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Sample records for concave costs oberwolfach

  1. DETERMINISTIC PRODUCTION PLANNING WITH CONCAVE COSTS AND CAPACITY CONSTRAINTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION , MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND CONTROL), (*PRODUCTION CONTROL, DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING), INVENTORY ANALYSIS, SCHEDULING, COST EFFECTIVENESS, STORAGE, MANPOWER, OPTIMIZATION, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, ALGORITHMS

  2. Log-Concavity and Strong Log-Concavity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Saumard, Adrien; Wellner, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    We review and formulate results concerning log-concavity and strong-log-concavity in both discrete and continuous settings. We show how preservation of log-concavity and strongly log-concavity on ℝ under convolution follows from a fundamental monotonicity result of Efron (1969). We provide a new proof of Efron's theorem using the recent asymmetric Brascamp-Lieb inequality due to Otto and Menz (2013). Along the way we review connections between log-concavity and other areas of mathematics and statistics, including concentration of measure, log-Sobolev inequalities, convex geometry, MCMC algorithms, Laplace approximations, and machine learning. PMID:27134693

  3. Log-Concavity and Strong Log-Concavity: a review.

    PubMed

    Saumard, Adrien; Wellner, Jon A

    We review and formulate results concerning log-concavity and strong-log-concavity in both discrete and continuous settings. We show how preservation of log-concavity and strongly log-concavity on ℝ under convolution follows from a fundamental monotonicity result of Efron (1969). We provide a new proof of Efron's theorem using the recent asymmetric Brascamp-Lieb inequality due to Otto and Menz (2013). Along the way we review connections between log-concavity and other areas of mathematics and statistics, including concentration of measure, log-Sobolev inequalities, convex geometry, MCMC algorithms, Laplace approximations, and machine learning.

  4. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  5. Detection of Convexity and Concavity in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertamini, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Sensitivity to shape changes was measured, in particular detection of convexity and concavity changes. The available data are contradictory. The author used a change detection task and simple polygons to systematically manipulate convexity/concavity. Performance was high for detecting a change of sign (a new concave vertex along a convex contour…

  6. Mesh segmentation with concavity-aware fields.

    PubMed

    Au, Oscar Kin-Chung; Zheng, Youyi; Chen, Menglin; Xu, Pengfei; Tai, Chiew-Lan

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a simple and efficient automatic mesh segmentation algorithm that solely exploits the shape concavity information. The method locates concave creases and seams using a set of concavity-sensitive scalar fields. These fields are computed by solving a Laplacian system with a novel concavity-sensitive weighting scheme. Isolines sampled from the concavity-aware fields naturally gather at concave seams, serving as good cutting boundary candidates. In addition, the fields provide sufficient information allowing efficient evaluation of the candidate cuts. We perform a summarization of all field gradient magnitudes to define a score for each isoline and employ a score-based greedy algorithm to select the best cuts. Extensive experiments and quantitative analysis have shown that the quality of our segmentations are better than or comparable with existing state-of-the-art more complex approaches.

  7. Flow behind concave shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  8. Strain responsive concave and convex microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2007-12-01

    We report the fabrication of single-component, strain responsive microlens arrays with real-time tunability. The concave lens array is fabricated by patterning hard oxide layer on a bidirectionally prestretched soft elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) followed by confined buckling upon release of the prestrain. The convex microlens array is replica molded from the concave lenses in PDMS. Due to difference in lens formation mechanisms, the two types of lenses show different tunable range of focal length in response to the applied strain: large focal length change is observed from the concave microlens array, whereas that from the convex microlens array is much smaller.

  9. Concave nanomagnets with widely tunable anisotropy

    DOEpatents

    Lambson, Brian; Gu, Zheng; Carlton, David; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    A nanomagnet having widely tunable anisotropy is disclosed. The disclosed nanomagnet is a magnetic particle with a convex shape having a first magnetically easy axis. The convex shape is modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form substantially offset from the first magnetically easy axis. In at least one embodiment, the convex shape is also modified to include at least one concavity to urge a second magnetically easy axis to form with a magnetic strength substantially different from the first magnetically easy axis.

  10. Infants' Perception of Information along Object Boundaries: Concavities versus Convexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Hayden, Angela; Reed, Andrea; Bertin, Evelin; Joseph, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Object parts are signaled by concave discontinuities in shape contours. In seven experiments, we examined whether 5- and 6 1/2-month-olds are sensitive to concavities as special aspects of contours. Infants of both ages detected discrepant concave elements amid convex distractors but failed to discriminate convex elements among concave…

  11. Longitudinal vortices in concave surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. I.,; Winoto, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Local measurements of mean and fluctuating velocity by laser anemometer were made inside the developing concave surface boundary layer in a free surface water channel at Reynolds numbers up to 16000. Concave surface radius was 3.5 times channel width and the ratio of spanwise mean boundary layer thickness to surface radius ranged between 0.03 and 0.11. Systems of longtitudinal vortices developed without artificial triggering. Vortex wavelength varied across the span by as much as a factor of 2, but mean wavelength was typically 1.3 times the boundary layer thickness and did not vary significantly in the flow direction. Continuous vortex growth at Reynolds number = 9800 contrasted with apparent breakup of the vortices at Reynolds number = 16000.

  12. Concave points for separating touching particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Deisy; Trujillo, Maria; Barraza, Juan Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Separation of touching objects/particles is a step before measuring morphological characteristics. An approach for identifying and splitting touching char particles is presented. The proposed approach is based on two processes. First, concave points are detected using a concavity measure and a list of touching point candidates is built. Second, separation lines are identified using location, length, blur and size. A decision criterion is derived for deciding whether or not to split a particle. The proposed approach is evaluated using 180 images of char particles and compared to the Watershed algorithm. The evaluation was twofold: quantifying the accuracy of identifying touching particles and measuring the separation quality. Expert criteria are used as a ground truth for qualitative evaluations. A good agreement between the visual judgement and automatic results was obtained, using the proposed approach.

  13. Machine for fabricating axially symmetric concave aspherics.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, H

    1973-07-01

    A machine has been constructed for fabricating concave aspheric surfaces of diameter up to 200 mm and reference radius from 20 mm to 150 mm. The principle is to use a plastic-bonded silicon carbide wheel with a convex cutting surface, which is continually dressed by a diamond form dresser. The cam used for directing the grinding wheel is cut on a numerically controlled jig borer with a tool of the same diameter as the cam follower. In operation, the location of the diamond dresser is used to provide feedback corrections for the grinding wheel.

  14. Sensitive visual test for concave diffraction gratings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, E. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A simple visual test for the evaluation of concave diffraction gratings is described. It is twice as sensitive as the Foucault knife edge test, from which it is derived, and has the advantage that the images are straight and free of astigmatism. It is particularly useful for grating with high ruling frequency where the above image faults limit the utility of the Foucault test. The test can be interpreted quantitatively and can detect zonal grating space errors of as little as 0.1 A.

  15. Imaging Spectrometers Using Concave Holographic Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradie, J.; Wang, S.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy combines the spatial attributes of imaging with the compositionally diagnostic attributes of spectroscopy. For spacebased remote sensing applications, mass, size, power, data rate, and application constrain the scanning approach. For the first three approaches, substantial savings in mass and size of the spectrometer can be achieved in some cases with a concave holographic grating and careful placement of an order-sorting filter. A hologram etched on the single concave surface contains the equivalent of the collimating, dispersing, and camera optics of a conventional grating spectrometer and provides substantial wavelength dependent corrections for spherical aberrations and a flat focal field. These gratings can be blazed to improve efficiency when used over a small wavelength range or left unblazed for broadband uniform efficiency when used over a wavelength range of up to 2 orders. More than 1 order can be imaged along the dispersion axis by placing an appropriately designed step order-sorting filter in front of the one- or two-dimensional detector. This filter can be shaped for additional aberration corrections. The VIRIS imaging spectrometer based on the broadband design provides simultaneous imaging of the entrance slit from lambda = 0.9 to 2.6 microns (1.5 orders) onto a 128 x 128 HgCdTe detector (at 77 K). The VIRIS spectrometer was used for lunar mapping with the UH 24.in telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The design is adaptable for small, low mass, space based imaging spectrometers.

  16. Verification of conicoidal concave surfaces by keratometry

    PubMed Central

    Douthwaite, William A.; Mallen, Edward A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possibility of using a keratometer to check the specification of the conicoidal back surface of rigid contact lenses. Methods A conicoidal surface can be described by quoting two parameters. The most useful for the contact lens practitioner are the apical radius (curvature) and the P-value (asphericity). A keratometer was used to measure calibrated aspheric concave surfaces with the surfaces tilted in relation to the keratometer optical axis in order to acquire sagittal radii of curvature for various regions across the concave surface. The known surface characteristics were used to apply a correction factor to the results in order to allow derivation of the surface apical radius and P-value by keratometry. Results The 95% confidence limits suggest an estimate to within —0.014 to +0.011 mm for apical radius and —0.011 to +0.009 for the P-value compared to the results derived by form Talysurf analysis. The coefficient of repeatability was 0.029 mm for apical radius and 0.031 for the P-value. Conclusions The investigation supports the notion that the keratometer could be used to check both the curvature and the asphericity of conicoidal back surface rigid contact lenses.

  17. Cesáro partial sums of concave univalent functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldawish, Ibtisam; Darus, Maslina

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we consider the Cesáro partial sums of certain concave univalent functions. We studied geometric properties of the Cesáro partial sums of certain concave univalent functions in the open unit disk. Examples are illustrated.

  18. GNCCP-Graduated NonConvexityand Concavity Procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhi-Yong Liu; Hong Qiao

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we propose the graduated nonconvexity and concavity procedure (GNCCP) as a general optimization framework to approximately solve the combinatorial optimization problems defined on the set of partial permutation matrices. GNCCP comprises two sub-procedures, graduated nonconvexity which realizes a convex relaxation and graduated concavity which realizes a concave relaxation. It is proved that GNCCP realizes exactly a type of convex-concave relaxation procedure (CCRP), but with a much simpler formulation without needing convex or concave relaxation in an explicit way. Actually, GNCCP involves only the gradient of the objective function and is therefore very easy to use in practical applications. Two typical related NP-hard problems, partial graph matching and quadratic assignment problem (QAP), are employed to demonstrate its simplicity and state-of-the-art performance.

  19. Elliptical concave microlens arrays built in the photosensitive TiO2/ormosils hybrid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua; Que, Wenxiu; Javed, Hafiz M. Asif; Wei, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Photosensitive TiO2/organically modified silane hybrid thin films were prepared by a low-temperature sol-gel spin-coating technique. Optical and structural properties of the hybrid films with different titanium contents were characterized by prism coupling technique, UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. Advantages for fabrication of elliptical concave micro-lens arrays (MLAs) based on the as-prepared hybrid films were demonstrated by combining polydimethylsiloxane soft mold with a UV-cured imprint technique. Results indicate that the as-prepared hybrid films have great applicability for the fabrication of photonic components, and the fabrication technique provides a simple and cost-effective way for the fabrication of the sol-gel elliptical concave MLAs.

  20. Classroom Note: Concavity and the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning-Davies, J.

    2003-01-01

    The importance of the mathematical notion of concavity in relation to thermodynamics is stressed and it is shown how it can be useful in increasing the enthusiasm of physics' students for their mathematics' courses.

  1. Convexity and concavity constants in Lorentz and Marcinkiewicz spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, Anna; Parrish, Anca M.

    2008-07-01

    We provide here the formulas for the q-convexity and q-concavity constants for function and sequence Lorentz spaces associated to either decreasing or increasing weights. It yields also the formula for the q-convexity constants in function and sequence Marcinkiewicz spaces. In this paper we extent and enhance the results from [G.J.O. Jameson, The q-concavity constants of Lorentz sequence spaces and related inequalities, Math. Z. 227 (1998) 129-142] and [A. Kaminska, A.M. Parrish, The q-concavity and q-convexity constants in Lorentz spaces, in: Banach Spaces and Their Applications in Analysis, Conference in Honor of Nigel Kalton, May 2006, Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, 2007, pp. 357-373].

  2. Monotonicity, concavity, and convexity of fractional derivative of functions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Feng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Zhixin; Jiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The monotonicity of the solutions of a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations is studied first, and the existing results were extended. Then we discuss monotonicity, concavity, and convexity of fractional derivative of some functions and derive corresponding criteria. Several examples are provided to illustrate the applications of our results.

  3. Concavity of Solutions of the Porous Medium Equation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    R x (0,T), for initial data not necessarily concave. She obtains results about existence, uniqueness and nonuniqueness for suitable classes of weak... Lipschitz -continuous curves (the interfaces), si(o) = a, s2(0) = b, and (-1) isi(t) is nondecreasing in time. Along the interfaces the derivative vx is

  4. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings.

  5. Critical Concavity of a Drainage Basin for Steady-State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Jongmin; Paik, Kyungrock

    2015-04-01

    Longitudinal profiles of natural streams are known to show concave forms. Saying A as drainage area, channel gradient S can be expressed as the power-law, S≈A-θ (Flint, 1974), which is one of the scale-invariant features of drainage basin. According to literature, θ of most natural streams falls into a narrow range (0.4 < θ < 0.7) (Tucker and Whipple, 2002). It leads to fundamental questions: 'Why does θ falls into such narrow range?' and 'How is this related with other power-law scaling relationships reported in natural drainage basins?' To answer above questions, we analytically derive θ for a steady-state drainage basin following Lane's equilibrium (Lane, 1955) throughout the corridor and named this specific case as the 'critical concavity'. In the derivation, sediment transport capacity is estimated by unit stream power model (Yang, 1976), yielding a power function of upstream area. Stability of channel at a local point occurs when incoming flux equals outgoing flux at the point. Therefore, given the drainage at steady-state where all channel beds are stable, the exponent of the power function should be zero. From this, we can determine the critical concavity. Considering ranges of variables associated in this derivation, critical concavity cannot be resolved as a single definite value, rather a range of critical concavity is suggested. This range well agrees with the widely reported range of θ (0.4 < θ < 0.7) in natural streams. In this theoretical study, inter-relationships between power-laws such as hydraulic geometry (Leopold and Maddock, 1953), dominant discharge-drainage area (Knighton et al., 1999), and concavity, are coupled into the power-law framework of stream power sediment transport model. This allows us to explore close relationships between their power-law exponents: their relative roles and sensitivity. Detailed analysis and implications will be presented. References Flint, J. J., 1974, Stream gradient as a function of order, magnitude

  6. Curvature morphology of the mandibular dentition and the development of concave-convex vertical stripping instruments.

    PubMed

    Ihlow, Dankmar; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Hunze, Justus; Dathe, Henning; Planert, Jens; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Nägerl, Hans

    2002-07-01

    Radii for concave-convex vertical stripping instruments can be derived from measurements of the natural curvature morphology in the horizontal contact area of the mandibular dentition. The concave-convex adjustment of contacts in the anterior dental arch with a newly developed set of concave-convex stripping instruments should enable orthodontic crowding problems to be alleviated biomechanically.

  7. GLOBAL SOLUTIONS TO FOLDED CONCAVE PENALIZED NONCONVEX LEARNING

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongcheng; Yao, Tao; Li, Runze

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with solving nonconvex learning problems with folded concave penalty. Despite that their global solutions entail desirable statistical properties, there lack optimization techniques that guarantee global optimality in a general setting. In this paper, we show that a class of nonconvex learning problems are equivalent to general quadratic programs. This equivalence facilitates us in developing mixed integer linear programming reformulations, which admit finite algorithms that find a provably global optimal solution. We refer to this reformulation-based technique as the mixed integer programming-based global optimization (MIPGO). To our knowledge, this is the first global optimization scheme with a theoretical guarantee for folded concave penalized nonconvex learning with the SCAD penalty (Fan and Li, 2001) and the MCP penalty (Zhang, 2010). Numerical results indicate a significant outperformance of MIPGO over the state-of-the-art solution scheme, local linear approximation, and other alternative solution techniques in literature in terms of solution quality. PMID:27141126

  8. Shock wave reflection over convex and concave wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitade, M.; Kosugi, T.; Yada, K.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the transition criterion nearly agrees with the detachment criterion in the case of strong shocks, two-dimensional, and pseudosteady flow. However, when the shock wave diffracts over a wedge whose angle is below the detachment criterion, that is, in the domain of Mach reflection, precursory regular reflection (PRR) appears near the leading edge and as the shock wave propagates, the PRR is swept away by the overtaking corner signal (cs) that forces the transition to Mach reflection. It is clear that viscosity and thermal conductivity influences transition and the triple point trajectory. On the other hand, the reflection over concave and convex wedges is truly unsteady flow, and the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on transition and triple point trajectory has not been reported. This paper describes that influence of viscosity over convex and concave corners investigated both experiments and numerical simulations.

