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  1. Prevalencia y tamizaje del Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad en Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Nicholas T.; Schuler, Jovita; Monge, Silvia; McGough, James J.; Chavira, Denise; Bagnarello, Monica; Herrera, Luis Diego; Mathews, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Resumen La investigación tuvo como propósito estimar la prevalencia del Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad (TDAH) en Costa Rica y determinar si la versión en español del cuestionario Swanson Nolan and Pelham Scale IV (SNAP-IV) es un instrumento de tamizaje útil en una población de niños y niñas escolares costarricenses. El instrumento fue entregado a padres y maestros de 425 niños entre 5 y 13 años de edad (promedio = 8.8). Todos fueron evaluados con el instrumento Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn and Pelham Scale (SKAMP). Su diagnóstico fue confirmado con una entrevista clínica. La sensibilidad y la especificidad del SNAP-IV fueron evaluadas como predictores de criterios de diagnóstico según el DSM-IV. La prevalencia puntual en la muestra del TDAH fue del 5%. El tamizaje más preciso lo hizo el SNAP-IV completado por el maestro en un corte de 20%, con una sensibilidad de 96% y una especificidad de un 82%. La sensibilidad de los instrumentos completados por los padres fue más baja que aquella de los maestros. El SNAP-IV completado por las maestras con un corte aislando el 20% de los mayores puntajes categorizó correctamente a un 87% de los sujetos. PMID:22432094

  2. Borderline personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Personality disorder - borderline ... Cause of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is unknown. Genetic, family, and social factors are thought to play roles. Risk factors for BPD include: Abandonment ...

  3. Borderline Personality

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2004-01-01

    BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER (BPD) IS A COMPLEX AXIS II Phenomenon that is typically described in a psychological or psychiatric context. In this article, we translate the various aspects of BPD to the primary care setting. Previous work in this area has explored specific relationships between BPD and individual medical disorders or between BPD and general somatic symptoms, but the synthesis of these findings and their augmentation with cogent psychological theory is new to the field. Specifically, we highlight the prevalence rate of BPD in the primary care setting, the effects on healthcare utilization, the themes of somatic preoccupation and somatization disorder, several medical syndromes that illustrate the dynamics of the disorder in the medical setting, and the relationship of BPD to disability. We believe that the BPD concept needs to extend beyond its traditional psychological/psychiatric borders to include the subset of BPD patients with somatic symptoms who are seen in primary care settings. PMID:21197375

  4. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Ask About BPD Programs There are different types of therapy for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Therapy may be given one-on-one and through support groups, enabling people with BPD to interact with others. The most effective type of therapy appears to be dialectical behavior therapy ( ...

  5. Characterizing depression in borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Soloff, P H; George, A; Nathan, R S; Schulz, P M

    1987-04-01

    The comorbidity of depression and borderline disorder was studied in 39 symptomatic borderline inpatients defined by the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines using three independent methods for assessing depression and three definitions of depression. Evaluations were conducted by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia interviews for Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) depressive disorders, by clinical ratings for atypical depressive disorder, and by self-rated questionnaires for hysteroid dysphoria. Diagnoses of an RDC depression were made in 25 (64.1%), atypical depressive disorder in 16 (41%), and hysteroid dysphoria in 25 (64.1%) of the borderline patients. Two depressive diagnoses were present in 64.1% of patients, while 17.9% of patients met criteria for all three depressive disorders. No one method accurately characterized depression in borderline patients.

  6. Treatment of borderline adolescents.

    PubMed

    Green, M R

    1983-01-01

    A recent revision of the proposed DSM III description of the borderline category is presented with reference to the work of Masterson (1972) and Grinker (1968). The contributions of Roger Shapiro et al. to a psychoanalytic formulation of the developmental and familial dynamics are summarized with reference to the genetic factors and the lack of validation to date of any general hypothesis. Treatment recommendations of Wolberg, Shapiro and Jacobson (1971) are described. Grinker's operational criteria were chosen for the pilot study: a defect in affectional relationships with no enduring close ties; child-like angry relationships with parental or authority figures, particularly in the dysphoric group; low self-esteem very poor sense of identity; a chronic depression characterized more by loneliness and boredom than by guilt or loss, and a pervading sense of anger or resentment. Cases are presented to illustrate treatment strategies. A brief differential diagnostic statement is made describing "borderline" as a separate category from other disorders manifesting oppositional, antisocial, and violent behavior.

  7. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  8. Prescribing and borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chanen, Andrew M; Thompson, Katherine N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate diagnosis is fundamental to effective management of borderline personality disorder, but many patients remain undetected. The first-line management for borderline personality disorder is psychosocial treatment, not drugs. There are major prescribing hazards including polypharmacy, overdose and misuse. Drug treatment might be warranted for patients who have a co-occurring mental disorder such as major depression. If a drug is prescribed for borderline personality disorder, it should only be as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment. There should be clear and collaborative goals that are regularly reviewed with the patient. Use single drugs prescribed in limited quantities for a limited time. Stop drugs that are ineffective. PMID:27340322

  9. [Borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Machizawa, S

    1994-05-01

    Although Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) overlaps considerably with Major Depression, recent studies of biology, genetics and childhood trauma have demonstrated that there are substantial differences between the two disorders. It is suggested that their apparent relationship is rather nonspecific. In this paper, the author emphasizes that the core symptom of BPD is impulsiveness, which causes depressive symptoms and/or is induced by depressive episodes, forming a vicious cycle. Furthermore, in BPD patients, depressive symptoms are modified by impulsiveness, masochism, vanity, despair, and difficulties in interpersonal relationships. The author concludes that BPD is not a homogeneous but heterogeneous syndrome, classified into subtypes: depressive type, impulsive type, and identity diffusion type. Treatment needs to be considered according to these types.

  10. Borderline disorder and attachment pathology.

    PubMed

    West, M; Keller, A; Links, P; Patrick, J

    1993-02-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the theoretical and empirical association between dysfunctions of the attachment system and borderline personality disorder. Attachment theory focuses on the maintenance of a sense of safety and security through a close personal relationship with a particular person. Based on a biological behavioural system, functional attachment relationships in adulthood rely on experiences and expectations of security within the relationship. These issues are also important to the definition and dynamics of borderline personality disorder. The dimensions and patterns of reciprocal attachment were compared with other scales measuring components of psychopathology and interpersonal relationships. In a sample of 85 female outpatients, only four of the attachment scales--feared loss, secure base, compulsive care-seeking and angry withdrawal--identified patients with high scores on a measure of borderline disorder. Of these four scales, feared loss had the predominant effect. These empirical results support the hypothesized relationship between dysfunctions of the attachment system and borderline disorder.

  11. Cirugía de los trastornos del comportamiento: el estado del arte

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Bendersky, Damián

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: La cirugía de los trastornos del comportamiento (CTC) se está convirtiendo en un tratamiento más común desde el desarrollo de la neuromodulación. Métodos: Este artículo es una revisión no sistemática de la historia, indicaciones actuales, técnicas y blancos quirúrgicos de la CTC. Dividimos su historia en 3 eras: la primera comienza en los inicios de la psicocirugía y termina con el desarrollo de las tícnicas estereotácticas, cuando comienza la segunda era. Ésta se caracteriza por la realización de lesiones estereotácticas. Nos encontramos transitando la tercera era, que comienza cuando la estimulación cerebral profunda (ECP) comienza a ser usada en CTC. Resultados: A pesar de los errores graves cometidos en el pasado, hoy en día, la CTC está renaciendo. Los trastornos psiquiátricos que se más frecuentemente se tratan con cirugía son: depresión refractaria, trastorno obsesivo-compulsivo y síndrome de Tourette. Además, algunos pacientes con agresividad fueron tratados quirúrgicamente. Hay varios blancos estereotácticos descriptos para estos trastornos. La estimulación vagal puede ser usada también para depresión. Conclusión: Los resultados de la ECP en estos trastornos parecen alentadores. Sin embargo, se necesitan más estudios randomizados para establecer la efectividad de la CTC. Debe tenerse en cuenta que una apropiada selección de pacientes nos ayudará a realizar un procedimiento más seguro así como también a lograr mejores resultados quirúrgicos, conduciendo a la CTC a ser más aceptada por psiquiatras, pacientes y sus familias. Se necesita mayor investigación en varios temas como: fisiopatología de los trastornos del comportamiento, indicaciones de CTC y nuevos blancos quirúrgicos. PMID:25165612

  12. Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brüne, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘Borderline Personality Disorder’ (BPD) refers to a psychiatric syndrome that is characterized by emotion dysregulation, impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, irritability, feelings of emptiness, self-injury and fear of abandonment, as well as unstable interpersonal relationships. BPD is not only common in psychiatric populations but also more prevalent in the general community than previously thought, and thus represents an important public health issue. In contrast to most psychiatric disorders, some symptoms associated with BPD may improve over time, even without therapy, though impaired social functioning and interpersonal disturbances in close relationships often persist. Another counterintuitive and insufficiently resolved question is why depressive symptoms and risk-taking behaviors can occur simultaneously in the same individual. Moreover, there is an ongoing debate about the nosological position of BPD, which impacts on research regarding sex differences in clinical presentation and patterns of comorbidity. In this review, it is argued that many features of BPD may be conceptualized within an evolutionary framework, namely behavioral ecology. According to Life History Theory, BPD reflects a pathological extreme or distortion of a behavioral ‘strategy’ which unconsciously aims at immediate exploitation of resources, both interpersonal and material, based on predictions shaped by early developmental experiences. Such a view is consistent with standard medical conceptualizations of BPD, but goes beyond classic ‘deficit’-oriented models, which may have profound implications for therapeutic approaches. PMID:26929090

  13. Employment in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies in the literature have explored employment outcomes in patients with borderline personality disorder. However, after imposing our exclusion criteria, we located only 11 viable studies, published between the years 1983 and 2010. Individual studies examined employment outcomes in 8 to 249 individuals, but eight studies consisted of 33 participants or less. At baseline, participants were recruited from various locales, including hospital settings (7 studies), outpatient settings (2 studies), day treatment (1 study), and a college campus (1 study). The follow-up periods in these studies ranged from 1 to 27 years. Three studies compared participants with borderline personality disorder to a cohort of individuals with other types of psychopathology whereas only two studies used a normative comparison group. Given a host of potential limitations, findings cautiously suggest that nearly half of individuals with borderline personality disorder remain unemployed at follow-up, and of these, only a portion are self-supporting; 20 to 45 percent subsist on disability. However, several studies found modest employment gains among some individuals with borderline personality disorder, and one study developed a work/school acclimatization program, which meaningfully improved employment outcomes. This general area warrants further research to clarify the explicit employment outcomes of patients with borderline personality disorder. PMID:23074700

  14. Family structure as recalled by borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Snyder, S; Pitts, W M; Goodpaster, W A; Gustin, Q L

    1984-01-01

    Research on the family of the borderline patient has been largely descriptive or anecdotal. This work was designed to provide data on the families of 26 patients fulfilling stringent criteria for borderline personality disorder. A standardized scoring instrument recorded the impressions of the adult borderline of his family experience during childhood and adolescence. The male parental figure was perceived as dominant significantly more often than the female figure. Female figures manifested significantly more affection toward the borderline child. Family relations tended to be perceived as deteriorating and to be more conflictual as the borderline patient aged. Results were discussed in terms of the developmental psychology, genetics, and existent family research on the borderline patient.

  15. Esquizofrenia y trastorno en el consumo de sustancias: prevalencia y characterísticas sociodemográficas en la población Latina

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Castro, Lorena; Raventós-Vorst, Henriette; Escamilla, Michael

    2012-01-01

    El interés por comprender la co-morbilidad de la esquizofrenia y el trastorno en el uso de sustancias, ha aumentado debido al incremento de este diagnóstico, a los efectos negativos observados en el sujeto y a los costos en los servicios de salud. Este trastorno dual puede tener efectos dramáticos en el curso clínico del trastorno psicótico tales como: mayores recaídas, re-hospitalizaciones, síntomas más severos, no adherencia al tratamiento antipsicótico, cambios marcados del humor, aumento en el grado de hostilidad e ideación suicida, así como alteraciones en otras áreas del funcionamiento incluyendo violencia, victimización, indigencia y problemas legales. La literatura proveniente en particular de Estados Unidos y Europa sugiere que el rango de prevalencia para este diagnóstico puede oscilar entre el 10% hasta el 70%. En este estudio, revisamos la prevalencia del diagnóstico dual de esquizofrenia y trastorno en el uso sustancias, así como sus características sociodemográficas, con base en la literatura disponible alrededor del mundo dando énfasis en la poblacion latina. A pesar de que este diagnóstico es ampliamente aceptado, se conoce poco sobre su prevalencia en la población latina, sobre los factores ambientales, demográficos, clínicos y otras características de estos individuos. Un mejor conocimiento sobre este diagnóstico permitiría mejorar los métodos para la detección y adecuada valoración del trastorno en el uso de sustancias en personas con trastornos metales severos como la esquizofrenia. PMID:21404151

  16. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  17. Day Hospital Treatment for Borderline Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Jerald I.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a literature review on the day treatment of borderline patients and discusses the diagnosis and dynamics of borderline adolescents. Describes methods used in a day hospital program whose goal was to potentiate a successful start of a longer-term psychotherapeutic process that would continue after discharge. Difficulties in prognosis and…

  18. The Borderline Personality--An Adlerian Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattner, Leo

    The person with a borderline personality is considered to be neither neurotic nor psychotic, but to exist somewhere in between these two diagnostic categories. Psychoanalytic theorists who have researched the phenomenon of the borderline personality have shifted their emphasis away from Freud's instinct psychology and toward an ego psychology…

  19. Adolescents with Borderline Intellectual Functioning: Psychopathological Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Gabriele; Marcheschi, Mara; Pfanner, Pietro

    1998-01-01

    Presents a qualitative analysis of cognitive and emotional functioning in intellectually borderline adolescents and the consequences for personality and social development. Psychopathological risk is analyzed. Describes conceptualizations that intellectually borderline adolescents have of their own mental functioning. Discusses the implication for…

  20. Borderline personality disorder: study in adolescence.

    PubMed

    James, A; Berelowitz, M; Vereker, M

    1996-04-01

    The study of the presentation, symptomatology and family characteristics of an exclusively adolescent sample of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) was undertaken. Twenty-four cases of borderline personality disorder, 20 females, 4 males, identified using chart review and meeting the criteria of the Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB) and DSM III-R, were matched with psychiatric controls. Adolescents with borderline personality disorder were found to have high rates of affective symptomatology with Axis I diagnosis of major depressive disorder MDD (DSM-III-R), and high rates of interpersonal psychopathology, i.e., manipulation, devaluation, and a pervasive sense of boredom. The latter seem to be characteristic as for adults with borderline personality disorder. The families were particularly angry and volatile. PMID:9117533

  1. Neurobiología de la impulsividad y los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria*

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Cabal, Luis Felipe; Herin, David

    2009-01-01

    Resumen Introducción La impulsividad es un rasgo de personalidad multidimensional relacionado con el control del comportamiento y las emociones. Está presente de manera diversa en los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria, particularmente, en la bulimia nerviosa (BN). Aunque la relación entre la impulsividad y BN ha sido objeto de numerosas investigaciones, en la actualidad se desconocen los sustratos neurobiológicos de esta relación. Objetivos Discutir críticamente la evidencia que sugiere que las alteraciones en los sistemas neuronales relacio-nados con las funciones ejecutivas, con la formación de preferencias y con la regulación de los estados emocionales sirven como base para el rasgo de personalidad impulsiva, así como su estado en subgrupos de pacientes con BN. Métodos Búsqueda selectiva de la literatura relevante. Resultados y conclusiones Esta discusión ilustra la complejidad de la relación entre la impulsividad y BN, donde la impulsividad actúa como un factor de vulnerabilidad que puede sensibilizar al sujeto con BN a estados emocionales negativos, durante los cuales modifica el impacto de estímulos internos y externos sobre el comportamiento y su regulación, favoreciendo así patrones de comportamiento maladaptativos e inflexibles. PMID:19838321

  2. Borderline Personality in the Medical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with borderline personality disorder in mental health settings tend to present with relationship difficulties, mood instability/dysphoria, and overt self-harm behavior. In contrast, it appears that individuals with borderline personality disorder in medical settings manifest physical symptoms that are medically difficult to substantiate. Through a review of the literature, we examine 2 symptom manifestations among patients with borderline personality in primary care and general medical settings—namely pain sensitivity and multiple somatic complaints. In addition to reviewing the research of others, we also highlight our own investigations into these 2 areas. Data Sources: We conducted a literature search of the PubMed database and a previous version of the PsycINFO search engine (no restrictions). Search terms included borderline personality, borderline personality disorder, personality disorders; chronic pain, pain, pain syndromes; and somatization disorder, Briquet’s syndrome, somatic preoccupation, somatic. Study Selection: Published articles related to borderline personality, pain and somatic symptoms (ie, somatization disorder, somatic preoccupation) were examined. Results: According to our review, the literature indicates higher-than-expected rates of borderline personality disorder among patients in primary care and general medical settings who present with chronic pain conditions and/or somatic preoccupation. Conclusions: Unlike patients with borderline personality disorder in mental health settings, who tend to present with relationship difficulties, mood instability/dysphoria, and overt self-harm behavior, patients with borderline personality disorder in primary care settings tend to present with unsubstantiated chronic pain of various types as well as somatic preoccupation. PMID:26644960

  3. Patient With Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Dorothy E.

    1989-01-01

    Every family practice includes people who are difficult to manage. Persons with a borderline personality disorder can be the most difficult of all. They will trust no one, and consequently few, if any, others will be able to tolerate their profoundly difficult interpersonal communication style. These patients will present to their family physician more and more often with a variety of somatic and emotional symptoms. They will demand, either verbally or silently, that these symptoms be relieved immediately. This increasing demand for immediate response may eventually cause the physician to reject the patient. An understanding of this condition and how it develops in infancy may enable the physician to help the patient. A family physician who can set appropriate limits to the patient's demands may slowly convince the patient that he can trust and not be hurt. PMID:21248944

  4. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Bent, C L; Sahdev, A; Rockall, A G; Singh, N; Sohaib, S A; Reznek, R H

    2009-04-01

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm(3)) and mucinous (6358.2 cm(3)) subtypes (p=0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  5. [Concepts of the borderline personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-08-01

    For many years, the borderline personality disorders have mainly been researched in terms of psychoanalytical theories, such as theories on relations with the object. Nowadays, there are three kinds of concepts that are distinguishable. The first ones are those which are group models, serving attempts to made characteristic sets of qualities, represented by individuals suffering from the borderline personality disorders, more precise. The remaining concepts are models of conflict and deficit, which explain complicated mechanisms of interactions of social, psychological and biological factors, and therefore, contribute to better understanding of the genesis of the symptoms of this disorder. Upon the basis of the attempts made so far in the field of describing the borderline personality disorders, one may indicate certain criteria, representative for the entire group of individuals with this diagnosis, regardless of the assumptions applicable to the genesis of the disorder and its symptoms, even though the population of the infirm suffering from the borderline personality disorders is not internally homogenous. The interest of psychologists, attempting to describe the borderline personality disorders, is focused upon certain sets of qualities, presented as the examples of descriptive models. Among the researchers, working on the issues of the borderline personality disorders in this manner, there are: Gunderson, Kernberg, Kohut, Winnicot, Guntrip, Fairbaim, Adler and Buie.

  6. Estudio epidemiológico de sucesos traumáticos, trastorno de estrés post-traumático y otros trastornos psiquiátricos en una muestra representativa de Chile

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Benítez, Carlos I.; Vicente, Benjamin; Zlotnick, Caron; Kohn, Robert; Johnson, Jennifer; Valdivia, Sandra; Rioseco, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    RESUMEN Durante la década de 1990 en los Estados Unidos (EU), el conocimiento sobre el trastorno de estrés post-traumático (TEPT) evolucionó de estudios específicos en un principio, sobre veteranos de guerra y sobre víctimas de desastres, a estudios epidemiológicos más tarde, sin embargo, la epidemiología del TEPT en países en desarrollo ha sido un área poco estudiada hasta ahora. Los expertos en el área de trauma han propuesto que los sucesos traumáticos que ocurren en la niñez son más perjudiciales para la salud mental que aquellos que ocurren más tarde en la vida. Este trabajo revisa los resultados de un estudio epidemiológico llevado a cabo en Chile. Específicamente, se revisan los resultados sobre las tasas de prevalencia del TEPT, traumas asociados más frecuentemente con él, así como la comorbilidad de este trastorno con otros trastornos psiquiátricos a lo largo de la vida. Igualmente se analizaron las diferencias del TEPT en cada sexo, así como la exposición a traumas en una muestra representativa de chilenos. Además se comparó la prevalencia de trastornos psiquiátricos en personas que sufrieron su primer trauma durante la niñez, durante la edad adulta, o que no reportaron traumas durante su vida. En estos estudios epidemiológicos se usaron módulos del TEPT y trastorno de personalidad antisocial (TPA) de la entrevista diagnóstica siguiendo los criterios del DSM-III-R (DIS–III-R). Para evaluar el resto de los trastornos psiquiátricos se usó la Entrevista Diagnóstica Internacional Compuesta (CIDI). Estos instrumentos fueron administrados en tres ciudades chilenas a 2390 personas mayores de 15 años. Para estimar los errores estándares (EE) debido al diseño de la muestra y a la necesidad de ajuste se usó el método Taylor de linearización seriada. También se usó un análisis de regresión logística para examinar la relación entre el TEPT, los factores demográficos de riesgo y el tipo de trauma. Además se utilizó la

  7. Disinhibition and borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel T; Silk, Kenneth R; Stavro, Gillian; Miller, Torri

    2005-01-01

    We review different conceptions of inhibitory control that may be relevant to the regulatory problems featured in borderline personality disorder (BPD). These conceptions have often been framed with regard to personality traits of inhibitory control, but can also be related to cognitive measures of response suppression as well as affect regulation. Reactive behavioral inhibition is relatively unstudied in relation to BPD. A substantial amount of literature links executive function problems with BPD, but that literature has not isolated executive response inhibition nor been controlled for other personality disorder symptoms of antisociality, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or depression, anxiety, or posttraumatic symptoms. We therefore conducted a study of this question looking at BPD symptoms in an adult sample with a small number of BPD subjects and other disorders. Results indicated that symptoms of BPD were correlated with response inhibition (measured by stop signal reaction time) even after controlling for the overlap of stop inhibition with ADHD, antisociality, and other Axis II disorder symptoms. We conclude by hypothesizing discrete developmental routes to BPD, based on different mechanism breakdowns, which would be amenable to empirical investigation at the cognitive or trait level of analysis. PMID:16613434

  8. Hyperbolic temperament and borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Thomas, Katherine M.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    Zanarini and Frankenburg (2007) described the “essential nature” of borderline psychopathology as involving intense and chronic inner pain deriving from a hyperbolic temperament that is mediated through interpersonal behaviors. These interpersonal behaviors can either provoke kindling events that promote the expression of borderline pathology or buffer against borderline symptoms. This study was designed to test this general hypothesis and to articulate both the temperamental and the mediating constructs implicated in this theory more specifically. A questionnaire containing the elements of this theory was administered to non-clinical (N = 545), clinical (N = 316) and treatment (N = 50) samples. Covariance analyses supported a hyperbolic temperament factor and four mediating factors labeled passive, agentic, validation seeking, and detached. Overall, validity correlations conformed to predictions in showing a strong association between hyperbolic temperament and borderline and other forms of personality pathology, and in demonstrating varying relations between the mediating factors with adaptivity, including psychiatric improvements in a treatment trial. The place of this theoretical model of borderline pathology beside other theories that tend to emphasize personality traits or interpersonal patterns are discussed, and clinical implications of the model are highlighted. PMID:22518203

  9. Recognizing borderline personality disorder in the family practice setting.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, J R; Saathoff, G B; Bernardo, M J; Barnett, B L

    1995-09-01

    The first step in the management of borderline personality disorder is making the correct diagnosis. A clinical example illustrates symptoms of a patient with borderline personality disorder in a family practice setting. Major characteristics of borderline personality disorder include severe mood instability, fear of abandonment, chronic boredom, self-injury, unstable interpersonal relationships, "splitting," identity instability and borderline rage. Early diagnosis may help prevent potential management problems and possible doctor-patient conflicts. PMID:7653428

  10. Accurately Diagnosing and Treating Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Julie P.; Correll, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    The high prevalence of comorbid bipolar and borderline personality disorders and some diagnostic criteria similar to both conditions present both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. This article delineates certain symptoms which, by careful history taking, may be attributed more closely to one of these two disorders. Making the correct primary diagnosis along with comorbid psychiatric conditions and choosing the appropriate type of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are critical steps to a patient's recovery. In this article, we will use a case example to illustrate some of the challenges the psychiatrist may face in diagnosing and treating borderline personality disorder. In addition, we will explore treatment strategies, including various types of therapy modalities and medication classes, which may prove effective in stabilizing or reducing a broad range of symptomotology associated with borderline personality disorder. PMID:20508805

  11. A quantum probability perspective on borderline vagueness.

    PubMed

    Blutner, Reinhard; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Bruza, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The term "vagueness" describes a property of natural concepts, which normally have fuzzy boundaries, admit borderline cases, and are susceptible to Zeno's sorites paradox. We will discuss the psychology of vagueness, especially experiments investigating the judgment of borderline cases and contradictions. In the theoretical part, we will propose a probabilistic model that describes the quantitative characteristics of the experimental finding and extends Alxatib's and Pelletier's () theoretical analysis. The model is based on a Hopfield network for predicting truth values. Powerful as this classical perspective is, we show that it falls short of providing an adequate coverage of the relevant empirical results. In the final part, we will argue that a substantial modification of the analysis put forward by Alxatib and Pelletier and its probabilistic pendant is needed. The proposed modification replaces the standard notion of probabilities by quantum probabilities. The crucial phenomenon of borderline contradictions can be explained then as a quantum interference phenomenon. PMID:24039093

  12. A quantum probability perspective on borderline vagueness.

    PubMed

    Blutner, Reinhard; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Bruza, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The term "vagueness" describes a property of natural concepts, which normally have fuzzy boundaries, admit borderline cases, and are susceptible to Zeno's sorites paradox. We will discuss the psychology of vagueness, especially experiments investigating the judgment of borderline cases and contradictions. In the theoretical part, we will propose a probabilistic model that describes the quantitative characteristics of the experimental finding and extends Alxatib's and Pelletier's () theoretical analysis. The model is based on a Hopfield network for predicting truth values. Powerful as this classical perspective is, we show that it falls short of providing an adequate coverage of the relevant empirical results. In the final part, we will argue that a substantial modification of the analysis put forward by Alxatib and Pelletier and its probabilistic pendant is needed. The proposed modification replaces the standard notion of probabilities by quantum probabilities. The crucial phenomenon of borderline contradictions can be explained then as a quantum interference phenomenon.

  13. The borderline personality disorder and gay people.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, C

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines the diagnostic category called Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and its relationship to gay people. It discusses the psychoanalytic definition of borderline personalities, and to it adds a cultural definition. In the light of these cultural variables, the diagnosis is defined as a metaphor for the complexities and confusions of modern life. These confusions are important in the lives of gay people, who, it is suggested, are currently more prone to be diagnosed as BPD. Through the life study of a gay man, both the psychoanalytic and cultural variables are identified, then generalized to the problems of gay people in our transitional society.

  14. Estudio epidemiológico de sucesos traumáticos, trastorno de estrés post-traumático y otros trastornos psiquiátricos en una muestra representativa de Chile

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Benítez, Carlos I.; Vicente, Benjamin; Zlotnick, Caron; Kohn, Robert; Johnson, Jennifer; Valdivia, Sandra; Rioseco, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    RESUMEN Durante la década de 1990 en los Estados Unidos (EU), el conocimiento sobre el trastorno de estrés post-traumático (TEPT) evolucionó de estudios específicos en un principio, sobre veteranos de guerra y sobre víctimas de desastres, a estudios epidemiológicos más tarde, sin embargo, la epidemiología del TEPT en países en desarrollo ha sido un área poco estudiada hasta ahora. Los expertos en el área de trauma han propuesto que los sucesos traumáticos que ocurren en la niñez son más perjudiciales para la salud mental que aquellos que ocurren más tarde en la vida. Este trabajo revisa los resultados de un estudio epidemiológico llevado a cabo en Chile. Específicamente, se revisan los resultados sobre las tasas de prevalencia del TEPT, traumas asociados más frecuentemente con él, así como la comorbilidad de este trastorno con otros trastornos psiquiátricos a lo largo de la vida. Igualmente se analizaron las diferencias del TEPT en cada sexo, así como la exposición a traumas en una muestra representativa de chilenos. Además se comparó la prevalencia de trastornos psiquiátricos en personas que sufrieron su primer trauma durante la niñez, durante la edad adulta, o que no reportaron traumas durante su vida. En estos estudios epidemiológicos se usaron módulos del TEPT y trastorno de personalidad antisocial (TPA) de la entrevista diagnóstica siguiendo los criterios del DSM-III-R (DIS–III-R). Para evaluar el resto de los trastornos psiquiátricos se usó la Entrevista Diagnóstica Internacional Compuesta (CIDI). Estos instrumentos fueron administrados en tres ciudades chilenas a 2390 personas mayores de 15 años. Para estimar los errores estándares (EE) debido al diseño de la muestra y a la necesidad de ajuste se usó el método Taylor de linearización seriada. También se usó un análisis de regresión logística para examinar la relación entre el TEPT, los factores demográficos de riesgo y el tipo de trauma. Además se utilizó la

  15. Management of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mahipal, Amit; Frakes, Jessica; Hoffe, Sarah; Kim, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States. Surgery remains the only curative option; however only 20% of the patients have resectable disease at the time of initial presentation. The definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is not uniform but generally denotes to regional vessel involvement that makes it unlikely to have negative surgical margins. The accurate staging of pancreatic cancer requires triple phase computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas. Management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer remains unclear. The data for treatment of these patients is primarily derived from retrospective single institution experience. The prospective trials have been plagued by small numbers and poor accrual. Neoadjuvant therapy is recommended and typically consists of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The chemotherapeutic regimens continue to evolve along with type and dose of radiation therapy. Gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil based chemotherapeutic combinations are administered. The type and dose of radiation vary among different institutions. With neoadjuvant treatment, approximately 50% of the patients are able to undergo surgical resections with negative margins obtained in greater than 80% of the patients. Newer trials are attempting to standardize the definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer and treatment regimens. In this review, we outline the definition, imaging requirements and management of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. PMID:26483878

  16. Borderline Intellectual Functioning: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltopuro, Minna; Ahonen, Timo; Kaartinen, Jukka; Seppälä, Heikki; Närhi, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to people with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) was systematically reviewed in order to summarize the present knowledge. Database searches yielded 1,726 citations, and 49 studies were included in the review. People with BIF face a variety of hardships in life, including neurocognitive, social, and mental health…

  17. The psychotherapy of core borderline psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Adler, G

    1993-01-01

    A psychodynamic formulation of borderline psychopathology includes the understanding of the borderline patient's aloneness problems, need-fear dilemma issues, and difficulties with primitive guilt. The aloneness problems are at the core of the disorder, and involve an inability to maintain an evocative memory, and holding and soothing introjects of significant people when under stress of separation. The possible childhood origins of these difficulties are explored and related to the ways these issues emerge in psychotherapy. The psychodynamic formulation is crucial in the psychotherapeutic approach to the aloneness problems. It helps the therapist work with the aloneness difficulties and understand the options as the therapy continues. Since rapid therapeutic decisions are often necessary with borderline patients, the formulation provides the necessary framework, and helps the therapist process and utilize countertransference feelings. Projective identification is an important concept that helps explain the complex transference/countertransference experiences, and is used in defining the resolution of the aloneness problems of borderline patients. Finally, limit-setting and the use of transitional objects are explored, utilizing the psychodynamic framework that has been defined. PMID:8517469

  18. Dysphoria and aloneness in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, A; Monti, M R

    2000-01-01

    A close examination of dysphoria, anger and aloneness (three main characteristics of the borderline syndrome) provides a theoretical model of reference for the therapist. Dysphoria results from the cyclical emotional oscillation between hope for stability and disappointment in its inattainability; a dependent-anaclitic depression arises from the mixture of anger, aloneness and inner emptiness which is so characteristic of the borderline syndrome. The tendency to be immersed in the here-and-now, an intra-festum mentality, exacerbates the sense of isolation, causing more irritation, mute frustration and, consequently, anger. The effects and ramifications of anger, and the resultant precarious cohesion of the self, are explored in the borderline syndrome; they are especially illuminated by the application of Kernberg's pain-anger-hate-vengefulness cycle concept. Meanings of solitude, in its forms of aloneness and loneliness, are explored in their pertinence. Aloneness - the constant needy search for, but condemnation to never finding, objects to fill an inner sense of emptiness - is especially germane. Suggestions for assisting subjects with borderline personality disorder to overcome aloneness and the lack of historical progression are made. PMID:10867581

  19. Increased serum prolactin in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad; Korkmaz, Sevda; Ustundag, Bilal; Ozkan, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Although there is an important interaction between serotonergic system, prolactin and suicidal behavior, and impulsivity, no investigation examined the prolactin values in borderline personality disorder in which suicidal behavior and impulsivity are core symptom dimensions. In this context, in the present investigation, we planned to measure serum prolactin levels in the patients with borderline personality disorder. The study comprised 15 patients with borderline personality disorder and 15 healthy controls. Prolactin values were measured in both patients and control subjects. The patients had abnormally higher mean value of prolactin compared to those of healthy controls (48.66 ± 36.48 mg/dl for patients vs. 15.20 ± 7.81 mg/dl for healthy controls). There was no correlation between prolactin values and any demographic variables for both the patients and control subjects. In conclusion, our present results suggest that prolactin values increased in the patients with borderline personality disorder and are required to be replicated by more comprehensive and detailed further studies to decipher the exact roles of prolactin increase.

  20. The psychotherapy of core borderline psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Adler, G

    1993-01-01

    A psychodynamic formulation of borderline psychopathology includes the understanding of the borderline patient's aloneness problems, need-fear dilemma issues, and difficulties with primitive guilt. The aloneness problems are at the core of the disorder, and involve an inability to maintain an evocative memory, and holding and soothing introjects of significant people when under stress of separation. The possible childhood origins of these difficulties are explored and related to the ways these issues emerge in psychotherapy. The psychodynamic formulation is crucial in the psychotherapeutic approach to the aloneness problems. It helps the therapist work with the aloneness difficulties and understand the options as the therapy continues. Since rapid therapeutic decisions are often necessary with borderline patients, the formulation provides the necessary framework, and helps the therapist process and utilize countertransference feelings. Projective identification is an important concept that helps explain the complex transference/countertransference experiences, and is used in defining the resolution of the aloneness problems of borderline patients. Finally, limit-setting and the use of transitional objects are explored, utilizing the psychodynamic framework that has been defined.

  1. Developmental antecedents of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Helgeland, Margareth I; Torgersen, Svenn

    2004-01-01

    Developmental antecedents of borderline personality disorders (BPDs) were examined in 25 DSM-IV-diagnosed subjects with BPD and 107 non-borderline control subjects on the basis of medical records and 28 years follow-up. Abuse, neglect, environmental instability, paternal psychopathology, and lower score on protective factors differentiated significantly between the groups. Environmental instability and lower score on protective factors such as artistic talents, superior school performance, above average intellectual skills, and talents in other areas were found to be independent predictors of BPD diagnosis. The results of this study suggest that both abuse and neglect, unpredictable and unstable early environment, as well as deficit in protective factors may substantially contribute to the development of BPD in persons constitutionally predisposed for the disorder. The results of the study also suggest that future research should address the impact of social and cultural context, as well as the absence of protective factors, on the development of the BPD.

  2. Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Biskin, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is frequently encountered in both adult and youth populations. There is a robust literature supporting psychotherapy for adults with BPD, but the literature supporting its use for BPD in youth is more limited. Methods: A literature review was conducted using the keywords “borderline personality disorders” and “adolescence.” Relevant articles were reviewed for inclusion. Results: Several specialized treatments have been studied with mixed results. Dialectical behaviour therapy has no randomized controlled trials in adolescents, emotion regulation training has not demonstrated superiority of treatment as usual, and cognitive analytic therapy has demonstrated more rapid recovery but little difference at follow-up. Mentalization-based treatment has one study supporting its use in self-harming adolescents. Pharmacotherapy has no evidence supporting its use in this population. Conclusions: Structured therapy may be the most important therapeutic component in this population. PMID:23970912

  3. Borderline histories: psychoanalysis inside and out.

    PubMed

    Lunbeck, Elizabeth

    2006-03-01

    Sociologists and historians have long favored externalist over internalist accounts of practices in the clinical disciplines. This has been particularly true in the case of the so-called new patient or borderline personality, which a range of commentators have located in culturally resonant narratives of decline. I argue here that these narratives, while pleasing, do not hold up as history; most problematic is their assumption that the appearance of the borderline portends the emergence of altogether novel forms of modal personhood. Internalist accounts of the category's consolidation are equally problematic in asserting a coherence and a stable referent that repeatedly proves elusive. In the end, I suggest that a complex account of disciplinary practice that attends to knowledge production in the clinical encounter supports the conclusion that the new patient was new to psychoanalysis. Whether or not he was altogether new cannot be established, undermining the critics' certitude and prophecies of decline. PMID:17147220

  4. Schema therapy for borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Scott H; Young, Jeffrey E

    2006-04-01

    This article presents the Schema Therapy (Young, Klosko, & Weishaar, 2003) approach to the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Schema therapy draws on the cognitive-behavioral, attachment, psychodynamic, and emotion-focused traditions and conceptualizes patients who have borderline personality disorder as being under the sway of five modes or aspects of the self. The goal of the therapy is to reorganize this inner structure. To this end, there are four core mechanisms of change that are used in this therapy: (1) limited reparenting, (2) experiential imagery and dialogue work, (3) cognitive restructuring and education, and (4) behavioral pattern breaking. These interventions are used during the three phases of treatment: (1) bonding and emotional regulation, (2) schema mode change, and (3) development of autonomy.

  5. Incest, Freud's seduction theory, and borderline personality.

    PubMed

    Stone, M H

    1992-01-01

    In the early 1890s Freud expressed the belief that many cases of hysteria had a basis in childhood incest. Later he expressed a different view, emphasizing childhood fantasies of sexual intimacies with a parent that never actually took place. Freud never totally repudiated his original seduction theory, however, maintaining to the end of his life that at least some cases of actual incest occurred and that these instances underlay certain types of psychopathology. In our era we have become aware that incest is frequently a forerunner of subsequent borderline disorders, especially in women hospitalized with borderline personality disorder (B.P.D.). All the clinical manifestations of B.P.D. can be related to the prior incest experiences.

  6. Borderline Tuberculoid Leprosy Associated with Histoid Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Coexistence of two immunologically diverse forms of leprosy in an individual is very rare. Herein, we report a case of association of borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy with histoid leprosy (HL) in a young immune competent male. He was diagnosed as a case of BT leprosy 10 years ago and now presented with multiple papules and nodules. Histopathological examination of biopsy taken from patch and nodule showed features of BT and HL, respectively. PMID:27688462

  7. Borderline Tuberculoid Leprosy Associated with Histoid Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Coexistence of two immunologically diverse forms of leprosy in an individual is very rare. Herein, we report a case of association of borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy with histoid leprosy (HL) in a young immune competent male. He was diagnosed as a case of BT leprosy 10 years ago and now presented with multiple papules and nodules. Histopathological examination of biopsy taken from patch and nodule showed features of BT and HL, respectively. PMID:27688462

  8. Borderline personality traits in hysterical neurosis.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, T

    2001-04-01

    The objective of the present study is to demonstrate the traits of the psychopathology of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) compared with hysterical neurosis. A total of 48 subjects with BPD and 40 subjects with hysterical neurosis both defined by DSM-III-R were assessed by Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines (DIB). Statistical analysis was done by quantification of the second type, a multivariate data analysis. The total scores of DIB were BPD group, 6.13 +/- 1.52; hysterical neurosis group, 4.9 +/- 2.12 (t = 3.05, P = 0.0016). The correlation ratio (index of to what extent the two groups are discriminated) was 0.2442. Among the four parameters of: (i) affect, (ii) cognition, (iii) impulse-action pattern, (iv), and interpersonal relationships, the partial coefficient correlations of (iii) and (iv) were significantly high (0.342, 0.287, P < 0.01). The question items with high independent coefficients were manipulation (0.4416), intolerance of aloneness (0.3797), demanding nature (0.3768), self-mutilation (0.3609), visual hallucination (0.3395). Those with low score of independent coefficients were counterdependency (0.0533), identity disturbance (0.1010), depression (0.1551), loneliness (0.1752), hypomanic episode (0.1936). Both of BPD and hysterical neurosis groups were not so fairly well discriminated. However, these results suggested that impulse-action pattern and disorder of interpersonal relationships were traits of borderline personality disorder. We could admit manipulation, intolerance of aloneness as its symptoms. In addition, counterdependency, identity disturbance were comparatively common to both. There were some borderline personality traits symptomatically in hysterical neurosis. PMID:11285092

  9. Borderline manifestations in the Rorschachs of male transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Murray, J F

    1985-10-01

    It was hypothesized that male transsexuals manifest a character structure consistent with Kernberg's criteria for borderline personality organization. Exploring this hypothesis, Kernberg's criteria for borderline personality organization were operationalized using Rorschach measures. The following variables were examined: aggression (Holt System Aggressive Content Section), object relations (Urist's Mutuality of Autonomy Scale), reality testing (Exner System X + %), and self/object differentiation (Exner System Special Scorings). A group of male college students, a group of male borderlines, and a group of male transsexuals were compared on the above variables. Compared to the normals, the transsexuals and borderlines displayed significantly more intense levels of aggression, a lower level of object relations, poorer reality testing, and impaired boundary differentiation. The transsexuals and borderlines did not differ significantly. The results were taken as suggesting that male gender dysphorics may be a sub-group of the wider borderline diagnostic category.

  10. Cardiac status in juvenile borderline hypertension.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, W S; Sodt, P C; Messerli, F H; Ruschhaupt, D G; Arcilla, R A

    1983-01-01

    A prospective M-mode echocardiographic study was done to look for early cardiovascular changes in children prone to hypertension with blood pressures between the 75th and 95th percentiles for age. Average systolic/diastolic pressures in 27 children with borderline hypertension were 137/89 mm Hg compared to 110/68 mm Hg for the 26 controls. Echocardiographic measurements were normalized for comparison using two methods. The borderline hypertensive group mean values were significantly greater than controls for left ventricular wall thickness (p less than 0.05 for method 1; p less than 0.001 for method 2), left ventricular mass (p less than 0.001; p less than 0.005) and left ventricular wall thickness to radius ratio (p less than 0.001, both methods). Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular function were lower in the hypertensive group. This study suggests that cardiac hypertrophy can be shown by noninvasive means in some children before arterial pressure becomes elevated. To assess the incidence and possible consequences of early target organ changes, more extensive clinical evaluation of borderline hypertension in children is recommended.

  11. Positive Affective and Cognitive States in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Lawrence Ian; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to compliment previous studies identifying negative states present in borderline personality disorder by investigating the presence of positive affective and cognitive states. Ninety-six patients with criteria-defined borderline personality disorder and 24 axis II comparison participants completed the Positive Affect Scale, a 50-item self-report measure designed to assess positive states thought to be characteristic of borderline patients (and axis II comparison participants). Seventeen positive states (4 affective, 10 cognitive, and 3 mixed) were found to be significantly more common among axis II comparison participants than borderline patients. Twelve of these states were common to both borderline patients and axis II comparison participants. Furthermore, 4 positive states, when co-occurring together, were particularly strongly associated with borderline personality disorder (three negatively and one positively): (a) Fond of myself, (b) That things around me are real, (c) That I’ve forgiven others, and (d) Assertive. Finally, the overall mean score on the PAS significantly distinguished patients with borderline personality disorder from axis II comparison participants. Taken together, these results suggest that borderline patients are far less likely to report experiencing positive states of an affective, cognitive, and mixed nature than axis II comparison participants. They also suggest that being assertive is a positive state particularly discriminating for borderline personality disorder. PMID:22217230

  12. [Inductance transducers for borderline localization of metallic foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Pudov, V I; Reutov, Iu Ia; Korotkikh, S A

    1996-01-01

    The paper outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a ferroprobe inductance transducer used in the borderline localization of a foreign ferromagnetic body. To eliminate the ferroprobe transducer-inherent disadvantages, a whirl-current inductance transducer has been developed. The transducer localizes a foreign nonferromagnetic and ferromagnetic body in its borderline localization in the eye and in the whole body.

  13. The role of labeling processes in diagnosing borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Henry, K A; Cohen, C I

    1983-11-01

    Normal men exhibited more characteristics of borderline personality disorder than did normal women on a questionnaire. In light of that finding, the authors suggest that labeling processes may be a contributing factor in the overrepresentation of women among patients diagnosed as borderline.

  14. Separation crisis in a family with a borderline adolescent.

    PubMed

    von Broembsen, F

    1986-01-01

    The case discussed illustrates the crisis value of separation strivings in borderline families. Dynamic and interpersonal issues were approached from a focus on (a) patterns of projective identification; (b) parental definitions interfering with the child's ego structure formation; and (c) the deterioration of a borderline personality toward frankly schizophrenic functioning under the double pressure of the developmental task of separation and binding parental maneuvers.

  15. Borderline Personality Disorder: Too Complex for Cognitive Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretzer, James L.

    Historically, the literature on psychotherapy with borderline personality disorder has been based on object-relations theory or psychoanalytical approaches, rather than cognitive and behavioral approaches. In clinical assessment, the term borderline has been used to refer to patients with both neurotic and psychotic symptoms, a particular type of…

  16. Familial Characteristics of Individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhardt, James Lawrence

    This paper explores the findings and current state of research on the familial characteristics of persons with borderline personality disorder (BPD). A review of the borderline personality disorder emphasizes the development of the term, etiological issues, and treatment issues related to BPD. Two formal approaches for obtaining accurate diagnosis…

  17. The Lifetime Course of Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Biskin, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has historically been seen as a lifelong, highly disabling disorder. Research during the past 2 decades has challenged this assumption. This paper reviews the course of BPD throughout life, including childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. BPD can be accurately identified in adolescence, and the course of the disorder, in adolescence and adulthood, is generally similar, with reductions in symptoms over time. Functional recovery is less consistent, and further research on factors or treatments that may improve the long-term functional outcome of patients with BPD is warranted. PMID:26175388

  18. Tailoring the Psychotherapy to the Borderline Patient

    PubMed Central

    HORWITZ, LEONARD; GABBARD, GLEN O.; ALLEN, JON G.; COLSON, DONALD B.; FRIESWYK, SIEBOLT; NEWSOM, GAVIN E.; COYNE, LOLAFAYE

    1996-01-01

    Views still differ as to the optimal psychodynamic treatment of borderline patients. Recommendations range from psychoanalysis and exploratory psychotherapy to an explicitly supportive treatment aimed at strengthening adaptive defenses. The authors contend that no single approach is appropriate for all patients in this wide-ranging diagnostic category, which spans a continuum from close-to-neurotic to close-to-psychotic levels of functioning. Careful differentiations based on developmental considerations, ego structures, and relationship patterns provide the basis for the optimal treatment approach. PMID:22700301

  19. Self-image and perception of mother and father in psychotic and borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Armelius, K; Granberg

    2000-02-01

    eine mangelnde Separation von ihren Müttern und eine geringe Differenzierung zwischen Autonomie und Kontrolle. Es wird außerdem diskutiert, wie die Ergebnisse auf die realen Beziehungen der Patienten zu anderen Menschen Einflus nehmen könnten. Des patients psychotiques et Borderline ont évalué leur image d'eux-mêmes et leur perception de leur mère et père à l'aide du modèle de l'Analyse Structural du Comportement Social (SASB. Les patients Borderline avaient des imagess plus négatives d'eux-mêmes et de leurs parents, surtout de leur père, que les patients psychotiques et les sujets normaux, alors que les patients psychotiques se jugeaient à peine différemment des sujets normaux. L'image de soi était en relation avec les images des deux parents pour les patients Borderline et pour les sujets normaux, alors que pour les patients psychotiques, seulement l'image de la mère jouait un rôle pour leur image. En plus, les patients psychotiques ne différenciaient pas entre les pôles de contrôle et d'autonomie dans l'image de soi introjectée. Nous en avons conclu que les patients Borderline se caractérisent par un attachement négatif, et les patients psychotiques par une faible séparation de la mère ainsi qu'une différenciation modeste entre autonomie et contrôle. L'influence de ceci sur les relations des patients avec les autrs est discutée dans cet article. Pacientes limítrofes y psicóticos evaluaron su autoimagen y la percepción que tenían de sus padres usando el modelo de Análisis estructural del comportamiento social (SASB). Los pacientes limítrofes registraron imágenes más negativas de sí mismos y de sus progenitores, especialmente de su padre, que los pacientes psicóticos y los normales, mientras que las evaluaciones de los pacientes psicóticos no difirieron mucho de las de los sujetos normales. La autoimagen tuvo relación con la imagen de ambos progenitores tanto en el caso de los pacientes limítrofes como de los sujetos normales

  20. Self-image and perception of mother and father in psychotic and borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Armelius, K; Granberg

    2000-02-01

    eine mangelnde Separation von ihren Müttern und eine geringe Differenzierung zwischen Autonomie und Kontrolle. Es wird außerdem diskutiert, wie die Ergebnisse auf die realen Beziehungen der Patienten zu anderen Menschen Einflus nehmen könnten. Des patients psychotiques et Borderline ont évalué leur image d'eux-mêmes et leur perception de leur mère et père à l'aide du modèle de l'Analyse Structural du Comportement Social (SASB. Les patients Borderline avaient des imagess plus négatives d'eux-mêmes et de leurs parents, surtout de leur père, que les patients psychotiques et les sujets normaux, alors que les patients psychotiques se jugeaient à peine différemment des sujets normaux. L'image de soi était en relation avec les images des deux parents pour les patients Borderline et pour les sujets normaux, alors que pour les patients psychotiques, seulement l'image de la mère jouait un rôle pour leur image. En plus, les patients psychotiques ne différenciaient pas entre les pôles de contrôle et d'autonomie dans l'image de soi introjectée. Nous en avons conclu que les patients Borderline se caractérisent par un attachement négatif, et les patients psychotiques par une faible séparation de la mère ainsi qu'une différenciation modeste entre autonomie et contrôle. L'influence de ceci sur les relations des patients avec les autrs est discutée dans cet article. Pacientes limítrofes y psicóticos evaluaron su autoimagen y la percepción que tenían de sus padres usando el modelo de Análisis estructural del comportamiento social (SASB). Los pacientes limítrofes registraron imágenes más negativas de sí mismos y de sus progenitores, especialmente de su padre, que los pacientes psicóticos y los normales, mientras que las evaluaciones de los pacientes psicóticos no difirieron mucho de las de los sujetos normales. La autoimagen tuvo relación con la imagen de ambos progenitores tanto en el caso de los pacientes limítrofes como de los sujetos normales

  1. [The phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients].

    PubMed

    Leichsenring, Falk

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The first part demonstrates that in most current conceptions of the borderline disorder affective disturbances are regarded as to be characteristic. In this context, the strong overlap between borderline disorders and affective disorders found in many empirical studies is described and different hypotheses are presented to explain this phenomenon. The second part of this review is concerned with the psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The role of affects in thinking, behaviour, self perception and the regulation of object relations is discussed. Borderline and other severe personality disorders are assessed from the perspective of affective disturbances. The psychodynamic functions of particularly characteristic affects such as anger, anxiety, depression and boredom are discussed. The close connection between affective and cognitive functioning in borderline patients is described and evaluated with regard to modern theories of affect and cognition. Finally, the role of affects in the treatment of borderline patients is discussed. PMID:15510348

  2. Borderline Personality and the Detection of Angry Faces

    PubMed Central

    Hepp, Johanna; Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Kieslich, Pascal J.; Herzog, Julia; Lis, Stefanie; Schmahl, Christian; Niedtfeld, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have assessed emotion recognition in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and considerable evidence has been accumulated on patients’ ability to categorize emotions. In contrast, their ability to detect emotions has been investigated sparsely. The only two studies that assessed emotion detection abilities found contradictory evidence on patients’ ability to detect angry faces. Methods To clarify whether patients with Borderline Personality Disorder show enhanced detection of angry faces, we conducted three experiments: a laboratory study (n = 53) with a clinical sample and two highly powered web studies that measured Borderline features (n1 = 342, n2 = 220). Participants in all studies completed a visual search paradigm, and the reaction times for the detection of angry vs. happy faces were measured. Results Consistently, data spoke against enhanced detection of angry faces in the Borderline groups, indicated by non-significant group (Borderline vs. healthy control) × target (angry vs. happy) interactions, despite highly satisfactory statistical power to detect even small effects. Conclusions In contrast to emotion categorization, emotion detection appears to be intact in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and individuals high in Borderline features. The importance of distinguishing between these two processes in future studies is discussed. PMID:27031611

  3. Borderline personality features in depressed or anxious patients.

    PubMed

    Distel, Marijn A; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-07-30

    Anxiety and depression frequently co-occur with borderline personality disorder. Relatively little research examined the presence of borderline personality features and its main domains (affective instability, identity problems, negative relationships and self-harm) in individuals with remitted and current anxiety and depression. Participants with current (n=597) or remitted (n=1115) anxiety and/or depression and healthy controls (n=431) were selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Assessments included the Personality Assessment Inventory - Borderline Features Scale and several clinical characteristics of anxiety and depression. Borderline personality features were more common in depression than in anxiety. Current comorbid anxiety and depression was associated with most borderline personality features. Anxiety and depression status explained 29.7% of the variance in borderline personality features and 3.8% (self-harm) to 31% (identity problems) of the variance in the four domains. A large part of the variance was shared between anxiety and depression but both disorders also explained a significant amount of unique variance. The severity of anxiety and depression and the level of daily dysfunctioning was positively associated with borderline personality features. Individuals with a longer duration of anxiety and depression showed more affective instability and identity problems. These findings suggest that patients with anxiety and depression may benefit from an assessment of personality pathology as it may have implications for psychological and pharmacological treatment. PMID:27183108

  4. Dracula. Disorders of the self and borderline personality organization.

    PubMed

    Raines, J M; Raines, L C; Singer, M

    1994-12-01

    It has been proposed that Bram Stoker's novel Dracula can best be understood as a dramatic, hyperbolic, and fantastic expression of themes consistent with contemporary psychoanalytic conceptions of borderline personality disorder organization. Such an understanding may, in turn, shed further light on the nature of the intrapsychic world and experiences of borderline patients. Excerpts from the novel can be used to support the conceptualization of recent contributions to object relations theory and the understanding of borderline personality organization. It is uncanny how consistent Dracula's characteristics are to the generally seen complaints of patients suffering from this disorder.

  5. Psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Luis H

    2013-06-01

    The best available evidence for psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is outlined here. BPD is defined by disturbances in identity and interpersonal functioning, and patients report potential medication treatment targets such as impulsivity, aggression, transient psychotic and dissociative symptoms, and refractory affective instability Few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, although multiple reviews have converged on the effectiveness of specific anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotic agents, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for medication providing significant improvements in impulsive aggression than in affective or other interpersonal symptoms. Future research strategies will focus on the potential role of neuropeptide agents and medications with greater specificity for 2A serotonin receptors, as well as optimizing concomitant implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, in order to improve BPD patients' overall functioning. PMID:24174895

  6. Borderline personality disorder and emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Peter, Mathell; Schuurmans, Hanneke; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M; Smeets, Guus; Verkoeijen, Peter; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigated emotional intelligence (EI) in borderline personality disorder (BPD). It was hypothesized that patients with BPD (n = 61) compared with patients with other personality disorders (PDs; n = 69) and nonpatients (n = 248) would show higher scores on the ability to perceive emotions and impairments in the ability to regulate emotions. EI was assessed with the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (Mayer, Salovey, and Caruso [New York: MHS, 2002]). As compared with the PD group and the nonpatient group, the patients with BPD displayed the anticipated deficits in their ability to understand, whereas no differences emerged with respect to their ability to perceive, use, and regulate emotions. In addition, a negative relationship was found between the severity of BPD and total EI score. However, this relationship disappeared when intelligence quotient was partialled out. These results suggest that BPD is associated with emotion understanding deficits, whereas temporary severity of BPD is associated with emotion regulation deficits.

  7. Psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Luis H

    2013-06-01

    The best available evidence for psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is outlined here. BPD is defined by disturbances in identity and interpersonal functioning, and patients report potential medication treatment targets such as impulsivity, aggression, transient psychotic and dissociative symptoms, and refractory affective instability Few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, although multiple reviews have converged on the effectiveness of specific anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotic agents, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for medication providing significant improvements in impulsive aggression than in affective or other interpersonal symptoms. Future research strategies will focus on the potential role of neuropeptide agents and medications with greater specificity for 2A serotonin receptors, as well as optimizing concomitant implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, in order to improve BPD patients' overall functioning.

