output data, nor be able to alter them; the computation contains intermediate data with the same requirements, and executes algorithms that the unauthorized should not be able to know or alter. Due to various system requirements, such critical systems are frequently built from commercial hardware, employ commercial software, and require network access. These hardware, software, and network system components increase the risk that sensitive input data, computation, and output data may be compromised.

  19. Teacher Teams and Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeffrey B.; Roberts, Nicole K.; Schoon, Perry L.; Fansler, Gigi

    This research used three groups in a quasi-experimental approach to assess the combined impact of teacher teaming and computer technology on student grade point averages (GPAs). Ninth-grade students' academic achievement in each of four different subject areas (algebra, biology, world cultures, and English) was studied. Two separate treatments…

  20. Computer Technology. Career Education Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC. European Area.

    The curriculum guide is designed to provide students with realistic training in computer technology theory and practice within the secondary educational framework and to prepare them for entry into an occupation or continuing postsecondary education. Each unit plan consists of a description of the area under consideration, estimated hours of…

  1. Optical Computers and Space Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Frazier, Donald O.; Penn, Benjamin; Paley, Mark S.; Witherow, William K.; Banks, Curtis; Hicks, Rosilen; Shields, Angela

    1995-01-01

    The rapidly increasing demand for greater speed and efficiency on the information superhighway requires significant improvements over conventional electronic logic circuits. Optical interconnections and optical integrated circuits are strong candidates to provide the way out of the extreme limitations imposed on the growth of speed and complexity of nowadays computations by the conventional electronic logic circuits. The new optical technology has increased the demand for high quality optical materials. NASA's recent involvement in processing optical materials in space has demonstrated that a new and unique class of high quality optical materials are processible in a microgravity environment. Microgravity processing can induce improved orders in these materials and could have a significant impact on the development of optical computers. We will discuss NASA's role in processing these materials and report on some of the associated nonlinear optical properties which are quite useful for optical computers technology.

  2. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  3. Redirection of client/server relationship of X Window system as a simple, low-cost, departmental picture archiving and communication system solution for nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Datz, F L; Baune, D A; Christian, P E

    1994-08-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) offer significant advantages over current film-management techniques. However, PACS are complex and expensive, factors that have limited their entry into the radiology and nuclear medicine communities. We present a simple, low-cost PACS solution that allows viewing of images from different computer systems by redirection of the X Window system. In this technique, multiple copies of the imaging software are remotely opened from generic UNIX workstations interfaced to the main computer system via Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol over Ethernet. The X Window system that provides the windowing system for the main computer is redirected to the workstations' displays. With this technique, viewing and processing of images on a remote station is virtually identical to working at the main computer's console. The technique requires that the commercial imaging system's hardware, operating system, and imaging software support multiuser multitasking and the execution of multiple copies of its imaging software, and that they use X Windows as the graphical system. Advantages of the technique include low cost, ease of maintenance, ease of interconnecting different types of computers, the capacity to view images regardless of file format, and the capacity to both view and process images. The latter is a necessity for modalities such as nuclear medicine. A disadvantage of the technique is that the number of nodes that can be supported is limited.

  4. Redirection of client/server relationship of X Window system as a simple, low-cost, departmental picture archiving and communication system solution for nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Datz, F L; Baune, D A; Christian, P E

    1994-08-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) offer significant advantages over current film-management techniques. However, PACS are complex and expensive, factors that have limited their entry into the radiology and nuclear medicine communities. We present a simple, low-cost PACS solution that allows viewing of images from different computer systems by redirection of the X Window system. In this technique, multiple copies of the imaging software are remotely opened from generic UNIX workstations interfaced to the main computer system via Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol over Ethernet. The X Window system that provides the windowing system for the main computer is redirected to the workstations' displays. With this technique, viewing and processing of images on a remote station is virtually identical to working at the main computer's console. The technique requires that the commercial imaging system's hardware, operating system, and imaging software support multiuser multitasking and the execution of multiple copies of its imaging software, and that they use X Windows as the graphical system. Advantages of the technique include low cost, ease of maintenance, ease of interconnecting different types of computers, the capacity to view images regardless of file format, and the capacity to both view and process images. The latter is a necessity for modalities such as nuclear medicine. A disadvantage of the technique is that the number of nodes that can be supported is limited. PMID:7948169

  5. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will

  6. Infinite possibilities: Computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (or CFD) methods are very familiar to the research community. Even the general public has had some exposure to CFD images, primarily through the news media. However, very little attention has been paid to CST--Computational Structures Technology. Yet, no important design can be completed without it. During the first half of this century, researchers only dreamed of designing and building structures on a computer. Today their dreams have become practical realities as computational methods are used in all phases of design, fabrication and testing of engineering systems. Increasingly complex structures can now be built in even shorter periods of time. Over the past four decades, computer technology has been developing, and early finite element methods have grown from small in-house programs to numerous commercial software programs. When coupled with advanced computing systems, they help engineers make dramatic leaps in designing and testing concepts. The goals of CST include: predicting how a structure will behave under actual operating conditions; designing and complementing other experiments conducted on a structure; investigating microstructural damage or chaotic, unpredictable behavior; helping material developers in improving material systems; and being a useful tool in design systems optimization and sensitivity techniques. Applying CST to a structure problem requires five steps: (1) observe the specific problem; (2) develop a computational model for numerical simulation; (3) develop and assemble software and hardware for running the codes; (4) post-process and interpret the results; and (5) use the model to analyze and design the actual structure. Researchers in both industry and academia continue to make significant contributions to advance this technology with improvements in software, collaborative computing environments and supercomputing systems. As these environments and systems evolve, computational structures technology will

  7. Computer Access. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on access including adaptations in input devices, output devices, and computer interfaces. Low technology devices include "no-technology" devices (usually modifications to existing devices), simple switches, and multiple switches. High technology input…

  8. Military engine computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Daniel E.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology Initiative (IHPTET) goals require a strong analytical base. Effective analysis of composite materials is critical to life analysis and structural optimization. Accurate life prediction for all material systems is critical. User friendly systems are also desirable. Post processing of results is very important. The IHPTET goal is to double turbine engine propulsion capability by the year 2003. Fifty percent of the goal will come from advanced materials and structures, the other 50 percent will come from increasing performance. Computer programs are listed.

  9. Computer technologies and institutional memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Christopher; Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    NASA programs for manned space flight are in their 27th year. Scientists and engineers who worked continuously on the development of aerospace technology during that period are approaching retirement. The resulting loss to the organization will be considerable. Although this problem is general to the NASA community, the problem was explored in terms of the institutional memory and technical expertise of a single individual in the Man-Systems division. The main domain of the expert was spacecraft lighting, which became the subject area for analysis in these studies. The report starts with an analysis of the cumulative expertise and institutional memory of technical employees of organizations such as NASA. A set of solutions to this problem are examined and found inadequate. Two solutions were investigated at length: hypertext and expert systems. Illustrative examples were provided of hypertext and expert system representation of spacecraft lighting. These computer technologies can be used to ameliorate the problem of the loss of invaluable personnel.

  10. Mobile Computing for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Swietek, Gregory E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The use of commercial computer technology in specific aerospace mission applications can reduce the cost and project cycle time required for the development of special-purpose computer systems. Additionally, the pace of technological innovation in the commercial market has made new computer capabilities available for demonstrations and flight tests. Three areas of research and development being explored by the Portable Computer Technology Project at NASA Ames Research Center are the application of commercial client/server network computing solutions to crew support and payload operations, the analysis of requirements for portable computing devices, and testing of wireless data communication links as extensions to the wired network. This paper will present computer architectural solutions to portable workstation design including the use of standard interfaces, advanced flat-panel displays and network configurations incorporating both wired and wireless transmission media. It will describe the design tradeoffs used in selecting high-performance processors and memories, interfaces for communication and peripheral control, and high resolution displays. The packaging issues for safe and reliable operation aboard spacecraft and aircraft are presented. The current status of wireless data links for portable computers is discussed from a system design perspective. An end-to-end data flow model for payload science operations from the experiment flight rack to the principal investigator is analyzed using capabilities provided by the new generation of computer products. A future flight experiment on-board the Russian MIR space station will be described in detail including system configuration and function, the characteristics of the spacecraft operating environment, the flight qualification measures needed for safety review, and the specifications of the computing devices to be used in the experiment. The software architecture chosen shall be presented. An analysis of the

  11. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  12. Faculty Computer Expertise and Use of Instructional Technology. Technology Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriner, Robert; Mery, Pamela

    This report shows the findings of a 1997 technology survey used to assess degrees of faculty computer expertise and the use of instructional technology. Part 1 reviews general findings of the fall 1997 technology survey: (1) the level of computer expertise among faculty, staff and administrators appears to be increasing; (2) in comparison with the…

  13. Computer Technology: State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withington, Frederic G.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature of modern general-purpose computer systems, including hardware, semiconductor electronics, microprocessors, computer architecture, input output technology, and system control programs. Seven suggested readings are cited. (FM)

  14. Computing environment for the ASSIST data warehouse at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shuk, K.

    1995-11-01

    The current computing environment for the ASSIST data warehouse at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is that of a central server that is accessed by a terminal or terminal emulator. The initiative to move to a client/server environment is strong, backed by desktop machines becoming more and more powerful. The desktop machines can now take on parts of tasks once run entirely on the central server, making the whole environment computationally more efficient as a result. Services are tasks that are repeated throughout the environment such that it makes sense to share them; tasks such as email, user authentication and file transfer are services. The new client/;server environment needs to determine which services must be included in the environment for basic functionality. These services then unify the computing environment, not only for the forthcoming ASSIST+, but for Administrative Information Systems as a whole, joining various server platforms with heterogeneous desktop computing platforms.

  15. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2001-01-01

    Examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by winners of the prestigious Turing award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. Discusses reasons why TGT is practical in computer science and…

  16. Prior Computer Experience and Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Prior computer experience with information technology has been identified as a key variable (Lee, Kozar, & Larsen, 2003) that can influence an individual's future use of newer computer technology. The lack of a theory driven approach to measuring prior experience has however led to conceptually different factors being used interchangeably in…

  17. Computer technology for autistic students.

    PubMed

    Panyan, M V

    1984-12-01

    The first purpose of this article is to review the literature related to the use of computers with autistic individuals. Although only a limited number of applications have been reported, the potential of the computer to facilitate the progress of autistic persons is promising. The second purpose is to identify specific learning problems or styles associated with autism from the research literature and link these with the unique aspects of computer-based instruction. For example, the computer's role in improving the motivation of autistic individuals is related to its capacity to analyze the reinforcing qualities of a particular event interactively and immediately for each user. Finally, recommendations that may enable computers to be maximally beneficial in assessing the learning process and remediating learning problems are offered. Two such recommendations are selecting appropriate software and integrating computer instruction within the classroom environment. PMID:6549182

  18. Computer technology for autistic students.

    PubMed

    Panyan, M V

    1984-12-01

    The first purpose of this article is to review the literature related to the use of computers with autistic individuals. Although only a limited number of applications have been reported, the potential of the computer to facilitate the progress of autistic persons is promising. The second purpose is to identify specific learning problems or styles associated with autism from the research literature and link these with the unique aspects of computer-based instruction. For example, the computer's role in improving the motivation of autistic individuals is related to its capacity to analyze the reinforcing qualities of a particular event interactively and immediately for each user. Finally, recommendations that may enable computers to be maximally beneficial in assessing the learning process and remediating learning problems are offered. Two such recommendations are selecting appropriate software and integrating computer instruction within the classroom environment.

  19. Center for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Functions of the Center for Computer Sciences and Technology (CCST), a national center for computer research and development for the United States government, are described. CCST provides computer and related services to the National Bureau of Standards of which it is a part and to other government agencies on a cost-reimbursable basis. The Office…

  20. Computer Service Technology (An Associate Degree Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuay, Paul L.; Bronk, Carol G.

    Delaware County College's (DCC's) computer service technology program is described in this paper, along with job market needs for computer personnel in Delaware County and nationwide. First, the type of work performed by computer service technicians and the areas in which they are employed are outlined. Next, the objectives of DCC's program are…

  1. SLJ Special Section: Computer Technology and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Journal, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This 5-article section provides an annotated bibliography of 39 books about computer technology; describes peripheral equipment essential for building computer systems; suggests an approach to software evaluation and selection; describes the implementation of a computer program for elementary/secondary students and teachers; and reviews 34…

  2. Computer Technology Resources for Literacy Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Council on Aging, Tallahassee.

    This resource booklet was prepared to assist literacy projects and community adult education programs in determining the technology they need to serve more older persons. Section 1 contains the following reprinted articles: "The Human Touch in the Computer Age: Seniors Learn Computer Skills from Schoolkids" (Suzanne Kashuba); "Computer Instruction…

  3. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  4. Art Therapists and Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brent C.; Stovall, Kay; Elkins, David E.; Parker-Bell, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of technology on art therapists by exploring how art therapists own and use technology and to determine barriers to ownership and use. A survey was conducted at the 2002 annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association in Washington, DC. Of the 250 surveys distributed, 195 were…

  5. Computers and Writing. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on the use of computers to improve skills and attitudes in writing instruction. Pre-writing tools such as group brainstorming, story webs, free-writing, journal entries, and prewriting guides help generate ideas and can be carried out either on or off…

  6. Theory-Guided Technology in Computer Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    Scientists usually identify themselves as either theoreticians or experimentalists, while technology - the application of science in practice - is done by engineers. In computer science, these distinctions are often blurred. This paper examines the history of major achievements in computer science as portrayed by the winners of the prestigious Turing Award and identifies a possibly unique activity called Theory-Guided Technology (TGT). Researchers develop TGT by using theoretical results to create practical technology. The reasons why TGT is practical in computer science are discussed, as is the cool reception that TGT has been received by software engineers.

  7. Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, John; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology Program (CICT) was established in 2001 to ensure NASA's Continuing leadership in emerging technologies. It is a coordinated, Agency-wide effort to develop and deploy key enabling technologies for a broad range of mission-critical tasks. The NASA CICT program is designed to address Agency-specific computing, information, and communications technology requirements beyond the projected capabilities of commercially available solutions. The areas of technical focus have been chosen for their impact on NASA's missions, their national importance, and the technical challenge they provide to the Program. In order to meet its objectives, the CICT Program is organized into the following four technology focused projects: 1) Computing, Networking and Information Systems (CNIS); 2) Intelligent Systems (IS); 3) Space Communications (SC); 4) Information Technology Strategic Research (ITSR).

  8. Advances and trends in computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Venneri, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of computational structures technology (CST) are outlined, and recent advances in CST are examined. These include computational material modeling, stochastic-based modeling, computational methods for articulated structural dynamics, strategies and numerical algorithms for new computing systems, multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. The role of CST in the future development of structures technology and the multidisciplinary design of future flight vehicles is addressed, and the future directions of CST research in the prediction of failures of structural components, the solution of large-scale structural problems, and quality assessment and control of numerical simulations are discussed.

  9. (CICT) Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) program is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communications technologies. This viewgraph presentation includes diagrams of how the political guidance behind CICT is structured. The presentation profiles each part of the NASA Mission in detail, and relates the Mission to the activities of CICT. CICT's Integrated Capability Goal is illustrated, and hypothetical missions which could be enabled by CICT are profiled. CICT technology development is profiled.

  10. Computer Programming Projects in Technology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses programming projects in applied technology courses, examining documentation, formal reports, and implementation. Includes recommendations based on experience with a sophomore machine elements course which provided computers for problem solving exercises. (DH)

  11. Ultimate computing. Biomolecular consciousness and nano Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hameroff, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book advances the premise that the cytoskeleton is the cell's nervous system, the biological controller/computer. If indeed cytoskeletal dynamics in the nanoscale (billionth meter, billionth second) are the texture of intracellular information processing, emerging ''NanoTechnologies'' (scanning tunneling microscopy, Feynman machines, von Neumann replicators, etc.) should enable direct monitoring, decoding and interfacing between biological and technological information devices. This in turn could result in important biomedical applications and perhaps a merger of mind and machine: Ultimate Computing.

  12. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  13. A Debugger for Computational Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robert; Jost, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    The p2d2 project at NAS has built a debugger for applications running on heterogeneous computational grids. It employs a client-server architecture to simplify the implementation. Its user interface has been designed to provide process control and state examination functions on a computation containing a large number of processes. It can find processes participating in distributed computations even when those processes were not created under debugger control. These process identification techniques work both on conventional distributed executions as well as those on a computational grid.

  14. [Computer technologies in teaching pathological anatomy].

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, A B; Fedorov, D N

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives experience with personal computers used at the Academician A.L. Strukov Department of Pathological Anatomy for more than 20 years. It shows the objective necessity of introducing computer technologies at all stages of acquiring skills in anatomical pathology, including lectures, students' free work, test check, etc.

  15. Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Jack, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Focusing on how computers can and should be used in intercollegiate forensics, this journal issue offers the perspectives of a number of forensics instructors. The lead article, "Applications of Computer Technology in Intercollegiate Debate" by Theodore F. Sheckels, Jr., discusses five areas in which forensics educators might use computer…

  16. Computer Technology: For Better or Worse?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Willis H.

    Computer technology ought to be among the most helpful and useful of any technology, but if it is not treated with care, the society will be worse off for it. The Federal Privacy Act of 1974 established the Privacy Protection Study Commission whose business started in June, 1975. In examination of the private sector, the commission's…

  17. Crystal gazing v. computer system technology projections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Donald C.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * PREDICTIONS FOR THE EARLY NINETIES * EVOLUTION OF COMPUTER CAPACITIES * UNIX IS COMING! * GRAPHICS TECHNOLOGY * MASSIVE ARCHIVAL STORAGE * ADA AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT * ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE TECHNOLOGY * FILLING IN THE DETAILS * UNIX DESIDERATA * ICON-DRIVEN COMMAND LANGUAGES? * AI AGAIN * DISCUSSION * REFERENCES * BIBLIOGRAPHY—FOR FURTHER READING

  18. Research on Key Technologies of Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shufen; Yan, Hongcan; Chen, Xuebin

    With the development of multi-core processors, virtualization, distributed storage, broadband Internet and automatic management, a new type of computing mode named cloud computing is produced. It distributes computation task on the resource pool which consists of massive computers, so the application systems can obtain the computing power, the storage space and software service according to its demand. It can concentrate all the computing resources and manage them automatically by the software without intervene. This makes application offers not to annoy for tedious details and more absorbed in his business. It will be advantageous to innovation and reduce cost. It's the ultimate goal of cloud computing to provide calculation, services and applications as a public facility for the public, So that people can use the computer resources just like using water, electricity, gas and telephone. Currently, the understanding of cloud computing is developing and changing constantly, cloud computing still has no unanimous definition. This paper describes three main service forms of cloud computing: SAAS, PAAS, IAAS, compared the definition of cloud computing which is given by Google, Amazon, IBM and other companies, summarized the basic characteristics of cloud computing, and emphasized on the key technologies such as data storage, data management, virtualization and programming model.

  19. Culture Computing: Interactive Technology to Explore Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheok, Adrian David

    The present day rapid development of media science and digital technology is offering the modern generation more opportunities as well as challenges as the new fundamental literacy. Therefore, to reach the modern generation on issues such as an appreciation of cultures, we have to find common grounds based on digital media technology. In an increasingly hybrid cultural environment, interaction and fusion of cultural factors with the computer technology will be an investigation into the possibilities of providing an experience into the cultures of the world, operating in the environments the modern generation inhabits. Research has created novel merging of traditional cultures and literature with recent media literacy. Three cultural computing systems, Media Me, BlogWall and Confucius Computer, are presented in this chapter. Studies showed that users gave positive feedback to their experience of interacting with cultural computing systems.

  20. Cloud Computing Technologies and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinzy

    In a nutshell, the existing Internet provides to us content in the forms of videos, emails and information served up in web pages. With Cloud Computing, the next generation of Internet will allow us to "buy" IT services from a web portal, drastic expanding the types of merchandise available beyond those on e-commerce sites such as eBay and Taobao. We would be able to rent from a virtual storefront the basic necessities to build a virtual data center: such as CPU, memory, storage, and add on top of that the middleware necessary: web application servers, databases, enterprise server bus, etc. as the platform(s) to support the applications we would like to either rent from an Independent Software Vendor (ISV) or develop ourselves. Together this is what we call as "IT as a Service," or ITaaS, bundled to us the end users as a virtual data center.

  1. A distributed, graphical user interface based, computer control system for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Aviv; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Atomic physics experiments often require a complex sequence of precisely timed computer controlled events. This paper describes a distributed graphical user interface-based control system designed with such experiments in mind, which makes use of off-the-shelf output hardware from National Instruments. The software makes use of a client-server separation between a user interface for sequence design and a set of output hardware servers. Output hardware servers are designed to use standard National Instruments output cards, but the client-server nature should allow this to be extended to other output hardware. Output sequences running on multiple servers and output cards can be synchronized using a shared clock. By using a field programmable gate array-generated variable frequency clock, redundant buffers can be dramatically shortened, and a time resolution of 100 ns achieved over effectively arbitrary sequence lengths.

  2. Towards optimizing server performance in an educational MMORPG for teaching computer programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malliarakis, Christos; Satratzemi, Maya; Xinogalos, Stelios

    2013-10-01

    Web-based games have become significantly popular during the last few years. This is due to the gradual increase of internet speed, which has led to the ongoing multiplayer games development and more importantly the emergence of the Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPG) field. In parallel, similar technologies called educational games have started to be developed in order to be put into practice in various educational contexts, resulting in the field of Game Based Learning. However, these technologies require significant amounts of resources, such as bandwidth, RAM and CPU capacity etc. These amounts may be even larger in an educational MMORPG game that supports computer programming education, due to the usual inclusion of a compiler and the constant client/server data transmissions that occur during program coding, possibly leading to technical issues that could cause malfunctions during learning. Thus, the determination of the elements that affect the overall games resources' load is essential so that server administrators can configure them and ensure educational games' proper operation during computer programming education. In this paper, we propose a new methodology with which we can achieve monitoring and optimization of the load balancing, so that the essential resources for the creation and proper execution of an educational MMORPG for computer programming can be foreseen and bestowed without overloading the system.

  3. Evaluation of Advanced Computing Techniques and Technologies: Reconfigurable Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, B. Earl

    2003-01-01

    The focus of this project was to survey the technology of reconfigurable computing determine its level of maturity and suitability for NASA applications. To better understand and assess the effectiveness of the reconfigurable design paradigm that is utilized within the HAL-15 reconfigurable computer system. This system was made available to NASA MSFC for this purpose, from Star Bridge Systems, Inc. To implement on at least one application that would benefit from the performance levels that are possible with reconfigurable hardware. It was originally proposed that experiments in fault tolerance and dynamically reconfigurability would be perform but time constraints mandated that these be pursued as future research.

  4. Instructional Technology in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Frederick J.

    2004-01-01

    The Web, the Internet, the intranet and associated resources, campus computer labs, smart classrooms, course management systems, and a plethora of software packages all offer opportunities for every classroom instructor to enrich in-class and out-of-class activities. Why should an instructor consider the integration of technology into their…

  5. Women Workers as Users of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larwood, Laurie

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expectations, trends, and implications of growth of computer technology and its effect on women workers argues that the experience of women is different from that of men in the nature of jobs in which women are found, their training and education, home-family conflict, and discrimination. The impact on women of increasing…

  6. Publishing a School Newspaper Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Jeanne; And Others

    By publishing a quarterly school and community newspaper, sixth, seventh, and eighth graders get involved in the writing of many types of articles, proofreading, communication skills, interviewing skills, investigative reporting, photography, artistic and graphic design, and computer technology. As the students work together on each issue of the…

  7. Business/Computer Technologies. State Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 272 competencies, grouped into 36 units, for tech prep programs in the business/computer technology cluster. The competencies were developed through collaboration of Ohio business, industry, and labor representatives and secondary and associate degree educators. The competencies are rated either "essential" (necessary to…

  8. Competency Index. [Business/Computer Technologies Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This index allows the user to scan the competencies under each title for the 28 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Titles of the 28 units are as follows: employability skills; professionalism; teamwork; professional and ethical standards; economic and business…

  9. Enabling computational technologies for subsurface simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, R D

    1999-02-22

    We collaborated with Environmental Programs to develop and apply advanced computational methodologies for simulating multiphase flow through heterogeneous porous media. The primary focus was on developing a fast accurate advection scheme using a new temporal subcycling technique and on the scalable and efficient solution of the nonlinear Richards' equation used to model two-phase (variably saturated) flow. The resulting algorithms can be orders-of-magnitude faster than existing methods. Our computational technologies were applied to the simulation of subsurface fluid flow and chemical transport in the context of two important applications: water resource management and groundwater remediation.

  10. Advances in computed tomography imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Gupta, Rajiv

    2014-07-11

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in diagnostic imaging for evaluating many clinical conditions. In recent years, there have been several notable advances in CT technology that already have had or are expected to have a significant clinical impact, including extreme multidetector CT, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dual-energy CT, cone-beam CT, portable CT, and phase-contrast CT. These techniques and their clinical applications are reviewed and illustrated in this article. In addition, emerging technologies that address deficiencies in these modalities are discussed.

  11. Technologies for Achieving Field Ubiquitous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Akira

    Although the term “ubiquitous” may sound like jargon used in information appliances, ubiquitous computing is an emerging concept in industrial automation. This paper presents the author's visions of field ubiquitous computing, which is based on the novel Internet Protocol IPv6. IPv6-based instrumentation will realize the next generation manufacturing excellence. This paper focuses on the following five key issues: 1. IPv6 standardization; 2. IPv6 interfaces embedded in field devices; 3. Compatibility with FOUNDATION fieldbus; 4. Network securities for field applications; and 5. Wireless technologies to complement IP instrumentation. Furthermore, the principles of digital plant operations and ubiquitous production to support the above key technologies to achieve field ubiquitous systems are discussed.

  12. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  13. Safeguards technology and computer security training

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.J.; Zack, N.R.

    1992-09-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Safeguards Systems Group provides a variety of training services to the federal government and its contractors. The US Department of Energy sponsors a Safeguards Technology Training Program at Los Alamos in which seminars are offered concerning materials accounting for nuclear safeguards, measurement control for materials accounting, and variance propagation and systems analysis. These seminars provide guidance and techniques for accounting for nuclear material, developing and quantifying quality nuclear material measurements, and assessing overall accounting system performance. The Safeguards Systems Group also provides training in computer and data security applications; i.e., a workshop and the Los Alamos Vulnerability/Risk Assessment System (LAVA), computer system security officer training, and nuclear material safeguards for managers training, which are available on request. This paper describes the purpose, content, and expected benefits of the training activities that can be applied at nuclear materials facilities or where there are computer and/or data security concerns.