  9. Non-Concave Penalized Likelihood with NP-Dimensionality

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Lv, Jinchi

    2011-01-01

    Penalized likelihood methods are fundamental to ultra-high dimensional variable selection. How high dimensionality such methods can handle remains largely unknown. In this paper, we show that in the context of generalized linear models, such methods possess model selection consistency with oracle properties even for dimensionality of Non-Polynomial (NP) order of sample size, for a class of penalized likelihood approaches using folded-concave penalty functions, which were introduced to ameliorate the bias problems of convex penalty functions. This fills a long-standing gap in the literature where the dimensionality is allowed to grow slowly with the sample size. Our results are also applicable to penalized likelihood with the L1-penalty, which is a convex function at the boundary of the class of folded-concave penalty functions under consideration. The coordinate optimization is implemented for finding the solution paths, whose performance is evaluated by a few simulation examples and the real data analysis. PMID:22287795

  10. Entanglement criteria via concave-function uncertainty relations

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yichen

    2010-07-15

    A general theorem as a necessary condition for the separability of quantum states in both finite and infinite dimensional systems, based on concave-function uncertainty relations, is derived. Two special cases of the general theorem are stronger than two known entanglement criteria based on the Shannon entropic uncertainty relation and the Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation, respectively; other special cases are able to detect entanglement where some famous entanglement criteria fail.

  11. Monotonicity and Logarithmic Concavity of Two Functions Involving Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ai-Qi; Li, Guo-Fu; Guo, Bai-Ni; Qi, Feng

    2008-01-01

    The function 1 divided by "x"[superscript 2] minus "e"[superscript"-x"] divided by (1 minus "e"[superscript"-x"])[superscript 2] for "x" greater than 0 is proved to be strictly decreasing. As an application of this monotonicity, the logarithmic concavity of the function "t" divided by "e"[superscript "at"] minus "e"[superscript"(a-1)""t"] for "a"…

  12. Study of Unsteady Flows with Concave Wall Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents computational fluid dynamic studies of the inlet turbulence and wall curvature effects on the flow steadiness at near wall surface locations in boundary layer flows. The time-stepping RANS numerical solver of the NASA Glenn-HT RANS code and a one-equation turbulence model, with a uniform inlet turbulence modeling level of the order of 10 percent of molecular viscosity, were used to perform the numerical computations. The approach was first calibrated for its predictabilities of friction factor, velocity, and temperature at near surface locations within a transitional boundary layer over concave wall. The approach was then used to predict the velocity and friction factor variations in a boundary layer recovering from concave curvature. As time iteration proceeded in the computations, the computed friction factors converged to their values from existing experiments. The computed friction factors, velocity, and static temperatures at near wall surface locations oscillated periodically in terms of time iteration steps and physical locations along the span-wise direction. At the upstream stations, the relationship among the normal and tangential velocities showed vortices effects on the velocity variations. Coherent vortices effect on the velocity components broke down at downstream stations. The computations also predicted the vortices effects on the velocity variations within a boundary layer flow developed along a concave wall surface with a downstream recovery flat wall surface. It was concluded that the computational approach might have the potential to analyze the flow steadiness in a turbine blade flow.

  13. Mixed convection heat transfer in concave and convex channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moukalled, F.; Doughan, A.; Acharya, S.

    1997-07-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer studies in the literature have been primarily confined to pipe and rectangular channel geometry's. In some applications, however, heat transfer in curved channels may be of interest (e.g., nozzle and diffuser shaped passages in HVAC systems, fume hoods, chimneys, bell-shaped or dome-shaped chemical reactors, etc.). A numerical investigation of laminar mixed convection heat transfer of air in concave and convex channels is presented. Six different channel aspects ratios (R/L = 1.04, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, and {infinity}) and five different values of Gr/Re{sup 2} (Gr/Re{sup 2} = 0, 0.1, 1, 3, 5) are considered. Results are displayed in terms of streamline and isotherm plots, velocity and temperature profiles, and local and average Nusselt number estimates. Numerical predictions reveal that compared to straight channels of equal height, concave channels of low aspect ratio have lower heat transfer at relatively low values of Gr/Re{sup 2} and higher heat transfer at high values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. When compared to straight channels of equal heated length, concave channels are always found to have lower heat transfer and for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. On the other hand, predictions for convex channels revealed enhancement in heat transfer compared to straight channels of equal height and/or equal heated length for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}.

  14. Comparison of generic force fields for packing of concave molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Regno, Annalaura; Siperstein, Flor R.

    2014-09-01

    Organic molecules of intrinsic microporosity (OMIMs) are a new class of highly concave molecules, designed to pack inefficiently and create microporous materials. In this work, OMIM-1 was described with full atomistic models using Dreiding, optimised potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) and Universal force fields to recognise the features enhanced by each force field and assess their ability in representing the structural properties of this new class of materials. In addition, argon adsorption isotherms were modelled to determine the features observed in the isotherm generated by each force field, for future comparison with experimental data.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of a boundary layer with concave streamwise curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulence modeling continues to be one of the most difficult problems in fluid mechanics. Existing prediction methods are well developed for certain classes of simple equilibrium flows, but are still not entirely satisfactory for a large category of complex non-equilibrium flows found in engineering practice. Direct and large-eddy simulation (LES) approaches have long been believed to have great potential for the accurate prediction of difficult turbulent flows, but the associated computational cost has been prohibitive for practical problems. This remains true for direct simulation but is no longer clear for large-eddy simulation. Advances in computer hardware, numerical methods, and subgrid-scale modeling have made it possible to conduct LES for flows or practical interest at Reynolds numbers in the range of laboratory experiments. The objective of this work is to apply ES and the dynamic subgrid-scale model to the flow of a boundary layer over a concave surface.

  16. Directable weathering of concave rock using curvature estimation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael D; Farley, McKay; Butler, Joseph; Beardall, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of directable weathering of exposed concave rock for use in computer-generated animation or games. Previous weathering models that admit concave surfaces are computationally inefficient and difficult to control. In nature, the spheroidal and cavernous weathering rates depend on the surface curvature. Spheroidal weathering is fastest in areas with large positive mean curvature and cavernous weathering is fastest in areas with large negative mean curvature. We simulate both processes using an approximation of mean curvature on a voxel grid. Both weathering rates are also influenced by rock durability. The user controls rock durability by editing a durability graph before and during weathering simulation. Simulations of rockfall and colluvium deposition further improve realism. The profile of the final weathered rock matches the shape of the durability graph up to the effects of weathering and colluvium deposition. We demonstrate the top-down directability and visual plausibility of the resulting model through a series of screenshots and rendered images. The results include the weathering of a cube into a sphere and of a sheltered inside corner into a cavern as predicted by the underlying geomorphological models.

  17. Head rice rate measurement based on concave point matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Wu, Wei; Yang, Tianle; Liu, Tao; Chen, Wen; Chen, Chen; Li, Rui; Zhou, Tong; Sun, Chengming; Zhou, Yue; Li, Xinlu

    2017-01-01

    Head rice rate is an important factor affecting rice quality. In this study, an inflection point detection-based technology was applied to measure the head rice rate by combining a vibrator and a conveyor belt for bulk grain image acquisition. The edge center mode proportion method (ECMP) was applied for concave points matching in which concave matching and separation was performed with collaborative constraint conditions followed by rice length calculation with a minimum enclosing rectangle (MER) to identify the head rice. Finally, the head rice rate was calculated using the sum area of head rice to the overall coverage of rice. Results showed that bulk grain image acquisition can be realized with test equipment, and the accuracy rate of separation of both indica rice and japonica rice exceeded 95%. An increase in the number of rice did not significantly affect ECMP and MER. High accuracy can be ensured with MER to calculate head rice rate by narrowing down its relative error between real values less than 3%. The test results show that the method is reliable as a reference for head rice rate calculation studies.

  18. The concave river long profile: a morphodynamic steady state?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, A.

    2011-12-01

    By definition, a morphodynamic steady state is governed by a spatially constant sediment transport rate. As the sediment transport rate is a function of shear stress associated with skin friction, the morphodynamic steady state has been considered to be governed by a spatially constant bed slope. For this reason, the typical concave river long profile has been considered to be a quasi-steady state. The river's steady state has been considered to be one with a spatially constant bed slope, with tributaries inducing a stepwise decrease in bed slope in streamwise direction. Yet, for the sediment transport rate to be spatially constant, it rather is the product of water surface slope and water depth associated with skin friction that needs to be constant. This implies that physical mechanisms that induce streamwise variation in the sediment transport rate can be compensated by a streamwise variation in bed slope so as to guarantee a spatially constant sediment transport rate. Following the river course, such physical mechanisms can be bedrock exposure, partial transport, and a spatially lagging bedform growth. At locations where tributaries increase the water discharge, the above mechanisms cause the river bed profile to be upward concave over a significant reach. At bifucations or at locations where river widening prevails, the river bed profile is upward convex.

  19. Head rice rate measurement based on concave point matching

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuan; Wu, Wei; Yang, Tianle; Liu, Tao; Chen, Wen; Chen, Chen; Li, Rui; Zhou, Tong; Sun, Chengming; Zhou, Yue; Li, Xinlu

    2017-01-01

    Head rice rate is an important factor affecting rice quality. In this study, an inflection point detection-based technology was applied to measure the head rice rate by combining a vibrator and a conveyor belt for bulk grain image acquisition. The edge center mode proportion method (ECMP) was applied for concave points matching in which concave matching and separation was performed with collaborative constraint conditions followed by rice length calculation with a minimum enclosing rectangle (MER) to identify the head rice. Finally, the head rice rate was calculated using the sum area of head rice to the overall coverage of rice. Results showed that bulk grain image acquisition can be realized with test equipment, and the accuracy rate of separation of both indica rice and japonica rice exceeded 95%. An increase in the number of rice did not significantly affect ECMP and MER. High accuracy can be ensured with MER to calculate head rice rate by narrowing down its relative error between real values less than 3%. The test results show that the method is reliable as a reference for head rice rate calculation studies. PMID:28128315

  20. Scaling relationships and concavity of small valley networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penido, Julita C.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Som, Sanjoy M.

    2013-01-01

    Valley networks are widely interpreted as the preserved erosional record of water flowing across the martian surface. The manner in which valley morphometric properties scale with drainage area has been widely examined on Earth. Earlier studies assessing these properties on Mars have suggested that martian valleys are morphometrically distinct from those on Earth. However, these earlier measurements were generally made on large valley systems because of the limited topographic data available. In this study, we determine the scaling properties of valley networks at smaller scales than have been previously assessed, using digital elevation models from the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC). We find a Hack's law exponent of 0.74, larger than on Earth, and our measurements also reveal that individual small valleys have concave up, concave down, and quasi-linear longitudinal profiles, consistent with earlier studies of dissected terrain on Mars. However, for many valleys, widths are observed to increase downstream similarly to how they scale in terrestrial channels. The similarities and differences between valley networks on Mars and Earth are consistent with the idea that valleys on Mars are comparatively immature, and precipitation was a likely mechanism for delivering water to these networks.

  1. Transversal stability of the bouncing ball on a concave surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chastaing, J.-Y.; Pillet, G.; Taberlet, N.; Géminard, J.-C.

    2015-05-01

    A ball bouncing repeatedly on a vertically vibrating surface constitutes the famous "bouncing ball" problem, a nonlinear system used in the 1980s, and still in use nowadays, to illustrate the route to chaos by period doubling. In experiments, in order to avoid the ball escape that would be inevitable with a flat surface, a concave lens is often used to limit the horizontal motion. However, we observe experimentally that the system is not stable. The ball departs from the system axis and exhibits a pendular motion in the permanent regime. We propose theoretical arguments to account for the decrease of the growth rate and of the asymptotic-size of the trajectory when the frequency of the vibration is increased. The instability is very sensitive to the physics of the contacts, which makes it a potentially interesting way to study the collisions rules, or to test the laws used in numerical studies of granular matter.

  2. Transient river response, captured by channel steepness and its concavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacker, Veerle; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Govers, Gerard; Molina, Armando; Campforts, Benjamin; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain rivers draining tropical regions are known to be great conveyor belts carrying efficiently more than half of the global sediment flux to the oceans. Many tropical mountain areas are located in tectonically active belts where the hillslope and stream channel morphology are rapidly evolving in response to changes in base level. Here, we report basin-wide denudation rates for an east-west transect through the tropical Andes. Hillslope and channel morphology vary systematically from east to west, reflecting the transition from high relief, strongly dissected topography in the escarpment zones into relatively low relief topography in the inter-Andean valley. The spatial pattern of differential denudation rates reflects the transient adjustment of the landscape to rapid river incision following tectonic uplift and river diversion. In the inter-Andean valley, upstream of the wave of incision, slopes and river channels display a relatively smooth, concave-up morphology and denudation rates (time scale of 104-105 a) are consistently low (3 to 200 mm/ka). In contrast, slopes and river channels of rejuvenated basins draining the eastern cordillera are steep to very steep; and the studied drainage basins show a wide range of denudation rate values (60 to 400 mm/ka) that increase systematically with increasing basin mean slope gradient, channel steepness, and channel convexity. Drainage basins that are characterised by strong convexities in their river longitudinal profiles systematically have higher denudation rates. As such, this is one of the first studies that provides field-based evidence of a correlation between channel concavity and basin mean denudation rates, consistent with process-based fluvial incision models.

  3. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  4. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration.

  5. Measurement of the configuration of a concave surface by the interference of reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumazawa, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Shida, S.

    1985-01-01

    A method whereby a concave surface is irradiated with coherent light and the resulting interference fringes yield information on the concave surface is described. This method can be applied to a surface which satisfies the following conditions: (1) the concave face has a mirror surface; (2) the profile of the face is expressed by a mathematical function with a point of inflection. In this interferometry, multilight waves reflected from the concave surface interfere and make fringes wherever the reflected light propagates. Interference fringe orders. Photographs of the fringe patterns for a uniformly loaded thin silicon plate clamped at the edge are shown experimentally. The experimental and the theoretical values of the maximum optical path difference show good agreement. This simple method can be applied to obtain accurate information on concave surfaces.

  6. Optimal Impeller Clearance for a Dual Stirred Unbaffled Tank with a Concave Blade Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, T. T.; Kumar, B.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental investigation of unbaffled stirred tanks is carried out with the use of a dual concave blade impeller to evaluate the mass transfer coefficient, power number, and vortex depth. The effect of the impeller clearance on mass transfer is analyzed to estimate the optimal impeller clearance for lower and upper impellers. It is found that the lower impeller positioned at 0.25 of the tank diameter with the clearance between the lower and upper impellers equal to 0.38 of the tank diameter gives the maximum mass transfer coefficient. A comparison with the results for dual Rushton and Rushton-concave impellers at the optimal clearance shows that the concave-concave impellers are most efficient. The scale-up criteria for optimal, geometrically similar systems of unbaffled stirred tanks with a dual concave impeller are proposed.

  7. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-06

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis.

  8. Tunable far-field acoustic imaging by two-dimensional sonic crystal with concave incident surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Feng-Fu; Lu, Dan-Feng; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Ji, Chang-Ying; Shi, Qing-Fan

    2017-01-01

    An additional concave incident surface comprised of two-dimensional (2D) sonic crystals (SCs) is employed to tune the acoustic image in the far-field region. The tunability is realized through changing the curvature of the concave surface. To explain the tuning mechanism, a simple ray-trace analysis is demonstrated based on the wave-beam negative refractive law. Then, a numerical confirmation is carried out. Results show that both the position and the intensity of the image can be tuned by the introduced concave surface.

  9. Research on adaptive temperature control in sound field induced by self-focused concave spherical transducer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiwen; Qian, Shengyou; Ding, Yajun

    2010-05-01

    Temperature control of hyperthermia treatments is generally implemented with multipoint feedback system comprised of phased-array transducer, which is complicated and high cost. Our simulations to the acoustic field induced by a self-focused concave spherical transducer (0.5MHz, 9cm aperture width, 8.0cm focal length) show that the distribution of temperature can keep the same "cigar shape" in the focal region during ultrasound insonation. Based on the characteristic of the temperature change, a two-dimensional model of a "cigar shape" tumor is designed and tested through numerical simulation. One single-point on the border of the "cigar shape" tumor is selected as the control target and is controlled at the temperature of 43 degrees C by using a self-tuning regulator (STR). Considering the nonlinear effects of biological medium, an accurate state-space model obtained via the finite Fourier integral transformation to the bioheat equation is presented and used for calculating temperature. Computer simulations were performed with the perfusion rates of 2.0kg/(m(3)s) and 4.5kg/(m(3)s) to the different targets, it was found that the temperatures on the border of the "cigar shape" tumor can achieve the desired temperature of 43 degrees C by control of one single-point. A larger perfusion rate requires a higher power output to obtain the same temperature elevation under the same insonation time and needs a higher cost for compensating the energy loss carried away by blood flow after steady state. The power output increases with the controlled region while achieving the same temperature at the same time. Especially, there is no overshoot during temperature elevation and no oscillation after steady state. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach may offers a way for obtaining a single-point, low-cost hyperthermia system.