  8. Emotional Granularity and Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Suvak, Michael K.; Litz, Brett T.; Sloan, Denise M.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the affective dysregulation component of borderline personality disorder (BPD) from an emotional granularity perspective, which refers to the specificity in which one represents emotions. Forty-six female participants meeting criteria for BPD and 51 female control participants without BPD and Axis I pathology completed tasks that assessed the degree to which participants incorporated information about valence (pleasant–unpleasant) and arousal (calm–activated) in their semantic/conceptual representations of emotions and in using labels to represent emotional reactions. As hypothesized, participants with BPD emphasized valence more and arousal less than control participants did when using emotion terms to label their emotional reactions. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21171723

  9. Psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    The best available evidence for psychopharmacologic treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is outlined here. BPD is defined by disturbances in identity and interpersonal functioning, and patients report potential medication treatment targets such as impulsivity, aggression, transient psychotic and dissociative symptoms, and refractory affective instability Few randomized controlled trials of psychopharmacological treatments for BPD have been published recently, although multiple reviews have converged on the effectiveness of specific anticonvulsants, atypical antipsychotic agents, and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation. Stronger evidence exists for medication providing significant improvements in impulsive aggression than in affective or other interpersonal symptoms. Future research strategies will focus on the potential role of neuropeptide agents and medications with greater specificity for 2A serotonin receptors, as well as optimizing concomitant implementation of evidence-based psychotherapy and psychopharmacology, in order to improve BPD patients' overall functioning. PMID:24174895

  10. Neurobiological correlates of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Schmahl, Christian G; McGlashan, Thomas H; Bremner, J Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Although patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are commonly seen in psychiatric practice, there has been far less biological research in BPD than in other psychiatric disorders. This article reviews the neurobiological research that has been performed to date in BPD and integrates the biological, psychological, and clinical findings in this disorder. BPD is best thought of in terms of dimensions rather than as a specific disorder. Each dimension has a biological profile and may be expressed differently in different patients. Four core elements are suggested to play a major role in the development of BPD: interpersonal stress, affective instability, impulsivity, and dissociation and self-injurious behavior. Genetic and environmental factors lead to brain alterations that are the basis for specific presentations of the disorder, such as self-injurious and impulsive aggressive behavior.

  11. Beyond borderline personality disorder: the mindful brain.

    PubMed

    Chafos, Vanessa H; Economou, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have showed an improvement in symptoms characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) when mindfulness-based interventions were integrated into the daily lives of individuals with BPD. Although these studies have examined the etiology and diagnostic prognosis of BPD, and have discussed the use of mindfulness-based treatments, few researchers have attempted to interpret the neuroscientific findings, which have showed an increase in gray matter in key areas of the brain in clients with BPD who engaged in mindfulness practice. Some clients who had originally met a minimum of five of the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for BPD no longer did so upon engaging in mindfulness-based treatment. This article highlights the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions with an emphasis on meditation, which leads to overall better psychological functioning in clients with BPD in three key areas: impulsivity, emotional irregularity, and relationship instability. PMID:25365830

  12. Hypersensitivity in Borderline Personality Disorder during Mindreading

    PubMed Central

    Kotchoubey, Boris; Sieswerda, Simkje; Dinu-Biringer, Ramona; Berger, Moritz; Veser, Sandra; Essig, Marco; Barnow, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the core symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is the instability in interpersonal relationships. This might be related to existent differences in mindreading between BPD patients and healthy individuals. Methods We examined the behavioural and neurophysiological (fMRI) responses of BPD patients and healthy controls (HC) during performance of the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes’ test (RMET). Results Mental state discrimination was significantly better and faster for affective eye gazes in BPD patients than in HC. At the neurophysiological level, this was manifested in a stronger activation of the amygdala and greater activity of the medial frontal gyrus, the left temporal pole and the middle temporal gyrus during affective eye gazes. In contrast, HC subjects showed a greater activation in the insula and the superior temporal gyri. Conclusion These findings indicate that BPD patients are highly vigilant to social stimuli, maybe because they resonate intuitively with mental states of others. PMID:22870240

  13. Parenting Children With Borderline Intellectual Functioning: A Unique Risk Population

    PubMed Central

    Fenning, Rachel M.; Baker, Jason K.; Baker, Bruce L.; Crnic, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Parenting was examined among families of children with borderline intelligence in comparison to families of typically developing children and children with developmental delays. Parenting data were obtained at child age 5 via naturalistic home observation. Mothers of children with borderline intelligence exhibited less positive and less sensitive parenting behaviors than did other mothers and were least likely to display a style of positive engagement. Children with borderline intelligence were not observed to be more behaviorally problematic than other children; however, their mothers perceived more externalizing symptoms than did mothers of typically developing children. Findings suggest the importance of mothers’ explanatory models for child difficulties and highlight children with borderline intelligence as uniquely at risk for poor parenting. PMID:17295551

  14. [Childhood trauma in the etiology of borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Kuritárné, Ildikó Szabó

    2005-01-01

    Serious, prolonged intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse is considered to be the main etiological factor in about half of the patients with borderline personality disorder in the USA. Special features of childhood interpersonal trauma leading to the development of borderline personality disorder are the seriousness of the trauma and the fact that it is sexual in nature. Serious intrafamilial childhood abuse can lead not only to the classic post-traumatic stress syndrome, but can influence all aspects of personality development, including the distortion of the sense of identity, self-regulation, and the patterns of interpersonal relations. Viewed from the perspective of the trauma concept, the entire range of adult borderline symptoms are considered as being the consequences of severe complex traumatic experiences. Other clinicians regard such an abuse as a marker of the severity of familial dysfunction and emphasize the role of other pathogenic factors, such as biparental neglect and biological vulnerability of the pre-borderline child.

  15. Gene-environment studies and borderline personality disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Ryan W; Tomko, Rachel L; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-01-01

    We review recent gene-environment studies relevant to borderline personality disorder, including those focusing on impulsivity, emotion sensitivity, suicidal behavior, aggression and anger, and the borderline personality phenotype itself. Almost all the studies reviewed suffered from a number of methodological and statistical problems, limiting the conclusions that currently can be drawn. The best evidence to date supports a gene-environment correlation (rGE) model for borderline personality traits and a range of adverse life events, indicating that those at risk for BPD are also at increased risk for exposure to environments that may trigger BPD. We provide suggestions regarding future research on GxE interaction and rGE effects in borderline personality.

  16. Parental qualities as perceived by borderline personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R L; Mann, L S; Wise, T N; Segall, E A

    1985-01-01

    This study explores the contribution of parental qualities to the borderline personality disorder. The Parental Bonding Inventory is used to compare four parental qualities (caring mother, caring father, overprotective father, and overprotective mother) across three groups (borderline personality disorders, assorted psychiatric controls and normal controls). The major finding was that the borderline patients perceived their parents to be significantly less caring and more overprotective than both the psychiatric control or nonclinical control groups. This study was verified previous reports that patients diagnosed with an affective illness (in either the borderline group or psychiatric control group) reported no significant differences on the inventory. Pinpointing parental characteristics which antecede mental disorders may be an important first step in devising primary preventive interventions for adult disorders. PMID:4077030

  17. [Complementary methods of rehabilitation in borderline mental disorders].

    PubMed

    Elfimov, M A; Kotenko, K V; Korchazhkina, N B; Filatova, E V; Portnov, V V; Chervinskaya, A V; Mikhailova, A A

    2016-01-01

    The article covers treatment results of 417 patients (186 males and 231 females) aged 18 to 71 years, with borderline mental disorders. Findings are that using specified complementary methods, more when treatment complex is applied, causes better psycho-emotional state in patients with borderline mental disorders, that is supported by results of medical diagnostic tests including psychometry tests (abridged minnesota multiphasic personality inventory, Beck depression inventory, Spielberger-Hanin, test "feeling, activity, mood"). PMID:27164743

  18. [Clinical diagnosis and standardized evaluation of borderline personality: preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Chaine, F; Guelfi, J D; Monier, C; Brun, A; Seunevel, F

    1995-01-01

    A sample of 36 patients considered by French clinicians as suffering from a borderline personality disorder was evaluated using the International Personality Disorder Examination, the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline-Revised, and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. First, global descriptive analysis of the sample elicited the socio-demographic and standard clinical characteristics of the borderline individuals. After diagnostic evaluation, the sample appeared to be quite homogeneous with 25 of the 36 patients evaluated (69.5%) being defined as borderline by two of the three diagnostic systems: ICD 10, DSM III-R and Gunderson (15/36 = 41.5% of patients were defined as borderline by all three systems). It is the types of BL personality co-diagnoses which differentiated the BL subjects in the sample from those classically described in the international literature, since the most frequent personalities were the Dependent and Avoiding ones, not the Antisocial, Histrionic, Narcissistic or Schizotypic personalities of the DSM III-R. ICD 10 elicited the same significant prevalence of Anxious and Dependent personalities. Lastly, the patients diagnosed as borderline both by clinicians and by all diagnostic systems (forming the sample "core") were compared with the rest of the sample with regard to socio-demographic, clinical and diagnostic characteristics. A few hypotheses are proposed on the type of variables that may permit to discriminate between these two types of patients.

  19. [Borderline personality disorders: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Allilaire, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorders are complex clinical states with highly polymorphic symptoms and signs, leading to delays in their diagnosis and treatment. All international classifications emphasize certain clinical criteria such as unstable identity and interpersonal relationships, feelings of emptiness or boredom, and pathological impulsiveness. The prevalence is about 2%, with a female-male sex ratio of 2 or 3 to 1. Both adolescents and adults may be affected There is a high risk of suicide, addictive behaviors, eating disorders, and criminality. These individuals frequently have a history of trauma in early childhood, such as separation, loss, physical or sexual abuse, or affective privation. Subjective signs and symptoms are particularly important in the diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation, and this requires an empathic and subtle approach. Standardized and semi-structured interviews may help to identify comorbidities such as thymic disorders, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, and, in some cases, psychotic symptoms. The psychiatric bio-psycho-social model takes into account multiple pathogenic factors, such as trauma during early development, temperamental instability and other emotional disorders, as well as psychosocial, neurobiological (5HT etc.) and genetic vulnerabilities. Treatment requires optimal integration of psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic approaches. Emergency intervention must be available in case of delirious or suicidal behavior The clinical course is often lengthy and complex, but outcome may be favorable, provided the principal risk--suicide--is correctly managed, PMID:23815019

  20. Borderline Personality Disorder in Suicidal Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Shirley; Gagnon, Kerry; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) in adolescents has been controversial. Thus, few studies have examined BPD in suicidal adolescents, even though it is strongly associated with suicidal behaviors in adults. This study examines differences between suicidal adolescents with (n=47) and without (n=72) BPD on history and characteristics of suicidal behavior, Axis I comorbidity, affect regulation, and aggression. Assessments were completed with both adolescents and parents, and consensus ratings based on best available data were analyzed. BPD participants were more likely to have a past history of suicide attempts and to have been admitted due to a suicide attempt (vs. suicidal ideation). There were no significant differences in self-injurious behaviors or degree of suicidal ideation. BPD participants also had more psychiatric comorbidity and higher aggression scores, but no significant differences in affective dysregulation compared to suicidal adolescents without BPD. Diagnostic stability over 6 months was modest. Our results demonstrate that compared to other acutely suicidal adolescents, the clinical profile of BPD participants is unique and suggests an increased risk for suicidal behaviors. This extends upon other studies which support the construct validity of BPD during adolescence and suggests that BPD should be considered in suicide risk assessment for adolescents. PMID:24343935

  1. Interpreting Borderline BeLPT Results

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, D.C.; Mayer, A.S.; Lewin, M.D.; Mroz, M.M.; Maier, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) identifies persons sensitized to beryllium (BeS) and thus at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD). BeLPT test results are abnormal (AB), borderline (BL), or normal (NL). This manuscript addresses the predictive value and interpretation of BL BeLPT results. Methods The various three-result combinations that meet or exceed a nominal referral criteria of 1 AB + 1 BL are assessed with probability modeling and compared. Results At 2% prevalence, the three-result combinations that meet or exceed this referral criteria and associated probabilities of BeS are: (a) 1 AB + 1 BL + 1 NL (72%); (b) 3 BL (91%); (c) 2 AB + 1 NL (95%); (d) 1 AB + 2 BL (99%); (e) 2 AB + 1 BL (100%); and (f) 3 AB (100%). Conclusion These results suggest that BL results are meaningful and that three BL results predict BeS across a broad range of population prevalences. An analysis of longitudinal BeLPT results and clinical findings from an actual surveillance program is warranted to confirm the model’s predictions. PMID:20957676

  2. Emotions and memory in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Winter, Dorina; Elzinga, Bernet; Schmahl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Memory processes such as encoding, storage, and retrieval of information are influenced by emotional content. Because patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are particularly susceptible to emotional information, it is relevant to understand whether such memory processes are altered in this patient group. This systematic literature review collects current evidence on this issue. Research suggests that emotional information interferes more strongly with information processing and learning in BPD patients than in healthy controls. In general, BPD patients do not seem to differ from healthy control subjects in their ability to memorize emotional information, but they tend to have specific difficulties forgetting negative information. Also, BPD patients seem to recall autobiographical, particularly negative events with stronger arousal than healthy controls, while BPD patients also show specific temporo-prefrontal alterations in neural correlates. No substantial evidence was found that the current affective state influences learning and memory in BPD patients any differently than in healthy control subjects. In general, a depressive mood seems to both deteriorate and negatively bias information processing and memories, while there is evidence that dissociative symptoms impair learning and memory independently of stimulus valence. This review discusses methodological challenges of studies on memory and emotions in BPD and makes suggestions for future research and clinical implications.

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder: Why 'fast and furious'?

    PubMed

    Brüne, Martin

    2016-02-28

    The term 'Borderline Personality Disorder' (BPD) refers to a psychiatric syndrome that is characterized by emotion dysregulation, impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, irritability, feelings of emptiness, self-injury and fear of abandonment, as well as unstable interpersonal relationships. BPD is not only common in psychiatric populations but also more prevalent in the general community than previously thought, and thus represents an important public health issue. In contrast to most psychiatric disorders, some symptoms associated with BPD may improve over time, even without therapy, though impaired social functioning and interpersonal disturbances in close relationships often persist. Another counterintuitive and insufficiently resolved question is why depressive symptoms and risk-taking behaviors can occur simultaneously in the same individual. Moreover, there is an ongoing debate about the nosological position of BPD, which impacts on research regarding sex differences in clinical presentation and patterns of comorbidity.In this review, it is argued that many features of BPD may be conceptualized within an evolutionary framework, namely behavioral ecology. According to Life History Theory, BPD reflects a pathological extreme or distortion of a behavioral 'strategy' which unconsciously aims at immediate exploitation of resources, both interpersonal and material, based on predictions shaped by early developmental experiences. Such a view is consistent with standard medical conceptualizations of BPD, but goes beyond classic 'deficit'-oriented models, which may have profound implications for therapeutic approaches.

  4. Compulsive buying and borderline personality symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Chang, Joy; Jewell, Bryan; Sellbom, Martin; Bidwell, Mark

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the relationship between compulsive buying and borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptomatology--two disorders possibly linked through impulsivity. Using a survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive sample of nonemergent female outpatients from an obstetrics/gynecology clinic, the authors assessed compulsive buying with the compulsive buying scale (CBS) and BPD symptomatology through the BPD scale of the personality diagnostic questionnaire-4 (PDQ-4) and the self-harm Inventory (SHI). In this sample, 8% of Caucasian women and 9% of African-American women scored positively for compulsive buying. The correlations between scores on the CBS and the PDQ-4 and SHI were 0.43 and 0.41, respectively-both statistically significant at the p < .001 level. Compared to Caucasian women, African-American women demonstrated statistical associations between the BPD measures and the CBS scale scores that were significantly larger. Findings suggest relationships between compulsive buying and BPD, particularly among African-American women.

  5. [Borderline personality disorders: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Allilaire, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorders are complex clinical states with highly polymorphic symptoms and signs, leading to delays in their diagnosis and treatment. All international classifications emphasize certain clinical criteria such as unstable identity and interpersonal relationships, feelings of emptiness or boredom, and pathological impulsiveness. The prevalence is about 2%, with a female-male sex ratio of 2 or 3 to 1. Both adolescents and adults may be affected There is a high risk of suicide, addictive behaviors, eating disorders, and criminality. These individuals frequently have a history of trauma in early childhood, such as separation, loss, physical or sexual abuse, or affective privation. Subjective signs and symptoms are particularly important in the diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation, and this requires an empathic and subtle approach. Standardized and semi-structured interviews may help to identify comorbidities such as thymic disorders, anxiety, addiction, eating disorders, and, in some cases, psychotic symptoms. The psychiatric bio-psycho-social model takes into account multiple pathogenic factors, such as trauma during early development, temperamental instability and other emotional disorders, as well as psychosocial, neurobiological (5HT etc.) and genetic vulnerabilities. Treatment requires optimal integration of psychotherapeutic and pharmacotherapeutic approaches. Emergency intervention must be available in case of delirious or suicidal behavior The clinical course is often lengthy and complex, but outcome may be favorable, provided the principal risk--suicide--is correctly managed,

  6. Social cognition in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Roepke, Stefan; Vater, Aline; Preißler, Sandra; Heekeren, Hauke R; Dziobek, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Many typical symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) occur within interpersonal contexts, suggesting that BPD is characterized by aberrant social cognition. While research consistently shows that BPD patients have biases in mental state attribution (e.g., evaluate others as malevolent), the research focusing on accuracy in inferring mental states (i.e., cognitive empathy) is less consistent. For complex and ecologically valid tasks in particular, emerging evidence suggests that individuals with BPD have impairments in the attribution of emotions, thoughts, and intentions of others (e.g., Preißler et al., 2010). A history of childhood trauma and co-morbid PTSD seem to be strong additional predictors for cognitive empathy deficits. Together with reduced emotional empathy and aberrant sending of social signals (e.g., expression of mixed and hard-to-read emotions), the deficits in mental state attribution might contribute to behavioral problems in BPD. Given the importance of social cognition on the part of both the sender and the recipient in maintaining interpersonal relationships and therapeutic alliance, these impairments deserve more attention. PMID:23335877

  7. Defense mechanisms in schizotypal, borderline, antisocial, and narcissistic personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Perry, J Christopher; Presniak, Michelle D; Olson, Trevor R

    2013-01-01

    Numerous authors have theorized that defense mechanisms play a role in personality disorders. We reviewed theoretical writings and empirical studies about defenses in schizotypal, borderline, antisocial, and narcissistic personality disorders, developing hypotheses about these differential relationships. We then examined these hypotheses using dynamic interview data rated for defenses in a study of participants (n = 107) diagnosed with these four personality disorder types. Overall, the prevalence of immature defenses was substantial, and all four disorders fit within the broad borderline personality organization construct. Defenses predicted the most variance in borderline and the least variance in schizotypal personality disorder, suggesting that dynamic factors played the largest role in borderline and the least in schizotypal personality. Central to borderline personality were strong associations with major image-distorting defenses, primarily splitting of self and other's images, and the hysterical level defenses, dissociation and repression. Narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders shared minor image-distorting defenses, such as omnipotence or devaluation, while narcissistic also used splitting of self-images and antisocial used disavowal defenses like denial. Overall, differential relationships between specific defenses and personality disorder types were largely consistent with the literature, and consistent with the importance that the treatment literature ascribes to working with defenses.

  8. Betrayal trauma and dimensions of borderline personality organization.

    PubMed

    Yalch, Matthew M; Levendosky, Alytia A

    2014-01-01

    Borderline personality pathology can be conceptualized as one of many conditions within a broader spectrum of borderline personality organization (BPO). This spectrum is composed of several specific dimensions of psychological functioning (primitive psychological defenses, identity diffusion, and reality testing). Although several theories associate trauma with borderline pathology, betrayal trauma theory specifies that trauma with a high degree of betrayal has an especially pernicious influence on borderline pathology. In addition, betrayal trauma theorists propose that constructs related to each BPO dimension are influenced by traumatic betrayal, but this has not yet been tested within the context of borderline pathology specifically. In this article, we examine the relation between trauma with varying levels of betrayal and the specific dimensions of BPO using a Bayesian approach to multiple regression. Results indicated that trauma with a high degree of betrayal was associated with each dimension of BPO, that medium betrayal trauma was associated with problems in reality testing, and that low betrayal trauma was associated with primitive psychological defenses. These effects differed by gender. Limitations of the study and directions for future research are also discussed.

  9. [Borderline leprosy as a rare differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Trawinski, Henning; Brüning, Jan-Hinnerk; Baum, Petra; Ziemer, Mirjana; Schubert, Stefan; Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    History and clinical findings | A 42-year-old migrant from Brazil presented with persistent sensory disturbances, skin discolorations and local alopecia in the upper limbs. Decisive for the presentation in our Tropical Medicine Clinic were new occurrences of severe pain and redness and swelling in the area of the lesions that had already been assessed by a number of medical specialists without a clear diagnosis could be made. Investigations and diagnosis | The histological analysis of skin biopsies showed perivascular, perineural, periadnexial lymphocytic and granulomatous dermatitis. In a direct microbiological preparation individual acid fast bacilli could be detected (Ziehl-Neelsen stain). The electroneurographical examination demonstrated a sensitive peripheral-neurogenic damage with emphasis on the right median nerve and the left ulnar and radial nerves. Thermography revealed an increased heating or cooling threshold. The serological investigation by ELISA for IgM antibodies against the phenolic glycolipid (PGL-1) was positive (titer 1 : 1200). In summary, the diagnosis of borderline leprosy (infection with Mycobacterium leprae) with transition to multibacillary leprosy (according to WHO) and leprosy reaction type 1 was made. Treatment and course | We initiated an oral antimycobacterial therapy (multidrug therapy, MDT) with rifampin, clofazimine and dapsone for 12 months (WHO regimen for multibacillary leprosy). Leprosy reaction type 1 was treated with prednisolone and by increasing the dose of clofazimine. Analgesic therapy on demand was carried out with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen). MDT and successful management of leprosy reaction lead to a rapid improvement of symptoms. Conclusions | Leprosy is an infectious disease occurring only rarely in Germany (average incidence of 1-2 cases per year) that is diagnosed almost exclusively among migrants. Main symptoms comprise non-itchy, reddish, touch insensitive skin lesions or nerve deficits. The

  10. Accurately diagnosing and treating borderline personality disorder: a psychotherapeutic case.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ashley B; Gentile, Julie P; Correll, Terry L

    2010-04-01

    The high prevalence of comorbid bipolar and borderline personality disorders and some diagnostic criteria similar to both conditions present both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. This article delineates certain symptoms which, by careful history taking, may be attributed more closely to one of these two disorders. Making the correct primary diagnosis along with comorbid psychiatric conditions and choosing the appropriate type of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are critical steps to a patient's recovery. In this article, we will use a case example to illustrate some of the challenges the psychiatrist may face in diagnosing and treating borderline personality disorder. In addition, we will explore treatment strategies, including various types of therapy modalities and medication classes, which may prove effective in stabilizing or reducing a broad range of symptomotology associated with borderline personality disorder.

  11. Borderline personality disorder: a review and reformulation from evolutionary theory.

    PubMed

    Molina, Juan D; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Stein, Dan J; Martín-Vázquez, María José; Alamo, Cecilio; Lerma-Carrillo, Iván; Andrade-Rosa, Cristina; Sánchez-López, María V; de la Calle-Real, Mario

    2009-09-01

    A number of authors have provided a useful evolutionary perspective on personality disorders, arguing that personality traits can be conceptualized in terms of evolutionary strategies. If we consider personality traits not as illnesses but as stable evolutionary strategies, the characteristic features of borderline personality disorder may respond to a behavioral pattern which, although deviating from the norm, would be in the service of survival of the species. Early environments involving factors such as childhood physical/sexual abuse may prove useful for explanation of personality traits based on gene-environment interaction, potentially providing a model for understanding borderline personality traits. We also review the question of whether personality traits exist in animals to also provide a translational perspective. We propose that certain traits in borderline personality disorder may derive from evolved mechanisms which in the short-term serve to help respond to adversity, but which when activated in an ongoing way prove maladaptive.

  12. Examining the Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Borderline Personality Disorder: Does Social Support Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elzy, Meredith B.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between childhood sexual abuse and borderline personality disorder is a prominent issue in the etiological research on borderline personality disorder. This study further explored the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and the development of borderline personality features while evaluating the moderating role of a primary…

  13. Increased Lead and Cadmium Burdens among Mentally Retarded Children and Children with Borderline Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between subtoxic metal levels and mild mental retardation and borderline intelligence was investigated through comparison of hair metal concentrations in 135 secondary students with mild retardation or borderline intelligence. Children in the retarded/borderline group had significantly higher lead and cadmium concentrations.…

  14. Art Therapy for Individuals with Borderline Personality: Using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drass, Jessica Masino

    2015-01-01

    Art therapy has shown benefits for people with borderline personality disorder and borderline personality traits by alleviating interpersonal difficulties such as affect regulation, an unstable sense of self, self-injurious behaviors, and suicidal ideation. Borderline personality disorder is currently viewed as a trauma spectrum disorder, because…

  15. Borderline personality disorder features predict negative outcomes 2 years later.

    PubMed

    Bagge, Courtney; Nickell, Angela; Stepp, Stephanie; Durrett, Christine; Jackson, Kristina; Trull, Timothy J

    2004-05-01

    In a sample of 351 young adults, the authors assessed whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) features prospectively predicted negative outcomes (poorer academic achievement and social maladjustment) over the subsequent 2 years, over and above gender and both Axis I and Axis II psychopathology. Borderline traits were significantly related to these outcomes, with impulsivity and affective instability the most highly associated. The present findings suggest that the impulsivity and affective instability associated with BPD leads to impairment in relating well with others, in meeting social role obligations, and in academic or occupational achievement. Therefore, these may be especially important features to target in interventions for BPD.

  16. Factors Related to Drop-outs by Borderline Patients

    PubMed Central

    YEOMANS, FRANK E.; GUTFREUND, JANICE; SELZER, MICHAEL A.; CLARKIN, JOHN F.; HULL, JAMES W.; SMITH, THOMAS E.

    1994-01-01

    High patient drop-out rates have traditionally interfered with both treatment and study of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The authors tested hypotheses that an adequate treatment contract, a positive therapeutic alliance, and the severity of illness would all correlate with continuation of treatment versus drop-out in a BPD cohort receiving psychodynamic psychotherapy. Therapists’ contributions to the contract and to the alliance correlated with the length of treatment. Patients’ impulsivity was negatively related to length of treatment. This study supports the view that the therapist’s technique plays a role in engaging the borderline patient to remain in treatment. PMID:22700170

  17. Diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of borderline ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Fischerova, Daniela; Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type-easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients.

  18. The Objective Borderline Method: A Probabilistic Method for Standard Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz; Poole, Phillippa; Jones, Philip; Wilkinson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A new probability-based standard setting technique, the Objective Borderline Method (OBM), was introduced recently. This was based on a mathematical model of how test scores relate to student ability. The present study refined the model and tested it using 2500 simulated data-sets. The OBM was feasible to use. On average, the OBM performed well…

  19. Assessing at the Borderline: Judging a Vocationally Related Portfolio Holistically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the cognitive strategies that underpin assessors' holistic judgments of a school-based vocationally-related portfolio performance. Using a portfolio already identified as containing borderline qualities, quantitative data were gathered about features that six assessors attended to as they holistically evaluated the…

  20. Treatment of Borderline Adolescents in Family Court Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Maurice R.

    A recent revision of the proposed DSM III description of the borderline category is presented with reference to the work of Masterson and Grinker. The contributions of Roger Shapiro and his group to a psychoanalytic formulation of the developmental and familial dynamics are summarized with reference to genetic factors and the lack of validation,…

  1. Is Anakin Skywalker suffering from borderline personality disorder?

    PubMed

    Bui, Eric; Rodgers, Rachel; Chabrol, Henri; Birmes, Philippe; Schmitt, Laurent

    2011-01-30

    Anakin Skywalker, one of the main characters in the "Star Wars" films, meets the criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). This finding is interesting for it may partly explain the commercial success of these movies among adolescents and be useful in educating the general public and medical students about BPD symptoms.

  2. The Borderline Personality Diagnosis in Adolescents: Gender Differences and Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Rebekah; Zittel Conklin, Carolyn; Westen, Drew

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to identify personality features characterizing adolescent girls and boys with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and to see whether meaningful patterns of heterogeneity exist among adolescents diagnosed with the disorder. Methods: Two hundred and ninety-four randomly selected doctoral-level clinicians described…

  3. Development and Validation of the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornovalova, Marina A.; Hicks, Brian M.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    Although large epidemiological data sets can inform research on the etiology and development of borderline personality disorder (BPD), they rarely include BPD measures. In some cases, however, proxy measures can be constructed using instruments already in these data sets. In this study, the authors developed and validated a self-report measure of…

  4. Borderline-lepromatous leprosy manifesting as granulomatous mastitis.

    PubMed

    Pandhi, Deepika; Verma, Prashant; Sharma, Sonal; Dhawan, Amit Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Leprosy is characterised by a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the skin and peripheral nerves. Dissemination of the lepra bacilli may cause involvement of other tissues as well. We describe an unusual case of the granulomatous involvement of the nipple-areola complex in a 35-year-old male consequent to borderline-lepromatous leprosy. PMID:22997696

  5. The Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder within a Distressed Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Alberta; Ingram, Timothy

    1985-01-01

    Suggests an integrated systemic-psychodynamic approach to the treatment of characterological disorders within conjoint marital therapy. Draws from object relations and systemic therapies in developing a treatment approach to marriages which include at least one borderline personality disorder spouse. A case example illustrates the…

  6. Autonomic Impairment in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Anna; Klonsky, E. David; Hajcak, Greg

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that emotional dysfunction in psychiatric disorders can be reflected in autonomic abnormalities. The present study examines sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system activity in individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) before, during, and following a social stressor task. Data were obtained…

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids…

  8. [Tattoos and piercings: motives for body modification in women suffering from borderline symptomatology].

    PubMed

    Höhner, Gesche; Teismann, Tobias; Willutzki, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Do women suffering from borderline symptomatology differ from women without these symptoms regarding their motives for body modifications?A sample of 289 women with body modifications were questioned about their tattoos, piercings and motives for body modifications as well as about symptoms of borderline personality disorder. Women with borderline symptomatology were compared to women without borderline symptomatology concerning the extent of and motives for body modification.The 2 groups showed no differences in regard to amount and extent of body modifications. The "borderline"-group considered individuality, coping and management of negative life-events to be more crucial reasons for body modification than the non-borderline females.The degree of a person's body modification is not a feasible indicator for psychopathological strain. Though, for people with borderline tendency body modification may serve as a coping strategy similar to self-injury.

  9. Second neoplasms after invasive and borderline ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Excess risk of subsequent cancers has been documented in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. We updated to 2006 data on second cancers in women diagnosed with invasive and borderline ovarian cancer in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Between 1974 and 2006, 304 borderline and 1530 invasive first ovarian tumours were abstracted from the Vaud Cancer Registry database and followed up till the end of 2006. Calculation of expected numbers of tumours in the cohorts was based on site-specific, age-specific and calendar-year-specific incidence rates. We computed the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of second cancers, and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was no change in the incidence of malignant cancers, but that of borderline tumours increased over more recent years. Overall, 110 second neoplasms were observed versus 49.7 expected after invasive ovarian cancer (SIR 2.21; 95% CI: 1.82-2.67). Significant excess risks were observed for cancers of the breast, corpus uteri and leukaemias. When synchronous cancers were excluded, the overall SIR for all sites declined to 1.05. Thirty-one second neoplasms were observed after borderline tumours compared with 21.1 expected (SIR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00-2.09). SIRs were above unity for ovary, colorectum and uterus. After exclusion of synchronous neoplasms, SIR for all neoplasms declined to 1.09, and remained significant only for second ovarian cancers (SIR=4.93). The present record linkage cohort study shows an excess risk for selected synchronous neoplasms in women diagnosed with both borderline and invasive ovarian cancer, likely because of shared genetic and perhaps environmental factors.

  10. Pharmacological interventions for borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stoffers, Jutta; Völlm, Birgit A; Rücker, Gerta; Timmer, Antje; Huband, Nick; Lieb, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Drugs are widely used in borderline personality disorder (BPD) treatment, chosen because of properties known from other psychiatric disorders (“off-label use”), mostly targeting affective or impulsive symptom clusters. Objectives To assess the effects of drug treatment in BPD patients. Search methods We searched bibliographic databases according to the Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group strategy up to September 2009, reference lists of articles, and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised studies comparing drug versus placebo, or drug versus drug(s) in BPD patients. Outcomes included total BPD severity, distinct BPD symptom facets according to DSM-IV criteria, associated psychopathology not specific to BPD, attrition and adverse effects. Data collection and analysis Two authors selected trials, assessed quality and extracted data, independently. Main results Twenty-eight trials involving a total of 1742 trial participants were included. First-generation antipsychotics (flupenthixol decanoate, haloperidol, thiothixene); second-generation antipsychotics (aripirazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone), mood stabilisers (carbamazepine, valproate semisodium, lamotrigine, topiramate), antidepressants (amitriptyline, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, phenelzine sulfate, mianserin), and dietary supplementation (omega-3 fatty acid) were tested. First-generation antipsychotics were subject to older trials, whereas recent studies focussed on second-generation antipsychotics and mood stabilisers. Data were sparse for individual comparisons, indicating marginal effects for first-generation antipsychotics and antidepressants. The findings were suggestive in supporting the use of second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilisers, and omega-3 fatty acids, but require replication, since most effect estimates were based on single studies. The long-term use of these drugs has not been assessed. Adverse event data were scarce

  11. [Neurotic symptoms of borderline patients: a case review study].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, N

    1992-01-01

    The author investigated neurotic symptoms of borderline patients by reviewing the clinical charts of twenty-six patients of longer than one year treatment period (8 men, 18 women; 23 patients with DSM III-R borderline personality disorder (BPD), 14 with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), (11 BPD-SPD overlaps); age at the first contact: mean = 24.3 y. o., SD = 6.7 y. o.; treatment period: mean = 51 months, SD = 35 months). The diagnoses of the comorbid neurotic disorders were obsessive compulsive disorder: 5 cases (19% (BPD: 22%, SPD: 7%)), somatoform disorder: 5 (19% (BPD: 22%, SPD: 21%)), panic disorder: 4 (15% (BPD: 17%, SPD: 14%)), social phobia: 2 (8% (BPD: 9%, SPD: 7%)), dissociative disorder: 2 (8% (BPD: 9%, SPD: 0%)), and generalized anxiety disorder: 1 (4% (BPD: 4%, SPD: 7%)). The neurotic symptoms identified in the charts of the subjects were as follows; symptoms of social phobia: 11 cases (42% (BPD: 43%, SPD: 43%)) including 6 with anthropophobic symptoms (23% (BPD: 26%, SPD: 36%)), obsessive compulsive symptoms and diffuse and floating anxiety: 9 (35% (BPD: 39%, SPD: 38%)), panic attacks: 8 (31% (BPD: 35%, SPD: 36%)), conversion symptoms: 7 (27% (BPD: 30%, SPD: 21%)), dissociative episodes: 6 (23% (BPD: 26%, SPD: 7%)), depersonalization: 5 (19% (BPD: 22%, SPD: 14%)), multiple apprehensive expectations: 4 (15% (BPD: 17%, SPD: 14%)), derealization: 3 (12% (BPD: 13%, SPD: 14%)), hyperventilation attacks: 3 (12% (BPD: 13%, SPD: 7%)), and somatization: 1 (4% (BPD: 4%, SPD: 7%)). In short, 54% (BPD: 61%, SPD: 43%) of the subjects had comorbid neurotic disorders, and 92% (BPD: 91%, SPD: 93%) reported at least one, and 54% (BPD: 61%, SPD: 50%), more than two kinds of neurotic symptoms, though no specific symptom correlating with BPD or SPD diagnosis was found. These findings suggest that neurotic symptoms and neurotic disorders cannot be ignored as peripheral in the borderline symptomatology. By analyzing in detail the neurotic experiences, the author

  12. Assessment of Borderline Personality Features in Population Samples: Is the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features Scale Measurement Invariant across Sex and Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moor, Marleen H. M.; Distel, Marijn A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more often diagnosed in women than in men, and symptoms tend to decline with age. Using a large community sample, the authors investigated whether sex and age differences in four main features of BPD, measured with the "Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features" scale (PAI-BOR; Morey, 1991), are…

  13. Standard setting for OSCEs: trial of borderline approach.

    PubMed

    Kilminster, Sue; Roberts, Trudie

    2004-01-01

    OSCE examinations were held in May and June 2002 for all third and fourth year and some fifth year medical students at the University of Leeds. There has been an arbitrary pass mark of 65% for these examinations. However, we recognise that it is important to adopt a systematic approach towards standard setting in all examinations so held a trial of the borderline approach to standard setting for third and fifth year examinations. This paper reports our findings. The results for the year 3 OSCE demonstrated that the borderline approach to standard setting is feasible and offers a method to ensure that the pass standard is both justifiable and credible. It is efficient, requiring much less time than other methods and has the advantage of using the judgements of expert clinicians about actual practice. In addition it offers a way of empowering clinicians because it uses their expertise.

  14. Construct validity of the five factor borderline inventory.

    PubMed

    DeShong, Hilary L; Lengel, Gregory J; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E; O'Meara, Madison; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2015-06-01

    The Five Factor Borderline Inventory (FFBI) is a new self-report measure developed to assess traits of borderline personality disorder (BPD) from the perspective of the Five Factor Model of general personality. The current study sought to first replicate initial validity findings for the FFBI and then to further validate the FFBI with predispositional risk factors of the biosocial theory of BPD and with commonly associated features of BPD (e.g., depression, low self-esteem) utilizing two samples of young adults (N = 87; 85) who have engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury. The FFBI showed strong convergent and discriminant validity across two measures of the Five Factor Model and also correlated strongly with measures of impulsivity, emotion dysregulation, and BPD. The FFBI also related to two measures of early childhood emotional vulnerability and parental invalidation and measures of depression, anxiety, and self-esteem. Overall, the results provide support for the FFBI as a measure of BPD. PMID:25155158

  15. A further validation of the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Elizabeth C; Cummings, Jenna R; Bornovalova, Marina A; Hopwood, Christopher J; Racine, Sarah E; Keel, Pamela K; Sisk, Cheryl L; Neale, Michael; Boker, Steven; Burt, S Alexandra; Klump, Kelly L

    2014-04-01

    Previous research indicates that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is well conceptualized as a dimensional construct that can be represented using normal personality traits. A previous study successfully developed and validated a BPD measure embedded within a normal trait measure, the Minnesota Borderline Personality Disorder Scale (MBPD). The current study performed a further validation of the MBPD by examining its convergent validity, external correlates, and heritability in a sample of 429 female twins. The MBPD correlated strongly with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II) screener for BPD and moderately with external correlates. Moreover, the MBPD and SCID-II screener exhibited very similar patterns of external correlations. Additionally, results indicated that the genetic and environmental influences on MBPD overlap with the genetic and environmental influences on the SCID-II screener, which suggests that these scales are measuring the same construct. These data provide further evidence for the construct validity of the MBPD. PMID:24364505

  16. Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome Presented as Severe Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pesic, Danilo; Peljto, Amir; Lukic, Biljana; Milovanovic, Maja; Svetozarevic, Snezana; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of findings confirm the significance of cerebellum in affecting regulation and early learning. Most consistent findings refer to association of congenital vermis anomalies with deficits in nonmotor functions of cerebellum. In this paper we presented a young woman who was treated since sixteen years of age for polysubstance abuse, affective instability, and self-harming who was later diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Since the neurological and neuropsychological reports pointed to signs of cerebellar dysfunction and dysexecutive syndrome, we performed magnetic resonance imaging of brain which demonstrated partially developed vermis and rhombencephalosynapsis. These findings match the description of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome and show an overlap with clinical manifestations of borderline personality disorder. PMID:24715924

  17. [An ovarian mucinous borderline tumour with mixed mural nodules].

    PubMed

    Dhouibi, A; Denoux, Y; Touil, N; Devouassoux Shisheboran, M; Carbonnel, M; Baglin, A C

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of mural nodules in serous or mucinous ovarian tumours is not frequent. Mural nodule can be developed in benign, borderline or malignant tumours. They can be benign, malignant or mixed type. Thus the prognosis of the ovarian tumour can be dramatically modified by the presence if these nodules. Eighty-two cases of mural nodules were reported in the literature, among which we account four cases of mixed nodules type. We report an additional case of mixed type mural nodules of anaplastic carcinoma and sarcoma-like developed in an ovarian mucinous borderline tumour at a 60-year-old woman.We give details about the classification, the differential diagnosis and prognosis of theses nodules.

  18. Construct validity of the five factor borderline inventory.

    PubMed

    DeShong, Hilary L; Lengel, Gregory J; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E; O'Meara, Madison; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2015-06-01

    The Five Factor Borderline Inventory (FFBI) is a new self-report measure developed to assess traits of borderline personality disorder (BPD) from the perspective of the Five Factor Model of general personality. The current study sought to first replicate initial validity findings for the FFBI and then to further validate the FFBI with predispositional risk factors of the biosocial theory of BPD and with commonly associated features of BPD (e.g., depression, low self-esteem) utilizing two samples of young adults (N = 87; 85) who have engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury. The FFBI showed strong convergent and discriminant validity across two measures of the Five Factor Model and also correlated strongly with measures of impulsivity, emotion dysregulation, and BPD. The FFBI also related to two measures of early childhood emotional vulnerability and parental invalidation and measures of depression, anxiety, and self-esteem. Overall, the results provide support for the FFBI as a measure of BPD.

  19. Exploration of nightmares in hospital treatment of borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Lansky, M R; Bley, C R

    1990-01-01

    A clinical investigation of nightmares enhanced the psychotherapy of many hospitalized borderline patients. Early familial trauma, prominent in the latent content of the nightmares, predisposed these patients to adult dysfunction or to a maladaptive response to subsequent trauma. The hospital ward's emphasis on intergenerational family therapy and the well-integrated holding environment helped offset distress in patients resulting from the upsurgence of conflictual material latent in their nightmares, whether or not they were posttraumatic. The authors present illustrative cases.

  20. Co-occurrence of dissociative identity disorder and borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A; Ferrell, Lynn; Schroeder, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The literature indicates that, among individuals with borderline personality disorder, pathological dissociation correlates with a wide range of impairments and difficulties in psychological function. It also predicts a poorer response to dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder. We hypothesized that (a) dissociative identity disorder commonly co-occurs with borderline personality disorder and vice versa, and (b) individuals who meet criteria for both disorders have more comorbidity and trauma than individuals who meet criteria for only 1 disorder. We interviewed a sample of inpatients in a hospital trauma program using 3 measures of dissociation. The most symptomatic group was those participants who met criteria for both borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder on the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule, followed by those who met criteria for dissociative identity disorder only, then those with borderline personality disorder only, and finally those with neither disorder. Greater attention should be paid to the relationship between borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder. PMID:24377974

  1. Co-occurrence of dissociative identity disorder and borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A; Ferrell, Lynn; Schroeder, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The literature indicates that, among individuals with borderline personality disorder, pathological dissociation correlates with a wide range of impairments and difficulties in psychological function. It also predicts a poorer response to dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder. We hypothesized that (a) dissociative identity disorder commonly co-occurs with borderline personality disorder and vice versa, and (b) individuals who meet criteria for both disorders have more comorbidity and trauma than individuals who meet criteria for only 1 disorder. We interviewed a sample of inpatients in a hospital trauma program using 3 measures of dissociation. The most symptomatic group was those participants who met criteria for both borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder on the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule, followed by those who met criteria for dissociative identity disorder only, then those with borderline personality disorder only, and finally those with neither disorder. Greater attention should be paid to the relationship between borderline personality disorder and dissociative identity disorder.

  2. Distinguishing female borderline adolescents from normal and other disturbed female adolescents.

    PubMed

    Block, M J; Westen, D; Ludolph, P; Wixom, J; Jackson, A

    1991-02-01

    PSYCHOANALYTIC theory would suggest that differentiating the borderline adolescent from his or her normal peers should be a difficult task. In many respects the developmental crises of adolescence dovetail with critical conflicts of Borderline Personality Disorder--e.g., identity formation and separation-individuation. Extensive semi-structured interviews (Gunderson's Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines) of normal, borderline and other disturbed adolescents provide a data base for examining the hallmarks of borderline pathology in adolescence. This paper focuses on the qualitative differences in patterns of impulsivity, affective lability, dissociative experience, and interpersonal relationships that distinguish borderline teenagers from other seriously disturbed and normal adolescents. The paper also outlines modifications in the Gunderson interview for an adolescent population.

  3. Cardiovascular response to static contraction in borderline hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seals, D R; Hanson, P G; Washburn, R A; Painter, P L; Ward, A; Nagle, F J

    1985-06-01

    Nine young males with borderline hypertension (BH) (mean age +/- SD, 25 +/- 5 yr) and 13 young male normotensive controls (NT) (24 +/- 3 yr) were studied to determine their cardiovascular responses to small and large muscle static contractions. The subjects performed one-arm handgrip and two-leg extension in a randomly assigned order for 3 min at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction. Mean intra-arterial blood pressure (MABP), heart rate (HR), and tension were measured throughout the contractions. Borderline hypertensive patients had a higher MABP at rest (p less than 0.005) and at the end of both types of static contractions (p less than 0.05). The average increases in MABP from rest to the end of exercise (delta MABP) were slightly greater for the BH patients (6 mmHg), but these differences were not significant (p greater than 0.1). However, a greater percentage of BH patients were hyperreactive to handgrip (delta BP greater than 35 mmHg) and leg extension (delta BP greater than 40 mmHg) when compared to controls. These data indicate that, in general, young men with borderline hypertension demonstrate normal cardiovascular regulation in response to static contraction, but that a portion of this population may be hyperreactive to this type of circulatory stress.

  4. Gender issues and borderline personality disorder: why do females dominate the diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Simmons, D

    1992-08-01

    There are significantly more females with the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder than males. This article explores the developmental factors that place females at a greater risk to develop the disorder. Societal expectations that increase the emerging of borderline symptoms are also discussed. Gender differences of "normal" behavior that effect the assigning of the diagnosis are explained. The theory that borderline personality disorder has become the "virus" of psychiatry is presented.

  5. [Carcinoma with low malignant potential (borderline tumor) of the ovary: immunomorphology and clinical aspects].

    PubMed

    Neunteufel, W; Gitsch, G; Schieder, K; Kölbl, H; Breitenecker, G

    1989-01-01

    Four of 28 patients with borderline tumors of the ovary died of intercurrent disease. Twenty-four are alive without clinical evidence of disease, despite the fact that six of them were stage III; joined with the invasive carcinomas they would distort the survival rates. The development of monoclonal antibodies specific to borderline tumors could improve the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of borderline tumors. Our results show that the rates of expression of CA 125, CA 19-9, and CEA indicate that borderline tumors are an independent group between benign and malignant ovarian tumors.

  6. [Historical background to the development of the concept of the borderline personality].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-11-01

    The history of the development of the concept of borderline personality disorder dates back to the late nineteenth century when in 1884 described the first cases of patients with a clinical picture similar to today's concept of borderline personality disorder, using the first time the concept of borderline. On the current understanding of the borderline personality disorder had a significant impact available and valid diagnostic criteria included in the classifications ICD-10 and DSM-IV-TR and psychological theories such as psychoanalytic theory of "object relations" and cognitive behavioral approaches.

  7. Childhood sexual and physical abuse in adult patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ogata, S N; Silk, K R; Goodrich, S; Lohr, N E; Westen, D; Hill, E M

    1990-08-01

    Experiences of abuse and neglect were assessed in 24 adults diagnosed as having borderline personality disorder according to the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients and in 18 depressed control subjects without borderline disorder. Significantly more of the borderline patients than depressed patients reported childhood sexual abuse, abuse by more than one person, and both sexual and physical abuse. There were no between-group differences for rates of neglect or physical abuse without sexual abuse. A stepwise logistic regression revealed that derealization, diagnostic group, and chronic dysphoria were the best predictors of childhood sexual abuse in this group of patients.

  8. Use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Borderline Personality Disorder: A View from Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Binali; Dunlop, Boadie W.; Ninan, Philip T.; Bradley, Rebekah

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in treating borderline personality disorder during psychiatry residency, and assess the status of DBT education within psychiatry residencies in the United States. Method: The authors present a patient with borderline personality disorder treated by a resident using DBT,…

  9. Emotion Regulation Training for Adolescents with Borderline Personality Disorder Traits: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuppert, H. Marieke; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Bloo, Josephine; van Gemert, Tonny G.; Wiersema, Herman M.; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Nauta, Maaike H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of Emotion Regulation Training (ERT), a 17-session weekly group training for adolescents with borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. Method: One hundred nine adolescents with borderline traits (73% meeting the full criteria for BPD) were randomized to treatment as usual only (TAU) or ERT + TAU.…

  10. Using Student Ability and Item Difficulty for Making Defensible Pass/Fail Decisions for Borderline Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulruf, Boaz; Jones, Phil; Turner, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The determination of Pass/Fail decisions over Borderline grades, (i.e., grades which do not clearly distinguish between the competent and incompetent examinees) has been an ongoing challenge for academic institutions. This study utilises the Objective Borderline Method (OBM) to determine examinee ability and item difficulty, and from that…

  11. Extremely rare borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Gyu; Kim, Shin Young; Jung, Hae Yoen; Lee, Deuk Young; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the male breast is an extremely rare disease, and far fewer cases of borderline phyllodes tumors than benign or malignant tumors in the male breast have been reported. We report a case of borderline phyllodes tumor in the male breast with imaging findings of the tumor and pathologic correlation. PMID:26316459

  12. Borderline viability: controversies in caring for the extremely premature infant.

    PubMed

    Leuthner, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    Controversy surrounding the decision to resuscitate at the limits or borderline of viability has been at the center of neonatal ethical debate for decades. This debate has led to numerous reports from individual institutions, councils, and advisory committees that all have remarkable consistency in the development of gestational age-based guidelines. This article reviews legal or regulatory concerns that may contradict ethical discussion and guidelines, discriminatory and scientific basis concerns with consensus guidelines, and personal controversy about how to determine best interest. Guidelines are a reasonable place to start in helping determine parental authority and autonomy. The article also addresses controversies raised in counseling and costs.

  13. Neurocognitive deficits in borderline personality disorder: implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Judd, Patricia A

    2012-03-01

    The cognitive dimension of Borderline Personality Disorder has received relatively little attention in the clinical literature and is poorly understood. This article illustrates how a range of cognitive problems including attention deficit disorder and learning disabilities may contribute to the cognitive disturbances identified in the disorder including dissociation, paranoia, all or nothing thinking, overvalued ideas, and denial and splitting. A review of relevant research supporting the presence of cognitive deficits is summarized along with a developmental pathway for the expression of the cognitive dimension. Clinical examples are provided. Recommendations for inclusion of assessment and treatment strategies that address cognitive deficits within a psychodynamically based psychotherapy are discussed.

  14. The Neurobiological Basis of Adolescent-onset Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Marianne; Mascitelli, Kathryn; Triebwasser, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Over the past two decades, neurobiological studies in adult onset borderline personality disorder have made important strides, but inquiry into adolescent-onset BPD is still in its infancy and our understanding of the neurobiology of adolescent BPD remains highly tentative. Methods: This paper highlights recent findings in genetics, neuroendocrinology and neuroimaging for adult and adolescent-onset BPD. Results: Neurobiological studies of adolescent-onset BPD to date have focused mainly on volumetric studies of various brain regions and measurements of HPA axis components, with comparatively few publications on brain functioning. Conclusion: Such information is essential to developing more effective screening, treatment and preventive strategies. PMID:23970910

  15. Alchemy, homeopathy and the treatment of borderline cases.

    PubMed

    Whitmont, E C

    1996-07-01

    Homeopathy is presented as a modality of potential usefulness in the treatment of borderline patients refractory to psychoanalytic work. In these instances a minimally adequate centre of consciousness did not solidify from the identity with the psychoid stratum. In the view of Alchemy, this failure of the mind to separate from the unio naturalis or massa confusa could be remedied by a medicamentum spagyricum, an archtypal essence acting according to the simile principle, which was to be extracted from various substances. Homeopathy is described as a modern, clinically effective modification of the alchemistic method. Two cases example are given for illustration.

  16. Borderline Personality Characteristics and Treatment Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for PTSD in Female Rape Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Stephanie B.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies report that comorbid borderline personality pathology is associated with poorer outcomes in the treatment of Axis I disorders. Given the high rates of comorbidity between borderline personality pathology and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is essential to determine whether borderline symptomatology affects PTSD treatment…

  17. Association between schizotypal and borderline personality disorder traits, and cannabis use in young adults.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Patrick; Chabrol, Henri

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association of schizotypal and borderline personality traits to cannabis use. Participants were 476 college students (95 males; 381 females; mean age of males=21; mean age of females=20.7) who completed self-report questionnaires assessing cannabis use, schizotypal and borderline personality traits. Problematic cannabis use, depressive symptoms, borderline and schizotypal traits were significantly inter-correlated. A logistic regression analysis showed that only borderline traits contributed significantly to cannabis use in the total sample. A multiple regression analysis showed that only schizotypal traits were positively and uniquely associated to problematic cannabis use symptoms among users. These results may imply that schizotypal traits are not a risk factor for initiating use, but may facilitate the development of problematic use symptoms among users. This study showed the necessity of taking into account schizotypal traits when exploring the relationships between depressive symptoms, borderline traits and cannabis use. PMID:27149691

  18. Distinct pattern of P3a event-related potential in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Meares, Russell; Melkonian, Dmitriy; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne

    2005-02-28

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials to auditory stimuli were recorded for 17 unmedicated patients with borderline personality disorder, 17 matched healthy controls and 100 healthy control participants spanning five decades. Using high-resolution fragmentary decomposition for single-trial event-related potential analysis, distinctive disturbances in P3a in borderline personality disorder patients were found: abnormally enhanced amplitude, failure to habituate and a loss of temporal locking with P3b. Normative age dependencies from 100 controls suggest that natural age-related decline in P3a amplitude is reduced in borderline personality disorder patients and is likely to indicate failure of frontal maturation. On the basis of the theories of Hughlings Jackson, this conceptualization of borderline personality disorder is consistent with an aetiological model of borderline personality disorder. PMID:15706238

  19. Association between schizotypal and borderline personality disorder traits, and cannabis use in young adults.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Patrick; Chabrol, Henri

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the association of schizotypal and borderline personality traits to cannabis use. Participants were 476 college students (95 males; 381 females; mean age of males=21; mean age of females=20.7) who completed self-report questionnaires assessing cannabis use, schizotypal and borderline personality traits. Problematic cannabis use, depressive symptoms, borderline and schizotypal traits were significantly inter-correlated. A logistic regression analysis showed that only borderline traits contributed significantly to cannabis use in the total sample. A multiple regression analysis showed that only schizotypal traits were positively and uniquely associated to problematic cannabis use symptoms among users. These results may imply that schizotypal traits are not a risk factor for initiating use, but may facilitate the development of problematic use symptoms among users. This study showed the necessity of taking into account schizotypal traits when exploring the relationships between depressive symptoms, borderline traits and cannabis use.

  20. [Posttraumatic stress disorder, dissociation and self-destructive behavior in borderline patients

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Carsten; Effler, Kerstin; Freyberger, Harald J.

    2000-01-01

    We studied traumatic childhood experiences, comorbid posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD), dissociation and self-destructive behavior in 30 inpatients with a borderline personality disorder. A standardized interview for the assessment of PTSD, the Dissociative Experience Scale and the Symptom-checklist were administered. Results were compared to a control of inpatients with neurotic disorders matched for gender and age. Borderline patients showed significantly more childhood sexual and physical abuse as well as emotional neglect than the control patients. Of the borderline patients, 67% met criteria for PTSD and only 13% of the control group. Dissociative symptoms were significantly more frequent in borderline patients and predicted in combination with PTSD symptoms and self-destructive behavior. We discuss our findings with respect to their etiological and clinical significance and propose a model for self-destruction in borderline patients which focusses on dissociation and trauma.

  1. Identity disturbance in adolescence: associations with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Westen, Drew; Betan, Ephi; Defife, Jared A

    2011-02-01

    Although establishing a coherent identity is often viewed as a normative developmental task of adolescence, an important question is whether forms of identity disturbance seen in adult personality disorders can also be distinguished in adolescents. If so, such disturbances would constitute an essential target for research and clinical interventions. The goal of this study is to investigate the nature of identity disturbance in an adolescent clinical sample and to explore its links with personality pathology, particularly borderline personality disorder. A national random sample of 139 psychiatrists and clinical psychologists completed a battery of instruments on a randomly selected adolescent patient in their care, including measures of Axis II symptoms and the Identity Disturbance Questionnaire-Adolescent Version, an instrument designed for clinically experienced observers that assesses a wide range of manifestations of potential identity disturbance among adolescents. Factor analysis of the Identity Disturbance Questionnaire--Adolescent Version yielded four clinically and conceptually coherent factors that resembled dimensions previously identified in adults: lack of normative commitment, role absorption, painful incoherence, and lack of consistency. As in adults, identity disturbance in adolescents is a clinically meaningful, multidimensional construct exhibiting significant relationships with different forms of severe personality pathology, most notably borderline personality disorder. As such, identity disturbance can be a manifestation of psychopathology above and beyond the typical Sturm und Drang (storm and stress) of adolescence.