  14. Grid computing technology for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecca, G.; Petitdidier, M.; Hluchy, L.; Ivanovic, M.; Kussul, N.; Ray, N.; Thieron, V.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryAdvances in e-Infrastructure promise to revolutionize sensing systems and the way in which data are collected and assimilated, and complex water systems are simulated and visualized. According to the EU Infrastructure 2010 work-programme, data and compute infrastructures and their underlying technologies, either oriented to tackle scientific challenges or complex problem solving in engineering, are expected to converge together into the so-called knowledge infrastructures, leading to a more effective research, education and innovation in the next decade and beyond. Grid technology is recognized as a fundamental component of e-Infrastructures. Nevertheless, this emerging paradigm highlights several topics, including data management, algorithm optimization, security, performance (speed, throughput, bandwidth, etc.), and scientific cooperation and collaboration issues that require further examination to fully exploit it and to better inform future research policies. The paper illustrates the results of six different surface and subsurface hydrology applications that have been deployed on the Grid. All the applications aim to answer to strong requirements from the Civil Society at large, relatively to natural and anthropogenic risks. Grid technology has been successfully tested to improve flood prediction, groundwater resources management and Black Sea hydrological survey, by providing large computing resources. It is also shown that Grid technology facilitates e-cooperation among partners by means of services for authentication and authorization, seamless access to distributed data sources, data protection and access right, and standardization.

  15. Computational Support for Technology- Investment Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, Virgil; Hua, Hook; Lincoln, William; Block, Gary; Mrozinski, Joseph; Shelton, Kacie; Weisbin, Charles; Elfes, Alberto; Smith, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology (START) is a user-friendly computer program that assists human managers in making decisions regarding research-and-development investment portfolios in the presence of uncertainties and of non-technological constraints that include budgetary and time limits, restrictions related to infrastructure, and programmatic and institutional priorities. START facilitates quantitative analysis of technologies, capabilities, missions, scenarios and programs, and thereby enables the selection and scheduling of value-optimal development efforts. START incorporates features that, variously, perform or support a unique combination of functions, most of which are not systematically performed or supported by prior decision- support software. These functions include the following: Optimal portfolio selection using an expected-utility-based assessment of capabilities and technologies; Temporal investment recommendations; Distinctions between enhancing and enabling capabilities; Analysis of partial funding for enhancing capabilities; and Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. START can run on almost any computing hardware, within Linux and related operating systems that include Mac OS X versions 10.3 and later, and can run in Windows under the Cygwin environment. START can be distributed in binary code form. START calls, as external libraries, several open-source software packages. Output is in Excel (.xls) file format.

  16. A cancellable and fuzzy fingerprint scheme for mobile computing security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wencheng; Xi, Kai; Li, Cai

    2012-09-01

    Fingerprint recognition provides an effective user authentication solution for mobile computing systems. However, as a fingerprint template protection scheme, fingerprint fuzzy vault is subject to cross-matching attacks, since the same finger might be registered for various applications. In this paper, we propose a fingerprint-based biometric security scheme named the cancellable and fuzzy fingerprint scheme, which combines a cancellable non-linear transformation with the client/server version of fuzzy vault, to address the cross-matching attack in a mobile computing system. Experimental results demonstrate that our scheme can provide reliable and secure protection to the mobile computing system while achieving an acceptable matching performance.

  17. Reviews of computing technology: Object-oriented technology

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    A useful metaphor in introducing object-oriented concepts is the idea of a computer hardware manufacturer assembling products from an existing stock of electronic parts. In this analogy, think of the parts as pieces of computer software and of the finished products as computer applications. Like its counterpart, the object is capable of performing its specific function in a wide variety of different applications. The advantages to assembling hardware using a set of prebuilt parts are obvious. The design process is greatly simplified in this scenario, since the designer needs only to carry the design down to the chip level, rather than to the transistor level. As a result, the designer is free to develop a more reliable and feature rich product. Also, since the component parts are reused in several different products, the parts can be made more robust and subjected to more rigorous testing than would be economically feasible for a part used in only one piece of equipment. Additionally, maintenance on the resulting systems is simplified because of the part-level consistency from one type of equipment to another. The remainder of this document introduces the techniques used to develop objects, the benefits of the technology, outstanding issues that remain with the technology, industry direction for the technology, and the impact that object-oriented technology is likely to have on the organization. While going through this material, the reader will find it useful to remember the parts analogy and to keep in mind that the overall purpose of object-oriented technology is to create software parts and to construct applications using those parts.

  18. Integrated multimodal human-computer interface and augmented reality for interactive display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliou, Marius S.; Sundareswaran, Venkataraman; Chen, S.; Behringer, Reinhold; Tam, Clement K.; Chan, M.; Bangayan, Phil T.; McGee, Joshua H.

    2000-08-01

    We describe new systems for improved integrated multimodal human-computer interaction and augmented reality for a diverse array of applications, including future advanced cockpits, tactical operations centers, and others. We have developed an integrated display system featuring: speech recognition of multiple concurrent users equipped with both standard air- coupled microphones and novel throat-coupled sensors (developed at Army Research Labs for increased noise immunity); lip reading for improving speech recognition accuracy in noisy environments, three-dimensional spatialized audio for improved display of warnings, alerts, and other information; wireless, coordinated handheld-PC control of a large display; real-time display of data and inferences from wireless integrated networked sensors with on-board signal processing and discrimination; gesture control with disambiguated point-and-speak capability; head- and eye- tracking coupled with speech recognition for 'look-and-speak' interaction; and integrated tetherless augmented reality on a wearable computer. The various interaction modalities (speech recognition, 3D audio, eyetracking, etc.) are implemented a 'modality servers' in an Internet-based client-server architecture. Each modality server encapsulates and exposes commercial and research software packages, presenting a socket network interface that is abstracted to a high-level interface, minimizing both vendor dependencies and required changes on the client side as the server's technology improves.

  19. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  20. Teaching with Technology: The Classroom Manager. Cost-Conscious Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rhea; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Teachers discuss how to make the most of technology in the classroom during a tight economy. Ideas include recycling computer printer ribbons, buying replacement batteries for computer power supply packs, upgrading via software, and soliciting donated computer equipment. (SM)

  1. Evaluating Computer Technology Integration in a Centralized School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteokleous, N.

    2008-01-01

    The study evaluated the current situation in Cyprus elementary classrooms regarding computer technology integration in an attempt to identify ways of expanding teachers' and students' experiences with computer technology. It examined how Cypriot elementary teachers use computers, and the factors that influence computer integration in their…

  2. Computer-aided design and computer science technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Voigt, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of computer-aided design requirements and the resulting computer science advances needed to support aerospace design. The aerospace design environment is examined, taking into account problems of data handling and aspects of computer hardware and software. The interactive terminal is normally the primary interface between the computer system and the engineering designer. Attention is given to user aids, interactive design, interactive computations, the characteristics of design information, data management requirements, hardware advancements, and computer science developments.

  3. Computer vision research with new imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guangqi; Liu, Fei; Sun, Zhenan

    2015-12-01

    Light field imaging is capable of capturing dense multi-view 2D images in one snapshot, which record both intensity values and directions of rays simultaneously. As an emerging 3D device, the light field camera has been widely used in digital refocusing, depth estimation, stereoscopic display, etc. Traditional multi-view stereo (MVS) methods only perform well on strongly texture surfaces, but the depth map contains numerous holes and large ambiguities on textureless or low-textured regions. In this paper, we exploit the light field imaging technology on 3D face modeling in computer vision. Based on a 3D morphable model, we estimate the pose parameters from facial feature points. Then the depth map is estimated through the epipolar plane images (EPIs) method. At last, the high quality 3D face model is exactly recovered via the fusing strategy. We evaluate the effectiveness and robustness on face images captured by a light field camera with different poses.

  4. Role of computer technology in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, M G; Cavalcanti, D D; Preul, M C

    2010-08-01

    In the clinical office, during surgical planning, or in the operating room, neurosurgeons have been surrounded by the digital world either recreating old tools or introducing new ones. Technological refinements, chiefly based on the use of computer systems, have altered the modus operandi for neurosurgery. In the emergency room or in the office, patient data are entered, digitally dictated, or gathered from electronic medical records. Images from every modality can be examined on a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) or can be seen remotely on cell phones. Surgical planning is based on high-resolution reconstructions, and microsurgical or radiosurgical approaches can be assessed precisely using stereotaxy. Tumor resection, abscess or hematoma evacuation, or the management of vascular lesions can be assisted intraoperatively by new imaging resources integrated into the surgical microscope. Mathematical models can dictate how a lesion may recur as well as how often a particular patient should be followed. Finally, virtual reality is being developed as a training tool for residents and surgeons by preoperatively simulating complex surgical scenarios. Altogether, computerization at each level of patient care has been affected by digital technology to help enhance the safety of procedures and thereby improve outcomes of patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures.

  5. Computer Graphics. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Clyde O.

    This curriculum guide for a 1-quarter or 1-semester course in computer graphics is designed to be used with Apple II computers. Some of the topics covered include the following: computer graphics terminology and applications, operating Apple computers, graphics programming in BASIC using various programs and commands, computer graphics painting,…

  6. No free lunch: institutional preparations for computer-based patient records.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Veterans Administration (VA) is aggressively pursuing computer-based medical records by deploying the Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS) across its 150 medical centers and 400 outpatient clinics. CPRS's client-server, patient-centered approach to clinical computing is a departure from VA's traditional terminal-compatible, department-centered approach. Although the CPRS software is freely distributed, institutional readiness for computer-based patient records has proven expensive. Preparations include organizational changes, human resource development, hardware deployment, physical plant upgrades, and software testing. This paper details CPRS preparations and their costs at one VA Medical Center. Lessons learned during the process are summarized. PMID:10566406

  7. Computer Utilization in Industrial Arts/Technology Education. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Industrial Arts Association.

    This guide is intended to assist industrial arts/technology education teachers in helping students in grades K-12 understand the impact of computers and computer technology in the world. Discussed in the introductory sections are the ways in which computers have changed the face of business, industry, and education and training; the scope and…

  8. Computer Science and Technology Publications. NBS Publications List 84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    This bibliography lists publications of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology of the National Bureau of Standards. Publications are listed by subject in the areas of computer security, computer networking, and automation technology. Sections list publications of: (1) current Federal Information Processing Standards; (2) computer…

  9. The Invisible Barrier to Integrating Computer Technology in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aflalo, Ester

    2014-01-01

    The article explores contradictions in teachers' perceptions regarding the place of computer technologies in education. The research population included 47 teachers who have incorporated computers in the classroom for several years. The teachers expressed positive attitudes regarding the decisive importance of computer technologies in furthering…

  10. Using Type II Computer Network Technology To Reach Distance Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastmond, Dan; Granger, Dan

    1998-01-01

    This article, in a series on computer technology and distance education, focuses on "Type II Technology," courses using textbooks and course guides for primary delivery, but enhancing them with computer conferencing as the main vehicle of instructional communication. Discusses technology proficiency, maximizing learning in conferencing…

  11. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  12. Cloud Computing. Technology Briefing. Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is Internet-based computing in which shared resources, software and information are delivered as a service that computers or mobile devices can access on demand. Cloud computing is already used extensively in education. Free or low-cost cloud-based services are used daily by learners and educators to support learning, social…

  13. The Steam Engine and the Computer: What Makes Technology Revolutionary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1987-01-01

    This discussion of technological revolution focuses on the computer and its uses in education. Contrasts between human traits, such as insight and creativity, and computer capabilities are discussed; the computer as its own instructional device is described; and possible educational changes resulting from computers are addressed. (LRW)

  14. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  15. Computer-based technological applications in psychotherapy training.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Despite obvious and documented advantages of technological applications in education, psychotherapy training based on information technology is either still rare or limited to technical innovations such as videotape recordings. This article outlines opportunities new computer-based learning technology create for psychotherapy training. First, approaches that include computer-mediated communication between trainees and teachers/supervisors are presented. Then, computer-based learning technology for self-study purposes is discussed in the context of educational approaches to learning. Computer-based tools that have been developed and evaluated in the context of psychotherapy training are described. Evaluations of the tools are discussed.

  16. Applied Computer Technology in Cree and Naskapi Language Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancewicz, Bill; MacKenzie, Marguerite

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the parameters for the application of computer technology in Cree and Naskapi language programs, and shows that the deliberate and structured introduction of these technologies to indigenous language programs can facilitate indigenous language stabilization and development. (Author/VWL)

  17. Computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Card, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The status and some recent developments of computational technology for high-temperature aerospace structures are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including: goals of computational technology for high-temperature structures; computational material modeling; life prediction methodology; computational modeling of high-temperature composites; error estimation and adaptive improvement strategies; strategies for solution of fluid flow/thermal/structural problems; and probabilistic methods and stochastic modeling approaches, integrated analysis and design. Recent trends in high-performance computing environment are described and the research areas which have high potential for meeting future technological needs are identified.

  18. Enabling Water Quality Management Decision Support and Public Outreach Using Cloud-Computing Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, A. Y.; Scanlon, B. R.; Uhlman, K.

    2013-12-01

    Watershed management is a participatory process that requires collaboration among multiple groups of people. Environmental decision support systems (EDSS) have long been used to support such co-management and co-learning processes in watershed management. However, implementing and maintaining EDSS in-house can be a significant burden to many water agencies because of budget, technical, and policy constraints. Basing on experiences from several web-GIS environmental management projects in Texas, we showcase how cloud-computing services can help shift the design and hosting of EDSS from the traditional client-server-based platforms to be simple clients of cloud-computing services.

  19. Computers--Teaching, Technology, and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cocco, Anthony M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Includes "Managing Personality Types in the Computer Classroom" (Cocco); "External I/O Input/Output with a PC" (Fryda); "The Future of CAD/CAM Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing Software" (Fulton); and "Teaching Quality Assurance--A Laboratory Approach" (Wojslaw). (SK)

  20. Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    de Supinski, B R

    2010-02-14

    The Petascale Computing Enabling Technologies (PCET) project addressed challenges arising from current trends in computer architecture that will lead to large-scale systems with many more nodes, each of which uses multicore chips. These factors will soon lead to systems that have over one million processors. Also, the use of multicore chips will lead to less memory and less memory bandwidth per core. We need fundamentally new algorithmic approaches to cope with these memory constraints and the huge number of processors. Further, correct, efficient code development is difficult even with the number of processors in current systems; more processors will only make it harder. The goal of PCET was to overcome these challenges by developing the computer science and mathematical underpinnings needed to realize the full potential of our future large-scale systems. Our research results will significantly increase the scientific output obtained from LLNL large-scale computing resources by improving application scientist productivity and system utilization. Our successes include scalable mathematical algorithms that adapt to these emerging architecture trends and through code correctness and performance methodologies that automate critical aspects of application development as well as the foundations for application-level fault tolerance techniques. PCET's scope encompassed several research thrusts in computer science and mathematics: code correctness and performance methodologies, scalable mathematics algorithms appropriate for multicore systems, and application-level fault tolerance techniques. Due to funding limitations, we focused primarily on the first three thrusts although our work also lays the foundation for the needed advances in fault tolerance. In the area of scalable mathematics algorithms, our preliminary work established that OpenMP performance of the AMG linear solver benchmark and important individual kernels on Atlas did not match the predictions of our

  1. Preschool Children. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on uses with preschool children with either mild to severe disabilities. Especially noted is the ability of the computer to provide access to environmental experiences otherwise inaccessible to the young handicapped child. Appropriate technology for…

  2. Guide for Teachers. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide is specifically directed to special education teachers and encourages them to become critical consumers of technology to ensure its most effective use. Brief descriptions of the various uses of the computer in the school setting--as an instructional tool, as an…

  3. Application of new technologies in the virtual library: Seminars in Turkey, Portugal, and Spain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Cotter, Gladys A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper focuses on the technologies that are available today to support the concept of a virtual library. The concept of a 'virtual library' or a 'library without walls' is meant to convey the idea that information in any format should be available to the end-user from the desktop as if it were located on the local workstation. Discussed here are the background, trends, technology enablers, end-user requirements, and the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) system, one example of how it is possible to apply existing technologies to the client server architecture to logically centralize geographically distributed applications and information.

  4. CICT Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CICT Program is part of the NASA Aerospace Technology Enterprise's fundamental technology thrust to develop tools. processes, and technologies that enable new aerospace system capabilities and missions. The CICT Program's four key objectives are: Provide seamless access to NASA resources- including ground-, air-, and space-based distributed information technology resources-so that NASA scientists and engineers can more easily control missions, make new scientific discoveries, and design the next-generation space vehicles, provide high-data delivery from these assets directly to users for missions, develop goal-oriented human-centered systems, and research, develop and evaluate revolutionary technology.

  5. Math Attitudes of Computer Education and Instructional Technology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekerek, Mehmet; Yeniterzi, Betul; Ercan, Orhan

    2011-01-01

    Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) Departments train computer teachers to fill gap of computer instructor in all grades of schools in Turkey. Additionally graduates can also work as instructional technologist or software developer. The curriculum of CEIT departments includes mathematics courses. The aim of this study is to…

  6. Computers and Autistic Learners: An Evolving Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedbring, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A research and demonstration computer center for severely handicapped autistic children, STEPPE-Lab, which uses computers as an augmentative communication and instructional system, is described. The article first reviews the keyboard, joystick, mouse, and drawing tablet as augmentative devices for helping communication disordered children interact…

  7. Cutting Technology Costs with Refurbished Computers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Many district administrators are finding that they can save money on computers by buying preowned ones instead of new ones. The practice has other benefits as well: It allows districts to give more computers to more students who need them, and it also promotes good environmental practices by keeping the machines out of landfills, where they…

  8. Questioning the Humanist Vision of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Alkemade, Kim

    Scholarship's reliance on humanism as a critical principle is problematic and needs to be called into question. The issue of access in "Computers and Composition" scholarship illustrates how a critical reliance on humanism may actually betray humanist values scholars in the field tend to promote. Scholarship in "Computers and Composition" has…

  9. Planning Computer Lessons. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    This guide offers planning and organizing ideas for effectively using computers in classrooms that include students both with and without disabilities. The guide addresses: developing lesson plans, introducing the lesson in a way that builds motivation, providing guided and independent practice, extending the learning, and choosing software.…

  10. Audit and Evaluation of Computer Security. Computer Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthberg, Zella G.

    This is a collection of consensus reports, each produced at a session of an invitational workshop sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards. The purpose of the workshop was to explore the state-of-the-art and define appropriate subjects for future research in the audit and evaluation of computer security. Leading experts in the audit and…

  11. Impact of Computer Technology on Design and Craft Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to answer the question, "How has the use of computer technology benefited the compulsory education system, focusing on Design and Technology?" In order to reply this question, it was necessary to focus on interactive whiteboards, e-portfolios and digital projectors as the main technology formats. An initial literature…

  12. Web Program for Development of GUIs for Cluster Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czikmantory, Akos; Cwik, Thomas; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hua, Hook; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Vinyard, Edward

    2003-01-01

    WIGLAF (a Web Interface Generator and Legacy Application Facade) is a computer program that provides a Web-based, distributed, graphical-user-interface (GUI) framework that can be adapted to any of a broad range of application programs, written in any programming language, that are executed remotely on any cluster computer system. WIGLAF enables the rapid development of a GUI for controlling and monitoring a specific application program running on the cluster and for transferring data to and from the application program. The only prerequisite for the execution of WIGLAF is a Web-browser program on a user's personal computer connected with the cluster via the Internet. WIGLAF has a client/server architecture: The server component is executed on the cluster system, where it controls the application program and serves data to the client component. The client component is an applet that runs in the Web browser. WIGLAF utilizes the Extensible Markup Language to hold all data associated with the application software, Java to enable platform-independent execution on the cluster system and the display of a GUI generator through the browser, and the Java Remote Method Invocation software package to provide simple, effective client/server networking.

  13. Emerging Trends in Technology Education Computer Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil I.

    1993-01-01

    Graphical User Interface (GUI)--and its variant, pen computing--is rapidly replacing older types of operating environments. Despite its heavier demand for processing power, GUI has many advantages. (SK)

  14. Mistaking Computers for Technology: Technology Literacy and the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiel, Tel

    2006-01-01

    No other information and communication technology has swept the globe with greater speed than the Internet, having the potential to promote vast social, economic, and political transformations. As new technologies become available the pattern of adoption and diffusion creates disparities in access and ownership. At the most basic this gap is…

  15. Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Goforth, Andre; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to current activities in the Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbed configurations that are part of the Advanced Data Systems Architectures Testbed at the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. The Embedded Data Processor Testbed evaluates advanced microprocessors for potential use in mission and payload applications within the Space Station Freedom Program. The Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Testbed integrates and demonstrates advanced portable computing devices and data system architectures. The PCT Testbed uses both commercial and custom-developed devices to demonstrate the feasibility of functional expansion and networking for portable computers in flight missions.

  16. Implementation of Multispectral Image Classification on a Remote Adaptive Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueiredo, Marco A.; Gloster, Clay S.; Stephens, Mark; Graves, Corey A.; Nakkar, Mouna

    1999-01-01

    As the demand for higher performance computers for the processing of remote sensing science algorithms increases, the need to investigate new computing paradigms its justified. Field Programmable Gate Arrays enable the implementation of algorithms at the hardware gate level, leading to orders of m a,gnitude performance increase over microprocessor based systems. The automatic classification of spaceborne multispectral images is an example of a computation intensive application, that, can benefit from implementation on an FPGA - based custom computing machine (adaptive or reconfigurable computer). A probabilistic neural network is used here to classify pixels of of a multispectral LANDSAT-2 image. The implementation described utilizes Java client/server application programs to access the adaptive computer from a remote site. Results verify that a remote hardware version of the algorithm (implemented on an adaptive computer) is significantly faster than a local software version of the same algorithm implemented on a typical general - purpose computer).

  17. Enabling Computational Technologies for Terascale Scientific Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.

    2000-08-24

    We develop scalable algorithms and object-oriented code frameworks for terascale scientific simulations on massively parallel processors (MPPs). Our research in multigrid-based linear solvers and adaptive mesh refinement enables Laboratory programs to use MPPs to explore important physical phenomena. For example, our research aids stockpile stewardship by making practical detailed 3D simulations of radiation transport. The need to solve large linear systems arises in many applications, including radiation transport, structural dynamics, combustion, and flow in porous media. These systems result from discretizations of partial differential equations on computational meshes. Our first research objective is to develop multigrid preconditioned iterative methods for such problems and to demonstrate their scalability on MPPs. Scalability describes how total computational work grows with problem size; it measures how effectively additional resources can help solve increasingly larger problems. Many factors contribute to scalability: computer architecture, parallel implementation, and choice of algorithm. Scalable algorithms have been shown to decrease simulation times by several orders of magnitude.

  18. Technological Imperatives: Using Computers in Academic Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticku, Ravinder; Phelps, Greg

    Intended for forensic educators and debate teams, this document details how one university debate team, at the University of Iowa, makes use of computer resources on campus to facilitate storage and retrieval of information useful to debaters. The introduction notes the problem of storing and retrieving the amount of information required by debate…

  19. CACTUS: Calculator and Computer Technology User Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students use computer-based spreadsheets to find out how much grain should be added to a chess board when a grain of rice is put on the first square, the amount is doubled for the next square, and the chess board is covered. (ASK)

  20. Cloud Computing Technologies Facilitate Earth Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement, NASA partnered with Seattle-based Amazon Web Services to make the agency's climate and Earth science satellite data publicly available on the company's servers. Users can access the data for free, but they can also pay to use Amazon's computing services to analyze and visualize information using the same software available to NASA researchers.

  1. Locating Materials using Computer Database Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissock, Craig; Lopez, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the development and contents of a computer database which helps social studies educators identify available curriculum materials. Materials can be located by using one or a combination of the following elements: Acquisition number, publisher, institution or sponsor, author, title, grade level, copyright date, cost, number of pages, and…

  2. Theories of Learning and Computer-Mediated Instructional Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes four major models of learning: behaviorism, cognitivism, constructivism, and social constructivism. Discusses situated cognition; differences between learning theories and instructional approaches; and how computer-mediated technologies can be integrated with learning theories. (LRW)

  3. Using Computer Technology To Foster Learning for Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Melle, Elaine; Tomalty, Lewis

    2000-01-01

    Describes how computer technology, specifically the use of a multimedia CD-ROM, was integrated into a microbiology curriculum as part of the transition from focusing on facts to fostering learning for understanding. (Contains 30 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. Technology and society: ideological implications of information and computer technologies in the Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Weigle, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the impact of technology on the USSR's social system from the perspective of Soviet ideological development. The analysis of information and computer technologies within this framework de-emphasizes both modernization theories and those that assume unchallenged Communist Party control over technological development. Previous studies have examined the level of Soviet technological achievements and the gap between this level and those in the West, many referring to ideological boundaries of Soviet technological development without, however, systematically analyzing the resulting implications for the Soviet ideology of Marxism-Leninism. This study develops a framework for analyzing the impact of new technologies in the USSR in the fields of technology, ideology, and the scientific and technological revolution. On the basis of this framework, examination turns to the relevant Soviet theoretical and technical literature and debates among Soviety elites, concluding that the introduction of information and computer technologies and the organization of computer networks has exacerbated tensions in Soviety Marxism-Leninism.

  5. Restricted access processor - An application of computer security technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a security guard device that is currently being developed by Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC). The methods used to provide assurance that the system meets its security requirements include the system architecture, a system security evaluation, and the application of formal and informal verification techniques. The combination of state-of-the-art technology and the incorporation of new verification procedures results in a demonstration of the feasibility of computer security technology for operational applications.

  6. Computer technology -- 1996: Applications and methodology. PVP-Volume 326

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, G.M.; Hsu, K.H.; Lee, T.W.; Nicholas, T.

    1996-12-01

    The primary objective of the Computer Technology Committee of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division is to promote interest and technical exchange in the field of computer technology, related to the design and analysis of pressure vessels and piping. The topics included in this volume are: analysis of bolted joints; nonlinear analysis, applications and methodology; finite element analysis and applications; and behavior of materials. Separate abstracts were prepared for 23 of the papers in this volume.