  10. High voltage photo-switch package module having encapsulation with profiled metallized concavities

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, James S; Sanders, David M; Hawkins, Steven A; Sampayan, Stephen A

    2015-05-05

    A photo-conductive switch package module having a photo-conductive substrate or wafer with opposing electrode-interface surfaces metalized with first metallic layers formed thereon, and encapsulated with a dielectric encapsulation material such as for example epoxy. The first metallic layers are exposed through the encapsulation via encapsulation concavities which have a known contour profile, such as a Rogowski edge profile. Second metallic layers are then formed to line the concavities and come in contact with the first metal layer, to form profiled and metalized encapsulation concavities which mitigate enhancement points at the edges of electrodes matingly seated in the concavities. One or more optical waveguides may also be bonded to the substrate for coupling light into the photo-conductive wafer, with the encapsulation also encapsulating the waveguides.

  11. Shadow-related concavity-convexity inversions reveal a very basic tolerance for impossible shadows.

    PubMed

    Casati, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The stimuli traditionally used for demonstrating shadow-related concavity-convexity inversions reveal a very basic tolerance for impossible shadows-namely, self shadows do not induce a visual request for geometrically mandatory cast shadows.

  12. Heat transfer characteristics of a single circular air jet impinging on a concave hemispherical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study was made of the local and average heat-transfer characteristics of a single turbulent air jet impinging on the concave surface of a hemisphere. Correlations were developed for expressing the effects of a number of dimensionless variables on the local and average Nusselt numbers. Results of the present study are compared with those from a similar study concerning a concave surface of a semicylindrical shell.

  13. An experimental investigation of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer subjected to concave curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-cheng; Wang, Zhen-guo; Zhao, Yu-xin

    2016-09-01

    By employing particle image velocimetry, the response of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer to the concave curvature is experimentally investigated. The radius of the concave wall is 350 mm, and the turning angle is 20∘. Logarithmic law is well preserved in the profile of streamwise velocity at all streamwise positions despite the impact of curvature. The varying trend of principal strain rate is found to be different at different heights within the boundary layer, which cannot be explained by the suggestion given by former researchers. Based on the three-layer model proposed in this paper, distribution of the principal strain rate is carefully analyzed. The streamwise increase of wall friction is suggested to be brought by the increase of velocity gradient in the thin subsonic layer. Increases of the static temperature and the related sound speed are responsible for that. Larger correlated turbulent motions could be introduced by the concave curvature. The probability density histograms of streamwise velocity reveal that the large scale hairpin packets are statistically well organized. The concave curvature is found to have the potential of reinforcing the organization, which explains the increase of turbulent level in the supersonic concave boundary layer.

  14. Micro-displacement sensor with multimode fused coupler and concave mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, S. W.; Yasin, M.; Ahmad, H.

    2011-04-01

    Fiber optic displacement sensor is demonstrated using a multimode fused coupler probe and a concave mirror target. It is observed that a focal length of the concave mirror make a significant influence to the displacement response, which illustrates three linear slopes with the second slope peaks at the position that is in vicinity of two times of the focal length. The highest sensitivity of 0.56 mV/mm is obtained with an infinity focal length and it is decreased as the focal length of the concave mirror decreases. The widest linear range of approximately 3.3 mm is observed in the third slope region with focal length of 6.0 mm. The highest linear range obtained with the use of 50:50 coupler.

  15. Convex and concave successions of power-law decays in small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The small-angle scattering (SAS) structure factor from a new model of a 3D deterministic fractal in which the relative positions and the number of structural units vary with fractal iteration number is calculated. It is shown that, depending on the relative positions of scattering units inside the fractal, we can obtain various types of power-law successions, such as: convex/concave - when the absolute value of the scattering exponent of the first power-law decay is higher/smaller than that of the subsequent power- law decay, or any combination of them (i.e. convex-concave or concave-convex). The obtained results can explain experimental SAS (neutron or X-rays) data which are characterized by a succession of power-law decays of arbitrary length.

  16. Concave Rhombic Dodecahedral Au Nanocatalyst with Multiple High-Index Facets for CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Eun; Yang, Ki Dong; Yoon, Sang Moon; Ahn, Hyo-Yong; Lee, Yoon Young; Chang, Hyejin; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Mi Young; Nam, Ki Tae

    2015-08-25

    A concave rhombic dodecahedron (RD) gold nanoparticle was synthesized by adding 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) during growth from seeds. This shape is enclosed by stabilized facets of various high-indexes, such as (331), (221), and (553). Because it is driven thermodynamically and stabilized by 4-ATP ligands, the concave RD maintains its structure over a few months, even after rigorous electrochemical reactions. We discussed the mechanism of the shape evolution controlled by 4-ATP and found that both the binding energy of Au-S and the aromatic geometry of 4-ATP are major determinants of Au atom deposition during growth. As a possible application, we demonstrated that the concave RD exhibits superior electrocatalytic performance for the selective conversion of CO2 to CO in aqueous solution.

  17. Simulation of sound field in a tissue medium generated by a concave spherically annular transducer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shengyou; Kamakura, Tomoo; Akiyama, Masahiko

    2006-12-22

    The concave spherically annular transducer is regarded as a negative and a positive concave spherical transducer, and the spheroidal beam equation is used to simulate the linear and nonlinear sound field in a tissue medium generated by this transducer. It is found that the acoustic focus of the ring does not coincide with the acoustic focus of its central part. If the width of the ring increases, its acoustic focus will move toward the geometric focus and the amplitudes of nonlinear harmonics will increase obviously. If there are several coaxial rings placed on the concave spherical surface, more than one peak will appear along the axial direction for the fundamental, and high harmonics focus better. The distribution of sound field will change with the number and the excited signals of rings, so it maybe is a potential approach to treat locally big tumors.

  18. Baum's Algorithm Learns Intersections of Halfspaces with Respect to Log-Concave Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klivans, Adam R.; Long, Philip M.; Tang, Alex K.

    In 1990, E. Baum gave an elegant polynomial-time algorithm for learning the intersection of two origin-centered halfspaces with respect to any symmetric distribution (i.e., any {\\cal D} such that {\\cal D}(E) = {\\cal D}(-E)) [3]. Here we prove that his algorithm also succeeds with respect to any mean zero distribution with a log-concave density (a broad class of distributions that need not be symmetric). As far as we are aware, prior to this work, it was not known how to efficiently learn any class of intersections of halfspaces with respect to log-concave distributions.

  19. Nanoscale aluminum concaves for light-trapping in organic thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław; Adam, Jost; Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Fiutowski, Jacek; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    2016-07-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, fabricated from oxalic acid and phosphoric acid, lead to non-periodic nanoscale concave structures in their underlying aluminum layer, which are investigated for their field-enhancement properties by applying a thin-film polymer coating based laser ablation technique. Local ablation spots, corresponding to field enhancement on the ridge edges of the aluminum concave nanostructures, are observed in surface-covering polymer films, and confirmed with FDTD studies. The field enhancement leads to improved light absorption in the applied polymer layers, which may be used as an efficient method for enhancing the power conversion efficiency of organic solar cells.

  20. An acoustical analysis of a room with a concave dome ceiling element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Sentagi S.

    2004-05-01

    Concave surfaces are often considered detrimental in room acoustics, especially because of the impact they have on the distribution of sound energy. This paper explores certain acoustical characteristics and anomalies found in spaces below concave dome ceiling elements. The architectural design of the Darusshollah mosque in East Java, Indonesia is used as a case study with specific spatial and functional concerns. Investigations of the mosque have been conducted through both a 1:12 scale model and a computer model that utilizes ray tracing and image source methods. Analysis techniques are discussed. Results are presented and compared to provide useful insights into the acoustics of such distinctive environments.

  1. Fabrication of concave microlens arrays by local fictive temperature modification of fused silica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanchao; Liao, Wei; Yang, Ke; Liu, Taixiang; Bai, Yang; Zhang, Lijuan; Jiang, Xiaolong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Yilan; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Hai; Yuan, Xiaodong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2017-03-15

    A simple and convenient means of fabricating concave microlens arrays direct on silica glass by using the local fictive temperature modification of fused silica is presented. This method is based on the fact that an increased fictive temperature results in a much higher HF acid etching rate of fused silica. Combining the abrupt local fictive temperature enhancement by the CO2 laser pulse and the subsequent etching by the HF acid solution, concave microlens arrays with high fill factors, excellent smoothness, and optical performance are generated on fused silica.

  2. Indirect methods to measure wetting and contact angles on spherical convex and concave surfaces.

    PubMed

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2012-05-22

    In this work, a method was developed for indirectly estimating contact angles of sessile liquid drops on convex and concave surfaces. Assuming that drops were sufficiently small that no gravitational distortion occurred, equations were derived to compute intrinsic contact angles from the radius of curvature of the solid surface, the volume of the liquid drop, and its contact diameter. These expressions were tested against experimental data for various liquids on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polycarbonate (PC) in the form of flat surfaces, spheres, and concave cavities. Intrinsic contact angles estimated indirectly using dimensions and volumes generally agreed with the values measured directly from flat surfaces using the traditional tangent method.

  3. Static Thrust of an Annular Nozzle with a Concave Central Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, Blake W., Jr.; Mercer, Charles E.

    1960-01-01

    A static test of an annular nozzle with a concave central base, producing a jet in which tangents to the jet streamlines at the exit converged toward a region on the axis of symmetry downstream of the exit, has indicated good thrust performance. A value of nozzle-flow coefficient only slightly less than unity indicates the internal loss to be small. Pressures on the concave central base are relatively large and positive, and a predictable portion of the total thrust of the jet is exerted on the central base.

  4. Cone Quasi-Concave Multi-Objective Programming Theory and Dominance Cone Constructions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    4 Cone Quasi-Concave Multi-Objective Prog ramm in(I Theory and Dominance Cone Constructions by A. Chames Z. M. Huang J. J. Rousseau 0. B. Sun 0. L...Report 606 Cone Quasi-Concave Multi-Objective Programming: Theory and Dominance Cone Constructions by A. Chames Z. M. Huang J. J. Rousseau D. B. Sun...permitted for any purpose of the U.S. Govemement. Tr% C CENTER FOR CYBERNETIC STUDIES cV- A. Chames , Director V 3 D 1 College of Business Administration

  5. Maximum likelihood estimation of the mixture of log-concave densities.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Wu, Yichao; Yao, Weixin

    2016-09-01

    Finite mixture models are useful tools and can be estimated via the EM algorithm. A main drawback is the strong parametric assumption about the component densities. In this paper, a much more flexible mixture model is considered, which assumes each component density to be log-concave. Under fairly general conditions, the log-concave maximum likelihood estimator (LCMLE) exists and is consistent. Numeric examples are also made to demonstrate that the LCMLE improves the clustering results while comparing with the traditional MLE for parametric mixture models.

  6. Negative Goos-Hänchen shift on a concave dielectric interface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L-M; Zou, C-L; Han, Z-F; Guo, G-C; Sun, F-W

    2011-03-01

    We study the Goos-Hänchen shift (GHS) on a curved surface through numerical simulation by the boundary element method. A negative GHS is first discovered on a concave dielectric interface below the critical angle, accompanied by a large positive GHS on the convexity. The simulation shows that the GHS on a planar interface is the composition of the GHS from a concave and the corresponding convex interface. This work will enrich the study of the GHS for different curved surfaces, which will have potential applications in micro-optics and near-field optics.

  7. Influence of patterned concave depth and surface curvature on anodization of titania nanotubes and alumina nanopores.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Lu, Kathy

    2011-10-04

    Vertically aligned TiO(2) nanotube and Al(2)O(3) nanopore arrays have been obtained by pattern guided anodization with uniform concave depths. There are some studies about the effect of surface curvature on the growth of Al(2)O(3) nanopores. However, the surface curvature influence on the development of TiO(2) nanotubes is seldom studied. Moreover, there is no research about the effect of heterogeneous concave depths of the guiding patterns on the anodized TiO(2) nanotube and Al(2)O(3) nanopore characteristics, such as diameter, growth direction, and termination/bifurcation. In this study, focused ion beam lithography is used to create concave patterns with heterogeneous depths on flat surfaces and with uniform depths on curved surfaces. For the former, bending and bifurcation of nanotubes/nanopores are observed after the anodization. For the latter, bifurcation of a large tube into two smaller tubes occurs on concave surfaces, while termination of existing tubes occurs on convex surfaces. The growth direction of all TiO(2) nanotubes is perpendicular to the local surface and thus is different on different facets of the same Ti foil. At the edge of the Ti foil where two facets meet, the nanotube growth direction is bent, resulting in a large stress release that causes the formation of cracks.

  8. Blood vessels are concentrated within the implant surface concavities: a histologic study in rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Perrotti, Vittoria; Artese, Luciano; Degidi, Marco; Degidi, Davide; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in bone formation and maintenance. Bone formation has been reported to initiate in the concavities rather than the convexities in a hydroxyapatite substratum and the implant threads of dental implants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number of the blood vessels inside the concavities and around the convexities of the threads of implants in a rabbit tibia model. A total of 32 thread-shaped implants blasted with apatitic calcium phosphate (TCP/HA blend) (Resorbable Blast Texturing, RBT) (Maestro, BioHorizons(®), Birmingham, AL, USA) were inserted in 8 rabbits. Each rabbit received 4 implants, 2 in the right and 2 in left tibia. Implants were retrieved after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks and treated to obtain thin ground sections. Statistically significant differences were found in the number of vessels that had formed in the concavities rather than the convexities of the implants after 1 (p = 0.000), and 2 weeks (p = 0.000), whilst no significant differences after 4 (p = 0.546) and 8 weeks (p = 0.275) were detected. The present results supported the hypothesis that blood vessel formation was stimulated by the presence of the concavities, which may provide a suitable environment in which mechanical forces, concentrations and gradients of chemotactic molecules and blood clot retention may all drive vascular and bone cell migration.

  9. On some fractional equations with convex-concave and logistic-type nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, Giulia; Mugnai, Dimitri

    2017-02-01

    We consider existence and multiplicity results for a semilinear problem driven by the square root of the negative Laplacian in presence of a nonlinear term which is the difference of two powers. In the case of convex-concave powers, a precise description of the problem at the threshold value of a given parameter is established through variational methods and truncation techniques.

  10. Slow approach to steady motion of a concave body in a free-molecular gas.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Arai, Junichi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2015-07-01

    A body in a free-molecular gas accelerated by a constant external force is considered on the basis of kinetic theory. The body is an infinitely long rectangular hollow column with one face removed, and thus it has a squarish U-shaped cross section. The concave part of the body points toward the direction of motion, and thus the gas molecules may be trapped in the concavity. Gas molecules undergo diffuse reflection on a base part, whereas specular reflection on two lateral parts. It is numerically shown that the velocity of the body approaches a terminal velocity, for which a drag force exerted by the gas counterbalances the external force, in such a way that their difference decreases in proportion to the inverse square of time for a large time. This rate of approach is slower than the known rate proportional to the inverse cube of time in the case of a body without concavity [Aoki et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 016309 (2009)]. Based on the detailed investigation on the velocity distribution function of gas molecules impinging on the body, it is clarified that the concavity prevents some molecules from escaping to infinity. This trapping enhances the effect of recollision between the body and the gas molecules, which is the cause of the inverse power laws, and thus leads to the slower approach.

  11. Exceptional methanol electro-oxidation activity by bimetallic concave and dendritic Pt-Cu nanocrystals catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Xia; Zhou, Hui-Jing; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Chen, Tie-Hong

    2014-01-01

    PtCux (x = 1, 2 and 3) bimetallic nanocrystals with concave surface and dendritic morphology were prepared and used as electrocatalysts in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized via one-pot co-reduction of H2PtCl6 and Cu(acac)2 by oleylamine and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in an autoclave at 180 °C. The concave dendritic bimetallic nanostructure consisted of a core rich in Cu and nanodendrites rich in Pt, which was formed via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pt. It was found that PVP played an important role in initiating, facilitating, and directing the replacement reaction. The electrochemical properties of the PtCux were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The concave dendritic PtCu2/C nanocrystals exhibited exceptionally high activity and strong poisoning resistance in MOR. At 0.75 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE) the mass activity and specific activity of PtCu2/C were 3.3 and 4.1 times higher than those of the commercial Pt/C catalysts, respectively. The enhanced catalytic activity could be attributed to the unique concave dendritic morphology of the bimetallic nanocrystals.

  12. Fabrication and test of a concave oblate ellipsoid with large relative aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke-xin; Yuan, Li-yin; Hao, Pei-ming

    2010-10-01

    Fabrication and test of the concave oblate ellipsoid becomes more difficult as the mirror relative aperture gets larger. The concave oblate ellipsoid discussed in this paper, has a very large relative aperture. Two processing methods are introduced. One is drilling sub-mirror from the mother mirror, the other is processing sub-mirror merely. A novel method to calculate aspheric grinding amount of the latter method is proposed. As the clear aperture and aperture decenter of the concave oblate ellipsoid in this paper are not large, the former processing method is finally adopted. Two online processing testing methods are proposed. One is reflective auto-collimating test; the other is refractive auto-collimating test. As for the former, a negative power lens is applied to compensate the positive spherical aberration of the concave oblate ellipsoid. The compensator has a negative - negative - positive configuration. As for the latter, the back surface of the spherical is designed to be an auxiliary spherical one. Its compensator is negative- positive- positive compensator. Besides, a high-precision plane is used to realize auto-collimating test. And the form test is selected for its online processing testing. By optical design of the compensator and gradual aberration optimization of its alignment, the test accuracy of the oblate ellipsoid shape can be achieved 1/10λ (632.8nm).