  2. Working around a contested diagnosis: borderline personality disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Koehne, Kristy; Hamilton, Bridget; Sands, Natisha; Humphreys, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    This discourse analytic study sits at the intersection of everyday communications with young people in mental health settings and the enduring sociological critique of diagnoses in psychiatry. The diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is both contested and stigmatized, in mental health and general health settings. Its legitimacy is further contested within the specialist adolescent mental health setting. In this setting, clinicians face a quandary regarding the application of adult diagnostic criteria to an adolescent population, aged less than 18 years. This article presents an analysis of interviews undertaken with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) clinicians in two publicly funded Australian services, about their use of the BPD diagnosis. In contrast with notions of primacy of diagnosis or of transparency in communications, doctors, nurses and allied health clinicians resisted and subverted a diagnosis of BPD in their work with adolescents. We delineate specific social and discursive strategies that clinicians displayed and reflected on, including: team rules which discouraged diagnostic disclosure; the lexical strategy of hedging when using the diagnosis; the prohibition and utility of informal 'borderline talk' among clinicians; and reframing the diagnosis with young people. For clinicians, these strategies legitimated their scepticism and enabled them to work with diagnostic uncertainty, in a population identified as vulnerable. For adolescent identities, these strategies served to forestall a BPD trajectory, allowing room for troubled adolescents to move and grow. These findings illuminate how the contest surrounding this diagnosis in principle is expressed in everyday clinical practice. PMID:22674745

  3. [Integrative approach in the psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years six psychotherapy methods have been developed specifically for borderline personality disorder. Solid RCT evidences suggests the efficacy of all the methods. Roughly equivalent improvement was obtained from the different types of psychotherapies. Today we have reached a new phase of the borderline "psychotherapy boom", the integrative approach. According to the integrative treatment advocates we should not choose among these effective treatments but we can incorporate in the therapy all the components that work. The integrative approach uses general factors common to all effective therapies, combined with specific treatment techniques taken from different therapies in order to treat the given patient's psychopathology. These common factors are: coherent framework; attention to strategies for building strong positive alliance and maintaining patient motivation; creating a safe and structured therapeutic environment; clear treatment frame; transparency of the goals and roles; focus upon presenting problems; higher level therapeutic activity; here-and-now focus; and facilitating self-reflection. Treatment focuses on change while maintaining a validating and supportive stance. General strategies can be supplemented by more specific techniques such as cognitive-behavioral interventions for reducing maladaptive behavior, training for developing emotion regulation skills and interpersonal skills coming from dialectical behavior therapy. Methods drawn from psychodynamic approaches can be used for the modification of underlying interpersonal cognitive-emotional schemas.

  4. Autistic barriers in the psychoanalysis of borderline adults.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D; Jay, S M

    1996-10-01

    The authors discuss Frances Tustin's work on childhood autism in order to clarify the nature and protective function of autistic barriers in adult patients who present challenging resistances in treatment. Tustin's thesis is that childhood autism constitutes a massive formation of avoidance reactions that develop in infancy to ward off traumatic awareness of bodily separateness. She describes two forms of childhood pathology that may develop: the encapsulated child who defends against all 'not me' experience by means of self-generated bodily sensations that augment the illusion of complete bodily continuity with the mother; and the entangled child who generates a protective illusion of being enfolded inside the body of the mother to minimise the experience of separateness. The transference resistances of borderline adults can be categorised according to Tustin's typology of encapsulation and entanglement. Clinical material is presented from the analyses of two borderline patients, one encapsulated and the other entangled. Despite seemingly different transference manifestations, both belong to the category of autistic barriers inasmuch as they ward off awareness of separation-induced injury to the primal self. The countertransference difficulties that the analyst encounters with patients who employ autistic barriers are discussed and treatment issues are reviewed.

  5. Dissociation in borderline personality disorder: a detailed look.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Marilyn I; Dell, Paul F; Links, Paul S; Thabane, Lehana; Fougere, Philip

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess in detail the whole spectrum of normal and pathological dissociative experiences and dissociative disorder (DD) diagnoses in borderline personality disorder (BPD) as diagnosed with the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Dissociation was measured comprehensively in 21 BPD outpatients using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised, the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID), the Dissociative Experiences Scale pathological taxon analysis, and the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire. The frequencies of DDs in this BPD sample were as follows: 24% no DD, 29% mild DD (dissociative amnesia and depersonalization disorder), 24% DD Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS), and 24% dissociative identity disorder. With regard to the dissociative experiences endorsed, almost all patients reported identity confusion, unexplained mood changes, and depersonalization. Even those BPD patients with mild DD reported derealization, depersonalization, and dissociative amnesia. BPD patients with DDNOS reported frequent depersonalization, frequent amnesia, and notable experiences of identity alteration. BPD patients with dissociative identity disorder endorsed severe dissociative symptoms in all categories. Analysis of the MID pathological dissociation items revealed that 32% of the items were endorsed at a clinically significant level of frequency by more than 50% of our BPD patients. In conclusion, the frequencies of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) DDs in these patients with BPD were surprisingly high. Likewise, the "average" BPD patient endorsed a wide variety of recurrent pathological dissociative symptoms.

  6. Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children

    PubMed Central

    BELSKY, DANIEL W.; CASPI, AVSHALOM; ARSENEAULT, LOUISE; BLEIDORN, WIEBKE; FONAGY, PETER; GOODMAN, MARIANNE; HOUTS, RENATE; MOFFITT, TERRIE E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that borderline personality related characteristics can be observed in children, and that these characteristics are associated with increased risk for the development of borderline personality disorder. It is not clear whether borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with adult borderline personality disorder. We investigated the etiology of borderline personality related characteristics in a longitudinal cohort study of 1,116 pairs of same-sex twins followed from birth through age 12 years. Borderline personality related characteristics measured at age 12 years were highly heritable, were more common in children who had exhibited poor cognitive function, impulsivity, and more behavioral and emotional problems at age 5 years, and co-occurred with symptoms of conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. Exposure to harsh treatment in the family environment through age 10 years predicted borderline personality related characteristics at age 12 years. This association showed evidence of environmental mediation and was stronger among children with a family history of psychiatric illness, consistent with diathesis–stress models of borderline etiology. Results indicate that borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with borderline personality disorder in adults and suggest that inherited and environmental risk factors make independent and interactive contributions to borderline etiology. PMID:22293008

  7. Etiological features of borderline personality related characteristics in a birth cohort of 12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Arseneault, Louise; Bleidorn, Wiebke; Fonagy, Peter; Goodman, Marianne; Houts, Renate; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2012-02-01

    It has been reported that borderline personality related characteristics can be observed in children, and that these characteristics are associated with increased risk for the development of borderline personality disorder. It is not clear whether borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with adult borderline personality disorder. We investigated the etiology of borderline personality related characteristics in a longitudinal cohort study of 1,116 pairs of same-sex twins followed from birth through age 12 years. Borderline personality related characteristics measured at age 12 years were highly heritable, were more common in children who had exhibited poor cognitive function, impulsivity, and more behavioral and emotional problems at age 5 years, and co-occurred with symptoms of conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. Exposure to harsh treatment in the family environment through age 10 years predicted borderline personality related characteristics at age 12 years. This association showed evidence of environmental mediation and was stronger among children with a family history of psychiatric illness, consistent with diathesis-stress models of borderline etiology. Results indicate that borderline personality related characteristics in children share etiological features with borderline personality disorder in adults and suggest that inherited and environmental risk factors make independent and interactive contributions to borderline etiology.

  8. Maternal empathy, family chaos, and the etiology of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Golomb, A; Ludolph, P; Westen, D; Block, M J; Maurer, P; Wiss, F C

    1994-01-01

    Psychoanalytic writers have traced the etiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) to be a preoedipal disturbance in the mother-child relationship. Despite the prevalence of theories focusing on the role of mothering in the development of BPD, few empirical studies have tested the hypothesis that borderlines were the recipients of unempathic mothering. The current preliminary study compared 13 mothers of borderline adolescents with 13 mothers of normal adolescents. This study found that mothers of borderlines tended to conceive of their children egocentrically, as need-gratifying objects, rather than as individuals with distinct and evolving personalities. This study also found that the mothers of borderlines reported raising their daughters in extremely chaotic families struggling to cope with multiple hardships, including divorce and financial worries. The stressful environmental circumstances reported by the mothers likely affected the borderline daughters directly as well as the mothers' ability to parent effectively and empathically. The results of this study suggest that, as predicted by psychoanalytic theory, a problematic mother-child relationship may play a significant role in the genesis of borderline pathology; however, the life circumstances that contextualize the mother-child relationship also need to be considered when accounting for the etiology of BPD. PMID:8040554

  9. DNA Cytometry and Nuclear Morphometry in Ovarian Benign, Borderline and Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    el Din, Amina A. Gamal; Badawi, Manal A.; Aal, Shereen E. Abdel; Ibrahim, Nihad A.; Morsy, Fatma A.; Shaffie, Nermeen M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKDROUND: Ovarian carcinoma is a leading cause of death in gynecological malignancy. Ovarian surface epithelial serous and mucinous tumours are classified as benign, borderline, and malignant. The identification of borderline tumours most likely to act aggressively remains an important clinical issue. AIM: This work aimed to study DNA ploidy and nuclear area in ovarian serous and mucinous; benign, borderline and malignant tumours. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included forty ovarian (23 serous and 17 mucinous) tumours. Paraffin blocks were sectioned; stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic and morphometric studies and with blue feulgen for DNA analysis. RESULTS: All four serous and six out of nine mucinous benign tumours were diploid. All eight serous and five mucinous malignant tumours were aneuploid. Nine of eleven (81.8%) serous and all three mucinous borderline tumours were aneuploid. There were highly significant differences in mean aneuploid cells percentage between serous benign (1.5%), borderline (45.6%) and malignant (74.5%) (p = 0.0001) and between mucinous benign (13.2%) and both borderline (63.7%) and malignant (68.4%) groups (p = 0.0001). There were significant differences in nuclear area between serous benign (26.191%), borderline (45.619%) and malignant (67.634 %) and a significant positive correlation between mean percentage aneuploid value and mean nuclear area in all serous and mucinous groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that DNA ploidy and nuclear area combined, may be adjuncts to histopathology; in ovarian serous and mucinous benign, borderline and malignant neoplasms; identifying the aggressive borderline tumours. PMID:27275284

  10. Management of borderline personality disorder: a review of psychotherapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    STONE, MICHAEL H.

    2006-01-01

    There are currently three major psychotherapeutic approaches to the management of borderline personality disorder (BPD): the psychodynamic, the cognitive-behavioral, and the supportive. There are special varieties within each: e.g., transference-focused psychotherapy (psychodynamic) or dialectic behavioral therapy (cognitive-behavioral). Though differing in basic conceptions and in methodology, all approaches aim at the amelioration of both the symptom-aspects that dominate the clinical picture at the outset, and the personality difficulties that remain apparent after the symptoms have been alleviated. The term "management" implies a focus on the more serious aspects of the borderline picture. These can be pictured hierarchically as to their level of seriousness, and there is universal agreement about the nature of this hierarchy. Therapists must pay attention first to suicidal and self-mutilative behaviors. Next, one deals with any threats to interrupt therapy prematurely. Third in order of seriousness: non-suicidal symptoms such as (mild to moderate) depression, substance abuse, panic and other anxiety manifestations, or dissociation. Psychopharmacological treatment will often be used adjunctively to help control any target symptoms, which usually fall into such categories as cognitive-perceptual, affect dysregulation, or impulsive/ behavioral dyscontrol. Therapists must then be alert to any signs of withholding, dishonesty, or antisocial tendencies, since these have an adverse effect on prognosis. When all these disruptive influences are (to the extent possible) dealt with, therapists will next take up milder symptoms such as social anxiety or lability of mood. Throughout this initial process, the personality-disorder attributes of BPD will become more apparent, and will usually emerge with greater clarity, once the serious symptoms have been dealt with. The management issues will gradually be supplanted with the overlapping and enduring personality issues

  11. Attachment, parental bonding and borderline personality disorder features in young adults.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Angela D; Waudby, Carol J; Trull, Timothy J

    2002-04-01

    The relations between parental bonding and attachment constructs and borderline personality disorder features were examined in a sample of 393 18-year-old participants. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that parental bonding and attachment scores (especially insecure attachment, anxious or ambivalent attachment, and a perception of a relative lack of caring from one's mother) were uniquely associated with borderline features beyond what could be accounted for by gender, childhood adversity experiences, Axis I disorder, and nonborderline Axis II symptoms. Although relatively modest, these relations suggest that bonding and attachment constructs might be considered in comprehensive etiological models of borderline personality disorder.

  12. The experience of borderline phenomena through cinema: Guentin Tarantino's Reservoir dogs, true romance, and pulp fiction.

    PubMed

    Ross, Donald R; Favero, Marcus

    2002-01-01

    The experience of many patients with borderline personality is intense and kaleidoscopic. These qualities may be represented in film in ways that reflect and convey their essential features that are less readily captured in words. Quentin Tarantino has produced a trilogy of films that bring to light and to life the borderline experience. We use these movies to illustrate and discuss five key borderline themes: the fluid nature of drive derivatives, the discontinuous experience of time and space, the coniflicted search for an idealized parent, antisocial distortions of the superego, and the organizing and stabilizing function of a central romantic fantasy.

  13. Pharmacotherapy for borderline patients: business as usual or by default?

    PubMed

    Ingenhoven, Theo

    2015-04-01

    In their analysis of a representative sample from the Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health in the UK health services, Paton et al found that 92% of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) received prescriptions for psychotropic medications. Although international guidelines recommend pharmacotherapy for comorbid psychiatric disorders whenever necessary, 82% of the UK BPD patients without such comorbid conditions nevertheless received pharmacotherapy "by default," mostly off-label polypharmacy without adequate psychiatric controls for effectiveness and tolerability. Business as usual? Bad care? International practice guidelines for the treatment of BPD all recommend evidence-based psychological treatment whenever possible (especially manualized psychotherapy like dialectical behavior therapy, schema-focused therapy, mentalization-based treatment, transference-focused psychotherapy) as the first-choice treatment.

  14. Schemas and Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Chapman, Alex; Cellucci, Tony

    2009-06-01

    There is increasing interest regarding the role of maladaptive cognition in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current study examined the relationship between early maladaptive schema (EMS) domains and BPD symptoms as well as whether schema domains account for the relationship between childhood maltreatment and BPD severity. Incarcerated women (N=105) were assessed for BPD symptoms via semi-structured diagnostic interview. Disconnection/Rejection and Impaired Limits were associated with BPD pathology although these domains shared variance with depression and antisocial personality disorder pathology, respectively. In addition, the relationship between childhood abuse and BPD severity was non-significant after controlling for schema domains. Related findings and the implications for cognitive treatment of BPD are discussed. PMID:19159865

  15. Temperament, character, and attachment patterns in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fossati, A; Donati, D; Donini, M; Novella, L; Bagnato, M; Maffei, C

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the specificity of the association between temperamental vulnerability, character deficits, and Borderline personality disorder (BPD), controlling for the effects of attachment patterns. A total of 44 BPD patients were compared with 98 non-BPD patients with other cluster B Personality Disorder (PD) diagnoses, 39 patients with any cluster A or cluster C PD diagnoses, 70 patients with no PD diagnosis, and 206 nonclinical patients. All patients were administered the Temperament and Character Inventory, the Parental Bonding Instrument, and the Attachment Style Questionnaire. Multivariate and univariate tests showed that BPD patients differed significantly from all control groups on Novelty Seeking and Cooperativeness. These differences remained significant when controlling for the effect of attachment.

  16. Use of Clozapine for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Amamou, Badii; Salah, Walid Bel Hadj; Mhalla, Ahmed; Benzarti, Nejla; Elloumi, Hend; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show significant impairment in functioning, particularly in the interpersonal and social domains. Prior reports suggest that clozapine may be effective in the management of BPD. We present the case of a patient with BPD who experienced persistent suicidal ideation and was treated with clozapine at a state psychiatric hospital. After treatment failure with other psychotropic medications, clozapine medication was initiated; not only did suicidal ideation cease, but social and professional functioning also greatly improved to the point of no longer requiring intensive levels of observation or restrictive procedures. Clozapine appears to be efficacious in the management of suicide attempts and self-injurious behavior. Moreover, it appears to be promising as a therapeutic measure for ameliorating the global functioning of patients with severe BPD. Larger, randomized, blinded, and controlled prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings and to determine optimal dosage. PMID:27121437

  17. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J; Jacob, Gitta A; Brändle, Laura S; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes.

  18. [A cognitive approach of the borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Keegan, Eduardo

    The development of cognitive models and treatments for borderline personality disorder over the last two decades has been remarkable. This article presents the main ideas of the models developed by Aaron T. Beck and Arthur Freeman, Jeffrey Young and Marsha Linehan. These theories have generated psychotherapies that have proven their efficacy in controlled empirical studies in a difficult to treat population. The models of Beck Freeman and Young are based on the concept of schema. Linehan's dialectical behavior therapy is based on a biosocial transactional conception of the disorder. All these models emphasize the importance of negative experiences in early development. The article presents the structure of these treatments and describes their specific interventions.

  19. Positron emission tomography in female patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Juengling, F D; Schmahl, C; Hesslinger, B; Ebert, D; Bremner, J D; Gostomzyk, J; Bohus, M; Lieb, K

    2003-01-01

    The pathology of Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is poorly understood and its biological basis remains largely unknown. One functional brain imaging study using [(18)F]Deoxyglucose-PET previously reported frontal and prefrontal hypometabolism. We studied brain metabolism at baseline in 12 medication-free female patients with BPD without current substance abuse or depression and 12 healthy female controls by [(18)F]Deoxyglucose-PET and statistical parametric mapping. We found significant frontal and prefrontal hypermetabolism in patients with BPD relative to controls as well as significant hypometabolism in the hippocampus and cuneus. This study demonstrated limbic and prefrontal dysfunction under resting conditions in patients with BPD by FDG-PET. Dysfunction in this network of brain regions, which has been implicated in the regulation of emotion, may underlie symptoms of BPD.

  20. Recent advances in the developmental aspects of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Kim, Sohye

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the current paper was to review the most recent advances in the developmental aspects of borderline personality disorder (BPD) over the last 3 years to highlight the most significant trends in the field. In so doing, we identify and discuss two exciting new trends: (a) an emphasis on the biological basis of adolescent BPD and (b) empirical evidence in support of long-held theories of the development of BPD. Together, these trends suggest that for the first time, empirical findings are beginning to emerge in support of complex and reciprocal biology × environment interactions over time in the development of BPD. We discuss the emerging literature and highlight the translational impact of this work for the assessment and intervention of adolescent BPD.

  1. Schemas and Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Chapman, Alex; Cellucci, Tony

    2009-06-01

    There is increasing interest regarding the role of maladaptive cognition in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current study examined the relationship between early maladaptive schema (EMS) domains and BPD symptoms as well as whether schema domains account for the relationship between childhood maltreatment and BPD severity. Incarcerated women (N=105) were assessed for BPD symptoms via semi-structured diagnostic interview. Disconnection/Rejection and Impaired Limits were associated with BPD pathology although these domains shared variance with depression and antisocial personality disorder pathology, respectively. In addition, the relationship between childhood abuse and BPD severity was non-significant after controlling for schema domains. Related findings and the implications for cognitive treatment of BPD are discussed.

  2. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  3. Multimethod Investigation of Interpersonal Functioning in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Even though interpersonal functioning is of great clinical importance for patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), the comparative validity of different assessment methods for interpersonal dysfunction has not yet been tested. This study examined multiple methods of assessing interpersonal functioning, including self- and other-reports, clinical ratings, electronic diaries, and social cognitions in three groups of psychiatric patients (N=138): patients with (1) BPD, (2) another personality disorder, and (3) Axis I psychopathology only. Using dominance analysis, we examined the predictive validity of each method in detecting changes in symptom distress and social functioning six months later. Across multiple methods, the BPD group often reported higher interpersonal dysfunction scores compared to other groups. Predictive validity results demonstrated that self-report and electronic diary ratings were the most important predictors of distress and social functioning. Our findings suggest that self-report scores and electronic diary ratings have high clinical utility, as these methods appear most sensitive to change. PMID:21808661

  4. Recent advances in the developmental aspects of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Kim, Sohye

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the current paper was to review the most recent advances in the developmental aspects of borderline personality disorder (BPD) over the last 3 years to highlight the most significant trends in the field. In so doing, we identify and discuss two exciting new trends: (a) an emphasis on the biological basis of adolescent BPD and (b) empirical evidence in support of long-held theories of the development of BPD. Together, these trends suggest that for the first time, empirical findings are beginning to emerge in support of complex and reciprocal biology × environment interactions over time in the development of BPD. We discuss the emerging literature and highlight the translational impact of this work for the assessment and intervention of adolescent BPD. PMID:25749744

  5. Borderline personality disorder: a disorder in search of advocacy.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Compared with bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder (BPD) is as frequent (if not more frequent), as impairing (if not more impairing), and as lethal (if not more lethal). Yet, BPD has received less than one-tenth the funding from the National Institutes of Health than has bipolar disorder. More than other reviewers of the literature on the interface between bipolar disorder and BPD, Paris and Black (Paris J and Black DW (2015) Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder: What is the Difference and Why Does it Matter? J Nerv Ment Dis 203:3-7) emphasize the clinical importance of correctly diagnosing BPD and not overdiagnosing bipolar disorder, with a focus on the clinical feature of affective instability and how the failure to recognize the distinction between sustained and transient mood perturbations can result in misdiagnosing patients with BPD as having bipolar disorder. The review by Paris and Black, then, is more of an advocacy for BPD than other reviews in this area have been. In the present article, the author will illustrate how the bipolar disorder research community has done a superior job of advocating for and "marketing" their disorder compared with researchers of BPD. Specifically, researchers of bipolar disorder have conducted multiple studies highlighting the problem with underdiagnosis, written commentaries about the problem with underdiagnosis, developed and promoted several screening scales to improve diagnostic recognition, published numerous studies of the operating characteristics of these screening measures, attempted to broaden the definition of bipolar disorder by advancing the concept of the bipolar spectrum, and repeatedly demonstrated the economic costs and public health significance of bipolar disorder. In contrast, researchers of BPD have almost completely ignored each of these issues and thus have been less successful in highlighting the public health significance of the disorder.

  6. Identifying Trajectories of Borderline Personality Features in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Haltigan, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine trajectories of adolescent borderline personality (BP) features in a normative-risk cohort (n = 566) of Canadian children assessed at ages 13, 14, 15, and 16 and childhood predictors of trajectory group membership assessed at ages 8, 10, 11, and 12. Method: Data were drawn from the McMaster Teen Study, an on-going study examining relations among bullying, mental health, and academic achievement. Participants and their parents completed a battery of mental health and peer relations questionnaires at each wave of the study. Academic competence was assessed at age 8 (Grade 3). Latent class growth analysis, analysis of variance, and logistic regression were used to analyze the data. Results: Three distinct BP features trajectory groups were identified: elevated or rising, intermediate or stable, and low or stable. Parent- and child-reported mental health symptoms, peer relations risk factors, and intra-individual risk factors were significant predictors of elevated or rising and intermediate or stable trajectory groups. Child-reported attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and somatization symptoms uniquely predicted elevated or rising trajectory group membership, whereas parent-reported anxiety and child-reported ADHD symptoms uniquely predicted intermediate or stable trajectory group membership. Child-reported somatization symptoms was the only predictor to differentiate the intermediate or stable and elevated or rising trajectory groups (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.28). Associations between child-reported reactive temperament and elevated BP features trajectory group membership were 10.23 times higher among children who were bullied, supporting a diathesis–stress pathway in the development of BP features for these youth. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the heterogeneous course of BP features in early adolescence and shed light on the potential prodromal course of later borderline personality disorder. PMID:27254092

  7. [Adult ADHD versus borderline personality disorder: criteria for differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Witt, O; Brücher, K; Biegel, G; Petermann, F; Schmidt, S

    2014-06-01

    The present study focuses on selected symptom criteria to distinguish between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and borderline personality disorder (BPD). A sample of n = 158 subjects was examined, consisting of BPD patients (n = 37), ADHD patients (n = 58), comorbid BPD/ADHD patients (n = 19), a clinical group of patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of a depressive disorder (DEP; n = 22) and a non-clinical control group (KG; n = 22). Selected symptom criteria were investigated by using the German scales "Skala zur Erfassung der Impulsivität und emotionalen Dysregulation der Borderline-Persönlichkeitsstörung" (IES-27), "ADHS-Screening für Erwachsene" (ADHS-LE), "Fragebogen zu dissoziativen Symptomen" (FDS) and a scale for the assessment of paranoid and dichotomous thinking (PADI). Multivariate analyses of variance revealed that BPD patients differed significantly with respect to self-mutilating behaviour, suicidality, dissociation, paranoia and dichotomy from all other groups. The same effect was found for affect regulation. Furthermore BPD patients differed significantly from ADHD patients by a more severe impulsiveness (IES-27), but not through disturbed impulse control and disinhibition overall. Regarding mean differences between ADHD and BPD patients for attentional control, ADHD patients revealed higher scores which just missed significance. For hyperactivity no significant group differences were found which is assumed to be influenced by symptom overlap like restlessness and aversive tension. The findings suggest that BPD-specific criteria, a stronger affective dysregulation and a higher tendency for autoaggressive impulsive reactions are more selective for differential diagnosis than the core symptoms of adult ADHD. Only attentional control might be a useful criterion for differential diagnosis, which should be examined in future studies.

  8. Toward a genetically-informed model of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Livesley, John

    2008-02-01

    This article describes a conceptual framework for describing borderline personality disorder (BPD) based on empirical studies of the phenotypic structure and genetic architecture of personality. The proposed phenotype has 2 components: (1) a description of core self and interpersonal pathology-the defining features of personality disorder-as these features are expressed in the disorder; and (2) a set of traits based on the anxious-dependent or emotional dysregulation factor of the four-factor model of PD. Four kinds of traits are described: emotional (anxiousness, emotional reactivity, emotional intensity, and pessimistic-anhedonia), interpersonal (submissiveness, insecure attachment, social apprehensiveness, and need for approval), cognitive (cognitive dysregulation), and self-harm (behaviors and ideas). Formulation of the phenotype was guided by the conceptualization of personality as a system of interrelated sub-systems. The psychopathology associated with BPD involves most components of the system. The trait structure of the disorder is assumed to reflect the genetic architecture of personality and individual traits are assumed to be based on adaptive mechanisms. It is suggested that borderline traits are organized around the trait of anxiousness and that an important feature of BPD is dysregulation of the threat management system leading to pervasive fearfulness and unstable emotions. The interpersonal traits are assumed to be heritable characteristics that evolved to deal with interpersonal threats that arose as a result of social living. The potential for unstable and conflicted interpersonal relationships that is inherent to the disorder is assumed to result from the interplay between the adaptive structure of personality and psychosocial adversity. The etiology of the disorder is discussed in terms of biological and environmental factors associated with each component of the phenotype.

  9. [Symptoms of DSM IV borderline personality disorder in a nonclinical population of adolescents: study of a series of 35 patients].

    PubMed

    Chabrol, H; Chouicha, K; Montovany, A; Callahan, S

    2001-01-01

    1,363 high school students were solicited to complete a personality disorder questionnaire and were encouraged to continue in the study by signing up for interviews with Master's level psychology students. 107 students (7.8%, 34 males, 73 females, mean age = 16.7 +/- 1.8) manifested themselves for the interview and were assessed by using structured diagnostic interviews for borderline personality disorder and major depressive disorder (DIB-R, Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines; MINI, Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview). The interviews were audiotaped. Interrater reliability was determined by independent ratings of 12 borderline subjects and 12 non-borderline subjects (kappa: 0.795). The distribution of the 107 subjects based on the number of DSM IV borderline personality disorder criteria indicated a gradual dispersion suggesting a continuum from normality to borderline personality disorder: 8% of the subjects met none of the criteria; 16% met one criterion; 17% met two; 12.5%, three; 13.7%, four; 8.4%, five; 5.6%, six; 9.3%, seven; 4.6%, eight; 4.6%, nine. Thirty-five of these 107 subjects (32.7%, 6 males, 29 females, mean age = 16.7 +/- 1.7) received a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder according to DSM IV criteria. The most frequent symptoms were paranoid ideation or dissociative symptoms (97.1%), affective instability (88.6%), inappropriate, intense anger (85.6%), suicidal gestures or automutilation (82.9%), followed by frantic efforts to avoid abandonment (77%), impulsivity (65.7%), unstable and intense relationships (62.9%), identity disturbance (60%), and emptiness (57.1%). The comparison between borderline and non-borderline subjects showed that all borderline personality disorder criteria discriminated significantly between the two groups. The high incidence of paranoid ideation (97.1%) and dissociative experiences (65.7%) in the borderline group suggests the pertinence of criterion 9 in the diagnosis of borderline

  10. Differentiating risk for mania and borderline personality disorder: The nature of goal regulation and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Fulford, Daniel; Eisner, Lori R; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-06-30

    Researchers and clinicians have long noted the overlap among features and high comorbidity of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. The shared features of impulsivity and labile mood in both disorders make them challenging to distinguish. We tested the hypothesis that variables related to goal dysregulation would be uniquely related to risk for mania, while emotion-relevant impulsivity would be related to risk for both disorders. We administered a broad range of measures related to goal regulation traits and impulsivity to 214 undergraduates. Findings confirmed that risk for mania, but not for borderline personality disorder, was related to higher sensitivity to reward and intense pursuit of goals. In contrast, borderline personality disorder symptoms related more strongly than did mania risk with threat sensitivity and with impulsivity in the context of negative affect. Results highlight potential differences and commonalities in mania risk versus borderline personality disorder risk. PMID:25892256

  11. BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN THE MEDICAL SETTING: Suggestive Behaviors, Syndromes, and Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a personality dysfunction that is characterized by disinhibition and impulsivity, which oftentimes manifest as self-regulation difficulties. Patients with this disorder have always been present in medical settings, but have been described as “difficult patients” rather than patients with borderline personality disorder. According to empirical findings, a number of behaviors and medical syndromes/diagnoses are suggestive of borderline personality disorder. Suggestive behaviors in the medical setting may include aggressive or disruptive behaviors, the intentional sabotage of medical care, and excessive healthcare utilization. Suggestive medical syndromes and diagnoses in the medical setting may include alcohol and substance misuse (including the abuse of prescription medications), multiple somatic complaints, chronic pain, obesity, sexual impulsivity, and hair pulling. While not all-inclusive or diagnostic, these behaviors and syndromes/diagnoses may invite further clinical evaluation of the patient for borderline personality disorder. PMID:26351624

  12. Banff Borderline Changes Suspicious for Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Becker, J U; Chang, A; Nickeleit, V; Randhawa, P; Roufosse, C

    2016-09-01

    The definition of Banff Borderline became ambiguous when the Banff 2005 consensus modified the lower threshold from i1t1 (10-25% interstitial inflammation with mild tubulitis) to i0t1 (0-10% interstitial inflammation with mild tubulitis). We conducted a worldwide survey among members of the Renal Pathology Society about their approach to this diagnostic category. A web-based survey was sent out to all 503 current members (153 respondents). A database search yielded which threshold for Banff i was applied in the most influential manuscripts about Borderline. Among the 139 nephropathologists using the Borderline category, 67% use the Banff 1997 definition, requiring Banff i1. Thirty-seven percent admitted to sometimes exaggerating Banff i in the presence of tubulitis, to reach a diagnosis of Borderline. Forty-eight percent were dissatisfied with the definition of Borderline. The majority of the most influential manuscripts used the 1997 definition, contrary to the current one. There is considerable dissatisfaction with Borderline, and practice in Banff i thresholds is variable. Until additional studies inform a revision, we suggest leaving it to each pathologist's discretion whether to use i0 or i1 as the minimal threshold. In order to avoid future ambiguity, a web-based synopsis of all scattered current Banff definitions and rules should be created. PMID:26988137

  13. Ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (borderline tumors): immune morphology and current status.

    PubMed

    Neunteufel, W; Gitsch, G; Schieder, K; Kölbl, H; Breitenecker, G

    1989-01-01

    CA 125, CA 19-9 and CEA were demonstrated in tissue samples of 30 ovarian borderline tumors by immunohistochemistry. Of the 21 serous and 9 mucinous borderline tumors, 23 were in stage I and 7 stage III. None of the patients died of disease. All mucinous borderline tumors were CA 125 negative, 89% CA 19-9 positive and 44% CEA positive. 62% of the serous borderline tumors were CA 125 positive, 52% CA 19-9 and 19% CEA positive. Tumors of low malignant potential responded to CA 19-9 like invasive carcinomas. The incidence of positive responses to CA 125 ands CEA fell between that of benign and malignant tumors. The marker pattern did not correlate with tumor stage and cytological grading. The biological behavior of ovarian borderline tumors ranges between that of benign tumors and invasive carcinomas and cannot be classified as definitely belonging to either group. It is plausible that they are primarily of the borderline type, and not benign tumors that undergo malignant degeneration.

  14. Parenting, relational aggression, and borderline personality features: associations over time in a Russian longitudinal sample.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David A; Coyne, Sarah M; Swanson, Savannah M; Hart, Craig H; Olsen, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    Crick, Murray-Close, and Woods (2005) encouraged the study of relational aggression as a developmental precursor to borderline personality features in children and adolescents. A longitudinal study is needed to more fully explore this association, to contrast potential associations with physical aggression, and to assess generalizability across various cultural contexts. In addition, parenting is of particular interest in the prediction of aggression or borderline personality disorder. Early aggression and parenting experiences may differ in their long-term prediction of aggression or borderline features, which may have important implications for early intervention. The currrent study incorporated a longitudinal sample of preschool children (84 boys, 84 girls) living in intact, two-parent biological households in Voronezh, Russia. Teachers provided ratings of children's relational and physical aggression in preschool. Mothers and fathers also self-reported their engagement in authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and psychological controlling forms of parenting with their preschooler. A decade later, 70.8% of the original child participants consented to a follow-up study in which they completed self-reports of relational and physical aggression and borderline personality features. The multivariate results of this study showed that preschool relational aggression in girls predicted adolescent relational aggression. Preschool aversive parenting (i.e., authoritarian, permissive, and psychologically controlling forms) significantly predicted aggression and borderline features in adolescent females. For adolescent males, preschool authoritative parenting served as a protective factor against aggression and borderline features, whereas authoritarian parenting was a risk factor for later aggression. PMID:25047298

  15. The immunohistochemical expression of CD24 and CD171 adhesion molecules in borderline ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Moulla, Alexandra; Miliaras, Dimosthenis; Sioga, Antonia; Kaidoglou, Aikaterini; Economou, Louisa

    2013-10-01

    CD24 and CD171 are cell adhesion proteins, which have been shown to be overexpressed in several carcinomas and to be associated with a poor clinical outcome. Our aim was to determine the expression of these two adhesion molecules in ovarian borderline neoplasms. We investigated 50 ovarian borderline tumors (serous, mucinous and endometrioid) as well as 29 benign cystadenomas and 25 carcinomas, which were used as controls. Paraffin sections were stained immunohistochemically for CD24 and CD171, and their expression was recorded in a semi-quantitative manner. In normal epithelium and benign ovarian cystadenomas both the CD24 and CD171 expression was negative to low, while their expression was significantly increased in borderline and malignant ovarian tumors. High-grade carcinomas, and carcinomas with metastases to the omentum presented considerably higher CD24 expression than low-grade carcinomas, and carcinomas without metastases. In addition, a few borderline and many malignant tumors presented cytoplasmic CD24 immunoreactivity, whereas all benign and most borderline tumors showed apical localization of this molecule. In conclusion, borderline tumors and carcinomas of the ovary present increased expression of CD24 and CD171 in relation to their benign counterparts, as is the case in malignant tumors of other organs. Change of staining pattern of CD24 (apical to cytoplasmic) apparently relates to a more aggressive phenotype. PMID:24166603

  16. Parenting, relational aggression, and borderline personality features: associations over time in a Russian longitudinal sample.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David A; Coyne, Sarah M; Swanson, Savannah M; Hart, Craig H; Olsen, Joseph A

    2014-08-01

    Crick, Murray-Close, and Woods (2005) encouraged the study of relational aggression as a developmental precursor to borderline personality features in children and adolescents. A longitudinal study is needed to more fully explore this association, to contrast potential associations with physical aggression, and to assess generalizability across various cultural contexts. In addition, parenting is of particular interest in the prediction of aggression or borderline personality disorder. Early aggression and parenting experiences may differ in their long-term prediction of aggression or borderline features, which may have important implications for early intervention. The currrent study incorporated a longitudinal sample of preschool children (84 boys, 84 girls) living in intact, two-parent biological households in Voronezh, Russia. Teachers provided ratings of children's relational and physical aggression in preschool. Mothers and fathers also self-reported their engagement in authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and psychological controlling forms of parenting with their preschooler. A decade later, 70.8% of the original child participants consented to a follow-up study in which they completed self-reports of relational and physical aggression and borderline personality features. The multivariate results of this study showed that preschool relational aggression in girls predicted adolescent relational aggression. Preschool aversive parenting (i.e., authoritarian, permissive, and psychologically controlling forms) significantly predicted aggression and borderline features in adolescent females. For adolescent males, preschool authoritative parenting served as a protective factor against aggression and borderline features, whereas authoritarian parenting was a risk factor for later aggression.

  17. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma.

  18. The spectrum of borderline personality disorder: a neurophysiological view.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) has been defined as a personality disorder in all editions of DSM since 1980; namely, DSM III through V. The criteria are a mixture of symptoms and traits; the etiology, a heterogeneous array of genetic, constitutional, and environmental factors. Until recently the diagnosis relied on clinical descriptions. In the last two decades, neurophysiological data, including MRI and fMRI, have established correlates in various brain regions, particularly those involving the frontal lobes and various limbic structures, that show promise of providing a more substantial basis for diagnosis-relying primarily on (internal) brain changes, rather than on (external) clinical observation. Some of the changes in BPD consist of decreased volume in the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and smaller volume in both the amygdala and hippocampus, though with heightened reactivity in the amygdala. Similar abnormalities have been noted in bipolar disorders (BDs) and in ADHD, both of which often accompany BPD and share certain clinical features. Persons with strong genetic predisposition to BDs can develop BPD even in the absence of adverse environmental factors; those with extreme adverse environmental factors (chiefly, early sexual molestation) can develop BPD in the absence of bipolar vulnerability. In some BPD patients, both sets of factors are present. As ideal treatment depends on careful analysis of these factors, neurophysiological testing may permit both more rational, brain-based diagnostic decisions and more appropriate therapeutic strategies.

  19. MRI appearances of pure epithelial papillary serous borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, J; Nagaraju, E; Ahmad, S

    2015-04-01

    Borderline epithelial ovarian tumours (BOT) represent 15-20% of all non-benign ovarian epithelial neoplasms. Compared to malignant ovarian tumours, they usually present at a younger age and carry a far superior prognosis. Fertility-conserving surgery is an important treatment option for patients with BOT. Ultrasound and CT are both widely available and play roles in the initial investigation and staging of BOT, respectively. However, lack of soft-tissue contrast limits their ability to characterize BOT. MRI can facilitate recognition of pure epithelial serous BOT (SBOT), including the cystic papillary and surface papillary subtypes. An abundance of hyperintense papillary projections with low signal internal branching and ovarian stroma preservation with a hypointense ovarian capsular margin on T2-weighted imaging are features strongly suggestive of SBOT. In this review we will discuss the general morphological features of SBOT, the benefits and drawbacks of ultrasound and CT in the initial work-up, and the principal MRI features enabling recognition of surface papillary and cystic papillary SBOT.

  20. Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown.

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder in the Emergency Department: Good Psychiatric Management.

    PubMed

    Hong, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are high utilizers of psychiatric emergency services and present unique challenges in that setting. Frequently advised to visit an emergency department (ED) if safety is in question, their experiences once there often do not have beneficial effects. Issues specific to patients with BPD in the ED include volatile interactions with staff, repeat visits, concerns about safety (and liability), and disposition. Emergency department staff attitudes toward these patients are frequently negative when compared to patients with other diagnoses, and can detrimentally affect outcomes and perpetuate stigma regarding BPD. These attitudes are often due to lack of education and training about how to understand, approach, and treat the patient with BPD. The limited literature regarding the treatment of BPD in the ED offers few guidelines. This article presents an approach based on Good Psychiatric Management that can reduce negative reactions by ED staff and make ED visits more effective and less harmful. Relevant principles include psychoeducation, the reinforcement of the connection between symptoms and interpersonal stressors, and employment of an active, authentic therapeutic stance. Training ED staff in these principles could lead to attitudinal changes, reduced stigma, and potentially improved outcomes. PMID:27603743

  2. Exploration of microstructural abnormalities in borderline personality disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Klaus H.; Brunner, Romuald; Henze, Romy; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Stieltjes, Bram

    2012-03-01

    As with other mental disorders, the causes of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are complex and not fully understood. In this study we aimed to determine whether adults with BPD exhibit microstructural abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). 56 female right-handed individuals (age range, 14-18 years), 19 with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD, 18 patients with a DSM-IV defined current psychiatric disorder and 19 healthy control subjects were included. Groups were matched for age and IQ. DTI Images were analyzed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS). The analysis revealed significanty reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the group of BPD patients compared to the normal controls. Similar FA reductions could not be found comparing BPD patients to clinical controls. Several clusters of increased radial (DR), axial (DA), and mean (MD) diffusivity were consistently identified when comparing the BPD patients to clinical as well as to healthy controls. None of the measures showed significant differences between the clinical and healthy controls. Diverse possible factors have been suggested to play a role in the disease, including environmental factors, neurobiological factors, or brain abnormalities. The presented results may play an important role in this ongoing debate.

  3. Patterns of interpersonal problems in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Simone; Streeck, Ulrich; Jaeger, Ulrich; Masuhr, Oliver; Warwas, Jasmin; Leichsenring, Falk; Leibing, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a wide variety of interpersonal problems. We examined whether there are different characteristic interpersonal patterns in BPD and how these patterns are related to symptom distress and therapeutic alliance. In 228 inpatients with diagnoses of BPD, interpersonal subtypes based on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (Horowitz et al., Inventar zur Erfassung Interpersonaler Probleme, 2000) were examined through cluster analyses. The global symptom severity and therapeutic alliance were also assessed. We identified five characteristic interpersonal patterns, which we labeled as follows: Cluster 1, "Vindictive"; Cluster 2, "Moderate Submissive"; Cluster 3, "Nonassertive"; Cluster 4, "Exploitable"; and Cluster 5, "Socially Avoidant." The clusters differed significantly in terms of interpersonal distress, interpersonal differentiation, and severity of global symptoms. The ratings of the therapeutic alliance by therapists during treatment significantly differed between the interpersonal subtypes, and the lowest ratings for patients were in the "Socially Avoidant" cluster. Our results stress the impact of interpersonal style on the appearance and treatment of BPD.

  4. Aggression in borderline personality disorder: A multidimensional model.

    PubMed

    Mancke, Falk; Herpertz, Sabine C; Bertsch, Katja

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes a multidimensional model of aggression in borderline personality disorder (BPD) from the perspective of the biobehavioral dimensions of affective dysregulation, impulsivity, threat hypersensitivity, and empathic functioning. It summarizes data from studies that investigated these biobehavioral dimensions using self-reports, behavioral tasks, neuroimaging, neurochemistry as well as psychophysiology, and identifies the following alterations: (a) affective dysregulation associated with prefrontal-limbic imbalance, enhanced heart rate reactivity, skin conductance, and startle response; (b) impulsivity also associated with prefrontal-limbic imbalance, central serotonergic dysfunction, more electroencephalographic slow wave activity, and reduced P300 amplitude in a 2-tone discrimination task; (c) threat hypersensitivity associated with enhanced perception of anger in ambiguous facial expressions, greater speed and number of reflexive eye movements to angry eyes (shown to be compensated by exogenous oxytocin), enhanced P100 amplitude in response to blends of happy versus angry facial expressions, and prefrontal-limbic imbalance; (d) reduced cognitive empathy associated with reduced activity in the superior temporal sulcus/gyrus and preliminary findings of lower oxytocinergic and higher vasopressinergic activity; and (e) reduced self-other differentiation associated with greater emotional simulation and hyperactivation of the somatosensory cortex. These biobehavioral dimensions can be nicely linked to conceptual terms of the alternative Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5) model of BPD, and thus to a multidimensional rather than a traditional categorical approach. PMID:26191822

  5. Maternal Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and Parenting of Adolescent Daughters

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Maureen; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Scott, Lori N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Beeney, Joseph F.; Hipwell, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms are associated with poorer parenting. However, most studies conducted are with young children. In the current study, the authors examined associations between maternal BPD symptoms and parenting in an urban community sample of 15- to 17-year-old girls (n = 1,598) and their biological mothers. Additionally, the authors tested the impact of adolescent temperament on these associations. Mothers reported on their own psychopathology and their daughters' temperament. Adolescent girls reported on mothers' parenting methods in terms of psychological and behavioral control. Results demonstrated that maternal BPD symptoms were associated with aspects of psychological and behavioral control, even after controlling for maternal depression and alcohol use severity. After examining specific BPD components that may account for these associations, the authors found that affective/behavioral dysregulation, but not interpersonal dysregulation or identity disturbance, uniquely accounted for parenting. Adolescent temperament did not moderate these associations. BPD symptoms, particularly affective/behavioral dysregulation, are important targets when conducting parenting interventions. PMID:24689767

  6. Borderline personality traits and disorder: predicting prospective patient functioning

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Decisions about the composition of personality assessment in DSM-V will be heavily influenced by the clinical utility of candidate constructs. This study addressed one aspect of clinical utility by testing the incremental validity of five-factor model personality traits and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) symptoms for predicting prospective patient functioning. Method Five-factor personality traits and BPD features were correlated with one another and predicted 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10-year psychosocial functioning scores for 362 personality-disordered patients. Results Traits and symptom domains related significantly and pervasively to one another and to prospective functioning. FFM extraversion and agreeableness tended to be most incrementally predictive of psychosocial functioning across all intervals; cognitive and impulse action features of BPD features incremented FFM traits in some models. Conclusions These data suggest that BPD symptoms and personality traits are important long-term indicators of clinical functioning that both overlap with and increment one another in clinical predictions. Results support the integration of personality traits and disorders in DSM-V. PMID:20658814

  7. Borderline personality disorder and related traits in forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Reid, William H

    2009-05-01

    Persons with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and related traits appear in many forensic psychiatry settings. Their clinical hallmarks affecting judgment, insight, impulsivity, motivations, and regulation of emotions, as well as their frequently chaotic lives (internal and external), inaccurate perceptions, rationalizations, and comorbid syndromes can have a marked effect on many civil, criminal, and institutional (eg, corrections) issues. Individuals with BPD are overrepresented in civil, criminal, and child custody forensic situations. The character psychopathology of these individuals is substantial, but is often not obvious to laypersons, including lawyers, judges, and jurors. The presence of BPD rarely affects basic responsibility for the person's actions, nor does it usually compromise most forms of competency. Function, not diagnosis, is the key arbiter of forensic relevance. BPD is associated with an increase in the likelihood of doctor-patient problems, including patient complaints and lawsuits that may not be deserved. Forensic professionals evaluating persons with BPD and related traits should be aware of personal and professional bias, particularly that associated with true countertransference.

  8. Psychic skin: psychotic defences, borderline process and delusions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, I apply the concept of psychic skin to analytic work with people suffering from personality disorders and psychoses. When psychoses emerge, the defensive skin which protects the ego is breached and violent unconscious forces rip through the personality. Some of the patients diagnosed as schizophrenic with whom I work have identified with archetypal characters such as Christ, Satan, John Lennon and the Queen. I attempt to show how the adoption of these inflated personas can serve as secondary psychic skins. Such delusional identifications can provide a protective shield to hide the denuded self and prevent intrusion from the external world. Through clinical example, I try to demonstrate how these archetypal 'second skins' can preserve life until internal and external conditions make it possible for the self to emerge. I contrast such psychotic identifications with 'thin-skinned' and 'thick-skinned' narcissism as well as 'defences of the self' in borderline states where the psychic skin may be damaged but does not disintegrate. I also look at the ways in which Jung's own personal experience was different from this and how he managed to avert psychotic breakdown. PMID:22288539

  9. Dopamine dysfunction in borderline personality disorder: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Robert O

    2004-06-01

    Research on the biological basis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused primarily on the serotonin model of impulsive aggression. However, there is evidence that dopamine (DA) dysfunction may also be associated with BPD. Pertinent research and review articles, identified by Medline searches of relevant topics, books, references from bibliographies, and conference proceedings from 1975 to 2003, were reviewed. Evidence of DA dysfunction in BPD derives from the efficacy of traditional and atypical antipsychotic agents in BPD, and from provocative challenges with amphetamine and methylphenidate of subjects with the disorder. In addition, human and animal studies indicate that DA activity plays an important role in emotion information processing, impulse control, and cognition. The results of this review suggest that DA dysfunction is associated with three dimensions of BPD, that is, emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, and cognitive-perceptual impairment. The main limitation of this hypothesis is that the evidence reviewed is circumstantial. There is no study that directly demonstrates DA dysfunction in BPD. In addition, the therapeutic effects of antipsychotic agents observed in BPD may be mediated by non-DA mechanisms of action. If the stated hypothesis is correct, DA dysfunction in BPD may result from genetic, developmental, or environmental factors directly affecting specific DA pathways. Alternatively, DA dysfunction in BPD may be a compensatory response to alterations in the primary neural systems that control emotion, impulse control, and cognition, and that are mediated by the brain's main neurotransmitters, glutamate, and GABA, or in one or more other neuromodulatory pathways such as serotonin, acetylcholine, and norepinephrine.

  10. The relationship between borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A

    2013-06-01

    It is clinically important to recognize both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in patients seeking treatment for depression, and it is important to distinguish between the two. Research considering whether BPD should be considered part of a bipolar spectrum reaches differing conclusions. We reviewed the most studied question on the relationship between BPD and bipolar disorder: their diagnostic concordance. Across studies, approximately 10% of patients with BPD had bipolar I disorder and another 10% had bipolar II disorder. Likewise, approximately 20% of bipolar II patients were diagnosed with BPD, though only 10% of bipolar I patients were diagnosed with BPD. While the comorbidity rates are substantial, each disorder is nontheless diagnosed in the absence of the other in the vast majority of cases (80% to 90%). In studies examining personality disorders broadly, other personality disorders were more commonly diagnosed in bipolar patients than was BPD. Likewise, the converse is also true: other axis I disorders such as major depression, substance abuse, and post-traumatic stress disorder are also more commonly diagnosed in patients with BPD than is bipolar disorder. These findings challenge the notion that BPD is part of the bipolar spectrum.

  11. Sleep disturbances and circadian CLOCK genes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Monika; Schäfer, Michael; Coogan, Andrew; Häßler, Frank; Thome, Johannes

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterised by a deep-reaching pattern of affective instability, incoherent identity, self-injury, suicide attempts, and disturbed interpersonal relations and lifestyle. The daily activities of BPD patients are often chaotic and disorganized, with patients often staying up late while sleeping during the day. These behavioural patterns suggest that altered circadian rhythms may be associated with BPD. Furthermore, BPD patients frequently report suffering from sleep disturbances. In this review, we overview the evidence that circadian rhythms and sleep are disturbed in BPD, and we explore the possibility that personality traits that are pertinent for BPD may be associated with circadian typology, and perhaps to circadian genotypes. With regards to sleep architecture, we review the evidence that BPD patients display altered non-REM and REM sleep. A possible cue to a deeper understanding of this temporal dysregulation might be an analysis of the circadian clock at the molecular and cellular level, as well as behavioural studies using actigraphy and we suggest avenues for further exploration of these factors. PMID:22806005

  12. Fertility preservation in women with borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Giorgia; Somigliana, Edgardo; Giorgione, Veronica; Martinelli, Fabio; Filippi, Francesca; Petrella, Maria Cristina; Candiani, Massimo; Peccatori, Fedro

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) may occur in young women and have an excellent survival rate. Therefore, there is the obligation to put emphasis on fertility preservation in affected women. On the other hand, it has also been underlined that the disease should be managed with caution because these tumours can relapse and, albeit rare, malignant transformation can also occur. Unfortunately, evidence on fertility preservation in women with BOT is scanty. In this opinion paper, we tried to draw some clinical indications based on the few available studies on the clinical management of BOT and their possible relation with controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation (COH). We ultimately came to the following conclusions: (1) Fertility counselling should become an integral part of the clinical management of women with BOT. Conservative management without pre-surgical counselling may expose women without reasonable chances of future conceptions to undue risks. (2) Despite some epidemiological concerns on the possible relation between COH and BOT, the conservative surgical treatment should be associated to oocyte cryopreservation considering the high risk of recurrence of the disease. (3) Letrozole during COH should be considered to temper the theoretical risk of increased recurrences. (4) Pregnancy should not be delayed in women at low-moderate risk of recurrences. Fertility preservation may be avoided in these women provided that they start active pregnancy seeking early. (5) Albeit experimental, oocytes retrieval from affected ovaries removed at the time of surgery can be considered. Conversely, ovarian cortex cryopreservation is not justified given the possible risks of malignant reseeding.

  13. Social dysfunctioning and brain in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Herpertz, Sabine C; Jeung, Haang; Mancke, Falk; Bertsch, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Interpersonal dysfunction is the most prominent and best discriminating characteristic in individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Data from experimental psychopathology point to emotional lability, (auto-)aggression, threat hypersensitivity, poor chance of interpersonal repair, frequent misunderstandings and self/other diffusion as the most significant factors which contribute to the interpersonal derailments typical of BPD. Neuroscientific methods are suitable to elucidate the mechanisms which mediate deficient social functioning in BPD, i.e. affective dysregulation, impulsivity/disinhibition and poor social cognition as well as their neurobiological correlates. Low prefrontoamygdalar coupling together with low activity in inhibiting prefrontal areas, high activity in the mirror neuron system, low activity in the mentalizing circuit, and low anterior insular activity in case of social norm violations are the most significant functional neuroimaging findings that have been reported from individuals with BPD, up to now. In addition, peculiarities of facial emotion processing have been detected by means of psychophysiological methodology in BPD patients. Data have led to preliminary models of social dysfunctioning in BPD that have to be experimentally tested in the future, evolving neuroscience into an important tool to better understand what distresses patients with BPD when communicating with others. PMID:25378381

  14. Perceptual biases in facial emotion recognition in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Daros, Alexander R; Uliaszek, Amanda A; Ruocco, Anthony C

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have biases in facial emotion recognition, which may underlie many of the core features of this disorder. Although they are known to misperceive specific prototypic expressions of emotion (i.e., those displayed at full emotional intensity), patients with this disorder may also show biases in their perceptions of emotions that are expressed at lower levels of emotional intensity. Females with BPD (n = 31) and IQ- and demographically matched nonpsychiatric controls (n = 28) completed a task assessing the recognition of neutral as well as happy and sad facial expressions at mild, moderate, and prototypic emotional intensities. Whereas patients with BPD were more likely than controls to ascribe an emotion to a neutral facial expression, they did not consistently attribute a more negative or positive valence to these faces as compared with controls. Patients were also more likely to perceive mildly sad facial expressions as more intensely sad, and this finding could not be attributed to depressed mood. The results of this study suggest that perceptions of even subtle expressions of negative affect in faces may be subjectively magnified by individuals with BPD, although there was no consistent evidence for a negative perceptual bias for faces displaying a neutral expression. These biases in facial emotion perception for patients with BPD may contribute to difficulties understanding others' emotional states and to problems engaging effectively in social interactions.

  15. Oxytocin can hinder trust and cooperation in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Daphne; Hamilton, Holly; Kim, Suah; Crystal, Sarah; Braun, Ashley; Vicens, Victor; Hollander, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin (OXT) on trust and cooperation in borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder marked by interpersonal instability and difficulties with cooperation. Although studies in healthy adults show that intranasal OXT increases trust, individuals with BPD may show an altered response to exogenous OXT because the effects of OXT on trust and pro-social behavior may vary depending on the relationship representations and expectations people possess and/or altered OXT system functioning in BPD. BPD and control participants received intranasal OXT and played a social dilemma game with a partner. Results showed that OXT produced divergent effects in BPD participants, decreasing trust and the likelihood of cooperative responses. Additional analyses focusing on individual differences in attachment anxiety and avoidance across BPD and control participants indicate that these divergent effects were driven by the anxiously attached, rejection-sensitive participants. These data suggest that OXT does not uniformly facilitate trust and pro-social behavior in humans; indeed, OXT may impede trust and pro-social behavior depending on chronic interpersonal insecurities, and/or possible neurochemical differences in the OXT system. Although popularly dubbed the ‘hormone of love’, these data suggest a more circumspect answer to the question of who will benefit from OXT. PMID:21115541

  16. Borderline Personality Disorder in Transition Age Youth with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Shirley; Frazier, Elisabeth; Hower, Heather; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Topor, David R.; Hunt, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Tina R.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Gill, Mary Kay; Ryan, Neal D.; Strober, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the longitudinal impact of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) on the course and outcome of Bipolar Disorder (BP) in a pediatric BP sample. Method Participants (N=271) and parents from the Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth (COBY) study were administered structured clinical interviews and self-reports on average every 8.7 months over a mean of 93 months starting at age 13.0 +/- 3.1 years. The Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SIDP-IV) was administered at the first follow-up after age 18 to assess for symptoms of BPD. BPD operationalized at the disorder, factor, and symptom level, was examined as a predictor of poor clinical course of BP using all years of follow-up data. Results The number of BPD symptoms was significantly associated with poor clinical course of BP, above and beyond BP characteristics. Affective dysregulation was most strongly associated with poor course at the factor level; the individual symptoms most strongly associated with poor course were dissociation/stress-related paranoid ideation, impulsivity, and affective instability. Conclusions BPD severity adds significantly to the burden of BP illness and is significantly associated with a more chronic and severe course and outcome beyond what can be attributable to BP characteristics. PMID:25865120

  17. Recovery, as Experienced by Women with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Larivière, Nadine; Couture, Élise; Blackburn, Catherine; Carbonneau, Manon; Lacombe, Christophe; Schinck, Shella-Ann; David, Pierre; St-Cyr-Tribble, Denise

    2015-12-01

    Studies examining recovery through the service users' perspectives have mainly included persons with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Giving voice to those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) would enrich our understanding of recovery, as their specific experiences may bring new dimensions, obstacles and facilitators. The objective of this study was to qualitatively capture the experience of recovery in women with BPD. Participants were women between 18 and 65 years old who had a diagnosis of BPD and completed at least 2 years in a program for persons with BPD. During the first meeting, they produced a picture collage, followed by an interview on their experience of recovery. The second meeting was a phone interview to discuss new thoughts. In addition, their medical records were reviewed. A thematic analysis of the interviews was conducted and organized with the Person-Environment-Occupation model. Although recovery was not the best term to name their experience, they all talked about a process towards stability and wellbeing (n = 12). Dimensions of recovery included, for example, letting go of the past (person), being involved in meaningful activities (occupation) and having healthy relationships (environment). Facilitators included social support and participation in a specialized therapy program. The main obstacle was unstable family relationships. The findings from this study showed similar dimensions to previous recovery studies, new perspectives on certain dimensions, as well as new ones. They also reinforced the importance to incorporate intervention outcomes that target the person with BPD, their social environment and meaningful occupations.