  7. Computers for artificial intelligence a technology assessment and forecast

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    This study reviews the development and current state-of-the-art in computers for artificial intelligence, including LISP machines, AI workstations, professional and engineering workstations, minicomputers, mainframes, and supercomputers. Major computer systems for AI applications are reviewed. The use of personal computers for expert system development is discussed, and AI software for the IBM PC, Texas Instrument Professional Computer, and Apple MacIntosh is presented. Current research aimed at developing a new computer for artificial intelligence is described, and future technological developments are discussed.

  8. "Computer" and "Information and Communication Technology": Students' Culture Specific Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elen, Jan; Clarebout, Geraldine; Sarfo, Frederick Kwaku; Louw, Lambertus Philippus; Poysa-Tarhonen, Johanna; Stassens, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Given the use of information and communication technology (ICT) and computer as synonyms in ICT-integration research on the one hand, and the potential problems in doing so on the other, this contribution tries to gain insight in the understanding of the words computer and ICT in different settings. In five different countries (Belgium, Finland,…

  9. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  10. Computer-Mediated Technology and Transcultural Counselor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, John

    2000-01-01

    This manuscript traces the history of computer technologies, their applications in mental health settings, and suggests that transcultural counselor educators engage their students in the design of a case-based computer simulation. The avatar-focused simulation offers an unprecedented environment for experimentation in collaborative learning and…

  11. Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology. Annual Report FY 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    Activities of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology (ICST) within the U.S. Department of Commerce during fiscal year 1986 are described in this annual report, which summarizes research and publications by ICST in the following areas: (1) standards and guidelines for computer security, including encryption and message authentication…

  12. Two Year Computer System Technology Curricula for the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palko, Donald N.; Hata, David M.

    1982-01-01

    The computer industry is viewed on a collision course with a human resources crisis. Changes expected during the next decade are outlined, with expectations noted that merging of hardware and software skills will be met in a technician's skill set. Essential curricula components of a computer system technology program are detailed. (MP)

  13. Selecting Software. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Center for Special Education Technology.

    One of nine brief guides for special educators on using computer technology, this guide focuses on the selection of software for use in the special education classroom. Four types of software used for computer assisted instruction are briefly described: tutorials; drill and practice; educational games; and simulations. The increasing use of tool…

  14. The Computer Industry. High Technology Industries: Profiles and Outlooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Trade Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    A series of meetings was held to assess future problems in United States high technology, particularly in the fields of robotics, computers, semiconductors, and telecommunications. This report, which focuses on the computer industry, includes a profile of this industry and the papers presented by industry speakers during the meetings. The profile…

  15. Coached, Interactive Computer Simulations: A New Technology for Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.

    This paper provides an overview of a prototype simulation-centered intelligent computer-based training (CBT) system--implemented using expert system technology--which provides: (1) an environment in which trainees can learn and practice complex skills; (2) a computer-based coach or mentor to critique performance, suggest improvements, and provide…

  16. Network Computer Technology. Phase I: Viability and Promise within NASA's Desktop Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluzzi, Peter; Miller, Rosalind; Kurihara, West; Eskey, Megan

    1998-01-01

    Over the past several months, major industry vendors have made a business case for the network computer as a win-win solution toward lowering total cost of ownership. This report provides results from Phase I of the Ames Research Center network computer evaluation project. It identifies factors to be considered for determining cost of ownership; further, it examines where, when, and how network computer technology might fit in NASA's desktop computing architecture.

  17. How gamma radiation processing systems are benefiting from the latest advances in information technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Wayne H.; Levesque, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses how gamma irradiation plants are putting the latest advances in computer and information technology to use for better process control, cost savings, and strategic advantages. Some irradiator operations are gaining significant benefits by integrating computer technology and robotics with real-time information processing, multi-user databases, and communication networks. The paper reports on several irradiation facilities that are making good use of client/server LANs, user-friendly graphics interfaces, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, distributed I/O with real-time sensor devices, trending analysis, real-time product tracking, dynamic product scheduling, and automated dosimetry reading. These plants are lowering costs by fast and reliable reconciliation of dosimetry data, easier validation to GMP requirements, optimizing production flow, and faster release of sterilized products to market. There is a trend in the manufacturing sector towards total automation using "predictive process control". Real-time verification of process parameters "on-the-run" allows control parameters to be adjusted appropriately, before the process strays out of limits. Applying this technology to the gamma radiation process, control will be based on monitoring the key parameters such as time, and making adjustments during the process to optimize quality and throughput. Dosimetry results will be used as a quality control measurement rather than as a final monitor for the release of the product. Results are correlated with the irradiation process data to quickly and confidently reconcile variations. Ultimately, a parametric process control system utilizing responsive control, feedback and verification will not only increase productivity and process efficiency, but can also result in operating within tighter dose control set points.

  18. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  19. Reaching Distance Students with Computer Network Technology (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distance Education Report, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This article is the second in a series on the typology of technology used in distance education courses at the Center for Distance Learning at the State University of New York's Empire State College. Discusses computer technology as the main delivery vehicle of the course guide, discussion, information resources, and assignments. Outlines learning…

  20. Complexity of Integrating Computer Technologies into Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbaba-Altun, Sadegul

    2006-01-01

    Integrating Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) into a centralized education system such as Turkey's depends on its successful design and application, which is an expensive and complex process. The aim of this study was to identify the issues related to integrating computer technologies into a centralized education system. Data were…

  1. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    SciTech Connect

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-26

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT and E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  2. Factors Influencing Cloud-Computing Technology Adoption in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hailu, Alemayehu

    2012-01-01

    Adoption of new technology has complicating components both from the selection, as well as decision-making criteria and process. Although new technology such as cloud computing provides great benefits especially to the developing countries, it has challenges that may complicate the selection decision and subsequent adoption process. This study…

  3. Building Computer Technology Skills in TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, Margo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research study that investigated factors influencing TESOL (teaching English to speakers of other languages) teacher candidates' (TCs) selection and use of technology in the English as a second language (ESL) classroom and the influence of explicit training in context in the use of computer technology for second…

  4. Exploring Computer Technology. The Illinois Plan for Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Univ., Normal.

    This guide, which is one in the "Exploration" series of curriculum guides intended to assist junior high and middle school industrial educators in helping their students explore diverse industrial situations and technologies used in industry, deals with exploring computer technology. The following topics are covered in the individual lessons: the…

  5. Computers Put a Journalism School on Technology's Leading Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Debra E.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the University of Missouri at Columbia's School of Journalism has been developing a high-technology environment for student work, including word processing, electronic imaging, networked personal computers, and telecommunications. Some faculty worry that the emphasis on technology may overshadow the concepts, principles, and substance…

  6. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  7. COMPUGIRLS: Stepping Stone to Future Computer-Based Technology Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jieun; Husman, Jenefer; Scott, Kimberly A.; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.

    2015-01-01

    The COMPUGIRLS: Culturally relevant technology program for adolescent girls was developed to promote underrepresented girls' future possible selves and career pathways in computer-related technology fields. We hypothesized that the COMPUGIRLS would promote academic possible selves and self-regulation to achieve these possible selves. We compared…

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Technology for Hypersonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    Several current challenges in computational fluid dynamics and aerothermodynamics for hypersonic vehicle applications are discussed. Example simulations are presented from code validation and code benchmarking efforts to illustrate capabilities and limitations. Opportunities to advance the state-of-art in algorithms, grid generation and adaptation, and code validation are identified. Highlights of diverse efforts to address these challenges are then discussed. One such effort to re-engineer and synthesize the existing analysis capability in LAURA, VULCAN, and FUN3D will provide context for these discussions. The critical (and evolving) role of agile software engineering practice in the capability enhancement process is also noted.

  9. Impact of new computing systems on computational mechanics and flight-vehicle structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storaasli, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Advances in computer technology which may have an impact on computational mechanics and flight vehicle structures technology were reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario for future hardware/software environment and engineering analysis systems is presented. Research areas with potential for improving the effectiveness of analysis methods in the new environment are identified.

  10. Design of a fault tolerant airborne digital computer. Volume 2: Computational requirements and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, R. S.; Shapiro, E. B.; Zeidler, H. M.; Wahlstrom, S. E.; Clark, C. B.; Goldberg, J.

    1973-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work on the design of a fault tolerant digital computer for aircraft. Volume 2 is composed of two parts. Part 1 is concerned with the computational requirements associated with an advanced commercial aircraft. Part 2 reviews the technology that will be available for the implementation of the computer in the 1975-1985 period. With regard to the computation task 26 computations have been categorized according to computational load, memory requirements, criticality, permitted down-time, and the need to save data in order to effect a roll-back. The technology part stresses the impact of large scale integration (LSI) on the realization of logic and memory. Also considered was module interconnection possibilities so as to minimize fault propagation.

  11. Mechanical Design Technology--Modified. (Computer Assisted Drafting, Computer Aided Design). Curriculum Grant 84/85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoolcraft Coll., Livonia, MI.

    This document is a curriculum guide for a program in mechanical design technology (computer-assisted drafting and design developed at Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Michigan). The program helps students to acquire the skills of drafters and to interact with electronic equipment, with the option of becoming efficient in the computer-aided…

  12. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  13. First Year Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Computers from Computer Education and Instructional Technology Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakin, Ilker, Sumuer, Evren

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the attitudes of first year university students towards computers. The study focuses on preservice teachers (N=46) included 33 male and 12 female from Middle East Technical University, Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) department. The study is delimited to first grade preservice teachers…

  14. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Krupnikov, K K; Makletsov, A A; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-10-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991 1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language. PMID:11542669

  15. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Krupnikov, K K; Makletsov, A A; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-10-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991 1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language.

  16. Beyond computer literacy: supporting youth's positive development through technology.

    PubMed

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for children to make a better world through the use of their computational skills, is just as important. The Positive Technological Development framework (PTD), a natural extension of the computer literacy and the technological fluency movements that have influenced the world of educational technology, adds psychosocial, civic, and ethical components to the cognitive ones. PTD examines the developmental tasks of a child growing up in our digital era and provides a model for developing and evaluating technology-rich youth programs. The explicit goal of PTD programs is to support children in the positive uses of technology to lead more fulfilling lives and make the world a better place. This article introduces the concept of PTD and presents examples of the Zora virtual world program for young people that the author developed following this framework.

  17. Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Research and Development Program Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Michael; McGuire, Kenyon; Sorgi, Alan

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this project report, focused on: (1) Design and development of two Advanced Portable Workstation 2 (APW 2) units. These units incorporate advanced technology features such as a low power Pentium processor, a high resolution color display, National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) video handling capabilities, a Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) interface, and Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) and ethernet interfaces. (2) Use these units to integrate and demonstrate advanced wireless network and portable video capabilities. (3) Qualification of the APW 2 systems for use in specific experiments aboard the Mir Space Station. A major objective of the PCT Phase 2 program was to help guide future choices in computing platforms and techniques for meeting National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) mission objectives. The focus being on the development of optimal configurations of computing hardware, software applications, and network technologies for use on NASA missions.

  18. Application of software technology to a future spacecraft computer design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaugh, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how major improvements in spacecraft computer systems can be obtained from recent advances in hardware and software technology. Investigations into integrated circuit technology indicated that the CMOS/SOS chip set being developed for the Air Force Avionics Laboratory at Wright Patterson had the best potential for improving the performance of spaceborne computer systems. An integral part of the chip set is the bit slice arithmetic and logic unit. The flexibility allowed by microprogramming, combined with the software investigations, led to the specification of a baseline architecture and instruction set.

  19. Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery. Image guided and robotic assistive technologies.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, A M; Jaramaz, B; Colgan, B D

    1998-09-01

    Technologies are emerging that will influence the way in which orthopaedic surgery is planned, simulated, and performed. Recent advances in the fields of medical imaging, computer vision, and robotics have provided the enabling technologies to permit computer aided surgery to become an established area which can address clinical needs. Although these technologies have been applied in industry for more than 20 years, the field of computer assisted orthopaedic surgery is still in its infancy. Image guided and surgical navigation systems, robotic assistive devices, and surgical simulators have begun to emerge from the laboratory and hold the potential to improve current surgical practice and patients' outcomes. The goals of these new clinically focused technologies are to develop interactive, patient specific preoperative planners to optimize the performance of surgery and the postoperative biologic response, and develop more precise and less invasive interactive smart tools and sensors to assist in the accurate and precise performance of surgery. The medical community is beginning to see the benefit of these enabling technologies which can be realized only through the collaboration and combined expertise of engineers, roboticists, computer scientists, and surgeons.

  20. The implementation of AI technologies in computer wargames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiller, John A.

    2004-08-01

    Computer wargames involve the most in-depth analysis of general game theory. The enumerated turns of a game like chess are dwarfed by the exponentially larger possibilities of even a simple computer wargame. Implementing challenging AI is computer wargames is an important goal in both the commercial and military environments. In the commercial marketplace, customers demand a challenging AI opponent when they play a computer wargame and are frustrated by a lack of competence on the part of the AI. In the military environment, challenging AI opponents are important for several reasons. A challenging AI opponent will force the military professional to avoid routine or set-piece approaches to situations and cause them to think much deeper about military situations before taking action. A good AI opponent would also include national characteristics of the opponent being simulated, thus providing the military professional with even more of a challenge in planning and approach. Implementing current AI technologies in computer wargames is a technological challenge. The goal is to join the needs of AI in computer wargames with the solutions of current AI technologies. This talk will address several of those issues, possible solutions, and currently unsolved problems.

  1. ATM-based cluster computing for multi-problem domains

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.Y.; Brandt, J.M.; Armstrong, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    This study evaluates the performance of an Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) local area network (LAN) for general as well as parallel distributed computing. General distributed computing uses client-server based applications that employ Remote Procedure Call (RPC) on top of the TCP/UDP/IP protocol. These applications typically require high throughput, good response time, and fairness. In contrast, parallel applications favor much simpler models of computation which require more direct access to data among processors. To efficiently run these programs, the network needs to achieve hardware speed. This paper describe our experience in building a multi-programmed distributed computing environment using Digital Equipment Corporation`s (DEC) AN2 ATM switch and Alpha workstations. We extend our study to include more elaborate network using simulation results.

  2. Computer and Information Technologies: Student and Service Provider Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Barile, Maria; Asuncion, Jennison; Judd, Darlene; Alapin, Iris; Lavers, Jason; Havel, Alice; Wolforth, Joan

    This presentation discusses the outcomes of a project that investigated the computer, information, and learning and adaptive technology needs and concerns of Canadian postsecondary students with disabilities. A series of four focus groups involving 33 students with disabilities and 25 service providers was held. The study found: (1) colleges have…

  3. Computer Technology and Student Preferences in a Nutrition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Norman J.; Kemp, Wendy C.; Benson, Wendy A.

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed learner preferences for using computer-based technology in a distance education course. A questionnaire was posted to students who had taken an undergraduate nutrition course at Athabasca University, Canada. The response rate was 57.1% (176 returned out of 308). Subjects were predominately female (93.7%) and nursing students…

  4. Computer Software for Forestry Technology Curricula. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Roy C.; Scobie, Walter R.

    Since microcomputers are being used more and more frequently in the forest products industry in the Pacific Northwest, Green River Community College conducted a project to search for BASIC language computer programs pertaining to forestry, and when possible, to adapt such software for use in teaching forestry technology. The search for applicable…

  5. Instructors' Integration of Computer Technology: Examining the Role of Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hoe Kyeung; Rissel, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Computer technology has the potential to provide rich resources for language teaching and learning. However, it continues to be underutilized, even though its availability, familiarity, and sophistication are steadily increasing. This case study explored the way in which three language instructors' beliefs about language teaching and learning…

  6. Computer Technology Integration and Student Learning: Barriers and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Political and institutional support has enabled many institutions of learning to spend millions of dollars to acquire educational computing tools (Ficklen and Muscara, "Am Educ" 25(3):22-29, 2001) that have not been effectively integrated into the curriculum. While access to educational technology tools has remarkably improved in most schools,…

  7. Introduction to CAD/Computers. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockerby, Hugh

    This learning module for an eighth-grade introductory technology course is designed to help teachers introduce students to computer-assisted design (CAD) in a communications unit on graphics. The module contains a module objective and five specific objectives, a content outline, suggested instructor methodology, student activities, a list of six…

  8. Computer-Aided Drafting. Education for Technology Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb. Dept. of Technology.

    This computer-aided drafting (CAD) curriculum was developed to provide drafting instructors in Illinois with a useful guide for relating an important new technological advance to the vocational classroom. The competency-based learning activity guides are written to be used with any CAD system being used at the secondary and postsecondary levels.…

  9. Computational Structures Technology for Airframes and Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (Compiler); Starnes, James H., Jr. (Compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (Compiler); Chamis, Christos C. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint University of Virginia (UVA)/NASA Workshops. The presentations included NASA Headquarters perspectives on High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), goals and objectives of the UVA Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST), NASA and Air Force CST activities, CST activities for airframes and propulsion systems in industry, and CST activities at Sandia National Laboratory.

  10. Troubling Discourse: Basic Writing and Computer-Mediated Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonaitis, Leigh A.

    2012-01-01

    Through an examination of literature in the fields of Basic Writing and developmental education, this essay provides some historical perspective and examines the prevalent discourses on the use of computer-mediated technologies in the basic writing classroom. The author uses Bertram Bruce's (1997) framework of various "stances" on…

  11. The Voice as Computer Interface: A Look at Tomorrow's Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Holley R.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of voice as the communications device for computer-human interaction focuses on voice recognition systems for use within a library environment. Voice technologies are described, including voice response and voice recognition; examples of voice systems in use in libraries are examined; and further possibilities, including use with…

  12. NASA CST aids U.S. industry. [computational structures technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, Jerry M.; Pinson, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of NASA's computational structures Technology (CST) research on aerospace vehicle design and operation is discussed. The application of this research to proposed version of a high-speed civil transport, to composite structures in aerospace, to the study of crack growth, and to resolving field problems is addressed.

  13. Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zou, Bin; Xing, Minjie; Wang, Yuping; Sun, Mingyu; Xiang, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Foreign Language Teaching and Learning: Technological Advances highlights new research and an original framework that brings together foreign language teaching, experiments and testing practices that utilize the most recent and widely used e-learning resources. This comprehensive collection of research will offer linguistic…

  14. Computer Technologies: Attitudes and Self-Efficacy across Undergraduate Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzie, Mable B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 359 undergraduate students in business (n=125), education (n=111), and nursing (n=123) in 3 state university systems investigated the use of 2 affective measures concerning aspects of computer technology. Data on construct validity, relationship between results of the two measures, and implications for future research are reported.…

  15. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  16. Pervasive Computing and Communication Technologies for U-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Young C.

    2014-01-01

    The development of digital information transfer, storage and communication methods influences a significant effect on education. The assimilation of pervasive computing and communication technologies marks another great step forward, with Ubiquitous Learning (U-learning) emerging for next generation learners. In the evolutionary view the 5G (or…

  17. Integration of Computer Technology and Interactive Learning in Geographic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Michael P.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Contends that the rapid proliferation of computer technology is dramatically improving geographic instruction. Describes how instructors can identify and access easily Internet resources using Mosaic software. Concludes that these diverse and informative materials can be used in a wide variety of pedagogical tasks. (CFR)

  18. Developing a University's Construction Technology and Mgt's Computer Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Richard; Kramer, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Provides working blueprints for a university technology lab built specifically for construction science students and faculty. More than just housing for computer workstations, the facility is intentionally designed as a medium for better communication and instruction. A future in which distance learning is the norm is addressed. (KRN)

  19. Beyond Computer Literacy: Technology Integration and Curriculum Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safar, Ammar H.; AlKhezzi, Fahad A.

    2013-01-01

    Personal computers, the Internet, smartphones, and other forms of information and communication technology (ICT) have changed our world, our job, our personal lives, as well as how we manage our knowledge and time effectively and efficiently. Research findings in the past decades have acknowledged and affirmed that the content the ICT medium…

  20. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  1. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are.

  2. Providing Assistive Technology Applications as a Service Through Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Users with disabilities interact with Personal Computers (PCs) using Assistive Technology (AT) software solutions. Such applications run on a PC that a person with a disability commonly uses. However the configuration of AT applications is not trivial at all, especially whenever the user needs to work on a PC that does not allow him/her to rely on his / her AT tools (e.g., at work, at university, in an Internet point). In this paper, we discuss how cloud computing provides a valid technological solution to enhance such a scenario.With the emergence of cloud computing, many applications are executed on top of virtual machines (VMs). Virtualization allows us to achieve a software implementation of a real computer able to execute a standard operating system and any kind of application. In this paper we propose to build personalized VMs running AT programs and settings. By using the remote desktop technology, our solution enables users to control their customized virtual desktop environment by means of an HTML5-based web interface running on any computer equipped with a browser, whenever they are. PMID:26132225

  3. Implications of Computer Technology. Harvard University Program on Technology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taviss, Irene; Burbank, Judith

    Lengthy abstracts of a small number of selected books and articles on the implications of computer technology are presented, preceded by a brief state-of-the-art survey which traces the impact of computers on the structure of economic and political organizations and socio-cultural patterns. A summary statement introduces each of the three abstract…

  4. Advanced computer modeling techniques expand belt conveyor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alspaugh, M.

    1998-07-01

    Increased mining production is continuing to challenge engineers and manufacturers to keep up. The pressure to produce larger and more versatile equipment is increasing. This paper will show some recent major projects in the belt conveyor industry that have pushed the limits of design and engineering technology. Also, it will discuss the systems engineering discipline and advanced computer modeling tools that have helped make these achievements possible. Several examples of technologically advanced designs will be reviewed. However, new technology can sometimes produce increased problems with equipment availability and reliability if not carefully developed. Computer modeling techniques that help one design larger equipment can also compound operational headaches if engineering processes and algorithms are not carefully analyzed every step of the way.

  5. The Adoption of Grid Computing Technology by Organizations: A Quantitative Study Using Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udoh, Emmanuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in grid technology have enabled some organizations to harness enormous computational power on demand. However, the prediction of widespread adoption of the grid technology has not materialized despite the obvious grid advantages. This situation has encouraged intense efforts to close the research gap in the grid adoption process. In this…

  6. Implementing a Computer/Technology Endorsement in a Classroom Technology Master's Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Gregg; O'Bannon, Blanche; Brownell, Nancy

    In the spring of 1998, the Master's program in Classroom Technology at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) was granted conditional approval to grant, as part of the program, the new State of Ohio Department of Education computer/technology endorsement. This paper briefly describes Ohio's change from certification to licensure, the removal of…

  7. Fax technology for collecting outcomes data in a computer database.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z M; Rascati, K L; Koeller, J M; Smeeding, J

    1999-12-15

    In this era of cost containment, outcomes research is becoming more prevalent. Therefore, various technologies allowing for flexibility in study design and the capture of specific clinical information need to be examined and used. These technologies include fax data systems, pocket scanners, automated telephone equipment, and hand-held computer devices. Fax data systems convert a fax machine into an automated data-entry system. Data-filled forms are faxed to a computer, the fax is converted, and the data are entered into preset fields in a database. Applications for fax systems include acute care-based and ambulatory care-based drug-use evaluations, drug recall systems, and patient-completed surveys of health status. Pocket scanners are hand-held instruments for rapid data entry and transport. Applications for pocket scanning include patient interview responses, procedure and disease analysis, and procedure coding. Options for automated telephone equipment include surveys with interactive voice-mail responses or keypad data entry, pharmacist-monitored drug information and survey services, fax-back and mail-out services, and patient-generated disease intervention programs. Hand-held computer technology is a source of information on multiple protocols and care pathways. All these technologies improve data collection with respect to accuracy and speed, facilitate data analysis, and promote cost-efficient information sharing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of fax technology in data collection for a prospective, multicenter study of the outcomes and cost-effectiveness of two drugs used in the treatment of cancer. Details for the pharmacoeconomic study can be found elsewhere. Fax technology was selected because of the ease with which those responsible for managing the data collection could be trained to use it, the affordability and efficiency of the technology, the ease with which data could be analyzed, and the accuracy of data collection.

  8. Computing, information, and communications: Technologies for the 21. Century

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    To meet the challenges of a radically new and technologically demanding century, the Federal Computing, Information, and Communications (CIC) programs are investing in long-term research and development (R and D) to advance computing, information, and communications in the United States. CIC R and D programs help Federal departments and agencies to fulfill their evolving missions, assure the long-term national security, better understand and manage the physical environment, improve health care, help improve the teaching of children, provide tools for lifelong training and distance learning to the workforce, and sustain critical US economic competitiveness. One of the nine committees of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), the Committee on Computing, Information, and Communications (CCIC)--through its CIC R and D Subcommittee--coordinates R and D programs conducted by twelve Federal departments and agencies in cooperation with US academia and industry. These R and D programs are organized into five Program Component Areas: (1) HECC--High End Computing and Computation; (2) LSN--Large Scale Networking, including the Next Generation Internet Initiative; (3) HCS--High Confidence Systems; (4) HuCS--Human Centered Systems; and (5) ETHR--Education, Training, and Human Resources. A brief synopsis of FY 1997 accomplishments and FY 1998 goals by PCA is presented. This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1998 Budget, describes the interagency CIC programs.

  9. Report of the Panel on Computer and Information Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstrom, Stephen F.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    Aircraft have become more and more dependent on computers (information processing) for improved performance and safety. It is clear that this activity will grow, since information processing technology has advanced by a factor of 10 every 5 years for the past 35 years and will continue to do so. Breakthroughs in device technology, from vacuum tubes through transistors to integrated circuits, contribute to this rapid pace. This progress is nearly matched by similar, though not as dramatic, advances in numerical software and algorithms. Progress has not been easy. Many technical and nontechnical challenges were surmounted. The outlook is for continued growth in capability but will require surmounting new challenges. The technology forecast presented in this report has been developed by extrapolating current trends and assessing the possibilities of several high-risk research topics. In the process, critical problem areas that require research and development emphasis have been identified. The outlook assumes a positive perspective; the projected capabilities are possible by the year 2000, and adequate resources will be made available to achieve them. Computer and information technology forecasts and the potential impacts of this technology on aeronautics are identified. Critical issues and technical challenges underlying the achievement of forecasted performance and benefits are addressed.

  10. Cloud computing and patient engagement: leveraging available technology.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Servan, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technology has the potential to transform medical practices and improve patient engagement and quality of care. However, issues such as privacy and security and "fit" can make incorporation of the cloud an intimidating decision for many physicians. This article summarizes the four most common types of clouds and discusses their ideal uses, how they engage patients, and how they improve the quality of care offered. This technology also can be used to meet Meaningful Use requirements 1 and 2; and, if speculation is correct, the cloud will provide the necessary support needed for Meaningful Use 3 as well. PMID:25807597

  11. Cloud computing and patient engagement: leveraging available technology.

    PubMed

    Noblin, Alice; Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Servan, Rosa M

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing technology has the potential to transform medical practices and improve patient engagement and quality of care. However, issues such as privacy and security and "fit" can make incorporation of the cloud an intimidating decision for many physicians. This article summarizes the four most common types of clouds and discusses their ideal uses, how they engage patients, and how they improve the quality of care offered. This technology also can be used to meet Meaningful Use requirements 1 and 2; and, if speculation is correct, the cloud will provide the necessary support needed for Meaningful Use 3 as well.