  13. The Scallop's Eye--A Concave Mirror in the Context of Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Waltner, Christine; Hopf, Martin; Wiesner, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Teaching physics in the context of medicine or biology is a way to generate students' interest in physics. A more uncommon type of eye, the scallop's eye (an eye with a spherical concave mirror, which is similar to a Newtonian or Schmidt telescope) and the image-forming mechanism in this eye are described. Also, a simple eye model, which can…

  14. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics does not promote remodeling in porcine aortic wall concavity

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Samantha K; Moore, Alison N; Sucosky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of type-I left-right bicuspid aortic valve (LR-BAV) hemodynamic stresses in the remodeling of the thoracic ascending aorta (AA) concavity, in the absence of underlying genetic or structural defects. METHODS: Transient wall shear stress (WSS) profiles in the concavity of tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) and LR-BAV AAs were obtained computationally. Tissue specimens excised from the concavity of normal (non-dilated) porcine AAs were subjected for 48 h to those stress environments using a shear stress bioreactor. Tissue remodeling was characterized in terms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity via immunostaining and gelatin zymography. RESULTS: Immunostaining semi-quantification results indicated no significant difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression between the tissue groups exposed to TAV and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.80 and P = 0.19, respectively). Zymography densitometry revealed no difference in MMP-2 activity (total activity, active form and latent form) between the groups subjected to TAV AA and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.08, P = 0.15 and P = 0.59, respectively). CONCLUSION: The hemodynamic stress environment present in the concavity of type-I LR-BAV AA does not cause any significant change in proteolytic enzyme expression and activity as compared to that present in the TAV AA. PMID:26839660

  15. A method to search for large-scale concavities in asteroid shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devogèle, M.; Rivet, J. P.; Tanga, P.; Bendjoya, Ph.; Surdej, J.; Bartczak, P.; Hanus, J.

    2015-11-01

    Photometric light-curve inversion of minor planets has proven to produce a unique model solution only under the hypothesis that the asteroid is convex. However, it was suggested that the resulting shape model, for the case of non-convex asteroids, is the convex-hull of the true asteroid non-convex shape. While a convex shape is already useful to provide the overall aspect of the target, much information about real shapes is missed, as we know that asteroids are very irregular. It is a commonly accepted evidence that large flat areas sometimes appearing on shapes derived from light curves correspond to concave areas, but this information has not been further explored and exploited so far. We present in this paper a method that allows to predict the presence of concavities from such flat regions. This method analyses the distribution of the local normals to the facets composing shape models to predict the presence of abnormally large flat surfaces. In order to test our approach, we consider here its application to a large family of synthetic asteroid shapes, and to real asteroids with large-scale concavities, whose detailed shape is known by other kinds of observations (radar and spacecraft encounters). The method that we propose has proven to be reliable and capable of providing a qualitative indication of the relevance of concavities on well-constrained asteroid shapes derived from purely photometric data sets.

  16. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  17. Energetic protons from an ultraintense laser interacting with a symmetric parabolic concave target

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Bake, Muhammad; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Wang Hongyu

    2013-03-15

    A scheme of a symmetric parabolic concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser for efficient proton acceleration is proposed and involved problem is studied by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Results indicate that on one hand, the laser field is focused by the front parabolic concave surface of target and, on the other hand, more energetic hot electrons will traverse to the rear surface of target due to concave shape. The space-charge-separation field, induced by those hot electrons escaping form parabolic concave rear surface of target, can accelerate protons to relatively high energy with narrow energy spread. The dependence of the efficiency of proton acceleration on the target parameters is examined, and the optimal target parameters are obtained. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the proton peak energy and energy spread are greatly enhanced when the target parameters are chosen optimal, for example, a proton bunch with the maximum energy {approx}27.5 MeV and energy spread {approx}7% can be generated. Some implications of our results to experiments and comparisons with the other works are also discussed briefly.

  18. A Basic Experimental Study for Imaging by Monopolar Pulse Radiated from Concave Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooyashiki, Atsuko; Yoshida, Yasuo; Inoue, Hiroshi; Murata, Kenji

    2004-05-01

    Monopolar C-mode imaging using a concaved polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) transducer was developed. The basic characteristics of the spreading of the ultrasound field are measured and discussed with respect to the imaging, along with the spatial resolution, and the C-mode image of a printed circuit board (PCB) surface.

  19. A study of the depth and size of concave cube Au nanoparticles as highly sensitive SERS probes.

    PubMed

    Romo-Herrera, J M; González, A L; Guerrini, L; Castiello, F R; Alonso-Nuñez, G; Contreras, O E; Alvarez-Puebla, R A

    2016-04-07

    High and uniform near fields are localized at the eight similar sharp corners of cubic gold nanoparticles. Moreover, by introducing concavity in the particle lateral planes, such field intensities can be further increased and tuned in the near infrared region without altering the overall size of the nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the morphological, crystallographic and plasmonic properties of concave gold nanocubes (GNCs) in the sub-70 nm size range, for their potential application as highly efficient SERS substrates in size-limiting cases. Theoretical calculations indicate that the highest increment of the near-field is located at the eight sharp tips and, interestingly, a medium near-field increment is also activated over the volume next to the concave surface. Remarkably, the plasmonic response of the concave cubic morphology showed great sensitivity to the concavity degree. Experimental SERS analysis nicely matches the outcome of the theoretical model, confirming that medium-sized concave GNCs (35 nm side length) possess the highest SERS activity upon excitation with a 633 nm laser, whereas larger 61 nm side concave GNCs dominate the optical response at 785 nm. Due to their size-intensity trade off, we envision that such small concave gold nanocubes can provide a highly active and efficient SERS platform for size-limiting applications, especially when near infrared excitations are required.

  20. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  1. Elevated Channel Concavities Arising from Sediment-Flux Effects in Natural Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, D. E. J.; Sinclair, H. D.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Cowie, P. A.; Adams, J. M.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Nudurupati, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The concavity of an incising river system - a measure of the rate of change of its bed slope with increasing discharge downstream - is a commonly used metric in fluvial geomorphology. It is commonly used in assessing variation of factors such as uplift, climate, and rock type along a system in a qualitative way, and underpins a number of quantitative analyses in tectonic geomorphology, such as the normalized channel steepness index. However, the factors that fundamentally control channel concavities in rocky streams remain relatively poorly understood, especially in rivers that are undergoing transient response to a perturbation in their boundary conditions.Here we use a combination of field data and numerical modeling to demonstrate that elevated channel concavities are a common and shared response to the propagation of a convex-upward "knickzone" through a bedrock channel long profile. Simulations using the novel modeling framework Landlab exploring thresholded incision and saltation-abrasion theory indicate that the presence of the knickzone can perturb the relative sediment flux in the area immediately downstream of the convexity, allowing enhanced erosion there and systematic elevation of channel concavities in reaches downstream of this point. The reality of this effect is demonstrated using field and remotely sensed data from three sites - the Red River area, Yunnan, China; channels on the Ladakh batholith, Indian Himalaya; and the Fagaras Alps, Romania. All contain broad scale migrating knickzones, but the causes of the disturbances that produced them and scales of the systems differ. Nonetheless, the concavities of all the channels are all elevated in the same way downstream of knickzones, consistent with the modeling output. These results demonstrate the ubiquity of sediment flux effects on erosion rates in many natural channels, and have consequences for the way we read tectonic histories from landscapes.

  2. Rapid prototyping of concave microwells for the formation of 3D multicellular cancer aggregates for drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ting-Yuan; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jing; Sun, Wei; Peng, Weng Kung; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Kamm, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Microwell technology has revolutionized many aspects of in vitro cellular studies from 2-dimensional (2D) traditional cultures to 3-dimensional (3D) in vivo-like functional assays. However, existing lithography-based approaches are often costly and time-consuming. This study presents a rapid, low-cost prototyping method of CO2 laser ablation of a conventional untreated culture dish to create concave microwells used for generating multicellular aggregates, which can be readily available for general laboratories. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polystyrene (PS) microwells were investigated, and each produced distinctive microwell features. Among these three materials, PS cell culture dishes produced the optimal surface smoothness and roundness. A549 lung cancer cells were grown to form cancer aggregates of controllable size from ~40 to ~80 μm in PS microwells. Functional assays of spheroids were performed to study migration on 2D substrates and in 3D hydrogel conditions as a step towards recapitulating the dissemination of cancer cells. Preclinical anti-cancer drug screening was investigated and revealed considerable differences between 2D and 3D conditions, indicating the importance of assay type as well as the utility of the present approach. PMID:23983140

  3. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  4. A study of the depth and size of concave cube Au nanoparticles as highly sensitive SERS probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo-Herrera, J. M.; González, A. L.; Guerrini, L.; Castiello, F. R.; Alonso-Nuñez, G.; Contreras, O. E.; Alvarez-Puebla, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    High and uniform near fields are localized at the eight similar sharp corners of cubic gold nanoparticles. Moreover, by introducing concavity in the particle lateral planes, such field intensities can be further increased and tuned in the near infrared region without altering the overall size of the nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the morphological, crystallographic and plasmonic properties of concave gold nanocubes (GNCs) in the sub-70 nm size range, for their potential application as highly efficient SERS substrates in size-limiting cases. Theoretical calculations indicate that the highest increment of the near-field is located at the eight sharp tips and, interestingly, a medium near-field increment is also activated over the volume next to the concave surface. Remarkably, the plasmonic response of the concave cubic morphology showed great sensitivity to the concavity degree. Experimental SERS analysis nicely matches the outcome of the theoretical model, confirming that medium-sized concave GNCs (35 nm side length) possess the highest SERS activity upon excitation with a 633 nm laser, whereas larger 61 nm side concave GNCs dominate the optical response at 785 nm. Due to their size-intensity trade off, we envision that such small concave gold nanocubes can provide a highly active and efficient SERS platform for size-limiting applications, especially when near infrared excitations are required.High and uniform near fields are localized at the eight similar sharp corners of cubic gold nanoparticles. Moreover, by introducing concavity in the particle lateral planes, such field intensities can be further increased and tuned in the near infrared region without altering the overall size of the nanoparticles. Herein, we perform a thorough investigation of the morphological, crystallographic and plasmonic properties of concave gold nanocubes (GNCs) in the sub-70 nm size range, for their potential application as highly efficient SERS

  5. Reproducible and recyclable SERS substrates: Flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces formed by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Juncao; Shu, Shiwei; Li, Jianfu; Huang, Chao; Li, Yang Yang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Direct synthesis of three-dimensional Ag structures on solid substrates for the purposes of producing reproducible and recyclable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications remains challenging. In this work, flower-like Ag structures with concave surfaces (FACS) were successfully electrodeposited onto ITO glass using the double-potentiostatic method. The FACS, with an enhancement factor of the order of 108, exhibited a SERS signal intensity 3.3 times stronger than that measured from Ag nanostructures without concave surfaces. A cleaning procedure involving lengthy immersion of the sample in ethanol and KNO3 was proposed to recycle the substrate and confirmed by using rhodamine 6G, adenine, and 4-aminothiophenol as target molecules. The findings can help to advance the practical applications of Ag nanostructure-based SERS substrates.

  6. Experimental study of the laminar-turbulent transition of a concave wall in a parallel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bippes, H.

    1978-01-01

    The instability of the laminar boundary layer flow along a concave wall was studied. Observations of these three-dimensional boundary layer phenomena were made using the hydrogen-bubble visualization technique. With the application of stereo-photogrammetric methods in the air-water system it was possible to investigate the flow processes qualitatively and quantitatively. In the case of a concave wall of sufficient curvature, a primary instability occurs first in the form of Goertler vortices with wave lengths depending upon the boundary layer thickness and the wall curvature. At the onset the amplification rate is in agreement with the linear theory. Later, during the non-linear amplification stage, periodic spanwise vorticity concentrations develop in the low velocity region between the longitudinal vortices. Then a meandering motion of the longitudinal vortex streets subsequently ensues, leading to turbulence.

  7. The contact angle for a droplet on homogeneous and spherical concave surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ai-Jun; Lv, Bao-Zhan; Wang, Xiao-Song; Zhou, Long

    2016-03-01

    Wetting of droplets on homogeneous and spherical concave rough surfaces is investigated based on thermodynamics. In this study, neglecting the droplet gravity and the thickness of the precursor film of the liquid-vapor interface, the three-phase system is divided into six parts using Gibbs concept of dividing surface. The system Helmholtz free energy is established based on thermodynamics. Supposing the temperature and chemical potential to be constant, a new generalized Young’s equation of the equilibrium contact angle for a spherical droplet on a spherical concave rough surfaces is obtained including the line tension effects. Under certain conditions, this generalized Young’s equation is the same as the Rusanov’s equation.

  8. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(ii) and NH4+ ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(ii) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets.This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into

  9. An extended magnetostatic Born-Infeld model with a concave lower order term

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Pan, Xing-Bin

    2013-11-15

    This paper concerns an extended Born-Infeld model with a concave lower order term for the magnetostatic case. Three types of boundary value problems are considered: the boundary condition prescribing the tangential component of A, the natural boundary condition, and the boundary condition prescribing the tangential component of curl A. In each case we obtain existence and regularity of solutions for small boundary data.

  10. Development of a Stretchable Concave Imaging Membrane Mirror of Variable Focus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-20

    experimental work for the future. Replacing heavy polished monolithic or segmented mirrors with lightweight holograms of those mirrors must be an attractive... monolithic mirrors. The problem is that the mirrors have to be very accurately supported and to the best of the writers knowledge have only obtained infra...systems, one monolithic and one an array, are described in references (26) and (27). An extremely interesting active concave plasic membrane mirror is that

  11. Precursor salt assisted syntheses of high-index faceted concave hexagon and nanorod-like polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jaya; Ganguly, Mainak; Mondal, Chanchal; Negishi, Yuichi; Pal, Tarasankar

    2015-01-14

    This paper describes an effective method for a precursor salt assisted fabrication and reshaping of two different polyoxometalates [(NH4)2Cu(MoO4)2 (ACM) and Cu3(MoO4)2(OH)2 (CMOH)] into five distinctive shapes through straightforward and indirect routes. Explicit regulation of the structural arrangements of ACM and CMOH has been studied in detail with altered precursor salt concentration employing our laboratory developed modified hydrothermal (MHT) method. Morphologically different ACM 3D architectures are evolved with higher molybdate concentration, whereas 1D growth of CMOH is observed with increased copper concentration. Interesting morphological transformation of the products has been accomplished employing one precursor salt at a time without using any other foreign reagent. It has been proven that large ACMs become labile in the presence of incoming Cu(II) and NH4(+) ions of the precursor salts. A new strategy for the conversion of faceted ACMs (hexagonal plate, circular plate and hollow flower) to exclusive CMOH nanorods through a Cu(II) assisted reaction has been adopted. According to thermodynamic consideration, the synthesis of rare concave nanostructures with high index facet is still challenging due to their higher reactivity. In this study, concave hexagonal ACM with high index facet {hkl} has been successfully prepared for the first time from hexagonal ACM through simple etching with ammonium heptamolybdate (AHM), which is another precursor salt. Hexagonal ACM corrugates to a concave hexagon because of the higher reactivity of the {001} crystal plane than that of the {010} plane. It has been shown that high index facet exposed concave hexagonal ACM serves as a better catalyst for the photodegradation of dye than the other microstructures enclosed by low index facets.

  12. A METHOD OF TREATING UNSTRUCTURED CONCAVE CELLS IN STAGGERED-GRID LAGRANGIAN HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    C. ROUSCULP; D. BURTON

    2000-12-01

    A method is proposed for the treatment of concave cells in staggered-grid Lagrangian hydrodynamics. The method is general enough to be applied to two- and three-dimensional unstructured cells. Instead of defining a cell-point as the geometric average of its nodes (a cell-center), the cell-point is that which equalizes the triangular/tetrahedral area/volume in two/three dimensions. Examples are given.

  13. The implementation of concave micro optical devices using a polymer dispensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Sheng-Yi; Lee, Chih-Chun; Fang, Weileun

    2008-08-01

    This study demonstrates a novel approach to implementing a double-concave (DCV) microlens using a simple polymer dispensing and sucking process. The DCV microlens is implemented at room temperature using a commercially-available pneumatic-controlled polymer dispensing system. The DCV lens profile can be tuned by varying the volume of the dispensed polymer. It is also easy to integrate the present polymer DCV microlens with other suspended micromachined devices such as silicon nitride film and silicon-on-glass (SOG) micromachined structures. This study further employs the process for DCV to implement a concave mirror. The measurement results show a typical DCV lens (made of NOA63 polymer) with negative focal lengths of -1.42 mm (red laser) and -1.17 mm (blue laser), and a concave mirror with a focal length of 3.28 mm. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the integration of a DCV microlens with other optical components, such as plano-convex and double-convex lenses.