  18. Diagnosing borderline. A contribution to the question of its conceptual validity.

    PubMed

    Modestin, J; Abrecht, I; Tschaggelar, W; Hoffmann, H

    1983-01-01

    A total of 437 acute psychiatric inpatients were investigated with the help of a questionnaire containing DSM-III diagnostic criteria for schizotypal as well as for borderline personality disorder and criteria of the Flexible System for the diagnosis of schizophrenia. All patients were also independently diagnosed according to the ICD-9. The clinical ICD-9 diagnoses were compared with the diagnoses given on the basis of the three operational criteria sets mentioned. Patients fulfilling the operational criteria for schizotypal personality disorder were clinically diagnosed as mostly schizophrenic, and there was also a considerable overlap between the two groups of patients, those fulfilling the operational criteria for schizotypal personality disorder and those fulfilling the criteria of the Flexible System for the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Schizotypal personality disorder does not seem to be a clinical entity in the sense of a traditional personality disorder. The majority of patients diagnosed as borderline personality disorder received a clinical diagnosis of a personality disorder. The DSM-III criteria of borderline personality disorder discriminated satisfactorily against schizophrenia as diagnosed by the Flexible System and as diagnosed according to ICD-9. On the other hand, there was no relationship between the borderline personality disorder diagnosis and any single of the ICD-9 personality disorder types. The patients fulfilling the criteria of the borderline personality disorder were equally distributed across all ICD-9 personality disorder types. They were also significantly younger than both the non-borderline and the ICD-9 personality disorder patients. The relationship between borderline personality disorder criteria and age might thus be of a greater relevance than the relationship between these criteria and a clinical type.

  19. Clinical characterization and survival of patients with borderline elevation in pulmonary artery pressure.

    PubMed

    Heresi, Gustavo A; Minai, Omar A; Tonelli, Adriano R; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Farha, Samar; Parambil, Joseph G; Dweik, Raed A

    2013-12-01

    Normal resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) is 8-20 mmHg. Pulmonary hypertension is defined as mean PAP of ≥25 mmHg. Borderline PAP levels of 21-24 mmHg are of unclear significance. We sought to determine the clinical characteristics and survival of subjects with mean PAP of 21-24 mmHg. We examined 1,491 patients enrolled in the Cleveland Clinic Pulmonary Hypertension Registry between February 1990 and May 2012 with baseline right heart catheterization. The relationship between PAP and all-cause mortality was assessed by Cox models and a tree-based analysis. Sixty-three patients had borderline PAP (underlying conditions: 12 left heart disease, 20 respiratory disease, 17 connective-tissue disease, 4 others, and 10 none). We then compared 3 groups: borderline PAP without heart or lung disease ([Formula: see text]), normal PAP without heart or lung disease ([Formula: see text]), and category 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH; [Formula: see text]). Borderline-PAP patients had levels of hemodynamic and functional compromise between those for normal-PAP patients and those for patients with PAH. Borderline PAP was associated with increased mortality compared to normal PAP (hazard ratio: 4.03 [95% confidence interval: 0.78-20.80], [Formula: see text]). A tree-based analysis demonstrated almost identical cut points in mean PAP (≤20, 21-26, and ≥27 mmHg) associated with differential survival ([Formula: see text]). Connective-tissue disease and an elevated transpulmonary gradient were predictors of worse survival in the borderline-PAP population. Borderline PAP elevation is associated with decreased survival, particularly in the context of connective-tissue disease and an elevated transpulmonary gradient. PMID:25006408

  20. Object relations, defensive operations, and affective states in narcissistic, borderline, and antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Gacono, C B; Meloy, J R; Berg, J L

    1992-08-01

    Rorschach data were used to psychometrically "map" the internal psychological operations of three Cluster B personality disorders, listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd ed., rev. [DSM-III-R]; American Psychiatric Association, 1987), all of which may be organized at a borderline level. Psychopathic antisocial subjects (P-APDs) and narcissistic subjects (NPDs) were highly narcissistic. NPD subjects, however, produced more indices of anxiety and attachment capacity and fewer scores related to borderline object relations and damaged identity. P-APDs and borderline subjects (BPDs) produced similar mean numbers of borderline object relations; however, the BPDs were more anxious, produced more unsublimated aggressive and libidinal drive material, and evidenced greater potential for attachment. BPDs were also less narcissistic than both P-APDs and NPDs. Nonpsychopathic antisocial subjects (NP-APDs) were less borderline than P-APDs and BPDs, less narcissistic in terms of a stable grandiose self-structure than NPD and P-APDs, produced less evidence of attachment capacity than NPDs and BPDs but more than P-APDs, and were similar to BPDs in their proneness to anxiety. The outpatient NPDs and BPDs produced more idealization responses than the incarcerated antisocial personality disorder (APD) groups. We conclude that the behavioral descriptions offered for these three Cluster B personality disorders, when used in conjunction with information such as level of personality organization (Kernberg, 1984), level of psychopathy (Hare, 1980, 1985), and outpatient versus inpatient research settings, may have greater intrapsychic specificity than previously thought.

  1. Familial Resemblance of Borderline Personality Disorder Features: Genetic or Cultural Transmission?

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Marijn A.; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Willemsen, Gonneke; Derom, Catherine A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a severe personality disorder for which genetic research has been limited to family studies and classical twin studies. These studies indicate that genetic effects explain 35 to 45% of the variance in borderline personality disorder and borderline personality features. However, effects of non-additive (dominance) genetic factors, non-random mating and cultural transmission have generally not been explored. In the present study an extended twin-family design was applied to self-report data of twins (N = 5,017) and their siblings (N = 1,266), parents (N = 3,064) and spouses (N = 939) from 4,015 families, to estimate the effects of additive and non-additive genetic and environmental factors, cultural transmission and non-random mating on individual differences in borderline personality features. Results showed that resemblance among biological relatives could completely be attributed to genetic effects. Variation in borderline personality features was explained by additive genetic (21%; 95% CI 17–26%) and dominant genetic (24%; 95% CI 17–31%) factors. Environmental influences (55%; 95% CI 51–60%) explained the remaining variance. Significant resemblance between spouses was observed, which was best explained by phenotypic assortative mating, but it had only a small effect on the genetic variance (1% of the total variance). There was no effect of cultural transmission from parents to offspring. PMID:19390632

  2. The 16-Year Course of Shame and Its Risk Factors in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Esen; Niesten, Isabella J. M.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study had two aims. The first was to examine the course of shame over 16 years of prospective follow-up among borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects. The second was to determine risk factors associated with feelings of shame among borderline patients. Two hundred and ninety borderline inpatients and 72 axis II comparison subjects were assessed using a series of semi-structured interviews and self-report measures at baseline and 87% of surviving patients were reassessed at eight waves of follow-up. Borderline patients reported significantly higher levels (2.6 times) of shame (assessed with one item) across 16 years of follow-up than axis II comparison subjects. However, the severity of shame decreased (78% relative decline) significantly over time for both groups. Regarding risk factors, four lifetime adversity risk factors were found to be significantly associated with feelings of shame. Two of these factors (severity of childhood sexual abuse and severity of childhood neglect) remained significant in multivariate analyses. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that borderline patients struggle with intense but decreasing feelings of shame. They also suggest that childhood adversities are significant risk factors for this dysphoric affective state. PMID:24599878

  3. Borderline typical symptoms in adult patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Feige, Bernd; Hesslinger, Bernd; Scheel, Corinna; Ebert, Dieter; Matthies, Swantje; Limberger, Matthias F; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Bohus, Martin; Lieb, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) share several clinical features, e.g. emotional lability and impulsivity. This study aimed to delineate differences and similarities between ADHD and BPD with respect to borderline typical symptomatology and gender specifics. Borderline symptomatology was assessed in 60 adult patients with ADHD with the borderline symptom list (BSL) and compared to both 60 gender- and age-matched BPD patients and control subjects. The BSL is a standardized instrument including 95 items on 7 subscales (self-perception, affect regulation, self-destruction, dysphoria, loneliness, intrusions and hostility). Adult ADHD patients showed significantly higher BSL total scores and all of the seven subscales compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001) but lower scores than BPD patients (p < 0.001). With respect to the seven subscales, the largest differences between ADHD and BPD patients were found with respect to self-destruction (d = 1.12) and affect dysregulation (d = 0.90), whereas the smallest difference was found with respect to loneliness (d = 0.36). In females, the BSL subscales "loneliness" and "hostility" did not differentiate between BPD and ADHD. Borderline typical symptoms are common in adult patients with ADHD but seem to be less pronounced than in patients with BPD. Females with ADHD and BPD share more clinical features than males. However, symptoms of self-destruction and affect dysregulation appear to be more severe in BPD patients.

  4. Functional connectivity of pain-mediated affect regulation in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Niedtfeld, Inga; Kirsch, Peter; Schulze, Lars; Herpertz, Sabine C; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Affective instability and self-injurious behavior are important features of Borderline Personality Disorder. Whereas affective instability may be caused by a pattern of limbic hyperreactivity paired with dysfunctional prefrontal regulation mechanisms, painful stimulation was found to reduce affective arousal at the neural level, possibly underlying the soothing effect of pain in BPD.We used psychophysiological interactions to analyze functional connectivity of (para-) limbic brain structures (i.e. amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex) in Borderline Personality Disorder in response to painful stimulation. Therefore, we re-analyzed a dataset from 20 patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and 23 healthy controls who took part in an fMRI-task inducing negative (versus neutral) affect and subsequently applying heat pain (versus warmth perception).Results suggest an enhanced negative coupling between limbic as well as paralimbic regions and prefrontal regions, specifically with the medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, when patients experienced pain in addition to emotional arousing pictures. When neutral pictures were combined with painful heat sensation, we found positive connectivity in Borderline Personality Disorder between (para-)limbic brain areas and parts of the basal ganglia (lentiform nucleus, putamen), as well areas involved in self-referential processing (precuneus and posterior cingulate).We found further evidence for alterations in the emotion regulation process in Borderline Personality Disorder, in the way that pain improves the inhibition of limbic activity by prefrontal areas. This study provides new insights in pain processing in BPD, including enhanced coupling of limbic structures and basal ganglia. PMID:22428013

  5. The 'Self' and Borderline Personality Disorder: Conceptual and Clinical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian B; Finlayson-Short, Laura; McCutcheon, Louise K; Beard, Hilary; Chanen, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Some concept of self has been used by many, although not all, researchers and clinicians as an 'organising construct' for borderline personality disorder (BPD). There is considerable variation in this usage and how clearly researchers have defined the self. Given this diversity, and that 'self' is often used interchangeably with parallel concepts (e.g., psyche, brain-mind, 'person') or with features of self (e.g., self-awareness, identity), unqualified use of the term is problematic. This is further complicated by the heterogeneity and 'comorbidity' of BPD and the limitations of syndromally based psychiatric nosology. Still, BPD remains in current classification systems and can be reliably diagnosed. A considerable body of research on self and BPD has accrued, including a recent profusion and confluence of neuroscientific and sociopsychological findings. These have generated supporting evidence for a supra-ordinate, functionally constituted entity of the self ranging over multiple, interacting levels from an unconscious, 'core' self, through to a reflective, phenotypic, 'idiographic' and relational self constituted by interpersonal and sociocultural experience. Important insights have been generated regarding emotional and social-cognitive dysregulation, disorder of self-awareness, relationality, identity, and coherence and continuity of the self. Many of these are shared by various trauma-related, dissociative disorders. A construct of the self could be useful as an explanatory principle in BPD, which could be construed as a 'self-state' (and relational) disorder, as opposed to a less severe disorder of aspects of the self (e.g., mood or memory). We offer a tentative description of 'Self' in this context, noting that any such construct will require a clear definition and to be evaluable. PMID:26346462

  6. The 'Self' and Borderline Personality Disorder: Conceptual and Clinical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian B; Finlayson-Short, Laura; McCutcheon, Louise K; Beard, Hilary; Chanen, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Some concept of self has been used by many, although not all, researchers and clinicians as an 'organising construct' for borderline personality disorder (BPD). There is considerable variation in this usage and how clearly researchers have defined the self. Given this diversity, and that 'self' is often used interchangeably with parallel concepts (e.g., psyche, brain-mind, 'person') or with features of self (e.g., self-awareness, identity), unqualified use of the term is problematic. This is further complicated by the heterogeneity and 'comorbidity' of BPD and the limitations of syndromally based psychiatric nosology. Still, BPD remains in current classification systems and can be reliably diagnosed. A considerable body of research on self and BPD has accrued, including a recent profusion and confluence of neuroscientific and sociopsychological findings. These have generated supporting evidence for a supra-ordinate, functionally constituted entity of the self ranging over multiple, interacting levels from an unconscious, 'core' self, through to a reflective, phenotypic, 'idiographic' and relational self constituted by interpersonal and sociocultural experience. Important insights have been generated regarding emotional and social-cognitive dysregulation, disorder of self-awareness, relationality, identity, and coherence and continuity of the self. Many of these are shared by various trauma-related, dissociative disorders. A construct of the self could be useful as an explanatory principle in BPD, which could be construed as a 'self-state' (and relational) disorder, as opposed to a less severe disorder of aspects of the self (e.g., mood or memory). We offer a tentative description of 'Self' in this context, noting that any such construct will require a clear definition and to be evaluable.

  7. Interpretation bias in Cluster-C and borderline personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Arntz, Arnoud; Weertman, Anoek; Salet, Sjoerd

    2011-08-01

    Cognitive therapy (CT) assumes that personality disorders (PDs) are characterized by interpretational biases that maintain the disorder. Changing interpretations is therefore a major aim of CT of PDs. This study tested whether Borderline PD (BPD), Avoidant and Dependent PD (AV/DEPD), and Obsessive-Compulsive PD (OCPD) are characterized by specific interpretations. Among the 122 participants there were 55 PD patients (17 BPD, 30 AV/DEPD, 29 OCPD diagnoses), 26 axis-1 patients, and 41 nonpatients. Participants put themselves into 10 scripts of negative events and noted feelings, thoughts and behaviors that came to mind. Next, they chose between hypothesized BPD-specific, AV/DEPD-specific, and OCPD-specific interpretations of each event (forced choice). Lastly, participants rated belief in each interpretation. Regression analyses revealed that forced choices and belief ratings supported the CT-model of BPD and AV/DEP: interpretations were specific. The alleged OCPD-beliefs were however not specifically related to OCPD, with relatively high popularity in axis-1 patients and nonpatients. The open responses were classified by judges blind for diagnoses, with the following results. BPD was characterized by low levels of solution-focused and healthy-flexible/accepting responses, and higher levels of criticizing others and malevolent interpretations of others. AV/DEPD was characterized by lower levels of solution-focused responses, and higher levels of self-criticism, negative emotions, guilt and fear of judgment, as well as lower levels of other-criticism. OCPD only showed trends for lower healthy responses, and higher compulsiveness and worry. It is concluded that the assumptions of CT are supported for BPD and AV/DEPD, but not - at least not on the explicit interpretational level - for OCPD. CT of OCPD might need a slightly different approach. PMID:21621746

  8. Fertility preservation in women with borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Mangili, Giorgia; Somigliana, Edgardo; Giorgione, Veronica; Martinelli, Fabio; Filippi, Francesca; Petrella, Maria Cristina; Candiani, Massimo; Peccatori, Fedro

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) may occur in young women and have an excellent survival rate. Therefore, there is the obligation to put emphasis on fertility preservation in affected women. On the other hand, it has also been underlined that the disease should be managed with caution because these tumours can relapse and, albeit rare, malignant transformation can also occur. Unfortunately, evidence on fertility preservation in women with BOT is scanty. In this opinion paper, we tried to draw some clinical indications based on the few available studies on the clinical management of BOT and their possible relation with controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation (COH). We ultimately came to the following conclusions: (1) Fertility counselling should become an integral part of the clinical management of women with BOT. Conservative management without pre-surgical counselling may expose women without reasonable chances of future conceptions to undue risks. (2) Despite some epidemiological concerns on the possible relation between COH and BOT, the conservative surgical treatment should be associated to oocyte cryopreservation considering the high risk of recurrence of the disease. (3) Letrozole during COH should be considered to temper the theoretical risk of increased recurrences. (4) Pregnancy should not be delayed in women at low-moderate risk of recurrences. Fertility preservation may be avoided in these women provided that they start active pregnancy seeking early. (5) Albeit experimental, oocytes retrieval from affected ovaries removed at the time of surgery can be considered. Conversely, ovarian cortex cryopreservation is not justified given the possible risks of malignant reseeding. PMID:27428850

  9. [Psychopharmacotherapy improves psychosocial functioning in adolescents with borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Wöckel, Lars; Goth, Kirstin; Zepf, Florian Daniel; Matic, Nina; Holtmann, Martin; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Poustka, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) has undergone significant changes within the last decades. Although there is no specific pharmacological treatment approach for BPD per se, there is evidence for a beneficial effect of psychopharmacological treatment in adults. As there is a significant lack of data regarding such treatment in adolescents we aim to investigate the effects of psychopharmacological treatment retrospectively focusing on the first period of treatment. The study sample comprised 2,778 subjects (inpatients and outpatients) from a population on demand of psychiatric services referred to our department, with 39 patients (aged 16,2 +/- 1,7 yrs.) having a diagnosis of BPD. Psychosocial functioning as indexed on axis VI was assessed within the BADO documentation algorithm before and after treatment. Effects of treatment in terms of improved psychosocial functioning under different medications as well as different risk variables were assessed. Moreover, medicated and un-medicated patients were compared as regards effects of treatment. Upon admission inpatients showed a significantly higher impairment in their psychosocial functioning compared with outpatients. There was no significant difference between medicated and un-medicated patients with respect to the different risk variables assessed. Psychosocial functioning improved under pharmacological treatment, with this effect being unrelated to in- or outpatient status. About 80% of the prescribed medications were antidepressants and neuroleptics, with a combination of two drugs being the most frequent treatment approach to be observed. The data of the present study indicate that psychopharmacological treatment of adolescents with BPD can improve psychosocial functioning. PMID:20491428

  10. [Skills Training for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder].

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Michael; Ehrig, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The emotionally instable personality disorder, mostly called borderline disorder, shows central abnormalities in impulse control as well as instability of mood and identity. It is composed of behaviour problems in creating relationships and in self-management, first of all by high psychophysiological tension. The prevalence of this disorder is 10 % in outpatients and 20 % in inpatients and has therefore high relevance for the medical-psychotherapeutic care system. The treatment is deemed to be complex and interminable. Regarding all evaluated techniques of treatment the best examined is the Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). This specific therapy, developed in the eighties by Marsha M. Linehan, can be used for inpatient and outpatient treatment and combines single and group sessions. It is essential in mental health care of this disorder, but not available everywhere. Essential part of DBT is the skill training, a specific technique for the acquirement and for exercising skills for mindfulness, modulation of tension, regulation of emotions, structuring of social competence and developing self value. The central goal of DBT is to ensure the survival of the patients, to reduce self- and external aggressive behaviour and to provide inpatient crisis interventions. For sustained crisis management skills for reality acceptance are best fitting. But before, fast available sensory and active body-related skills should be used. Radical acceptance is the most important, since most effective, skill. The skills training, although in use for only twenty years, is permanently expanding in practice and is meanwhile also used for other disorders such as, for example, PTSD or ADHD. Since 2010, there also exists an elaborated DBT-version for adolescents. For medical care politics and health-economic reasons a supply with skills training for in- and outpatients all over the country is desirable. PMID:27388871

  11. [Skills Training for Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder].

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Michael; Ehrig, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The emotionally instable personality disorder, mostly called borderline disorder, shows central abnormalities in impulse control as well as instability of mood and identity. It is composed of behaviour problems in creating relationships and in self-management, first of all by high psychophysiological tension. The prevalence of this disorder is 10 % in outpatients and 20 % in inpatients and has therefore high relevance for the medical-psychotherapeutic care system. The treatment is deemed to be complex and interminable. Regarding all evaluated techniques of treatment the best examined is the Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). This specific therapy, developed in the eighties by Marsha M. Linehan, can be used for inpatient and outpatient treatment and combines single and group sessions. It is essential in mental health care of this disorder, but not available everywhere. Essential part of DBT is the skill training, a specific technique for the acquirement and for exercising skills for mindfulness, modulation of tension, regulation of emotions, structuring of social competence and developing self value. The central goal of DBT is to ensure the survival of the patients, to reduce self- and external aggressive behaviour and to provide inpatient crisis interventions. For sustained crisis management skills for reality acceptance are best fitting. But before, fast available sensory and active body-related skills should be used. Radical acceptance is the most important, since most effective, skill. The skills training, although in use for only twenty years, is permanently expanding in practice and is meanwhile also used for other disorders such as, for example, PTSD or ADHD. Since 2010, there also exists an elaborated DBT-version for adolescents. For medical care politics and health-economic reasons a supply with skills training for in- and outpatients all over the country is desirable.

  12. Diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder: Examination of How Clinical Indicators Are Used by Professionals in the Health Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treloar, Amanda Jane Commons; Lewis, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the recognition of borderline personality disorder as a clinical disorder, followed by a review of the contemporary practice of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in psychiatric settings. Many researchers have cautioned against the conflation of difficult patients with the diagnostic category of borderline…

  13. Bullied by Peers in Childhood and Borderline Personality Symptoms at 11-Years of Age: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolke, Dieter; Schreier, Andrea; Zanarini, Mary C.; Winsper, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Abuse by adults has been reported as a potent predictor of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Unclear is whether victimisation by peers increases the risk of borderline personality symptoms. Method: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) prospective, longitudinal observation study of 6050 mothers and their…

  14. Borderline Personality Features and Implicit Shame-Prone Self-Concept in Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, David J.; Helyer, Rebekah; Herlianto, Eugene C.; Willing, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    This study tested if children and adolescents with high levels of borderline personality features (BPF) exhibit the same shame-prone self-concept previously found to characterize adults with borderline personality disorder (Rusch et al., 2007). Self-concept was indexed using the Implicit Association Test, in a community sample of…

  15. Exploring the Association between Emotional Abuse and Childhood Borderline Personality Features: The Moderating Role of Personality Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratz, Kim L.; Latzman, Robert D.; Tull, Matthew T.; Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the extant literature on borderline personality disorder has focused on the course, consequences, and correlates of this disorder among adults. However, little is known about childhood borderline personality (BP) features, or the factors associated with the emergence of BP pathology in childhood. A greater understanding of childhood BP…

  16. Borderline states: pharmacotherapy and psychobiology of personality. A discussion of Soloff's article.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R

    1994-01-01

    The question of the existence of rational drug treatment of borderline personality disorder is discussed from two different positions. To the empiricists, the answer must rely on rigorous analysis of controlled drug trials, while to the realists theoretical conceptions of borderline personality disorder must also be seriously addressed. A rational pharmacotherapy can be claimed even when the nosological status of the disorder is not clarified but must be based on a dimensional analysis of psychopathology. Current psychotropic drugs have some but not any too impressive efficacy in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. It is argued that future drug treatment may benefit from the progress in neuroscience, especially within the area of psychobiology of personality.

  17. Borderline personality pathology and insomnia symptoms in community-dwelling older adults

    PubMed Central

    Oltmanns, Joshua R.; Weinstein, Yana; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research has associated BPD with sleep problems, but the relationship has been explored primarily in small clinical samples of younger adults. Findings from our lab have demonstrated that borderline symptoms remain present in later middle age and are associated with several negative life outcomes. A representative community sample of older adults (N = 633, Mage = 62.3) was obtained from the St Louis area, and interviewer-reports, self-reports, and informant-reports of personality pathology were completed along with an insomnia symptoms questionnaire. Cross-sectional analyses revealed that symptoms from all 10 DSM-IV personality disorders were significantly correlated with insomnia symptoms. However, after statistically controlling for major depression, body-mass index, race and gender, only borderline personality pathology remained significantly associated with insomnia symptoms. Our results demonstrate that in addition to other negative health outcomes, borderline personality pathology is uniquely associated with sleep problems in later middle-aged adults in the community. PMID:24574136

  18. [The main directions of research on the causes conditioning the occurrence of the borderline personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2011-10-01

    Currently, there are two main directions of explaining the occurrence of the borderline personality disorders (BPD). The first of them attempts to explain them upon the constitutional basis, finding the causes in the genetic conditioning, biological and organic factors. The other one underline a role of the psychological developmental categories. A significant role is ascribed to traumatic childhood mental experiences such as: harassment and sexual abuse, as well as neglect of emotional and developmental needs of a child. About 40-71% of the infirm with the borderline personality admits to have been sexually abused. It was observed that there is a connection between the extent of sexual abuse of an individual in childhood and the intensification of the disorders proper for the borderline personality. One should, however, point out that sexual abuse, although they are regarded as a risk factor, are not seen as specific to the infirm with the borderline personality disorders. Moreover, there is a third direction referred to in the literature, seeking the causes of the occurrence of the borderline personality in a significant influence of social-cultural and environment factors. It was noticed that there is a significant correlation between the social situation and the degree of dissemination of those disorders. The borderline personality disorders are more frequent among the people of the low social status background and with relatively low level of education. More and more frequently, theorists and clinical personnel adhere to the view that the development of that disorder is caused by a combination of neurobiological and social factors, together with the pathological qualities of early-childhood development.

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated endothlium-dependent vasodilation is impaired with borderline high-LDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kyle J; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; Weil, Brian R; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The experimental aims of this study were to determine: (1) whether nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is blunted in adult humans with borderline high plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared with adults with optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol levels; and, if so: (2) whether the magnitude of impairment in adults with borderline high LDL-cholesterol is similar to adults with high LDL-cholesterol. Forearm blood flow responses to intraarterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were measured in 50 middle-aged (43-64 year) adults: 20 in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol range (<130 mg/dL); 20 with borderline high LDL-cholesterol (130-159 mg/dL); and 10 with high LDL-cholesterol ($160 mg/dL). In addition, blood flow responses to acetylcholine were determined in the absence and presence of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G) -monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Vasodilation to acetylcholine was ~20% lower (p < 0.05) in the borderline high (from 4.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) and high (from 4.3 ± 0.3 to 12.0 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol groups compared with the optimal/near optimal (from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 14.5 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol group. L-NMMA significantly reduced (~30%) the vasodilator response to acetylcholine in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol group but not the borderline high or high LDL-cholesterol groups. Borderline high LDL-cholesterol is associated with impaired nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  20. The course of marriage/sustained cohabitation and parenthood among borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years.

    PubMed

    Zanarini, Mary C; Frankenburg, Frances R; Reich, D Bradford; Wedig, Michelle M; Conkey, Lindsey C; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of marriage/sustained cohabitation and parenthood reported by recovered and nonrecovered borderline patients, the age first undertaken, and the stability of these relationships. Borderline patients were interviewed about these topics during their index admission and eight times over 16 years of prospective follow-up. Recovered borderline patients were significantly more likely than nonrecovered borderline patients to have married/lived with an intimate partner and to have become a parent. In addition, they first married/cohabited and became a parent at a significantly older age. They were also significantly less likely to have been divorced or ended a cohabiting relationship. In addition, they were significantly less likely to have given up or lost custody of a child. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that stable functioning as a spouse/partner and as a parent are strongly associated with recovery status for borderline patients.

  1. Borderline and antisocial personality scores as mediators between attachment and intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Anne Marie; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Lopez, Frederick G

    2007-01-01

    Court-mandated male batterers (n = 192) attending an intervention program completed measures examining adult attachment orientations (anxious and avoidant), personality disorders (borderline and antisocial), type of violence (psychological and physical), and social desirability. Structural equation modeling was used to determine whether there were significant relationships between anxious attachment and physical and psychological violence that are mediated by either borderline or antisocial personality disorders. Social desirability was included in both models as a covariate. Results indicated that personality disorders fully mediated the relationship between avoidant attachment and physical as well as psychological violence. Personality disorders only partially mediated the relationship between anxious attachment and psychological violence. Implications for intervention are discussed.

  2. A Paratesticular Serous Borderline Tumor in a Pediatric Patient With Proteus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Zachary; Fox, Patrick J; McLees, Lauren; Zheng, Mei; Sharma, Suash; Donohoe, Jeffrey M; Neal, Durwood E

    2015-12-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder of asymmetric overgrowth of various tissues of the body and is associated with specific tumors appearing before the second decade. Although there have been reports of lesions of the genitourinary tract associated with Proteus syndrome, a case of serous borderline tumor of the paratestis has not been previously recorded. We report the first such case in a 20-month-old child who presented with a left-sided testicular mass that was found on histology to be a serous borderline tumor of the paratestis. Surgical management included a left inguinal radical orchiectomy and surveillance follow-up.

  3. A Method for Analyzing Therapist Interventions in the Psychotherapy of Borderline Patients

    PubMed Central

    KOENIGSBERG, HAROLD W.; KERNBERG, OTTO F.; APPELBAUM, ANN H.; SMITH, THOMAS

    1993-01-01

    The authors developed a method for studying the therapist’s use of technique in responding to specific patient themes during treatment of patients with borderline personality disorder. This method can monitor the use of expressive and supportive techniques as well as the congruence between patients’ theme categories and the direction of the therapist’s interventions. The method was developed to monitor adherence to an operationally defined treatment approach for psychodynamic psychotherapy of borderline patients. Data are presented on interrater agreement obtained with this method and on its application to 12 psychotherapy sessions. PMID:22700136

  4. The case of an aging person with borderline personality disorder and possible dementia.

    PubMed

    Helmes, Edward; Steward, Lynda

    2010-08-01

    There is little literature on older adults with borderline personality disorder during neuropsychological assessment. Here we report on a 59-year-old woman with borderline personality disorder who referred herself for assessment because she feared the onset of dementia. Results showed an above average level of intelligence, with scores on memory tests that ranged from well below to well above average in a pattern that was not consistent with a dementia or with common forms of neurologically based memory impairments. A test of memory malingering was within normal limits. Results are discussed in terms of somatization within this personality disorder.

  5. Transference-focused psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder: change in reflective function.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Doering, Stephan; Taubner, Svenja; Hörz, Susanne; Zimmermann, Johannes; Rentrop, Michael; Schuster, Peter; Buchheim, Peter; Buchheim, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Borderline personality disorder is associated with deficits in personality functioning and mentalisation. In a randomised controlled trial 104 people with borderline personality disorder received either transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) or treatment by experienced community therapists. Among other outcome variables, mentalisation was assessed by means of the Reflective Functioning Scale (RF Scale). Findings revealed only significant improvements in reflective function in the TFP group within 1 year of treatment. The between-group effect was of medium size (d = 0.45). Improvements in reflective function were significantly correlated with improvements in personality organisation. PMID:25999334

  6. Sarcoma-like mural nodule in a borderline mucinous tumor of the ovary: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik; Bhowmik, Sourav

    2014-10-01

    Sarcoma-like mural nodule (SLMN) is a very uncommon and misleading benign entity which may be associated with benign, borderline or malignant mucinous neoplasm of the ovary. It should be distinguished from other malignant mural nodules with sarcoma, carcinosarcoma or anaplastic carcinoma for proper management. We report a rare case of SLMN in a borderline mucinous tumor of the ovary in a 30-year-old lady. In spite of having confusing histopathological features the final diagnosis was made depending on the younger age of the patient, well circumscription of the nodule, absence of vascular invasion and immunohistochemical profile. PMID:25540570

  7. Transference-focused psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder: change in reflective function.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Doering, Stephan; Taubner, Svenja; Hörz, Susanne; Zimmermann, Johannes; Rentrop, Michael; Schuster, Peter; Buchheim, Peter; Buchheim, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Borderline personality disorder is associated with deficits in personality functioning and mentalisation. In a randomised controlled trial 104 people with borderline personality disorder received either transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) or treatment by experienced community therapists. Among other outcome variables, mentalisation was assessed by means of the Reflective Functioning Scale (RF Scale). Findings revealed only significant improvements in reflective function in the TFP group within 1 year of treatment. The between-group effect was of medium size (d = 0.45). Improvements in reflective function were significantly correlated with improvements in personality organisation.

  8. Sarcoma-like mural nodule in a borderline mucinous tumor of the ovary: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik; Bhowmik, Sourav

    2014-10-01

    Sarcoma-like mural nodule (SLMN) is a very uncommon and misleading benign entity which may be associated with benign, borderline or malignant mucinous neoplasm of the ovary. It should be distinguished from other malignant mural nodules with sarcoma, carcinosarcoma or anaplastic carcinoma for proper management. We report a rare case of SLMN in a borderline mucinous tumor of the ovary in a 30-year-old lady. In spite of having confusing histopathological features the final diagnosis was made depending on the younger age of the patient, well circumscription of the nodule, absence of vascular invasion and immunohistochemical profile.

  9. Ten-Year Course of Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, John G.; Stout, Robert L.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Shea, M. Tracie; Morey, Leslie C.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Yen, Shirley; Markowitz, John C.; Sanislow, Charles; Ansell, Emily; Pinto, Anthony; Skodol, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    Context Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is traditionally considered chronic and intractable. Objective To compare the course of BPD’s psychopathology and social function with that of other personality disorders and with major depressive disorder (MDD) over 10 years. Design A collaborative study of treatment-seeking, 18-to 45-year-old patients followed up with standardized, reliable, and repeated measures of diagnostic remission and relapse and of both global social functioning and subtypes of social functioning. Setting Nineteen clinical settings (hospital and outpatient) in 4 northeastern US cities. Participants Three study groups, including 175 patients with BPD, 312 with cluster C personality disorders, and 95 with MDD but no personality disorder. Main Outcome Measures The Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders and its follow-along version (the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders–Follow-Along Version) were used to diagnose personality disorders and assess changes in them. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation were used to diagnose MDD and assess changes in MDD and in social function. Results Eighty-five percent of patients with BPD remitted. Remission of BPD was slower than for MDD (P<.001) and minimally slower than for other personality disorders (P<.03). Twelve percent of patients with BPD relapsed, a rate less frequent and slower than for patients with MDD (P<.001) and other personality disorders (P=.008). All BPD criteria declined at similar rates. Social function scores showed severe impairment with only modest albeit statistically significant improvement; patients with BPD remained persistently more dysfunctional than the other 2 groups (P<.001). Reductions in criteria predicted subsequent improvements in DSM-IV Axis V Global Assessment of Functioning scores (P<.001). Conclusions The 10-year course of BPD is characterized by high rates of

  10. Long-Term Course of Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Information concerning the longitudinal course of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) derives mainly from (a) long-term (10 to 25 year) retrospective follow-up studies, primarily those conducted during the 1980s/1990s, (b) brief (1 to 3 year) follow-up studies of recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of several different treatment approaches, and (c) prospective follow-up studies. The patients contacted in the retrospective studies had been treated mostly by psychoanalytically informed approaches or supportive. Though there was a significant suicide rate of 3 to 9%, about two-thirds of the BPD patients eventually achieved a global assessment score in the 60s or beyond. BPD represents a heterogeneous group of patients, whose outcome is a function of many variables, including personality traits (paranoid and narcissistic conducing to less favorable outcomes), cultural differences, socio-economic level, intelligence level, gender, and age of onset. The RCT studies focused on amelioration of the symptom components of BPD, especially tendencies to self-injury and suicide. The currently favored treatment methods showed in a large percentage of patients, a lessening of these self-destructive behaviors after a year or two of treatment. The time spans were too brief to allow assessment of improvement in key life areas (attainment of self-sufficiency in work, widening of the circle of friends, and success in forming satisfactory intimate partnerships). The prospective studies are based on reassessments at regular intervals of BPD patients and a control group with other personality disorders. Over the past 16 years the BPD patients, compared with controls, were slower to achieve remission, and more apt to show cognitive peculiarities initially-though they showed appreciable improvement over time. The "recovered" BPD patients, compared with the non-recovered patients, showed twice the likelihood of achieving a successful intimate relationship. At 16 years the Mc

  11. Long-Term Course of Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Information concerning the longitudinal course of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) derives mainly from (a) long-term (10 to 25 year) retrospective follow-up studies, primarily those conducted during the 1980s/1990s, (b) brief (1 to 3 year) follow-up studies of recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of several different treatment approaches, and (c) prospective follow-up studies. The patients contacted in the retrospective studies had been treated mostly by psychoanalytically informed approaches or supportive. Though there was a significant suicide rate of 3 to 9%, about two-thirds of the BPD patients eventually achieved a global assessment score in the 60s or beyond. BPD represents a heterogeneous group of patients, whose outcome is a function of many variables, including personality traits (paranoid and narcissistic conducing to less favorable outcomes), cultural differences, socio-economic level, intelligence level, gender, and age of onset. The RCT studies focused on amelioration of the symptom components of BPD, especially tendencies to self-injury and suicide. The currently favored treatment methods showed in a large percentage of patients, a lessening of these self-destructive behaviors after a year or two of treatment. The time spans were too brief to allow assessment of improvement in key life areas (attainment of self-sufficiency in work, widening of the circle of friends, and success in forming satisfactory intimate partnerships). The prospective studies are based on reassessments at regular intervals of BPD patients and a control group with other personality disorders. Over the past 16 years the BPD patients, compared with controls, were slower to achieve remission, and more apt to show cognitive peculiarities initially-though they showed appreciable improvement over time. The "recovered" BPD patients, compared with the non-recovered patients, showed twice the likelihood of achieving a successful intimate relationship. At 16 years the Mc

  12. Assessment of borderline personality features in population samples: is the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features scale measurement invariant across sex and age?

    PubMed

    De Moor, Marleen H M; Distel, Marijn A; Trull, Timothy J; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2009-03-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is more often diagnosed in women than in men, and symptoms tend to decline with age. Using a large community sample, the authors investigated whether sex and age differences in four main features of BPD, measured with the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features scale (PAI-BOR; Morey, 1991), are a result of measurement bias or if they represent true differences. The PAI-BOR was completed by four Sex x Age groups (N = 6,838). Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that the PAI-BOR is measurement invariant across sex and age. Compared with men, women reported more borderline characteristics for affective instability, identity problems, and negative relationships but not for self-harm. Younger men had higher scores for identity problems and self-harm than did older men. Younger women had higher scores for identity problems and affective instability than did older women. Results suggest that the PAI-BOR can be used to study the etiology of BPD features in population-based samples and to screen for BPD features in clinical settings in both men and women of varying ages. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Emotional Responses to Self-Injury Imagery among Adults with Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Stacy Shaw; Linehan, Marsha M.; Sylvers, Patrick; Chittams, Jesse; Rizvi, Shireen L.

    2008-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SAs) are especially prevalent in borderline personality disorder. One proposed mechanism for the maintenance of NSSI and SAs is escape conditioning, whereby immediate reductions in aversive emotional states negatively reinforce the behaviors. Psychophysiological and subjective indicators of…

  14. Metallothionein expression and nuclear size in benign, borderline, and malignant serous ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y; Sinniah, R; Bay, B H; Singh, G

    1999-09-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight proteins involved in metalloregulatory functions such as cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation. In recent years, MT expression has been linked with carcinogenesis, resistance to cancer therapy, and tumour progression. However, the significance of MT expression in ovarian cancers is at present inadequately documented. In this study, MT immunohistochemistry was performed in 12 benign, 14 borderline, and eight malignant serous tumours of the ovary. The intensity of the immunostaining was evaluated by image analysis. There was a significantly higher number of MT-immunopositive cells in the multilayered epithelial cells of borderline serous tumours (atypical proliferative serous tumours) than in the single layered epithelial cells within the same tumour, and in the single cell layer of benign serous tumours. There was no difference in the expression of MTs in the single layered tumour cells of benign and borderline serous tumours. Significantly higher numbers of MT-immunopositive cells were observed in both the single and the multilayered epithelial cells of serous carcinomas, the highest number being observed in the multiple layers of serous carcinomas. The positively stained malignant tumour cells in both single and multiple layers were larger than the negatively stained cells in benign, borderline, and malignant serous ovarian tumours. There was moderate to intense staining. These findings indicate that there is increased expression of MTs in the progression of malignancy, which could be used as a marker in grading the three groups of ovarian serous tumours and for determining prognosis.

  15. A Developmental Neuroscience of Borderline Pathology: Emotion Dysregulation and Social Baseline Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Amy E.; Crowell, Sheila E.; Uyeji, Lauren; Coan, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical research has linked poor emotion regulation abilities with dysfunctional frontolimbic circuitry. Consistent with this, research on borderline personality disorder (BPD) finds that frontolimbic dysfunction is a predominant neural substrate underlying the disorder. Emotion regulation is profoundly compromised in BPD.…

  16. The Effects of Countertransference on the Therapist Treating Borderline Personality Disorder: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capodanno, Karin H.

    The purpose of this paper is to review and critique the literature on the effects of countertransference on the life of the therapist treating patients with borderline personality disorder. Countertransference has long been recognized as an integral component of the therapeutic relationship and may have far reaching effects on both the…

  17. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and…

  18. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  19. Beyond Borderline Personality Disorder: Dialectical Behavior Therapy in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panepinto, Amberly R.; Uschold, Carissa C.; Olandese, Michelle; Linn, Braden K.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the efficacy of a dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program with a general college counseling center population, not limited to students diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. A review of records of 64 students found that obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, paranoia,…

  20. Individual Characteristics, Familial Experience, and Psychopathology in Children of Mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnow, Sven; Spitzer, Carsten; Grabe, Hans J.; Kessler, Christoph; Freyberger, Harald J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine individual characteristics, familial experience, and psychopathology of children of mothers with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Method: Children of mothers with BPD were compared to children of mothers (1) with depressive disorders, (2) with cluster C personality disorders, and (3) without…

  1. Linguistic Factors Associated with Self-Inflicted Injury in Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdwell, Benjamin Park

    2009-01-01

    The present study builds on previous research, which demonstrated higher levels of depressive and interpersonal conflict language in first-person narrative accounts of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempt (SA) in borderline personality disorder. The present study was designed to examine the semantic similarity of time-sequences…

  2. An Educational Programming Framework for a Subset of Students with Diverse Learning Needs: Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Students with intelligence test scores between 70 and 85 frequently fall into the gap between general and special education. Students with borderline intellectual functioning are a large population at-risk for school failure. Recent educational trends (e.g., the use of response to intervention models of special education eligibility,…

  3. Working Memory and Executive Function Profiles of Individuals with Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to investigate the following issues: (1) Do students with borderline intellectual functioning have a pervasive pattern of impaired working memory skills across both verbal and visuo-spatial domains? (2) Is there evidence for impairment in executive function skills, and which tasks indicate greater…

  4. Cognitive Biases in Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability and Alcohol Use-Related Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Duijvenbode, Neomi; Didden, Robert; Voogd, Hubert; Korzilius, Hubert P. L. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of the present pilot study was to examine cognitive biases in individuals with mild to borderline ID and alcohol use-related problems. Participants (N = 57) performed the approach avoidance task, picture rating task and visual dot probe task, which was combined with eye-tracking methodology. They were admitted to a forensic setting…

  5. Fenfluramine and Methylphenidate in Children with Mental Retardation and Borderline IQ: Clinical Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Aman, Michael G.

    1997-01-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of methylphenidate and different doses of fenfluramine in 30 children (ages 5-14) with mental retardation or borderline IQ and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was conducted. Parents and teachers cited more improvement with fenfluramine; however, fenfluramine had more side effects,…

  6. Borderline personality disorder in adolescents: the He-who-must-not-be-named of psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Larrivée, Marie-Pier

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the possibility and pertinence of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in adolescents. The etiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder in adolescents are discussed, and its management is addressed in terms of psychotherapy, pharmacology, hospitalization issues, and family involvement considerations. PMID:24174891

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder and Deliberate Self-Harm: Does Experiential Avoidance Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Alexander L.; Specht, Matthew W.; Cellucci, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The theory that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with experiential avoidance, and that experiential avoidance mediates the association between BPD and deliberate, nonsuicidal self-harm was examined. Female inmate participants (N = 105) were given structured diagnostic assessments of BPD, as well as several measures of…

  8. Borderline personality disorder in adolescents: the He-who-must-not-be-named of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Larrivée, Marie-Pier

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the possibility and pertinence of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in adolescents. The etiology and clinical manifestations of this disorder in adolescents are discussed, and its management is addressed in terms of psychotherapy, pharmacology, hospitalization issues, and family involvement considerations.

  9. Parent-child interaction over time in families of young children with borderline intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Fenning, Rachel M; Baker, Jason K; Baker, Bruce L; Crnic, Keith A

    2014-06-01

    A previous study suggested that mothers of 5-year-old children with borderline intellectual functioning displayed lower positive engagement with their children as compared with both mothers of typically developing children and mothers of children with significant developmental delays (Fenning, Baker, Baker, & Crnic, 2007). The current study integrated father data and followed these families over the subsequent 1-year period. Parent and child behavior were coded from naturalistic home observations at both waves. Results revealed that mothers of children with borderline intellectual functioning displayed a greater increase in negative-controlling parenting from child age 5 to 6 than did other mothers; fathers displayed more negative-controlling behavior in comparison to fathers of typically developing children. In addition, children with borderline intellectual functioning themselves exhibited a more significant escalation in difficult behavior than did typically developing children. Cross-lagged analyses for the sample as a whole indicated that maternal negative-controlling behavior predicted subsequent child difficulties, whereas negative paternal behavior was predicted by earlier child behavior. In conjunction with evidence from Fenning et al. (2007), these findings suggest a complex, dynamic, and systemic developmental pattern in the emotional behavior of families of children with borderline intellectual functioning. Implications and areas in need of additional research are discussed.

  10. Effectiveness and Moderators of Improvement in a Family Education Program for Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiditch, Emily R.

    2010-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) puts great stress on the family system as family members cope with difficult symptoms, accompanying stigma, and caregiver burden. However, development and research on family interventions for BPD lags behind that of other serious mental illnesses. The current study describes a sample of family members,…

  11. Prediction of Time-to-Attainment of Recovery for Borderline Patients Followed Prospectively for 16 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Reich, D. Bradford; Wedig, Michelle M.; Conkey, Lindsey C.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the most clinically relevant baseline predictors of time-to-recovery from borderline personality disorder. Method 290 inpatients meeting rigorous criteria for borderline personality disorder were assessed during their index admission using a series of semistructured interviews and self-report measures. Recovery status, which was defined as concurrent symptomatic remission and good social and full-time vocational functioning, was reassessed at eight contiguous two-year time periods. Survival analytic methods (Cox regression), which controlled for overall baseline severity, were used to estimate hazard ratios and their confidence intervals. Results All told, 60% of the borderline patients studied achieved a two-year recovery. In bivariate analyses, seventeen variables were found to be significant predictors of earlier time-to-recovery. Six of these predictors remained significant in multivariate analyses: no prior psychiatric hospitalizations, higher IQ, good full-time vocational record in two years prior to index admission, absence of an anxious cluster personality disorder, high extraversion, and high agreeableness. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study suggest that prediction of time-to-recovery for borderline patients is multifactorial in nature, involving factors related to lack of chronicity, competence, and more adaptive aspects of temperament. PMID:24588583

  12. Integrating Recovery and the Narrative Attachment Systems Perspective to Working through Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardon, Stephanie; Pernice-Duca, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) presents a number of symptoms and adjustment issues for individuals, but it is also associated with a myriad of risks for the larger family system. A systemic perspective is crucial to comprehending the development of BPD. Promoting healthy relationships with one or more supportive adult enables the child to…

  13. Adolescent Disruptive Behavior and Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in Young Adult Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jeffrey D.; Stepp, Stephanie D.

    2012-01-01

    Very few studies have prospective information, especially regarding males, on the prediction of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) in adulthood from psychiatric disorders in childhood. Certain childhood disorders, however, have notably similar features in common with BPD. In particular, the affective dysfunction, hostility and interpersonal…

  14. Counseling a Student Presenting Borderline Personality Disorder in the Small College Context: Case Study and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Matthew R.; Faulkner, Ginger E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the dynamics and challenges associated with counseling a client experiencing borderline personality disorder in the small college institutional context. The work of counseling centers at small private institutions has been relatively unexplored in the extant college counseling literature. To help fill this gap, the current…

  15. Prospective Associations among Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms, Interpersonal Problems, and Aggressive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Stephanie D.; Smith, Tiffany D.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prospective relationships among borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, interpersonal problems, and types of aggressive behaviors (i.e., experiencing psychological and physical victimization and perpetrating psychological and physical aggression) in a psychiatric sample (N = 139) over the course of 2 years. We…

  16. Double dissociation between cognitive and affective empathy in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Harari, Hagai; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G; Ravid, Milli; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2010-02-28

    We sought to characterize the cognitive and affective empathic abilities of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). While controls showed higher cognitive as compared with affective empathy scores, the BPD group demonstrated the opposite pattern. These results suggest that a dysfunctional pattern of empathic capacity may account for behavioral difficulties in BPD. PMID:20045198

  17. Psychoanalytic Classification and Empiricism with Borderline Personality Disorder as a Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Theodore

    1989-01-01

    Empirical studies based on psychoanalytic model have concentrated on study of therapeutic process and diagnostic groups such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). Work in BPD provides paradigm for future approaches in study of second-order inferences removed from immediate observational field. Concept of structure may be clarified by empirical…

  18. Validation of Measures of Biosocial Precursors to Borderline Personality Disorder: Childhood Emotional Vulnerability and Environmental Invalidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Shannon E.; Baer, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    Linehan's biosocial theory suggests that borderline personality disorder (BPD) results from a transaction of two childhood precursors: emotional vulnerability and an invalidating environment. Until recently, few empirical studies have explored relationships between these theoretical precursors and symptoms of the disorder. Psychometrically sound…

  19. Skills Practice in Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Suicidal Women Meeting Criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2007-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based practice for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and suicidal behavior that has been replicated with a variety of populations. Patients' practice of behavioral skills taught in the group skills training component of DBT may be partly responsible for the positive treatment outcomes according…

  20. Two-Year Stability and Change of Schizotypal, Borderline, Avoidant, and Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Gunderson, John G.; Pagano, Maria E.; Yen, Shirley; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, Tracie M.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Stout, Robert L.; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the stability of schizotypal (STPD), borderline (BPD), avoidant (AVPD) and obsessive-compulsive (OCPD) personality disorders (PDs) over 2 years of prospective multiwave follow-up. Six hundred thirty-three participants recruited at 4 collaborating sites who met criteria for 1 or more of the 4 PDs or for major depressive…

  1. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Meta-Analysis Using Mixed-Effects Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliem, Soren; Kroger, Christoph; Kosfelder, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: At present, the most frequently investigated psychosocial intervention for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the efficacy and long-term effectiveness of DBT. Method: Systematic bibliographic research was undertaken to find relevant literature from online…

  2. Development of Borderline Personality Disorder in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Introduction to the Special Section

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Stephanie D.

    2012-01-01

    Recognizable symptoms and features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) appear during adolescence. However, there has been resistance to diagnose or research this disorder prior to adulthood because of clinical lore that BPD is a long-standing illness and that personality traits are not stable until adulthood. This has resulted in little…

  3. Working Memory Development in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J.; Henry, L. A.; Van Luit, J. E. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the current cross-sectional study was to examine the developmental progression in working memory (WM) between the ages of 9 and 16 years in a large sample of children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities (MBID). Baddeley's influential WM model was used as a theoretical framework. Furthermore, the…

  4. Working Memory Structure in 10- and 15-Year Old Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual, Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Molen, Mariet J.

    2010-01-01

    The validity of Baddeley's working memory model within the typically developing population, was tested. However, it is not clear if this model also holds in children and adolescents with mild to, borderline intellectual disabilities (ID; IQ score 55-85). The main purpose of this study was therefore, to explore the model's validity in this…

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Regulation: Insights from the Polyvagal Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Marilyn A.; Riniolo, Todd C.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    The current study provides the first published evidence that the parasympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system differentiates the response profiles between individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and controls. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a non-invasive marker of the influence of the myelinated vagal…

  6. Intellectual Disabilities and Power Spectra Analysis during Sleep: A New Perspective on Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, M.; Carotenuto, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of sleep in cognitive processes has been confirmed by a growing number of reports for all ages of life. Analysing sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra may be useful to study cortical organisation in individuals with Borderline Intellectual Functioning (BIF), as seen in other disturbances even if it is not considered a…

  7. Tuberculous lymphadenitis and borderline leprosy in a patient with isolated unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia.

    PubMed

    Magazine, Rahul; Chogtu, Bharti; Manu, Mohan K; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar

    2014-01-01

    A 35-year-old man was diagnosed with tuberculous lymphadenitis and multibacillary borderline tuberculoid leprosy. On investigation, isolated unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia was detected and evaluation led us to conclude that the probable cause was Gilbert's syndrome. He was successfully managed by administration of chemotherapy for the treatment of both the mycobacterial infections, with no adverse effects on liver function tests. PMID:25385559

  8. (Social) Cognitive Skills and Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contributions of (social) cognitive skills such as inhibition, working memory, perspective taking, facial emotion recognition, and interpretation of situations to the variance in social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities. Respondents were 79…

  9. Psychiatric Morbidity and Social Functioning among Adults with Borderline Intelligence Living in Private Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassiotis, A.; Strydom, A.; Hall, I.; Ali, A.; Lawrence-Smith, G.; Meltzer, H.; Head, J; Bebbington, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-eighth of the population will have DSM-IV borderline intelligence. Various mental disorders and social disability are associated with it. Method: The paper uses data (secondary analysis) from a UK-wide cross-sectional survey of 8450 adults living in private households. Data were collected on psychiatric disorders,…

  10. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Borderline Personality Disorder in the Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Glenn

    1994-01-01

    Examination of 115 women with eating disorders revealed a secondary diagnosis of borderline personality disorder associated with a history of childhood sexual abuse. A model involving background features, precipitants, and immediate and long-term psychological consequences is suggested to explain the link to childhood abuse, and implications for…

  11. A biosocial developmental model of borderline personality: Elaborating and extending Linehan's theory.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sheila E; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Linehan, Marsha M

    2009-05-01

    Over the past several decades, research has focused increasingly on developmental precursors to psychological disorders that were previously assumed to emerge only in adulthood. This change in focus follows from the recognition that complex transactions between biological vulnerabilities and psychosocial risk factors shape emotional and behavioral development beginning at conception. To date, however, empirical research on the development of borderline personality is extremely limited. Indeed, in the decade since M. M. Linehan initially proposed a biosocial model of the development of borderline personality disorder, there have been few attempts to test the model among at-risk youth. In this review, diverse literatures are reviewed that can inform understanding of the ontogenesis of borderline pathology, and testable hypotheses are proposed to guide future research with at-risk children and adolescents. One probable pathway is identified that leads to borderline personality disorder; it begins with early vulnerability, expressed initially as impulsivity and followed by heightened emotional sensitivity. These vulnerabilities are potentiated across development by environmental risk factors that give rise to more extreme emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dysregulation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Redefining Borderline Syndromes as Posttraumatic and Rediscovering Emotional Containment as a First Stage in Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Jean M.