  12. Diversity in computing technologies and strategies for dynamic resource allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, G.; Gutsche, O.

    2015-01-01

    Here, High Energy Physics (HEP) is a very data intensive and trivially parallelizable science discipline. HEP is probing nature at increasingly finer details requiring ever increasing computational resources to process and analyze experimental data. In this paper, we discuss how HEP provisioned resources so far using Grid technologies, how HEP is starting to include new resource providers like commercial Clouds and HPC installations, and how HEP is transparently provisioning resources at these diverse providers.

  13. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    SciTech Connect

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  14. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  15. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  16. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  17. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  18. 25 CFR 502.7 - Electronic, computer or other technologic aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. 502.7... DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.7 Electronic, computer or other technologic aid. (a) Electronic, computer or... applicable Federal communications law. (b) Electronic, computer or other technologic aids include, but...

  19. A virtual computer lab for distance biomedical technology education

    PubMed Central

    Locatis, Craig; Vega, Anibal; Bhagwat, Medha; Liu, Wei-Li; Conde, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background The National Library of Medicine's National Center for Biotechnology Information offers mini-courses which entail applying concepts in biochemistry and genetics to search genomics databases and other information sources. They are highly interactive and involve use of 3D molecular visualization software that can be computationally taxing. Methods Methods were devised to offer the courses at a distance so as to provide as much functionality of a computer lab as possible, the venue where they are normally taught. The methods, which can be employed with varied videoconferencing technology and desktop sharing software, were used to deliver mini-courses at a distance in pilot applications where students could see demonstrations by the instructor and the instructor could observe and interact with students working at their remote desktops. Results Student ratings of the learning experience and comments to open ended questions were similar to those when the courses are offered face to face. The real time interaction and the instructor's ability to access student desktops from a distance in order to provide individual assistance and feedback were considered invaluable. Conclusion The technologies and methods mimic much of the functionality of computer labs and may be usefully applied in any context where content changes frequently, training needs to be offered on complex computer applications at a distance in real time, and where it is necessary for the instructor to monitor students as they work. PMID:18366629

  20. Advances in parallel computer technology for desktop atmospheric dispersion models

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X.; Ionescu-Niscov, S.; Fast, J.D.; Allwine, K.J.

    1996-12-31

    Desktop models are those models used by analysts with varied backgrounds, for performing, for example, air quality assessment and emergency response activities. These models must be robust, well documented, have minimal and well controlled user inputs, and have clear outputs. Existing coarse-grained parallel computers can provide significant increases in computation speed in desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling without considerable increases in hardware cost. This increased speed will allow for significant improvements to be made in the scientific foundations of these applied models, in the form of more advanced diffusion schemes and better representation of the wind and turbulence fields. This is especially attractive for emergency response applications where speed and accuracy are of utmost importance. This paper describes one particular application of coarse-grained parallel computer technology to a desktop complex terrain atmospheric dispersion modeling system. By comparing performance characteristics of the coarse-grained parallel version of the model with the single-processor version, we will demonstrate that applying coarse-grained parallel computer technology to desktop atmospheric dispersion modeling systems will allow us to address critical issues facing future requirements of this class of dispersion models.

  1. Campus Computing, 1998. The Ninth National Survey of Desktop Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    This report presents findings of a June 1998 survey of computing officials at 1,623 two- and four-year U.S. colleges and universities concerning the use of computer technology. The survey found that computing and information technology (IT) are now core components of the campus environment and classroom experience. However, key aspects of IT…

  2. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90`s. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN`s so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  3. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90's. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN's so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  4. Computer technology to evaluate body composition, nutrition, and exercise.

    PubMed

    Katch, F I; Katch, V L

    1983-09-01

    The use of computer technology has made it possible to make accurate determinations of body composition, nutrition, and exercise. With the FITCOMP computer assessment system, detailed measurements of physique status have been made on a variety of world-class athletes, including professional football and baseball players, as well as on diverse groups of young and older men and women throughout the United States. The FITCOMP measurement system allows the user a choice of measurement techniques: fatfolds, girths, bone diameters, and hydrostatic weighing. Combined with body composition assessment is a nutrition and exercise plan. The nutrition plan is based on guidelines formulated by the American Dietetic Association. This application of computer technology is unique, because individuals can select the foods they will eat from a list of preferred choices from the basic food groups. Individual menu plans for breakfast, lunch, and dinner are generated to provide an optimal blend of nutrients aimed at achieving ideal body mass and fat percentage. This is coupled with an aerobic exercise program that is selected by the individual from nine different forms, including walking, jogging, running, swimming, cycling, and various sport activities. The caloric output is designed to reduce total body fat through reductions in body weight of 1.4 to 2.5 pounds per week, depending on the exercise selected and total weight loss necessary to achieve a weight goal (and ideal fat percentage). The aerobic exercise plan is based on the method of overload, where intensity and duration are periodically increased dependent on individual capabilities. The use of fitness-oriented computer technology makes it possible to prepare detailed reports about current status and progress as well as to systematize record keeping.

  5. Computer program for distance learning of pesticide application technology.

    PubMed

    Maia, Bruno; Cunha, Joao P A R

    2011-12-01

    Distance learning presents great potential for mitigating field problems on pesticide application technology. Thus, due to the lack of teaching material about pesticide spraying technology in the Portuguese language and the increasing availability of distance learning, this study developed and evaluated a computer program for distance learning about the theory of pesticide spraying technology using the tools of information technology. The modules comprising the course, named Pulverizar, were: (1) Basic concepts, (2) Factors that affect application, (3) Equipments, (4) Spraying nozzles, (5) Sprayer calibration, (6) Aerial application, (7) Chemigation, (8) Physical-chemical properties, (9) Formulations, (10) Adjuvants, (11) Water quality, and (12) Adequate use of pesticides. The program was made available to the public on July 1(st), 2008, hosted at the web site www.pulverizar.iciag.ufu.br, and was simple, robust and practical on the complementation of traditional teaching for the education of professionals in Agricultural Sciences. Mastering pesticide spraying technology by people involved in agricultural production can be facilitated by the program Pulverizar, which was well accepted in its initial evaluation.

  6. Computer technology applications in industrial and organizational psychology.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Timothy R; Austin, James T

    2002-08-01

    This article reviews computer applications developed and utilized by industrial-organizational (I-O) psychologists, both in practice and in research. A primary emphasis is on applications developed for Internet usage, because this "network of networks" changes the way I-O psychologists work. The review focuses on traditional and emerging topics in I-O psychology. The first topic involves information technology applications in measurement, defined broadly across levels of analysis (persons, groups, organizations) and domains (abilities, personality, attitudes). Discussion then focuses on individual learning at work, both in formal training and in coping with continual automation of work. A section on job analysis follows, illustrating the role of computers and the Internet in studying jobs. Shifting focus to the group level of analysis, we briefly review how information technology is being used to understand and support cooperative work. Finally, special emphasis is given to the emerging "third discipline" in I-O psychology research-computational modeling of behavioral events in organizations. Throughout this review, themes of innovation and dissemination underlie a continuum between research and practice. The review concludes by setting a framework for I-O psychology in a computerized and networked world.

  7. Foreign and Domestic Accomplishments in Magnetic Bubble Device Technology. Computer Science & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnar, Robert B. J.; Calomeris, Peter J.

    This document assesses the status of magnetic bubble technology as displayed by non-U.S. research and manufacturing facilities. Non-U.S. research and U.S. accomplishments are described while both technical and economic factors are addressed. Magnetic bubble devices are discussed whenever their application could impact future computer system…

  8. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  9. Technologies for Large Data Management in Scientific Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, intense usage of computing has been the main strategy of investigations in several scientific research projects. The progress in computing technology has opened unprecedented opportunities for systematic collection of experimental data and the associated analysis that were considered impossible only few years ago. This paper focuses on the strategies in use: it reviews the various components that are necessary for an effective solution that ensures the storage, the long term preservation, and the worldwide distribution of large quantities of data that are necessary in a large scientific research project. The paper also mentions several examples of data management solutions used in High Energy Physics for the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments in Geneva, Switzerland which generate more than 30,000 terabytes of data every year that need to be preserved, analyzed, and made available to a community of several tenth of thousands scientists worldwide.

  10. Application Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-09-30

    Our accomplishments over the last three years of the DOE project Application- Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing (DOE Agreement: DE-FG02-05ER25680) are described below. The project will have met all of its objectives by the time of its completion at the end of September, 2008. Two extensive yearly progress reports were produced in in March 2006 and 2007 and were previously submitted to the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR). Following an overview of the objectives of the project, we summarize for each of the project areas the achievements in the first two years, and then describe in some more detail the project accomplishments this past year. At the end, we discuss the relationship of the proposed renewal application to the work done on the current project.

  11. Reconfigurable high-speed optoelectronic interconnect technology for multiprocessor computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Julian

    1995-06-01

    We describe a compact optoelectronic switching technology for interconnecting multiple computer processors and shared memory modules together through dynamically reconfigurable optical paths to provide simultaneous, high speed communication amongst different nodes. Each switch provides a optical link to other nodes as well as electrical access to an individual processor, and it can perform optical and optoelectronic switching to covert digital data between various electrical and optical input/output formats. This multifunctional switching technology is based on the monolithic integration of arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with photodetectors and heterojunction bipolar transistors. The various digital switching and routing functions, as well as optically cascaded multistage operation, have been experimentally demonstrated.

  12. Emerging computer technologies and the news media of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrabel, Debra A.

    1993-01-01

    The media environment of the future may be dramatically different from what exists today. As new computing and communications technologies evolve and synthesize to form a global, integrated communications system of networks, public domain hardware and software, and consumer products, it will be possible for citizens to fulfill most information needs at any time and from any place, to obtain desired information easily and quickly, to obtain information in a variety of forms, and to experience and interact with information in a variety of ways. This system will transform almost every institution, every profession, and every aspect of human life--including the creation, packaging, and distribution of news and information by media organizations. This paper presents one vision of a 21st century global information system and how it might be used by citizens. It surveys some of the technologies now on the market that are paving the way for new media environment.

  13. Processing instrumentation technology: Process definition with a cognitive computer

    SciTech Connect

    Price, H.L.

    1996-11-01

    Much of the polymer composites industry is built around the thermochemical conversion of raw material into useful composites. The raw materials (molding compound, prepreg) often are made up of thermosetting resins and small fibers or particles. While this conversion can follow a large number of paths, only a few paths are efficient, economical and lead to desirable composite properties. Processing instrument (P/I) technology enables a computer to sense and interpret changes taking place during the cure of prepreg or molding compound. P/I technology has been used to make estimates of gel time and cure time, thermal diffusivity measurements and transition temperature measurements. Control and sensing software is comparatively straightforward. The interpretation of results with appropriate software is under development.

  14. Japanese technology assessment: Computer science, opto- and microelectronics mechatronics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Brandin, D.; Wieder, H.; Spicer, W.; Nevins, J.; Oxender, D.

    1986-01-01

    The series studies Japanese research and development in four high-technology areas - computer science, opto and microelectronics, mechatronics (a term created by the Japanese to describe the union of mechanical and electronic engineering to produce the next generation of machines, robots, and the like), and biotechnology. The evaluations were conducted by panels of U.S. scientists - chosen from academia, government, and industry - actively involved in research in areas of expertise. The studies were prepared for the purpose of aiding the U.S. response to Japan's technological challenge. The main focus of the assessments is on the current status and long-term direction and emphasis of Japanese research and development. Other aspects covered include evolution of the state of the art; identification of Japanese researchers, R and D organizations, and resources; and comparative U.S. efforts. The general time frame of the studies corresponds to future industrial applications and potential commercial impacts spanning approximately the next two decades.

  15. On the Relevancy of Efficient, Integrated Computer and Network Monitoring in HEP Distributed Online Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, D.; Gavillet, Ph.; Delgado, V.; Albert, J. N.; Bellas, N.; Javello, J.; Miere, Y.; Ruffinoni, D.; Smith, G.

    Large Scientific Equipments are controlled by Computer Systems whose complexity is growing driven, on the one hand by the volume and variety of the information, its distributed nature, the sophistication of its treatment and, on the other hand by the fast evolution of the computer and network market. Some people call them genetically Large-Scale Distributed Data Intensive Information Systems or Distributed Computer Control Systems (DCCS) for those systems dealing more with real time control. Taking advantage of (or forced by) the distributed architecture, the tasks are more and more often implemented as Client-Server applications. In this framework the monitoring of the computer nodes, the communications network and the applications becomes of primary importance for ensuring the safe running and guaranteed performance of the system. With the future generation of HEP experiments, such as those at the LHC in view, it is proposed to integrate the various functions of DCCS monitoring into one general purpose Multi-layer System.

  16. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won

  17. Primer on computers and information technology. Part two: an introduction to computer networking.

    PubMed

    Channin, D S; Chang, P J

    1997-01-01

    Computers networks are a way of connecting computers together such that they can exchange information. For this exchange to be successful, system behavior must be planned and specified very clearly at a number of different levels. Although there are many choices to be made at each level, often there are simple decisions that can be made to rapidly reduce the number of options. Planning is most important at the highest (application) and lowest (wiring) levels, whereas the middle levels must be specified to ensure compatibility. Because of the widespread use of the Internet, solutions based on Internet technologies are often cost-effective and should be considered when designing a network. As in all technical fields, consultation with experts (ie, computer networking specialists) may be worthwhile. PMID:9225395

  18. Primer on computers and information technology. Part two: an introduction to computer networking.

    PubMed

    Channin, D S; Chang, P J

    1997-01-01

    Computers networks are a way of connecting computers together such that they can exchange information. For this exchange to be successful, system behavior must be planned and specified very clearly at a number of different levels. Although there are many choices to be made at each level, often there are simple decisions that can be made to rapidly reduce the number of options. Planning is most important at the highest (application) and lowest (wiring) levels, whereas the middle levels must be specified to ensure compatibility. Because of the widespread use of the Internet, solutions based on Internet technologies are often cost-effective and should be considered when designing a network. As in all technical fields, consultation with experts (ie, computer networking specialists) may be worthwhile.

  19. How Computer Technology Expands Educational Options: A Rationale, Recommendations, and a Pamphlet for Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelch, Panette Evers; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical rationale on how computer technology, particularly the Internet, expands educational options for administrators and teachers. A review of the literature includes a brief history of computer technology and its growing use, and a discussion of computer technology for distance learning, for…

  20. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture technology.

    PubMed

    Calamia, J R

    1996-01-01

    Although the development of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology and the benefits of increased productivity became obvious in the automobile and aerospace industries in the 1970s, investigations of this technology's application in the field of dentistry did not begin until the 1980s. Only now are we beginning to see the fruits of this work with the commercial availability of some systems; the potential for this technology seems boundless. This article reviews the recent literature with emphasis on the period from June 1992 to May 1993. This review should familiarize the reader with some of the latest developments in this technology, including a brief description of some systems currently available and the clinical and economical rationale for their acceptance into the dental mainstream. This article concentrates on a particular system, the Cerec (Siemens/Pelton and Crane, Charlotte, NC) system, for three reasons: First, this system has been available since 1985 and, as a result, has a track record of almost 7 years of data. Most of the data have just recently been released and consequently, much of this year's literature on CAD-CAM is monopolized by studies using this system. Second, this system was developed as a mobile, affordable, direct chairside CAD-CAM restorative method. As such, it is of special interest to the patient, providing a one-visit restoration. Third, the author is currently engaged in research using this particular system and has a working knowledge of this system's capabilities.

  1. Counseling Student Computer Competency Skills: Effects of Technology Course in Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Yolanda V.; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe; Bethea, James

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this article is to assess counseling student computer competency level as an effect of a one-credit hour introductory course in computer technology. Results indicate student computer competencies increased after completing the computer technology course in the following areas: ethics, assisting clients with internet searches,…

  2. Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Srivastava, Rameshwar D.; Ciferno, Jared; Litynski, John; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2013-08-15

    This special section of Energy & Fuels comprises a selection of papers presented at the topical conference “Accelerating Technology Development through Integrated Computation and Experimentation”, sponsored and organized by the United States Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as part of the 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting held in Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 28-Nov 2, 2012. That topical conference focused on the latest research and development efforts in five main areas related to fossil energy, with each area focusing on the utilization of both experimental and computational approaches: (1) gas separations (membranes, sorbents, and solvents for CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} production), (2) CO{sub 2} utilization (enhanced oil recovery, chemical production, mineralization, etc.), (3) carbon sequestration (flow in natural systems), (4) advanced power cycles (oxy-combustion, chemical looping, gasification, etc.), and (5) fuel processing (H{sub 2} production for fuel cells).

  3. Implementation of Parallel Computing Technology to Vortex Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    Mainframe supercomputers such as the Cray C90 was invaluable in obtaining large scale computations using several millions of grid points to resolve salient features of a tip vortex flow over a lifting wing. However, real flight configurations require tracking not only of the flow over several lifting wings but its growth and decay in the near- and intermediate- wake regions, not to mention the interaction of these vortices with each other. Resolving and tracking the evolution and interaction of these vortices shed from complex bodies is computationally intensive. Parallel computing technology is an attractive option in solving these flows. In planetary science vortical flows are also important in studying how planets and protoplanets form when cosmic dust and gases become gravitationally unstable and eventually form planets or protoplanets. The current paradigm for the formation of planetary systems maintains that the planets accreted from the nebula of gas and dust left over from the formation of the Sun. Traditional theory also indicate that such a preplanetary nebula took the form of flattened disk. The coagulation of dust led to the settling of aggregates toward the midplane of the disk, where they grew further into asteroid-like planetesimals. Some of the issues still remaining in this process are the onset of gravitational instability, the role of turbulence in the damping of particles and radial effects. In this study the focus will be with the role of turbulence and the radial effects.

  4. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture technology.

    PubMed

    Calamia, J R

    1994-01-01

    Although the development of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology and the benefits of increased productivity became obvious in the automobile and aerospace industries in the 1970s, investigations of this technology's application in the field of dentistry did not begin until the 1980s. Only now are we beginning to see the fruits of this work with the commercial availability of some systems; the potential for this technology seems boundless. This article reviews the recent literature with emphasis on the period from June 1992 to May 1993. This review should familiarize the reader with some of the latest developments in this technology, including a brief description of some systems currently available and the clinical and economical rationale for their acceptance into the dental mainstream. This article concentrates on a particular system, the Cerec (Siemens/Pelton and Crane, Charlotte, NC) system, for three reasons: first, this system has been available since 1985 and, as a result, has a track record of almost 7 years of data. Most of the data have just recently been released and consequently, much of this year's literature on CAD-CAM is monopolized by studies using this system. Second, this system was developed as a mobile, affordable, direct chairside CAD-CAM restorative method. As such, it is of special interest to the dentist who will offer this new technology directly to the patient, providing a one-visit restoration. Third, the author is currently engaged in research using this particular system and has a working knowledge of this system's capabilities.

  5. Numerical Technology for Large-Scale Computational Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R; Champagne, N; White, D; Stowell, M; Adams, R

    2003-01-30

    The key bottleneck of implicit computational electromagnetics tools for large complex geometries is the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. The goal of this effort was to research and develop critical numerical technology that alleviates this bottleneck for large-scale computational electromagnetics (CEM). The mathematical operators and numerical formulations used in this arena of CEM yield linear equations that are complex valued, unstructured, and indefinite. Also, simultaneously applying multiple mathematical modeling formulations to different portions of a complex problem (hybrid formulations) results in a mixed structure linear system, further increasing the computational difficulty. Typically, these hybrid linear systems are solved using a direct solution method, which was acceptable for Cray-class machines but does not scale adequately for ASCI-class machines. Additionally, LLNL's previously existing linear solvers were not well suited for the linear systems that are created by hybrid implicit CEM codes. Hence, a new approach was required to make effective use of ASCI-class computing platforms and to enable the next generation design capabilities. Multiple approaches were investigated, including the latest sparse-direct methods developed by our ASCI collaborators. In addition, approaches that combine domain decomposition (or matrix partitioning) with general-purpose iterative methods and special purpose pre-conditioners were investigated. Special-purpose pre-conditioners that take advantage of the structure of the matrix were adapted and developed based on intimate knowledge of the matrix properties. Finally, new operator formulations were developed that radically improve the conditioning of the resulting linear systems thus greatly reducing solution time. The goal was to enable the solution of CEM problems that are 10 to 100 times larger than our previous capability.

  6. JavaTech, an Introduction to Scientific and Technical Computing with Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Clark S.; Tolliver, Johnny S.; Lindblad, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introduction to Java: 1. Introduction; 2. Language basics; 3. Classes and objects in Java; 4. More about objects in Java; 5. Organizing Java files and other practicalities; 6. Java graphics; 7. Graphical user interfaces; 8. Threads; 9. Java input/output; 10. Java utilities; 11. Image handling and processing; 12. More techniques and tips; Part II. Java and the Network: 13. Java networking basics; 14. A Java web server; 15. Client/server with sockets; 16. Distributed computing; 17. Distributed computing - the client; 18. Java remote method invocation (RMI); 19. CORBA; 20. Distributed computing - putting it all together; 21. Introduction to web services and XML; Part III. Out of the Sandbox: 22. The Java native interface (JNI); 23. Accessing the platform; 24. Embedded Java; Appendices; Index.

  7. JavaTech, an Introduction to Scientific and Technical Computing with Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Clark S.; Tolliver, Johnny S.; Lindblad, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introduction to Java: 1. Introduction; 2. Language basics; 3. Classes and objects in Java; 4. More about objects in Java; 5. Organizing Java files and other practicalities; 6. Java graphics; 7. Graphical user interfaces; 8. Threads; 9. Java input/output; 10. Java utilities; 11. Image handling and processing; 12. More techniques and tips; Part II. Java and the Network: 13. Java networking basics; 14. A Java web server; 15. Client/server with sockets; 16. Distributed computing; 17. Distributed computing - the client; 18. Java remote method invocation (RMI); 19. CORBA; 20. Distributed computing - putting it all together; 21. Introduction to web services and XML; Part III. Out of the Sandbox: 22. The Java native interface (JNI); 23. Accessing the platform; 24. Embedded Java; Appendices; Index.

  8. The Utah Educational Technology Initiative Year Two Evaluation: Program Implementation, Computer Acquisition and Placement, and Computer Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergendoller, John R.; And Others

    This evaluation report describes program implementation, computer acquisition and placement, and computer use during the second year (1991-92) of the Utah Educational Technology Initiative (ETI). In addition, it discusses the various ways computers are used in Utah schools and reports the opinions and experiences of ETI coordinators in the 12…

  9. What Can Computer Technology Offer Special Education? Research & Resources: Special Education Information for Policymakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Conference of State Legislatures, Washington, DC.

    Intended for policymakers, this brief addresses issues related to computer technology and its contributions to special education. Trends are noted and three types of applications are considered: computer assisted instruction, computer managed instruction, and computer support activities. Descriptions of several computer applications in local and…

  10. A Distributed Computing Infrastructure for Computational Thermodynamic Calculations of Solid-Liquid Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiorso, M. S.; Kress, V. C.

    2004-12-01

    Software tools like MELTS (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995, CMP 119:197) and its derivatives (Ghiorso et al., 2002, G3 3:10.1029/2001GC000217) are sophisticated calculators used by geoscientists to quantify the chemistry of melt production, transport and storage. These tools utilize computational thermodynamics to evaluate the equilibrium state of the system under specified external conditions by minimizing a suitably constructed thermodynamic potential. Like any thermodynamically based tool, the principal advantage in employing these techniques to model igneous processes is the intrinsic ability to couple the chemistry and energetics of the evolution of the system in a self consistent and rigorous formalism. Access to MELTS is normally accomplished via a standalone X11-based executable or as a Java-based web applet. The latter is a dedicated client-server application rooted at the University of Chicago. Our on-going objective is the development of a distributed computing infrastructure to provide "MELTS-like" computations on demand to remote network users by utilizing a language independent client-server protocol based on CORBA. The advantages of this model are numerous. First, the burden of implementing and executing MELTS computations is centralized with a software implementation optimized to a compute cluster dedicated for that purpose. Improvements and updates to MELTS software are handled locally on the server side without intervention of the user and the server-model lessens the burden of supporting the computational code on a variety of hardware and OS platforms. Second, the client hardware platform does not incur the computational cost of performing a MELTS simulation and the remote user can focus on the task of incorporating results into their model. Third, the client user can write software in a computer language of their choosing and procedural calls to the MELTS library can be executed transparently over the network as if a local language-compatible library of

  11. Important advances in technology and unique applications to cardiovascular computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Choi, Su Yeon; Nabi, Faisal; Chang, Su Min

    2014-01-01

    For the past decade, multidetector cardiac computed tomography and its main application, coronary computed tomography angiography, have been established as a noninvasive technique for anatomical assessment of coronary arteries. This new era of coronary artery evaluation by coronary computed tomography angiography has arisen from the rapid advancement in computed tomography technology, which has led to massive diagnostic and prognostic clinical studies in various patient populations. This article gives a brief overview of current multidetector cardiac computed tomography systems, developing cardiac computed tomography technologies in both hardware and software fields, innovative radiation exposure reduction measures, multidetector cardiac computed tomography functional studies, and their newer clinical applications beyond coronary computed tomography angiography. PMID:25574342

  12. Elicitation of natural language representations of uncertainty using computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R.; Travis, C.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation is an important aspect of risk analysis. Knowledge about risks must be accurately elicited from experts for use in risk assessments. Knowledge and perceptions of risks must also be accurately elicited from the public in order to intelligently perform policy analysis and develop and implement programs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing computer technology to effectively and efficiently elicit knowledge from experts and the public. This paper discusses software developed to elicit natural language representations of uncertainty. The software is written in Common Lisp and resides on VAX Computers System and Symbolics Lisp machines. The software has three goals, to determine preferences for using natural language terms for representing uncertainty; likelihood rankings of the terms; and how likelihood estimates are combined to form new terms. The first two goals relate to providing useful results for those interested in risk communication. The third relates to providing cognitive data to further our understanding of people's decision making under uncertainty. The software is used to elicit natural language terms used to express the likelihood of various agents causing cancer in humans and cancer resulting in various maladies, and the likelihood of everyday events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Advances in computer technology: impact on the practice of medicine.