  14. Technology for fabricating micro-lens arrays utilizing lithographically replicated concave resist patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Noa; Sasaki, Ryunosuke; Horiuchi, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Lithography has been generally used for printing two-dimensional patterns on flat wafers. Recently, however, it is also applied to a three-dimensional patterning for fabricating various MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) components. The purpose of this research is to develop a new method for fabricating micro-lens arrays. At first, resist (Tokyo Ohka Kogyo, PMER LA-900PM) mold patterns with densely arrayed square or hexagonal concaves were replicated by intentionally shifting the focal position of projection exposure. The size of resist-mold was 2 mm square, and the initial thickness of the resist was 10 μm. Next, the wafer with the concave resist patterns was cut into small chips, and each wafer chip was fixed at the bottom of a paper cup using an adhesive tape. Then the epoxy resin (Nissin resin, Crystal resin Neo) was poured on the concave resist-mold patterns, and the resin was coagulated. Afterward, the hardened resin was grooved along the wafer chip using a cutter knife, and the wafer chip with the resist-mold patterns was forcibly removed using a pair of tweezers. Finally, both sides of the resin block were polished, and the thickness was reduced. Although the transparency and roughness of the resin block surfaces should be improved, epoxy micro-lens arrays were certainly fabricated. The mean values of curvature radius and lens height were 28.3μm and 4.9 μm, respectively.

  15. LES of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a concave surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arolla, Sunil; Durbin, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We revisit the problem of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a concave surface. Unlike previous investigations, we simulate the combined effects of curvature-induced pressure gradients as well as streamline curvature on the turbulence. Our focus is on investigating the response of the turbulent boundary layer to the sudden onset of curvature and the destabilizing influence of concave surface in the presence of pressure gradients. This is of interest for evaluating the turbulence closure models. Numerical simulations have been performed using the large eddy simulation framework in OpenFOAM. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is used to account for the sub-grid scale stresses. A variant of the recycling and rescaling method is used to generate the inflow turbulence. At the beginning of the curve, the momentum thickness Reynolds number is 1300 and the ratio of boundary layer thickness to the radius of curvature is δ0 / R = 0 . 055 . The radial profiles of the mean velocity and turbulence statistics at different locations along the concave surface are presented. In addition, the secondary flow structures observed are reported.

  16. Physical and numerical aspects of the high-speed unsteady flow around concave axisymmetric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaras, Argyris; Drikakis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    The axisymmetric concave body is a typical configuration about which shock/shock interactions appear. Various shapes of axisymmetric concave bodies are used in a variety of applications in aeronautics, for example, axisymmetric jet inlets with conical centerbody, ballistic missiles drag reduction by spike, plasma or hot gas injection, parachutes for pilot-ejection capsules. However, it is well known that two distinct modes of instability appear around a concave body in the high-speed flow regime for a certain range of geometric parameters. These instabilities can cause undesirable effects such as severe vibration of the structure, heating and pressure loads. According to the experimental evidence, the unsteady flow is characterised by periodic radial inflation and collapse of the conical separation bubble formed around the forebody (pulsation). Various explanations have been given for the driving mechanism of the instabilities. In the present, merging of the leading explanations is done, and basic rules for the passive suppression of the instabilities are applied, in order to enforce their proposed driving. In addition, the effect of the flow initialisation method on the flow structure predicted by numerical simulations is examined. For certain configurations, bifurcation of the time-dependent flow has been found. This behaviour is explained with recourse to the phenomenon of hysteresis, which is an inherent feature of the examined flows.

  17. High-Speed Unsteady Flows around Concave Axisymmetric Bodies: Flow Instabilities and their Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaras, A.; Drikakis, D.

    2009-01-01

    The axisymmetric concave body, i.e. a body in which the normals to its surface intersect, is a typical configuration about which shock/shock interactions appear. Various shapes of axisymmetric concave bodies are used in a variety of applications in aeronautics. For exampe: axisymmetric jet inlets with conical centerbody, ballistic missiles drag reduction by spike, plasma or hot gas injection, parachutes for pilot-ejection capsules. However, it is well known that two distinct modes of instability appear around a concave body in the high-speed flow regime, for a certain range of geometric parameters. These instabilities can cause undesirable effects such as severe vibration of the structure, heating and pressure loads. According to the experimental evidence, the unsteady flow is characterized by periodic radial inflation and collapse of the conical separation bubble formed around the forebody (pulsation). Various explanations have been given for the driving mechanism of the instabilities. They are based on interpretation of experimental results or on numerical simulation of the related flows. A merging of the leading explanations is done, and basic rules for the passive suppression of the instabilities are applied, in order to enforce the proposed driving mechanism of the instabilities. Most of the analysis is based on numerical simulations.

  18. Fabrication of a roller type PDMS stamp using SU-8 concave molds and its application for roll contact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongho; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-03-01

    Continuous fabrication of micropatterns at low-cost is attracting attention in various applications within industrial fields. To meet such demands, we have demonstrated a roll contact printing technique, using roller type polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Roller type PDMS stamps for roll contact printing were fabricated using a custom-made metal support and SU-8 microstructures fabricated on concave substrates as a mold. The molding/casting method which we developed here provided faster and easier fabrication than conventional methods for roller type stamps. Next, roll contact printing was performed using fabricated roller type PDMS stamps with roll-to-flat and roll-to-roll stages. Patterns with minimum widths of 3 μm and 2.1 μm were continuously fabricated for each stage, respectively. In addition, the relationship between applied pressures and dimensional changes of roll contact printed patterns was investigated. Finally, we confirmed that roll contact printing and the new fabrication method for roller stamps presented in this study demonstrated the feasibility for industrial applications.

  19. Three-dimensional metal-organic framework derived porous CoP3 concave polyhedrons as superior bifunctional electrocatalysts for the evolution of hydrogen and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianli; Pi, Mingyu; Wang, Xiaodeng; Zhang, Dingke; Chen, Shijian

    2017-01-18

    Developing low-cost and highly-efficient non-precious metal bifunctional electrocatalysts towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is an attractively alternative strategy to solve the environmental pollution problems and energy demands. In this study, metal-organic framework (MOF) derived porous cobalt poly-phosphide (CoP3) concave polyhedrons are prepared and explored as superior bifunctional electrocatalysts for the HER and OER. The prepared MOF derived CoP3 concave polyhedrons show excellent electrocatalytic activity and stability towards the HER and OER in both acidic and alkaline media, with the Tafel slopes of 53 mV dec(-1) and 76 mV dec(-1) and a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at the overpotentials of -78 and 343 mV for the HER and OER, respectively, which are remarkably superior to those of the transition metal phosphides (TMPs) and comparable to those of the commercial precious metal catalysts. In addition, they also offer efficient catalytic activities and durabilities under neutral and basic conditions for the HER. The results of our study may shed light on the direction towards highly efficient bifunctional TMP electrocatalysts with high phosphorous component.

  20. Semiconductor light-emitting devices having concave microstructures providing improved light extraction efficiency and method for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Gilchrist, James F; Ee, Yik-Khoon; Kumnorkaew, Pisist

    2013-11-19

    A conventional semiconductor LED is modified to include a microlens layer over its light-emitting surface. The LED may have an active layer including at least one quantum well layer of InGaN and GaN. The microlens layer includes a plurality of concave microstructures that cause light rays emanating from the LED to diffuse outwardly, leading to an increase in the light extraction efficiency of the LED. The concave microstructures may be arranged in a substantially uniform array, such as a close-packed hexagonal array. The microlens layer is preferably constructed of curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and is formed by soft-lithography imprinting by contacting fluid material of the microlens layer with a template bearing a monolayer of homogeneous microsphere crystals, to cause concave impressions, and then curing the material to fix the concave microstructures in the microlens layer and provide relatively uniform surface roughness.

  1. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  2. Alternative hypotheses to explain why biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships are concave-up in some natural ecosystems but concave-down in manipulative experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Camilo; Danovaro, Roberto; Loreau, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of the relationship between biodiversity and functioning in marine ecosystems have yielded non-saturating patterns that contrast sharply with the results of experimental studies, where ecosystem functioning rapidly saturates with increases in biodiversity. Here we provide a simple theoretical framework of three alternative hypotheses that, individually or combined, are likely to explain this contrast: i) the use of functional richness instead of species richness, ii) an increased production efficiency of species in producing biomass when more ecological interactions are present, and iii) the fact that communities are likely assembled in an ordered succession of species from low to high ecological efficiency. Our results provide theoretical support for concave-up biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in natural ecosystems and confirm that the loss of species can have substantially larger effects on the functioning of natural ecosystems than anticipated from controlled manipulative experiments. PMID:24962477

  3. Alternative hypotheses to explain why biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships are concave-up in some natural ecosystems but concave-down in manipulative experiments.

    PubMed

    Mora, Camilo; Danovaro, Roberto; Loreau, Michel

    2014-06-25

    Recent studies of the relationship between biodiversity and functioning in marine ecosystems have yielded non-saturating patterns that contrast sharply with the results of experimental studies, where ecosystem functioning rapidly saturates with increases in biodiversity. Here we provide a simple theoretical framework of three alternative hypotheses that, individually or combined, are likely to explain this contrast: i) the use of functional richness instead of species richness, ii) an increased production efficiency of species in producing biomass when more ecological interactions are present, and iii) the fact that communities are likely assembled in an ordered succession of species from low to high ecological efficiency. Our results provide theoretical support for concave-up biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in natural ecosystems and confirm that the loss of species can have substantially larger effects on the functioning of natural ecosystems than anticipated from controlled manipulative experiments.

  4. Seamless lamination of a concave-convex architecture with single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Taekyung; Baik, Jaeyoon; Seo, Keumyoung; Moon, Youngkwon; Park, Noejung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Kyu Kwak, Sang; Ju, Sanghyun; Real Ahn, Joung

    2015-10-01

    Graphene has been used as an electrode and channel material in electronic devices because of its superior physical properties. Recently, electronic devices have changed from a planar to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) geometry to overcome the limitations of planar devices. The evolution of electronic devices requires that graphene be adaptable to a 3D substrate. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposited single-layer graphene can be transferred onto a silicon dioxide substrate with a 3D geometry, such as a concave-convex architecture. A variety of silicon dioxide concave-convex architectures were uniformly and seamlessly laminated with graphene using a thermal treatment. The planar graphene was stretched to cover the concave-convex architecture, and the resulting strain on the curved graphene was spatially resolved by confocal Raman spectroscopy; molecular dynamic simulations were also conducted and supported the observations. Changes in electrical resistivity caused by the spatially varying strain induced as the graphene-silicon dioxide laminate varies dimensionally from 2D to 3D were measured by using a four-point probe. The resistivity measurements suggest that the electrical resistivity can be systematically controlled by the 3D geometry of the graphene-silicon dioxide laminate. This 3D graphene-insulator laminate will broaden the range of graphene applications beyond planar structures to 3D materials.Graphene has been used as an electrode and channel material in electronic devices because of its superior physical properties. Recently, electronic devices have changed from a planar to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) geometry to overcome the limitations of planar devices. The evolution of electronic devices requires that graphene be adaptable to a 3D substrate. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposited single-layer graphene can be transferred onto a silicon dioxide substrate with a 3D geometry, such as a concave-convex architecture. A

  5. Effect of a concave grid mesh in a carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Successful design using a concave grid mesh for the focusing electron. • Much better X-ray image due to the concave grid mesh. • Higher anode current efficiency using the concave grid mesh versus a flat grid mesh. - Abstract: This study introduces a simple approach to improve the X-ray image quality produced by the carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter X-ray source by altering the geometrical shape of the grid mesh from the conventional flat shape to a concave one in a typical triode structure. The concave shape of the grid electrode increases the effective number of the grid cells in the mesh, which exerted an electric field in the direction of the emitted electrons, thereby increasing the emission current reaching the anode. Furthermore, the curved mesh (concave grid mesh), which was responsible for the extraction of electrons from the field emitter, exhibited a focusing effect on the electron beam trajectory thereby, reducing the focal spot size impinging on the anode and resulted in a better spatial resolution of the X-ray images produced.

  6. Triangle and concave pentagon electrodes for an improved broadband frequency response of stripline beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro; Chin, Yong Ho; Takata, Koji; Toyama, Takeshi; Nakamura, Keigo

    2016-02-01

    The frequency domain performance of a stripline beam position monitor depends largely on the longitudinal shape of its electrode. Some shapes other than a conventional rectangle have been proposed and tested. To attain a good impedance matching along the electrode, they need to be precisely bent down toward their downstream in proportion to their width. This is a considerable task, and a failure to comply with it will result in a large distortion of the frequency-domain transfer function from the ideal one due to unwanted signal reflections. In this report, we first propose a triangle electrode for easy fabrication and setup: it only requires that a triangularly cut flat electrode will be placed in a chamber while being obliquely inclined toward the downstream port. Theoretical and simulation results show that the simple triangle electrode has a remarkably flatter frequency response than the rectangle one. The frequency response, in particular at high frequencies, can be further improved by attaching an "apron" plate, perpendicular to the upstream edge of the electrode. The overshooting of the frequency response at low frequency can be eliminated by replacing the straight sidelines of the triangle by three-point polylines (with a result that the triangle is transformed to a concave pentagon). The concave pentagon electrode needs to be bent only once at the middle point of the polylines for a good impedance matching and thus its fabrication and setup remain to be easy. Rf measurements for the various electrode shapes have been carried out. We found that the concave pentagon electrode achieves a wide and flat frequency response up to about 4 GHz for the J-PARC Main Ring (MR).

  7. Limit Distribution Theory for Maximum Likelihood Estimation of a Log-Concave Density.

    PubMed

    Balabdaoui, Fadoua; Rufibach, Kaspar; Wellner, Jon A

    2009-06-01

    We find limiting distributions of the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a log-concave density, i.e. a density of the form f(0) = exp varphi(0) where varphi(0) is a concave function on R. Existence, form, characterizations and uniform rates of convergence of the MLE are given by Rufibach (2006) and Dümbgen and Rufibach (2007). The characterization of the log-concave MLE in terms of distribution functions is the same (up to sign) as the characterization of the least squares estimator of a convex density on [0, infinity) as studied by Groeneboom, Jongbloed and Wellner (2001b). We use this connection to show that the limiting distributions of the MLE and its derivative are, under comparable smoothness assumptions, the same (up to sign) as in the convex density estimation problem. In particular, changing the smoothness assumptions of Groeneboom, Jongbloed and Wellner (2001b) slightly by allowing some higher derivatives to vanish at the point of interest, we find that the pointwise limiting distributions depend on the second and third derivatives at 0 of H(k), the "lower invelope" of an integrated Brownian motion process minus a drift term depending on the number of vanishing derivatives of varphi(0) = log f(0) at the point of interest. We also establish the limiting distribution of the resulting estimator of the mode M(f(0)) and establish a new local asymptotic minimax lower bound which shows the optimality of our mode estimator in terms of both rate of convergence and dependence of constants on population values.

  8. A Study of Laminar Separation Bubble in the Concave Region of an Airfoil Using Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalam, Sivaramakrishnan; Meyers, James F.; Dagenhart, John R.; Harvey, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) was used to study the nature of laminar separation bubbles in the concave region of a 1.83-meter airfoil model which was tested in the NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Three component, coincident data from LV measurements including histograms of particle velocity, mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stresses within the shear layer were used to determine the locations of laminar separation, transition, and turbulent reattachment. Boundary-layer parameters determined from velocity profiles were used to compare the results with existing empirical relations for describing the laminar separation bubble.

  9. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-streem turbulence levels was performed. Where possible, sampling according to the intermittency function was made. Such sampling allowed segregation of the signal into two types of behavior: laminar-like and turbulent-like. The results from the investigation are discussed. Documentation is presented in two volumes. Volume one contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume two contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data.

  10. Change of blaze wavelength as a function of position on the surface of a concave grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Conventional ruling of a concave diffraction grating with blaze angle constant relative to the optical axis produces a grating whose blaze wavelength changes continuously with displacement across the face of the ruled area. A simple explanation of the effect is given in terms of geometrical optics, and quantitative expressions are developed that relate the expected blaze-wavelength shift to the grating constant and aperture ratio. Results are compared with experimental efficiency measurements, and the magnitude of the effect in a typical grating is discussed.