    2005-01-01

    This brief review traces the evolution of clinical understanding about borderline syndromes during the last three decades of the 20th century. The focus shifted from descriptive phenomenology in the 1970s to documenting linkages with childhood trauma in the 1980s. In the 1990s, effective and teachable techniques for emotional containment in these…

  13. A Biosocial Developmental Model of Borderline Personality: Elaborating and Extending Linehan’s Theory

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, research has focused increasingly on developmental precursors to psychological disorders that were previously assumed to emerge only in adulthood. This change in focus follows from the recognition that complex transactions between biological vulnerabilities and psychosocial risk factors shape emotional and behavioral development beginning at conception. To date, however, empirical research on the development of borderline personality is extremely limited. Indeed, in the decade since M. M. Linehan initially proposed a biosocial model of the development of borderline personality disorder, there have been few attempts to test the model among at-risk youth. In this review, diverse literatures are reviewed that can inform understanding of the ontogenesis of borderline pathology, and testable hypotheses are proposed to guide future research with at-risk children and adolescents. One probable pathway is identified that leads to borderline personality disorder; it begins with early vulnerability, expressed initially as impulsivity and followed by heightened emotional sensitivity. These vulnerabilities are potentiated across development by environmental risk factors that give rise to more extreme emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dysregulation. PMID:19379027

  14. Outcomes with FOLFIRINOX for Borderline Resectable and Locally Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Brian A.; Steve, Jennifer; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Zureikat, Amer H.; Lembersky, Barry C.; Gibson, Michael K.; Stoller, Ronald; Zeh, Herbert J.; Bahary, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Background Trials examining FOLFIRINOX in metastatic pancreatic cancer demonstrate higher response rates compared to gemcitabine-based regimens. There is currently limited experience with neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX in pancreatic cancer. Methods Retrospective review of outcomes of patients with borderline resectable or locally unresectable pancreatic cancer who were recommended to undergo neoadjuvant treatment with FOLFIRINOX. Results FOLFIRINOX was recommended for 25 patients with pancreatic cancer, 13 (52%) unresectable and 12 (48%) borderline resectable. Four patients (16%) refused treatment or were lost to follow up. 21 patients (84%) were treated with a median of 4.7 cycles. 6 patients (29%) required dose reductions secondary to toxicity. 2 patients (9%) were unable to tolerate treatment and 3 patients (14%) had disease progression on treatment. 7 patients (33%) underwent surgical resection following treatment with FOLFIRINOX alone, 2 (10%) of which were initially unresectable. 2 patients underwent resection following FOLFIRINOX + stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The R0 resection rate for patients treated with FOLFIRINOX +/− SBRT was 33% (55% borderline resectable, 10% unresectable). A total of 5 patients (24%) demonstrated a significant pathologic response. Conclusions FOLFIRINOX is a biologically active regimen in borderline resectable and locally unresectable pancreatic cancer with encouraging R0 resection and pathologic response rates. PMID:23955427

  15. Intersession Telephone Contact with Individuals Diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder: Lessons from Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Porath, Denise D.

    2004-01-01

    Therapists often struggle with managing intersession contact with clients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, particularly when dangerous and life-threatening symptoms are communicated (Gunderson, 1996). Difficulties have arisen, in part, because previous phone contacts with this population have failed to recognize the importance of…

  16. The Effectiveness of Biofeedback and Home Relaxation Training on Reduction of Borderline Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesko, Wayne A.; Summerfield, Liane M.

    1988-01-01

    Relaxation and biofeedback have been established as being effective in reducing high blood pressure over both the short and long term. A study found that biofeedback, progressive relaxation, and biofeedback/relaxation combined were all effective treatments for borderline hypertension. (JD)

  17. Comparative evaluation of soft tissue changes in Class I borderline patients treated with extraction and nonextraction modalities

    PubMed Central

    Yashwant V., Aniruddh; K., Ravi; Arumugam, Edeinton

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare soft tissue changes in Class I borderline cases treated with extraction and nonextraction modalities. Methods: A parent sample of 150 patients with Class I dental and skeletal malocclusion (89 patients treated with premolar extraction and 61 patients without extraction) was randomly selected and subjected to discriminant analysis which identified the borderline sample of 44 patients (22 extraction and 22 nonextraction patients). Pretreatment and post-treatment cephalograms of the borderline subsample were analyzed using 22 soft tissue parameters. Results: Upper and lower lips were more retracted and thickness of the upper lip increased more in the borderline extraction cases (p < 0.01). The nasolabial angle became more obtuse and the interlabial gap was reduced in the borderline extraction cases (p < 0.01). Lower lip, interlabial gap and nasolabial angle showed no changes in the borderline nonextraction cases. Conclusion: The soft tissue parameters which can be used as guideline in decision making to choose either extraction or nonextraction in Class I borderline cases are upper and lower lip protrusion in relation to the E-plane and Sn-Pg' line, lower lip protrusion in relation to the true vertical line (TVL), upper lip thickness, nasolabial angle and interlabial gap. PMID:27653264

  18. Borderline Personality Features in Students: the Predicting Role of Schema, Emotion Regulation, Dissociative Experience and Suicidal Ideation

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Seyede Fateme; Arshadi, Nasrin; Zargar, Yadolla; Mehrabizade Honarmand, Mahnaz; Hajjari, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have demonstrated that early maladaptive schemas, emotional dysregulation are supposed to be the defining core of borderline personality disorder. Many studies have also found a strong association between the diagnosis of borderline personality and the occurrence of suicide ideation and dissociative symptoms. Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between borderline personality features and schema, emotion regulation, dissociative experiences and suicidal ideation among high school students in Shiraz City, Iran. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive correlational study, 300 students (150 boys and 150 girls) were selected from the high schools in Shiraz, Iran, using the multi-stage random sampling. Data were collected using some instruments including borderline personality feature scale for children, young schema questionnaire-short form, difficulties in emotion-regulation scale (DERS), dissociative experience scale and beck suicide ideation scale. Data were analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient and multivariate regression analysis. Results: The results showed a significant positive correlation between schema, emotion regulation, dissociative experiences and suicide ideation with borderline personality features. Moreover, the results of multivariate regression analysis suggested that among the studied variables, schema was the most effective predicting variable of borderline features (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The findings of this study are in accordance with findings from previous studies, and generally show a meaningful association between schema, emotion regulation, dissociative experiences, and suicide ideation with borderline personality features. PMID:26401490

  19. PRN (As-Needed) Psychotropic Medication Use in Borderline Patients and Other Personality-Disordered Subjects over 14 Years of Prospective Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Eduardo; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of PRN (as-needed) psychotropic medication in borderline patients has not been well characterized. This study had three purposes: (i) to describe the prevalence of PRN psychotropic medication use among borderline patients and other personality-disordered comparison subjects over 14 years of prospective follow-up; (ii) to examine the rates reported by ever-recovered and never-recovered borderline patients; and (iii) to examine the reasons for taking PRN medication reported by these patients. Overall, the prevalence of PRN psychotropic medication use was initially approximately 3 times higher among borderline patients than other personality-disordered comparison subjects, with a significant one- third decline in the use of PRN medication reported by borderline patients over time. In analyses restricted to borderline patients, never-recovered borderline patients were about twice as likely to use PRN medication than ever-recovered borderline patients over time. In terms of reasons for use, the rates of PRN medication use to decrease agitation for both diagnostic groups declined significantly over time, although they remained significantly higher among borderline patients. Likewise, never-recovered borderline patients reported higher use of PRN medication to decrease agitation than ever-recovered borderline patients over time. The results of this study indicate that PRN psychotropic medication is widely used for the treatment of borderline patients, particularly those who have not achieved a recovery in both the symptomatic and psychosocial realms. They also suggest that borderline patients use proportionally more PRN medication to decrease agitation than other personality comparison subjects, with lower proportional use to reduce agitation found among recovered borderline patients. PMID:24875066

  20. [Functional Neuroimaging Pilot Study of Borderline Personality Disorder in Adolescents].

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, Amélie; Guilé, Jean-Marc; Labelle, Réal; Luck, David

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is being increasingly recognized by clinicians working with adolescents, and the reliability and validity of the diagnosis have been established in the adolescent population. Adolescence is known to be a period of high risk for BPD development as most patients identify the onset of their symptoms to be in the adolescent period. As with other mental health disorders, personality disorder, are thought to result from the interaction between biological and environmental factors. Functional neuroimaging studies are reporting an increasing amount of data on abnormal neuronal functions in BPD adult patients. However, no functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted in adolescents with BPD.Objectives This pilot project aims to evaluate the feasibility of a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study coupled with clinical and psychological measures in adolescent girls with a diagnosis of BPD. It also aims to identify neuronal regions of interest (ROI) for the study of BPD in adolescent girls.Method Six female adolescents meeting DSM-IV criteria for BPD and 6 female adolescents without psychiatric disorder were recruited. Both groups were evaluated for BPD symptoms, depressive symptoms, impulsivity, affective lability, and other potential psychiatric comorbidities. We used fMRI to compare patterns of regional brain activation between these two groups as they viewed 20 positive, 20 negative and 20 neutral emotion-inducing pictures, which were presented in random order.Results Participants were recruited over a period of 22 months. The protocol was well tolerated by participants. Mean age of the BPD group and control group was 15.8 ± 0.9 years-old and 15.5 ± 1.2 years-old respectively. Psychiatric comorbidity and use of medication was common among participants in the BPD group. This group showed higher impulsivity and affective lability scores. For the fMRI task, BPD patients demonstrated greater differences in activation

  1. The Effect of Attending Good Psychiatric Management (GPM) Workshops on Attitudes Toward Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Keuroghlian, Alex S.; Palmer, Brian A.; Choi-Kain, Lois W.; Borba, Christina P. C.; Links, Paul S.; Gunderson, John G.

    2015-01-01

    The effect that attending a 1-day workshop on good psychiatric management (GPM) had on attitudes about borderline personality disorder (BPD) was assessed among 297 clinicians. Change was recorded by comparing before and after scores on a 9-item survey previously developed to assess the effects of workshops on Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS). Participants reported decreased inclination to avoid borderline patients, dislike of borderline patients, and belief that BPD’s prognosis is hopeless, as well as increased feeling of competence, belief that borderline patients have low self-esteem, feeling of being able to make a positive difference, and belief that effective psychotherapies exist. Less clinical experience was related to an increased feeling of competence and belief that borderline patients have low self-esteem. These findings were compared to those from the STEPPS workshop. This assessment demonstrates GPM’s potential for training clinicians to meet population-wide needs related to borderline personality disorder. PMID:26111249

  2. The course of dysphoric affective and cognitive states in borderline personality disorder: a 10-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Lawrence Ian; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    The current study aimed to assess dysphoric states among 290 patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and 72 non-borderline axis II comparison subjects (OPD) over a 10-year course of prospective follow-up. Additionally, we assessed the severity of these states among borderline patients who had and had not recovered both symptomatically and psychosocially. The Dysphoric Affect Scale (DAS) – a 50-item self-report measure of affective and cognitive states thought to be common among borderline patients and specific to the disorder – was administered at five waves of prospective follow-up. Affective and cognitive DAS items were separately analyzed, yielding respective subscores. Borderline patients reported more severe dysphoric states compared to OPD subjects at baseline. However, the severity of affective and cognitive states declined significantly for both groups taken together over 10–years of follow-up. Within the BPD group, recovered subjects reported less severe dysphoric states compared to non-recovered subjects at baseline. Results also showed a significant decline in DAS scores over time, but at a greater rate for recovered subjects. In sum, while the severity of dysphoric states declines significantly over time, inner distress remains an area of vulnerability for borderline subjects. Additionally, the severity and pervasiveness of these states may affect recovery over time. PMID:22326877

  3. A New Perspective on the Pathophysiology of Borderline Personality Disorder: A Model of the Role of Oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Herpertz, Sabine C; Bertsch, Katja

    2015-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder is characterized by three domains of dysfunction: affect dysregulation, behavioral dyscontrol, and interpersonal hypersensitivity. Interpersonal hypersensitivity is associated with a (pre)attentive bias toward negative social information and, on the level of the brain, enhanced bottom-up emotion generation, while affect dysregulation results from abnormal top-down processes. Additionally, the problems of patients with borderline personality disorder in interpersonal functioning appear to be related to alterations in the (social) reward and empathy networks. There is increasing evidence that the oxytocinergic system may be involved in these domains of dysfunction and may thus contribute to borderline psychopathology and even open new avenues for targeted pharmacotherapeutic approaches. From studies in healthy and clinical subjects (including first studies with borderline personality disorder patients), the authors provide a conceptual framework for future research in borderline personality disorder that is based on oxytocinergic modulation of the following biobehavioral mechanisms: 1) the brain salience network favoring adaptive social approach behavior, 2) the affect regulation circuit normalizing top-down processes, 3) the mesolimbic circuit improving social reward experiences, and 4) modulating brain regions involved in cognitive and emotional empathy. In addition, preliminary data point to interactions between the oxytocin and cannabinoid system, with implications for pain processing. These mechanisms, which the authors believe to be modulated by oxytocin, may not be specific for borderline personality disorder but rather may be common to a host of psychiatric disorders in which disturbed parent-infant attachment is a major etiological factor. PMID:26324303

  4. Chronic complex dissociative disorders and borderline personality disorder: disorders of emotion dysregulation?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Lanius, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Emotion dysregulation is a core feature of chronic complex dissociative disorders (DD), as it is for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Chronic complex DD include dissociative identity disorder (DID) and the most common form of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS, type 1), now known as Other Specified Dissociative Disorders (OSDD, type 1). BPD is a common comorbid disorder with DD, although preliminary research indicates the disorders have some distinguishing features as well as considerable overlap. This article focuses on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, psychological profile, treatment, and neurobiology of chronic complex DD with emphasis placed on the role of emotion dysregulation in each of these areas. Trauma experts conceptualize borderline symptoms as often being trauma based, as are chronic complex DD. We review the preliminary research that compares DD to BPD in the hopes that this will stimulate additional comparative research. PMID:26401297

  5. Chronic complex dissociative disorders and borderline personality disorder: disorders of emotion dysregulation?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany L; Lanius, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Emotion dysregulation is a core feature of chronic complex dissociative disorders (DD), as it is for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Chronic complex DD include dissociative identity disorder (DID) and the most common form of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DDNOS, type 1), now known as Other Specified Dissociative Disorders (OSDD, type 1). BPD is a common comorbid disorder with DD, although preliminary research indicates the disorders have some distinguishing features as well as considerable overlap. This article focuses on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, psychological profile, treatment, and neurobiology of chronic complex DD with emphasis placed on the role of emotion dysregulation in each of these areas. Trauma experts conceptualize borderline symptoms as often being trauma based, as are chronic complex DD. We review the preliminary research that compares DD to BPD in the hopes that this will stimulate additional comparative research.

  6. The Beginning Psychotherapist and Borderline Personality Disorder: Basic Treatment Principles and Clinical Foci.

    PubMed

    Merced, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a prevalent psychopathology; thus, most graduate students in psychology, residents in psychiatry, and early career clinicians will encounter patients with this disorder in the course of their training or initial professional practice. This paper provides clear and concise guidelines for conducting treatment geared toward the clinician's developmental level. It builds upon the knowledge and skills that are typically acquired during graduate education and training to provide an accessible framework for undertaking psychotherapy with patients who have borderline personality disorder. This paper draws upon common psychotherapeutic factors and existing evidence-based treatments for the disorder to identify principals and interventions that are likely to contribute to therapeutic action. It uses behavioral, cognitive, and psychodynamic interventions to address the patient's multidimensional psychopathology. This approach offers a coherent and integrated treatment framework for the beginning psychotherapy practitioner.

  7. Relationship between Cumulative BMI and Symptomatic, Psychosocial, and Medical Outcomes in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frankenburg, Frances R.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the relationship between cumulative body mass index (BMI) and symptomatic, psychosocial, and medical outcomes in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Two hundred female borderline patients were weighed and measured during their index admission. They were subsequently interviewed at six, eight, and 10 years intervals. Over 10 years of prospective follow-up, increases in cumulative BMI were significantly associated with self-mutilation and dissociation (but not suicide attempts). Increases in cumulative BMI were also significantly associated with having no life partner, a poor work or school history, being on disability, being rated with a GAF score in the fair or poor range, and having a low income. In addition, increases in BMI were related to having two or more obesity-related medical conditions and using costly forms of health care. Increases in cumulative BMI may be a marker for adverse symptomatic, functional, and medical outcomes in patients with BPD. PMID:21838559

  8. Personality organization in borderline patients with a history of suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Baus, Nicole; Fischer-Kern, Melitta; Naderer, Andrea; Klein, Jakob; Doering, Stephan; Pastner, Barbara; Leithner-Dziubas, Katharina; Plener, Paul L; Kapusta, Nestor D

    2014-08-15

    Suicide attempts (SA) are common in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Recent studies focus on aspects of personality associated with risk for SA such as deficits in affect regulation including impulse control and aggression. The current study examines associations of dysfunctional personality organization, psychiatric comorbidities as well as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) with SA in a sample of 68 BPD outpatients. Patients with a history of SA yielded higher scores in personality domains of aggression, especially self-directed aggression. Further, a history of SA was associated with a worse general level of personality organization and a higher prevalence rate of NSSI and substance abuse disorder. The results demonstrate that SA in BPD patients might be regarded as a manifestation of impaired personality functioning rather than mere state variables and symptoms. Moreover, these findings might have implications for indication, treatment, and prognosis of Borderline Personality Disorder. PMID:24746393

  9. A longitudinal study of the 10-year course of interpersonal features in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Choi-Kain, Lois W; Zanarini, Mary C; Frankenburg, Frances R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Reich, D Bradford

    2010-06-01

    The literature on borderline personality disorder (BPD) describes interpersonal disturbances as a core sector of psychopathology. The longitudinal course of these features remains poorly understood. Our aim is to describe the course of interpersonal features of BPD in a more detailed way than has been done previously. Twenty interpersonal aspects of borderline psychopathology were assessed using two reliable semi-structured diagnostic interviews at baseline and at five successive two-year follow-up waves in the ongoing McLean Study for Adult Development. Behaviorally-oriented features, such as recurrent breakups, sadism, demandingness, entitlement, regression in treatment, and boundary violations, remitted quickly and were rare at the end of follow-up. The interpersonal features slowest to remit were affective responses to being alone, active caretaking, discomfort with care, and dependency. The behavioral interpersonal features of BPD remit rapidly, while core affectively-oriented features related to intolerance of aloneness and conflicts over dependency are more persistent. PMID:20545500

  10. It is time to bring borderline intellectual functioning back into the main fold of classification systems

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Jannelien; Zitman, Frans G.

    2016-01-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning is an important and frequently unrecognised comorbid condition relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of any and all psychiatric disorders. In the DSM-IV-TR, it is defined by IQ in the 71–84 range. In DSM-5, IQ boundaries are no longer part of the classification, leaving the concept without a clear definition. This modification is one of the least highlighted changes in DSM-5. In this article we describe the history of the classification of borderline intellectual functioning. We provide information about it and on the importance of placing it in the right context and in the right place in future DSM editions and other classification systems such as the International Classification of Diseases. PMID:27512590

  11. A case-control study of borderline ovarian tumors: the influence of perineal exposure to talc.

    PubMed

    Harlow, B L; Weiss, N S

    1989-08-01

    The authors interviewed 116 female residents of western Washington State with serous and mucinous borderline ovarian tumors diagnosed between 1980 and 1985 and questioned them on their use of hygienic powders. A sample of 158 control women from the same counties were identified through random digit dialing and were interviewed as well. Neither the perineal application of baby powder nor the perineal application of cornstarch was associated with an appreciably altered risk of borderline ovarian tumors. However, women who used deodorizing powders alone or in combination with other talc-containing powders had 2.8 times the risk (95% confidence interval 1.1-11.7) of women who had not had perineal exposure to powder. These results suggest that future studies of ovarian tumors in relation to the application of talc-containing powders should consider ascertaining the specific type(s) of powder used.

  12. Relationships between individual differences in motivation and borderline personality disorder, psychopathy, and maladjustment.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Larry C

    2013-08-01

    Two studies investigate relationships between individual differences in motivation and borderline personality disorder, psychopathy, and maladjustment. Participants completed the Brief Assessment of Individual Motives 1--Revised, a measure of 15 putative evolved motives (i.e., "traits of action"). In Study 1, N = 147 adult participants also completed the Borderline Personality Questionnaire and Self-Report Psychopathy III Questionnaire (SRP III). In Study 2, N = 135 college age participants also completed the SRP III and the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62. Regression analyses suggested that individual differences in motivational traits account for moderate amounts of variance in measures of antisocial personality disorder, psychopathy, and maladjustment. They also suggested that lower motivation to engage in cooperative behaviors (e.g., sharing resources and forming coalitions) is related to impaired interpersonal relationships and maladjustment.

  13. Exploratory factor analysis of borderline personality disorder criteria in monolingual Hispanic outpatients with substance use disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel F.; Añez, Luis Miguel; Paris, Manuel; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Hispanic patients. Subjects were 130 monolingual Hispanic adults who had been admitted to a specialty outpatient clinic that provides psychiatric and substance abuse services to Spanish-speaking individuals. All were reliably assessed with the Spanish-Language Version of the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders. After evaluating internal consistency of the BPD criterion set, an exploratory factor analysis was performed using principal axis factoring. Results suggested a unidimensional structure, and were consistent with similar studies of the DSM-IV criteria for BPD in non-Hispanic samples. These findings have implications for understanding borderline psychopathology in this population, and for the overall validity of the DSM-IV BPD construct. PMID:20472296

  14. The identification and characteristics of the partially dissociated states of patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Golynkina, K; Ryle, A

    1999-12-01

    A developmental and structural model of borderline personality disorder is described. Partial dissociation provoked by trauma and deprivation in childhood is seen to result in the persistence of separate self states. The characteristics of these and alternations between them are seen to account for the main features of the condition. The identification and characterization of states through clinical procedures and the use of the states grid are described and case illustrations are given. The states identified by the grid method in a series of 20 borderline patients are described and classified into six groups, named abuser rage, victim rage, passive victim, ideal, coping and zombie. The clinical value and nosological implications of the model and these findings are briefly discussed. PMID:10616128

  15. Willing to give but not to forgive: borderline personality features and cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Thielmann, Isabel; Hilbig, Benjamin E; Niedtfeld, Inga

    2014-12-01

    Impaired cooperation has been proposed to contribute to social dysfunctioning in borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, prior research has not distinguished active from reactive cooperation (i.e., nonexploitation versus non-retaliation)--two aspects of cooperative behavior associated with different basic personality traits (viz. Honesty-Humility and Agreeableness). The authors hypothesized that, due to low levels of Agreeableness, but normal levels of Honesty-Humility, borderline personality (BP) features are related to impaired reactive cooperation, but unrelated to active cooperation. Participants (N = 559) hypothetically played both the allocator in the dictator game and the recipient in the ultimatum game. High levels of BP features predicted impaired reactive cooperation in the ultimatum game, which was mediated through low Agreeableness. In contrast, BP features did not predict active cooperation in the dictator game-mirroring the nonassociation between BP features and Honesty-Humility. The findings highlight the importance of focusing on aspects of forgiveness in interventions aiming to improve cooperativeness in BPD.

  16. [Suicide by a borderline patient at the end of fatal self-destructive behavior].

    PubMed

    Heide, S; Schmidt, V

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a borderline personality disorder must also be considered in forensic medicine appraisements, beside the various motivations for a self injurious behaviour and apart from other psychiatric illnesses. This personality disorder is frequently characterized by cuts and scratches made by the patients using sharp objects to inflict themselves when in situations causing great psychological distress. A case of a young female student is presented who exhibited a clear auto-destructive behaviour. Due to a tragic psychodynamic development, she committed suicide by means of carbamazepine intoxikation. In addition to the impressive morphological and traumatological injury pattern, the psychiatric case history of the female patient also showed that she had suffered from a typical borderline personality disorder.

  17. The role of affective instability and UPPS impulsivity in borderline personality disorder features.

    PubMed

    Tragesser, Sarah L; Robinson, R Joe

    2009-08-01

    Current theories of borderline personality disorder (BPD) suggest that extreme levels of affective instability/emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, or a combination of these traits account for the symptoms of BPD. The present study tested the extent to which personality measures of affective instability and impulsivity could account for BPD features in a nonclinical sample. One hundred forty-one undergraduates completed the Affective Lability Scale, the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, and the Personality Assessment Inventory for Borderlines. Both affective instability and impulsivity were uniquely associated with BPD features. Shifts between euthymia and anger, and between anxiety and depression, were associated with BPD features, as were the urgency and (lack of) premeditation scales. Results indicated that specific BPD features may be differentially accounted for by affective instability vs. impulsivity, consistent with perspectives on BPD emphasizing combinations of affective instability and impulsivity as underlying dimensions of the disorder. PMID:19663657

  18. Facial expression recognition ability among women with borderline personality disorder: implications for emotion regulation?

    PubMed

    Wagner, A W; Linehan, M M

    1999-01-01

    This study examined recognition of facial expressions of emotion among women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD; n = 21), compared to a group of women with histories of childhood sexual abuse with no current or prior diagnosis of BPD (n = 21) and a group of women with no history of sexual abuse or BPD (n = 20). Facial recognition was assessed by a slide set developed by Ekman and Matsumoto (Japanese and Caucasian Facial Expressions of Emotion and Neutral Faces, 1992), expanded and improved from previous slide sets, and utilized a coding system that allowed for free responses rather than the more typical fixed-response format. Results indicated that borderline individuals were primarily accurate perceivers of others' emotions and showed a tendency toward heightened sensitivity on recognition of fear, specifically. Results are discussed in terms of emotional appraisal ability and emotion dysregulation among individuals with BPD. PMID:10633314

  19. Etiological significance of associations between childhood trauma and borderline personality disorder: conceptual and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Sabo, A N

    1997-01-01

    Numerous studies over the past decade have pointed to the frequent occurrence of trauma and neglect in the childhood experience of patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Advancing research on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Dissociative Disorders offers further insight into understanding shared clinical phenomena with BPD. Drawing upon attachment theory, models of learned helplessness, and early primate deprivation, empirical, theoretical and clinical data are integrated to conceptualize the role of trauma and neglect in the etiology of BPD. PMID:9113822

  20. Prognostic consequences of borderline dysnatremia: pay attention to minimal serum sodium change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To assess the prevalence of dysnatremia, including borderline changes in serum sodium concentration, and to estimate the impact of these dysnatremia on mortality after adjustment for confounders. Methods Observational study on a prospective database fed by 13 intensive care units (ICUs). Unselected patients with ICU stay longer than 48 h were enrolled over a 14-year period were included in this study. Mild to severe hyponatremia were defined as serum sodium concentration < 135, < 130, and < 125 mmol/L respectively. Mild to severe hypernatremia were defined as serum sodium concentration > 145, > 150, and > 155 mmol/L respectively. Borderline hyponatremia and hypernatremia were defined as serum sodium concentration between 135 and 137 mmol/L or 143 and 145 respectively. Results A total of 11,125 patients were included in this study. Among these patients, 3,047 (27.4%) had mild to severe hyponatremia at ICU admission, 2,258 (20.3%) had borderline hyponatremia at ICU admission, 1,078 (9.7%) had borderline hypernatremia and 877 (7.9%) had mild to severe hypernatremia. After adjustment for confounder, both moderate and severe hyponatremia (subdistribution hazard ratio (sHR) 1.82, 95% CI 1.002 to 1.395 and 1.27, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.60 respectively) were associated with day-30 mortality. Similarly, mild, moderate and severe hypernatremia (sHR 1.34, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.57; 1.51, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.99; and 2.64, 95% CI 2.00 to 3.81 respectively) were independently associated with day-30 mortality. Conclusions One-third of critically ill patients had a mild to moderate dysnatremia at ICU admission. Dysnatremia, including mild changes in serum sodium concentration, is an independent risk factor for hospital mortality and should not be neglected. PMID:23336363

  1. Dermatitis Artefacta Mimicking Borderline Personality Disorder: Sometimes, Skin Could Be Misleading

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Seshadri Sekhar; Mitra, Sayantanava

    2016-01-01

    Dermatitis artefacta lies in a gray zone, between the specialities of psychiatry and dermatology. The condition could mimic a number of other lesions and therefore is a source of much confusion in clinical practice. Here, we describe a case of dermatitis artefacta in an 11-years old girl, which resembled self-harming behavior in Borderline personality disorder. We then discuss how the two could be differentiated and why this becomes imperative while dealing with such cases. PMID:27489388

  2. A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations of Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brettschneider, Christian; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; König, Hans-Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The borderline personality disorder is a common mental disorder. It is frequently associated with various mental co-morbidities and a fundamental loss of functioning. The borderline personality disorder causes high costs to society. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic literature review of existing economic evaluations of treatments for borderline personality disorder. Materials and Methods We performed a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and NHSEED for partial and full economic evaluations regarding borderline personality disorder. Reported cost data were inflated to the year 2012 and converted into US-$ using purchasing power parities to allow for comparability. Quality assessment of the studies was performed by means of the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria checklist, a checklist developed by a Delphi method in cooperation with 23 international experts. Results We identified 6 partial and 9 full economic evaluations. The methodical quality was moderate (fulfilled quality criteria: 79.2% [SD: 15.4%] in partial economic evaluations, 77.3% [SD: 8.5%] in full economic evaluations). Most evaluations analysed psychotherapeutic interventions. Although ambiguous, most evidence exists on dialectical-behavioural therapy. Cognitive behavioural therapy and schema-focused therapy are cost-saving. Evidence on other interventions is scarce. Conclusion The economic evidence is not sufficient to draw robust conclusions for all treatments. It is possible that some treatments are cost-effective. Most evidence exists on dialectical-behavioural therapy. Yet, it is ambiguous. Further research concerning the cost-effectiveness of treatments is necessary as well as the identification of relevant cost categories and the validation of effect measures. PMID:25265185

  3. Psychiatrists׳ fear of death is associated with negative emotions toward borderline personality disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Bodner, Ehud; Shrira, Amit; Hermesh, Hagai; Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Iancu, Iulian

    2015-08-30

    This study examines the relationship between psychiatrists׳ fear of death and negative emotions toward patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). A survey (N=120) demonstrated that fear of death is associated with stronger negative attitudes toward BPD patients, after controlling for attitudes toward suicide. Our findings emphasize the importance of psychiatrists׳ awareness to their fear of death as a relevant factor for their emotions toward BPD patients.

  4. Predictors of appendicitis on computed tomography among cases with borderline appendix size.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Atalie C; Olcott, Eric W; Poullos, Peter D; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Thompson, Matthew O; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Shin, Lewis K

    2015-08-01

    Confident diagnosis of appendicitis when the appendix is borderline (6 to 7 mm) in size can be challenging. This retrospective study assessed computed tomography (CT) findings that are most predictive of appendicitis when the appendix is borderline in diameter. Three radiologists conducted separate, blind retrospective reviews of 105 contrast-enhanced CTs with borderline appendices. Presence or absence of appendicitis was confirmed by chart review of clinical or surgical outcomes. Logistic regression was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) and the receiver operating characteristic for CT features predictive of appendicitis. Absence of intraluminal air (OR = 5.11, p < 0.001), wall hyperemia (OR = 3.92, p = 0.002), wall thickening (OR = 29.7, p < 0.001), and fat stranding (OR = 3.85, p = 0.003) were significant findings in univariate logistic regression. Using a multivariate model, we found that the absence of intraluminal air (OR = 6.04, p = 0.002) and wall thickening (OR = 24.6, p < 0.001) remained statistically significant and were unaffected by adjustment for gender and pediatric age. The area under the curve was significantly greater for the multivariate model than the initial, clinical CT impressions (p = 0.024). The combination of wall thickening and absence of intraluminal air was 92.6 % (95 % CI 75.7-99.1) sensitive and 82.4 % (95 % CI 65.5-93.2) specific for appendicitis. Wall thickening and the absence of intraluminal air are prominent predictors of appendicitis and, if present together, these features may aid in identifying appendicitis on CT when the appendix is borderline in size.

  5. Severity of Anxiety Symptoms Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: Description and Prediction over 16 Years of Prospective Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2014-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to determine the severity of anxiety symptoms reported by borderline patients and axis II comparison subjects over 16 years of follow-up. The second was to determine the most salient predictors of the severity of anxiety symptoms of borderline patients. Initially, 290 borderline inpatients and 72 comparison subjects were assessed using measures of anxiety, childhood adversity, and normal personality. The severity of anxiety symptoms was reassessed every two years. Borderline patients reported approximately twice as severe symptoms of anxiety as comparison subjects. However, these symptoms decreased significantly over time for those in both groups. Among borderline patients, two variables were found to be significant multivariate predictors of severity of overall anxiety: non-sexual childhood abuse and trait neuroticism. The results of this study suggest that anxiety symptoms form a distinct profile for borderline patients--a profile related to both childhood adversity and a vulnerable temperament. PMID:24932876

  6. Isolated subcutaneous implantation of a borderline ovarian tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Banys-Paluchowski, Malgorzata; Yeganeh, Borsu; Luettges, Jutta; Maibach, Achim; Langenberg, Ruediger; Krawczyk, Natalia; Paluchowski, Peter; Maul, Holger; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy-related tumor implantations of gynecological malignancies into the subcutaneous tissue are rarely diagnosed. We report an interesting case of a 46-year-old female who presented with an abdominal subcutaneous metastasis of a borderline ovarian tumor. The patient received a laparoscopic unilateral adnexectomy for a solid-cystic tumor of the right ovary. Histopathological workup showed a papillary borderline tumor of mucinous type. Nine days later she underwent a hysterectomy, left adnexectomy, appendectomy and omentectomy. Exploration of the peritoneum revealed no intraperitoneal implants. Further exploration showed a non-invasive implant of a borderline tumor in the subcutaneous tissue above the fascia that had no contact to the peritoneum. It is hypothesized that tumor cells may have been implanted during a previous laparoscopy, the most recent of which had been fourteen years prior to her current presentation. Various risk factors for port-site malignancies have been identified. Tumor manipulation and extraction of tumor tissue without a protective bag may contribute to development of trocar-site metastasis. PMID:27081651

  7. Disentangling depressive personality disorder from avoidant, borderline, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Zimmerman, Mark; Chelminski, Iwona

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have found that 3 personality disorders (PDs) tend to share moderate rates of comorbidity with depressive PD: avoidant, borderline, and obsessive-compulsive. This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic criteria of each disorder in an effort to understand where areas of overlap may occur and to modify criteria sets where reasonable to reduce any degree of overlap. One thousand two hundred psychiatric outpatients were interviewed with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders. The highest degree of comorbidity was observed between avoidant PD and depressive PD. Logistic regression analyses indicated that 2 criteria-avoidant criterion 5 and depressive criterion 2-could be removed from the diagnostic criteria sets and reduce the rates of overlap by as much as 15%. A factor analysis of the criteria of all 4 PDs indicated that there is a common clustering of many of the symptoms of avoidant, borderline, depressive, and obsessive-compulsive PDs and that borderline symptoms tend to cluster together most consistently. Avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality symptoms clustered in ways that may reflect a problem of how to engage with others, suggestive of an approach-avoidance conflict. Depressive PD symptoms clustered in a way suggestive of problems with anger that is directed toward oneself and others. The factor analysis results suggest that an organization of symptoms around themes of conflict may provide useful ways of understanding the personality patterns of these 4 disorders.

  8. The 10-year Course of PTSD in Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Hörz, Susanne; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Weingeroff, Jolie; Reich, D. Bradford; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2011-01-01

    Objective The first objective is to detail the prevalence of PTSD over a decade of follow-up for those in both study groups. The second is to determine time-to-remission, recurrence, and new onset of PTSD and the third is to assess the relationship between sexual adversity and the likelihood of remission and recurrence of PTSD. Method The SCID I was administered to 290 borderline inpatients and 72 axis II comparison subjects during their index admission and re-administered at five contiguous two-year follow-up periods. Results The prevalence of PTSD declined significantly over time for patients with BPD (61%). Over 85% of borderline patients meeting criteria for PTSD at baseline experienced a remission by the time of the 10-year follow-up. Recurrences (40%) and new onsets (27%) were less common. A childhood history of sexual abuse significantly decreased the likelihood of remission from PTSD and an adult history of sexual assault significantly increased the likelihood of a recurrence of PTSD. Conclusion Taken together, the results of this study suggest that PTSD is not a chronic disorder for the majority of borderline patients. They also suggest a strong relationship between sexual adversity and the course of PTSD among patients with BPD. PMID:21564040

  9. Preventing wounds from healing: clinical prevalence and relationship to borderline personality.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2013-11-01

    In medico-economic studies, wound care has been shown to be expensive but is seemingly unavoidable given an aging population and the high community rates of diabetes and obesity. Astonishingly, however, some impaired wound resolution is intentional or purposeful. According to our review of seven clinical samples, the prevalence of preventing wounds from healing varies from 0.8 percent in a cardiac-stress-testing sample to 13.3 percent in a psychiatric inpatient sample. These variations in prevalence suggest that the more psychiatric loading in a given population, the higher the potential rate of preventing wounds from healing. In addition, statistical analyses indicate that preventing wounds from healing is consistently associated with borderline personality disorder. This link is most likely explained through the psychodynamics of self-harm behavior. Self-harm behavior is an inherent feature of borderline personality disorder, and preventing wounds from healing may be a self-injury equivalent among some patients with this particular personality dysfunction. Among participants with this Axis II disorder, women tend to report higher rates of preventing wounds from healing than men. Overall findings suggest that clinicians need to be alert to unexpected delays with wound healing, particularly in patients with psychiatric histories, and consider that such behavior is likely to be associated with borderline personality disorder.

  10. Characterising adequacy or inadequacy of the borderline left ventricle: what tools can we use?

    PubMed

    Kaplinski, Michelle; Cohen, Meryl S

    2015-12-01

    Borderline left ventricle refers to a spectrum of left ventricular underdevelopment, typically associated with other cardiac anomalies. The left ventricle may be mildly hypoplastic, as is sometimes seen accompanying aortic coarctation, or it can be severely hypoplastic, as is seen in hypoplastic left heart syndrome. For patients with a borderline left ventricle that is at either extreme, the treatment decision is relatively straightforward. Those with the most severe form of left ventricle hypoplasia will require single ventricle palliation or cardiac transplantation, whereas those with the mildest form may not need any intervention. It is the management strategy of children that fall within the grey zone of the spectrum, which continues to be controversial and remains variable within and among different institutions. Cardiac diseases with associated left ventricle hypoplasia include critical aortic stenosis, mitral stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, arch hypoplasia, cor triatriatum, unbalanced common atrioventricular canal, Shone's complex, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, and complex conotruncal abnormalities. In this review, we will discuss the assessment and management of infants with borderline left ventricle with critical aortic stenosis or arch obstruction and associated mitral anomalies.

  11. Reduced glucose metabolism in temporo-parietal cortices of women with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Lange, Claudia; Kracht, Lutz; Herholz, Karl; Sachsse, Ulrich; Irle, Eva

    2005-07-30

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often experience dissociative symptoms. Evidence is increasing that stress-related hyperglutamatergic states may contribute to dissociative symptoms and neurodegeneration in temporo-parietal cortical areas. Seventeen young women with BPD who had been exposed to severe childhood physical/sexual abuse and presented with pronounced dissociative symptoms underwent (18)fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nine healthy, matched volunteers served as comparison subjects. Borderline subjects displayed reduced FDG uptake (as analyzed by SPM) in the right temporal pole/anterior fusiform gyrus and in the left precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex. Impaired memory performance among borderline subjects was significantly correlated with metabolic activity in ventromedial and lateral temporal cortices. Our results demonstrate regional hypometabolism in temporal and medial parietal cortical regions known to be involved in episodic memory consolidation and retrieval. Currently, the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex is modeled as part of a network of tonically active brain regions that continuously gather information about the world around and within us. Decreased resting metabolic rate of these regions may reflect dissociative symptoms and possibly also identity disturbances and interpersonal difficulties of individuals with BPD.

  12. Epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of borderline and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Eugenia Maria Chaves De Moraes

    Data from the Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study, a multicenter, population-based, case-control study were used to identify risk factors for epithelial ovarian cancer according to tumor behavior, histologic types, as well as p53 expression. Cases were women between 20 to 54 years old diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer from 1980 to 1982. Controls were women selected by random digit dialing. Tumor samples were analyzed for p53 overexpression using immunohistochemistry. Case-case and case-control conditional logistic regression models matched on age and diagnosing centers were used to calculate odds ratios (OR's) and 95% confidence intervals (CI's) for borderline, malignant, mucinous, and nonmucinous tumors, and p53 positive and p53 negative cases. The OR's for high number of lifetime ovulatory cycles (376-533 compared with less than 234) were 3.1 (95% CI 1.6-6.1) for malignant and 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.7) for borderline cases. The high number of ovulatory cycles was also a strong risk factor among nonmucinous cases. OR's for current and recent ex-smokers compared with never smokers were 2.8 (95% CI 1.7-4.8) for mucinous and 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.1) for nonmucinous types. Infertility showed a positive association with borderline ovarian cancer. Family history of ovarian or breast cancer was positively associated with malignant and nonmucinous cases. Parity had an inverse association with malignant ovarian cancer cases. When cases were subdivided by p53 results, the OR for tobacco smoking and p53 positive ovarian cancer was elevated for mucinous (OR = 3.9; 95% CI 0.8-18) at localized stage. Alcohol use showed a positive association with p53 positive malignant cases at advanced stage (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.2) and with p53 positive nonmucinous cases at advanced stage (OR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.4). A positive association between high number of ovulatory cycles and p53 positive malignant cases was observed in cases with localized stage (OR = 6.6; 95% CI 1.0-45) and advanced

  13. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  14. The Course of Positive Affective and Cognitive States in Borderline Personality Disorder: A 10-year Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Lawrence Ian; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    This study had two aims. The first was to identify and define the course of positive affective and cognitive states present in borderline personality disorder (BPD) and compare them to those of comparison subjects with other personality disorders. The second was to compare the positive affective and cognitive states of borderline patients who recovered from BPD to those who did not. Two hundred ninety patients with BPD and 72 non-borderline axis II subjects (OPD) completed the Positive Affect Scale (PAS), a 50-item self-report measure designed to assess positive states thought to be common among and characteristic of BPD over a 10-year course of prospective follow-up. Affective, cognitive, and mixed PAS items were separately analyzed, based on respective subscores. Borderline patients reported positive affective, cognitive, and mixed states less frequently than OPD subjects. Additionally, affective, and cognitive subscores increased significantly for both groups taken together over 10-years of follow-up though at greater rates among borderline patients. Mixed subscores showed a significant increase over time and at similar rates for both groups. Within the BPD group, recovered patients reported more positive affective, cognitive, and mixed states compared to non-recovered patients. Results also showed a significant increase in affective and cognitive states at similar rates for both groups taken together over 10-years of follow-up. Mixed subscores also showed a significant increase for both groups taken over time, though at greater rates among recovered borderline patients. Taken together, these results suggest a characteristic profile of positive states within borderline patients that is far lower than those reported by axis II comparison subjects. They also suggest that this characteristic profile is predictive of recovery of BPD over time. PMID:23606922

  15. The Course of Marriage/Sustained Cohabitation and Parenthood among Borderline Patients Followed Prospectively for 16 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Reich, D. Bradford; Wedig, Michelle M.; Conkey, Lindsey C.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of marriage/sustained cohabitation and parenthood reported by recovered and non-recovered borderline patients, the age first undertaken, and the stability of these relationships. Borderline patients were interviewed about these topics during their index admission and eight times over 16 years of prospective follow-up. Recovered borderline patients were significantly more likely than non-recovered borderline patients to have married/lived with an intimate partner and to have become a parent. In addition, they first married/cohabited and became a parent at a significantly older age. They were also significantly less likely to have been divorced or ended a cohabiting relationship. In addition, they were significantly less likely to have given up or lost custody of a child. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that stable functioning as a spouse/partner and as a parent are strongly associated with recovery status for borderline patients. PMID:24963829

  16. Empathy Impairments in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators With Antisocial and Borderline Traits: A Key Factor in the Risk of Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Lila, Marisol; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antisocial, borderline, and narcissistic personality traits have been described as characteristics of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators. Furthermore, deficits in cognitive empathy and impairments in emotional decoding processes may at least partially explain conduct disorders and social dysfunction in general. However, previous research has not explored potential associations between empathy deficits and the aforementioned traits or whether they are reflected in recidivism in IPV perpetrators. Accordingly, the main aim of this study was to explore associations between empathy deficits, antisocial, borderline, and narcissistic traits and the risk of recidivism in this population. The sample consisted of 144 IPV perpetrators (mean age = 41 years). High antisocial and borderline personality traits in this sample were associated with a high risk of recidivism, these relationships being moderated by poor empathy skills. Moreover, in IPV perpetrators with both antisocial and borderline personality traits, the risk of recidivism was higher than in those with only one of these traits. In contrast, narcissistic traits were unrelated to the risk of recidivism and impairments in empathy. The results of our study highlight the importance of empathy deficits and may help professionals to develop specific intervention programs focusing on improving empathy skills in antisocial and borderline IPV perpetrators. PMID:26830110

  17. Borderline Symptoms and Suicidality/Self-injury in Late Adolescence: Prospectively Observed Relationship Correlates in Infancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons-Ruth, Karlen; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Holmes, Bjarne; Easterbrooks, Ann; Brooks, Nancy Hall

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective was to assess whether prospectively observed quality of parent-child interaction in infancy and middle childhood contributed to the prediction of borderline symptoms and recurrent suicidality/self-injury in late adolescence. Adolescents (mean 19.9 years) from 56 families participating in a longitudinal study since infancy (retention rate 74%) were assessed on the SCID-II for symptoms of borderline personality disorder, including suicidality/self-injury. Early clinical risk was indexed by clinical referral to parent-infant services. Attachment security and parent-child interaction were assessed from videotape at 18 months and 8 years. Severity of childhood abuse was rated from interview and self-report measures. Maternal withdrawal in infancy was a significant predictor of both borderline symptoms and suicidality/self-injury in late adolescence. Disorganizedcontrolling child behavior at age 8 contributed independently to the prediction of borderline symptoms. The effect of maternal withdrawal was independent of, and additive to, variability explained by severity of childhood abuse. Borderline symptoms and suicidality/self-injury may be preceded developmentally by disturbed interactions as early as 18 months of age. A parent-child transactional model is proposed to account for the findings. PMID:23123044

  18. Empathy Impairments in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators With Antisocial and Borderline Traits: A Key Factor in the Risk of Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Lila, Marisol; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antisocial, borderline, and narcissistic personality traits have been described as characteristics of intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators. Furthermore, deficits in cognitive empathy and impairments in emotional decoding processes may at least partially explain conduct disorders and social dysfunction in general. However, previous research has not explored potential associations between empathy deficits and the aforementioned traits or whether they are reflected in recidivism in IPV perpetrators. Accordingly, the main aim of this study was to explore associations between empathy deficits, antisocial, borderline, and narcissistic traits and the risk of recidivism in this population. The sample consisted of 144 IPV perpetrators (mean age = 41 years). High antisocial and borderline personality traits in this sample were associated with a high risk of recidivism, these relationships being moderated by poor empathy skills. Moreover, in IPV perpetrators with both antisocial and borderline personality traits, the risk of recidivism was higher than in those with only one of these traits. In contrast, narcissistic traits were unrelated to the risk of recidivism and impairments in empathy. The results of our study highlight the importance of empathy deficits and may help professionals to develop specific intervention programs focusing on improving empathy skills in antisocial and borderline IPV perpetrators.

  19. Defining the construct of reactive aggression in borderline personality disorder: Commentary on "Aggression in borderline personality disorder--A multidimensional model".

    PubMed

    Flory, Janine D

    2015-07-01

    Comments on the article by F. Mancke et al. (see record 2015-31349-001). The article presents a multidimensional model of aggression in the context of borderline personality disorder (BPD), with a selective review of the research literature. BPD is arguably the most widely researched personality disorder, and the review suggests that there has been extensive progress in characterizing behavioral and biological correlates of aggression. What is not clear from the review, and indeed, the broader literature, is whether the research cited in this review is specific to BPD or can generally be applied to reactive aggression in the context of other disorders (or by extension into the normative range of the behavior). The review by Mancke et al. also highlights the fact that there is a general lack of research establishing predictive validity of aggression in BPD, with most research comparing two groups sampled at one time point.

  20. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity during rest and exercise in borderline hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Vind, J; Winther, K

    1995-04-01

    In this study we examined whether the reduced fibrinolysis and increased platelet activity that are known to occur in hypertension are already present in borderline hypertension. Twelve patients with 'borderline' hypertension (diastolic blood pressure 90-95 mmHg) were found to have substantially reduced fibrinolytic activity, both at rest and during exercise, compared with 12 normotensive controls. Euglobulin clot lysis time (ECLT) was significantly higher in hypertensive subjects (218 min vs. 145 min; P < 0.05), and this difference persisted during exercise. Resting tissue plasminogen activator activity (t-PA) did not differ in the two groups, but the brisk increase in t-PA in controls during exercise (0.64 rising to 1.44 IU mL-1; P < 0.01) did not occur to the same extent in the borderline hypertensive subjects. Levels of the fast-acting t-PA inhibitor, normally referred to as PAI-1, were considerably higher in hypertensives (9.22 vs. 4.41 IU mL-1; P < 0.02), and this difference persisted in the upright posture, indicating a decrease in fibrinolytic activity. Platelet aggregability induced by ADP in vitro was not significantly higher in the hypertensive subjects, but indices of platelet activity in vivo (B-TG and PF-4 levels) revealed enhanced platelet function in the hypertensives. These results indicate that the indicators of altered haemostatic function known to occur in hypertension, namely diminished fibrinolytic activity and increased platelet function, are already detectable during the very earliest stage of the disease.

  1. Political Leaders and Psychohistorical Approaches in a Time of Borderline Polarization.

    PubMed

    Dervin, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Since the breakup of the Soviet Empire in 1989, followed by Yugoslavia, many otherwise secure countries have been collapsing and splitting apart. The maps in the Middle East are continually being redrawn, more often than not, in blood. Scotland is poised to break away from the UK, Catalonia from Spain, and here at home several states toy around with secession. Much of this turmoil on the macro level seems to dovetail with my present focus on the micro. Whether the two are related in some fashion is tantalizingly beyond the present scope. In this paper my micro-purpose is to delve into the deeper recesses of our public life and explore the intra-psychic fissures. The key concept for this quest is a relative newcomer to psychoanalytic nomenclature: the borderline. Coming to the fore in the 1970s, the term addresses the widespread splitting both within the self and in relationships, manifest in either-or, all-or-nothing ideation, along with an impulsivity that further distances actions from consequences. These and related features-are conducive to an anything-goes politics of us-against-them. Richard Hofstadter's 1965 "paranoid style," of political leaders is recalled and modified to a borderline-mode factored into a psychohistorical dynamic which construes politicians as delegates for group-fantasy. Recent presidential elections offer a rich field for testing the aptness of this approach. Then, after brief detours into how Freud and Darwin disrupted polarizing forces in their own cultures, we revisit political turmoil during the Woodrow Wilson years for historical similarities and differences in which repeated recourse to purity serves as a bridge word. The inquiry closes with reflections on how psychohistory may avoid pitfalls in further probing this vexing state of affairs and primes the reader to ponder whether the disaffected young males drawn to ISIS are functioning on borderline levels. If so, we have a plausible bridge between macro and micro realms.

  2. Treatment Differences in the Therapeutic Relationship and Introject during a 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy versus Nonbehavioral Psychotherapy Experts for Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedics, Jamie D.; Atkins, David C.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study explored the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method: Women meeting "DSM-IV" criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community…

  3. Borderline but not antisocial personality disorder symptoms are related to self-reported partner aggression in late middle-age.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Gleason, Marci E J; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2012-08-01

    We examined the relationship between personality pathology and the frequency of self-reported psychological and physical partner aggression in a community sample of 872 adults aged 55-64. Previous research suggests that antisocial and borderline personality disorder (PD) symptoms are associated with partner aggression. Controlling for gender, education, alcohol dependence, and other personality pathology, we found that borderline PD symptoms, which include abandonment fears, unstable identity, and affective instability, were significantly related to the frequency of self-reported aggression toward one's partner. This relationship was observed regardless of whether the participant's personality was described by a clinical interviewer, the participant themselves, or an informant chosen by the participant. Further, the relationship between borderline PD symptoms and self-reported partner aggression was moderated by gender such that women were driving the association. Conversely, antisocial PD symptoms, which include deceitfulness, irresponsibility, disregard for rules, and lack of remorse did not significantly account for variance in self-reported partner aggression.

  4. Social skills and sex-role functioning in borderline personality disorder: relationship to self-mutilating behavior.

    PubMed

    McKay, Dean; Gavigan, Carie A; Kulchycky, Sonia

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the social skills functioning and sex role affiliation of female inpatients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder who engaged in self-mutilating behavior (n = 30) with female patients with borderline personality disorder who did not engage in such behavior (n = 18). Patients with borderline personality disorder who engaged in self-mutilating behavior were found to have relatively poorer skills in communicating non-verbal emotional information to others and in receiving and interpreting such information from others. In terms of sex role orientation, patients who engaged in self-mutilating behavior were significantly more likely than non-mutilators to be typed as undifferentiated using the Bem Sex Role Inventory. These participants were less likely to identify with either masculine or feminine sex roles. Patients who did not self-mutilate were found to be significantly more likely than those who did self-mutilate to identify with the masculine sex role.

  5. The impact of client sexual orientation and gender on clinical judgments and diagnosis of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2006-06-01

    Concerns have been raised that individuals who are having difficulty coming out as gay or bisexual may be misdiagnosed with borderline personality disorder. In this analogue study, 141 psychologists evaluated a hypothetical client with problems that resembled borderline symptoms but were also consistent with a sexual identity crisis. Client descriptions varied by sexual orientation and gender. Results revealed an effect of sexual orientation for male clients, but not female clients. Male clients whom therapists perceived likely to be gay or bisexual, and male clients with partners of unspecified gender, were more likely to be diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Therapists were more confident and willing to work with female clients and gave them a better prognosis. Therapists' responses are discussed in light of gender role bias and social desirability.

  6. Using negative emotions to trace the experience of borderline personality pathology: Interconnected relationships revealed in an experience sampling study

    PubMed Central

    Law, Mary Kate; Fleeson, William; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Furr, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    While emotional difficulties are highly implicated in borderline personality disorder (BPD), the dynamic relationships between emotions and BPD symptoms that occur in everyday life are unknown. The current paper examined the function of negative emotions as they relate to BPD symptoms in real time. Experience sampling methodology with 281 participants measured negative emotions and borderline symptoms, expressed as a spectrum of experiences, five times daily for two weeks. Overall, having a BDP diagnosis was associated with experiencing more negative emotions. Multilevel modeling supported positive concurrent relationships between negative emotions and BPD symptoms. Lagged models showed that even after three hours negative emotions and several symptoms continued to influence each other. Therefore, results indicated that negative emotions and BPD symptoms are intricately related; some evidenced long-lasting relationships. This research supports emotion-symptom contingencies within BPD and provides insight regarding the reactivity and functionality of negative emotions in borderline pathology. PMID:25710731

  7. Using Negative Emotions to Trace the Experience of Borderline Personality Pathology: Interconnected Relationships Revealed in an Experience Sampling Study.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary Kate; Fleeson, William; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Furr, R Michael

    2016-02-01

    While emotional difficulties are highly implicated in borderline personality disorder (BPD), the dynamic relationships between emotions and BPD symptoms that occur in everyday life are unknown. The current paper examined the function of negative emotions as they relate to BPD symptoms in real time. Experience sampling methodology with 281 participants measured negative emotions and borderline symptoms, expressed as a spectrum of experiences, five times daily for two weeks. Overall, having a BDP diagnosis was associated with experiencing more negative emotions. Multilevel modeling supported positive concurrent relationships between negative emotions and BPD symptoms. Lagged models showed that even after 3 hours negative emotions and several symptoms continued to influence each other. Therefore, results indicated that negative emotions and BPD symptoms are intricately related; some evidenced long-lasting relationships. This research supports emotion-symptom contingencies within BPD and provides insight regarding the reactivity and functionality of negative emotions in borderline pathology.

  8. The fairy tale as paradigm of the separation-individuation crisis: implications for treatment of the borderline adolescent.

    PubMed

    Brandt, L M

    1983-01-01

    This chapter is an attempt to offer a model for therapeutic work with borderline patients that is based on the structure and content of the fairy tale. It views the fairy tale as both descriptive in its echoing of developmental struggles of childhood and integrative in providing a model for resolution of these conflicts. Clare's use of the fairy tale offers confirmation of theoretical notions which place the etiology of borderline pathology in early developmental failures and a clue to the therapeutic work with borderline patients. While the childhood route of the fairy tale may no longer be available to most, its subtle mirroring of the separation-individuation crisis and gradual, growthful steps toward integration of both the external and the internal worlds offer an exquisite model for the work of psychotherapy. "Once a king in Narnia , always a king in Narnia . But don't go trying to use the same route twice. . ." (Lewis 1950, p. 186).

  9. [A serous cystadenoma of the ovary of borderline malignancy with a fifteen-year history. A case report].