    PubMed

    Groth-Vasselli, B; Singh, K; Farnsworth, P N

    1995-01-01

    Advances in computer technology provide a wide range of applications which are revolutionizing the practice of medicine. The development of new software for the office creates a web of communication among physicians, staff members, health care facilities and associated agencies. This provides the physician with the prospect of a paperless office. At the other end of the spectrum, the development of 3D work stations and software based on computational chemistry permits visualization of protein molecules involved in disease. Computer assisted molecular modeling has been used to construct working 3D models of lens alpha-crystallin. The 3D structure of alpha-crystallin is basic to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lens fiber cell maturation, stabilization of the inner nuclear region, the maintenance of lens transparency and cataractogenesis. The major component of the high molecular weight aggregates that occur during cataractogenesis is alpha-crystallin subunits. Subunits of alpha-crystallin occur in other tissues of the body. In the central nervous system accumulation of these subunits in the form of dense inclusion bodies occurs in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and toxoplasmosis (Iwaki, Wisniewski et al., 1992), as well as neoplasms of astrocyte origin (Iwaki, Iwaki, et al., 1991). Also cardiac ischemia is associated with an increased alpha B synthesis (Chiesi, Longoni et al., 1990). On a more global level, the molecular structure of alpha-crystallin may provide information pertaining to the function of small heat shock proteins, hsp, in maintaining cell stability under the stress of disease.

  14. Enabling Technologies for Scalable Trapped Ion Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Stephen; Gaultney, Daniel; Mount, Emily; Knoernschild, Caleb; Baek, Soyoung; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-05-01

    Scalability is one of the main challenges of trapped ion based quantum computation, mainly limited by the lack of enabling technologies needed to trap, manipulate and process the increasing number of qubits. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows one to design movable micromirrors to focus laser beams on individual ions in a chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Our current MEMS system is designed to steer 355 nm pulsed laser beams to carry out logic gates on a chain of Yb ions with a waist of 1.5 μm across a 20 μm range. In order to read the state of the qubit chain we developed a 32-channel PMT with a custom read-out circuit operating near the thermal noise limit of the readout amplifier which increases state detection fidelity. We also developed a set of digital to analog converters (DACs) used to supply analog DC voltages to the electrodes of an ion trap. We designed asynchronous DACs to avoid added noise injection at the update rate commonly found in synchronous DACs. Effective noise filtering is expected to reduce the heating rate of a surface trap, thus improving multi-qubit logic gate fidelities. Our DAC system features 96 channels and an integrated FPGA that allows the system to be controlled in real time. This work was supported by IARPA/ARO.

  15. Review of Enabling Technologies to Facilitate Secure Compute Customization

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Caldwell, Blake A; Hicks, Susan Elaine; Koch, Scott M; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Pelfrey, Daniel S; Pogge, James R; Scott, Stephen L; Shipman, Galen M; Sorrillo, Lawrence

    2014-12-01

    High performance computing environments are often used for a wide variety of workloads ranging from simulation, data transformation and analysis, and complex workflows to name just a few. These systems may process data for a variety of users, often requiring strong separation between job allocations. There are many challenges to establishing these secure enclaves within the shared infrastructure of high-performance computing (HPC) environments. The isolation mechanisms in the system software are the basic building blocks for enabling secure compute enclaves. There are a variety of approaches and the focus of this report is to review the different virtualization technologies that facilitate the creation of secure compute enclaves. The report reviews current operating system (OS) protection mechanisms and modern virtualization technologies to better understand the performance/isolation properties. We also examine the feasibility of running ``virtualized'' computing resources as non-privileged users, and providing controlled administrative permissions for standard users running within a virtualized context. Our examination includes technologies such as Linux containers (LXC [32], Docker [15]) and full virtualization (KVM [26], Xen [5]). We categorize these different approaches to virtualization into two broad groups: OS-level virtualization and system-level virtualization. The OS-level virtualization uses containers to allow a single OS kernel to be partitioned to create Virtual Environments (VE), e.g., LXC. The resources within the host's kernel are only virtualized in the sense of separate namespaces. In contrast, system-level virtualization uses hypervisors to manage multiple OS kernels and virtualize the physical resources (hardware) to create Virtual Machines (VM), e.g., Xen, KVM. This terminology of VE and VM, detailed in Section 2, is used throughout the report to distinguish between the two different approaches to providing virtualized execution environments

  16. Computer architectures for computational physics work done by Computational Research and Technology Branch and Advanced Computational Concepts Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Slides are reproduced that describe the importance of having high performance number crunching and graphics capability. They also indicate the types of research and development underway at Ames Research Center to ensure that, in the near term, Ames is a smart buyer and user, and in the long-term that Ames knows the best possible solutions for number crunching and graphics needs. The drivers for this research are real computational physics applications of interest to Ames and NASA. They are concerned with how to map the applications, and how to maximize the physics learned from the results of the calculations. The computer graphics activities are aimed at getting maximum information from the three-dimensional calculations by using the real time manipulation of three-dimensional data on the Silicon Graphics workstation. Work is underway on new algorithms that will permit the display of experimental results that are sparse and random, the same way that the dense and regular computed results are displayed.

  17. The Technology Refresh Program: Affording State-of-the Art Personal Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiwak, Rand

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Florida Community College Technology Refresh Program in which 28 Florida community colleges refresh their personal computer technology on a three-year cyclical basis through negotiation of a contract with Dell Computer Corporation. Discusses the contract highlights (such as a 22.5 percent discount on personal computers and on-site…

  18. A Detailed Analysis over Some Important Issues towards Using Computer Technology into the EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2014-01-01

    Computer technology has changed the ways we work, learn, interact and spend our leisure time. Computer technology has changed every aspect of our daily life--how and where we get our news, how we order goods and services, and how we communicate. This study investigates some of the significant issues concerning the use of computer technology…

  19. Factors Contributing to Teachers' Use of Computer Technology in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilakjani, Abbas Pourhosein

    2013-01-01

    There are many factors for teachers to use computer technology in their classrooms. The goal of this study is to identify some of the important factors contributing the teachers' use of computer technology. The first goal of this paper is to discuss computer self-efficacy. The second goal is to explain teaching experience. The third goal is to…

  20. Technological Metaphors and Moral Education: The Hacker Ethic and the Computational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    This essay is an attempt to understand how technological metaphors, particularly computer metaphors, are relevant to moral education. After discussing various types of technological metaphors, it is argued that technological metaphors enter moral thought through their "functional descriptions." The computer metaphor is then explored by turning to…

  1. Computer vision challenges and technologies for agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molley, Perry A.

    1996-02-01

    applicable to commercial production processes and applications. Computer vision will play a critical role in the new agile production environment for automation of processes such as inspection, assembly, welding, material dispensing and other process control tasks. Although there are many academic and commercial solutions that have been developed, none have had widespread adoption considering the huge potential number of applications that could benefit from this technology. The reason for this slow adoption is that the advantages of computer vision for automation can be a double-edged sword. The benefits can be lost if the vision system requires an inordinate amount of time for reprogramming by a skilled operator to account for different parts, changes in lighting conditions, background clutter, changes in optics, etc. Commercially available solutions typically require an operator to manually program the vision system with features used for the recognition. In a recent survey, we asked a number of commercial manufacturers and machine vision companies the question, 'What prevents machine vision systems from being more useful in factories?' The number one (and unanimous) response was that vision systems require too much skill to set up and program to be cost effective.

  2. Dental Student Experience and Perceptions of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Cecile A.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 180 dental students in 3 classes assessed student knowledge of computer-related topics and perceptions of the usefulness of computers in different areas of practice management. Computer ownership and use, computer-related courses taken, software types used, and student characteristics (age, sex, academic achievement, undergraduate…

  3. Roles of Computer Technology in the Mathematics Education of the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandgenett, Neal

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews technological advances in educational computer use and discusses applications for computers as tools, tutors, and tutees in mathematics education of gifted students. Computer-assisted instruction, artificial intelligence, multimedia, numeric processing, computer-aided design, LOGO, robotics, and hypercard software packages are…

  4. Criminal history systems: new technology and new directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threatte, James

    1997-02-01

    Many forces are driving states to improve their current Criminal History and On-Line Criminal Justice Information Systems. The predominate factors compelling this movement are (1) the deterioration and cost of supporting older legacy systems, (2) current generation high performance, low cost hardware and system software, and (3) funding programs, such as the National Criminal History Improvement Program, which are targeted specifically at improving these important systems. In early 1996, SAIC established an Internal Research and Development project devoted to Computerized Criminal History Systems (CCH). This project began with an assessment of current hardware, operating system, and relational database technology. Application software design and development approaches were then reviewed with a focus on object-oriented approaches, three tier client server architectures, and tools that enable the `right sizing' of systems. An operational prototype of a State CCH system was established based on the results of these investigations.

  5. Optimizing alcohol production from whey using computer technology. [Kluyveromyces fragilis

    SciTech Connect

    Zertuche, L.; Zall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken with the major goal of optimizing the ethanol production from whey using computer technology. To reach this goal, a mathematical model that would describe the fermentation and that could be used for the optimization was developed. Kluyveromyces fragilis was the microorganism used to ferment the lactose in the whey into ethanol. Preliminary studies showed that K. fragilis produced about 90% of the theoretical ethanol yield when grown in whey-complemented media. However, when this yeast is grown in nonsupplemented whey media, it does not produce more than 32% of that yield. Comparative batch fermentations of lactose and whey-complemented media showed that whey possibly contains enhancing components for yeast growth and ethanol production. To obtain the mathematical model, the one-to-one effect of the process variables (lactose and yeast extract concentrations, air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate) on the ethanol production were first investigated. Experiments on the pH effect showed that a decrease in pH from 7 to 4 produced an increase in ethanol concentration from 16.5 to 26.5 g/L (50 g/L initial lactose). The results obtained from modeling of the continuous fermentation using the previously listed variables showed that air flow rate, pH, and dilution rate were the process variables that most influence the production of ethanol.

  6. Social Studies: Application Units. Course II, Teachers. Computer-Oriented Curriculum. REACT (Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tecnica Education Corp., San Carlos, CA.

    This book is one of a series in Course II of the Relevant Educational Applications of Computer Technology (REACT) Project. It is designed to point out to teachers two of the major applications of computers in the social sciences: simulation and data analysis. The first section contains a variety of simulation units organized under the following…

  7. Influence of Gender and Computer Teaching Efficacy on Computer Acceptance among Malaysian Student Teachers: An Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kung-Teck; Teo, Timothy; Russo, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the technology acceptance model (TAM) in an educational context and explore the role of gender and computer teaching efficacy as external variables. From the literature, it appeared that only limited studies had developed models to explain statistically the chain of influence of computer teaching efficacy…

  8. Self-Concept, Computer Anxiety, Gender and Attitude towards Interactive Computer Technologies: A Predictive Study among Nigerian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbatogun, Alaba Olaoluwakotansibe

    2010-01-01

    Interactive Computer Technologies (ICTs) have crept into education industry, thus dramatically causing transformation in instructional process. This study examined the relative and combined contributions of computer anxiety, self-concept and gender to teachers' attitude towards the use of ICT(s). 454 Nigerian teachers constituted the sample. Three…

  9. Computers and Classrooms: The Status of Technology in U.S. Schools. Policy Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Richard; Cradler, John; Engel, Penelope K.

    The purpose of this report is to provide a "snapshot" of the status of technology use in United States schools. The report focuses on the following: school access to technology; student use of computers; evaluating the impact of educational technology; connecting teachers and technology; assessing the content and quality of courseware; and the…

  10. Towards a 'siliconeural computer': technological successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark A; Shipston, Mike J; Murray, Alan F

    2015-07-28

    Electronic signals govern the function of both nervous systems and computers, albeit in different ways. As such, hybridizing both systems to create an iono-electric brain-computer interface is a realistic goal; and one that promises exciting advances in both heterotic computing and neuroprosthetics capable of circumventing devastating neuropathology. 'Neural networks' were, in the 1980s, viewed naively as a potential panacea for all computational problems that did not fit well with conventional computing. The field bifurcated during the 1990s into a highly successful and much more realistic machine learning community and an equally pragmatic, biologically oriented 'neuromorphic computing' community. Algorithms found in nature that use the non-synchronous, spiking nature of neuronal signals have been found to be (i) implementable efficiently in silicon and (ii) computationally useful. As a result, interest has grown in techniques that could create mixed 'siliconeural' computers. Here, we discuss potential approaches and focus on one particular platform using parylene-patterned silicon dioxide.

  11. Computer Technology in Rural Schools: The Case of Mendocino County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoachlander, E. Gareth

    The county education office of Mendocino County, California, serving nine school districts and 11,800 elementary and secondary students, began planning for computers in 1979-1980, purchased two central computers, and by 1983 had one computer or terminal for every 40 students in the county. The county was characterized by its very enthusiastic…

  12. The application of microprocessor technology to in-flight computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, P. L.; Somers, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A modular design of a general purpose microprocessor-based computer to perform in-flight computations for cross-country soaring pilots is described. The basic requirements for the system are discussed. Several specialized applications of the computer are presented, including real-time pilot feedback and flight-test data acquisition and reduction.

  13. Fascinating Technology: Computer Games as an Issue for Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholtz, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Computer games as an important part of youth culture can, from a certain perspective, be highly relevant for religious education. I will review the role of computer games, and then give a brief overview, suggesting a specific phenomenological approach for research on computer games and religious education. After presenting one example of such…

  14. Cloud Computing: A Free Technology Option to Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del

    2010-01-01

    In a time of budget cuts and limited funding, purchasing and installing the latest software on classroom computers can be prohibitive for schools. Many educators are unaware that a variety of free software options exist, and some of them do not actually require installing software on the user's computer. One such option is cloud computing. This…

  15. Educational Technology Classics: The Computer versus the Clock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    It is no accident that the first use of computers in school systems was to arrange schedules for students and teachers. The proper use of the computer in the classroom is as a replacement for the clock and its strict temporal schedule. By conveying information through self-instructional content, the computer can schedule work for pupils in…

  16. Making Advanced Computer Science Topics More Accessible through Interactive Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Kun; Maher, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Teaching advanced technical concepts in a computer science program to students of different technical backgrounds presents many challenges. The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed experimental pedagogy in teaching advanced computer science topics, such as computer networking, telecommunications and data structures using…

  17. Computer Programmed Milling Machine Operations. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Dennis

    This learning module for a high school metals and manufacturing course is designed to introduce the concept of computer-assisted machining (CAM). Through it, students learn how to set up and put data into the controller to machine a part. They also become familiar with computer-aided manufacturing and learn the advantages of computer numerical…

  18. Experimental Demonstration of a Self-organized Architecture for Emerging Grid Computing Applications on OBS Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Hong, Xiaobin; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    As Grid computing continues to gain popularity in the industry and research community, it also attracts more attention from the customer level. The large number of users and high frequency of job requests in the consumer market make it challenging. Clearly, all the current Client/Server(C/S)-based architecture will become unfeasible for supporting large-scale Grid applications due to its poor scalability and poor fault-tolerance. In this paper, based on our previous works [1, 2], a novel self-organized architecture to realize a highly scalable and flexible platform for Grids is proposed. Experimental results show that this architecture is suitable and efficient for consumer-oriented Grids.

  19. The Dialogic Classroom: Teachers Integrating Computer Technology, Pedagogy, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galin, Jeffrey R., Ed.; Latchaw, Joan, Ed.

    The 12 essays collected in this book suggest both practical and theoretical approaches to teaching through networked technologies. Moving beyond technology for its own sake, the book articulates a pedagogy which makes its own productive uses of emergent technologies, both inside and outside the classroom. The book models for students one possible…

  20. Beginnings: Introducing Computer Technology to Students in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McErlain, Eileen; Squibb, Kevin

    In the areas of audiology and speech science, computer technology has moved to the forefront in both the clinical and laboratory settings. It is imperative that students in both speech-language pathology and audiology acquire fundamental skills with all aspects of computer technology in order to maintain professional marketability. A survey of 75…

  1. A Quantitative Exploration of Preservice Teachers' Intent to Use Computer-based Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kioh; Jain, Sachin; Westhoff, Guy; Rezabek, Landra

    2008-01-01

    Based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory, the purpose of this study is to identify the relationship of preservice teachers' perceptions of faculty modeling of computer-based technology and preservice teachers' intent of using computer-based technology in educational settings. There were 92 participants in this study; they were enrolled in…

  2. University Students and Ethics of Computer Technology Usage: Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyadat, Waleed; Iyadat, Yousef; Ashour, Rateb; Khasawneh, Samer

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of students' awareness about computer technology ethics at the Hashemite University in Jordan. A total of 180 university students participated in the study by completing the questionnaire designed by the researchers, named the Computer Technology Ethics Questionnaire (CTEQ). Results…

  3. The Use of Computer Software to Teach High Technology Skills to Vocational Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Edgar I.

    A study examined the type of computer software that is best suited to teach high technology skills to vocational students. During the study, 50 manufacturers of computer software and hardware were sent questionnaires designed to gather data concerning their recommendations in regard to: software to teach high technology skills to vocational…

  4. An Exploratory Study of the Implementation of Computer Technology in an American Islamic Private School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleem, Mohammed M.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study of the implementation of computer technology in an American Islamic private school leveraged the case study methodology and ethnographic methods informed by symbolic interactionism and the framework of the Muslim Diaspora. The study focused on describing the implementation of computer technology and identifying the…

  5. Effect of Physical Education Teachers' Computer Literacy on Technology Use in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' computer literacy has been identified as a factor that determines their technology use in class. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical education (PE) teachers' computer literacy and their technology use in PE. The study group consisted of 57 high school level in-service PE teachers. A survey was used…

  6. Computer Courses in Higher-Education: Improving Learning by Screencast Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghilay, Yaron; Ghilay, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out a method designated to improve the learning of computer courses by adding Screencast technology. The intention was to measure the influence of high-quality clips produced by Screencast technology, on the learning process of computer courses. It was required to find out the characteristics (pedagogical and…

  7. Tech-Prep Competency Profiles within the Business/Computer Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for educators throughout Ohio who are involved in planning and/or delivering tech prep programs within the business/computer technologies cluster, discusses and presents tech prep competency profiles (TCPs) for 12 business/computer technology occupations. The first part of the document contains the following:…

  8. The Role of Computer Technology in Teaching Reading and Writing: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding the use of computer technology in teaching reading and writing in Jordan. The researcher developed a questionnaire consisting of two scales--Teachers' Beliefs Scale (TB Scale) and Teachers' Practices Scale (TP Scale)--to examine the role of computer technology in teaching…

  9. Land Cover Change Community-based Processing and Analysis System (LC-ComPS): Lessons Learned from Technology Infusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, J.; Rao, A.; Gao, F.; Davis, P.; Jackson, G.; Huang, C.; Weinstein, B.

    2008-12-01

    The Land Cover Change Community-based Processing and Analysis System (LC-ComPS) combines grid technology, existing science modules, and dynamic workflows to enable users to complete advanced land data processing on data available from local and distributed archives. Changes in land cover represent a direct link between human activities and the global environment, and in turn affect Earth's climate. Thus characterizing land cover change has become a major goal for Earth observation science. Many science algorithms exist to generate new products (e.g., surface reflectance, change detection) used to study land cover change. The overall objective of the LC-ComPS is to release a set of tools and services to the land science community that can be implemented as a flexible LC-ComPS to produce surface reflectance and land-cover change information with ground resolution on the order of Landsat-class instruments. This package includes software modules for pre-processing Landsat-type satellite imagery (calibration, atmospheric correction, orthorectification, precision registration, BRDF correction) for performing land-cover change analysis and includes pre-built workflow chains to automatically generate surface reflectance and land-cover change products based on user input. In order to meet the project objectives, the team created the infrastructure (i.e., client-server system with graphical and machine interfaces) to expand the use of these existing science algorithm capabilities in a community with distributed, large data archives and processing centers. Because of the distributed nature of the user community, grid technology was chosen to unite the dispersed community resources. At that time, grid computing was not used consistently and operationally within the Earth science research community. Therefore, there was a learning curve to configure and implement the underlying public key infrastructure (PKI) interfaces, required for the user authentication, secure file

  10. Review of parallel computing methods and tools for FPGA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieszewski, Radosław; Linczuk, Maciej; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2013-10-01

    Parallel computing is emerging as an important area of research in computer architectures and software systems. Many algorithms can be greatly accelerated using parallel computing techniques. Specialized parallel computer architectures are used for accelerating speci c tasks. High-Energy Physics Experiments measuring systems often use FPGAs for ne-grained computation. FPGA combines many bene ts of both software and ASIC implementations. Like software, the mapped circuit is exible, and can be recon gured over the lifetime of the system. FPGAs therefore have the potential to achieve far greater performance than software as a result of bypassing the fetch-decode-execute operations of traditional processors, and possibly exploiting a greater level of parallelism. Creating parallel programs implemented in FPGAs is not trivial. This paper presents existing methods and tools for ne-grained computation implemented in FPGA using Behavioral Description and High Level Programming Languages.

  11. Predicting Cloud Computing Technology Adoption by Organizations: An Empirical Integration of Technology Acceptance Model and Theory of Planned Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekufu, ThankGod K.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are finding it difficult in today's economy to implement the vast information technology infrastructure required to effectively conduct their business operations. Despite the fact that some of these organizations are leveraging on the computational powers and the cost-saving benefits of computing on the Internet cloud, others…

  12. The application of computer-aided technologies in automotive styling design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ze-feng; Zhang, Ji; Zheng, Ying

    2012-04-01

    In automotive industry, outline design is its life and creative design is its soul indeed. Computer-aided technology has been widely used in the automotive industry and more and more attention has been paid. This paper chiefly introduce the application of computer-aided technologies including CAD, CAM and CAE, analyses the process of automotive structural design and describe the development tendency of computer-aided design.

  13. Examining the Relationship between Technological, Organizational, and Environmental Factors and Cloud Computing Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweel, Abdeneaser

    2012-01-01

    High uncertainties related to cloud computing adoption may hinder IT managers from making solid decisions about adopting cloud computing. The problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the relationship between factors related to the adoption of cloud computing and IT managers' interest in adopting this technology. In…

  14. Understanding Pre-Service Teachers' Computer Attitudes: Applying and Extending the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, T.; Lee, C. B.; Chai, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Computers are increasingly widespread, influencing many aspects of our social and work lives. As we move into a technology-based society, it is important that classroom experiences with computers are made available for all students. The purpose of this study is to examine pre-service teachers' attitudes towards computers. This study extends the…

  15. The Relationship Between Perceived Stress and Computer Technology Attitude: an Application on Health Sciences Students

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurek, Pakize; Oztasan, Nuray; Kilic, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to define attitudes of students in health sciences towards perceived personal stress and computer technologies, and to present the relationship between stress and computer technology attitudes. Methods: In this scope, this study has a descriptive nature and thus a questionnaire has been applied on 764 students from Afyon Kocatepe University Health Sciences High School, Turkey for data gathering. Descriptive statistics, independent samples, t test, one way ANOVA, and regression analysis have been used for data analysis. Findings: In the study, it is seen that female (=3,78) have a more positive attitude towards computer technology than male students (=3,62). according to the results of regression analysis of the study, the regression model between computer technology attitude (CTA) and perceived stress (PS) has been found meaningful (F=16,291; p<0,005). There was a negative relationship between computer technology attitude and perceived stress (when computer technology altitude increases, perceived stress decreases), and an increase of one unit in computer attitude results in 0.275 decrease in perceived stress. Conclusions: it can be concluded that correct and proper use of computer technologies can be accepted as a component of overcoming stress methods. PMID:25870489

  16. Internet and Computer Technology Hazards: Perspectives for Family Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2000-01-01

    Explores the social construction of the various computer hazards that households are encountering, such as computer addiction and children's access to on-line pornography. Discusses these issues in terms of constructivist counseling perspectives that are sensitive to cultural and environmental contexts. Outlines specific strategies for countering…

  17. Science and Technology Resources on the Internet: Computer Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkus, Jane F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues related to computer security, including confidentiality, integrity, and authentication or availability; and presents a selected list of Web sites that cover the basic issues of computer security under subject headings that include ethics, privacy, kids, antivirus, policies, cryptography, operating system security, and biometrics.…

  18. Towards a 'siliconeural computer': technological successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark A; Shipston, Mike J; Murray, Alan F

    2015-07-28

    Electronic signals govern the function of both nervous systems and computers, albeit in different ways. As such, hybridizing both systems to create an iono-electric brain-computer interface is a realistic goal; and one that promises exciting advances in both heterotic computing and neuroprosthetics capable of circumventing devastating neuropathology. 'Neural networks' were, in the 1980s, viewed naively as a potential panacea for all computational problems that did not fit well with conventional computing. The field bifurcated during the 1990s into a highly successful and much more realistic machine learning community and an equally pragmatic, biologically oriented 'neuromorphic computing' community. Algorithms found in nature that use the non-synchronous, spiking nature of neuronal signals have been found to be (i) implementable efficiently in silicon and (ii) computationally useful. As a result, interest has grown in techniques that could create mixed 'siliconeural' computers. Here, we discuss potential approaches and focus on one particular platform using parylene-patterned silicon dioxide. PMID:26078350

  19. Quantitative Investigation of the Technologies That Support Cloud Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Wenjin

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is dramatically shaping modern IT infrastructure. It virtualizes computing resources, provides elastic scalability, serves as a pay-as-you-use utility, simplifies the IT administrators' daily tasks, enhances the mobility and collaboration of data, and increases user productivity. We focus on providing generalized black-box…

  20. Computer Modeling and Visualization in Design Technology: An Instructional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidera, Stan

    2002-01-01

    Design visualization can increase awareness of issues related to perceptual and psychological aspects of design that computer-assisted design and computer modeling may not allow. A pilot university course developed core skills in modeling and simulation using visualization. Students were consistently able to meet course objectives. (Contains 16…

  1. Finding a Balance: Computer Software, Intellectual Property and the Challenge of Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report, prepared by the Office of Technological Assessment (OTA) in response to a request from the House Committee on the Judiciary, examines the rapid and complex technological changes and trends in computer software technologies and their possible effects on the nation's intellectual property system. The three policy issues identified are:…

  2. The Technology Fix: The Promise and Reality of Computers in Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflaum, William D.