  11. Hollow and Concave Nanoparticles via Preferential Oxidation of the Core in Colloidal Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hollow and concave nanocrystals find applications in many fields, and their fabrication can follow different possible mechanisms. We report a new route to these nanostructures that exploits the oxidation of Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS core/shell nanocrystals with various etchants. Even though the Cu2–xSe core is encased in a thick Cu2–xS shell, the initial effect of oxidation is the creation of a void in the core. This is rationalized in terms of diffusion of Cu+ ions and electrons from the core to the shell (and from there to the solution). Differently from the classical Kirkendall effect, which entails an imbalance between in-diffusion and out-diffusion of two different species across an interface, the present mechanism can be considered as a limiting case of such effect and is triggered by the stronger tendency of Cu2–xSe over Cu2–xS toward oxidation and by fast Cu+ diffusion in copper chalcogenides. As the oxidation progresses, expansion of the inner void erodes the entire Cu2–xSe core, accompanied by etching and partial collapse of the shell, yielding Cu2–xSySe1–y concave particles. PMID:24866716

  12. AUTOMATED CELL COUNTING AND CLUSTER SEGMENTATION USING CONCAVITY DETECTION AND ELLIPSE FITTING TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Sonal; Chaudry, Qaiser; Wang, May D

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, fast and semi-automatic method for accurate cell cluster segmentation and cell counting of digital tissue image samples. In pathological conditions, complex cell clusters are a prominent feature in tissue samples. Segmentation of these clusters is a major challenge for development of an accurate cell counting methodology. We address the issue of cluster segmentation by following a three step process. The first step involves pre-processing required to obtain the appropriate nuclei cluster boundary image from the RGB tissue samples. The second step involves concavity detection at the edge of a cluster to find the points of overlap between two nuclei. The third step involves segmentation at these concavities by using an ellipse-fitting technique. Once the clusters are segmented, individual nuclei are counted to give the cell count. The method was tested on four different types of cancerous tissue samples and shows promising results with a low percentage error, high true positive rate and low false discovery rate.

  13. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Surface Micromachined Adjustable Micro-Concave Mirror for Bio-Detection Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan; Chen, Wei-Lun; Jywe, Wen-Yuh

    2009-08-01

    We present a bio-detection system integrated with an adjustable micro-concave mirror. The bio-detection system consists of an adjustable micro-concave mirror, micro flow cytometer chip and optical detection module. The adjustable micro-concave mirror can be fabricated with ease using commercially available MEMS foundry services (such as multiuser MEMS processes, MUMPs) and its curvature can be controlled utilizing thermal or electrical effects. Experimental results show that focal lengths of the micro-concave mirror ranging from 313.5 to 2275.0 μm are achieved. The adjustable micro-concave mirror can be used to increase the efficiency of optical detection and provide a high signal-to-noise ratio. The developed micro-concave mirror is integrated with a micro flow cytometer for cell counting applications. Successful counting of fluorescent-labeled beads is demonstrated using the developed method.

  14. 3D Quantification of Low-Coordinate Surface Atom Density: Bridging Catalytic Activity to Concave Facets of Nanocatalysts in Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Ke, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Gui-Rong; Cheng, Zhiying; Xu, Bo-Qing

    2016-12-01

    A protocol to quantify the distribution of surface atoms of concave nanocatalysts according to their coordination number is proposed. The 3D surface of an Au@Pd concave nanocube is reconstructed and segmented. The crystallographic coordinates and low-coordinate surface atom densities of the concave facets are determined. The result shows that 32% of the surface atoms are low-coordinated, which may contribute to the high activity.

  15. A design method based on photonic crystal theory for Bragg concave diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bingzheng; Zhu, Jingping; Mao, Yuzheng; Li, Bao; Zhang, Yunyao; Hou, Xun

    2017-02-01

    A design method based on one-dimensional photonic crystal theory (1-D PC theory) is presented to design Bragg concave diffraction grating (Bragg-CDG) for the demultiplexer. With this design method, the reflection condition calculated by the 1-D PC theory can be matched perfectly with the diffraction condition. As a result, the shift of central wavelength of diffraction spectra can be improved, while keeping high diffraction efficiency. Performances of Bragg-CDG for TE and TM-mode are investigated, and the simulation results are consistent with the 1-D PC theory. This design method is expected to be applied to improve the accuracy and efficiency of Bragg-CDG after further research.

  16. One algorithm for branch and bound method for solving concave optimization problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, A. A.; Korepanova, A. A.; Halilova, I. F.

    2016-11-01

    The article describes the algorithm for branch and bound method for solving the concave programming problem, which is based on the idea of similarity the necessary and sufficient conditions of optimum for the original problem and for a convex programming problem with another feasible set and reverse the sign of the objective function. To find the feasible set of the equivalent convex programming problem we construct an algorithm using the idea of the branch and bound method. We formulate various branching techniques and discusses the construction of the lower objective function evaluations for the node of the decision tree. The article discusses the results of experiments of this algorithm for some famous test problems of a particular form.

  17. Calculation of Isodose Curves for Cca and Ccb Concave Eye Applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Yazdani, Majed

    BEBIG Ruthenium-106 ophthalmic plaques have been used for treatment of uveal melanoma, retinoblastoma, melanoma of the iris and other special applications for more than 30 years. The plaques consist of a thin film of Ru-106, a beta emitter encapsulated in pure silver. Simulations of small concave applicators CCA and CCB, manufactured by Bebig, were performed using Monte Carlo MCNP4C code which allows for description of the applicator (geometry and materials) in detail. Electrons are emitted from the 106Ru nuclei isotropically with initial energy randomly sampled from the corresponding Fermi spectra and with initial positions uniformly distributed on the radioactive layer. In this work, relative doses were calculated in soft tissue phantom near the active layer. Isodose curves for CCA and CCB eye applicators were determined. Our calculated data agrees well with the measured phantom data reported in literature.

  18. [Automatic segmentation of clustered breast cancer cells based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching].

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhen; Pu, Lixin; Dong, Fangjie

    2013-08-01

    As a common malignant tumor, breast cancer has seriously affected women's physical and psychological health even threatened their lives. Breast cancer has even begun to show a gradual trend of high incidence in some places in the world. As a kind of common pathological assist diagnosis technique, immunohistochemical technique plays an important role in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Usually, Pathologists isolate positive cells from the stained specimen which were processed by immunohistochemical technique and calculate the ratio of positive cells which is a core indicator of breast cancer in diagnosis. In this paper, we present a new algorithm which was based on modified watershed algorithm and concavity points searching to identify the positive cells and segment the clustered cells automatically, and then realize automatic counting. By comparison of the results of our experiments with those of other methods, our method can exactly segment the clustered cells without losing any geometrical cell features and give the exact number of separating cells.

  19. Stability and control of compressible flows over a surface with concave-conves curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    The active control of spatially unstable disturbances in a laminar, two-dimensional, compressible boundary layer over a curved surface is numerically simulated. The control is effected by localized time-periodic surface heating. We consider two similar surfaces of different heights with concave-convex curvature. In one, the height is sufficiently large so that the favorable pressure gradient is sufficient to stabilize a particular disturbance. In the other case the pressure gradient induced by the curvature is destabilizing. It is shown that by using active control that the disturbance can be stabilized. The results demonstrate that the curvature induced mean pressure gradient significantly enhances the receptivity of the flow localized time-periodic surface heating and that this is a potentially viable mechanism in air.

  20. Chemocavity: specific concavity in protein reserved for the binding of biologically functional small molecules.

    PubMed

    Soga, Shinji; Shirai, Hiroki; Kobori, Masato; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2008-08-01

    The idea that there should be a specific site on a protein for a particular functional small molecule is widespread. It is, however, usually not so easy to understand what characteristics of the site determine the binding ability of the functional small molecule. We have focused on the concurrence rate of the 20 standard amino acids at such binding sites. In order to correlate the concurrence rate and the specific binding site, we have analyzed high-quality X-ray structures of complexes between proteins and small molecules. A novel index characterizing the binding site based on the concurrency rate has been introduced. Using this index we have identified that there is a specific concavity designated as a chemocavity where a specific group of small molecules, i.e., canonical molecular group, is highly inclined to be bound. This study has demonstrated that a chemocavity is reserved for a specific canonical molecular group, and the prevalent idea has been confirmed.

  1. Detection and separation of overlapping cells based on contour concavity for Leishmania images.

    PubMed

    Neves, João C; Castro, Helena; Tomás, Ana; Coimbra, Miguel; Proença, Hugo

    2014-06-01

    Life scientists often must count cells in microscopy images, which is a tedious and time-consuming task. Automatic approaches present a solution to this problem. Several procedures have been devised for this task, but the majority suffer from performance degradation in the case of cell overlap. In this article, we propose a method to determine the positions of macrophages and parasites in fluorescence images of Leishmania-infected macrophages. The proposed strategy is primarily based on blob detection, clustering, and separation using concave regions of the cells' contours. In comparison with the approaches of Nogueira (Master's thesis, Department of University of Porto Computer Science, 2011) and Leal et al. (Proceedings of the 9th international conference on Image Analysis and Recognition, Vol. II, ICIAR'12. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag; 2012. pp. 432-439), which also addressed this type of image, we conclude that the proposed methodology achieves better performance in the automatic annotation of Leishmania infections.

  2. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-stream turbulence levels was performed. Results show that for transition of a flat-plate, the two forms of boundary layer behavior, identified as laminar-like and turbulent-like, cannot be thought of as separate Blasius and fully-turbulent profiles, respectively. Thus, simple transition models in which the desired quantity is assumed to be an average, weighted on intermittency, of the theoretical laminar and fully turbulent values is not expected to be successful. Deviation of the flow identified as laminar-like from theoretical laminar behavior is shown to be due to recovery after the passage of a turbulent spot, while deviation of the flow identified as turbulent-like from the full-turbulent values is thought to be due to incomplete establishment of the fully-turbulent power spectral distribution. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for the transitional flow, computed from measured shear stress, turbulent heat flux and mean velocity and temperature profiles, were less than unity. For the curved-wall case with low free-stream turbulence intensity, the existence of Gortler vortices on the concave wall within both laminar and turbulent flows was established using liquid crystal visualization and spanwise velocity and temperature traverses. Transition was found to occur via a vortex breakdown mode. The vortex wavelength was quite irregular in both the laminar and turbulent flows, but the vortices were stable in time and space. The upwash was found to be more unstable, with higher levels of u' and u'v', and lower skin friction coefficients and shape factors. Turbulent Prandtl numbers, measured using a triple-wire probe, were found to be near unity for all post-transitional profiles, indicating no gross violation of Reynolds analogy. No evidence of streamwise vortices was seen in the high turbulence intensity case.

  3. Average heat-transfer characteristics of a row of circular air jets impinging on a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingood, J. N. B.; Gauntner, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the average heat-transfer characteristics of air jets impinging on the concave side of a right-circular semicylinder is reported. Results from existing correlating are compared with each other and with experimental heat-transfer data for a row of circular jets. Two correlations available in the literature are recommended for use in designing cooled turbine vanes and blades.

  4. Use of concave mirrors and a single camera to acquire full surface information of randomly oriented apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using machine vision to fully inspect fruit for contamination requires imaging as much of the surface of each fruit as is possible. For apples, the concave nature of the stem and calyx regions present a particular problem. These regions are more likely to harbor contamination and full visualization ...

  5. Uniform Magnetic Field Between Face-to-Face HTS Bulk Magnets Combining Concave and Convex Magnetic Field Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yaginuma, S.; Ogawa, J.; Fukui, S.; Sato, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Nakamura, T.

    The authors have been attempting to obtain the uniform magnetic field distribution in the space between the face-to-face HTS bulk magnets. The magnetic poles containing the HTS bulk magnets are usually characterized as non-uniform magnetic field distribution. Since the distributions show the conical or convex shapes, it is difficult to obtain the uniform magnetic field spaces even when the magnetic poles would be placed face-to-face. The authors have modified the shape of the distribution of one-side magnetic pole by attaching an iron plate on the surface, and formed the concave magnetic field distribution on the pole surface. The steep concave or convex distributions at each pole surface change to be flat with increasing distance from the pole surface. After the experimental result recording the best uniformity of 358 ppm by combining the concave and convex field distributions face-to-face, we attempted to simulate the feasible performance in this configuration. In the numerical simulation, the concave field distribution modified by attaching an imaginary spiral coil on the pole surface was coupled with the original convex field. We succeeded in obtaining the best uniformity of 30 ppm at 1.1 T in 4 x 4 mm2x-y plane at 7 mm distant from the pole surface in the gap of 30 mm. This result suggests that the concave and convex magnetic field distributions compensate the field uniformity with each other with keeping the magnetic field strength in the gap, and also suggests the novel compact NMR/MRI devices in the future.

  6. Universal tectonic dichotomy of small celestial bodies expressed in their common convexo-concave shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The wave planetology [1, 2, 3 & others] declares in its first theorem that all celestial bodies are dichotomous. This is a result of a warping action of the fundamental wave (wave 1 long 2πR where R is a body radius) that appears in any body due to its movement in non-round (elliptical, parabolic) keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations. Having a standing character and four crossing directions in rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these waves inevitably press in one hemisphere and bulge out the opposite one tending to impose on a body convexo-concave shape. This shape is leveled out in larger bodies due to enhanced gravity but is clearly observed in smaller ones with diminished gravity. Still, in the larger bodies as, for an example, in Earth the tectonic dichotomy is expressed as an opposition of the subsided western Pacific hemisphere and the uplifted eastern continental hemisphere. At Mars even sharper dichotomy is in the north-south direction. Small bodies (normally less than 400-500 km across) notwithstanding their type (asteroids, comets, satellites), size and composition (stones, metals, ices) are flattened and bended by the fundamental wave. That is why all asteroids in the main asteroid belt have an oblong shape what was established rather long ago but never was properly explained. Now a number of small satellites is observed by Cassini spacecraft in the saturnian system that makes together with jovian and martian small satellites a representative group for comparisons. In the figures below are shown asteroids, satellites and a comet arranged in a row of increasing sizes. They all are flattened except the largest in the row Enceladus (505 km) and bended tending to acquire a convexo-concave shape. Asteroids: Itokawa (0.5 km long), Eros (33 km, PIA03111). Satellites: Calypso (22 km, PIA07633), Atlas (32 km, PIA08233), Prometheus (102 km, PIA08192), Hyperion (350 km, PIA06645), Enceladus (505 km, PIA08258, comet-like behaviour). Comet

  7. Dense nuclei segmentation based on graph cut and convexity-concavity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, J

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid advancement of 3D confocal imaging technology, more and more 3D cellular images will be available. However, robust and automatic extraction of nuclei shape may be hindered by a highly cluttered environment, as for example, in fly eye tissues. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient nuclei segmentation algorithm based on the combination of graph cut and convex shape assumption. The main characteristic of the algorithm is that it segments nuclei foreground using a graph-cut algorithm with our proposed new initialization method and splits overlapping or touching cell nuclei by simple convexity and concavity analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can segment complicated nuclei clumps effectively in our fluorescent fruit fly eye images. Evaluation on a public hand-labelled 2D benchmark demonstrates substantial quantitative improvement over other methods. For example, the proposed method achieves a 3.2 Hausdorff distance decrease and a 1.8 decrease in the merged nuclei error per slice.

  8. Micro-concave waveguide antenna for high photon extraction from nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamond

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Kewes, Günter; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Roberts, Ann; Benson, Oliver; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy colour center (NV− center) in nanodiamond is an excellent single photon source due to its stable photon generation in ambient conditions, optically addressable nuclear spin state, high quantum yield and its availability in nanometer sized crystals. In order to make practical devices using nanodiamond, highly efficient and directional emission of single photons in well-defined modes, either collimated into free space or waveguides are essential. This is a Herculean task as the photoluminescence of the NV centers is associated with two orthogonal dipoles arranged in a plane perpendicular to the NV defect symmetry axis. Here, we report on a micro-concave waveguide antenna design, which can effectively direct single photons from any emitter into either free space or into waveguides in a narrow cone angle with more than 80% collection efficiency irrespective of the dipole orientation. The device also enhances the spontaneous emission rate which further increases the number of photons available for collection. The waveguide antenna has potential applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation, spectroscopy and metrology. PMID:26169682

  9. Reliable single chip genotyping with semi-parametric log-concave mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Ralph C A; Meulman, Jacqueline J; Eilers, Paul H C

    2012-01-01

    The common approach to SNP genotyping is to use (model-based) clustering per individual SNP, on a set of arrays. Genotyping all SNPs on a single array is much more attractive, in terms of flexibility, stability and applicability, when developing new chips. A new semi-parametric method, named SCALA, is proposed. It is based on a mixture model using semi-parametric log-concave densities. Instead of using the raw data, the mixture is fitted on a two-dimensional histogram, thereby making computation time almost independent of the number of SNPs. Furthermore, the algorithm is effective in low-MAF situations.Comparisons between SCALA and CRLMM on HapMap genotypes show very reliable calling of single arrays. Some heterozygous genotypes from HapMap are called homozygous by SCALA and to lesser extent by CRLMM too. Furthermore, HapMap's NoCalls (NN) could be genotyped by SCALA, mostly with high probability. The software is available as R scripts from the website www.math.leidenuniv.nl/~rrippe.