    PubMed

    Nagata, O; Aramaki, S; Iino, H; Ishikawa, S; Yoshida, H; Azekami, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Iwasa, T; Matsukuma, K; Iwata, Y

    1990-04-01

    A case of a serous cystadenoma of a ovary of borderline malignancy is reported. Sixteen years earlier, the patient had undergone an exploratory laparotomy because of ovarian tumor, and the histologic diagnosis had been a serous cystadenocarcinoma. Postoperative chemotherapy was not effective and drainage of the tumor fluid had been performed for 15 years, with the estimated drainage volume estimated to have reached, 1,000 1. Gradual malnutrition and marked tumor growth then become apparent. A reevaluation of the initial histologic slides and her clinical course strongly suggested a serous cystadenoma of borderline malignancy. Thus a tumor resection, a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a hysterectomy was performed. A histologic diagnosis of a resected specimen confirmed a serous cystadenoma of borderline malignancy and the histologic features were quite similar to those of the initial biopsy specimens. The patient is living well postoperatively for 8 months without postoperative chemotherapy. PMID:2325270

  10. Evidence-Based Care of the Patient with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex, serious, and high-cost psychiatric disorder. The high prevalence of patients with BPD and co-occurring depression, eating disorders, and substance-use disorders in primary care and mental health settings contribute to their high use of resources in these practice settings. Regardless of treatment challenges associated with BPD, researchers suggest a more positive outlook in the treatment of this complex psychiatric condition. This article focuses on areas in which nurses can strengthen their understanding of underpinnings and multimodal approaches, assess the patient's immediate needs, and manage distressful emotional states and impulsivity. PMID:27229283

  11. A case report of a young girl with mucinous borderline tumor of the ovary

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Mi; So, Kyeong A; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian tumors are relatively rare in children and adolescent. The incidence of malignancies in these groups is 1% to 1.5%. The common histologic type is non-epithelial type such as germ cell tumors or sex cord-stromal tumors and only 10% to 17% of those are epithelial tumors. It is important to accurately diagnose in the early these rare tumors for proper staging and treatment to save the patient's life and fertility. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl with a giant ovarian mucinous borderline tumor. PMID:27462604

  12. Approaches to psychotherapy for borderline personality: demonstrations by four master clinicians.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Swenson, Charles; Bateman, Anthony; Yeomans, Frank E; Gunderson, John G

    2014-01-01

    Several efficacious therapies for borderline personality disorder (BPD) now exist despite longstanding skepticism in the field regarding amenability to treatment. In this article, 4 master clinicians describe a brief interaction with an actress playing the part of a patient with BPD that occurred at the First Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Personality Disorders in Boston, April 2013. The approaches include dialectical behavior therapy, transference focused psychotherapy, mentalization based therapy, and good psychiatric management. The paper concludes with a discussion of what these approaches have in common, how they differ, and future directions for the treatment of BPD. PMID:24588067

  13. A case report of a young girl with mucinous borderline tumor of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Mi; So, Kyeong A; Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Tae-Jin; Lee, Ki Heon

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian tumors are relatively rare in children and adolescent. The incidence of malignancies in these groups is 1% to 1.5%. The common histologic type is non-epithelial type such as germ cell tumors or sex cord-stromal tumors and only 10% to 17% of those are epithelial tumors. It is important to accurately diagnose in the early these rare tumors for proper staging and treatment to save the patient's life and fertility. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl with a giant ovarian mucinous borderline tumor.

  14. [The lessons of Cleopatra or reflections on conter-transfer and borderlines.].

    PubMed

    Richard, H

    1989-01-01

    The author examines certain counter-transference stakes in psychotherapeutic work with borderline patients. Specifically, she looks at counter-transference linked, on the one hand, to these persons' mode of communication, marked by identity projection, and on the other hand, to their mode of relating, characterized by the desire to merge both their anxieties and their ways of thinking, influenced by abundant use of a splitting mechanism. The author then reflects on narcissistic economy and the length considerations for the patient-therapist pair. She illustrates her article with clinical vignettes from her work with one of her patients, Cleo, who inspired this article.

  15. The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Emotion Dysregulation in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Laddis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrollable emotional lability and impulsivity are a paramount phenomenon of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This paper aims to review theories that entertain emotion dysregulation as the core deficit of BPD and a key factor in the etiology of BPD, in order, then, to propose the author's own theory, which arguably transcends certain limitations of the earlier ones. The author asserts that his psychodynamic theory explains the symptoms of BPD more thoroughly and it inspires a more parsimonious interpretation of brain imaging findings. In closing, the author draws implications of the proposed theory for clinical practice. He reports an efficacy study for treatment of emotion dysregulation based on that theory. PMID:26380355

  16. A monoclinic form of dendocarbin A: a borderline case of one-dimensional isostructural polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristian; Burgos, Viviana; Suarez, Sebastián; Baggio, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    The title compound, dendocarbin A [systematic name: (1R,5aS,9aS,9bR)-1-hydroxy-6,6,9a-trimethyldodecahydronaphtho[1,2-c]furan-3-one], C15H22O3, is a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Drimys winteri var chilensis. The monoclinic phase described herein displays an identical molecular structure to the orthorhombic phase that we reported previously [Paz Robles et al. (2014). Acta Cryst. C70, 1007-1010], while varying significantly in chain pitch, and can thus be considered as a borderline case of one-dimensional isostructural polymorphism.

  17. A case of secondary syphilis with HIV, resembling borderline lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mohan Zachariah; Kanish, Bimal; Kwatra, Kanwardeep; Chaudhary, Paulina R.; Bhatia, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting an unusual case of secondary syphilis, in a homosexual male patient, which resembled borderline lepromatous leprosy, and in whom the diagnosis was considered on clinical grounds. The patient also had concomitant HIV infection, with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. His rapid plasma reagin test was reactive in 1:128 dilution. He improved with three standard, weekly injections of benzathine penicillin, along with 2 g of intravenous ceftriaxone daily for 15 days. This case is being reported to highlight the need for a high index of suspicion in diagnosing unusual cases of secondary syphilis, especially in those with concomitant HIV infection. PMID:26692613

  18. [Treatment of borderline personality disorder with the schema-focused approach].

    PubMed

    Cousineau, P; Young, J E

    1997-01-01

    The treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder has been a challenge for Cognitive Therapy (CT): some modifications to the CT basic model had to be implemented in order to intervene with BPD patients. Young's schema-focused approach offers an intervention model which relies on early maladaptive schemas and modes concepts. According to this model, the BDP presents four dysfunctional modes: the Abandoned Child mode, the Detached Protector mode, the Punitive Parent mode, the Angry Child mode. The therapist must identify the presence of these modes and implement therapeutic strategies specific to each of them. There are four different kinds of therapeutic strategies: interpersonal (therapy relationship), experiential, cognitive and behavioral.

  19. Relationships between childhood maltreatment, parenting style, and borderline personality disorder criteria.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ana; Arntz, Arnoud; Gaviria, Ana M; Labad, Antonio; Gutiérrez-Zotes, José Alfonso

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the relationship of different types of childhood maltreatment and the perceived parenting style with borderline personality disorder (BPD) criteria. Kendall's Tau partial correlations were performed controlling for the effect of simultaneous adverse experiences and Axis I and II symptoms in a sample of 109 female patients (32 BPD, 43 other personality disorder, and 34 non-personality disorder). BPD criteria were associated with higher scores on emotional and sexual abuse, whereas parenting style did not show a specific association with BPD. Findings of the present study help clarify the effects of overlapping environmental factors that are associated with BPD. PMID:23013341

  20. A case of secondary syphilis with HIV, resembling borderline lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mohan Zachariah; Kanish, Bimal; Kwatra, Kanwardeep; Chaudhary, Paulina R; Bhatia, Anuradha

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting an unusual case of secondary syphilis, in a homosexual male patient, which resembled borderline lepromatous leprosy, and in whom the diagnosis was considered on clinical grounds. The patient also had concomitant HIV infection, with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. His rapid plasma reagin test was reactive in 1:128 dilution. He improved with three standard, weekly injections of benzathine penicillin, along with 2 g of intravenous ceftriaxone daily for 15 days. This case is being reported to highlight the need for a high index of suspicion in diagnosing unusual cases of secondary syphilis, especially in those with concomitant HIV infection. PMID:26692613

  1. [The evolution of the borderline personality disorder diagnosis: past, present and future].

    PubMed

    Matusevich, Daniel; Ruiz, Martín; Vairo, María C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to go along the different senses and meanings that borderline diagnosis has had across time. On behalf of this, many original papers as well as textbooks and other works are analyzed, to define the way and significant points in the discovery or construction of this critical pathology, that even today still divides the opinions in health world community. From Prichard, to Stern, Deutsch, Grinker and Knight, till Kernberg, Gunderson, Linehan and Fonagy we try to put clear the most important contributions of each author.

  2. The Pathogenesis and Treatment of Emotion Dysregulation in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Laddis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrollable emotional lability and impulsivity are a paramount phenomenon of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This paper aims to review theories that entertain emotion dysregulation as the core deficit of BPD and a key factor in the etiology of BPD, in order, then, to propose the author's own theory, which arguably transcends certain limitations of the earlier ones. The author asserts that his psychodynamic theory explains the symptoms of BPD more thoroughly and it inspires a more parsimonious interpretation of brain imaging findings. In closing, the author draws implications of the proposed theory for clinical practice. He reports an efficacy study for treatment of emotion dysregulation based on that theory. PMID:26380355

  3. Cross-linguistic variation in the neurophysiological response to semantic processing: evidence from anomalies at the borderline of awareness.

    PubMed

    Tune, Sarah; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L; Sanford, Anthony J; Bohan, Jason; Sassenhagen, Jona; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2014-04-01

    The N400 event-related brain potential (ERP) has played a major role in the examination of how the human brain processes meaning. For current theories of the N400, classes of semantic inconsistencies which do not elicit N400 effects have proven particularly influential. Semantic anomalies that are difficult to detect are a case in point ("borderline anomalies", e.g. "After an air crash, where should the survivors be buried?"), engendering a late positive ERP response but no N400 effect in English (Sanford, Leuthold, Bohan, & Sanford, 2011). In three auditory ERP experiments, we demonstrate that this result is subject to cross-linguistic variation. In a German version of Sanford and colleagues' experiment (Experiment 1), detected borderline anomalies elicited both N400 and late positivity effects compared to control stimuli or to missed borderline anomalies. Classic easy-to-detect semantic (non-borderline) anomalies showed the same pattern as in English (N400 plus late positivity). The cross-linguistic difference in the response to borderline anomalies was replicated in two additional studies with a slightly modified task (Experiment 2a: German; Experiment 2b: English), with a reliable LANGUAGE×ANOMALY interaction for the borderline anomalies confirming that the N400 effect is subject to systematic cross-linguistic variation. We argue that this variation results from differences in the language-specific default weighting of top-down and bottom-up information, concluding that N400 amplitude reflects the interaction between the two information sources in the form-to-meaning mapping.

  4. Cross-linguistic variation in the neurophysiological response to semantic processing: Evidence from anomalies at the borderline of awareness

    PubMed Central

    Tune, Sarah; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Small, Steven L.; Sanford, Anthony J.; Bohan, Jason; Sassenhagen, Jona; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2014-01-01

    The N400 event-related brain potential (ERP) has played a major role in the examination of how the human brain processes meaning. For current theories of the N400, classes of semantic inconsistencies which do not elicit N400 effects have proven particularly influential. Semantic anomalies that are difficult to detect are a case in point (“borderline anomalies”, e.g. “After an air crash, where should the survivors be buried?”), engendering a late positive ERP response but no N400 effect in English (Sanford, Leuthold, Bohan, & Sanford, 2011). In three auditory ERP experiments, we demonstrate that this result is subject to cross-linguistic variation. In a German version of Sanford and colleagues' experiment (Experiment 1), detected borderline anomalies elicited both N400 and late positivity effects compared to control stimuli or to missed borderline anomalies. Classic easy-to-detect semantic (non-borderline) anomalies showed the same pattern as in English (N400 plus late positivity). The cross-linguistic difference in the response to borderline anomalies was replicated in two additional studies with a slightly modified task (Experiment 2a: German; Experiment 2b: English), with a reliable LANGUAGE × ANOMALY interaction for the borderline anomalies confirming that the N400 effect is subject to systematic cross-linguistic variation. We argue that this variation results from differences in the language-specific default weighting of top-down and bottom-up information, concluding that N400 amplitude reflects the interaction between the two information sources in the form-to-meaning mapping. PMID:24447768

  5. Cognitive Experiences Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 16-year Prospective Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Wedig, Michelle M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study assesses three main types of cognition: nonpsychotic thought (odd thinking, unusual perceptual experiences, and non-delusional paranoia), quasi-psychotic thought, and true-psychotic thought in borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years. It also compares the rates of these disturbed cognitions to those reported by axis II comparison subjects. Method The cognitive experiences of 362 inpatients—290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects—were assessed at study entry using the cognitive section of the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Their cognitive experiences were reassessed every two years using the same interview. Results Each of the five main types of thought studied was reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects over time. Each of these types of thought, except true-psychotic thought, declined significantly over time for those in both groups. Eleven of the 17 more specific forms of thought studied were also reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients over the years of follow-up: magical thinking, overvalued ideas, recurrent illusions, depersonalization, derealization, undue suspiciousness, ideas of reference, other paranoid ideation, quasi-psychotic delusions, quasi-psychotic hallucinations, and true-psychotic hallucinations. Fourteen specific forms of thought were found to decline significantly over time for those in both groups: all forms of thought mentioned above except true-psychotic hallucinations plus marked superstitiousness, sixth sense, telepathy, and clairvoyance. Conclusions Disturbed cognitions are common among borderline patients and distinguishing for the disorder. They also decline substantially over time but remain a problem, particularly those of a nonpsychotic nature. PMID:23558452

  6. Use of dialectical behavior therapy in a partial hospital program for women with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Simpson, E B; Pistorello, J; Begin, A; Costello, E; Levinson, J; Mulberry, S; Pearlstein, T; Rosen, K; Stevens, M

    1998-05-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy, an outpatient psychosocial treatment for chronically suicidal women with borderline personality disorder, has been adapted for use in a partial hospital program for women. Patients attend the program for a minimum of five days of individual and group therapy, and full census is 12 women. About 65 percent of participants meet at least three criteria for borderline personality disorder, and most have suicidal and self-injurious behavior. Their comorbid diagnoses include trauma-related diagnoses and anxiety disorders, severe eating disorders, substance abuse, and depression. The partial hospital program is linked to an aftercare program offering six months of outpatient skills training based on dialectical behavior therapy. Both programs focus on teaching patients four skills: mindfulness (attention to one's experience), interpersonal effectiveness, emotional regulation, and distress tolerance. Two years of operation of the women's partial hospital program provides promising anecdotal evidence that dialectical behavioral therapy, an outpatient approach, can be effectively modified for partial hospital settings and a more diverse population.

  7. Endometrioid Paraovarian Borderline Cystic Tumor in an Infant with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Liliana; Tello, Mariela; Maza, Ivan; Oscanoa, Monica; Dueñas, Milagros; Castro, Haydee; Latorre, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and paraovarian neoplasms are uncommon in children, mainly originating from germ cell tumors and, least frequently, epithelial tumors. There is an association between genital tract tumors and Proteus syndrome, a rare, sporadic, and progressive entity, characterized by a postnatal overgrowth in several tissues caused by a mosaic mutation in the AKT1 gene. We describe a 20-month-old asymptomatic infant with Proteus syndrome who developed an endometrioid paraovarian borderline cystic tumor. This is the youngest patient so far reported in the literature with this rare syndrome and an adnexal tumor of borderline malignancy. A total of nine patients have been described with female tract tumors and associated Proteus syndrome, which includes bilateral ovarian cystadenomas and other benign masses. A paraovarian neoplasm is extremely rare in children and could be considered a criterion for Proteus syndrome. Standardized staging and treatment of these tumors are not well established; however, most authors conclude that these neoplasms must be treated as their ovarian counterparts. PMID:26558123

  8. Can assessors and therapists predict the outcome of long-term psychotherapy in borderline personality disorder?

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, Philip; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Dyck, Richard; Arntz, Arnoud

    2008-06-01

    Surprisingly few studies have investigated the accuracy of prognostic assessments of therapy outcome by clinicians. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between clinicians' prognostic assessments and patient characteristics and treatment outcome. Seventy-one patients with a borderline personality disorder randomly allocated to schema-focused therapy (SFT) or transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) were assessed every 3 months for 3 years. Prognostic assessments proved to be unrelated to patients' biographical (i.e., age, gender, education level, and employment level) and clinical characteristics (i.e., number of Axis I and Axis II diagnoses, and severity of psychiatric symptoms or borderline personality pathology). Clinical assessors as well as therapists rated the probability of success for SFT to be higher than for TFP. Prospective assessments of assessors and therapists accurately predicted different indices of outcome above and independent of patient characteristics. The prediction of outcome in the TFP condition in particular proved to be valid. Identifying prognostic markers of treatment outcome as used by clinicians in their prognostic assessments may improve current prediction models and patient-treatment matching.

  9. Exploring Attachment Patterns in Patients With Comorbid Borderline Personality and Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Andreas; Sack, Peter-Michael

    2015-11-01

    Studies exploring attachment patterns in samples of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) report a combination of preoccupied and fearful-avoidant patterns. This has been interpreted as reflecting the approach-avoidance dilemma of BPD. Comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) have not been considered in these studies, despite the high proportions of SUD among BPD patients and despite the more avoidant attachment in SUD samples. This cross-sectional, naturalistic study explores attachment patterns in a sample of comorbid (BPD and SUD) patients, comparing them to two samples of patients with either SUD or BPD only. Within-group comparisons replicated findings of both preoccupied and fearful-avoidant attachment in BPD and comorbid groups. But between-group comparisons showed that comorbid patients were significantly less preoccupied (p = 0.018) and more dismissing-avoidant (p = 0.030). Although both groups were similar in several psychiatric measures, attachment patterns of the comorbid group were more similar to substance abusers than to borderline patients. PMID:26488917

  10. Borderline Personality Pathology and Chronic Health Problems in Later Adulthood: The Mediating Role of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Abigail D.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with many negative physical health outcomes, including increased risk for serious chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and arthritis. BPD is also linked with obesity, a condition that is strongly related to many of the same physical health problems. Although research has shown that BPD is related to these physical conditions, there is limited evidence of whether body mass mediates the relation between BPD and serious physical health problems. The present study examined the associations among BPD features, body mass index (BMI), and six major physical health problems in an epidemiologically-based sample (N=1051) of Saint Louis residents, ages 55–64. Using interviewer-, self-, and informant-report of personality pathology, we found that BPD features were significantly related to reported presence of heart disease, arthritis, and obesity. BMI was also significantly related to heart disease and arthritis. Sobel mediation models showed that BMI fully mediated the relation between BPD features and arthritis. These results suggest that borderline pathology is an important risk factor for serious health problems in later adulthood. Obesity appears to be one pathway that leads to more health problems among individuals with BPD symptoms and may be a useful starting point when thinking about future intervention strategies. PMID:22686464

  11. Exploring the inner world of self-mutilating borderline patients: a Rorschach investigation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Hilsenroth, M J; Nolan, E

    2000-01-01

    Psychiatric patients who engage in self-destructive behavior by cutting, burning, or abrading their skin are currently one of the most difficult-to-treat groups in both inpatient and outpatient settings. The complexities of treating these patients, the risk factors associated with this symptom, and the rise in the prevalence of self-mutilation in America's adolescents and young adults provided the impetus for the current study. This article explores aspects of aggression, dependency, object relations, defensive structure, and psychic boundary integrity that may contribute to the genesis and maintenance of self-mutilation. Rorschach protocols from 90 borderline personality-disordered inpatients (48 self-mutilators and 42 non-self-mutilators) were scored using five psychoanalytic content scales. Results indicate that self-mutilating patients exhibit greater incidence of primary process aggression, severe boundary disturbance, pathological object representations, defensive idealization, devaluation, and splitting than did a matched group of non-self-mutilating borderline patients. Clinical theory and technical recommendations are considered in light of the current empirical findings.

  12. Testing DSM-III symptom criteria for schizotypal and borderline personality disorders.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, T H

    1987-02-01

    Schizotypal and borderline personality disorders (SPD and BPD, respectively) appear to be different at follow-up, yet they are poorly discriminated from each other by current DSM-III symptom criteria. In the Chestnut Lodge Follow-up Study, three axis II study cohorts (pure SPD, n = 10; pure BPD, n = 81; mixed SPD/BPD, n = 18) with distinctive outcomes are defined using current borderline systems. This study compares the relative frequency with which individual symptom criteria from each system discriminate across study cohorts. Findings suggest that for SPD, the most characteristic (core) DSM-III symptoms are odd communication, suspiciousness/paranoid ideation, and social isolation, while the least discriminating symptom is illusions/depersonalization/derealization; the core DSM-III symptoms for BPD are unstable relationships, impulsivity, and self-damaging acts, while the least discriminating symptoms are inappropriate anger and intolerance of aloneness; depression as a symptom does not discriminate between SPD and BPD; and transient psychoses and brief paranoid experiences and/or regression in treatment discriminate for SPD but against BPD and therefore fit better as SPD criteria. Results support the retention of some, but the elimination of other, DSM-III symptom criteria for the diagnosis of SPD and BPD. PMID:3813809

  13. The implications of attachment theory and research for understanding borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Levy, Kenneth N

    2005-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a highly prevalent, chronic, and debilitating psychiatric problem characterized by a pattern of chaotic and self-defeating interpersonal relationships, emotional lability, poor impulse control, angry outbursts, frequent suicidality, and self-mutilation. Recently, psychopathology researchers and theorists have begun to understand fundamental aspects of BPD such as unstable, intense interpersonal relationships, feelings of emptiness, bursts of rage, chronic fears of abandonment and intolerance for aloneness, and lack of a stable sense of self as stemming from impairments in the underlying attachment organization. These investigators have noted that the impulsivity, affective lability, and self-damaging actions that are the hallmark of borderline personality occur in an interpersonal context and are often precipitated by real or imagined events in relationships. This article reviews attachment theory and research as a means of providing a developmental psychopathology perspective on BPD. Following a brief review of Bowlby's theory of attachment, and an overview of the evidence with respect to the major claims of attachment theory, I discuss individual differences, the evidence that these differences are rooted in patterns of interaction with caregivers, and how these patterns have important implications for evolving adaptations and development. Following this discussion, I present recent work linking attachment theory and BPD, focusing on the implications for understanding the etiology and treatment of BPD. In conclusion, I address some of the salient issues that point to the direction for future research efforts. PMID:16613426

  14. Evaluation of behavioral impulsivity and aggression tasks as endophenotypes for borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Michael S.; New, Antonia S.; Siever, Larry J.; Goodman, Marianne; Koenigsberg, Harold W.; Flory, Janine D.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2010-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is marked by aggression and impulsive, often self-destructive behavior. Despite the severe risks associated with BPD, relatively little is known about the disorder’s etiology. Identification of genetic correlates (endophenotypes) of BPD would improve the prospects of targeted interventions for more homogeneous subsets of borderline patients characterized by specific genetic vulnerabilities. The current study evaluated behavioral measures of aggression and impulsivity as potential endophenotypes for BPD. Subjects with BPD (N = 127), a non cluster B personality disorder (OPD N = 122), or healthy volunteers (HV N = 112) completed self report and behavioral measures of aggression, motor impulsivity and cognitive impulsivity. Results showed that BPD subjects demonstrated more aggression and motor impulsivity than HV (but not OPD) subjects on behavioral tasks. In contrast, BPD subjects self-reported more impulsivity and aggression than either comparison group. Subsequent analyses showed that among BPD subjects behavioral aggression was associated with self-reported aggression, while behavioral and self-report impulsivity measures were more modestly associated. Overall, the results provide partial support for the use of behavioral measures of aggression and motor impulsivity as endophenotypes for BPD, with stronger support for behavioral aggression measures as an endophenotype for aggression within BPD samples. PMID:19232640

  15. One of early maladaptive schemas’ causal relationship through metacognitive beliefs with borderline and antisocial personality patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zirakbash, Amin; Naderi, Farah; Enayati, Mir Salahedin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed at determining the causal relationship of metacognitive beliefs as a mediator between one of early maladaptive schemas including (emotional deprivation, abandonment, mistrust/abuse, social isolation/alienation and defectiveness/shame) and borderline and antisocial personality patterns. Materials and Methods: The study type has been relational and seeking causal modeling of path analysis has been used. The population used in this study included outpatients in counseling, psychological and psychiatric centers in 2012–2013. We randomly distributed 350 questionnaires in five centers out of three parts in Isfahan, and finally 230 valid questionnaires were evaluated and analyzed. Data collection tool has been Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III's (MCMI-III's) personality questionnaire, Yang's schema questionnaire (75 items), Metacognition Questionnaire-30 (30 items). Reliability of the Yang's Schema Questionnaire in this study was calculated by Cronbach's alpha (α =96%), and that of metacognition was calculated the same way (α =87%). Data analysis has been done using MCMI-III's software for Millon's personality questionnaire, and SPSS-16 and AMOS-18 software. We used path analysis method for testing each model in statistical data analysis. Result: The results of this study suggest a possible causal relationship between the number of one of the early maladaptive schemas and the patterns of anti-social and borderline personalities through some metacognitive beliefs. Conclusion: This study showed that cognitive beliefs can be activators of the early schema and continuation's coping behaviors in personality patterns. PMID:26430689

  16. Assumptions in borderline personality disorder: specificity, stability and relationship with etiological factors.

    PubMed

    Arntz, A; Dietzel, R; Dreessen, L

    1999-06-01

    The specificity and stability of a set of assumptions hypothesized to be characteristic of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) was investigated. BPD patients (n = 16) were compared to cluster-C personality disorder patients (n = 12) and to normal controls (n = 15). All subjects were female and diagnosed with SCID-I and -II. Subjects rated a short version of the Personality Disorder Beliefs Questionnaire (PDBQ), with six sets of 20 assumptions each, hypothesized to be characteristic of avoidant, dependent, obsessive-compulsive, paranoid, histrionic and borderline personality disorder. The BPD assumptions (Cronbach alpha = 0.95) proved to be the most specific to BPD patients. Subjects rated the shortened PDBQ again after viewing an emotional video fragment one week later. Despite increased negative emotions, the PDBQ ratings remained relatively stable. Confirming the cognitive hypothesis, regression analyses indicated that the BPD assumptions mediate the relationship between self-reported etiological factors from childhood (sexual abuse and emotional/physical abuse) and BPD pathology assessed with the SCID-II. It is suggested that a set of assumptions is characteristic of BPD, and is relatively stable despite the instability of the behaviour of people diagnosed as having BPD.

  17. Validation of the Spanish version of the borderline symptom list, short form (BSL-23)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Borderline Symptom List-23 (BSL-23) is a reliable and valid self-report instrument for assessing Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) severity. The psychometric properties of the original version have proven to be adequate. The aim of the present study was to validate the Spanish language version of the BSL-23. Methods The BSL-23 was administered to 240 subjects with BPD diagnosis. Factor structure, reliability, test-retest stability, convergent validity, and sensitivity to change were analyzed. Results The Spanish version of the BSL-23 replicates the one-factor structure of the original version. The scale has high reliability (Cronbach’s alpha=.949), as well as good test-retest stability, which was checked in a subsample (n=74; r=.734; p<.01). The Spanish BSL-23 shows moderate to high correlations with depressive symptomatology, state and trait anxiety, hostility and impulsivity scores and BPD measures. The Spanish BSL-23 is able to discriminate among different levels of BPD severity and shows satisfactory sensitivity to change after treatment, which was verified by assessing change before and after 12 group sessions of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy in a subgroup of 31 subjects. Conclusions Similar to the original BSL-23, the Spanish BSL-23 is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing BPD severity and sensitivity to change. PMID:23672691

  18. Associations of emotional arousal, dissociation and symptom severity with operant conditioning in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Hoesterey, Steffen; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-10-30

    Those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display altered evaluations regarding reward and punishment compared to others. The processing of rewards is basal for operant conditioning. However, studies addressing operant conditioning in BPD patients are rare. In the current study, an operant conditioning task combining learning acquisition and reversal was used. BPD patients and matched healthy controls (HCs) were exposed to aversive and neutral stimuli to assess the influence of emotion on learning. Picture content, dissociation, aversive tension and symptom severity were rated. Error rates were measured. Results showed no group interactions between aversive versus neutral scenes. The higher emotional arousal, dissociation and tension, the worse the acquisition, but not reversal, scores were for BPD patients. Scores from the Borderline Symptom List were associated with more errors in the reversal, but not the acquisition phase. The results are preliminary evidence for impaired acquisition learning due to increased emotional arousal, dissociation and tension in BPD patients. A failure to process punishment in the reversal phase was associated with symptom severity and may be related to neuropsychological dysfunctioning involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Conclusions are limited due to the correlational study design and the small sample size. PMID:27491014

  19. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms and intrusions in borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Kris; Pieters, Guido; Claes, Laurence; Berens, Ann; Raes, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM), the tendency to retrieve categories of events from autobiographical memory instead of single events, is found to be a reliable predictor for future mood disturbances and post-traumatic symptom severity. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often report co-morbid episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, we investigated whether OGM would predict depression severity and (post-traumatic) stress symptoms in BPD patients. At admission (N = 54) and at six-month follow-up (N ≥ 31), BPD patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders, the Autobiographical Memory Test, the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd edition (BDI-II), and the Impact of Event Scale. OGM at baseline predicted (a) higher levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up and (b) more intrusions related to a stressful event over and above baseline levels of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, and intrusions, respectively. No association was found between memory specificity and event-related avoidance at follow-up. Despite previous findings suggesting that OGM in BPD is less robust than in MDD and PTSD, our results suggest that memory specificity in BPD patients may have some relevance for the course of depressive and stress symptomatology in BPD.

  20. A Contingency-Oriented Approach to Understanding Borderline Personality Disorder: Situational Triggers and Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miskewicz, Kelly; Fleeson, William; Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield; Law, Mary Kate; Mneimne, Malek; Furr, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article tested a contingency-oriented perspective to examine the dynamic relationships between in-the-moment borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptom events and in-the-moment triggers. An experience sampling study with 282 adults, including 77 participants with BPD, obtained reports of situational triggers and BPD symptom events five times daily for two weeks. Triggers included being rejected, betrayed, abandoned, offended, disappointed, having one’s self-concept threatened, being in a boring situation, and being alone. BPD was associated with increased situational triggers. Multilevel models revealed significant within-person associations between situational triggers and BPD symptoms for the average participant in the study, with significant individual variance in the strength and direction of trigger-symptom contingencies. Most trigger-symptom contingencies were stronger for individuals with higher borderline symptomatology, suggesting that triggers are meaningfully related to BPD. These findings highlight possible proximal mechanisms that maintain BPD and help explain the course of a disorder often described as chaotic and unpredictable. PMID:26200848

  1. Evaluation of Apoptosis in Skin Biopsies of Patients of Borderline Leprosy and Lepra Type 1 Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Nivedita; Agarwal, Sarla; Sharma, Sonal; Sharma, Satendra; Pandhi, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of apoptosis is not clear in leprosy and lepra reactions. Objectives: To evaluate frequency of apoptosis in skin lesions of borderline leprosy and Type 1 lepra reaction. Methods: Sixty patients with borderline leprosy (30 with clinically diagnosed Type 1 reaction (T1R) (Group I) and 30 without clinical evidence of reaction (Group II)) were analyzed in this prospective study. Apoptosis was detected by two different methods for comparison, that is, histopathologic examination (HPE) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation and electrophoresis. Quantification of apoptotic bodies/10 high power fields (HPF) was also done. Results: Out of 30 cases, apoptosis was detected in 29 cases in Group I and 24 cases in Group II by HPE (P = 0.103), whereas, with the use of DNA electrophoresis it was detected in 24 cases in Group I and 18 cases in Group II (P = 0.091). On quantitative estimation it was found that number of apoptotic bodies are higher in Group I in comparison to Group II (2.77 vs 1.99), which is statistically significant. Conclusions: There was moderate agreement (κ = 0.47) between the two methods of apoptosis detection. Apoptosis was seen more in patients with T1R both qualitatively (statistically nonsignificant) and quantitatively (statistically significant). Clinical significance of this novel finding is that apoptosis can be used as one of the variables for diagnosis of T1R to increase detection rate. PMID:25657399

  2. Exploring the inner world of self-mutilating borderline patients: a Rorschach investigation.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Hilsenroth, M J; Nolan, E

    2000-01-01

    Psychiatric patients who engage in self-destructive behavior by cutting, burning, or abrading their skin are currently one of the most difficult-to-treat groups in both inpatient and outpatient settings. The complexities of treating these patients, the risk factors associated with this symptom, and the rise in the prevalence of self-mutilation in America's adolescents and young adults provided the impetus for the current study. This article explores aspects of aggression, dependency, object relations, defensive structure, and psychic boundary integrity that may contribute to the genesis and maintenance of self-mutilation. Rorschach protocols from 90 borderline personality-disordered inpatients (48 self-mutilators and 42 non-self-mutilators) were scored using five psychoanalytic content scales. Results indicate that self-mutilating patients exhibit greater incidence of primary process aggression, severe boundary disturbance, pathological object representations, defensive idealization, devaluation, and splitting than did a matched group of non-self-mutilating borderline patients. Clinical theory and technical recommendations are considered in light of the current empirical findings. PMID:10998813

  3. Five-factor trait instability in borderline relative to other personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Zanarini, Mary C

    2010-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is related to five-factor model (FFM) traits and can be characterized as involving psychological and behavioral instability. A previous study comparing the FFM trait stability across individuals with borderline and other personality disorders found that the BPD group tended to have lower stability, particularly on neuroticism and conscientiousness and the overall configuration of FFM profiles over 6 years, suggesting that associated psychological and behavioral variability may be due to trait variability. The current study was designed to test the degree to which these findings replicate in another sample using different diagnostic and trait measures and extending the measurement period to 10 years. Results are consistent with previous findings in showing lower differential (rank-order) stability on conscientiousness, greater mean-level decreases on neuroticism, lower individual-level stability on conscientiousness, and lower ipsative stability of trait profile configurations among those with BPD. However, unlike the previous study, no differences were observed for differential or individual-level neuroticism or mean-level conscientiousness. Overall, findings show that the instability characteristic of BPD extends into typically stable personality traits, and that it does so with some specificity in terms of which traits are affected and how instability manifests.

  4. Unique Influences of Adolescent Antecedents on Adult Borderline Personality Disorder Features

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Stephanie D.; Olino, Thomas M.; Klein, Daniel N.; Seeley, John R.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a dearth of prospective information regarding adolescent precursors of borderline personality disorder (BPD). This study aims to determine the unique associations between early maladaptive family functioning, parental psychiatric diagnoses, proband early-onset psychiatric diagnosis and BPD symptoms in adulthood using an existing longitudinal study. Participants were randomly selected from nine high schools in western Oregon. A total of 1,709 students (ages 14-18 years) completed two assessments during adolescence. All adolescents with a history of a depressive disorder (n = 360) or a history of non-mood disorders (n = 284), and a random sample of adolescents with no history of psychopathology (n = 457) were invited to participate in a third and fourth evaluation when participants were on average 24 years and 30 years, respectively. Biological parents were interviewed at the third assessment. The multivariate model with all early risk factors found that maternal-child discord (p < .05), maternal BPD (p < .05), paternal Substance Use Disorder (SUD) (p < .05), and proband depression (p < .05), SUD (p < .001), and suicidality (p < .05) were associated with later BPD symptoms. Maternal SUD and proband anxiety, Conduct Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder were also associated with proband BPD symptoms in univariate analyses, but were no longer significant when the other risk factors were included in the model. Multivariate assessment models are needed to identify unique risk factors for Borderline Personality Disorder. This will enhance the efficiency of screening efforts for early detection of risk. PMID:23397935

  5. Disappointed Love and Suicide: A Randomized Controlled Trial of "Abandonment Psychotherapy" Among Borderline Patients.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, A; Burnand, Y; Cochennec, M-F; Ohlendorf, P; Frambati, L; Gaudry-Maire, D; Di Clemente, Th; Hourton, G; Lorillard, S; Canuto, A; Frances, A

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether ambulatory psychotherapy targeted to abandonment experiences and fears can reduce suicidality and improve outcome in borderline patients referred to the emergency room with major depressive disorder and self-destructive behavior severe enough to require medical/surgical treatment and a brief psychiatric hospitalization. A total of 170 subjects were randomized at hospital discharge into three treatment groups: treatment as usual (TAU), abandonment psychotherapy delivered by certified psychotherapists, and abandonment psychotherapy delivered by nurses. Assessments were performed before randomization and at 3-month follow-up. Continued suicidality and other outcome measures were significantly worse in the treatment-as-usual as compared to both abandonment psychotherapy groups, but there were no differences between the two psychotherapy groups. These results suggest the efficacy of manualized psychotherapy that specifically targets the abandonment fears and experiences that are so common as precipitants to suicidal and self-destructive acts in borderline patients. It does not appear that formal psychotherapy training is associated with better outcomes.

  6. Surgical Management of Benign and Borderline Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Moutte, Amandine; Chopin, Nicolas; Faure, Christelle; Beurrier, Frédéric; Ho Quoc, Christophe; Guinaudeau, Florence; Treilleux, Isabelle; Carrabin, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PT) are uncommon fibroepithelial breast neoplasms and there is currently no clear consensual treatment for these tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the surgical management and outcome of benign and borderline PT. We retrospectively assessed 76 cases of benign or borderline PT managed at the Leon Berard comprehensive cancer center in Lyon, France between July 2003 and December 2013. The mean age at diagnosis was 37.9 years and the median follow-up was 58 months. Seventy-five patients (99%), with a mean tumor size of 27 mm, underwent a breast-conserving procedure. The tumor margins were considered positive (when the tumor was present at the inked surgical section) in seven of 76 cases (9%) and negative in 65 out of 76 cases (86%). We observed the presence of small negative surgical margins <10 mm in 89% and <1 mm in 71% of the patients. Although no re-excision was performed to increase these margins, we did not see any increase in the local recurrence rate (4%) when compared to recurrence rates reported in the literature. We thus suggest that systematic revision surgery for close or positive surgical margins for benign PT should not be systematically performed. However, as recurrences occur within 2 years of initial excision, we recommend a regular clinical and imaging follow-up especially during this period for which patient's compliance is essential.

  7. Borderline personality features and associated difficulty in emotion perception: An examination of accuracy and bias.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Justin K; Morey, Leslie C

    2015-08-01

    Research on borderline personality disorder (BPD) has consistently found that those with the disorder often experience volatile interpersonal interactions, and several areas of research have been dedicated to the understanding of the mechanisms behind these interpersonal struggles. One of the most common theories is that the emotional dysregulation that is characteristic of BPD may adversely impact these interpersonal interactions, perhaps through a resulting misperception of emotional states in others. The purpose of the current study was to examine perception of negative affect in those with borderline personality features using a signal detection paradigm, a modified version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task. Results support the hypothesis of atypical perception of negative emotions in BPD, but with disinhibitory aspects of the disorder demonstrating the largest potential influence. This finding was obtained even after controlling for gender differences that were also observed on this task. These results suggest that an examination of trait components of BPD may be necessary for a complete understanding of the emotion perception abilities of those with the disorder. PMID:26104825

  8. Surgical Management of Benign and Borderline Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Moutte, Amandine; Chopin, Nicolas; Faure, Christelle; Beurrier, Frédéric; Ho Quoc, Christophe; Guinaudeau, Florence; Treilleux, Isabelle; Carrabin, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PT) are uncommon fibroepithelial breast neoplasms and there is currently no clear consensual treatment for these tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the surgical management and outcome of benign and borderline PT. We retrospectively assessed 76 cases of benign or borderline PT managed at the Leon Berard comprehensive cancer center in Lyon, France between July 2003 and December 2013. The mean age at diagnosis was 37.9 years and the median follow-up was 58 months. Seventy-five patients (99%), with a mean tumor size of 27 mm, underwent a breast-conserving procedure. The tumor margins were considered positive (when the tumor was present at the inked surgical section) in seven of 76 cases (9%) and negative in 65 out of 76 cases (86%). We observed the presence of small negative surgical margins <10 mm in 89% and <1 mm in 71% of the patients. Although no re-excision was performed to increase these margins, we did not see any increase in the local recurrence rate (4%) when compared to recurrence rates reported in the literature. We thus suggest that systematic revision surgery for close or positive surgical margins for benign PT should not be systematically performed. However, as recurrences occur within 2 years of initial excision, we recommend a regular clinical and imaging follow-up especially during this period for which patient's compliance is essential. PMID:27265474

  9. Borderline Personality Disorder and Oxytocin: Review of Clinical Trials and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Amad, Ali; Thomas, Pierre; Perez-Rodriguez, M Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common mental disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of emotional Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common mental disorder characterized by a pervasive pattern of emotional lability, impulsivity, interpersonal difficulties, identity disturbances, and disturbed cognition. Traditional pharmacotherapies are effective in treating some of these core symptoms but have only modest effects on the domain of interpersonal dysfunction of BPD. Thus there is a need to develop new, neurobiologically informed pharmacological treatments for BPD. This review focuses on the potential use of intranasal oxytocin (OXT), which has key roles in the regulation of complex social cognition and behaviors, to target symptoms of interpersonal dysfunction in BPD. Surprisingly, despite promising data on the prosocial effects of OXT, only 5 trials in BPD have been published to date. These trials show mixed results with on one hand, a decrease of emotional responses to stress and on the other hand, some "paradoxical" reactions with worsened interpersonal anxiety and decreased cooperative behavior. These mixed results are interpreted according to different theoretical models and also in light of some methodological limitations. Further studies are needed to understand the effect of OXT in patients with BPD and ongoing clinical trials will provide some answers to remaining questions on the use of OXT in BPD. Recommendations for future studies are also proposed in this review. PMID:26088114

  10. Associations of emotional arousal, dissociation and symptom severity with operant conditioning in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Paret, Christian; Hoesterey, Steffen; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-10-30

    Those with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display altered evaluations regarding reward and punishment compared to others. The processing of rewards is basal for operant conditioning. However, studies addressing operant conditioning in BPD patients are rare. In the current study, an operant conditioning task combining learning acquisition and reversal was used. BPD patients and matched healthy controls (HCs) were exposed to aversive and neutral stimuli to assess the influence of emotion on learning. Picture content, dissociation, aversive tension and symptom severity were rated. Error rates were measured. Results showed no group interactions between aversive versus neutral scenes. The higher emotional arousal, dissociation and tension, the worse the acquisition, but not reversal, scores were for BPD patients. Scores from the Borderline Symptom List were associated with more errors in the reversal, but not the acquisition phase. The results are preliminary evidence for impaired acquisition learning due to increased emotional arousal, dissociation and tension in BPD patients. A failure to process punishment in the reversal phase was associated with symptom severity and may be related to neuropsychological dysfunctioning involving the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Conclusions are limited due to the correlational study design and the small sample size.

  11. Differentiating Adolescent Self-Injury from Adolescent Depression: Possible Implications for Borderline Personality Development

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Hsiao, Ray C.; Vasilev, Christina A.; Yaptangco, Mona; Linehan, Marsha M.; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Self-inflicted injury (SII) in adolescence marks heightened risk for suicide attempts, completed suicide, and adult psychopathology. Although several studies have revealed elevated rates of depression among adolescents who self injure, no one has compared adolescent self injury with adolescent depression on biological, self-, and informant-report markers of vulnerability and risk. Such a comparison may have important implications for treatment, prevention, and developmental models of self injury and borderline personality disorder. We used a multi-method, multi-informant approach to examine how adolescent SII differs from adolescent depression. Self-injuring, depressed, and typical adolescent females (n = 25 per group) and their mothers completed measures of psychopathology and emotion regulation, among others. In addition, we assessed electrodermal responding (EDR), a peripheral biomarker of trait impulsivity. Participants in the SII group (a) scored higher than depressed adolescents on measures of both externalizing psychopathology and emotion dysregulation, and (b) exhibited attenuated EDR, similar to patterns observed among impulsive, externalizing males. Self-injuring adolescents also scored higher on measures of borderline pathology. These findings reveal a coherent pattern of differences between self-injuring and depressed adolescent girls, consistent with theories that SII differs from depression in etiology and developmental course. PMID:22016199

  12. [Blood pressure with physical stress (ergometry) of 105 normotensive, borderline hypertensive and hypertensive children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Lucas, M; Riechers, B; Michel, U

    1991-12-01

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cardiovascular diseases; its roots go back to childhood. A load study such as ergometry can help to recognise which persons are at risk. Ergometric measurements were performed by us on 105 children and adolescents, 72 of whom had borderline hypertensive or hypertensive blood pressure levels. Of these, the blood pressure rose during stress in 14%, the proportionate share being independent of the physical activity of the subjects. However, among those whose hypertension was on a borderline level, there was a disproportionately large percentage of obese subjects. These showed in addition an increase in blood pressure with increasing load and a reduced physical performance range. Obesity and lack of physical mobility had an unfavourable influence on blood pressure. Unfortunately there are no standardised rules for assessing the blood pressure during stress in children and adolescents. This would be all the more desirable since this easy examination is of prognostic value for an early discovery of manifest hypertension.

  13. The Effects of Different Standard Setting Methods and the Composition of Borderline Groups: A Study within a Law Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dochy, Filip; Kyndt, Eva; Baeten, Marlies; Pottier, Sofie; Veestraeten, Marlies; Leuven, K. U.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different standard setting methods on the size and composition of the borderline group, on the discrimination between different types of students and on the types of students passing with one method but failing with another. A total of 107 university students were classified into 4 different types…

  14. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Group Treatment for Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder: A Public Sector Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Jane; Snowdon, Sharon; Gopold, Michelle; Guymer, Elise

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study of a brief group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention (12 two-hour sessions) was conducted with clients of public mental health services meeting four or more criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Participants were randomly assigned to receive the ACT group intervention in addition to their current…

  15. The Relationship between Borderline Personality Disorder and Academic and Interpersonal Functioning among College Students: Does Religiosity Moderate the Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosack, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    The significantly negative effects of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are widely known among researchers and clinicians. Individuals with BPD struggle in many areas. College students with BPD have been found to particularly struggle in academic and interpersonal ways. Over the last two decades, religiosity has been examined as a moderator of…

  16. Borderline Personality Symptoms Differentiate Non-Suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injury in Ethnically Diverse Adolescent Outpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Ertelt, Troy W.; Miller, Alec L.; Claes, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little research on how specific borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms relate to suicide attempts or suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) within adolescent populations, which is important to know given the recent proposal of an NSSI disorder. Even less well known is whether specific BPD symptoms distinguish NSSI…

  17. The Therapeutic Alliance in Schema-Focused Therapy and Transference-Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinhoven, Philip; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Dyck, Richard; Kooiman, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the quality and development of the therapeutic alliance as a mediator of change in schema-focused therapy (SFT) and transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) for borderline personality disorder. Seventy-eight patients were randomly allocated to 3 years of biweekly SFT or TFP. Scores of both therapists and patients for the…

  18. Contextual Variables Affecting Aggressive Behaviour in Individuals with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities Who Live in a Residential Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Didden, R.; Huitink, C.; Schreuder, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a common type of problem behaviour in clients with mild to borderline intellectual disability who live in a residential facility. We explored contextual events that elicit aggressive behaviour and variables that were associated with such events. Method: Respondents were 87 direct-care staff members of 87 clients with…

  19. A Preliminary Examination of Burnout among Counselor Trainees Treating Clients with Recent Suicidal Ideation and Borderline Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Grant D.; Iverson, Katherine M.; Kemmelmeier, Markus; MacLane, Chelsea; Pistorello, Jacqueline; Fruzzetti, Alan E.; Watkins, Melanie M.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Oser, Megan; Katrichak, Barrie M.; Erikson, Karen M.; Crenshaw, Katrina Y.

    2011-01-01

    Treating suicidal clients with borderline traits can be conducive to burnout. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) may assuage this burnout in counselors. As part of a DBT treatment outcome study, 6 counselors in training collected their own salivary cortisol samples and completed self-report measures of burnout and well-being for 1 year. Findings…

  20. A Comparison of Interview and Self-Report Methods for the Assessment of Borderline Personality Disorder Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Morey, Leslie C.; Edelen, Maria Orlando; Shea, M. Tracie; Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Daversa, Maria T.; Gunderson, John G.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Markowitz, John C.; Skodol, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Interview methods are widely regarded as the standard for the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD), whereas self-report methods are considered a time-efficient alternative. However, the relative validity of these methods has not been sufficiently tested. The current study used data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality…

  1. Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

  2. The Development of a Diagnostic Instrument to Measure Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.; Scheepmaker, M.; Smit, M.; Porton, E.

    2011-01-01

    A growing interest exists in the measuring of social adaptive functioning in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities (MBID), but valid instruments to measure this construct are lacking. The aim of the present study was to develop such an instrument and to examine it on its discriminate validity. In 141 children aged 8-12 years a…

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder and Personality Traits: A Comparison of SCID-II BPD and NEO-PI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkin, John F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Hospitalized female patients with borderline personality disorder were assessed for Axis II disorders by the Structured Clinical Inventory for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID-II) and for personality traits with the NEO Personality Inventory. The relationship of results to social adjustment and the utility of…

  4. Impulse Control and Aggressive Response Generation as Predictors of Aggressive Behaviour in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities and Borderline Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Orobio de Castro, B.; van Aken, M. A. G.; Matthys, W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A growing interest exists in mechanisms involved in behaviour problems in children with mild intellectual disabilities and borderline intelligence (MID/BI). Social problem solving difficulties have been found to be an explanatory mechanism for aggressive behaviour in these children. However, recently a discrepancy was found between…

  5. Childhood Familial Environment, Maltreatment and Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in a Non-Clinical Sample: A Cognitive Behavioural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Steven; Francis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to determine if cognitive beliefs and schemas mediated the relationship between retrospectively reported childhood events and adult borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and seventy-eight non-clinical participants completed questionnaires measuring BPD symptoms, core beliefs,…

  6. Math Practice and Its Influence on Math Skills and Executive Functions in Adolescents with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Brenda R. J.; De Lange, Eva; Van der Molen, Mariet J.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) often complete schooling without mastering basic math skills, even though basic math is essential for math-related challenges in everyday life. Limited attention to cognitive skills and low executive functioning (EF) may cause this delay. We aimed to improve math skills in an…

  7. Mural nodules of clear cell carcinoma in a mucinous borderline tumor of the ovary: a case report.

    PubMed

    Allende, Daniela S; Drake, Richard D; Chen, Longwen

    2010-04-13

    Mural nodules of ovarian mucinous borderline tumors are rare. In this study, we report a case of mural nodules of clear cell carcinoma in an intestinal type mucinous borderline tumor of the ovary. The patient was a 54-years-old woman presented with back and pelvic pain for 3 months. A right-sided multiloculated ovarian mass approximately 20 cm was identified on the CT scan. CA-125 was moderately elevated. She underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and bilateral pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Grossly, the right ovarian mass showed a multiloculated cystic mass with mucinous fluid. There were papillations in the internal surface and two mural nodules were seen. Microscopic examination revealed that the cystic mass was an intestinal type borderline mucinous tumor. The mural nodules showed a classic histology of clear cell carcinoma with tubulocystic and papillary growth patterns. This is an extremely rare case of mural nodules of clear cell carcinoma arising in a mucinous borderline tumor.

  8. Serial-Episodic Brief Treatment for Borderline Spectrum Families: Employing the Matrix of Projections in a Child Abuse Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Steven

    2006-01-01

    The author addresses the fact that many families with a borderline structure receive treatment throughout the life cycle. Serial episodic brief treatment is recommended, utilizing projective identification as an organizing principle to promote incremental change during each treatment episode. The author selects a child abuse case to review, that…

  9. Avoidance of Affect Mediates the Effect of Invalidating Childhood Environments on Borderline Personality Symptomatology in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturrock, Bonnie A.; Francis, Andrew; Carr, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the Linehan (1993) proposal regarding associations between invalidating childhood environments, distress tolerance (e.g., avoidance of affect), and borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms. The sample consisted of 141 non-clinical participants (51 men, 89 women, one gender unknown), ranging in age from 18 to…

  10. Integrating Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Prolonged Exposure to Treat Co-Occurring Borderline Personality Disorder and PTSD: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harned, Melanie S.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the high rate of trauma and PTSD among individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), no studies have specifically evaluated the treatment of PTSD in a BPD population. These case studies illustrate the use of a protocol based on prolonged exposure therapy that can be integrated into standard dialectical behavior therapy to treat…

  11. Mentalization as a common process in treatments for borderline personality disorder: Commentary on the special issue on mentalization in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Alexander L; Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L

    2015-10-01

    Chapman and Dixon-Gordon were invited to write this commentary, they were concerned that they did not know enough about mentalization to make coherent comments on this interesting series. As it turns out, they were among a shrinking minority, as the past decade has witnessed a surge research on mentalization. Work in this field has been pioneered, in no small part, by the authors of the present issue. Collectively, this set of articles provides a useful summary of the state of mentalization research for the uninitiated and makes a compelling case for mentalization as a key translational construct, particularly with regard to borderline personality disorder (BPD). Mentalization deserves attention in further translational research as well as in treatment refinement for BPD and other clinical problems. Future work should also involve the development of effective, objective ways to assess mentalization. Ultimately, the use of translational constructs to loosen the boundaries between evidence-based treatment approaches may help us move toward more refined, accessible, and effective treatment for BPD and other complex mental health problems. PMID:26436582

  12. Next steps in research on aggression in borderline personality disorder: Commentary on "Aggression in borderline personality disorder--A multidimensional model".

    PubMed

    Scott, Lori N; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    Comments on the article by F. Mancke et al. (see record 2015-31349-001). The article proposes a multidimensional model of aggression in borderline personality disorder (BPD) on the basis of an overview of empirical studies supporting the proposed dimensions. We applaud the authors for the timeliness of this piece and their comprehensive summary of the empirical literature on aggression in BPD. We highlight several issues for further attention and study. We first discuss the proposed multidimensional model itself with an emphasis on the choice of constructs, clinical applications, and limitations. We acknowledge the importance of this first step in model-building (i.e., the identification of potentially important dimensions as inferred from variable-focused, group-based comparisons). However, we encourage the necessary next steps-a movement toward a mechanistic and dynamic understanding of these dimensions that relies more heavily on a person-centered approach and enhances clinical relevance. In that spirit, we make some suggestions for future research on aggression in BPD that may have increased translational value for prevention and intervention. PMID:26191825

  13. Personality trait interactions in parents of patients with borderline personality disorder: a controlled study using the Temperament and Character Inventory.

    PubMed

    Fassino, Secondo; Amianto, Federico; Gastaldi, Filippo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Brambilla, Francesca; Leombruni, Paolo

    2009-01-30

    Family environment is a pathogenic factor of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, the personality traits of patients with BPD and their parents have never been assessed using the same instrument and then examined for relationships. In the present study, we explored the temperament and character traits of BPD patients and their parents to investigate possible interactions. In total, 56 patients with BPD and their parents were evaluated with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) and compared with 53 control families. Discriminant and correlation analyses indicated that subjects with BPD displayed higher levels of novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and self-transcendence and lower levels of self-directedness than control subjects. Their fathers displayed higher levels of novelty seeking and lower levels of persistence and self-directedness, and their mothers displayed lower levels of self-directedness compared with levels in control parents. In BPD families, temperament and character traits displayed high levels of discriminatory power. Novelty seeking in offspring with borderline personality disorder was significantly correlated with their mothers' novelty seeking and their fathers' self-transcendence. Self-directedness in borderline offspring was significantly correlated with both their mothers' and fathers' novelty seeking, and their self-transcendence was significantly correlated with their mothers' novelty seeking and harm avoidance. The different correlational pattern for borderline and control families is discussed. Characteristic personality patterns were found in BPD offspring and in both parents. The relationship between personality traits of borderline offspring and those of their parents may be related to both genetic transmission and family dynamics. Ramifications for treatment are discussed.

  14. Psychobiology of borderline personality traits related to subtypes of eating disorders: a study of platelet MAO activity.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Marsá, Marina; Carrasco, Jose L; de Anta, Laura; Molina, Rosa; Sáiz, Jerónimo; Cesar, Jesus; López-Ibor, Juan J

    2011-12-30

    Increased and decreased levers of platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity have been reported in patients with eating disorders, indicating abnormalities of the serotonin turnover. However, whether these findings are related to eating disorders or are rather reflecting the pathophysiology of borderline personality traits in these patients is still unknown. Platelet MAO activity and comorbid personality disorders were investigated in 72 patients with different subtypes of eating disorders (ED) and in a group of 28 healthy controls. ED patients comprised the following subtypes: 25 anorexia nervosa (AN) restrictive, 14 AN binge eating-purging (AN b-p), 3 anorexia nervosa not otherwise specified (AN NOS) and 30 bulimia nervosa (BN). Personality disorders and traits were assessed with the Structured Interview for Personality Disorders (SCID-II), the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder, and the Barrat Impulsiveness Scale. Platelet MAO activity was significantly lower in ED patients with comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) than in ED without Borderline personality disorder (BDP). Platelet MAO activity was significantly and inversely correlated with the number and severity of BPD clinical features. In the subsample of patients with binge eating-purging symptoms (AN b-p, AN NOS and BN), platelet MAO activity was significantly lower in binge-purge patients with comorbid BPD than in binge-purge patients without BPD. The whole group of eating disorders had a significantly reduced lever of platelet MAO activity compared with the control group. The results suggest that low platelet MAO activity might characterize eating disorders with comorbid borderline personality traits, reflecting greater serotonin dysfunction in these patients. The role of decreased platelet MAO as an endophenotype with specific clinical manifestations should be explored in future studies.

  15. Stress regulation and incision in borderline personality disorder--a pilot study modeling cutting behavior.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Sarah; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2012-08-01

    Emotion dysregulation in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is characterized by high baseline negative intensity, high reactivity, and slow return to baseline. Patients with BPD often engage in self-injurious behavior because it leads to immediate relief of stress levels. We aimed to assess stress regulation as well as the influence of tissue damage on subjective (aversive tension) and objective (heart rate) stress correlates in BPD. In 14 unmedicated patients with BPD and 18 healthy controls, a stress induction was followed by an incision into the forearm conducted by an investigator. For aversive tension, we found elevated baseline levels as well as slower return to baseline in BPD. In controls, incision resulted in a short-term increase of aversive tension, whereas tension and heart rate decreased in the BPD group. Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that tissue damage may play a role in disturbed stress regulation in BPD.