    2004-01-01

    During the technology boom of the 1980s and 1990s, computers seemed set to revolutionize education. Do any of these promises sound familiar? (1) Technology would help all students learn better, thanks to multimedia programs capable of adapting to individual needs, learning styles, and skill levels; (2) Technology would transform the teacher's role…

  3. A Computer-Assisted Approach for Conducting Information Technology Applied Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tsai, Pei Jin; Yang, Tzu-Chi

    2009-01-01

    The growing popularity of computer and network technologies has attracted researchers to investigate the strategies and the effects of information technology applied instructions. Previous research has not only demonstrated the benefits of applying information technologies to the learning process, but has also revealed the difficulty of applying…

  4. Energy-efficient building design and operation: The role of computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, M.R.

    1990-09-01

    Computer technology provides many opportunities to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings throughout the entire building life cycle. We are faced with developing those technologies to put the results of many years of buildings research into the hands of building owners, designers, and operators. This report discusses both the philosophical and technological aspect associated with this topic.

  5. Manned space station environmental control and life support system computer-aided technology assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Pickett, S. J.; Sage, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program for assessing manned space station environmental control and life support systems technology is described. The methodology, mission model parameters, evaluation criteria, and data base for 17 candidate technologies for providing metabolic oxygen and water to the crew are discussed. Examples are presented which demonstrate the capability of the program to evaluate candidate technology options for evolving space station requirements.

  6. GEANT4 distributed computing for compact clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrawood, Brian P.; Agasthya, Greeshma A.; Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Raterman, Gretchen; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-11-01

    A new technique for distribution of GEANT4 processes is introduced to simplify running a simulation in a parallel environment such as a tightly coupled computer cluster. Using a new C++ class derived from the GEANT4 toolkit, multiple runs forming a single simulation are managed across a local network of computers with a simple inter-node communication protocol. The class is integrated with the GEANT4 toolkit and is designed to scale from a single symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) machine to compact clusters ranging in size from tens to thousands of nodes. User designed 'work tickets' are distributed to clients using a client-server work flow model to specify the parameters for each individual run of the simulation. The new g4DistributedRunManager class was developed and well tested in the course of our Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography (NSECT) experiments. It will be useful for anyone running GEANT4 for large discrete data sets such as covering a range of angles in computed tomography, calculating dose delivery with multiple fractions or simply speeding the through-put of a single model.

  7. Use of Computer Speech Technologies To Enhance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Joe

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the design of an innovative learning system that uses new technologies for the man-machine interface, incorporating a combination of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Text To Speech (TTS) synthesis. Highlights include using speech technologies to mimic the attributes of the ideal tutor and design features. (AEF)

  8. Computer in the Kitchen---or---Being Served by Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Audrey J.

    Hopefully, the time will come when the humanistic users of communications technology will be used to make English teaching better and will help students learn. This paper presents an overview of the technological possibilities for English classrooms, assuming that school systems are not likely to undergo drastic changes in the future and that most…

  9. STEM-Based Computational Modeling for Technology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy V.

    2008-01-01

    According to professionals in education, change is an ever-present and evolving process. With transformation in education at both state and national levels, technology education must determine a position in this climate of change. This paper reflects the views on the future of technology education based on an ongoing research project. The purpose…

  10. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, K. Yuasa, S.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-05-07

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  11. Radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation using cloud computing technology.

    PubMed

    Poole, C M; Cornelius, I; Trapp, J V; Langton, C M

    2012-12-01

    Cloud computing allows for vast computational resources to be leveraged quickly and easily in bursts as and when required. Here we describe a technique that allows for Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculations to be performed using GEANT4 and executed in the cloud, with relative simulation cost and completion time evaluated as a function of machine count. As expected, simulation completion time decreases as 1/n for n parallel machines, and relative simulation cost is found to be optimal where n is a factor of the total simulation time in hours. Using the technique, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of cloud computing as a solution for rapid Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation without the need for dedicated local computer hardware as a proof of principal.

  12. Teachers' Organization of Participation Structures for Teaching Science with Computer Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study that investigated the nature of the participation structures and how the participation structures were organized by four science teachers when they constructed and communicated science content in their classrooms with computer technology. Participation structures focus on the activity structures and processes in social settings like classrooms thereby providing glimpses into the complex dynamics of teacher-students interactions, configurations, and conventions during collective meaning making and knowledge creation. Data included observations, interviews, and focus group interviews. Analysis revealed that the dominant participation structure evident within participants' instruction with computer technology was ( Teacher) initiation-( Student and Teacher) response sequences-( Teacher) evaluate participation structure. Three key events characterized the how participants organized this participation structure in their classrooms: setting the stage for interactive instruction, the joint activity, and maintaining accountability. Implications include the following: (1) teacher educators need to tap into the knowledge base that underscores science teachers' learning to teach philosophies when computer technology is used in instruction. (2) Teacher educators need to emphasize the essential idea that learning and cognition is not situated within the computer technology but within the pedagogical practices, specifically the participation structures. (3) The pedagogical practices developed with the integration or with the use of computer technology underscored by the teachers' own knowledge of classroom contexts and curriculum needs to be the focus for how students learn science content with computer technology instead of just focusing on how computer technology solely supports students learning of science content.

  13. Special purpose computer system for flow visualization using holography technology.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukio; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Wakabayashi, Hideaki; Kazo, Yuta; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Satake, Shin-ichi; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Sato, Kazuho

    2008-05-26

    We have designed a special purpose computer system for visualizing fluid flow using digital holographic particle tracking velocimetry (DHPTV). This computer contains an Field Programmble Gate Array (FPGA) chip in which a pipeline for calculating the intensity of an object from a hologram by fast Fourier transform is installed. This system can produce 100 reconstructed images from a 1024 x 1024-grid hologram in 3.3 sec. It is expected that this system will contribute to fluid flow analysis.

  14. A Study to Compare Curriculum of Computer Information Systems and Computer Education and Instructional Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire

    2008-01-01

    Today, developments of information and communication technologies have been developing very fast all over the world. These new technologies were taking an important place in education like other sciences. For this reason, education was developing parallel to new developments on the new technologies. Departments which cover curriculum of new…

  15. Educational Technology Network: a computer conferencing system dedicated to applications of computers in radiology practice, research, and education.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, M P; Ackerman, M J; Sparks, S M

    1993-11-01

    Educational Technology Network (ET Net) is a free, easy to use, on-line computer conferencing system organized and funded by the National Library of Medicine that is accessible via the SprintNet (SprintNet, Reston, VA) and Internet (Merit, Ann Arbor, MI) computer networks. It is dedicated to helping bring together, in a single continuously running electronic forum, developers and users of computer applications in the health sciences, including radiology. ET Net uses the Caucus computer conferencing software (Camber-Roth, Troy, NY) running on a microcomputer. This microcomputer is located in the National Library of Medicine's Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications and is directly connected to the SprintNet and the Internet networks. The advanced computer conferencing software of ET Net allows individuals who are separated in space and time to unite electronically to participate, at any time, in interactive discussions on applications of computers in radiology. A computer conferencing system such as ET Net allows radiologists to maintain contact with colleagues on a regular basis when they are not physically together. Topics of discussion on ET Net encompass all applications of computers in radiological practice, research, and education. ET Net has been in successful operation for 3 years and has a promising future aiding radiologists in the exchange of information pertaining to applications of computers in radiology.

  16. Computational nano-optic technology based on discrete sources method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Elena; Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Continuous advance in the potential of fabrication and utilization of nanostructures for different applications requires an adequate tool for such structures' analysis and characterization. Investigation of light scattered by nanostructures by means of computer simulation seems to be a reliable tool for investigation of the properties and functional abilities of nanostructures. In particular, nano-features embedded in layered structures are of growing interest for many practical applications. Mathematical modeling of light scattering allows us to predict functional properties and behavior of nanostructures prior to their fabrication. This helps to reduce manufacturing and experimental costs. In the present paper, the Discrete Sources Method (DSM) is used as a tool of computational nano-optics. Mathematical models based on DSM are used for several practical applications. We are going to demonstrate that the computer simulation analysis allows not only prediction and investigation of the system properties, but can help in development and design of new setups.

  17. Progress in hypersonic combustion technology with computation and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Griffin Y.; Kumar, Ajay; Erdos, John I.

    1990-01-01

    Design of successful airbreathing engines for operation at near-orbital speeds presents significant challenges in all the disciplines involved, including propulsion. This paper presents a discussion of the important physics of hypersonic combustion and an assessment of the state of the art of ground simulations with pulse facilities and with computational techniques. Recent examples of experimental and computational simulations are presented and discussed. The need for continued application of these tools to establish the credibility and fidelity of engineering design methods for practical hypersonic combustors is emphasized along with the critical need for improved diagnostic methods for hypervelocity reacting flows.

  18. Using OPC technology to support the study of advanced process control.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Magdi S; Sabih, Muhammad; Elshafei, Moustafa

    2015-03-01

    OPC, originally the Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) for Process Control, brings a broad communication opportunity between different kinds of control systems. This paper investigates the use of OPC technology for the study of distributed control systems (DCS) as a cost effective and flexible research tool for the development and testing of advanced process control (APC) techniques in university research centers. Co-Simulation environment based on Matlab, LabVIEW and TCP/IP network is presented here. Several implementation issues and OPC based client/server control application have been addressed for TCP/IP network. A nonlinear boiler model is simulated as OPC server and OPC client is used for closed loop model identification, and to design a Model Predictive Controller. The MPC is able to control the NOx emissions in addition to drum water level and steam pressure. PMID:25702044

  19. Using OPC technology to support the study of advanced process control.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Magdi S; Sabih, Muhammad; Elshafei, Moustafa

    2015-03-01

    OPC, originally the Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) for Process Control, brings a broad communication opportunity between different kinds of control systems. This paper investigates the use of OPC technology for the study of distributed control systems (DCS) as a cost effective and flexible research tool for the development and testing of advanced process control (APC) techniques in university research centers. Co-Simulation environment based on Matlab, LabVIEW and TCP/IP network is presented here. Several implementation issues and OPC based client/server control application have been addressed for TCP/IP network. A nonlinear boiler model is simulated as OPC server and OPC client is used for closed loop model identification, and to design a Model Predictive Controller. The MPC is able to control the NOx emissions in addition to drum water level and steam pressure.

  20. Business and Technology Concepts--Business Computations. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    This Illinois State Board of Education teacher's guide on business computations is for students enrolled in the 9th or 10th grade. The course provides a foundation in arithmetic skills and their applications to common business problems for the senior high school vocational business courses. The curriculum guide includes teacher and student…

  1. Children and Computers: New Technology--Old Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartella, Ellen A.; Jennings, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    Places current research on children and computers in historical context with earlier research on the mass media, noting recurrent patterns in 20th century media research. Concludes that to inform and sustain the creation of more quality content for children, further research is needed on the effects of media on children, with new partnerships…

  2. Educational Technology Research Journals: Computers & Education, 2002-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rackham, David D.; Hyatt, Frederick R.; Macfarlane, David C.; Nisse, Tony; Woodfield, Wendy; West, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the journal "Computers & Education" to discover research trends in the articles published during 2002-2011. Research articles were analyzed to determine trends in the research methods and types of articles published, as well as the key topics published, top authors, and some of the most-cited…

  3. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

    2004-12-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid.

  4. Investing in Computer Technology: Criteria and Procedures for System Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    The criteria used by the University of Delaware in selecting the PLATO computer-based educational system are discussed in this document. Consideration was given to support for instructional strategies, requirements of the student learning station, features for instructors and authors of instructional materials, general operational characteristics,…

  5. An overview of flight computer technologies for future NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, L.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of current developments by several US Government Agencies and associated programs, towards high-performance single board computers for use in space. Three separate projects will be described; two that are based on the Power PC processor, and one based on the Pentium processor.

  6. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers these occupations: manufacturing technician, computer-assisted design and drafting (CADD) technician, quality technician, and mechanical technician. Section 1 provides occupation definitions. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes---abbreviations for grade level…

  7. Effects of Educational Beliefs on Attitudes towards Using Computer Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onen, Aysem Seda

    2012-01-01

    This study, aiming to determine the relationship between pre-service teachers' beliefs about education and their attitudes towards utilizing computers and internet, is a descriptive study in scanning model. The sampling of the study consisted of 270 pre-service teachers. The potential relationship between the beliefs of pre-service teachers about…

  8. Teaching, Learning and Inquiry Strategies Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, A-Y.; Looi, Chee-K.

    1999-01-01

    Reports a case study in a Singapore school where a group of at-risk secondary students were given a series of linked computer-based projects. Describes the conceptual framework based on constructivism and situated learning and discusses benefits in academic performance, student motivation, language development, cooperation and stress management,…

  9. Technology Allows Engineers to Make Solid Objects from Computer Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Computer operators using the technique of three-dimensional printing or rapid prototyping may soon be able to sculpt an object on the screen and within minutes, have a paper, plastic, or ceramic version of the object in hand. The process uses the principle that physical objects can be created in layers. (MSE)

  10. Computer Technology Can Enhance Presentation of Pharmacological Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffee, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The use of liquid crystal display (LCD) techniques for projection of computer monitor images onto a large screen for classroom viewing is discussed and illustrated with a pharmacology class presentation on drug/neurotransmitter-receptor interactions. The method is seen as a way of bringing a new dynamic to visual instruction. (MSE)

  11. Managing Technostress: Optimizing the Use of Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Craig

    1982-01-01

    Afraid of change, many employees refuse to join the computer revolution. The author states that only understanding and proper training can break down such resistance. The term "technostress" is described and the importance of employee self-assessment is examined. (CT)

  12. Computer Technology: How It Impacts the Lives of Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Marilyn

    1996-01-01

    Results of surveys of Mini White House Conference attendees, Norwalk (Connecticut) Senior Center members, and SeniorNet participants indicate that many senior citizens are interested in learning and/or using computers for a variety of purposes including socialization, personal financial management, intergenerational communication, special…

  13. The Mediated Museum: Computer-Based Technology and Museum Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterman, Nanette T.; Allen, Brockenbrough S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the use of computer-based tools and techniques in museums. The integration of realia with media-based advice and interpretation is described, electronic replicas of ancient Greek vases in the J. Paul Getty Museum are explained, examples of mediated exhibits are presented, and the use of hypermedia is discussed. (five references) (LRW)

  14. Computer Technology in Curriculum and Instruction Handbook: Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Sue; And Others

    This annotated bibliography and resource list is the fourth guide in a series that constitutes a handbook on educational computing for teachers and administrators. Citations include the title, author, publisher, copyright date, current price, and publisher's address. Research and journal articles are listed under the following topic areas:…

  15. Future of computing technology in physics - the potentials and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, A.E.

    1984-02-01

    The impact of the developments of modern digital computers is discussed, especially with respect to physics research in the future. The effects of large data processing capability and increasing rates at which data can be acquired and processed are considered. (GHT)

  16. Research on the application in disaster reduction for using cloud computing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Liang; Fan, Yida; Wang, Xingling

    Cloud Computing technology has been rapidly applied in different domains recently, promotes the progress of the domain's informatization. Based on the analysis of the state of application requirement in disaster reduction and combining the characteristics of Cloud Computing technology, we present the research on the application of Cloud Computing technology in disaster reduction. First of all, we give the architecture of disaster reduction cloud, which consists of disaster reduction infrastructure as a service (IAAS), disaster reduction cloud application platform as a service (PAAS) and disaster reduction software as a service (SAAS). Secondly, we talk about the standard system of disaster reduction in five aspects. Thirdly, we indicate the security system of disaster reduction cloud. Finally, we draw a conclusion the use of cloud computing technology will help us to solve the problems for disaster reduction and promote the development of disaster reduction.

  17. A Technological Primrose Path? ESL Students and Computer-Assisted Writing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Donald E; and Gregory, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Describes what happened when students, unsupervised, used a style-checking computer program to check their essays. The feedback (considered somewhat misleading) suggested that teachers need to guide students along the technological path. (seven references) (GLR)

  18. Video Capture and Analysis: Seizing on Computer Technology To Teach the Physical Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessie, Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Describes a course for nonscience majors in which material is presented using video capture and analysis technology. Students study real-life physical phenomena and learn significant computer, quantitative analysis, and modeling skills. (SAH)

  19. Computer Technology in Curriculum and Instruction Handbook: So You Want to Use Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiblar, Bill; Newman, Joan

    The second in a series on educational computing for teachers and administrators, this booklet offers a checklist for use in making decisions about program development, 11 case studies illustrating how teachers in Washington state have initiated programs, and a collection of articles on various aspects of educational computing programs. The…

  20. Using the Computer with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Tech Use Guide: Using Computer Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Gail

    This guide examines the computer's role in the educational environment of students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD). The computer's power to reinforce students who are reluctant learners, in a personalized learning environment without the complications of adult interactions or behavioral control issues, is noted. Characteristics of EBD…

  1. Computer Science and Technology: Computers, Personnel Administration, and Citizen Rights. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westin, Alan F.

    This study of computer use and privacy issues in personnel administration was conducted through an examination of pre-computer patterns of employer information collection and record-keeping about job applicants, employees, and former employees, noting the prevailing rules of organizational policy and law that governed the use of such data before…

  2. Computer Technologies in Education. Proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Technologies in Education (Kiev, Ukraine, September 14-17, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrushin, V., Ed.; Dovgiallo, A., Ed.

    The conference reported in this document provides a meeting place for researchers from around the world, where the emphasis is on new ideas connected to computer technologies in education. This volume contains 140 extended abstracts selected by the program committee and organized into the following categories: (1) educational informational…

  3. Educational Computing in the Schools: Technology, Communication, and Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Jay, Ed.

    This book is a collection of articles that examine critical issues of technology, teaching, and learning in three areas: access, communication, and literacy. Following an Introduction by Jay Blanchard, articles are presented in three sections: Access and Opportunity; Online Communication; and Literacy. The articles include: "An Exploration of…

  4. College and the Digital Generation: Assessing and Training Students for the Technological Demands of College by Exploring Relationships between Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Today's college students are often labeled the "Net Generation" and assumed to be computer savvy and technological minded. Exposure to and use of technologies can increase self-efficacy regarding ability to complete desired computer tasks, but students arrive on campuses unable to pass computer proficiency exams. This is concerning because some…

  5. Tool or Science? The History of Computing at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordal, Ola

    One may characterize the history of computing at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology by a tension between the computer as a tool in other disciplines and computer science as discipline in itself. This tension has been latent since the pioneering period of the 1950s until today. This paper shows how this have been expressed in the early attempts to take up computing at the University, and how it gave the Division of Computer Science a fairly rough start when it opened in 1972.

  6. The ergonomics of computer aided design within advanced manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    John, P A

    1988-03-01

    Many manufacturing companies have now awakened to the significance of computer aided design (CAD), although the majority of them have only been able to purchase computerised draughting systems of which only a subset produce direct manufacturing data. Such companies are moving steadily towards the concept of computer integrated manufacture (CIM), and this demands CAD to address more than draughting. CAD architects are thus having to rethink the basic specification of such systems, although they typically suffer from an insufficient understanding of the design task and have consequently been working with inadequate specifications. It is at this fundamental level that ergonomics has much to offer, making its contribution by encouraging user-centred design. The discussion considers the relationships between CAD and: the design task; the organisation and people; creativity; and artificial intelligence. It finishes with a summary of the contribution of ergonomics.

  7. NASA Scientists Push the Limits of Computer Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Donald Frazier,NASA researcher, uses a blue laser shining through a quarts window into a special mix of chemicals to generate a polymer film on the inside quartz surface. As the chemicals respond to the laser light, they adhere to the glass surface, forming optical films. Dr. Frazier and Dr. Mark S. Paley developed the process in the Space Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Working aboard the Space Shuttle, a science team led by Dr. Frazier formed thin films potentially useful in optical computers with fewer impurities than those formed on Earth. Patterns of these films can be traced onto the quartz surface. In the optical computers of the future, these films could replace electronic circuits and wires, making the systems more efficient and cost-effective, as well as lighter and more compact. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  8. NASA Scientists Push the Limits of Computer Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA researcher Dr. Donald Frazier uses a blue laser shining through a quartz window into a special mix of chemicals to generate a polymer film on the inside quartz surface. As the chemicals respond to the laser light, they adhere to the glass surface, forming optical films. Dr. Frazier and Dr. Mark S. Paley developed the process in the Space Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Working aboard the Space Shuttle, a science team led by Dr. Frazier formed thin-films potentially useful in optical computers with fewer impurities than those formed on Earth. Patterns of these films can be traced onto the quartz surface. In the optical computers of the future, thee films could replace electronic circuits and wires, making the systems more efficient and cost-effective, as well as lighter and more compact. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  9. NASA Scientists Push the Limits of Computer Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA research Dr. Donald Frazier uses a blue laser shining through a quartz window into a special mix of chemicals to generate a polymer film on the inside quartz surface. As the chemicals respond to the laser light, they adhere to the glass surface, forming opticl films. Dr. Frazier and Dr. Mark S. Paley developed the process in the Space Sciences Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Working aboard the Space Shuttle, a science team led by Dr. Frazier formed thin-films potentially useful in optical computers with fewer impurities than those formed on Earth. Patterns of these films can be traced onto the quartz surface. In the optical computers on the future, these films could replace electronic circuits and wires, making the systems more efficient and cost-effective, as well as lighter and more compact. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  10. Computational structures technology at Grumman: Current practice/future needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Eidinoff, Harvey

    1992-05-01

    The current practice for the design analysis of new airframe structural systems is to construct a master finite element model of the vehicle in order to develop internal load distributions. The inputs to this model include the geometry which is taken directly from CADAM and CATIA structural layout and aerodynamic loads and mass distribution computer models. This master model is sufficiently detailed to define major load paths and for the computation of dynamic mode shapes and structural frequencies, but not detailed enough to define local stress gradients and notch stresses. This master model is then used to perform structural optimization studies that will provide minimum weights for major structural members. The post-processed output from the master model, load, stress, and strain analysis is then used by structural analysts to perform detailed stress analysis of local regions in order to design local structure with all its required details. This local analysis consists of hand stress analysis and life prediction analysis with the assistance of manuals, design charts, computer stress and structural life analysis and sometimes finite element or boundary element analysis. The resulting design is verified by fatigue tests.

  11. Computational structures technology at Grumman: Current practice/future needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Eidinoff, Harvey

    1992-01-01

    The current practice for the design analysis of new airframe structural systems is to construct a master finite element model of the vehicle in order to develop internal load distributions. The inputs to this model include the geometry which is taken directly from CADAM and CATIA structural layout and aerodynamic loads and mass distribution computer models. This master model is sufficiently detailed to define major load paths and for the computation of dynamic mode shapes and structural frequencies, but not detailed enough to define local stress gradients and notch stresses. This master model is then used to perform structural optimization studies that will provide minimum weights for major structural members. The post-processed output from the master model, load, stress, and strain analysis is then used by structural analysts to perform detailed stress analysis of local regions in order to design local structure with all its required details. This local analysis consists of hand stress analysis and life prediction analysis with the assistance of manuals, design charts, computer stress and structural life analysis and sometimes finite element or boundary element analysis. The resulting design is verified by fatigue tests.

  12. Computer-aided manufacturing technologies for guided implant placement.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jörg; Stachulla, Gerhard; Ritter, Lutz; Dreiseidler, Timo; Mischkowski, Robert A; Keeve, Erwin; Zöller, Joachim E

    2010-01-01

    Implant treatment increasingly focuses on the reduction of treatment time and postoperative impairment. The improvement of 3D dental diagnosis by ConeBeam computed tomography allows detailed preparation for the surgical placement of dental implants under prosthetic considerations. While the first generation of implant planning software used high-contrast multislice computed tomography, software that has been specifically designed for ConeBeam computed tomography is now available. Implant placement can be performed using surgical guides or under the control of optical tracking systems. Surgical guides are more commonly used in private office owing to their availability. The accuracy for both techniques is clinically acceptable for achieving implant placement in critical anatomical indications. When using prefabricated superstructures and in flapless surgery, special abutments or an adjusted workflow are still necessary to compensate misfits of between 150 and 600 microm. The proposition to ensure proper implant placement by dentists with limited surgical experience through the use of surgical guides is unlikely to be successful, because there is also a specific learning curve for guided implant placement. Current and future development will continue to decrease the classical laboratory-technician work and will integrate the fabrication of superstructures with virtual treatment planning from the start.

  13. Computer Based Technology and the Language/Liberal Arts: Stepping into the Electronic Universe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis M.

    The need for the liberal arts curriculum to incorporate new technology in order for education to reach its potential is examined in this paper, which also looks at the potential for computer-based telecommunications to extend continued education for professionals. A survey of applications of computer-based telecommunications in reading and writing…

  14. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. Working Paper 48

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? The authors use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that…

  15. Scaling the Digital Divide: Home Computer Technology and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 16078

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Jacob L.; Ladd, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Does differential access to computer technology at home compound the educational disparities between rich and poor? Would a program of government provision of computers to early secondary school students reduce these disparities? We use administrative data on North Carolina public school students to corroborate earlier surveys that document broad…

  16. Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer and Information Technology: The Case of Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsitouridou, Melpomeni; Vryzas, Konstantinos

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the attitudes of early childhood teachers towards computers and Information Technology (IT). The study examined whether or not attitudes are differentiated by a series of factors, such as: years of previous service, the use of a computer at home (with Internet access), inservice training, and…

  17. Embedding Computer Technology in Developmentally Appropriate Practice: Engaging with Early Years Professionals' Beliefs and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Elaine; Higgins, Steven

    2002-01-01

    The use of computers in early years has become a contentious issue, with advocates calling for more Information and Communications Technology (ICT), more machines, better software, and more training for professionals, while other groups call for "a moratorium on the further introduction of computers in early childhood and elementary education"…

  18. Coordinating Technological Resources in a Non-Technical Profession: The Administrative Computer User Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollo, J. Michael; Marmarchev, Helen L.