  10. Frequency-independent approach to calculate physical optics radiations with the quadratic concave phase variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu Mao; Teng, Si Jia

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop the numerical steepest descent path (NSDP) method to calculate the physical optics (PO) radiations with the quadratic concave phase variations. With the surface integral equation method, the physical optics (PO) scattered fields are formulated and further reduced to the surface integrals. The high frequency physical critical points contributions, including the stationary phase points, the boundary resonance points and the vertex points are comprehensively studied via the proposed NSDP method. The key contributions of this work are twofold. One is that together with the PO integrals taking the quadratic parabolic and hyperbolic phase terms, this work makes the NSDP theory be complete for treating the PO integrals with quadratic phase variations. Another is that, in order to illustrate the transition effect of the high frequency physical critical points, in this work, we consider and further extend the NSDP method to calculate the PO integrals with the coalescence of the high frequency critical points. Numerical results for the highly oscillatory PO integral with the coalescence of the critical points are given to verify the efficiency of the proposed NSDP method. The NSDP method could achieve the frequency independent computational workload and error controllable accuracy in all the numerical experiments, especially for the case of the coalescence of the high frequency critical points.

  11. A proof of convergence of the concave-convex procedure using Zangwill's theory.

    PubMed

    Sriperumbudur, Bharath K; Lanckriet, Gert R G

    2012-06-01

    The concave-convex procedure (CCCP) is an iterative algorithm that solves d.c. (difference of convex functions) programs as a sequence of convex programs. In machine learning, CCCP is extensively used in many learning algorithms, including sparse support vector machines (SVMs), transductive SVMs, and sparse principal component analysis. Though CCCP is widely used in many applications, its convergence behavior has not gotten a lot of specific attention. Yuille and Rangarajan analyzed its convergence in their original paper; however, we believe the analysis is not complete. The convergence of CCCP can be derived from the convergence of the d.c. algorithm (DCA), proposed in the global optimization literature to solve general d.c. programs, whose proof relies on d.c. duality. In this note, we follow a different reasoning and show how Zangwill's global convergence theory of iterative algorithms provides a natural framework to prove the convergence of CCCP. This underlines Zangwill's theory as a powerful and general framework to deal with the convergence issues of iterative algorithms, after also being used to prove the convergence of algorithms like expectation-maximization and generalized alternating minimization. In this note, we provide a rigorous analysis of the convergence of CCCP by addressing two questions: When does CCCP find a local minimum or a stationary point of the d.c. program under consideration? and when does the sequence generated by CCCP converge? We also present an open problem on the issue of local convergence of CCCP.

  12. Plasma confinement by magnetic field with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Krashevskaya, Galina V.; Prishvitsyn, Alexander S.

    2015-06-01

    It has been found that plasma confinement by the magnetic field of alternating-sign curvature with convex-concave field lines results in a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) perturbations. For simple combinations of axisymmetric mirrors and cusps the calculations according to the kinetic stability criterion give strongly, centrally peaked stable plasma pressure profiles instead of shallow ones. For the experimental research of this effect, a compact magnetic confinement device has been modified by adding of the external current coil to fulfil the field-line curvature requirements. The critical convectively-stable plasma pressure profiles calculation in this experimental geometry and the probe measurements of the spatial plasma distribution in the new magnetic configuration of alternating-sign curvature have been performed. The experimental results give some support for a conclusion that there is an increase in the ion saturation current at the region near the minimum of the specific volume min ∫dl/B. This region corresponds to the average minimum in the second adiabatic invariant, and the kinetic description predicts the stable pressure profile peaking here due to reduction of charge separation by particle drift in alternating-sign curvature.

  13. An orthogonal coordinate grid following the three-dimensional viscous flow over a concave surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagenhart, J. R; Saric, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Swept wings designed for laminar flow control exhibit both centrifugal and crossflow instabilities which produce streamwise vortices that can lead to early transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the presence of Tollmien-Schlichting waves. This paper outlines an iterative algorithm for generation of an orthogonal, curvilinear, coordinate grid following the streamlines of the three-dimensional viscous flow over a swept, concave surface. The governing equations for the metric tensor are derived from the Riemann-Christoffel tensor for an Euclidian geometry. Unit vectors along streamline, normal and binormal directions are determined. The governing equations are not solved directly, but are employed only as compatibility equations. The scale factor for the streamline coordinate is obtained by an iterative integration scheme on a 200 x 100 x 5 grid, while the other two scale factors are determined from definitions. Sample results are obtained which indicate that the compatibility equation error decreases linearly with grid step size. Grids smaller than 200 x 100 x 5 are found to be inadequate to resolve the grid curvature.

  14. Analysis of mode stability in a concave mirror vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with an oxide aperture.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young-Gu

    2005-05-16

    We applied the Fox-Li resonator theory to analyze the mode stability of concave mirror surface-emitting lasers. The numerical modeling incorporates the oxide aperture in the simple classical cavity by adding a non-uniform phase shifting layer to the flat mirror side. The calculation shows that there is a modal loss difference between the fundamental mode and the competing modes. The amount of loss difference depends upon cavity length and the thickness of the oxide aperture. In addition to loss difference, modal gain difference plays a key role in discriminating between the fundamental mode and the higher order transverse modes. The modal gain difference heavily depends upon the size of the oxide aperture and the field intensity distribution. To summarize, the geometry of the concave cavity affects the mode profile and the unique field profile of each transverse mode makes a difference in both modal loss and gain. Finally, this leads to a side-mode suppression.

  15. Development of twin-illumination and subtraction technique for detection of concave and convex defects on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Akihiro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Koshihara, Takahiro; Kodama, Toshifumi; Iizuka, Yukinori; Oshige, Takahiko

    2016-09-01

    Optical surface inspection of steel mill products such as pipes, plates and slabs usually has the problem of overdetection, which is caused by signals from harmless parts such as scale and surface texture. The authors propose a new inspection technique based on the experience that most harmful defects on these products have a concave or convex shape, whereas most harmless parts that might be overdetected have flat shapes. The proposed technique is called the `twin-illumination and subtraction technique'. In this technique, firstly, two images of the target area on a steel surface illuminated from the two sides are captured, respectively. A subtraction image is then calculated from these images. Comparing the images illuminated from the different sides, the images from concave or convex defects look different due to their different shadows, while images from harmless flat parts look the same because illumination does not cause any shadow. As a result, two images with the same appearances from a harmless part are canceled by subtraction, and two images with different appearances from a concave or convex defect remain even after subtraction. Finally, it is possible to detect only concave or convex defects without overdetecting flat patterns. In this manuscript, first, we explain the proposed technique and confirmation experiments in the laboratory. We also explain a new optical inspection system based on the concept described above and its application to moving hot pipes in a steel manufacturing plant to prove the effectiveness of the technique. We concluded that the inspection system has sufficient performance for use as a practical system.

  16. GABA and GABA receptors alterations in the primary visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen; Bi, Ai-Ling; Xu, Chao-Li; Ye, Xiang; Chen, Mei-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Jun-Guo; Jiang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Bi, Hong-Sheng

    2017-02-02

    Until recently most researches on myopia mechanisms have mainly been focused on the eye ball and few investigations were explored on the upper visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. The roles of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the retinal and in the upper visual pathway are inter-correlated. As the retinal glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), GABA, and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors increased during the concave lens induced myopia formation, however, whether GABA alterations also occurred in the visual cortex during the concave lens induction is still unknown. In the present study, using HPLC, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Real-Time Quantitative-PCR (RT-PCR) methods, we observed the changing trends of GABA, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), and GABA receptors in the visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic guinea pigs. Similar to the changing patterns of retinal GABA, the concentrations of GAD, GABA and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors in the visual cortex also increased. These results indicate that the exploration on myopia mechanisms should possibly be investigated on the whole visual pathway and the detailed significance of cortical GABA alterations needs further investigation.

  17. Effect of Concave Sound Reflecting Surfaces on Speech Intelligibility and Articulation Index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaiyat, Sami Abdulrahman

    Three different methods are used to assess speech intelligibility in spaces with and without concave sound reflecting surfaces: calculated articulation index (AI), measured rapid speech transmission index (RASTI), and modified rhyme tests (MRT) with occupants. Factors such as the room size, size of curvature, the speaker's position, and the background noise level are considered in the two on -site testing methods. The MRT results show unexpectedly significant deviation from results obtained through the other methods such that they are de-emphasized in all discussions. Results from rooms without curvatures show no significant differences between the AI and RASTI values; whereas, these differences are significant when rooms with curvatures are considered. A modification factor to be subtracted from calculated AI values to account for erosional effects of the curved surfaces is developed according to further analysis of the differences between the AI and RASTI values. The magnitude of the modification factors depends on all the above factors as well as the location of the listeners within the room. There are no clear indications of any dead spots, however, the sound foci from both the 2ft. and 8ft. curvatures have caused certain group locations to have smaller modification factors than that of all other locations. The magnitude of the developed modification factors ranges between 0.01, for the 16ft. curvature in the small rooms, to 0.17, for the 8ft. curvature in the large room with NC-45 and the speaker's position is on the center. This range is of almost the same magnitude as that of the erosional corrections to calculated AI due to elevated reverberation time. This range is also of almost same magnitude as that of improvement in calculated AI due to presence of visual cues.

  18. ANISOTROPY OF X-RAY BURSTS FROM NEUTRON STARS WITH CONCAVE ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    He, C.-C.; Keek, L.

    2016-03-01

    Emission from neutron stars and accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries is anisotropic. The non-spherical shape of the disk as well as blocking of the neutron star by the disk make the observed flux dependent on the inclination angle of the disk with respect to the line of sight. This is of importance for the interpretation of thermonuclear X-ray bursts from neutron stars. Because part of the X-ray burst is reflected off the disk, the observed burst flux depends on the anisotropies for both direct emission from the neutron star and reflection off the disk. This influences measurements of source distance, mass accretion rate, and constraints on the neutron star’s equation of state. Previous predictions of the anisotropy factors assumed a geometrically flat disk. Detailed observations of two so-called superbursts allowed for the direct and the reflected burst fluxes to each be measured separately. The reflection fraction was much higher than what the anisotropies of a flat disk can account for. We create numerical models to calculate the anisotropy factors for different disk shapes, including concave disks. We present the anisotropy factors of the direct and reflected burst fluxes separately, as well as the anisotropy of the persistent flux. Reflection fractions substantially larger than unity are produced in the case where the inner accretion disk increases steeply in height, such that part of the star is blocked from view. Such a geometry could possibly be induced by the X-ray burst if X-ray heating causes the inner disk to puff up.

  19. Elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting process characterization for the fabrication of arrays of concave refractive microlenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmet, L.; Van Overmeire, S.; Van Erps, J.; Ottevaere, H.; Debaes, C.; Thienpont, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete and precise quantitative characterization of the different process steps used in an elastomeric inverse moulding and vacuum casting technique. We use the latter replication technique to fabricate concave replicas from an array of convex thermal reflow microlenses. During the inverse elastomeric moulding we obtain a secondary silicone mould of the original silicone mould in which the master component is embedded. Using vacuum casting, we are then able to cast out of the second mould several optical transparent poly-urethane arrays of concave refractive microlenses. We select ten particular representative microlenses on the original, the silicone moulds and replica sample and quantitatively characterize and statistically compare them during the various fabrication steps. For this purpose, we use several state-of-the-art and ultra-precise characterization tools such as a stereo microscope, a stylus surface profilometer, a non-contact optical profilometer, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Twyman-Green interferometer and an atomic force microscope to compare various microlens parameters such as the lens height, the diameter, the paraxial focal length, the radius of curvature, the Strehl ratio, the peak-to-valley and the root-mean-square wave aberrations and the surface roughness. When appropriate, the microlens parameter under test is measured with several different measuring tools to check for consistency in the measurement data. Although none of the lens samples shows diffraction-limited performance, we prove that the obtained replicated arrays of concave microlenses exhibit sufficiently low surface roughness and sufficiently high lens quality for various imaging applications.

  20. Concave slab out board of the Tonga subduction zone caused by opposite toroidal flows under the North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. K.

    2014-05-01

    An alternative scenario is proposed for the origin of a concave NE-facing slab under the North Fiji Basin between the Tonga subduction slab and Vanuatu Arc. During rollback of the Australian Plate, Vanuatu Arc rotated clockwise, whereas Fiji Platform rotated counterclockwise from 12/10 Ma until 1.5 Ma ago. Thereafter, only Vanuatu Arc rotated until the present. During the period of opposite rotations, toroidal flows entered the mantle around the northwest slab edge of Vanuatu Arc and from the northeast slab edge of Fiji Platform. The latter lies close to the northern end of the Tonga slab where arc-parallel flows are shown by volcanic geochemistry and mantle anisotropy. Opposite toroidal flows with upwelling and downwelling components generate the concave form of the combined Vanuatu/Fiji Platform slab, match its extent to mapped deep seismicity, explain its position overlying the Tonga slab, provide a mechanism for high heat flow in the North Fiji Basin as well as enriched MORB and OIB basalts in the northern NFB, and obviate slab collisions invoked to produce slab curvature.

  1. Restricted mobility of side chains on concave surfaces of solenoid proteins may impart heightened potential for intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Ramya, L; Gautham, N; Chaloin, Laurent; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in the determination of the protein structures with their number today passing over a hundred thousand structures. The next challenge is the understanding and prediction of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. In this work we address this problem by analyzing curved solenoid proteins. Many of these proteins are considered as "hub molecules" for their high potential to interact with many different molecules and to be a scaffold for multisubunit protein machineries. Our analysis of these structures through molecular dynamics simulations reveals that the mobility of the side-chains on the concave surfaces of the solenoids is lower than on the convex ones. This result provides an explanation to the observed preferential binding of the ligands, including small and flexible ligands, to the concave surface of the curved solenoid proteins. The relationship between the landscapes and dynamic properties of the protein surfaces can be further generalized to the other types of protein structures and eventually used in the computer algorithms, allowing prediction of protein-ligand interactions by analysis of protein surfaces.

  2. Small human sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities linked to chromatin condensation failure.

    PubMed

    Boitrelle, F; Albert, M; Petit, J-M; Ferfouri, F; Wainer, R; Bergere, M; Bailly, M; Vialard, F; Selva, J

    2013-08-01

    Since an embryo's ability to grow to the blastocyst stage and implant can be improved by selection of a normal spermatozoon with a vacuole-free head, this study set out to determine the nature of small sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification (>×6300). For 15 infertile men with various sperm profiles, high-magnification microscopy was used to select motile, morphometrically normal spermatozoa with no vacuoles (n=450) or more than two small vacuoles (each of which occupied less than 4% of the head's area; n=450). Spermatozoa acrosome reaction status and degree of chromatin condensation were analysed. Three-dimensional deconvolution microscopy was used to accurately image the nucleus and acrosome at all depths in all spermatozoa. In all 450 spermatozoa with small vacuoles, the latter were seen to be abnormal, DNA-free nuclear concavities. Spermatozoa with small vacuoles were significantly more likely than vacuole-free spermatozoa to have noncondensed chromatin (39.8% versus 9.3%, respectively; P<0.0001). There was no significant difference between the two groups of spermatozoa in terms of acrosome reaction status. No association between chromatin condensation and acrosome reaction status was observed. Small human sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities related to failure of chromatin condensation.

  3. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics of concave-surface curvature. Final report, 1 January 1986-31 December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, P.; Johnston, J.P.; Moffat, R.J.

    1988-04-21

    This project investigated the mechanisms responsible for the known increases in shear stress and convective heat transfer when a turbulent boundary layer flows over a concave wall compared to a similar flow over a flat wall. The effects of grid-generated Free-Stream Turbulence (FST level< or = 7.5% ) were also examined for flat and concave-wall TBL's. The work was conducted in a large scale boundary layer using low-speed water flow. Momentum thickness Re was = 1400. Surface heat-transfer rate was measured with a constant-temperature metal surface and by use of a liquid-crystal surface. Temperature profiles were obtained by miniature thermocouple probe down to y+ = 3 and all three velocity components by a 3-D, laser velocimeter down to y+ = 7. Heat transfer and wall shear stress were both found to be augmented by curvature and free-stream turbulence applied separately, but the combined effect of curvature and FST is not simply the sum of the individual effects. In the case of wall stress, the effects of curvature are much larger than FST effects once the flow develops downstream. The nature of the interaction is being investigated using a working hypothesis based on the ideas of active (Reynolds stress producing) and inactive can stimulate only a limited increase (order 25%) in wall friction coefficient. However, for the moderate levels of FST used in this study, no such saturation process exists to limit the increase in surface heat-transfer rate.