  16. Naturalistic Outcomes of Evidence-Based Therapies for Borderline Personality Disorder at a Medical University Clinic.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Robert J; Sachdeva, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy (DDP) are listed in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices based on their performances in randomized controlled trials. However, little is known about their effectiveness in real-world settings. In the present study, the authors observed the naturalistic outcomes of 68 clients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) who were treated at a medical university clinic by experienced therapists using either comprehensive DBT (n = 25) or DDP (n = 27), with 16 clients treated with unstructured psychotherapy serving as a control. We found both DBT and DDP achieved significant reductions in symptoms of BPD, depression, and disability by 12 months of treatment, and showed effect sizes consistent with controlled trials. However, attrition from DBT was high and DDP obtained better outcomes than DBT (d = .53). Larger effectiveness studies are needed to replicate these findings, delineate common and unique treatment processes, and determine therapist and patient characteristics predicting positive outcomes. PMID:27329405

  17. Cross-cultural bias in the diagnosis of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Jani, Suni; Johnson, R Scott; Banu, Sophia; Shah, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is an internationally recognized disorder, although it is slightly varied in its nosology in the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5), and the Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders (CCMD). While it is recognized by genetic and neurobiological patterns, instability of affect, impaired interpersonal relationships, and unstable sense of self, its manifestation is extremely varied based on environmental factors, particularly culture. Several studies of the manifestation of BPD between and across countries, particularly in immigrant populations, identify variations in symptom prevalence based on culture. These findings reveal a need for more unified dimensional-based categorization of BPD to reduce cross-cultural bias and improve identification. PMID:27294587

  18. An Empirical Test of Rejection- and Anger-Related Interpretation Bias in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Lobbestael, Jill; McNally, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    The authors tested whether borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by interpretation bias for disambiguating stimuli in favor of threatening interpretations, especially concerning abuse, abandonment, rejection, and anger-core emotional triggers for BPD patients. A mixed sample of 106 patients with marked BPD traits and nonpatients were assessed with SCID I and II and were presented with vignettes depicting ambiguous social interactions. Interpretations of these vignettes were assessed both in a closed and an open answer format. Results showed that BPD traits were related to a rejection- (closed and open answer formats) and an anger-related interpretation bias (closed answer option only). Cluster C traits were associated with self-blame interpretations. Aside from further validating the cognitive model of BPD, these findings denote interpretation bias as a key feature in patients with BPD that might contribute to their emotional hyperreactivity and interpersonal problems. These findings also highlight the importance of therapeutically normalizing interpretative bias in BPD and cluster C patients.

  19. Volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala in patients with borderline personality disorder: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paulo Menezes; Wenzel, Amy; Borges, Karinne Tavares; Porto, Cristianne Ribeiro; Caminha, Renato Maiato; de Oliveira, Irismar Reis

    2009-08-01

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often exhibit impulsive and aggressive behavior. The hippocampus and amygdala form part of the limbic system, which plays a central role in controlling such expressions of emotional reactivity. There are mixed results in the literature regarding whether patients with BPD have smaller hippocampal and amygdalar volume relative to healthy controls. To clarify the precise nature of these mixed results, we performed a meta-analysis to aggregate data on the size of the hippocampus and amygdala in patients with BPD. Seven publications involving six studies and a total of 104 patients with BPD and 122 healthy controls were included. A significantly smaller volume was found in both the right and left hippocampi and amygdala of patients with BPD compared to healthy controls. These findings raise the possibility that reduced hippocampal and amygdalar volumes are biological substrates of some symptoms of BPD. PMID:19663654

  20. Principles of Treatment for Borderline, Micropapillary Serous, and Low-Grade Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Kari E; Uppal, Shitanshu; Johnston, Carolyn

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) are less common than epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs). Low-grade EOCs (LG-EOCs) occur even less frequently than BOTs. After primary therapy, recurrence rates of BOTs and LG-EOCs are significantly lower and the stage-adjusted survival is higher than for high-grade EOCs. Thus, determining the best management in terms of traditional ovarian cancer staging and debulking procedures is more challenging and has been recently brought to question. This article reviews the particulars of BOTs and LG-EOCs, their similarities and differences, and how they are best managed and treated, and emphasizes the major role of surgery and the controversial role of chemotherapy. Because these tumors disproportionately affect younger women, this review addresses ovarian preservation in circumstances when fertility or hormonal preservation is desired.

  1. Increased hair testosterone but unaltered hair cortisol in female patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Dettenborn, Lucia; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Gao, Wei; Spitzer, Carsten; Roepke, Stefan; Otte, Christian; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have reported on dysfunctions in steroid secretion, including altered cortisol and testosterone levels in borderline personality disorder (BDP) patients compared to healthy controls. The present study extends findings from blood and saliva studies to the cumulative measure of hair steroids. We investigated women with BPD (n=18) and age- and education-matched healthy women (n=17). We did not find differences between BPD patients and healthy women (p=0.40) concerning hair cortisol levels but increased hair testosterone levels among BPD patients compared to controls (p=0.03). These results remained when restricting the analyses to unmedicated patients. Our data indicate altered long-term testosterone but not cortisol levels in females with BPD. Future studies should address the possible impact of altered testosterone on medical illness processes including metabolic syndrome in this population. PMID:27290653

  2. The connections place: a job preparedness program for individuals with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Beth; Konet, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pilot project that provided a job preparedness program specifically designed for individuals who suffer from borderline personality disorder (BPD). The program called "The Connections Place" or "TCP" was based on a 16-week curriculum that focused on both helping individuals with BPD overcome emotional barriers to employment and preparing these individuals to enter/reenter the work world. Ninety clients were enrolled in the pilot project that was conducted over three and one-half years. Almost all participants (n = 54) who completed at least 1 month of the program made significant strides in the following areas: obtained employment or achieved a similar goal (48 %), notably improved their job preparedness (22 %), or made some/limited progress toward job preparedness (26 %). These preliminary findings support the potential effectiveness of job preparedness programs targeted to individuals with BPD. PMID:23408295

  3. Brief report: Borderline personality symptoms and perceived caregiver criticism in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Diana J; Malkin, Mallory L; Freeman, Megan J; Young, John; Gratz, Kim L

    2015-06-01

    Despite findings of an association between adolescent psychopathology and perceived parental criticism, the relation between adolescent borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms and perceived parental criticism has not been examined. Given the centrality of interpersonal sensitivity to BPD (relative to other forms of psychopathology), we hypothesized that adolescent BPD symptoms would be uniquely related to perceived caregiver criticism, above and beyond other forms of psychopathology and general emotion dysregulation. Adolescents (N = 109) in a residential psychiatric treatment facility completed self-report measures of BPD symptoms, perceived caregiver criticism, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Results revealed a unique relation of adolescent BPD symptoms to perceived caregiver criticism, above and beyond age, gender, and other forms of psychopathology. Findings suggest that adolescent BPD symptoms may have unique relevance for adolescents' perceptions of caregivers' attitudes and behaviors, increasing the likelihood of negative perceptions.

  4. Exploring sleep disturbances in adolescent borderline personality disorder using actigraphy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guilé, Jean Marc; Huynh, Christophe; Desrosiers, Lyne; Bouvier, Hélène; MacKay, Jacques; Chevrier, Elyse; Godbout, Roger; Breton, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Actigraphy has been used in clinical pediatric populations for many years, including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and mood disorders to characterize circadian rhythms of motor activity, and as an alternative evaluation of sleep patterns. We present a case of an adolescent presenting with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and substance dependence for whom an investigation of sleep patterns using actigraphy and a sleep diary appeared to be useful in managing the case. Actigraphy contributed to the diagnostic clarification and disconfirmed the relevance of prescribing medication to this patient for sleep problems. Actigraphy is a cost-effective measure to evaluate sleep/wake patterns allowing for several-day-periods of observation. From the patient standpoint, actigraphy is less invasive than more in-depth investigation as polysomnography. Actigraphy might be a promising tool in those clinical occurrences when disentangling sleep disturbances from primary diagnosis or substance use is required.

  5. Etiology of borderline personality disorder: disentangling the contributions of intercorrelated antecedents.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Rebekah; Jenei, Johanna; Westen, Drew

    2005-01-01

    A substantial body of research points to several variables relevant to the etiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD), notably childhood physical and sexual abuse, childhood family environment, and familial aggregation of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. However, these variables tend to be correlated, and few studies have examined them simultaneously. A national sample of randomly selected psychologists and psychiatrists described 524 adult patients with personality disorders. Family environment, parental psychopathology, and history of abuse all independently predicted BPD symptoms in multiple regression analyses. Sexual abuse contributed to the prediction of BPD symptoms over and above family environment, although family environmental factors such as instability partially mediated the effect. The results converge with recent studies using very different samples and methodologies.

  6. Personality Disorders and Mindreading: Specific Impairments in Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder Compared to Other PDs.

    PubMed

    Semerari, Antonio; Colle, Livia; Pellecchia, Giovanni; Carcione, Antonino; Conti, Laura; Fiore, Donatella; Moroni, Fabio; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Procacci, Michele; Pedone, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The capacity of understanding mental states is a complex function which involves several components. Single components can be selectively impaired in specific clinical populations. It has been suggested that impairments in mindreading are central for borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, empirical findings are inconsistent, and it is debatable whether BPD presents a specific profile of mindreading impairments. The aim of this study is to compare BPD and other PDs in mindreading. Seventy-two patients with BPD and 125 patients with other PD diagnoses were assessed using the Metacognition Assessment Interview. BPD showed difficulties in two mindreading functions, differentiation and integration, even when the severity of psychopathology was controlled. These results suggest a specific mindreading impairment in BPD and a strong relationship between these impairments and the severity of psychopathology.

  7. [Comparative assessment of cognitive styles forming personal behavior in health and borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Zakharov, N P

    2006-01-01

    The author suggests a cognitive-analytical concept of personality focusing on cognitively mediated processes of cyclic interaction of different levels of consciousness and subconsciousness represented in the form of emotional-behavioral potential and functional-dynamic system. A cognitive type (cognitype)--a type of personality-centered cognitive operations that determines the pattern of behavioral cycle and distinctive features of social adaptation--is singled out as an integrative basic individual and psychological component of personality. Presented is classification of personality cognitypes, their adaptive and maladaptive variants, correlations between cognitypes and anomalies of personality. The principles of psychotherapy of maladaptive behavior, borderline and addictive disorders (positive reintegration of personality) are substantiated.

  8. The wandering mind in borderline personality disorder: Instability in self- and other-related thoughts.

    PubMed

    Kanske, Philipp; Schulze, Lars; Dziobek, Isabel; Scheibner, Hannah; Roepke, Stefan; Singer, Tania

    2016-08-30

    Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) include instability in identity and interpersonal relationships. Here, we probed whether instability is already present in BPD patients' thoughts about themselves and others. We tested BPD patients (N=27) and healthy controls (N=25) with a mind-wandering task that assesses content and variability of stimulus-independent self-generated thoughts. Multi-level modeling revealed that while BPD patients and healthy controls mind-wander to a similar extent, BPD patients' thoughts are colored predominantly negatively. Most importantly, although their thoughts concerned the self and others as much as in controls, they fluctuated more strongly in the degree to which their thoughts concerned themselves and others and also gave more extreme ratings. Self- and other related thoughts that were more extreme were also more negative in valence. The increased variability supports current conceptualizations of BPD and may account for the instability in identity and interpersonal relationships. PMID:27318635

  9. Does Borderline Personality Disorder Manifest Itself Differently in Patients With Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy; Walsh, Emily

    2015-12-01

    Perugi and colleagues (2013) recently reported that some features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) significantly predicted a diagnosis of bipolar disorder among depressed patients. They interpreted these findings as indicating that some BPD criteria are nonspecific and are indicators of bipolar disorder rather than BPD, whereas other criteria are more specific to BPD. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, the authors tested the hypothesis that BPD presents itself differently in psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. The authors found that the patients with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely to report impulsive behavior and transient dissociation. No criterion was significantly more common in the BPD patients with MDD. The authors therefore do not consider the BPD criteria to be nonspecific with regard to the distinction between BPD and bipolar disorder.

  10. Borderline personality disorder: patterns of self-harm, reported childhood trauma and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Rebecca; Gavin, Victoria; Levita, Liat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consecutive admissions of 214 women with borderline personality disorder were investigated for patterns of specific forms of self-harm and reported developmental experiences. Systematic examination of clinical notes found that 75% had previously reported a history of childhood sexual abuse. These women were more likely to self-harm, and in specific ways that may reflect their past experiences. Despite this, treatment within a dialectical behaviour therapy-informed therapeutic community leads to relatively greater clinical gains than for those without a reported sexual abuse trauma history. Notably, greater behavioural and self-reported distress and dissociation were not found to predict poor clinical outcome. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  11. Childhood abuse and aggression in girls: the contribution of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Burnette, Mandi L; Reppucci, N Dickon

    2009-01-01

    The authors tested whether emerging borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms mediated the association between childhood physical abuse (CPA) and aggression among incarcerated girls. Participants were 121 incarcerated adolescent girls (13-19 years old). Three forms of aggression (relational, overt, and violent offending behavior) and exposure to CPA by a parental figure were assessed using self-report inventories, whereas BPD symptoms were evaluated using a structured interview. Mediation models, including tests of indirect effects, were conducted in which each form of aggression was predicted from CPA with BPD symptoms entered as a mediator. A divergent pattern emerged in which BPD symptoms mediated the relationship between CPA and violent offending, but not less severe forms of overt aggression. Relational aggression, although correlated with CPA, was not associated with BPD symptoms. Implications for the conceptualization and treatment of girls' aggression within the context of interpersonal functioning are discussed. PMID:19144235

  12. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination

    PubMed Central

    Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan’s Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed. PMID:27348858

  13. Fine needle aspiration cytology of cervical lymph node involvement by ovarian serous borderline tumor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longwen; Butler, Kristina A; Bell, Debra A

    2016-01-01

    Serous borderline tumor (SBT) involving a cervical lymph node is extremely rare. In addition, fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology of the involved cervical lymph node shares tremendous morphologic similarity with other low-grade papillary carcinomas. Thus, it can be easily misdiagnosed as metastatic carcinoma. A 42-year-old female had a history of bilateral SBT and postbilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She presented with left cervical lymphadenopathy 6 months later. FNA cytology showed a low-grade papillary neoplasm with psammoma bodies. Needle core biopsy along with immunostains was diagnostic of cervical lymph node involvement (LNI) of SBT. although extremely rare, cervical LNI can be found in patients with SBTs. FNA cytology, sometimes, is indistinguishable from metastatic papillary adenocarcinoma. Cell block or needle core biopsy is essential to make the correct diagnosis. PMID:27563339

  14. Impact of borderline personality disorder in late life on systems of care.

    PubMed

    Rosowsky, E; Gurian, B

    1992-04-01

    Some symptoms that are benchmarks of borderline personality disorder in the younger patient--identity disturbance, impulsivity, self-mutilation, risk taking, and substance abuse--do not appear to define the disorder in late life. However, changes in the environment or social context of elderly persons may cause core symptoms to manifest differently. Identity disturbance in old age may be evidenced by an inability to formulate future plans or pursue goal-directed activities. Anorexia may be a substitute for more obvious forms of self-mutilation. Elderly patients with severe personality disorders may disrupt nursing homes and other service delivery systems. The authors suggest that staff who work with these patients receive special training and that more research is needed to identify which symptoms of personality disorders are maintained into old age.

  15. Fine needle aspiration cytology of cervical lymph node involvement by ovarian serous borderline tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Longwen; Butler, Kristina A.; Bell, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    Serous borderline tumor (SBT) involving a cervical lymph node is extremely rare. In addition, fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology of the involved cervical lymph node shares tremendous morphologic similarity with other low-grade papillary carcinomas. Thus, it can be easily misdiagnosed as metastatic carcinoma. A 42-year-old female had a history of bilateral SBT and postbilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She presented with left cervical lymphadenopathy 6 months later. FNA cytology showed a low-grade papillary neoplasm with psammoma bodies. Needle core biopsy along with immunostains was diagnostic of cervical lymph node involvement (LNI) of SBT. although extremely rare, cervical LNI can be found in patients with SBTs. FNA cytology, sometimes, is indistinguishable from metastatic papillary adenocarcinoma. Cell block or needle core biopsy is essential to make the correct diagnosis. PMID:27563339

  16. Representations of God uncovered in a spirituality group of borderline inpatients.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Geoff; Manierre, Amy

    2008-01-01

    We present aspects of a psychoanalytically-oriented, exploratory spirituality group for nine female psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Through drawings and group process, the patients uncovered and elaborated on their representations of God. Two patterns of representations were identified: (1) representations of a punitive, judgmental, rigid God that seemed directly to reflect and correspond with parental representations and (2) representations of a depersonified, inanimate, abstract God entailing aspects of idealization that seemed to compensate for parental representations. Interestingly, the second pattern was associated with comorbid narcissistic features in the patients. Those patients who presented punitive God representations were able to begin the process of re-creating these representations toward more benign or benevolent images in the context of this group, while those participants who presented depersonified God representations seemed unable to do so.

  17. Principles of Treatment for Borderline, Micropapillary Serous, and Low-Grade Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Kari E; Uppal, Shitanshu; Johnston, Carolyn

    2016-09-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) are less common than epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs). Low-grade EOCs (LG-EOCs) occur even less frequently than BOTs. After primary therapy, recurrence rates of BOTs and LG-EOCs are significantly lower and the stage-adjusted survival is higher than for high-grade EOCs. Thus, determining the best management in terms of traditional ovarian cancer staging and debulking procedures is more challenging and has been recently brought to question. This article reviews the particulars of BOTs and LG-EOCs, their similarities and differences, and how they are best managed and treated, and emphasizes the major role of surgery and the controversial role of chemotherapy. Because these tumors disproportionately affect younger women, this review addresses ovarian preservation in circumstances when fertility or hormonal preservation is desired. PMID:27587627

  18. The wandering mind in borderline personality disorder: Instability in self- and other-related thoughts.

    PubMed

    Kanske, Philipp; Schulze, Lars; Dziobek, Isabel; Scheibner, Hannah; Roepke, Stefan; Singer, Tania

    2016-08-30

    Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) include instability in identity and interpersonal relationships. Here, we probed whether instability is already present in BPD patients' thoughts about themselves and others. We tested BPD patients (N=27) and healthy controls (N=25) with a mind-wandering task that assesses content and variability of stimulus-independent self-generated thoughts. Multi-level modeling revealed that while BPD patients and healthy controls mind-wander to a similar extent, BPD patients' thoughts are colored predominantly negatively. Most importantly, although their thoughts concerned the self and others as much as in controls, they fluctuated more strongly in the degree to which their thoughts concerned themselves and others and also gave more extreme ratings. Self- and other related thoughts that were more extreme were also more negative in valence. The increased variability supports current conceptualizations of BPD and may account for the instability in identity and interpersonal relationships.

  19. Associations Between Changes in Normal Personality Traits and Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms over 16 years

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant movement toward conceptualizing borderline personality disorder (BPD) with normal personality traits. However one critical assumption underlying this transition, that longitudinal trajectories of BPD symptoms and normal traits track together, has not been tested. We evaluated the prospective longitudinal associations of changes in five-factor model traits and BPD symptoms over the course of 16 years using parallel process latent growth curve models in 362 patients with BPD (N=290) or other PDs (N=72). Moderate to strong cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were observed between BPD symptoms and Neuroticism, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. This study is the first to demonstrate a longitudinal link between changes in BPD symptoms and changes in traits over an extended interval in a clinical sample. These findings imply that changes in BPD symptoms occur in concert with changes in normal traits, and support the proposed transition to conceptualizing BPD, at least in part, with trait dimensions. PMID:25364942

  20. Differential-diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Brunnhuber, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive symptoms are clinically unspecific and can be found in numerous disorders. Within the framework of psychotherapeutically treatable illnesses, the classical obsessive-compulsive neurosis can be distinguished from early anancastia in the case of borderline personality disorder. The text refers to some aspects of the obsessive-compulsive disorder within these earlier disorders. At least five characteristics can be discussed: In the course of this, the varying functions of obsessive-compulsive symptoms for the inner-psychological organization become clear and specifically show that on a low structural level, symptoms do not appear to be primarily pathological but are a part of a "quasi-physiological" and ego-sustaining mechanism. What remains open to discussion in the end is, whether there may be an important substratum for the basis of a historiographical biology as called repeatedly for from psychosomatic theory repeatedly. In addition to this, the awareness of both forms is an important requirement for treatment.

  1. Borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder: what is the difference and why does it matter?

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel; Black, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and bipolar disorder (types I and II) are frequently confused because of their symptomatic overlap. Although affective instability is a prominent feature of each, the pattern is entirely different. BPD is characterized by transient mood shifts that occur in response to interpersonal stressors, whereas bipolar disorder is associated with sustained mood changes. These disorders can be further distinguished by comparing their phenomenology, etiology, family history, biological studies, outcome, and response to medication. Their distinction is of great clinical importance because misdiagnosis can deprive the patient of potentially effective treatment, whether it is psychotherapy for BPD or medication for bipolar disorder. On the basis of a comprehensive literature review, guidelines for differential diagnosis are suggested, and priorities for further research are recommended.

  2. The brain in overdrive: a new look at borderline and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael H

    2013-10-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been recognized as heterogeneous, etiologically, stemming from many combinations of genetic and environmental factors BPD never occurs alone: it is always accompanied by traits of other personality disorders and by various symptom-conditions, especially mood disorders. The controversy about linkage between BPD and bipolar disorder could not be resolved when the debate relied only on clinical description. Some twin-studies suggested modest overlap between BPD and bipolar disorder. Current neuroimaging research points to similarities in brain changes among several conditions characterized by emotional over-reactivity to stress: bipolar disorder, certain cases of BPD and attention-deficit hyperactivity (ADHD). These include alterations in the limbic system (e.g., amygdala and hippocampus) and neocortex (especially the prefrontal cortex). An important subset of BPD exists in which brain changes are essentially identical with those of bipolar disorder. Relevant brain-change findings and treatment implications are summarized in this article. PMID:23982298

  3. Impulsivity mediates the association between borderline personality pathology and body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Iacovino, Juliette M.; Powers, Abigail D.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with obesity, a major risk factor for a number of chronic illnesses (e.g., cardiovascular disease). We examined whether impulsivity and affective instability mediate the association between BPD pathology and body mass index (BMI). Participants were a community sample of adults ages 55–64 and their informants. The Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality measured BPD symptoms and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory measured self- and informant-report impulsivity and affective instability. Mediation analyses demonstrated that only higher self-report impulsivity significantly mediated the association between greater BPD pathology and higher BMI. A subsequent model revealed that higher scores on the impulsiveness (lack of inhibitory control) and deliberation (planning) facets of impulsivity mediated the BPD–BMI association, with impulsiveness exerting a stronger mediation effect than deliberation. Obesity interventions that improve inhibitory control may be most effective for individuals with BPD pathology. PMID:24505165

  4. Some interpersonal aspects of self-mutilation in a borderline patient.

    PubMed

    Kwawer, J S

    1980-04-01

    Some interpersonal aspects of self-mutilation and vampiristic blood rituals in borderline states are discussed, as these were clarified in the therapeutic relationship established with a hospitalized young woman. The therapeutic stance during the period of inpatient treatment discussed emphasized consistent reinforcement of boundaries and limits in order to facilitate a mutual exploration of the interpersonal context in which her symptoms emerged. Blood rituals repeatedly expressed primitive identifications with intrusive, controlling, and sadistic aspects of a psychotic mothering figure. These were reflected in the treatment in her crazed, angry demands--through her symptoms--for a "caring" response from the therapist, whom she deliberately and vengefully assaulted through the medium of her own blood. Her manipulative and controlling efforts to maintain a human attachment highlighted her anxieties about separation and abandonment. In subsequent phases of the psychotherapeutic work, her relation to her own blood reflected struggles with womanhood and sexuality.

  5. The relation between attachment, personality, internalizing, and externalizing dimensions in adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vera; Canta, Guilherme; de Castro, Filipa; Leal, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The relation between attachment and personality features is an important field to explore in adolescent borderline personality disorder (BPD), and previous research has shown that personality features may be conceptualized within latent internalizing and externalizing dimensions. This cross-sectional study used a structural equation model to examine the association between the BPD participants' perception of attachment and personality features, mediated by the underlying internalizing/externalizing personality dimensions. Data were analyzed for 60 adolescents, ages 15 to 18 years, diagnosed with BPD who completed attachment and personality self-report measures. The authors' results showed a good fit of the model, suggesting a significant association between attachment and the internalizing/externalizing dimensions, which simultaneously congregate and influence personality traits. The perception of attachment anxiety was positively related to the internalizing dimension and at the same time negatively related to the externalizing dimension. However, the perception of attachment avoidance was not related to internalizing or externalizing personality dimensions. PMID:27583810

  6. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Rebecca; Hasking, Penelope; Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan's Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed. PMID:27348858

  7. Schema therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder: a single case series.

    PubMed

    Nordahl, Hans M; Nysaeter, Tor E

    2005-09-01

    The effectiveness of schema therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) developed by Young was investigated using a single case series trial of six patients who all had primarily a DSM-IV BPD diagnosis. The treatment approach comprised the core elements of schema therapy with an emphasis on schema mode work and limited re-parenting. An A-B direct replication series with follow-up assessments at 12 months was implemented. From baseline to follow-up improvement was large, as indicated by large effect sizes, and improvement was clinically meaningful for five of the six patients included. Three of the six patients did not any longer fulfill the criteria for BPD by the end of the treatment.

  8. [Treatment satisfaction of patients with borderline personality disorder in inpatient schema therapy].

    PubMed

    Reiss, Neele; Vogel, Friederike; Nill, Marco; Graf-Morgenstern, Mechthild; Finkelmeier, Britta; Lieb, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    Patients with severe and chronic psychiatric disorders, such as Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), are hospitalized frequently, but we often find a high ambivalence regarding treatment in this group of patients. 31 patients with severe BPD participated in an inpatient Schema Therapy (ST) treatment program and evaluated both the intensive ST treatment program and group therapy elements regarding their treatment -satisfaction. A high global treatment satisfaction with the ST treatment program was demonstrated and we found a higher treatment satisfaction in patients with than without BPD specific symptom reductions. Remarkable differences in treatment satisfaction showed when looking at the evaluation of group therapies. The results of the present study demonstrate treatment satisfaction of BPD patients in inpatient ST and give directions for the future development of these programs.

  9. The effect of anger rumination in the relationship between borderline personality disorder symptoms and precursors.

    PubMed

    Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E; Geiger, Paul J; Baer, Ruth A

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has identified an invalidating childhood environment and a biological predisposition for affective instability to be two precursors for the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD). In addition, rumination, particularly in response to anger, is significantly associated with symptom severity and dysregulated behavior in BPD. This study examined whether a significant relationship between childhood precursors and current BPD symptom severity could be accounted for by the tendency to engage in anger rumination in a sample of undergraduate students (N = 342), including many with high BPD features. Results showed a significant indirect effect of anger rumination in the relationship between self-reported childhood emotional vulnerability (but not invalidating childhood environment) and BPD symptom severity. This finding suggests that anger rumination could be a risk factor for BPD. These results suggest the importance of continued research on the role of anger rumination in the development and exacerbation of BPD symptoms.

  10. Increased attempts to suppress negative and positive emotions in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Beblo, Thomas; Fernando, Silvia; Kamper, Pia; Griepenstroh, Julia; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Pastuszak, Anna; Schlosser, Nicole; Driessen, Martin

    2013-12-15

    Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) show evidence of disturbed emotion regulation. In particular, patients may try to suppress their emotions with possibly negative effects on mental health. We investigated the suppression of both negative and positive emotions in BPD patients and healthy participants. Thirty BPD patients and 30 matched healthy controls were assessed for emotion suppression using the Emotion Acceptance Questionnaire (EAQ). In addition, we administered additional questionnaires to validate emotion suppression findings. BPD patients reported increased attempts to suppress both negative and positive emotions. These findings indicate that BPD patients are not simply acting out negative emotions. Therapeutic approaches that focus on emotion acceptance of emotions are supported by our study data. Apart from negative emotions, treatment programs should consider positive emotions as well.

  11. Inconsistency and social decision making in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Brändle, Laura S; Hager, Oliver M; Haynes, Melanie; Fischbacher, Urs; Hasler, Gregor

    2016-09-30

    Inconsistent social behavior is a core psychopathological feature of borderline personality disorder. The goal of the present study was to examine inconsistency in social decision-making using simple economic social experiments. We investigated the decisions of 17 female patients with BPD, 24 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 36 healthy controls in three single shot economic experiments measuring trust, cooperation, and punishment. BPD severity was assessed using the Zanarini Rating Scale for BPD. Investments across identical one-shot trust and punishment games were significantly more inconsistent in BPD patients than in controls. Such inconsistencies were only found in the social risk conditions of the trust and punishment conditions but not in the non-social control conditions. MDD patients did not show such inconsistencies. Furthermore, social support was negatively correlated with inconsistent decision-making in the trust and punishment game, which underscores the clinical relevance of this finding.

  12. Inconsistency and social decision making in patients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Brändle, Laura S; Hager, Oliver M; Haynes, Melanie; Fischbacher, Urs; Hasler, Gregor

    2016-09-30

    Inconsistent social behavior is a core psychopathological feature of borderline personality disorder. The goal of the present study was to examine inconsistency in social decision-making using simple economic social experiments. We investigated the decisions of 17 female patients with BPD, 24 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 36 healthy controls in three single shot economic experiments measuring trust, cooperation, and punishment. BPD severity was assessed using the Zanarini Rating Scale for BPD. Investments across identical one-shot trust and punishment games were significantly more inconsistent in BPD patients than in controls. Such inconsistencies were only found in the social risk conditions of the trust and punishment conditions but not in the non-social control conditions. MDD patients did not show such inconsistencies. Furthermore, social support was negatively correlated with inconsistent decision-making in the trust and punishment game, which underscores the clinical relevance of this finding. PMID:27380424

  13. Borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder: what is the difference and why does it matter?

    PubMed

    Paris, Joel; Black, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and bipolar disorder (types I and II) are frequently confused because of their symptomatic overlap. Although affective instability is a prominent feature of each, the pattern is entirely different. BPD is characterized by transient mood shifts that occur in response to interpersonal stressors, whereas bipolar disorder is associated with sustained mood changes. These disorders can be further distinguished by comparing their phenomenology, etiology, family history, biological studies, outcome, and response to medication. Their distinction is of great clinical importance because misdiagnosis can deprive the patient of potentially effective treatment, whether it is psychotherapy for BPD or medication for bipolar disorder. On the basis of a comprehensive literature review, guidelines for differential diagnosis are suggested, and priorities for further research are recommended. PMID:25536097

  14. Requirement for expert histopathological assessment of ovarian cancer and borderline tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, P S; Shanks, J H; Buckley, C H; Ryder, W D J; Davies, J; Reynolds, K; Slade, R J; Kitchener, H C; Jayson, G C

    2000-01-01

    The distinction between borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) and ovarian carcinoma is made by histopathological assessment. Of 64 patients managed according to institutional BOT protocols, 27 (42%) had been referred with a diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma that was subsequently changed to BOT following histopathological review. The 70% 6-year event-free survival of the patients with a revised diagnosis was not significantly different from those who were referred with a diagnosis of BOT. This change in diagnosis is important as it avoids the need for chemotherapy for most patients and results in patients receiving appropriate information concerning prognosis. Interestingly, 24 patients (38.1%) reported a family history of epithelial cancer, a finding that has not been reported previously.© 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10732741

  15. [Baroreflex and blood pressure variations in borderline hypertension of the young adult].

    PubMed

    Chanudet, X; Chau, N P; Hoffman, O; Fassa, Y; Clément, R; Garcin, J M; Larroque, P

    1991-08-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability depends on external and internal factors. Among these, arterial baroreflex play an important role. The matter of this study is to assess the relationship between these two parameters in borderline hypertension (BL). Twenty six BL male hypertensive were recruited for the study, all gave informed consent. Age: 21 +/- 2 years, height: 177 +/- 8 cm, weight: 77 +/- 14 kg. An ambulatory BP monitoring was performed in each one using a Diasys (Novacor) recorder. Measurements were obtained each 15 minutes for 24 hours. Mean, standard deviation and variation coefficient (VC) of BP and heart rate (HR) were computed for 24 hours, daytime (9a.m.-7 p.m.), nighttime (11 p.m.-7 a.m.). Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined as the ratio of HR variation on systolic BP variation recorded with a Finapres device from the fourth phase of a Valsalva manoeuvre. Mean systolic and diastolic BP values for 24 hours, daytime and nighttime are: 129 +/- 11/73 +/- 13, 137 +/- 14/76 +/- 15, 114 +/- 11/69 +/- 12 mmHg. VC are: 12 +/- 3/15 +/- 3, 9 +/- 3/13 +/- 3, 10 +/- 3/13 +/- 4%. HR values are: 73 +/- 10, 84 +/- 14, 58 +/- 7 b/min, VC are: 24 +/- 5, 17 +/- 4, 17 +/- 7%. Index for BRS = 1.76 +/- 0.65%. There is no correlation between BRS and systolic BP or HR. BRS is correlated to the inverse of systolic daytime BP VC: r = -0.556, p = 0.003. There is no correlation with other parameters. This study provides evidence for a link between BRS and daytime BP variability in borderline hypertension. PMID:1953260

  16. Effects of long-term air jet noise and dietary sodium chloride in borderline hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D C; Hunt, R A

    1993-10-01

    The hypothesis that simultaneous exposure to a high (8%) sodium chloride diet and behavioral stress (air jet noise) would act synergistically to increase blood pressure was investigated in male borderline hypertensive rats. Rats were fed either a 1% or an 8% sodium chloride diet beginning at 6 weeks of age. Rats in the Air Noise condition were restrained and exposed to random blasts of air jet noise for 2 h/d, 5 d/wk, from 7 to 17 weeks of age. Controls either were placed in identical restrainers and test chambers but not exposed to air jet noise (Restrained Control) or were left undisturbed (Maturation Control). Biweekly indirect blood pressure measurements showed that by 17 weeks of age, the high-sodium chloride diet and air jet noise exposure produced additive increases in blood pressure. Direct blood pressure measurements at 18 weeks of age confirmed the higher systolic pressures in borderline hypertensive rats exposed to both an 8% sodium chloride diet and air jet noise. After ganglionic blockade, the blood pressure of rats in the Air Noise group remained higher than that of Restrained and Maturation Controls, suggesting that the increased blood pressure of air jet noise-exposed rats was not maintained by increased autonomic activity. Blood pressure after maximal vasodilation by hydralazine was increased in rats exposed to both an 8% sodium chloride diet and air jet noise compared with other groups. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (tested by graded doses of angiotensin II) did not differ among groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Differences in Facial Emotion Recognition between First Episode Psychosis, Borderline Personality Disorder and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez de Artaza, Maider; Bustamante, Sonia; Orgaz, Pablo; Osa, Luis; Angosto, Virxinia; Valverde, Cristina; Bilbao, Amaia; Madrazo, Arantza; van Os, Jim; Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Facial emotion recognition (FER) is essential to guide social functioning and behaviour for interpersonal communication. FER may be altered in severe mental illness such as in psychosis and in borderline personality disorder patients. However, it is unclear if these FER alterations are specifically related to psychosis. Awareness of FER alterations may be useful in clinical settings to improve treatment strategies. The aim of our study was to examine FER in patients with severe mental disorder and their relation with psychotic symptomatology. Materials and Methods Socio-demographic and clinical variables were collected. Alterations on emotion recognition were assessed in 3 groups: patients with first episode psychosis (FEP) (n = 64), borderline personality patients (BPD) (n = 37) and healthy controls (n = 137), using the Degraded Facial Affect Recognition Task. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Structured Interview for Schizotypy Revised and Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences scales were used to assess positive psychotic symptoms. WAIS III subtests were used to assess IQ. Results Kruskal-Wallis analysis showed a significant difference between groups on the FER of neutral faces score between FEP, BPD patients and controls and between FEP patients and controls in angry face recognition. No significant differences were found between groups in the fear or happy conditions. There was a significant difference between groups in the attribution of negative emotion to happy faces. BPD and FEP groups had a much higher tendency to recognize happy faces as negatives. There was no association with the different symptom domains in either group. Conclusions FEP and BPD patients have problems in recognizing neutral faces more frequently than controls. Moreover, patients tend to over-report negative emotions in recognition of happy faces. Although no relation between psychotic symptoms and FER alterations was found, these deficits could contribute to a

  18. The Relationship Between Borderline Personality Disorder and Major Depression in Later Life: Acute Versus Temperamental Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Galione, Janine N.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective A recent issue in the personality disorder field is the prevalence and course of Axis II symptoms in later life. Focusing on the presentation of personality disorder criteria over time may have some utility in exploring the relationship between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depression in older adults. Temperamental personality symptoms are relatively resistant to change but tend to be nonspecific to disorders, while acute symptoms remit relatively quickly. We predicted that temperamental BPD symptoms would be positively correlated with a history of depression and did not expect to find a relationship between major depression and acute BPD symptoms. Method One thousand six hundred and thirty participants between the ages of 55 and 64 were recruited to participate in a community-based longitudinal study representative of the St. Louis area. Participants completed a battery of assessments at baseline, including diagnostic interviews for all ten personality disorders and major depressive disorder. Results Temperamental and acute BPD symptoms were significantly correlated with a history of major depression. After adjustments were made for the effects of temperamental symptoms on depression, acute symptoms were no longer correlated with a history of depression. As predicted, temperamental symptoms remained significantly related to depression, even after controlling for the effects of acute symptoms. BPD acute symptoms showed a unique negative correlation with the amount of time following remission from a depressive episode. Conclusions Overall, this study supports associations between major depression and borderline personality in older adults. The findings indicate that a history of major depression is primarily related to stable BPD symptoms related to emotional distress, which are more prevalent in older adults compared to acute features. PMID:23567384

  19. Prior appendectomy does not protect against subsequent development of malignant or borderline mucinous ovarian neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Kevin M.; Labidi-Galy, S. Intidhar; Vitonis, Allison F.; Hornick, Jason L.; Doyle, Leona A.; Hirsch, Michelle S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Drapkin, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to concern that mucinous malignant or borderline ovarian neoplasms (MON) may represent metastatic deposits from appendiceal primaries, gynecologic oncologists routinely perform appendectomy in these cases. However, a multidisciplinary critique of this practice is lacking. Methods The New England Case-Control study database was utilized to compare the effect of prior appendectomy against known risk factors for MON. Pathology and operative reports of local cases of MON were reviewed to estimate the frequency of microscopic mucinous lesions in the appendix. Protein expression patterns among mucinous ovarian, colorectal, and appendiceal cancers were compared by immunohistochemistry. Results From the New England Case-Control study, 287 cases of MON were compared against 2,339 age-matched controls. Prior appendectomy did not reduce the risk of MON (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.83–1.92, p=0.23), while prior tubal ligation, parity, and breastfeeding were each protective against MON. Active smoking (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.48–2.80, p<0.001) was associated with an increased risk of MON. Among 196 mucinous adnexal tumors, appendectomy did not reclassify any MON as appendiceal in origin. By immunohistochemistry, mucinous ovarian carcinomas tended to be CK7+/CK20-/MUC2-/CDX2-, whereas mucinous colorectal and appendiceal adenocarcinomas were typically CK7-/CK20+/MUC2+/CDX2+, although with some overlap in immunophenotype. Additionally, PAX8 was positive in a subset of MOC and negative in all appendiceal carcinomas. Conclusion Prior appendectomy is not protective against development of malignant or borderline MON. Routine appendectomy during surgery for MON seldom reveals an unsuspected GI primary in early stage tumors but may aid in final diagnosis in advanced stage cases. PMID:24342438

  20. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  1. Developmental Differences in Diffusion-Tensor Imaging Parameters in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    New, Antonia S.; Carpenter, David M.; Perez-Rodriguez, M. Mercedes; Ripoll, Luis H.; Avedon, Jennifer; Patil, Uday; Hazlett, Erin A.; Goodman, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Background Borderline personality disorder (BPD) often presents during adolescence. Early detection and intervention decreases its subsequent severity. However, little is known about early predictors and biological underpinnings of BPD. The observed abnormal functional connectivity among brain regions in BPD led to studies of white matter, as the neural substrate of connectivity. However, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies in adult BPD have been inconclusive, and, as yet, there are no published DTI studies in borderline adolescents. Methods We conducted DTI tractography in 38 BPD patients (14-adolescents,24-adults) and 32 healthy controls (13-adolescents,19-adults). Results We found bilateral tract-specific decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) in inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) in BPD adolescents compared to adolescent controls. ILF FA was significantly higher in adolescent controls compared to BPD adolescents, BPD adults and adult controls (WilksF(3,57)=3.55, p<0.02). Follow-up voxelwise TBSS analysis demonstrated lower FA in BPD adolescents compared to adolescent controls also in uncinate and occipitofrontal fasciculi. Discussion FA generally develops along an inverted U-shape curve, increasing through adolescence, and slowly decreasing in adulthood. Our findings suggest that, in adolescent BPD, this normal developmental “peak” in FA, which is seen in healthy controls, is not achieved. This suggests a possible neural substrate for the previously reported OFC-amygdala disconnect in adults with BPD. It raises the possibility that a white matter tract abnormality in BPD present in adolescence may not be appreciable in adulthood, but a functional abnormality in the coordination among brain regions persists. Our finding represents a possible biological marker to identify those at risk for developing BPD. PMID:23628384

  2. Characterizing emotional dysfunction in borderline personality, major depression, and their co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Weiss, Nicole H; Tull, Matthew T; DiLillo, David; Messman-Moore, Terri; Gratz, Kim L

    2015-10-01

    This research aimed to characterize patterns of emotional reactivity and dysregulation in borderline personality, depression, and their co-occurrence. In study 1, 488 young adult women from the community were categorized into four groups based on self-reported major depressive disorder (MDD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms (Low BPD/Low MDD; Low BPD/High MDD; High BPD/Low MDD; High BPD/High MDD). Immediate and prolonged subjective emotional reactivity to a laboratory stressor were assessed, and participants completed self-report and behavioral measures of emotion dysregulation. Study 2 extended these findings, examining emotional reactivity and dysregulation in a clinical population of 176 substance dependent patients with diagnoses of BPD and MDD and including a biological index of emotional reactivity. Results revealed greater prolonged fear reactivity in the High BPD/High MDD (vs. Low BPD/Low MDD) group in study 1, and greater prolonged anxiety and negative affect reactivity in both High BPD groups (vs. Low BPD/Low MDD and Low BPD/High MDD groups) in study 2 (but no differences in cortisol reactivity). Results also demonstrated greater subjective (but not behavioral) emotion dysregulation in the High BPD/High MDD (vs. Low BPD/Low MDD) group in study 1 and both High BPD groups (vs. both Low BPD groups) in study 2. Finally, the High BPD/High MDD group reported greater difficulties controlling impulsive behaviors compared with all other groups in study 1 and the Low BPD groups in study 2. Findings suggest that BPD pathology (but not MDD pathology alone) is characterized by greater prolonged emotional (especially anxiety/fear-related) reactivity and heightened emotion dysregulation. PMID:26343484

  3. Defense Mechanisms Reported by Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and Axis II Comparison Subjects Over 16 Years of Prospective Follow-up: Description and Prediction of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the defensive functioning of 290 borderline patients and compared it to that of 72 patients with other forms of axis II psychopathology over 16 years of prospective follow-up. It also assessed the relationship between time-varying defenses and recovery from borderline personality disorder. Method The Defense Style Questionnaire, a self-report measure with demonstrated criterion validity and internal consistency, was initially administered at study entry. It was readministered at eight contiguous two-year long follow-up periods. Results Borderline patients had significantly lower scores than axis II comparison subjects on one mature defense mechanism (suppression) and significantly higher scores on seven of the other 18 defenses studied. More specifically, borderline patients had significantly higher scores on one neurotic-level defense (undoing), four immature defenses (acting out, emotional hypochondriasis, passive aggression, and projection), and two image-distorting/borderline defenses (projective identification and splitting). In terms of change, borderline patients were found to have had significant improvement on 13 of the 19 defenses studied. More specifically, they had significantly higher scores over time on one mature defense (anticipation) and significantly lower scores on two neurotic defenses (isolation and undoing), all immature defenses, and all image-distorting/borderline defenses except primitive idealization. In addition, four time-varying defense mechanisms were found to predict time-to-recovery: humor, acting out, emotional hypochondriasis, and projection. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the longitudinal defensive functioning of borderline patients is both distinct and improves substantially over time. They also suggest that immature defenses are the best predictors of time-to-recovery. PMID:23223866

  4. Attainment and Stability of Sustained Symptomatic Remission and Recovery among Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 16-year Prospective Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Reich, D. Bradford; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2012-01-01

    Objective The first purpose of this study was to determine time-to-attainment of symptomatic remissions and recoveries of 2, 4, 6, and 8 years duration for those with borderline personality disorder and comparison subjects with other personality disorders; the second was to determine the stability of these outcomes. Method 290 inpatients meeting both Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-III-R criteria for borderline personality disorder and 72 axis II comparison subjects were assessed during their index admission using a series of semistructured interviews. The same instruments were readministered at eight contiguous two-year time periods. Results Borderline patients were significantly slower to achieve remission or recovery (which involved good social and vocational functioning as well as symptomatic remission) than axis II comparison subjects. However, those in both study groups ultimately achieved about the same high rates of remission (borderline patients: 78–99%; axis II comparison subjects: 97–99%) but not recovery (40–60% vs. 75–85%) by the time of the 16-year follow-up. In contrast, symptomatic recurrence (10–36% vs. 4–7%) and loss of recovery (20–44% vs. 9–28%) occurred more rapidly and at substantially higher rates among borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study suggest that sustained symptomatic remission is substantially more common than sustained recovery from borderline personality disorder. They also suggest that sustained remissions and recoveries are substantially more difficult for borderline patients to attain and maintain than those with other forms of personality disorder. PMID:22737693

  5. Severity of borderline personality symptoms in adolescence: relationship with maternal parenting stress, maternal psychopathology, and rearing styles.

    PubMed

    Schuppert, H Marieke; Albers, Casper J; Minderaa, Ruud B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Nauta, Maaike H

    2015-06-01

    The development of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been associated with parenting styles and parental psychopathology. Only a few studies have examined current parental rearing styles and parental psychopathology in relationship to BPD symptoms in adolescents. Moreover, parenting stress has not been examined in this group. The current study examined 101 adolescents (14-19 years old) with BPD symptoms and their mothers. Assessments were made on severity of BPD symptoms, youth-perceived maternal rearing styles, and psychopathology and parenting stress in mothers. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine potential predictors of borderline severity. No correlation was found between severity of BPD symptoms in adolescents and parenting stress. Only youth-perceived maternal overprotection was significantly related to BPD severity. The combination of perceived maternal rejection with cluster B traits in mothers was significantly related to BPD severity in adolescents. This study provides a contribution to the disentanglement of the developmental pathways that lead to BPD.

  6. The therapeutic alliance in schema-focused therapy and transference-focused psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, Philip; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Dyck, Richard; Kooiman, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud

    2007-02-01

    This study investigated the quality and development of the therapeutic alliance as a mediator of change in schema-focused therapy (SFT) and transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) for borderline personality disorder. Seventy-eight patients were randomly allocated to 3 years of biweekly SFT or TFP. Scores of both therapists and patients for the therapeutic alliance were higher in SFT than in TFP. Negative ratings of therapists and patients at early treatment were predictive of dropout, whereas increasingly positive ratings of patients in the 1st half of treatment predicted subsequent clinical improvement. Dissimilarity between therapist and patients in pathological personality characteristics had a direct effect on growth of the therapeutic alliance but showed no relationship with clinical improvement. The authors conclude that the therapeutic alliance and specific techniques interact with and influence one another and may serve to facilitate change processes underlying clinical improvement in patients with borderline personality disorder.

  7. Evidence for a single latent class of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders borderline personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Allan; Pilkonis, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been described as clinically heterogeneous, with numerous subtypes of the disorder posited. The present study investigated this potential heterogeneity by conducting both confirmatory factor analysis and latent class analysis of consensus ratings of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) Revised Third Edition BPD criteria in a mixed clinical and nonclinical sample (n = 411). Confirmatory factor analysis results suggested that a single factor fit the data most parsimoniously. Latent class analysis results supported 2 latent classes: those with a high likelihood of BPD symptoms (n = 171) and those with a low likelihood (n = 240). The borderline latent class was more inclusive than diagnoses made based on DSM-III-R thresholds and improved prediction of symptom severity and interpersonal dysfunction, suggesting the clinical importance of 3 or more BPD criteria. Future research on subtypes of BPD may benefit by focusing on variables that supplement the DSM criteria.

  8. Reasons for Non-Suicidal Self-Harm in Adult Male Offenders With and Without Borderline Personality Traits.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kathryn Jane; Dodsworth, Jo; Klonsky, E David

    2016-01-01

    The presented study aimed to advance understanding of the reasons for non-suicidal self-harm (NSSH) in adult male offenders, with and without borderline personality traits. 179 offenders completed self-report measures of NSSH and other clinical constructs, with 42 being identified as having self-harmed. Results were consistent with past research and supported the relative importance of intrapersonal over interpersonal functions, but also highlight that self-harm is performed rarely for one type of reason. The results also show that the presence of borderline personality traits increases the likelihood of endorsing a range of interpersonal reasons. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the range of reasons for engaging in NSSH to help manage the behaviour within the prison.

  9. Severity of borderline personality symptoms in adolescence: relationship with maternal parenting stress, maternal psychopathology, and rearing styles.

    PubMed

    Schuppert, H Marieke; Albers, Casper J; Minderaa, Ruud B; Emmelkamp, Paul M G; Nauta, Maaike H

    2015-06-01

    The development of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been associated with parenting styles and parental psychopathology. Only a few studies have examined current parental rearing styles and parental psychopathology in relationship to BPD symptoms in adolescents. Moreover, parenting stress has not been examined in this group. The current study examined 101 adolescents (14-19 years old) with BPD symptoms and their mothers. Assessments were made on severity of BPD symptoms, youth-perceived maternal rearing styles, and psychopathology and parenting stress in mothers. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine potential predictors of borderline severity. No correlation was found between severity of BPD symptoms in adolescents and parenting stress. Only youth-perceived maternal overprotection was significantly related to BPD severity. The combination of perceived maternal rejection with cluster B traits in mothers was significantly related to BPD severity in adolescents. This study provides a contribution to the disentanglement of the developmental pathways that lead to BPD. PMID:25102082

  10. Effekt einer ad libitum verzehrten fettreduzierten Kost, reich an Obst, Gemüse und Milchprodukten auf den Blutdruck bei Borderline-Hypertonikern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möseneder, Jutta M.

    2002-01-01

    Kontrollgruppe eher der amerikanischen Idealgruppe entsprach. In der Pilot-Studie waren die Unterschiede in der Nährstoffzufuhr zwischen den beiden Gruppen viel geringer als in der DASH-Studie; für eine blutdrucksenkende Ernährungsumstellung bestand somit nur ein geringer Spielraum. Eine weitere Erklärung besteht in der unterschiedlichen Zusammensetzung der Studienpopulation. Bei DASH wurden vorwiegend farbige Probanden (40% höhere Hypertonieprävalenz) untersucht. Die Studienergebnisse lassen also den Schluss zu, dass Ernährungs- und Lebensstilgewohnheiten sowie der genetische Hintergrund der entsprechenden Bevölkerungsgruppe bei der Formulierung von nährstoff- oder lebensmittelbezogenen Empfehlungen zur Senkung des Bluthochdruckes Berücksichtigung finden müssen. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension trial (DASH), a randomized well-controlled feeding study conducted at 4 medical centers, demonstrated that a low-fat diet, rich in fruits, vegetables and dairy products is able to lower blood pressure of borderline-hypertensive people significantly. Body weight, sodium intake and alcohol consumption were kept constant during the whole study period, due to the known influence on hypertension. Aim of our study project was to investigate whether the results of the DASH study can be confirmed by (i) using a German hypertensive population and (ii) replacing the well-controlled feeding design by allowing ad libitum intake according to dietary ad-vice. The participants were asked to keep their body weight, sodium urine excretion (un-der this study design more valid than sodium intake) and their alcohol consumption con-stant. Our pilot study population consisted of 53 mainly overweight participants with borderline hypertension and without medication or any metabolic disorders. They were randomly assigned to either an ideal diet low in fat and rich in dairy products, fruits and vegetables (similar to the DASH I-group) or a habitual diet as control (C-group). During five

  11. Effekt einer ad libitum verzehrten fettreduzierten Kost, reich an Obst, Gemüse und Milchprodukten auf den Blutdruck bei Borderline-Hypertonikern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möseneder, Jutta M.

    2002-01-01

    Kontrollgruppe eher der amerikanischen Idealgruppe entsprach. In der Pilot-Studie waren die Unterschiede in der Nährstoffzufuhr zwischen den beiden Gruppen viel geringer als in der DASH-Studie; für eine blutdrucksenkende Ernährungsumstellung bestand somit nur ein geringer Spielraum. Eine weitere Erklärung besteht in der unterschiedlichen Zusammensetzung der Studienpopulation. Bei DASH wurden vorwiegend farbige Probanden (40% höhere Hypertonieprävalenz) untersucht. Die Studienergebnisse lassen also den Schluss zu, dass Ernährungs- und Lebensstilgewohnheiten sowie der genetische Hintergrund der entsprechenden Bevölkerungsgruppe bei der Formulierung von nährstoff- oder lebensmittelbezogenen Empfehlungen zur Senkung des Bluthochdruckes Berücksichtigung finden müssen. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension trial (DASH), a randomized well-controlled feeding study conducted at 4 medical centers, demonstrated that a low-fat diet, rich in fruits, vegetables and dairy products is able to lower blood pressure of borderline-hypertensive people significantly. Body weight, sodium intake and alcohol consumption were kept constant during the whole study period, due to the known influence on hypertension. Aim of our study project was to investigate whether the results of the DASH study can be confirmed by (i) using a German hypertensive population and (ii) replacing the well-controlled feeding design by allowing ad libitum intake according to dietary ad-vice. The participants were asked to keep their body weight, sodium urine excretion (un-der this study design more valid than sodium intake) and their alcohol consumption con-stant. Our pilot study population consisted of 53 mainly overweight participants with borderline hypertension and without medication or any metabolic disorders. They were randomly assigned to either an ideal diet low in fat and rich in dairy products, fruits and vegetables (similar to the DASH I-group) or a habitual diet as control (C-group). During five

  12. Encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de NMDA: experiencia con seis pacientes pediátricos. Potencial eficacia del metotrexato

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Oro, Antonio; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos; Quezada-Corona, Arturo; Dalmau, Josep; Campos-Guevara, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Introducción La encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de N-metil-D-aspartato (NMDA) es una entidad cada vez más diagnosticada en edad pediátrica. A diferencia de los adultos, en muchos casos no se asocia a tumores y las manifestaciones iniciales en niños más frecuentes son crisis convulsivas y trastornos del movimiento, mientras que en los adultos predominan las alteraciones psiquiátricas. Casos clínicos Presentamos seis casos pediátricos confirmados con anticuerpos contra la subunidad NR1 del receptor de NMDA en suero y líquido cefalorraquídeo. Cinco de los casos comenzaron con crisis convulsivas como manifestación clínica inicial antes de desarrollar el cuadro clásico de esta entidad. En todos los casos se utilizaron esteroides como primera línea de tratamiento, con los que sólo se observó control de las manifestaciones en uno, por lo que el resto de los pacientes requirió inmunomoduladores de segunda línea. Todos los pacientes recibieron metotrexato como tratamiento inmunomodulador para evitar recaídas y la evolución fue a la mejoría en todos ellos. Conclusiones En nuestra serie de pacientes con encefalitis por anticuerpos contra el receptor de NMDA, ninguno se asoció a tumores. Todos los casos recibieron metotrexato por lo menos durante un año, no observamos eventos adversos clínicos ni por laboratorio, ni hubo secuelas neurológicas ni recaídas durante el tratamiento. Aunque es una serie pequeña y es deseable incrementar el número y tiempo de evolución, consideramos el metotrexato una excelente alternativa como tratamiento inmunomodulador para esta patología. PMID:24150952

  13. Reasons for self-mutilation reported by borderline patients over 16 years of prospective follow-up.

    PubMed

    Zanarini, Mary C; Laudate, Corina S; Frankenburg, Frances R; Wedig, Michelle M; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the reasons for episodes of self-mutilation engaged in by patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) over 16 years of prospective follow-up. Two hundred and ninety patients meeting both DIB-R and DSM-III-R criteria for BPD were interviewed every 2 years. The authors divided the borderline patients into two groups: those with a more extensive and those with a less extensive lifetime history of self-mutilation at study entry. These groups were not significantly different than one another on either of the interpersonally directed reasons for self-mutilation studied. However, those in the more extensive group were significantly more likely to report each of the five internally directed reasons studied. The results of this study suggest that borderline patients with a more extensive history of self-mutilation are best distinguished from those with a less extensive history by episodes of self-harm that are motivated, at least in part, by dysphoric inner states.