    1999-01-01

    The explosion of computer applications in the modern workplace has required student affairs professionals to keep pace with technological advances for office productivity. This article recommends establishing an administrative computer user groups, utilizing coordinated web site development, and enhancing working relationships as ways of dealing…

  19. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Computer Technology in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Cheng-Chieh; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of computer technology and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) programs for current second language learning. According to the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition & Language Instruction Educational Programs' report (2002), more than nine million…

  20. Embodying Computational Thinking: Initial Design of an Emerging Technological Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daily, Shaundra B.; Leonard, Alison E.; Jörg, Sophie; Babu, Sabarish; Gundersen, Kara; Parmar, Dhaval

    2015-01-01

    This emerging technology report describes virtual environment interactions an approach for blending movement and computer programming as an embodied way to support girls in building computational thinking skills. The authors seek to understand how body syntonicity might enable young learners to bootstrap their intuitive knowledge in order to…

  1. The Role of Wireless Computing Technology in the Design of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nair, Prakash

    This document discusses integrating computers logically and affordably into a school building's infrastructure through the use of wireless technology. It begins by discussing why wireless networks using mobile computers are preferable to desktop machines in each classoom. It then explains the features of a wireless local area network (WLAN) and…

  2. Reading Teachers' Beliefs and Utilization of Computer and Technology: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remetio, Jessica Espinas

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers believe that computers have the ability to help improve the reading skills of students. In an effort to improve the poor reading scores of students on state tests, as well as improve students' overall academic performance, computers and other technologies have been installed in Frozen Bay School classrooms. As the success of these…

  3. Visualizing History: Computer Technology and the Graphic Presentation of the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Computer technology has impacted both the study and idea of history in a number of ways. The Internet has provided numerous web-sites for students to read, see and look into for historical information. Historians, both professional and public have also begun to utilize the computer in a variety of ways, both in academic terms as well as leisure…

  4. Evaluation of Two Different Teaching Concepts in Dentistry Using Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Sven; Simon, James F.; Ruedinger, Dirk; Shortall, Adrian; Wichmann, Manfred; Frankenberger, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The common teaching goal of two different phantom head courses was to enable the students to provide an all-ceramic restoration by the means of computer technology. The aim of this study was to compare these two courses with regard to the different educational methods using identical computer software. Undergraduate dental students from a single…

  5. WWC Quick Review of the Article "Technology's Edge: The Educational Benefits of Computer-Aided Instruction"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The study, "Technology's Edge: The Educational Benefits of Computer-Aided Instruction," examined whether the "I CAN Learn"[R] computer-based curriculum is more effective than traditional classroom instruction at teaching pre-algebra and algebra concepts to middle- and high-school students. The study included about 1,600 students in 15 high schools…

  6. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  7. An application of interactive computer graphics technology to the design of dispersal mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, B. J.; Welch, B. H.

    1977-01-01

    Interactive computer graphics technology is combined with a general purpose mechanisms computer code to study the operational behavior of three guided bomb dispersal mechanism designs. These studies illustrate the use of computer graphics techniques to discover operational anomalies, to assess the effectiveness of design improvements, to reduce the time and cost of the modeling effort, and to provide the mechanism designer with a visual understanding of the physical operation of such systems.

  8. Who's wired and who's not: children's access to and use of computer technology.

    PubMed

    Becker, H J

    2000-01-01

    As computer technology becomes increasingly prevalent throughout society, concerns have been raised about an emerging "digital divide" between those children who are benefitting and those who are being left behind. This article presents results from new analyses of national survey data describing children's differential access to computers in school and at home, and the varying conditions that affect how children experience computers. For example, responses from a nationwide survey of teachers suggest that, as of 1998, more than 75% of students had access to computers at school. In fact, those teaching lower-income students reported weekly use of computers more often than those teaching higher-income students. But the nature of children's experiences using computers in school varied greatly by subject and teacher objectives, and the data suggest that lower-income students use computers more often for repetitive practice, whereas higher-income students use computers more often for more sophisticated, intellectually complex applications. Differences between low-income and high-income children's access to home computers were far less subtle. Survey data indicate that only about 22% of children in families with annual incomes of less than $20,000 had access to a home computer, compared to 91% of those in families with annual incomes of more than $75,000. And among children with access, those in low-income families were reported to use the computer less than those in high-income families, perhaps because most low-income families with computers lacked a connection to the Internet. The two most predictive factors of children's use of home computers were the child's age and the computer's capabilities. The author concludes that home access to computers will be a continued area of inequality in American society, and that schools must play a critical role in ensuring equal opportunity for less-advantaged children to access the benefits of the more intellectually powerful

  9. The future of voice-processing technology in the world of computers and communications.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Y

    1995-01-01

    This talk, which was the keynote address of the NAS Colloquium on Human-Machine Communication by Voice, discusses the past, present, and future of human-machine communications, especially speech recognition and speech synthesis. Progress in these technologies is reviewed in the context of the general progress in computer and communications technologies. PMID:7479726

  10. Technology Readiness, Internet Self-Efficacy and Computing Experience of Professional Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ming-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to assess the state of technology readiness of professional accounting students in Malaysia, to examine their level of internet self-efficacy, to assess their prior computing experience, and to explore if they are satisfied with the professional course that they are pursuing in improving their technology skills.…

  11. "A Technical Assistance Report" on Computer Technology Applications. Smithville School District, Smithville, Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrimack Education Center, Chelmsford, MA.

    This report of the Technical Assistance Study provided to the Smithville Public Schools by the Technology Lighthouse of the Merrimack Education Center offers information for use in planning computer technology applications over a 3-year period. It provides specific guidelines and criteria for planning and development, equipment considerations,…

  12. Present Place and the Future of Computing and Technology on the College Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, James L.

    Serious budgetary and administrative questions concerning educational computing and technology confront liberal arts college administrators. What will be the impact of microcomputers and other technologies on a liberal arts education? Since monies are less and less apt to come from outside grants, especially for non-innovative institutions, and…

  13. The Use of Innovative Computer Technology for Teaching Social Communication to Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Allison L.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2011-01-01

    For individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), the use of technology to provide intervention, particularly targeting the core social-communication deficits of the disorder, is promising. This literature review will examine studies that have used innovative technology, such as interactive computer programs and virtual reality, to deliver…

  14. Factors Impacting Adult Learner Achievement in a Technology Certificate Program on Computer Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delialioglu, Omer; Cakir, Hasan; Bichelmeyer, Barbara A.; Dennis, Alan R.; Duffy, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the factors impacting the achievement of adult learners in a technology certificate program on computer networks. We studied 2442 participants in 256 institutions. The participants were older than age 18 and were enrolled in the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) technology training program as "non-degree" or…

  15. Modeling Computer Usage Intentions of Tertiary Students in a Developing Country through the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afari-Kumah, Eben; Achampong, Akwasi Kyere

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to examine the computer usage intentions of Ghanaian Tertiary Students. The Technology Acceptance Model was adopted as the theoretical framework to ascertain whether it could help explain behavioral intentions of individuals to accept and use technology. Factor analysis was used to assess the construct validity of the initial…

  16. Investigation of Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Attitudes Towards Computer Technologies (Case of Turkey)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Can, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of pre-service physical education teachers' attitudes towards computer technologies seems to be of great importance to satisfy the conditions to be met for the conscious and effective use of the technologies required by the age to be used in educational settings. In this respect, the purpose of the present study is to investigate…

  17. Community Colleges in the Information Age: Gains Associated with Students' Use of Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Bodi; Horn, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Computer literacy is increasingly important in higher education, and many educational technology experts propose a more prominent integration of technology into pedagogy. Empirical evidence is needed to support these theories. This study examined community college students planning to transfer to 4-year universities and estimated the relationship…

  18. The Use of Information Technologies for Education in Science, Mathematics, and Computers. An Agenda for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Technology Center, Cambridge, MA.

    Developed to guide the research of the Educational Technology Center, a consortium based at Harvard Graduate School of Education, this report addresses the use of new information technologies to enrich, extend, and transform current instructional practice in science, mathematics, and computer education. A discussion of the basic elements required…

  19. The Impact of Iranian Teachers Cultural Values on Computer Technology Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Karim; Saribagloo, Javad Amani; Aghdam, Samad Hanifepour; Mahmoudi, Hojjat

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of testing the technology acceptance model and the impact of Hofstede cultural values (masculinity/femininity, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism, and power distance) on computer technology acceptance among teachers at Urmia city (Iran) using the structural equation modeling approach. From among…

  20. Use of Computer Technology for English Language Learning: Do Learning Styles, Gender, and Age Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cynthia; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing; Ip, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Computer technology provides spaces and locales for language learning. However, learning style preference and demographic variables may affect the effectiveness of technology use for a desired goal. Adapting Reid's pioneering Perceptual Learning Style Preference Questionnaire (PLSPQ), this study investigated the relations of university students'…

  1. A Delphi Study on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Applied on Computer Science (CS) Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Marcela; Mas-Machuca, Marta; Martinez-Costa, Carme; Maillet, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is a new pedagogical domain aiming to study the usage of information and communication technologies to support teaching and learning. The following study investigated how this domain is used to increase technical skills in Computer Science (CS). A Delphi method was applied, using three-rounds of online survey…

  2. Finding Space for Technology: Pedagogical Observations on the Organization of Computers in School Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Jennifer; Rose, Chloë Brushwood

    2006-01-01

    With the large-scale acquisition and installation of computer and networking hardware in schools across Canada, a major concern has been where to locate these new technologies and whether and how the structure of the school might itself be made to accommodate these new technologies. In this paper, we suggest that the physical location and…

  3. Information and Computing Technology and the Gap between School Pedagogy and Children's Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Birgitte Holm

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the gap between the use of Information and Computing Technology (ICT) in schools and the use made of ICT in children's everyday life outside school. Particular emphasis is placed on the communities of practice that young people create through their use of digital technology. The article is based on data collected over five…

  4. An Evaluation of Computer-Managed Education Technology at New York City Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitayat, Linda

    The Computer-Managed Education Technology (COMET) program was designed to improve group instruction through the use of technological aids in the classroom. Specific objectives included: (1) improving feedback on student comprehension during a class period; (2) facilitating the administration and grading of homework and quizzes; (3) providing for…

  5. Computer science and technology: overview of computer security certification and accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruthberg, Z.G.; Neugent, W.

    1984-04-01

    This overview is primarily intended for use by ADP policy managers and information resource managers to become familiar with the approach to computer security certification and accreditation found in Guideline for Computer Security Certification and Accreditation, FIPS PUB 102. ADP technical managers and staff will also find it a useful overview. This overview summarizes how to establish and carry out a program and a technical process for computer security certification and accreditation of sensitive computer applications. The overview identifies and briefly describes the steps involved in performing computer security certification and accreditation; it identifies and briefly discusses important issues in managing a computer security certification and accreditation program; and it identifies and briefly describes the principal functional roles needed within an organization to carry out such a program. Recertification and reaccreditation and its relation to change control are also touched upon. A discussion of evaluation techniques to be used for certification includes risk analysis, EDP audit, VV and T (verification, validation, and testing), and security safeguard reviews. The relation of these to the system lifecycle is indicated.

  6. In the Clouds: The Implications of Cloud Computing for Higher Education Information Technology Governance and Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Malik H.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies challenge the management of information technology in organizations. Paradigm changing technologies, such as cloud computing, have the ability to reverse the norms in organizational management, decision making, and information technology governance. This study explores the effects of cloud computing on information technology…

  7. Instructor and Student Classroom Interactions during Technology Skills Instruction for Facilitating Preservice Teachers' Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Joyce H. L.; Frick, Theodore W.

    2009-01-01

    Technology skills instruction is an important component of educational technology courses, which has been shown to raise pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy. Computer self-efficacy, in turn, is positively related to their self-efficacy for technology integration. Studies of undergraduate technology skills instruction found that classroom…

  8. Computer-Aided Analysis of Patents for Product Technology Maturity Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yanhong; Gan, Dequan; Guo, Yingchun; Zhang, Peng

    Product technology maturity foresting is vital for any enterprises to hold the chance for innovation and keep competitive for a long term. The Theory of Invention Problem Solving (TRIZ) is acknowledged both as a systematic methodology for innovation and a powerful tool for technology forecasting. Based on TRIZ, the state -of-the-art on the technology maturity of product and the limits of application are discussed. With the application of text mining and patent analysis technologies, this paper proposes a computer-aided approach for product technology maturity forecasting. It can overcome the shortcomings of the current methods.

  9. An evolving infrastructure for scientific computing and the integration of new graphics technology

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    The National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently pursuing several projects to implement and integrate new hardware and software technologies. While each of these projects ought to be and is in fact individually justifiable, there is an appealing metaphor for viewing them collectively which provides a simple and memorable way to understand the future direction not only of supercomputing services but of computer centers in general. Once this general direction is understood, it becomes clearer what future computer graphics technologies would be possible and desirable, at least within the context of large scale scientific computing.

  10. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  11. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  12. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 6: Computer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential technical capabilities of energy conversion systems in the 1985 - 2000 time period were defined with emphasis on systems using coal, coal-derived fuels or alternate fuels. Industrial process data developed for the large energy consuming industries serve as a framework for the cogeneration applications. Ground rules for the study were established and other necessary equipment (balance-of-plant) was defined. This combination of technical information, energy conversion system data ground rules, industrial process information and balance-of-plant characteristics was analyzed to evaluate energy consumption, capital and operating costs and emissions. Data in the form of computer printouts developed for 3000 energy conversion system-industrial process combinations are presented.

  13. Parallel, distributed and GPU computing technologies in single-particle electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Martin; Heisen, Burkhard C.; Luettich, Mario; Busche, Boris; Hauer, Florian; Koske, Tobias; Knauber, Karl-Heinz; Stark, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Most known methods for the determination of the structure of macromolecular complexes are limited or at least restricted at some point by their computational demands. Recent developments in information technology such as multicore, parallel and GPU processing can be used to overcome these limitations. In particular, graphics processing units (GPUs), which were originally developed for rendering real-time effects in computer games, are now ubiquitous and provide unprecedented computational power for scientific applications. Each parallel-processing paradigm alone can improve overall performance; the increased computational performance obtained by combining all paradigms, unleashing the full power of today’s technology, makes certain applications feasible that were previously virtually impossible. In this article, state-of-the-art paradigms are introduced, the tools and infrastructure needed to apply these paradigms are presented and a state-of-the-art infrastructure and solution strategy for moving scientific applications to the next generation of computer hardware is outlined. PMID:19564686

  14. From computer images to video presentation: Enhancing technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    With NASA placing increased emphasis on transferring technology to outside industry, NASA researchers need to evaluate many aspects of their efforts in this regard. Often it may seem like too much self-promotion to many researchers. However, industry's use of video presentations in sales, advertising, public relations and training should be considered. Today, the most typical presentation at NASA is through the use of vu-graphs (overhead transparencies) which can be effective for text or static presentations. For full blown color and sound presentations, however, the best method is videotape. In fact, it is frequently more convenient due to its portability and the availability of viewing equipment. This talk describes techniques for creating a video presentation through the use of a combined researcher and video professional team.

  15. Technology transfer of brain-computer interfaces as assistive technology: barriers and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, F

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an analysis of perspectives from different stakeholders on the state-of-the-art of BCI. Three barriers for technology transfer of BCIs as access technologies are identified. First, BCIs are developed with a narrow focus on creating a reliable technology, while a broader focus on creating a usable technology is needed. Second, the potential target group, which could benefit from BCIs as access technologies is expected to be very small. Development costs are therefore high, while reimbursements are expected to be low, which challenges the commercial viability. Third, potential target users should be much more included in the design process of BCIs to ensure that the end-products meet technical, ethical, legal and social requirements. These three issues need to be urgently addressed so that target users may benefit from this promising technology.

  16. Campus Computing, 2000: The 11th National Survey of Computing and Information Technology in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    The 2000 Campus Computing Survey, the 11th such survey, was sent to the chief academic officer at 1,176 two-year and four-year colleges and universities across the United States. By October 2000, 506 responses had been received, a response rate of 43%. New data reveal that the growing demand for technology talent across all sectors of the U.S.…

  17. Computer Technology/Special Education/Rehabilitation: Proceedings of the Conference (2nd, Northridge, California, October 16-18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Harry J., Ed.

    The following 25 papers (with their authors) are presented from a conference on computer technology in special education and rehabilitation: "Computers for Business--Computers for Life" (I. Keith Austin); "Rehabilitation and the Computer: How to Find What You Need" (Thomas Backer); "Computer Access Alternatives for Visually Impaired People in…

  18. A Computer Oriented Problem Solving Unit, Consume. Teacher Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the teacher's guide to accompany the student guide which together comprise one of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. This unit explores U.S. energy consumption; is applicable to Mathematics, Social Studies, and Ecology or Science Studies with Mathematics background; and is intended for use in grades 9 through 14.…

  19. The Use of Passwords for Controlled Access to Computer Resources. Computer Science & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Helen M.

    This paper considers the generation of passwords and their effective application to the problem of controlling access to computer resources. After describing the need for and uses of passwords, password schemes are categorized according to selection technique, lifetime, physical characteristics, and information content. Password protection, both…

  20. Computer Courseware Evaluations. A Series of Reports Compiled by the Clearinghouse Computer Technology Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This report reviews Apple computer courseware in business education, library skills, mathematics, science, special education, and word processing based on the curricular requirements of Alberta, Canada. It provides detailed evaluations of 23 authorized titles in business education (2), mathematics (20), and science (1); 3 of the math titles are…

  1. A distributed computing model for telemetry data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Scott, Kevin L.; Weismuller, Steven P.

    1994-05-01

    We present a new approach to distributing processed telemetry data among spacecraft flight controllers within the control centers at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This approach facilitates the development of application programs which integrate spacecraft-telemetered data and ground-based synthesized data, then distributes this information to flight controllers for analysis and decision-making. The new approach combines various distributed computing models into one hybrid distributed computing model. The model employs both client-server and peer-to-peer distributed computing models cooperating to provide users with information throughout a diverse operations environment. Specifically, it provides an attractive foundation upon which we are building critical real-time monitoring and control applications, while simultaneously lending itself to peripheral applications in playback operations, mission preparations, flight controller training, and program development and verification. We have realized the hybrid distributed computing model through an information sharing protocol. We shall describe the motivations that inspired us to create this protocol, along with a brief conceptual description of the distributed computing models it employs. We describe the protocol design in more detail, discussing many of the program design considerations and techniques we have adopted. Finally, we describe how this model is especially suitable for supporting the implementation of distributed expert system applications.

  2. Computer-assisted optics teaching at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soboleva, Natalia N.; Kozel, Stanislav M.; Lockshin, Gennady R.; Entin, M. A.; Galichsky, K. V.; Lebedinsky, P. L.; Zhdanovich, P. M.

    1995-10-01

    Traditional methods used in optics teaching lack clarity and vividness when illustrating abstract notions such as polarization or interference. Here's where computer models may help, but they usually show only a single phenomenon or process and don't let the student see the entire picture. For this reason at Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology was developed the courseware 'Wave Optics on the Computer' consisting of a number of related simulations. It is intended for students studying optics at the Universities. Recently we have developed different simulations in optics for secondary school level. They are included as part of large computer courseware 'Physics by Pictures'. The courseware 'Wave Optics on the Computer' consists of nine large simulation programs and the textbook. The programs are simulating basic phenomena of wave optics. parameters of optical systems can be varied by the user. The textbook contains theoretical considerations on studied optical phenomena, recommendations concerning work with computer programs, and, especially for those wishing to deeper understand wave optics, original problems for individual solution. At the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology the course 'Wave Optics on the Computer' is used for teaching optics in the course of general physics. The course provides both the computer assisted teaching for lectures support and computer assisted learning for students during seminars in the computer classroom.

  3. Use of computer and cellular phone technology by older rural adults.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Tara Renee; Treiber, Frank; Jenkins, Carolyn; Mercier, Angela

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the use of computer and cellular phone technology among older adults living in the rural Appalachian region of North Carolina. A 21-item questionnaire on access to and use of computer and cellular phone technology was administered to 43 older adults, using dichotomous and frequency-rated questions. The sample was recruited from two rural senior centers in the Appalachian region of North Carolina. Forty percent of the participants earned $20 000 or less annually. The majority owned a cellular phone (79.9%), and nearly half had a desktop computer (44.2%). High-speed Internet coverage was the most frequent type (42%) of in-home coverage. This study provides insights into the needs and challenges of older rural Appalachians with regard to technology. Computer technology may be more accessible and have fewer barriers by older adults than other forms of technology. Future research should explore the levels of computer literacy of older adults.

  4. Critical Issues Forum: A multidisciplinary educational program integrating computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, R.J.; Robertson, B.; Jacobs, D.

    1998-09-01

    The Critical Issues Forum (CIF) funded by the US Department of Energy is a collaborative effort between the Science Education Team of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and New Mexico high schools to improve science education throughout the state of New Mexico as well as nationally. By creating an education relationship between the LANL with its unique scientific resources and New Mexico high schools, students and teachers participate in programs that increase not only their science content knowledge but also their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The CIF program focuses on current, globally oriented topics crucial to the security of not only the US but to that of all nations. The CIF is an academic-year program that involves both teachers and students in the process of seeking solutions for real world concerns. Built around issues tied to LANL`s mission, participating students and teachers are asked to critically investigate and examine the interactions among the political, social, economic, and scientific domains while considering diversity issues that include geopolitical entities and cultural and ethnic groupings. Participants are expected to collaborate through telecommunications during the research phase and participate in a culminating multimedia activity, where they produce and deliver recommendations for the current issues being studied. The CIF was evaluated and found to be an effective approach for teacher professional training, especially in the development of skills for critical thinking and questioning. The CIF contributed to students` ability to integrate diverse disciplinary content about science-related topics and supported teachers in facilitating the understanding of their students using the CIF approach. Networking technology in CIF has been used as an information repository, resource delivery mechanism, and communication medium.

  5. A Study on Attitude and Opinion towards Using Computer Technology in Teaching among B.Ed. Trainees in Tiruchirappalli District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, C. Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to find out whether there was a significant difference in the attitude and opinion towards using Computer Technology in teaching among B.Ed., trainees in terms of select independent variables. Normative survey was the technique employed. Opinion towards Computer Usage and Attitude towards Computer Technology inventory…

  6. The Challenges and Benefits of Using Computer Technology for Communication and Teaching in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairley, J. P.; Hinds, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    The advent of the World Wide Web in the early 1990s not only revolutionized the exchange of ideas and information within the scientific community, but also provided educators with a new array of teaching, informational, and promotional tools. Use of computer graphics and animation to explain concepts and processes can stimulate classroom participation and student interest in the geosciences, which has historically attracted students with strong spatial and visualization skills. In today's job market, graduates are expected to have knowledge of computers and the ability to use them for acquiring, processing, and visually analyzing data. Furthermore, in addition to promoting visibility and communication within the scientific community, computer graphics and the Internet can be informative and educational for the general public. Although computer skills are crucial for earth science students and educators, many pitfalls exist in implementing computer technology and web-based resources into research and classroom activities. Learning to use these new tools effectively requires a significant time commitment and careful attention to the source and reliability of the data presented. Furthermore, educators have a responsibility to ensure that students and the public understand the assumptions and limitations of the materials presented, rather than allowing them to be overwhelmed by "gee-whiz" aspects of the technology. We present three examples of computer technology in the earth sciences classroom: 1) a computer animation of water table response to well pumping, 2) a 3-D fly-through animation of a fault controlled valley, and 3) a virtual field trip for an introductory geology class. These examples demonstrate some of the challenges and benefits of these new tools, and encourage educators to expand the responsible use of computer technology for teaching and communicating scientific results to the general public.

  7. Proceedings of the 1993 Conference on Intelligent Computer-Aided Training and Virtual Environment Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Patricia R.; Loftin, R. Bowen

    1993-01-01

    The volume 2 proceedings from the 1993 Conference on Intelligent Computer-Aided Training and Virtual Environment Technology are presented. Topics discussed include intelligent computer assisted training (ICAT) systems architectures, ICAT educational and medical applications, virtual environment (VE) training and assessment, human factors engineering and VE, ICAT theory and natural language processing, ICAT military applications, VE engineering applications, ICAT knowledge acquisition processes and applications, and ICAT aerospace applications.

  8. Technology development for remote, computer-assisted operation of a continuous mining machine

    SciTech Connect

    Schnakenberg, G.H.

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines was created to conduct research to improve the health, safety, and efficiency of the coal and metal mining industries. In 1986, the Bureau embarked on a new, major research effort to develop the technology that would enable the relocation of workers from hazardous areas to areas of relative safety. This effort is in contrast to historical efforts by the Bureau of controlling or reducing the hazardous agent or providing protection to the worker. The technologies associated with automation, robotics, and computer software and hardware systems had progressed to the point that their use to develop computer-assisted operation of mobile mining equipment appeared to be a cost-effective and accomplishable task. At the first International Symposium of Mine Mechanization and Automation, an overview of the Bureau`s computer-assisted mining program for underground coal mining was presented. The elements included providing computer-assisted tele-remote operation of continuous mining machines, haulage systems and roof bolting machines. Areas of research included sensors for machine guidance and for coal interface detection. Additionally, the research included computer hardware and software architectures which are extremely important in developing technology that is transferable to industry and is flexible enough to accommodate the variety of machines used in coal mining today. This paper provides an update of the research under the computer-assisted mining program.

  9. Final Report for ''Client Server Software for the National Transport Code Collaboration''

    SciTech Connect

    John R Cary; David Alexander; Johan Carlsson; Kelly Luetkemeyer; Nathaniel Sizemore

    2004-04-30

    OAK-B135 Tech-X Corporation designed and developed all the networking code tying together the NTCC data server with the data client and the physics server with the data server and physics client. We were also solely responsible for the data and physics clients and the vast majority of the work on the data server. We also performed a number of other tasks.

  10. Volume serving and media management in a networked, distributed client/server environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Ralph H.; Tefend, Linda L.

    1993-01-01

    The E-Systems Modular Automated Storage System (EMASS) is a family of hierarchical mass storage systems providing complete storage/'file space' management. The EMASS volume server provides the flexibility to work with different clients (file servers), different platforms, and different archives with a 'mix and match' capability. The EMASS design considers all file management programs as clients of the volume server system. System storage capacities are tailored to customer needs ranging from small data centers to large central libraries serving multiple users simultaneously. All EMASS hardware is commercial off the shelf (COTS), selected to provide the performance and reliability needed in current and future mass storage solutions. All interfaces use standard commercial protocols and networks suitable to service multiple hosts. EMASS is designed to efficiently store and retrieve in excess of 10,000 terabytes of data. Current clients include CRAY's YMP Model E based Data Migration Facility (DMF), IBM's RS/6000 based Unitree, and CONVEX based EMASS File Server software. The VolSer software provides the capability to accept client or graphical user interface (GUI) commands from the operator's console and translate them to the commands needed to control any configured archive. The VolSer system offers advanced features to enhance media handling and particularly media mounting such as: automated media migration, preferred media placement, drive load leveling, registered MediaClass groupings, and drive pooling.

  11. Combining Brain–Computer Interfaces and Assistive Technologies: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Millán, J. d. R.; Rupp, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Murray-Smith, R.; Giugliemma, C.; Tangermann, M.; Vidaurre, C.; Cincotti, F.; Kübler, A.; Leeb, R.; Neuper, C.; Müller, K.-R.; Mattia, D.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, new research has brought the field of electroencephalogram (EEG)-based brain–computer interfacing (BCI) out of its infancy and into a phase of relative maturity through many demonstrated prototypes such as brain-controlled wheelchairs, keyboards, and computer games. With this proof-of-concept phase in the past, the time is now ripe to focus on the development of practical BCI technologies that can be brought out of the lab and into real-world applications. In particular, we focus on the prospect of improving the lives of countless disabled individuals through a combination of BCI technology with existing assistive technologies (AT). In pursuit of more practical BCIs for use outside of the lab, in this paper, we identify four application areas where disabled individuals could greatly benefit from advancements in BCI technology, namely, “Communication and Control”, “Motor Substitution”, “Entertainment”, and “Motor Recovery”. We review the current state of the art and possible future developments, while discussing the main research issues in these four areas. In particular, we expect the most progress in the development of technologies such as hybrid BCI architectures, user–machine adaptation algorithms, the exploitation of users’ mental states for BCI reliability and confidence measures, the incorporation of principles in human–computer interaction (HCI) to improve BCI usability, and the development of novel BCI technology including better EEG devices. PMID:20877434

  12. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  13. Managing the technological edge: the UNESCO International Computation Centre and the limits to the transfer of computer technology, 1946-61.

    PubMed

    Nofre, David

    2014-07-01

    The spread of the modern computer is assumed to have been a smooth process of technology transfer. This view relies on an assessment of the open circulation of knowledge ensured by the US and British governments in the early post-war years. This article presents new historical evidence that question this view. At the centre of the article lies the ill-fated establishment of the UNESCO International Computation Centre. The project was initially conceived in 1946 to provide advanced computation capabilities to scientists of all nations. It soon became a prize sought by Western European countries like The Netherlands and Italy seeking to speed up their own national research programs. Nonetheless, as the article explains, the US government's limitations on the research function of the future centre resulted in the withdrawal of European support for the project. These limitations illustrate the extent to which US foreign science policy could operate as (stealth) industrial policy to secure a competitive technological advantage and the prospects of US manufacturers in a future European market.

  14. Managing the technological edge: the UNESCO International Computation Centre and the limits to the transfer of computer technology, 1946-61.

    PubMed

    Nofre, David

    2014-07-01

    The spread of the modern computer is assumed to have been a smooth process of technology transfer. This view relies on an assessment of the open circulation of knowledge ensured by the US and British governments in the early post-war years. This article presents new historical evidence that question this view. At the centre of the article lies the ill-fated establishment of the UNESCO International Computation Centre. The project was initially conceived in 1946 to provide advanced computation capabilities to scientists of all nations. It soon became a prize sought by Western European countries like The Netherlands and Italy seeking to speed up their own national research programs. Nonetheless, as the article explains, the US government's limitations on the research function of the future centre resulted in the withdrawal of European support for the project. These limitations illustrate the extent to which US foreign science policy could operate as (stealth) industrial policy to secure a competitive technological advantage and the prospects of US manufacturers in a future European market. PMID:24908797

  15. Changing how and what children learn in school with computer-based technologies.

    PubMed

    Roschelle, J M; Pea, R D; Hoadley, C M; Gordin, D N; Means, B M

    2000-01-01

    Schools today face ever-increasing demands in their attempts to ensure that students are well equipped to enter the workforce and navigate a complex world. Research indicates that computer technology can help support learning, and that it is especially useful in developing the higher-order skills of critical thinking, analysis, and scientific inquiry. But the mere presence of computers in the classroom does not ensure their effective use. Some computer applications have been shown to be more successful than others, and many factors influence how well even the most promising applications are implemented. This article explores the various ways computer technology can be used to improve how and what children learn in the classroom. Several examples of computer-based applications are highlighted to illustrate ways technology can enhance how children learn by supporting four fundamental characteristics of learning: (1) active engagement, (2) participation in groups, (3) frequent interaction and feedback, and (4) connections to real-world contexts. Additional examples illustrate ways technology can expand what children learn by helping them to understand core concepts in subjects like math, science, and literacy. Research indicates, however, that the use of technology as an effective learning tool is more likely to take place when embedded in a broader education reform movement that includes improvements in teacher training, curriculum, student assessment, and a school's capacity for change. To help inform decisions about the future role of computers in the classroom, the authors conclude that further research is needed to identify the uses that most effectively support learning and the conditions required for successful implementation.

  16. An Investigation of the Relationships among Technology Experiences, Communication Apprehension, Writing Apprehension and Computer Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Earl E.; Schuelke, L. David

    This study explored the relationships among communication technologies, communication apprehension, writing apprehension, and computer anxiety. Participants were 130 students from a variety of undergraduate oral communication classes in a large midwestern university who completed a modified form, 10 items, of McCroskey's Personal Report of…

  17. A Computational-Modeling Course for Undergraduate Students in Chemical Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessley, Rita K.

    2004-01-01

    The PC-based software technology, a computational-modeling course, for undergraduate chemistry students helps them to understand the molecular modeling in a better way. This course would be able to accommodate a wider array of topics and a greater depth of theory as the modeling is increasingly incorporated into the chemistry curriculum.

  18. Computer Mediated Communications Inside a Classroom: A Study Using CMT Technology with ELT Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Kathleen Center; Fitzpatrick, Dale; Sackville, Patricia

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of CMT (computer-mediated communications) to help ELT (English-language training, or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) acquire high-level communication, cultural, and employability skills as well as language skills for postsecondary studies and employment. (LRW)

  19. Computer Technology and Educational Equity. ERIC/CUE Urban Diversity Series, Number 91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edmund W.; Armour-Thomas, Eleanor

    The impact of the technological revolution on education is examined in this monograph, which focuses primarily on computers. First, the history of the educational uses of a variety of media (film, radio, television, teaching machines, and videodisc systems) is traced and assessed. As instructional aids, it is said, the media economize teachers'…

  20. Interactive Computer Models for Science Education. Research Paper: Connecting Technology to Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Haddad, Hisham; Little, Mike

    The state government of West Virginia has been motivating a reform of high school science and technology education by actively funding projects that lead to innovative computer-based teaching techniques. Faculties at Marshall University (Huntington, West Virginia) have been active participants in this reform, and have been developing…

  1. Computer Technology Enables Georgetown U. Medical Students to Simulate Dialogue with Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David L.

    1991-01-01

    A combination of computer, videodisk, and voice-recognition technology lets Georgetown University medical students ask questions of an electronic "patient" who appears on a television monitor and appears to respond. Students can order laboratory tests and study patient behavior inside and outside the hospital. Simulations use actors or actual…

  2. Managing Information Technology: Facing the Issues. Track VI: Academic Computing Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers making up Track VI of the 1989 conference of the Professional Association for the Management of Information Technology in Higher Education (known as CAUSE, an acronym of the association's former name) are presented in this document. The focus of Track VI is on academic computing issues, and the papers include: "Loan-a-Mac: A…

  3. Global Journal of Computer Science and Technology. Volume 1.2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixit, R. K.

    2009-01-01

    Articles in this issue of "Global Journal of Computer Science and Technology" include: (1) Input Data Processing Techniques in Intrusion Detection Systems--Short Review (Suhair H. Amer and John A. Hamilton, Jr.); (2) Semantic Annotation of Stock Photography for CBIR Using MPEG-7 standards (R. Balasubramani and V. Kannan); (3) An Experimental Study…

  4. Integrating Computer Technology in Early Childhood Education Environments: Issues Raised by Early Childhood Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Eileen; Specht, Jacqueline; Willoughby, Teena; Mueller, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the educators' perspectives on the introduction of computer technology in the early childhood education environment. Fifty early childhood educators completed a survey and participated in focus groups. Parallels existed between the individually completed survey data and the focus group discussions. The…

  5. Conductors of the Digitized Underground Railroad: Black Teachers Empower Pedagogies with Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrick, Rona M.

    2007-01-01

    An interpretive case study framed by the critical race theory (CRT) and African centered theory is used to examine the teaching practices of two transformative African American teachers, which transformed the thinking and lives of their students. The analysis has illustrated that the computer technology has helped teachers in engaging in…

  6. Leveraging Cognitive Load Theory, Scaffolding, and Distance Technologies to Enhance Computer Programming for Non-Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Impelluso, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) was used as a foundation to redesign a computer programming class for mechanical engineers, in which content was delivered with hybrid/distance technology. The effort confirmed the utility of CLT in course design. And it demonstrates that hybrid/distance learning is not merely a tool of convenience, but one, which, when…

  7. Computer Technology-Integrated Projects Should Not Supplant Craft Projects in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopp, Tabatha J.; Rule, Audrey C.; Schneider, Jean Suchsland; Boody, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The current emphasis on computer technology integration and narrowing of the curriculum has displaced arts and crafts. However, the hands-on, concrete nature of craft work in science modeling enables students to understand difficult concepts and to be engaged and motivated while learning spatial, logical, and sequential thinking skills. Analogy…

  8. Technology Trends in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Elementary Education from 2009 to 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses mobile computer supported collaborative learning in elementary education worldwide focusing on technology trends for the period from 2009 to 2014. The results present representation of device types used to support collaborative activities, their distribution per users (1:1 or 1:m) and if students are learning through or around…

  9. Are Computer Science and Information Technology Still Masculine Fields? High School Students' Perceptions and Career Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastergiou, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated Greek high school students' intentions and motivation towards and against pursuing academic studies in Computer Science (CS), the influence of the family and the scholastic environment on students' career choices, students' perceptions of CS and the Information Technology (IT) profession as well as students' attendance at…

  10. Teachers' Organization of Participation Structures for Teaching Science with Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study that investigated the nature of the participation structures and how the participation structures were organized by four science teachers when they constructed and communicated science content in their classrooms with computer technology. Participation structures focus on the activity structures and…

  11. Teachers' Computer Self-Efficacy and Their Use of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turel, Vehbi

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the use of educational technology by primary and subject teachers (i.e. secondary and high school teachers) in a small town in the eastern part of Turkey in the spring of 2012. The study examined the primary, secondary and high school teachers': (1) personal and computer related (demographic) characteristics; (2) their…

  12. Making the Most of Micro-Computers. Technology in Language Learning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendall, Heather

    A guide to various instructional technology (IT) approaches is aimed at modern language teachers who are just beginning to integrate IT into their methodology. Hints and suggestions are given about what questions to ask when acquiring a computer and buying software and how to avoid some problems. Chapters include the following: (1) Why should I?;…

  13. A Synthesis and Survey of Critical Success Factors for Computer Technology Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ross A.

    2012-01-01

    The author investigated the existence of critical success factors for computer technology projects. Current research literature and a survey of experienced project managers indicate that there are 23 critical success factors (CSFs) that correlate with project success. The survey gathered an assessment of project success and the degree to which…

  14. Receptivity toward Assistive Computer Technology by Non-Users Who Are Blind/Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leff, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The non-use of assistive computer technology by some people who are legallyblind/visually-impaired was investigated to determine the reasons for lack of interest (Chiang, Cole, Gupta, Kaiser, & Starren, 2006; Williamson, Wright, Schauder & Bow, 2001). Social and psychological factors implicated in non-interest were determined by profiling…

  15. Teaching Pronunciation with Computer Assisted Pronunciation Instruction in a Technological University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Sze-Chu; Hung, Po-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of computer assisted pronunciation instruction in English pronunciation for students in vocational colleges and universities in Taiwan. The participants were fifty-one first-year undergraduate students from a technological university located in central Taiwan. The participants received an…

  16. Computational support of the X-29A Advanced Technology Demonstrator flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Bates, B. L.

    1989-01-01

    Issues and questions associated with the forward swept wing and closely coupled canard are addressed. The primary focus will be on research questions which must be addressed to obtain high quality ground and flight test data. These data will be used in conjunction with computational predictions to complement the analyses required to comprehensively understand the interacting technologies.

  17. Advanced Telecommunications and Computer Technologies in Georgia Public Elementary School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jackie L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine what recent progress had been made in Georgia public elementary school library media centers regarding access to advanced telecommunications and computer technologies as a result of special funding. A questionnaire addressed the following areas: automation and networking of the school library media center…

  18. Using Visual Technologies in the Introductory Programming Courses for Computer Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kellie W.

    2013-01-01

    Decreasing enrollments, lower rates of student retention and changes in the learning styles of today's students are all issues that the Computer Science (CS) academic community is currently facing. As a result, CS educators are being challenged to find the right blend of technology and pedagogy for their curriculum in order to help students…

  19. Technology at the zoo: the influence of a touchscreen computer on orangutans and zoo visitors.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Bonnie M; Clay, Andrea W; Gaalema, Diann E; Maple, Terry L; Stoinski, Tara S

    2012-01-01

    A computer-controlled touchscreen apparatus (hereafter referred to as "touchscreen") in the orangutan exhibit at Zoo Atlanta provides enrichment to the animals and allows cognitive research to take place on exhibit. This study investigated the impact of the touchscreen on orangutan behavior and visibility, as well as its impact on zoo visitors. Despite previous research suggesting that providing a single computer system may negatively affect orangutan behavior, there was not a significant increase in aggression, stereotypic, or distress-related behaviors following the activation of the on-exhibit touchscreen. We also investigated the possibility that zoo visitors may be negatively affected by technology because it deviates from naturalism. However, we did not find a change in stay time or overall experience rating when the computer was turned on. This research was the first to assess visitor attitudes toward technology at the zoo, and we found that visitors report highly positive attitudes about technology for both animals and visitors. If subjects visited the exhibit when the computer was turned on, they more strongly agreed that orangutans benefit from interacting with computerized enrichment. This study is the first investigation of an on-exhibit touchscreen in group-housed apes; our findings of no negative effects on the animals or zoo visitors and positive attitudes toward technology suggest a significant value of this practice.

  20. A City Parking Integration System Combined with Cloud Computing Technologies and Smart Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Her-Tyan; Chen, Bing-Chang; Wang, Bo-Xun

    2016-01-01

    The current study applied cloud computing technology and smart mobile devices combined with a streaming server for parking lots to plan a city parking integration system. It is also equipped with a parking search system, parking navigation system, parking reservation service, and car retrieval service. With this system, users can quickly find…

  1. Tertiary Students' Perceptions and Use of Information Computer Technology for Language Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on some factors that influence a student's choice, perception and motivation to use computer technology for a speaking and a writing consultation service, based on interviews and student-teacher online discourse patterns. It also discusses the motivation behind the choices with reference to Deci and Ryan's self-determination…

  2. Talking Instead of Typing: Alternate Access to Computers via Speech Recognition Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalier, Albert R.; Ferretti, Ralph P.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of alternative access to computers for persons with developmental disabilities and the ways in which speech recognition technology has been used to reach this goal are discussed. Illustrative studies of the use of speech recognition by persons with disabilities are reviewed, and implications for the effective application of this…

  3. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 8: Academic Computing and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on academic computing and library issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "Where's the Beef?: Implementation of Discipline-Specific Training on Internet Resources" (Priscilla Hancock and others); (2) "'What I Really Want…

  4. Students' Relationship to Technology and Conceptions of Mathematics while Learning in a Computer Algebra System Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meagher, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The research presented here is a group case study of students learning calculus in a Computer Algebra System (CAS) environment which examines the following research questions: What are students' perceptions of the role of technology in their learning? What is the students' relationship to CAS? What is the effect of learning in a CAS environment on…

  5. African American Faculty Women Experiences of Underrepresentation in Computer Technology Positions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    African American women are underrepresented in computer technology disciplines in institutions of higher education throughout the United States. Although equitable gender representation is progressing in most fields, much less information is available on why institutions are still lagging in workforce diversity, a problem which can be lessened by…

  6. A Review of Research on Intercultural Learning through Computer-Based Digital Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çiftçi, Emrullah Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Intercultural communication is now a crucial part of our globalizing lives; however, not everyone has an opportunity to engage in an intercultural interaction with people from different cultures. Computer-based technologies are promising in creating environments for people to communicate with people from diverse cultures. This qualitative…

  7. Teachers' Innovative Use of Computer Technologies in Classroom: A Case of Selected Ghanaian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buabeng-Andoh, Charles; Totimeh, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore secondary school teachers' innovative use of computer technologies in classroom. Questionnaires were distributed to 273 teachers in fourteen schools comprising 5 urban schools, 5 semi-urban schools and 4 rural schools. 241 were returned, and 231 valid questionnaires were used for data analysis, representing…

  8. Global Journal of Computer Science and Technology. Volume 9, Issue 5 (Ver. 2.0)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixit, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    This is a special issue published in version 1.0 of "Global Journal of Computer Science and Technology." Articles in this issue include: (1) [Theta] Scheme (Orthogonal Milstein Scheme), a Better Numerical Approximation for Multi-dimensional SDEs (Klaus Schmitz Abe); (2) Input Data Processing Techniques in Intrusion Detection Systems--Short Review…

  9. Resistance to the Adoption of Computer Communication Technology by Communication Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herling, Thomas J.

    A study examined adoption of computer communication technology by communication faculty in a sample of schools of communication in which online database services and electronic mail were made available to individual faculty members without cost or access barriers. A mail survey sent to 178 faculty at 10 institutions was returned by 115 faculty,…

  10. Revisiting Computer-Aided Notetaking Technological Assistive Devices for Hearing-Impaired Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Dana L.; Pendegraft, Norman

    2005-01-01

    The first part of this article describes the use of Computer-aided note taking (CAN) for a fifth-grade student with a profound hearing loss who has been mainstreamed in her local grade school since first grade. As such, this is a case study of how technology can directly and dramatically impact the educational experience of a student with a…

  11. Computer Technology and Academic Skill Training for Improving Disabled Students' Academic Performance: Applications and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severs, Mary K.

    The Educational Center for Disabled Students at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is designed to improve the academic performance and attitudes toward success of disabled students through computer technology and academic skills training. Adaptive equipment interventions take into account keyboard access and screen and voice output. Non-adaptive…

  12. How changes in computer technology are revolutionizing the practice of chemistry.

    PubMed

    Levy, G C

    1988-11-01

    During the early 1980s, two major developments in computer technology changed the way chemists approached their science. The advent of the micropressor and then the PC changed experimental chemistry, while the availability of two classes of computer, the superminicomputer and supercomputer, greatly influenced computational chemistry. In the past two years, graphics workstation computers have begun to affect the practice of chemistry by combining fast, high-resolution, multiwindow graphics with superminicomputer power. In 1988, the advent of a new class of computer--the graphics supercomputer--offers extraordinary promise to both theoretician and experimentalist. In these systems, near-Cray compute power is combined with ultrahigh-speed 3-dimensional graphics for unparalleled visualization of molecular processes and other complex events. This is made practical not just by computing and graphics power but by use of ultrahigh internal bandwidths inside the graphics supercomputers. Another major development in scientific computing is the evolving concept of the laboratory computer network. Current network designs include hierarchical configurations incorporating various levels of computers--through supercomputers--either locally or via national or regional networks. New software methods are also having impact on chemical research, allowing, for example, the scientist to better abstract information from noisy or incomplete experimental data. Use of parallelism (multiple CPUs) in new design workstation computers will extend their power, by the early 1990s, past that of current supercomputer mainframes. Within five years the chemist will have $10 million of 1985 computer power on his desk, for considerably less than $100,000, along with visualization tools and software only dreamed of in 1985.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3235470

  13. Opportunities and Needs for Mobile-Computing Technology to Support U.S. Geological Survey Fieldwork

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Halsing, David L.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the opportunities and needs for mobile-computing technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), we conducted an internal, Internet-based survey of bureau scientists whose research includes fieldwork. In summer 2005, 144 survey participants answered 65 questions about fieldwork activities and conditions, technology to support field research, and postfieldwork data processing and analysis. Results suggest that some types of mobile-computing technology are already commonplace, such as digital cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, whereas others are not, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet-based personal computers (tablet PCs). The potential for PDA use in the USGS is high: 97 percent of respondents record field observations (primarily environmental conditions and water-quality data), and 87 percent take field samples (primarily water-quality data, water samples, and sediment/soil samples). The potential for tablet PC use in the USGS is also high: 59 percent of respondents map environmental features in the field, primarily by sketching in field notebooks, on aerial photographs, or on topographic-map sheets. Results also suggest that efficient mobile-computing-technology solutions could benefit many USGS scientists because most respondents spend at least 1 week per year in the field, conduct field sessions that are least 1 week in duration, have field crews of one to three people, and typically travel on foot about 1 mi from their field vehicles. By allowing researchers to enter data directly into digital databases while in the field, mobile-computing technology could also minimize postfieldwork data processing: 93 percent of respondents enter collected field data into their office computers, and more than 50 percent spend at least 1 week per year on postfieldwork data processing. Reducing postfieldwork data processing could free up additional time for researchers and result in cost savings for the bureau. Generally

  14. [A computer-aided design assessment system for recovery life support technology options].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Wang, F; Sun, J; Shang, C

    1997-04-01

    A specific computer-aided decision support system was designed and implemented for design computation and decision assessment of environmental control and life support system of manned space station. An advanced multiobjective decision methodology and a hierarchic structure model of assessment index of recovery life support system was developed. The program incorporates a database for each technology option, metabolic design loads associated with crew activity, mission model variables to accommodate evolving mission requirements, and algorithms to produce products criteria in order to provide recommendations relative to candidate technology selection and development. A specific structure was developed for the decision system which consists of a database, a methodology base and a model base as well as their management systems. Moreover, a centre control system with friendly user interface plays a very important role in the man-computer interaction.

  15. Assessment of computer dispatch technology in the Paratransit Industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.R.; Gilbert, G.; Nalevanko, A.

    1992-03-01

    The document explores how computer dispatch technology can improve the efficiency of dispatching shared-ride vehicles on a real time basis. The document investigates the current operating capabilities of such systems, their costs and economic benefits, their suitability for specific transit applications, and future technological directions for computer dispatch. The study found such systems were not inexpensive, averaging about $1 million for a company with 300 taxis. However, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act were expected to increase the demand for such applications. The current focus of the industry is on technology and a variety of hardware and software improvements: smart cards, automatic vehicle location, real-time scheduling for shared rides, integrated reporting and billing, and graphic displays of service areas with relative passenger and vehicle locations.

  16. High performance computing and communications: Advancing the frontiers of information technology

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This report, which supplements the President`s Fiscal Year 1997 Budget, describes the interagency High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The HPCC Program will celebrate its fifth anniversary in October 1996 with an impressive array of accomplishments to its credit. Over its five-year history, the HPCC Program has focused on developing high performance computing and communications technologies that can be applied to computation-intensive applications. Major highlights for FY 1996: (1) High performance computing systems enable practical solutions to complex problems with accuracies not possible five years ago; (2) HPCC-funded research in very large scale networking techniques has been instrumental in the evolution of the Internet, which continues exponential growth in size, speed, and availability of information; (3) The combination of hardware capability measured in gigaflop/s, networking technology measured in gigabit/s, and new computational science techniques for modeling phenomena has demonstrated that very large scale accurate scientific calculations can be executed across heterogeneous parallel processing systems located thousands of miles apart; (4) Federal investments in HPCC software R and D support researchers who pioneered the development of parallel languages and compilers, high performance mathematical, engineering, and scientific libraries, and software tools--technologies that allow scientists to use powerful parallel systems to focus on Federal agency mission applications; and (5) HPCC support for virtual environments has enabled the development of immersive technologies, where researchers can explore and manipulate multi-dimensional scientific and engineering problems. Educational programs fostered by the HPCC Program have brought into classrooms new science and engineering curricula designed to teach computational science. This document contains a small sample of the significant HPCC Program accomplishments in FY 1996.

  17. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  18. Method for computing marginal costs associated with on-site energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, R.; Davitian, H.

    1980-08-01

    A method for calculating long-run marginal costs for an electric utility is described. The method is especially suitable for computing the marginal costs associated with the use of small on-site energy technologies, i.e., cogenerators, solar heating and hot water systems, wind generators, etc., which are interconnected with electric utilities. In particular, both the costs a utility avoids when power is delivered to it from a facility with an on-site generator and marginal cost to the utility of supplementary power sold to the facility can be calculated. A utility capacity expansion model is used to compute changes in the utility's costs when loads are modified by the use of the on-site technology. Changes in capacity-related costs and production costs are thus computed in an internally consistent manner. The variable nature of the generation/load pattern of the on-site technology is treated explicitly. The method yields several measures of utility costs that can be used to develop rates based on marginal avoided costs for on-site technologies as well as marginal cost rates for conventional utility customers.

  19. Computer Technology Training in the Workplace: A Longitudinal Investigation of the Effect of Mood.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh; Speier

    1999-07-01

    How does a person's mood during technology training influence motivation, intentions, and, ultimately, usage of the new technology? Do these mood effects dissipate or are they sustainable over time? A repeated-measures field study (n = 316) investigated the effect of mood on employee motivation and intentions toward using a specific computer technology at two points in time: immediately after training and 6 weeks after training. Actual usage behavior was assessed for 12 weeks after training. Each individual was assigned to one of three mood treatments: positive, negative, or control. Results indicated that there were only short-term boosts in intrinsic motivation and intention to use the technology among individuals in the positive mood intervention. However, a long-term lowering of intrinsic motivation and intention was observed among those in the negative mood condition. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10388607

  20. A distributed computing tool for generating neural simulation databases.

    PubMed

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J; Katz, Paul S

    2006-12-01

    After developing a model neuron or network, it is important to systematically explore its behavior across a wide range of parameter values or experimental conditions, or both. However, compiling a very large set of simulation runs is challenging because it typically requires both access to and expertise with high-performance computing facilities. To lower the barrier for large-scale model analysis, we have developed NeuronPM, a client/server application that creates a "screen-saver" cluster for running simulations in NEURON (Hines & Carnevale, 1997). NeuronPM provides a user-friendly way to use existing computing resources to catalog the performance of a neural simulation across a wide range of parameter values and experimental conditions. The NeuronPM client is a Windows-based screen saver, and the NeuronPM server can be hosted on any Apache/PHP/MySQL server. During idle time, the client retrieves model files and work assignments from the server, invokes NEURON to run the simulation, and returns results to the server. Administrative panels make it simple to upload model files, define the parameters and conditions to vary, and then monitor client status and work progress. NeuronPM is open-source freeware and is available for download at http://neuronpm.homeip.net . It is a useful entry-level tool for systematically analyzing complex neuron and network simulations.