  14. Reasons for Self-mutilation Reported by Borderline Patients over 16 Years of Prospective Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Laudate, Corina S.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Wedig, Michelle M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the reasons for episodes of self-mutilation engaged in by patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) over 16 years of prospective follow-up. Two hundred and ninety patients meeting both DIB-R and DSM-III-R criteria for BPD were interviewed every two years. We divided the borderline patients into two groups: those with a more and less extensive lifetime history of self-mutilation at study entry. These groups were not significantly different than one another on either of the interpersonally-directed reasons for self-mutilation studied. However, those in the more extensive group were significantly more likely to report each of the five internally-directed reasons studied. The results of this study suggest that borderline patients with a more extensive history of self-mutilation are best distinguished from those with a less extensive history by episodes of self-harm that are motivated, at least in part, by dysphoric inner states. PMID:23795756

  15. The Relationship between Childhood Adversity and Dysphoric Inner States among Borderline Patients Followed Prospectively for 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Lawrence Ian; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Zanarini, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood experiences of abuse and neglect were assessed in relation to dysphoric states among patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) over a 10-year course of prospective follow-up. The Revised Childhood Experiences Questionnaire was administered at baseline to 290 patients meeting DIB-R and DSM-III-R criteria for BPD. The Dysphoric Affect Scale – a 50-item self-report measure of affective and cognitive states thought to be common among and specific to borderline patients– was administered at fives waves of prospective follow-up. Significant predictors of dysphoric states included: emotional abuse, verbal abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional withdrawal, inconsistent treatment, denial of patient’s feelings, lack of a real relationship, placing patient in parental role, and failure to protect patient. This suggests that abusive and neglectful childhood experiences are significant risk factors for severe affective and cognitive difficulties reported by borderline patients and that sexual abuse is neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of these troubling inner states. PMID:23445475

  16. Schema therapy for borderline personality disorder: a comprehensive review of its empirical foundations, effectiveness and implementation possibilities.

    PubMed

    Sempértegui, Gabriela A; Karreman, Annemiek; Arntz, Arnoud; Bekker, Marrie H J

    2013-04-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a serious psychiatric disorder for which the effectiveness of the current pharmacotherapeutical and psychotherapeutic approaches has shown to be limited. In the last decades, schema therapy has increased in popularity as a treatment of borderline personality disorder; however, systematic evaluation of both effectiveness and empirical evidence for the theoretical background of the therapy is limited. This literature review comprehensively evaluates the current empirical status of schema therapy for borderline personality disorder. We first described the theoretical framework and reviewed its empirical foundations. Next, we examined the evidence regarding effectiveness and implementability. We found evidence for a considerable number of elements of Young's schema model; however, the strength of the results varies and there are also mixed results and some empirical blanks in the theory. The number of studies on effectiveness is small, but reviewed findings suggest that schema therapy is a promising treatment. In Western-European societies, the therapy could be readily implemented as a cost-effective strategy with positive economic consequences.

  17. Emotion regulation choice in female patients with borderline personality disorder: Findings from self-reports and experimental measures.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Christina; Sheppes, Gal; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Arens, Elisabeth A; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Barnow, Sven

    2016-08-30

    Emotion dysregulation is a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). So far, many studies have tested the consequences of the implementation of certain emotion regulation (ER) strategies, but there have been no investigations about ER choices in BPD. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate habitual ER choices by self-report questionnaires and experimentally by testing the preference to select between distraction and reappraisal when facing different emotional intensities (high vs. low) and contents (borderline-specific vs. unspecific negative) in patients with BPD (n=24) compared with clinical controls (patients with major depression, n=19) and a healthy control group (n=32). Additionally, heart rate (HR) responses were continuously assessed. Main results revealed that both patient groups showed maladaptive self-reported ER choice profiles compared with HC. We found, however, no differences between the groups in the choice of distraction and reappraisal on the behavioral level and in HR responses. In BPD, within-group analyses revealed a positive correlation between symptom severity and the preference for distraction under high-intensity borderline-specific stimuli. Our findings provide preliminary evidence of ER choices in BPD and show the robustness of the choice effect in patients with affective disorders. PMID:27344452

  18. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY FOR BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER STUDY OF COGNITIVE THERAPY (BOSCOT) TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Kate; Norrie, John; Tyrer, Peter; Gumley, Andrew; Tata, Philip; Murray, Heather; Palmer, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The outcome of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy in addition to treatment as usual (CBT plus TAU) compared with TAU alone (TAU) in one hundred and six participants meeting diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder is described. We anticipated that CBT plus TAU would decrease the number of participants with in-patient psychiatric hospitalizations or accident and emergency room contact or suicidal acts over twelve months treatment and twelve months follow-up, compared with TAU. We also anticipated that CBT plus TAU would lead to improvement in a range of secondary outcomes of mental health and social functioning compared to TAU. Of the 106 participants randomized, follow-up data on 102 (96%) was obtained at two years. Those randomized to CBT were offered an average of 27 sessions over 12 months and attended on average 16 (range 0 to 35). We found that the global odds ratio of a participant in the CBT plus TAU group compared with the TAU alone group having any of the outcomes of a suicidal act, in-patient hospitalization, or accident and emergency contact in the 24 months following randomization was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45 to 1.66, p = 0.66). The corresponding global odds ratio, excluding accident and emergency room contact, was 0.75 (95% CI 0.37 to 1.54, p = 0.44). In terms of the number of suicidal acts, there was a significant reduction over the two years in favor of CBT plus TAU over TAU, with a mean difference of −0.91 (95% CI −1.67 to −0.15, p = 0.020). Across both treatment arms there was gradual and sustained improvement in both primary and secondary outcomes, with evidence of benefit for the addition of CBT on the positive symptom distress index at one year, and on state anxiety, dysfunctional beliefs and the quantity of suicidal acts at two year follow-up. CBT can deliver clinically important changes in relatively few clinical sessions in real clinical settings. PMID:17032158

  19. Experiences of care by Australians with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Lawn, S; McMahon, J

    2015-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex and challenging mental health condition for the person and service providers who support them. This paper reports on the results of a survey of 153 people with a diagnosis of BPD about their experiences of attempting to receive support in managing this mental health condition. It provides their perceptions of a range of experiences not reported in the existing literature, including general practitioner roles, urban and rural differences, public and private hospital differences, and comparison of usefulness of support across multiple support types. People with a diagnosis of BPD continue to experience significant discrimination when attempting to get their needs met within both public and private health services. Further education for nurses and other health professionals is indicated to address pervasive negative attitudes towards people with a diagnosis of BPD. There is limited understanding of the experience of seeking and receiving treatment and care by people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD), their perceptions of barriers to care and the quality of services they receive. This study aimed to explore these experiences from the perspective of Australians with this diagnosis. An invitation to participate in an online survey was distributed across multiple consumer and carer organizations and mental health services, by the Private Mental Health Consumer Carer Network (Australia) in 2011. Responses from 153 people with a diagnosis of BPD showed that they experience significant challenges and discrimination when attempting to get their needs met within both public and private health services, including general practice. Seeking help from hospital emergency departments during crises was particularly challenging. Metropolitan and rural differences, and gender differences, were also apparent. Community supports were perceived as inadequate to meet their needs. This study provides data on a range

  20. Experiences of care by Australians with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, J.

    2015-01-01

    Accessible summary Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a complex and challenging mental health condition for the person and service providers who support them.This paper reports on the results of a survey of 153 people with a diagnosis of BPD about their experiences of attempting to receive support in managing this mental health condition. It provides their perceptions of a range of experiences not reported in the existing literature, including general practitioner roles, urban and rural differences, public and private hospital differences, and comparison of usefulness of support across multiple support types.People with a diagnosis of BPD continue to experience significant discrimination when attempting to get their needs met within both public and private health services. Further education for nurses and other health professionals is indicated to address pervasive negative attitudes towards people with a diagnosis of BPD. Abstract There is limited understanding of the experience of seeking and receiving treatment and care by people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD), their perceptions of barriers to care and the quality of services they receive. This study aimed to explore these experiences from the perspective of Australians with this diagnosis. An invitation to participate in an online survey was distributed across multiple consumer and carer organizations and mental health services, by the Private Mental Health Consumer Carer Network (Australia) in 2011. Responses from 153 people with a diagnosis of BPD showed that they experience significant challenges and discrimination when attempting to get their needs met within both public and private health services, including general practice. Seeking help from hospital emergency departments during crises was particularly challenging. Metropolitan and rural differences, and gender differences, were also apparent. Community supports were perceived as inadequate to meet their needs. This study

  1. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of the effect of addition of immunotherapy with Mw vaccine to standard chemotherapy in borderline leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kamal, R; Natrajan, M; Katoch, K; Arora, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports detailed analysis of clinical parameters and clearance of granuloma in borderline leprosy patients treated with immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It aims to assess the additive effect of immunotherapy (Mwvaccine) with standard MDT on clinical status of untreated borderline leprosy cases and on granuloma fraction of untreated borderline leprosy cases. Patients attending the OPD were serially recruited in two groups. A total of 150 cases in one treatment (trial) group (Mw vaccine plus MDT) and 120 cases in another treatment (control) group (MDT only) of border line leprosy have been included. After the formal written consent, detailed clinical examination, charting, smear examination of all untreated borderline patients of both groups was done, biopsies were taken from the active lesions of all patients of both groups at start of therapy and every six month thereafter till the completion of therapy. The same procedure was repeated every six months during the follow-up period. Standard MDT was given to all the patients of both groups according to type of disease. Mw vaccine 0.1 ml (0.5 x 10(9) bacilli) was injected intra-dermally at the start of therapy and every six months in addition to chemotherapy to the treatment group. The BT cases were followed up after 6 doses of MDT and 2 doses of Mw vaccine, and, the BB, BL cases were followed up after 24 doses of MDT plus 5 doses of Mw vaccine. Clinically, greater and faster improvement was observed in all the clinical parameters, faster attainment of smear negativity and two episodes of lepra reaction occurred in cases treated with combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy, as compared to controls (chemotherapy alone) wherein clinical improvement was slower in all parameters, slower attainment of smear negativity in bacillary index and seven showed the occurrence of reactions, histipathologically in addition to more rapid clearance of granuloma in immunotherapy treated group, a significant finding was an

  2. The impact of stimulus arousal level on emotion regulation effectiveness in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Skye; Kuo, Janice R

    2016-07-30

    Basic emotion theory suggests that the effectiveness of different emotion regulation strategies vary with the intensity of the emotionally-salient stimulus. Although findings from studies using healthy samples are concordant with what is proposed by theory, it is unclear whether these relationships hold true among individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Twenty-five individuals with BPD and 30 HCs were exposed to negative images of varying levels of emotional arousal and were instructed to either react as they normally would, distract, or use mindful awareness. Self-reported negativity ratings, heart rate, and skin conductance level (SCL) were monitored throughout. SCL data indicated that increases in image arousal resulted in larger reductions in SCL when distracting but not when implementing mindful awareness. Self-report data suggested that, in HCs, the effectiveness of mindful awareness decreased to a greater extent than distraction when image arousal increased. These findings are consistent with basic emotion research and suggest that some forms of emotion regulation (distraction) are more suited to high emotion arousal contexts than others (mindful awareness) and that, compared with HCs, individuals with BPD may be more resilient to the deteriorating effectiveness of mindful awareness with respect to increasing emotional arousal. PMID:27203152

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of intraoperative consultation (frozen section) in borderline ovarian tumours and factors associated with misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Basaran, D; Salman, M C; Calis, P; Ozek, A; Ozgul, N; Usubütün, A; Yuce, K

    2014-07-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of frozen section (FS) in borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) and to define the factors associated with misdiagnosis during FS evaluation. We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy for an adnexal mass, from January 2007 to July 2012, at a tertiary oncology centre in Turkey. Patients with a diagnosis of BOT either in FS or in permanent pathology were identified. Agreement between FS diagnosis and permanent histology was observed in 37/59 patients (62.7%), which gave a sensitivity and a positive predictive value of 71.2% and 84.1%, respectively. In patients with a diagnosis of BOT by frozen section only (n = 44), the diagnosis was consistent with permanent histopathology in 37/44 patients (84.1%). Frozen section interpreted a malignant tumour as BOT (under-diagnosis) in 6/44 (13.6%) of cases and interpreted a benign lesion as BOT (over-diagnosis) in 1/44 (2.3%) of cases. Slide review of discrepant cases revealed that major pathological causes of under-diagnosis were misinterpretation and sampling errors. Univariate analysis showed that presence of bilateral tumour and positive peritoneal cytology were associated with under-diagnosis. We concluded that, despite significant risk of under-diagnosis, FS analysis is an accurate method for intraoperative diagnosis of BOTs.

  4. The unreachable object? Difficulties and paradoxes in the analytical relationship with borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Irene

    2012-06-01

    The author investigates the main difficulties the analyst encounters in borderline patient analysis, focusing on the specific way in which such patients put the analyst's mental functioning to the test and highlighting the most salient elements of the transference-countertransference dynamic. The author picks out several of the paradoxes that characterize the analytical relationship with these patients, who are constantly seeking contact with the object, which is inevitably traumatic for them. On the basis of highly detailed clinical material, the author demonstrates how - no matter which theoretical-clinical model is adopted - a specific technical problem with these patients is how to manage their intense destructiveness. With these patients, countertransferential difficulties are inevitably predominant because of the looming threat of the destruction of the analytical relationship. Maintaining a balance between the recognition-legitimization of primary narcissistic mirroring needs and the recognition-control of narcissistic demands and attacks on the analytical link is as crucial as it is complex. The paper examines the most important therapeutic and anti-therapeutic factors, highlighting the importance of countertransference analysis and self-analysis as ways of accessing as yet unrepresented elements of the patient and analyst respectively. Particular attention is given to the role played by the analyst's subjectivity and to the enactment.

  5. Dysregulation between emotion and theory of mind networks in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Aisling; D'Souza, Arun; Samson, Andrea C; Carballedo, Angela; Kerskens, Christian; Frodl, Thomas

    2015-01-30

    Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) commonly display deficits in emotion regulation, but findings in the area of social cognitive (e.g., theory of mind, ToM) capacities have been heterogeneous. The aims of the current study were to investigate differences between patients with BPD and controls in functional connectivity (1) between the emotion and ToM network and (2) in the default mode network (DMN). Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate 19 healthy controls and 17 patients with BPD at rest and during ToM processing. Functional coupling was analysed. Significantly decreased functional connectivity was found for patients compared with controls between anterior cingulate cortex and three brain areas involved in ToM processes: the left superior temporal lobe, right supramarginal/inferior parietal lobes, and right middle cingulate cortex. Increased functional connectivity was found in patients compared with controls between the precuneus as the DMN seed and the left inferior frontal lobe, left precentral/middle frontal, and left middle occipital/superior parietal lobes during rest. Reduced functional coupling between the emotional and the ToM network during ToM processing is in line with emotion-regulation dysfunctions in BPD. The increased connectivity between precuneus and frontal regions during rest might be related to extensive processing of internal thoughts and self-referential information in BPD. PMID:25482858

  6. Self and identity in women with symptoms of borderline personality: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Agnew, Gillian; Shannon, Ciarán; Ryan, Tina; Storey, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    Identity disturbance has been suggested to be a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, there is little known about the identity of individuals with symptoms of BPD from the participant's perspective. This study availed of in-depth lightly structured life story interviews with five female participants. Thematic analysis was utilized to derive three themes of identity: connection, distance between us, and hurt and healing. Results provided support for multiple and flexible conceptualizations of identity in comparison to the idea of a unitary self/identity. Results also suggested that participants were able to establish differing connections to others ranging from disconnection to intimacy and care. Participants reported that their identities were impacted upon by historical and current family/relationship dysfunction, but life stories also illustrated the positive impact of healing relationship experiences. Findings provide support for psychological theories that consider a multiple and relational self/identity and the empowerment of healthy aspects of the self in BPD recovery. Studies that assess the association between insight and change may further our knowledge into this complex population. PMID:27015876

  7. Deficits in pain perception in borderline personality disorder: results from the thermal grill illusion

    PubMed Central

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Chung, Boo Young; Richter, Ingmarie; Wicking, Manon; Foell, Jens; Mancke, Falk; Schmahl, Christian; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is well documented that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by reduced pain sensitivity, which might be related to nonsuicidal self-injury and dissociative experiences in patients with BPD. However, it remains an open question whether this insensitivity relies at least partly on altered sensory integration or on an altered evaluation of pain or a combination of both. In this study, we used the thermal grill illusion (TGI), describing a painful sensation induced by the application of alternating cold and warm nonnoxious stimuli, in patients with either current or remitted BPD as well as matched healthy controls. Two additional conditions, applying warm or cold temperatures only, served as control. We further assessed thermal perception, discrimination, and pain thresholds. We found significantly reduced heat and cold pain thresholds for the current BPD group, as well as reduced cold pain thresholds for the remitted BPD group, as compared with the HC group. Current BPD patients perceived a less-intense TGI in terms of induced pain and unpleasantness, while their general ability to perceive this kind of illusion seemed to be unaffected. Thermal grill illusion magnitude was negatively correlated with dissociation and traumatization only in the current BPD patients. These results indicate that higher-order pain perception is altered in current BPD, which seems to normalize after remission. We discuss these findings against the background of neurophysiological evidence for the TGI in general and reduced pain sensitivity in BPD and suggest a relationship to alterations in N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmission. PMID:26098439

  8. Women with borderline personality disorder do not show altered BOLD responses during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Julia; Sebastian, Alexandra; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Cackowski, Sylvia; Demirakca, Traute; Biedermann, Sarah V; Lieb, Klaus; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele; Tüscher, Oliver

    2015-12-30

    Impulsivity is central to borderline personality disorder (BPD). Response inhibition, addressing the ability to suppress or stop actions, is one aspect of behavioral impulse control which is frequently used to assess impulsivity. BPD patients display deficits in response inhibition under stress condition or negative emotions. We assessed whether response inhibition and its neural underpinnings are impaired in BPD when tested in an emotionally neutral setting and when co-morbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is excluded. To this end, we studied response inhibition in unmedicated BPD patients and healthy controls (HC) in two independent samples using functional magnetic resonance imaging during Simon-, Go/nogo-, and Stopsignal tasks. BPD patients and HC did not differ significantly in their performance in the Go/nogo and the Stopsignal tasks. Response interference in the Simon task was increased in BPD patients in one sample, but this could not be replicated in the second sample. In both samples, no significant differences in brain activation patterns during any of the tasks were present while the neural impulse control network was robustly activated during the inhibition tasks in both groups. Our results provide evidence that under emotionally neutral conditions response inhibition is not impaired in patients with BPD without co-occurring ADHD. PMID:26483213

  9. [Psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder: critical factors and proposals of intervention].

    PubMed

    Bellino, Silvio; Brunetti, Chiara; Bozzatello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) represents a significant therapeutic challenge. Critical factors in psychotherapeutic treatment of patients with BPD are noticeable and strictly related to the psychopathological dimensions of this disorder: affective and relational instability, behavioral impulsivity and precarious definition of identity. These features are emphasized by therapeutic intervention and become evident during the course of the treatment. Psychotherapeutic setting induces BPD patient to actualize the dysfunctional relational patterns that have been acquired during childhood. Specific critical factors concern the characteristics of the patient (risk of suicide, aggressive behaviors, chronic course of the disorder, disorganized attachment style), of the therapist (therapeutic skills, training, countertransference, risk of burnout) and of the setting of psychotherapy (patients selection, therapeutic alliance, need to set limits, duration and end of therapy). In Otto Kernberg's and Marsha Linehan's models of psychotherapy specific for DBP the authors identify substantially overlapping objectives and modalities of intervention. In particular, therapists should take care of patient safety, maintain boundaries of therapeutic setting and promote the development of psychotherapeutic process. The aim of this article is to analyze the main critical factors affecting psychotherapeutic process in patients with BPD. Objectives and priorities that therapist should consider to address these issues will be discussed. We will also try to make clear why interpersonal psychotherapy adapted to DBP can represent one of the therapeutic models that may be useful to manage and resolve these difficulties. PMID:27030345

  10. Self and identity in women with symptoms of borderline personality: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Gillian; Shannon, Ciarán; Ryan, Tina; Storey, Lesley; McDonnell, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Identity disturbance has been suggested to be a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, there is little known about the identity of individuals with symptoms of BPD from the participant's perspective. This study availed of in-depth lightly structured life story interviews with five female participants. Thematic analysis was utilized to derive three themes of identity: connection, distance between us, and hurt and healing. Results provided support for multiple and flexible conceptualizations of identity in comparison to the idea of a unitary self/identity. Results also suggested that participants were able to establish differing connections to others ranging from disconnection to intimacy and care. Participants reported that their identities were impacted upon by historical and current family/relationship dysfunction, but life stories also illustrated the positive impact of healing relationship experiences. Findings provide support for psychological theories that consider a multiple and relational self/identity and the empowerment of healthy aspects of the self in BPD recovery. Studies that assess the association between insight and change may further our knowledge into this complex population. PMID:27015876

  11. Developmental Trajectories of Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and Psychosocial Functioning in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aidan G.C.; Zalewski, Maureen; Hallquist, Michael N.; Hipwell, Alison E.; Stepp, Stephanie D.

    2015-01-01

    Major gains toward understanding the emergence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) pathology, which is typically first noted during adolescence, have been made. The present study addresses a gap in our understanding of within-person change in BPD symptoms across adolescence and contributes to the limited literature on outcomes associated with adolescent BPD. Using an at-risk community sample of girls (N=2,450), bivariate latent growth curve models were used to analyze the co-development of BPD symptoms with eight domains of psychosocial functioning (e.g., social skills, sexual behavior) across ages 14–17. Findings revealed moderate to strong effect sizes for the associations between BPD symptoms and every domain of psychosocial functioning, suggesting that the development of BPD was coupled with poorer outcomes across development. These results highlight the increased need for extending advancements in the adult PD literature to research on PDs in adolescence, and for greater recognition of adolescent BPD in clinical settings. PMID:26067158

  12. Reduced risk avoidance and altered neural correlates of feedback processing in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Endrass, Tanja; Schuermann, Beate; Roepke, Stefan; Kessler-Scheil, Sonia; Kathmann, Norbert

    2016-09-30

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show deficits in reward-guided decision making and learning. The present study examined risk-taking behavior in combination with feedback processing. Eighteen BPD patients and 18 healthy controls performed a probabilistic two-choice gambling task, while an electroencephalogram was recorded. Options differed in risk, but were identical in expected value and outcome probability. The feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the feedback-related P300 were analyzed. Healthy controls preferred low-risk over high-risk options, whereas BPD patients chose both option with equal probability. FRN amplitudes were reduced in BPD, but effects of feedback valence and risk did not differ between groups. This suggests attenuated outcome processing in the anterior cingulate cortex, but intact reward prediction error signaling. Furthermore, the modulation of the feedback-related P300 with feedback valence and risk was smaller in BPD patients, and decreased P300 amplitudes were associated with increased behavioral risk-taking behavior. These findings could relate to the reduced ability of BPD patients to learn and adequately adjust their behavior based on feedback information, possibly due to reduced significance of negative feedback.

  13. Changes in schemas of patients with severe borderline personality disorder: the Oulu BPD study.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Virpi; Kärki, Anna; Saariaho, Tom; Lindeman, Sari; Hakko, Helinä

    2015-02-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a relatively common and severe psychiatric disorder that can impair quality of life in many ways. The aim of this study was to determine whether a combined treatment model for BPD patients, utilising major principles from schema-focused therapy (SFT) and dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT), could be more effective in relieving early maladaptive schemas of BPD patients, compared to treatment as usual (TAU). This study is a part of the Oulu BPD study conducted at mental health care services run by Oulu city social and health care services. The study is a multisite, randomized controlled trial conducted over a one year period, involving two groups of patients with severe BPD: (1) Community Treatment By Experts (CTBE) patients (n = 18) receiving the combined treatment model, and 2) TAU patients (n = 27). The patients' schemas were assessed using the Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ-L3a) before and after one year of treatment. The results reveal that CTBE patients who attended the combined treatment model showed a statistically significant reduction in eight out of 18 early maladaptive schemas, while patients receiving treatment as usual did not demonstrate any significant changes in schemas. The cognitive therapeutic treatment model can be applied for clinical use in public mental health settings using existing professionals, and appears to produce positive changes in patients with BPD. PMID:25358652

  14. Borderline Intracranial Hypertension Manifesting as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Venous Sinus Stenting.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Nicholas; Pickard, John; Lever, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension without signs of raised intracranial pressure can be impossible to distinguish without direct measurement of intracranial pressure. Moreover, lumbar puncture, the usual method of measuring intracranial pressure, can produce a similar respite from symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue as it does in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. This suggests a connection between them, with chronic fatigue syndrome representing a forme fruste variant of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. If this were the case, then treatments available for idiopathic intracranial hypertension might be appropriate for chronic fatigue. We describe a 49-year-old woman with a long and debilitating history of chronic fatigue syndrome who was targeted for investigation of intracranial pressure because of headache, then diagnosed with borderline idiopathic intracranial hypertension after lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Further investigation showed narrowings at the anterior ends of the transverse sinuses, typical of those seen in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and associated with pressure gradients. Stenting of both transverse sinuses brought about a life-changing remission of symptoms with no regression in 2 years of follow-up. This result invites study of an alternative approach to the investigation and management of chronic fatigue.

  15. Sleep and dreaming in patients with borderline personality disorder: a polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Schredl, Michael; Paul, Franc; Reinhard, Iris; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich Walter; Schmahl, Christian; Bohus, Martin

    2012-12-30

    Previous research has demonstrated disturbances in sleep continuity in subjects with borderline personality disorders (BPD). Moreover, depression-like sleep abnormalities like reduced REM latency have been found in BPD subjects, even without comorbid major depression disorder. Yet it is still unknown what the effect is of co-morbid posttraumatic stress disorder on sleep continuity and dream content in BPD patients group. The present study compared 27 unmedicated female BPD subjects and healthy controls. The patients exhibited increased sleep fragmentation, increased REM density, and reduced REM latency. The findings were independent from co-morbid posttraumatic stress response (PTSD), which was present in 33% of the patient sample. Negatively toned dreams obtained by REM awakenings and nightmares were also reported more often by the patients-also irrespective of co-morbid PTSD-whereas dreams of specific BPD behavior, like self-mutilation, were rare. Taking these finding into account, one might productively investigate whether the sleep abnormalities improve during successful treatment of BPD and whether efficient methods for treating nightmares can be beneficial for this patient group.

  16. Clinical Observations About the Potential Benefits and Pitfalls of Between-Session Contacts with Borderline Patients.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) has a reputation for being a challenging disorder to treat due to the nature of the illness. With the development of evidence-based treatments, therapists are becoming more skilled at successfully helping this cohort of patients. A common factor associated with all validated treatments for BPD is the active involvement of therapists. For example, DBT is one treatment where therapists are expected to be available to patients for coaching outside of sessions. However, understanding the benefits and pitfalls associated with therapists' accessibility in between sessions is relevant to any treatment with intersession contact. In this article, three benefits of intersession contact are described: to generalize the use of skills, to improve understanding of the patient's needs, and to facilitate an alliance. This article also addresses the pitfalls of therapists being so accessible to patients. Both the benefits and pitfalls of intersession contact are illustrated using case vignettes. Assessing the function served by a patient's contact in between sessions is an important way to determine whether such contact is a productive part of treatment. Recommendations are provided to avoid detrimental outcomes for both the therapist (therapist burnout) and the patient. PMID:27603746

  17. The relationship between hippocampal asymmetry and temperament in adolescent borderline and antisocial personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Jovev, Martina; Whittle, Sarah; Yücel, Murat; Simmons, Julian Guy; Allen, Nicholas B; Chanen, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Investigating etiological processes early in the life span represents an important step toward a better understanding of the development of personality pathology. The current study evaluated the interaction between an individual difference risk factor (i.e., temperament) and a biological risk factor for aggressive behavior (i.e., atypical [larger] rightward hippocampal asymmetry) in predicting the emergence of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and antisocial personality disorder symptoms during early adolescence. The sample consisted of 153 healthy adolescents (M = 12.6 years, SD = 0.4, range = 11.4-13.7) who were selected from a larger sample to maximize variation in temperament. Interactions between four temperament factors (effortful control, negative affectivity, surgency, and affiliativeness), based on the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised, and volumetric measures of hippocampal asymmetry were examined as cross-sectional predictors of BPD and antisocial personality disorder symptoms. Boys were more likely to have elevated BPD symptoms if they were high on affiliation and had larger rightward hippocampal asymmetry. In boys, low affiliation was a significant predictor of BPD symptoms in the presence of low rightward hippocampal asymmetry. For girls, low effortful control was associated with elevated BPD symptoms in the presence of atypical rightward hippocampal asymmetry. This study builds on previous work reporting significant associations between atypical hippocampal asymmetry and poor behavioral regulation.

  18. Reasons for premature termination of dialectical behavior therapy for inpatients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Christoph; Roepke, Stefan; Röepke, Stefan; Kliem, Sören

    2014-09-01

    Although one of the main aims of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is to increase the retention rates, premature termination rates for DBT inpatient programs were found to be over 30%. The aim of the study was to identify the reasons for, and to analyze, patient characteristics that are associated with premature termination. We studied 541 inpatients with BPD, who were consecutively admitted for an open-door 3-month DBT inpatient treatment in Berlin, Germany. All participants completed several self-rating measures and participated in clinical interviews. Fourteen percent, who did not complete the full 84 days of assigned treatment, were expelled, mainly due to treatment-disturbing behaviors, or substance abuse or possession. Nearly 19% dropped out of treatment, mostly due to lack of motivation, arguments with others, and poor tolerance of emotional distress. Using non-parametric conditional inference trees, expulsion was associated with anorexia nervosa and alcohol abuse, whereas more than 9 suicide attempts, antisocial personality disorders, and more than 86 weeks in a psychiatric hospital were risk factors for dropout. We discussed measures and interventions that might lead to an adaptation of DBT inpatient programs. Future research should examine the symptom course and utilization of health-care services of non-completers. PMID:25058040

  19. Functions and timescale of self-cutting in participants suffering from borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Perroud, Nader; Dieben, Karen; Nicastro, Rosetta; Muscionico, Michel; Huguelet, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the meanings and timescale of self-cuttings in a cohort of 22 outpatients suffering from borderline personality disorder. Sixty-one events were recorded using the newly developed self-cutting-checklist (SCUC) designed to investigate the severity of self-cuttings, and intent to die, suicidal ideation, inner tension, sense of relief and anesthesia, and consequences associated with this behavior. We found that typical self-cuttings were associated with a decrease in inner tension and suicidal ideation. Moreover self-cuttings associated with a desire to die differentiated from those associated with no desire to die by significantly less reduction in inner tension. Finally, self-cuttings occurred significantly more often during evenings and nights than during daytime. In conclusion, self-cuttings can be reasonably addressed by self-report. Attention to specific issues such as intent to die and the time of the self-cuttings may improve the outcome of these particularly high-risk subjects.

  20. Experiences of patients with borderline personality disorder with the brief admission intervention: a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Helleman, Marjolein; Goossens, Peter J J; Kaasenbrood, Ad; van Achterberg, Theo

    2014-10-01

    Brief admission is a crisis intervention for patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), and refers to a clinical admission at a psychiatric hospital for a period of 1-5 nights. Patients formulate a treatment plan together with their community mental health nurse about the maximum frequency allowed for these brief admissions. The purpose of the study was to describe the lived experiences of patients with BPD with use of the brief admission intervention. The study used a phenomenological approach. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of BPD, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria; experience with brief admission, and sufficient understanding of the Dutch language. A total of 16 female patients and one male patient participated in the study. Thematic analysis of the transcripts of the interviews revealed four major meaning units: (i) organization of the brief admission; (ii) contact with a nurse; (iii) time out from daily life; and (iv) experienced value for the patient. Patients highlighted the quality of the contact with a nurse as the most important aspect of the brief admission. Nurses should be aware of the importance of connecting with patients who have BPD during a brief admission, particularly in light of the interpersonal hypersensitivity that characterizes these patients.

  1. Axis II comorbidity in borderline personality disorder is influenced by sex, age, and clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, Judith; Pascual, Juan C; Ferrer, Marc; Soler, Joaquim; Rufat, M Jesús; Andión, Oscar; Tiana, Thais; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Casas, Miquel; Pérez, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe psychiatric disorder that has a high clinical heterogeneity and frequent co-occurrence with other personality disorders (PDs). Although several studies have been performed to assess axis II comorbidity in BPD, more research is needed to clarify associated factors. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of co-occurrent axis II disorders in a large sample of patients with BPD and to investigate the influence of sex, age, and severity on this comorbidity. Data were collected from 484 patients with BPD through 2 semistructured interviews. We analyzed the frequency of axis II comorbidity and assessed differences regarding sex, age, and severity of BPD. About 74% of patients with BPD had at least 1 co-occurrent axis II disorder. The most common were paranoid, passive-aggressive, avoidant, and dependent PDs. Significant sex differences were found. Women presented more comorbidity with dependent PD, whereas men showed higher rates of comorbidity with antisocial PD. We also observed a significant positive correlation between age and the number of co-occurrent axis II disorders in women with BPD. Another finding was the positive correlation between BPD severity and the number of co-occurrent axis II disorders. These findings suggest that comorbidity with other axis II disorders and sex, age, and severity should be taken into account when developing treatment strategies and determining the prognosis of BPD.

  2. When social inclusion is not enough: Implicit expectations of extreme inclusion in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    De Panfilis, Chiara; Riva, Paolo; Preti, Emanuele; Cabrino, Chiara; Marchesi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) might feel rejected even when socially included by others. A psychological mechanism accounting for this response bias could be that objective social inclusion violates BPD patients' underlying implicit needs of "extreme" inclusion. Thus, this study investigated whether, during interpersonal exchanges, BPD patients report more rejection-related negative emotions and less feelings of social connection than controls unless they are faced with conditions of extreme social inclusion. Sixty-one BPD patients and 61 healthy controls completed a modified Cyberball paradigm. They were randomly assigned to a condition of ostracism, social inclusion, or overinclusion (a proxy for extreme social inclusion). They then rated their emotional states and feelings of social connection immediately and 20 min after the game. BPD patients reported greater levels of negative emotions than controls in the ostracism and the inclusion conditions, but not when overincluded. Furthermore, only for BPD participants was overinclusion associated with experiencing less negative emotions than the ostracism condition. However, BPD patients reported lower feelings of social connection than controls in any experimental situation. Thus, in BPD, a laboratory condition of "overinclusion" is associated with a reduction of negative emotions to levels comparable to those of control participants, but not with similar degrees of social connection. These results suggest that for BPD patients, even "including contexts" activate feelings of rejection. Their implicit expectations of idealized interpersonal inclusion may nullify the opportunity of experiencing "real" social connection and explain their distorted subjective experiences of rejection.

  3. Deficits in pain perception in borderline personality disorder: results from the thermal grill illusion.

    PubMed

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Chung, Boo Young; Richter, Ingmarie; Wicking, Manon; Foell, Jens; Mancke, Falk; Schmahl, Christian; Flor, Herta

    2015-10-01

    It is well documented that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by reduced pain sensitivity, which might be related to nonsuicidal self-injury and dissociative experiences in patients with BPD. However, it remains an open question whether this insensitivity relies at least partly on altered sensory integration or on an altered evaluation of pain or a combination of both. In this study, we used the thermal grill illusion (TGI), describing a painful sensation induced by the application of alternating cold and warm nonnoxious stimuli, in patients with either current or remitted BPD as well as matched healthy controls. Two additional conditions, applying warm or cold temperatures only, served as control. We further assessed thermal perception, discrimination, and pain thresholds. We found significantly reduced heat and cold pain thresholds for the current BPD group, as well as reduced cold pain thresholds for the remitted BPD group, as compared with the HC group. Current BPD patients perceived a less-intense TGI in terms of induced pain and unpleasantness, while their general ability to perceive this kind of illusion seemed to be unaffected. Thermal grill illusion magnitude was negatively correlated with dissociation and traumatization only in the current BPD patients. These results indicate that higher-order pain perception is altered in current BPD, which seems to normalize after remission. We discuss these findings against the background of neurophysiological evidence for the TGI in general and reduced pain sensitivity in BPD and suggest a relationship to alterations in N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmission. PMID:26098439

  4. Refining the Phenotype of Borderline Personality Disorder: Diagnostic Criteria and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a heterogeneous disorder, and previous analyses have parsed its phenotype in terms of subtypes or underlying traits. We refined the BPD construct by testing a range of latent variable models to ascertain whether BPD is composed of traits, latent classes, or both. We also tested whether subtypes of BPD could be distinguished by anger, aggressiveness, antisocial behavior, and mistrustfulness, additional putative indicators drawn from Kernberg’s (1967, 1975) theory of BPD. In a mixed clinical and nonclinical sample (n = 362), a factor mixture model consisting of two latent classes (symptomatic and asymptomatic) and a single severity dimension fit the DSM-IV BPD criteria data better than latent class or factor analytic approaches. In the second analytic phase, finite mixture modeling of the symptomatic latent class (n = 100) revealed four BPD subtypes: angry/aggressive, angry/mistrustful, poor identity/low anger, and prototypical. Our results support a hybrid categorical-dimensional model of the BPD DSM criteria. The BPD subtypes emerging from this model have important implications for treatment and etiological research. PMID:22823231

  5. Higher Executive Control and Visual Memory Performance Predict Treatment Completion in Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fertuck, Eric A.; Keilp, John; Song, Inkyung; Morris, Melissa C.; Wilson, Scott T.; Brodsky, Beth S.; Stanley, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-completion of a prescribed course of treatment occurs in 20–60% of individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD). While symptom severity, personality traits and environmental factors have been implicated as predictors of treatment non-completion (TNC), there have been no studies of neuropsychological predictors in this population. Methods From a randomized controlled trial, a subsample of 31, unmedicated outpatients diagnosed with BPD with recent self-injurious behavior was assessed on 5 neuropsychological domains. Patients were also assessed for general IQ, demographic and other salient clinical variables. Patients were randomized to one of four treatment conditions, which lasted up to 1 year. Number of weeks in treatment (WIT) up to 1 year was utilized as the index of TNC. Results Thirty-three percent of the subsample (n = 12) did not complete 1 year of treatment. However, more WIT were predicted by better baseline executive control (Trails B; p < 0.01) and visual memory performance (Benton visual retention; p < 0.001); other neuropsychological domains did not predict WIT. Conclusion In the treatment of outpatients with BPD, better executive control and visual memory performance predict more WIT. Assessing and addressing these neurocognitive factors in treatment may reduce TNC in this high-risk population. PMID:22116411

  6. Childhood emotional abuse and borderline personality features: The role of anxiety sensitivity among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bounoua, Nadia; Felton, Julia F; Long, Katie; Stadnik, Ryan D; Loya, Jennifer M; MacPherson, Laura; Lejuez, Carl W

    2015-05-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a pervasive personality disorder that poses a burden for affected individuals, their family members and society as a whole. Current research suggests that early childhood abuse, including emotional abuse, may be an important predictor of later BPD symptomology. Further, an emerging body of literature suggests that anxiety sensitivity (AS) may serve as a form of emotional vulnerability and be a key variable in the relation between abuse and the development of BPD symptomatology. This literature has relied on retrospective recall of abuse and AS in adult samples. As a result, there is a dearth of literature examining these variables in adolescence, which is a developmental period in which personality traits begin to emerge. This study explored the impact of AS in the development of BPD symptoms in a group of 277 adolescents. Results suggest a significant indirect effect of emotional abuse on BPD symptoms via AS, after controlling for sex, grade and prior levels of AS (indirect effect = 0.04, standard error (SE) = 0.02 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.001-0.070)). These findings suggest that, among adolescents, AS may serve as an important contributor to the development of BPD symptoms. Implications for interventions and future research are further discussed. PMID:25940514

  7. Deficits in pain perception in borderline personality disorder: results from the thermal grill illusion.

    PubMed

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Chung, Boo Young; Richter, Ingmarie; Wicking, Manon; Foell, Jens; Mancke, Falk; Schmahl, Christian; Flor, Herta

    2015-10-01

    It is well documented that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by reduced pain sensitivity, which might be related to nonsuicidal self-injury and dissociative experiences in patients with BPD. However, it remains an open question whether this insensitivity relies at least partly on altered sensory integration or on an altered evaluation of pain or a combination of both. In this study, we used the thermal grill illusion (TGI), describing a painful sensation induced by the application of alternating cold and warm nonnoxious stimuli, in patients with either current or remitted BPD as well as matched healthy controls. Two additional conditions, applying warm or cold temperatures only, served as control. We further assessed thermal perception, discrimination, and pain thresholds. We found significantly reduced heat and cold pain thresholds for the current BPD group, as well as reduced cold pain thresholds for the remitted BPD group, as compared with the HC group. Current BPD patients perceived a less-intense TGI in terms of induced pain and unpleasantness, while their general ability to perceive this kind of illusion seemed to be unaffected. Thermal grill illusion magnitude was negatively correlated with dissociation and traumatization only in the current BPD patients. These results indicate that higher-order pain perception is altered in current BPD, which seems to normalize after remission. We discuss these findings against the background of neurophysiological evidence for the TGI in general and reduced pain sensitivity in BPD and suggest a relationship to alterations in N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmission.

  8. Types of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in patients admitted for suicide-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Rebok, Federico; Teti, Germán L; Fantini, Adrián P; Cárdenas-Delgado, Christian; Rojas, Sasha M; Derito, María N C; Daray, Federico M

    2015-03-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is determined by the presence of any five of nine diagnostic criteria, leading patients with heterogeneous clinical features to be diagnosed under the same label without an individualized clinical and therapeutic approach. In response to this problem, Oldham proposed five types of BPD: affective, impulsive, aggressive, dependent and empty. The present study categorized a sample of BPD patients hospitalized due to suicide-related behavior according to Oldham's BPD proposed subtypes, and evaluated their clinical and demographic characteristics. Data were obtained from a sample of 93 female patients admitted to the « Dr. Braulio A. Moyano » Neuropsychiatric Hospital following suicide-related behavior. A total of 87 patients were classified as affective (26%), impulsive (37%), aggressive (4%), dependent (29%), and empty (5%). Patients classified as dependent were significantly older at the time of first suicide-related behavior (p = 0.0008) and reported significantly less events of previous suicide-related behaviors (p = 0.03), while patients classified as impulsive reported significantly higher rates of drug use (p = 0.02). Dependent, impulsive and affective BPD types were observed most frequently in our sample. Findings are discussed specific to demographic and clinical implications of BPD patients reporting concurrent suicidal behavior.

  9. Physical and social pains in borderline disorder and neuroanatomical correlates: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ducasse, Déborah; Courtet, Philippe; Olié, Emilie

    2014-05-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a common psychiatric disorder, the core features of which are affective dysregulation, identity disturbances, and problems in social interaction, with an intense fear of loss, abandonment, or rejection by social partners. Self-injurious behaviors (SIB), such as superficial cutting, occur in 70-80 % of BPD patients, which are associated with emotional relief. Intriguingly, the majority of BPD patients report reduced or no pain associated with SIB, whereas BPD patients are over-represented in chronic pain patients. Thus, studying pain perception in such patients may help to understand the pathophysiology of BPD, but also the interaction between affective and physical dimensions of pain. We conducted a systematic review dealing with physical and social pains in BPD patients, with a special focus on neuroimaging data. SIB appear to be an inadequate strategy to regulate negative emotions that may be related to social/psychological pain, by increasing dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation in order to regulate amygdala activation. In addition, abnormal hyperactivation of the insula is a possible trait marker of BPD, and might contribute to modified pain sensitivity. When considering psychological pain in BPD patients, neuroanatomical studies have shown a hyper-responsive subcortical limbic network and a deficient regulatory control system operating through anterior brain regions. Promising therapeutic strategies should target neuroanatomical and neurobiological dysfunctions, which lead to altered pain perception in BPD patients. PMID:24633938

  10. Relationship between maladaptive cognitions about sleep and recovery in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Plante, David T; Frankenburg, Frances R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Zanarini, Mary C

    2013-12-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been associated with maladaptive cognitive processes including dysfunctional attitudes and a negative attribution style. Comorbid insomnia affects the course of multiple psychiatric disorders, and has been associated with the absence of recovery from BPD. Because dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes are common among patients with insomnia, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between maladaptive sleep-related cognitions and recovery status (symptomatic remission plus good concurrent psychosocial functioning) in patients with BPD. Two hundred and twenty three BPD patients participating in the McLean Study of Adult Development (MSAD) were administered the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep questionnaire (DBAS-16) as part of the 16-year follow-up wave. Maladaptive sleep cognitions were compared between recovered (n=105) and non-recovered (n=118) BPD participants, in analyses that adjusted for age, sex, depression, anxiety, and primary sleep disorders. Results demonstrated that non-recovered BPD patients had significantly more severe maladaptive sleep-related cognitions as measured by the overall DBAS-16 score. These results demonstrate an association between dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep and recovery status among BPD patients. Further research is warranted to evaluate treatments targeted towards maladaptive sleep-related cognitions, and their subsequent effects on the course of BPD.

  11. Emotion Dysregulation as a Maintenance Factor of Borderline Personality Disorder Features

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Stephanie D.; Scott, Lori N.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Nolf, Kimberly A.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined within-individual changes in emotion dysregulation over the course of one year as a maintenance factor of borderline personality disorder (BPD) features. We evaluated the extent to which (1) BPD symptom severity at baseline predicted within-individual changes in emotion dysregulation and (2) within-individual changes in emotion dysregulation predicted four BPD features at 12-month follow-up: affective instability, identity disturbances, negative relationships, and impulsivity. The specificity of emotion dysregulation as a maintaining mechanism of BPD features was examined by controlling for a competing intervening variable, interpersonal conflict. BPD symptoms at baseline predicted overall level and increasing emotion dysregulation. Additionally, increasing emotion dysregulation predicted all four BPD features at 12-month follow-up after controlling for BPD symptoms at baseline. Further, overall level of emotion dysregulation mediated the association between BPD symptom severity at baseline and both affective instability and identity disturbance at 12-month follow-up, consistent with the notion of emotion dysregulation as a maintenance factor. Future research on the malleability of emotion dysregulation in laboratory paradigms and its effects on short-term changes in BPD features is needed to inform interventions. PMID:24342056

  12. Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Regulation: Insights from the Polyvagal Theory

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Marilyn A.; Riniolo, Todd C.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    The current study provides the first published evidence that the parasympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system differentiates the response profiles between individuals diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and controls. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a non-invasive marker of the influence of the myelinated vagal fibers on the heart, and heart period were collected during the presentation of film clips of varying emotional content. The BPD and control groups had similar initial levels of RSA and heart period. However, during the experiment the groups exhibited contrasting trajectories, with the BPD group decreasing RSA and heart period and the control group increasing RSA and heart period. By the end of the experiment, the groups different significantly on both RSA and heart period. The correlation between the changes in RSA and heart period was significant only for the control group, suggesting that vagal mechanisms mediated the heart period responses only in the control group. The findings were consistent with the Polyvagal Theory (Porges, 1995, 2001, 2003), illustrating different adaptive shifts in autonomic state throughout the course of the experiment. The BPD group ended in a physiological state that supports the mobilization behaviors of fight and flight, while the control group ended in a physiological state that supports social engagement behaviors. These finding are consistent with other published studies demonstrating atypical vagal regulation of the heart with other psychiatric disorders. PMID:17659821

  13. Self and identity in women with symptoms of borderline personality: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Gillian; Shannon, Ciarán; Ryan, Tina; Storey, Lesley; McDonnell, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Identity disturbance has been suggested to be a core feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, there is little known about the identity of individuals with symptoms of BPD from the participant's perspective. This study availed of in-depth lightly structured life story interviews with five female participants. Thematic analysis was utilized to derive three themes of identity: connection, distance between us, and hurt and healing. Results provided support for multiple and flexible conceptualizations of identity in comparison to the idea of a unitary self/identity. Results also suggested that participants were able to establish differing connections to others ranging from disconnection to intimacy and care. Participants reported that their identities were impacted upon by historical and current family/relationship dysfunction, but life stories also illustrated the positive impact of healing relationship experiences. Findings provide support for psychological theories that consider a multiple and relational self/identity and the empowerment of healthy aspects of the self in BPD recovery. Studies that assess the association between insight and change may further our knowledge into this complex population.

  14. Lower Oxytocin Plasma Levels in Borderline Patients with Unresolved Attachment Representations.

    PubMed

    Jobst, Andrea; Padberg, Frank; Mauer, Maria-Christine; Daltrozzo, Tanja; Bauriedl-Schmidt, Christine; Sabass, Lena; Sarubin, Nina; Falkai, Peter; Renneberg, Babette; Zill, Peter; Gander, Manuela; Buchheim, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal problems and affective dysregulation are core characteristics of borderline personality disorder (BPD). BPD patients predominantly show unresolved attachment representations. The oxytocin (OT) system is associated with human social attachment and affiliative behavior, and OT dysregulation may be related to distinct attachment characteristics. Here, we investigated whether attachment representations are related to peripheral OT levels in BPD patients. Twenty-one female BPD patients and 20 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs) were assessed with clinical scales and measures of interpersonal and attachment-related characteristics, including the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP). Plasma OT concentrations were measured prior to and during social exclusion in a virtual ball tossing game (Cyberball). The majority of BPD patients (63.2%) but no HCs showed unresolved (disorganized) attachment representations. In this subgroup of patients, baseline OT plasma levels were significantly lower than in BPD patients with organized attachment representations. This pilot study extends previous findings of altered OT regulation in BPD as a putative key mechanism underlying interpersonal dysregulation. Our results provide first evidence that altered OT plasma levels are related to disorganized attachment representations in BPD patients.

  15. Striatal Activity in Borderline Personality Disorder with Comorbid Intermittent Explosive Disorder: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Rodriguez, M. Mercedes; Hazlett, Erin A.; Rich, Erin L.; Ripoll, Luis H.; Weiner, Daniel M.; Spence, Nicole; Goodman, Marianne; Koenigsberg, Harold W.; Siever, Larry J.; New, Antonia S.

    2012-01-01

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is associated with behavioral and emotional dysregulation, particularly in social contexts; however, the underlying pathophysiology at the level of brain function is not well understood. Previous studies found abnormalities in frontal cortical and limbic areas suggestive of poor frontal regulation of downstream brain regions. However, the striatum, which is closely connected with the medial frontal cortices and plays an important role in motivated behaviors and processing of rewarding stimuli, has been understudied in BPD. Here we hypothesized that, in addition to frontal dysfunction, BPD patients may show abnormal striatal function. In this study, 38 BPD patients with intermittent explosive disorder (BPD-IED) and 36 healthy controls (HC) participated in the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP), a computer game played with a fictitious other player. 18Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measured relative glucose metabolism (rGMR) within caudate and putamen in response to aggression-provoking and non-provoking versions of the PSAP. Male BPD-IED patients had significantly lower striatal rGMR than all other groups during both conditions, although male and female BPD-IED patients did not differ in clinical or behavioral measures. These sex differences suggest differential involvement of frontal-striatal circuits in BPD-IED, and are discussed in relation to striatal involvement in affective learning and social decision-making. PMID:22464337

  16. Assessment of Rorschach dependency measures in female inpatients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Brunnschweiler, Benjamin; Swales, Stephanie; Brock, Johanna

    2005-10-01

    The psychometric properties and predictive validity of the Dependency Index (DI; Hilsenroth & Bornstein, 2002) and the Rorschach Oral Dependency Scale (ROD; Masling, Rabie, & Blondheim, 1967) were examined to determine if these implicit measures of dependency predict observable attachment-seeking behavior in 66 female inpatients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Results indicate that both scales produce excellent reliability estimates. The DI and ROD yield adequate base rates, and the distributions of scores approximate normal distributions. The DI was predictive of nursing staff observation of positive attachment/treatment compliance (r = .28, p = .02) but not excessive isolation. By contrast, the ROD predicted positive attachment/treatment compliance (r = .38, p = .002) and excessive isolation (r = -.35, p = .004). Texture responses predicted excessive isolation (r = -.25, p = .05). Discriminant validity was supported when neither dependency measure predicted hostile interactions or self-destructive behaviors. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the ROD demonstrated incremental validity over the DI and select Comprehensive System (Exner, 1993) variables associated with dependency.

  17. A Qualitative Assessment of the Parenting Challenges and Treatment Needs of Mothers with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Maureen; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Whalen, Diana J.; Scott, Lori N.

    2014-01-01

    There are currently no empirically supported interventions to target parenting among mothers who have Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current study uses Consensus Qualitative Research (CQR) methodology to: I) learn about mothers’ experiences of parenting with BPD, and II) identify treatment modifications to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) as suggested by mothers with BPD who are currently engaged in DBT skills training. Twenty-three mothers were recruited from intensive outpatient and partial hospitalization programs that teach DBT skills. A total of 9 focus groups that met one time were conducted asking women a series of questions regarding their experiences of parenting with BPD and how they would modify DBT to address parenting issues. Using the CQR approach, we coded domains and categories that were discussed by mothers in the focus groups. Coding revealed that mothers with BPD wished parenting was integrated more in their current DBT skills groups. In addition, one of the most prominent themes to emerge was that parenting is particularly stressful to mothers with BPD and is associated with guilt, uncertainty, and worry. Finally, mothers offered many ideas for how to integrate parenting-focused interventions into DBT. The CQR method revealed gaps in current treatment for mothers with BPD and provided useful ideas for how to modify DBT to target parenting and integrate these modifications into other approaches for treating mothers with BPD. PMID:26257507

  18. Sadomasochism and complementarity in the interaction of the narcissistic and borderline personality type.

    PubMed

    Finell, J S

    1992-01-01

    The narcissist and borderline personality types complement one another's defensive style providing needed defensive externalization of disavowed and split-off feelings. One is exploitative, grandiose, and dominant, forever seeking admiration and exhibiting an aggrandized self; the other experiences humiliation, neediness, helplessness, and terror of aloneness. They form a powerful complementary dyad wherein each identifies with disavowed emotional experiences displayed in the other. They can coexist for lengths of time, defensively discharging unwanted feelings. In the first case presented above, the transference was split initially, with the masoborderline patient being victimized and humiliated by her sadonarcissistic lover. In the second case, a male sadonarcissist enacted disavowed feelings through relationships with masoborderline women. In both cases, defensive enactment was fed by a complementary, intense, and symbiotic relationship. Complementary dynamics can be subtle and difficult to analyze. They involve defensive identification that draws on projection, enactment, and externalization--all difficult defenses to analyze. Enactment rather than remembering is inimical to the development of insight into transference and genetic connections and must be worked through for the analysis to progress. More than the usual analytic patience and resolve is needed to work through the difficult entrapments caused by these dynamics. PMID:1438630

  19. Neural correlates of attachment trauma in borderline personality disorder: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Kircher, Tilo; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Ruchsow, Martin; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2008-08-30

    Functional imaging studies have shown that individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display prefrontal and amygdala dysfunction while viewing or listening to emotional or traumatic stimuli. The study examined for the first time the functional neuroanatomy of attachment trauma in BPD patients using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the telling of individual stories. A group of 11 female BPD patients and 17 healthy female controls, matched for age and education, told stories in response to a validated set of seven attachment pictures while being scanned. Group differences in narrative and neural responses to "monadic" pictures (characters facing attachment threats alone) and "dyadic" pictures (interaction between characters in an attachment context) were analyzed. Behavioral narrative data showed that monadic pictures were significantly more traumatic for BPD patients than for controls. As hypothesized BPD patients showed significantly more anterior midcingulate cortex activation in response to monadic pictures than controls. In response to dyadic pictures patients showed more activation of the right superior temporal sulcus and less activation of the right parahippocampal gyrus compared to controls. Our results suggest evidence for potential neural mechanisms of attachment trauma underlying interpersonal symptoms of BPD, i.e. fearful and painful intolerance of aloneness, hypersensitivity to social environment, and reduced positive memories of dyadic interactions. PMID:18635342

  20. Reciprocal effects of parenting and borderline personality disorder symptoms in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Stepp, Stephanie D; Whalen, Diana J; Scott, Lori N; Zalewski, Maureen; Loeber, Rolf; Hipwell, Alison E

    2014-05-01

    Theories of borderline personality disorder (BPD) postulate that high-risk transactions between caregiver and child are important for the development and maintenance of the disorder. Little empirical evidence exists regarding the reciprocal effects of parenting on the development of BPD symptoms in adolescence. The impact of child and caregiver characteristics on this reciprocal relationship is also unknown. Thus, the current study examines bidirectional effects of parenting, specifically harsh punishment practices and caregiver low warmth, and BPD symptoms in girls aged 14-17 years based on annual, longitudinal data from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (N = 2,451) in the context of child and caregiver characteristics. We examined these associations through the use of autoregressive latent trajectory models to differentiate time-specific variations in BPD symptoms and parenting from the stable processes that steadily influence repeated measures within an individual. The developmental trajectories of BPD symptoms and parenting were moderately associated, suggesting a reciprocal relationship. There was some support for time-specific elevations in BPD symptoms predicting subsequent increases in harsh punishment and caregiver low warmth. There was little support for increases in harsh punishment and caregiver low warmth predicting subsequent elevations in BPD symptoms. Child impulsivity and negative affectivity, and caregiver psychopathology were related to parenting trajectories, while only child characteristics predicted BPD trajectories. The results highlight the stability of the reciprocal associations between parenting and BPD trajectories in adolescent girls and add to our understanding of the longitudinal course of BPD in youth.