  4. Steepness and Concavity Controls on the Expression of Reach-Scale Channel Morphology, Debris Flow Deposition, and the Spatial Distribution of Salmonids in the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, C. L.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    Steepness and concavity indexes derived from the power function relationship between drainage area and channel slope provide a first-order control on (1) the expression of reach-scale channel morphology, (2) runout potential of debris flows, and (3) the spatial distribution of anadromous fish in the Pacific Northwest. Channels steeper than about 10% are typically dominated by the effects of periodic debris flow scour and subsequent accumulation of coarse sediment. Downstream of this area, channels with slopes between 3 to 10% represent a transition from debris flow to fluvial process dominance. In this transitional region of the network, debris flow deposits often form fill deposits that are subsequently incised by fluvial re-working that leads to the formation of step-pool sequences. Such reaches have restricted salmonid access, generally being most favorable to steelhead and cutthroat trout. The stronger the concavity of a channel profile, the shorter the length of this transitional reach. In the Oregon Coast Range, steepness and concavity values are high and the spatial extent of transitional channels is greatly restricted (typically only occurring in reaches with draining areas between 0.5 and 1.5 km2). The abrupt change in slope from steep debris flow prone channels to low-gradient pool-riffle and bedrock channels promotes debris flow deposition and fan formation at tributary junctions. In these highly concave basins, a relatively large proportion of the fluvial channel network have gradients below 3% and are accessible to salmonids, resulting in a broad spatial distribution. This broad distribution allows for a spreading of risk that may enhance a population's ability to persist during severe disturbance. In contrast, many catchments in the Klamath Mountains of northern California have high steepness values but low concavity. In this region, the portion of the network occupied by transitional reaches is greatly expanded. Step-pool channels dominate the

  5. Development of a variable focal length concave mirror for on-shot thermal lens correction in rod amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jens; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick; Porter, John; Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc

    2006-11-13

    An optical surface of variable concave parabolic shape and a clear aperture of 30 mm was created using two rings to deform a flat 50.8 mm diameter mirror. The deformable mirror assembly was modeled using finite element analysis software as well as analytical solutions. Measured parabolic surface deformation showed good agreement with those models. Mirror performance was quantitatively studied using an interferometer and focal lengths from hundreds of meters down to the meter scale have been achieved. In this publication, the deformable mirror has been applied to compensate on shot thermal lensing in 16 mm diameter and 25 mm diameter Nd:Phosphate glass rod amplifiers by using only a single actuator. The possibility to rapidly change focal lengths across two to three orders of magnitude has applications for remote sensing, such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, LIDAR, and control of laser filament formation.

  6. Development of a variable focal length concave mirror for on-shot thermal lens correction in rod amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Jens; Geissel, Matthias; Rambo, Patrick; Porter, John; Headley, Daniel; Ramsey, Marc

    2006-11-01

    An optical surface of variable concave parabolic shape and a clear aperture of 30 mm was created using two rings to deform a flat 50.8 mm diameter mirror. The deformable mirror assembly was modeled using finite element analysis software as well as analytical solutions. Measured parabolic surface deformation showed good agreement with those models. Mirror performance was quantitatively studied using an interferometer and focal lengths from hundreds of meters down to the meter scale have been achieved. In this publication, the deformable mirror has been applied to compensate on shot thermal lensing in 16 mm diameter and 25 mm diameter Nd:Phosphate glass rod amplifiers by using only a single actuator. The possibility to rapidly change focal lengths across two to three orders of magnitude has applications for remote sensing, such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, LIDAR, and control of laser filament formation.

  7. Self-assembly of metallosupramolecular rhombi from chiral concave 9,9’-spirobifluorene-derived bis(pyridine) ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hovorka, Rainer; Hytteballe, Sophie; Piehler, Torsten; Meyer-Eppler, Georg; Topić, Filip; Rissanen, Kari; Engeser, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Summary Two new 9,9’-spirobifluorene-based bis(4-pyridines) were synthesised in enantiopure and one also in racemic form. These ligands act as concave templates and form metallosupramolecular [(dppp)2M2L2] rhombi with cis-protected [(dppp)Pd]2+ and [(dppp)Pt]2+ ions. The self-assembly process of the racemic ligand preferably occurs in a narcissistic self-recognising manner. Hence, a mixture of all three possible stereoisomers [(dppp)2M2{(R)-L}2](OTf)4, [(dppp)2M2{(S)-L}2](OTf)4, and [(dppp)2M2{(R)-L}{(S)-L}](OTf)4 was obtained in an approximate 1.5:1.5:1 ratio which corresponds to an amplification of the homochiral assemblies by a factor of approximately three as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The racemic homochiral assemblies could also be characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction. PMID:24605163

  8. Self-assembly of metallosupramolecular rhombi from chiral concave 9,9'-spirobifluorene-derived bis(pyridine) ligands.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, Rainer; Hytteballe, Sophie; Piehler, Torsten; Meyer-Eppler, Georg; Topić, Filip; Rissanen, Kari; Engeser, Marianne; Lützen, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Two new 9,9'-spirobifluorene-based bis(4-pyridines) were synthesised in enantiopure and one also in racemic form. These ligands act as concave templates and form metallosupramolecular [(dppp)2M2L2] rhombi with cis-protected [(dppp)Pd](2+) and [(dppp)Pt](2+) ions. The self-assembly process of the racemic ligand preferably occurs in a narcissistic self-recognising manner. Hence, a mixture of all three possible stereoisomers [(dppp)2M2{(R)-L}2](OTf)4, [(dppp)2M2{(S)-L}2](OTf)4, and [(dppp)2M2{(R)-L}{(S)-L}](OTf)4 was obtained in an approximate 1.5:1.5:1 ratio which corresponds to an amplification of the homochiral assemblies by a factor of approximately three as evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The racemic homochiral assemblies could also be characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 3: Unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the unsteady aerodynamics of bodies with concave nose geometries was performed. The results show that the experimentally observed pulsating flow on spiked bodies and in forward facing cavities can be described by the developed simple mathematical model of the phenomenon. Static experimental data is used as a basis for determination of the oscillatory frequency of spike-induced flow pulsations. The agreement between predicted and measured reduced frequencies is generally very good. The spiked-body mathematical model is extended to describe the pulsations observed in forward facing cavities and it is shown that not only the frequency but also the pressure time history can be described with the accuracy needed to predict the experimentally observed time average effects. This implies that it should be possible to determine analytically the impact of the flow pulsation on the structural integrity of the nozzles for the jettisoned empty SRM-shells.

  10. Tank Tests of a Model of a Flying-boat Hull Having a Longitudinally Concave Planing Bottom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, J B

    1935-01-01

    The NACA model 11-B, which has a longitudinally concave planing bottom forward of the step, was tested over a wide range of loading. The results of the tests are presented as curves of resistance and trimming moment plotted against speed for various trim angles and as curves of resistance coefficient at best trim angle, and trimming-moment coefficient. The characteristics of the form at the optimum trim are compared with those of NACA model 11-C which has the same form with the exception of a planing bottom longitudinally straight near the step. Photographs of the models being towed in the tank are included for a comparison of the spray patterns. At the best angles of trim in each case model 11-B has lower resistance at high speeds, a higher maximum positive trimming moment near the hump speed, and a more favorable spray pattern than of model 11-C.

  11. Plasmonic enhancement of UV emission from ZnO thin films induced by Al nano-concave arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norek, Małgorzata; Łuka, Grzegorz; Włodarski, Maksymilian

    2016-10-01

    Surface plasmons (SPs) supported by Al nano-concave arrays with increasing interpore distance (Dc) were used to enhance the ultraviolet light emission from ZnO thin films. Two sets of samples were prepared: in the first set the thin ZnO films were deposited directly on Al nanoconcaves (the Al/ZnO samples) and in the second set a 10 nm - Al2O3 spacer was placed between the textured Al and the ZnO films (the Al/Al2O3-ALD/ZnO samples). In the Al/ZnO samples the enhancement was limited by a nonradiative energy dissipation due to the Ohmic loss in the Al metal. However, for the ZnO layer deposited directly on Al nanopits synthesized at 150 V (Dc = 333 ± 18 nm), the largest 9-fold enhancement was obtained by achieving the best energy fit between the near band-edge (NBE) emission from ZnO and the λ(0,1) SPP resonance mode. In the Al/Al2O3-ALD/ZnO samples the amplification of the UV emission was smaller than in the Al/ZnO samples due to a big energy mismatch between the NBE emission and the λ(0,1) plasmonic mode. The results obtained in this work indicate that better tuning of the NBE - λ(0,1) SPP resonance mode coupling is possible through a proper modification of geometrical parameters in the Al/Al2O3-ALD/ZnO system such as Al nano-concave spacing and the thickness of the corresponding layer. This approach will reduce the negative influence of the non-radiative plasmonic modes and most likely will lead to further enhancement of the SP-modulated UV emission from ZnO thin films.

  12. MOF-templated synthesis of porous Co(3)O(4) concave nanocubes with high specific surface area and their gas sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Lü, Yinyun; Zhan, Wenwen; He, Yue; Wang, Yiting; Kong, Xiangjian; Kuang, Qin; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2014-03-26

    Porous metal oxides nanomaterials with controlled morphology have received great attention because of their promising applications in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, gas sensing, etc. In this paper, porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes with extremely high specific surface area (120.9 m(2)·g(-1)) were synthesized simply by calcining Co-based metal-organic framework (Co-MOF, ZIF-67) templates at the optimized temperature (300 °C), and the formation mechanism of such highly porous structures as well as the influence of the calcination temperature are well explained by taking into account thermal behavior and intrinsic structural features of the Co-MOF precursors. The gas-sensing properties of the as-synthesized porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes were systematically tested towards volatile organic compounds including ethanol, acetone, toluene, and benzene. Experimental results reveal that the porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes present the highest sensitivity to ethanol with fast response/recovery time (< 10 s) and a low detection limit (at least 10 ppm). Such outstanding gas sensing performance of the porous Co3O4 concave nanocubes benefits from their high porosity, large specific surface area, and remarkable capabilities of surface-adsorbed oxygen.

  13. Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra: A unique probe for monitoring Au-catalyzed reduction and oxidation reactions by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Jiawei; Winget, Sarah A.; Wu, Yiren; ...

    2016-01-26

    In this paper, we report a facile synthesis of Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra by titrating aqueous HAuCl4 into a suspension of Ag cuboctahedra in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), NaOH, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) at room temperature. Initially, the Au atoms derived from the reduction of Au3+ by AA are conformally deposited on the entire surface of a Ag cuboctahedron. Upon the formation of a complete Au shell, however, the subsequently formed Au atoms are preferentially deposited onto the Au{100} facets, resulting in the formation of a Ag@Au cuboctahedron with concave structures at the sites of {111} facets. The concave cuboctahedramore » embrace excellent SERS activity that is more than 70-fold stronger than that of the original Ag cuboctahedra at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The concave cuboctahedra also exhibit remarkable stability in the presence of an oxidant such as H2O2 because of the protection by a complete Au shell. These two unique attributes enable in-situ SERS monitoring of the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) to 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) by NaBH4 through a 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (trans-DMAB) intermediate and the subsequent oxidation of 4-ATP back to trans-DMAB upon the introduction of H2O2.« less

  14. Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra: A unique probe for monitoring Au-catalyzed reduction and oxidation reactions by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiawei; Winget, Sarah A.; Wu, Yiren; Su, Dong; Sun, Xiaojun; Xie, Zhao -Xiong; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-26

    In this paper, we report a facile synthesis of Ag@Au concave cuboctahedra by titrating aqueous HAuCl4 into a suspension of Ag cuboctahedra in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), NaOH, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) at room temperature. Initially, the Au atoms derived from the reduction of Au3+ by AA are conformally deposited on the entire surface of a Ag cuboctahedron. Upon the formation of a complete Au shell, however, the subsequently formed Au atoms are preferentially deposited onto the Au{100} facets, resulting in the formation of a Ag@Au cuboctahedron with concave structures at the sites of {111} facets. The concave cuboctahedra embrace excellent SERS activity that is more than 70-fold stronger than that of the original Ag cuboctahedra at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The concave cuboctahedra also exhibit remarkable stability in the presence of an oxidant such as H2O2 because of the protection by a complete Au shell. These two unique attributes enable in-situ SERS monitoring of the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) to 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) by NaBH4 through a 4,4'-dimercaptoazobenzene (trans-DMAB) intermediate and the subsequent oxidation of 4-ATP back to trans-DMAB upon the introduction of H2O2.

  15. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  16. Synthesis of Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with concave Au nanocuboids as seeds and their enhanced electrocatalytic properties in the ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lingyu; Li, Lidong; Peng, Yi; Guo, Lin

    2015-12-18

    Herein, a new type of uniform and well-structured Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) with highly active concave Au nanocuboids (NCs) as seeds was successfully synthesized by using the classic seed-mediated method. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to demonstrate their greatly enhanced catalytic performance in the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). It was found that the electrochemical performance for Au@Pt BNPs with the concave Au NCs as seeds, which were enclosed by {611} high-index facets, could be seven times higher than that of the Au@Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with regular spherical Au NPs as seeds. Furthermore, our findings show that the morphology and electrocatalytic activity of the Au@Pt BNPs can be tuned simply by changing the compositional ratios of the growth solution. The lower the amount of H2PtCl6 used in the growth solution, the thinner the Pt shell grew, and the more high-index facets of concave Au NCs seeds were exposed in Au@Pt BNPs, leading to higher electrochemical activity. These as-prepared concave Au@Pt BNPs will open up new strategies for improving catalytic efficiency and reducing the use of the expensive and scarce resource of platinum in the ethanol oxidation reaction, and are potentially applicable as electrochemical catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  17. Pd@Pt core-shell concave decahedra: A class of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction with enhanced activity and durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue; Vera, Madeline; Chi, Miaofang; Xia, Younan; Luo, Ming; Huang, Hongwen; Ruditskiy, Aleksey; Park, Jinho; Bao, Shixiong; Liu, Jingyue; Howe, Jane; Xie, Zhaoxiong

    2015-11-13

    Here, we report a facile synthesis of multiply twinned Pd@Pt core shell concave decahedra by controlling the deposition of Pt on preformed Pd decahedral seeds. The Pt atoms are initially deposited on the vertices of a decahedral seed, followed by surface diffusion to other regions along the edges/ridges and then across the faces. Different from the coating of a Pd icosahedral seed, the Pt atoms prefer to stay at the vertices and edges/ridges of a decahedral seed even when the deposition is conducted at 200 degrees C, naturally generating a core shell structure covered by concave facets. The nonuniformity in the Pt coating can be attributed to the presence of twin boundaries at the vertices, as well as the {100} facets and twin defects along the edges/ridges of a decahedron, effectively trapping the Pt adatoms at these high-energy sites. As compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@Pt concave decahedra show substantial enhancement in both catalytic activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For the concave decahedra with 29.6% Pt by weight, their specific (1.66 mA/cm2pt) and mass (1.60 A/mg/2pt) ORR activities are enhanced by 4.4 and 6.6 times relative to those of the Pt/C catalyst (0.36 mA/cm2pt and 0.32 A/mgpt, respectively). After 10 000 cycles of accelerated durability test, the concave decahedra still exhibit a mass activity of 0.69 A/mgpt, more than twice that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst.

  18. Pd@Pt core-shell concave decahedra: A class of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction with enhanced activity and durability

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xue; Vera, Madeline; Chi, Miaofang; ...

    2015-11-13

    Here, we report a facile synthesis of multiply twinned Pd@Pt core shell concave decahedra by controlling the deposition of Pt on preformed Pd decahedral seeds. The Pt atoms are initially deposited on the vertices of a decahedral seed, followed by surface diffusion to other regions along the edges/ridges and then across the faces. Different from the coating of a Pd icosahedral seed, the Pt atoms prefer to stay at the vertices and edges/ridges of a decahedral seed even when the deposition is conducted at 200 degrees C, naturally generating a core shell structure covered by concave facets. The nonuniformity inmore » the Pt coating can be attributed to the presence of twin boundaries at the vertices, as well as the {100} facets and twin defects along the edges/ridges of a decahedron, effectively trapping the Pt adatoms at these high-energy sites. As compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@Pt concave decahedra show substantial enhancement in both catalytic activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For the concave decahedra with 29.6% Pt by weight, their specific (1.66 mA/cm2pt) and mass (1.60 A/mg/2pt) ORR activities are enhanced by 4.4 and 6.6 times relative to those of the Pt/C catalyst (0.36 mA/cm2pt and 0.32 A/mgpt, respectively). After 10 000 cycles of accelerated durability test, the concave decahedra still exhibit a mass activity of 0.69 A/mgpt, more than twice that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst.« less

  19. Linear QoS goals of additive and concave metrics in ad hoc cognitive packet routing.

    PubMed

    Lent, Ricardo

    2006-12-01

    This paper addresses two scalability problems related to the cognitive map of packets in ad hoc cognitive packet networks and proposes a solution. Previous works have included latency as part of the routing goal of smart packets, which requires packets to collect their arrival time at each node in a path. Such a requirement resulted in a packet overhead proportional to the path length. The second problem is that the multiplicative form of path availability, which was employed to measure resources, loses accuracy in long paths. To solve these problems, new goals are proposed in this paper. These goals are linear functions of low-overhead metrics and can provide similar performance results with lower cost. One direct result shown in simulation is that smart packets driven by a linear function of path length and buffer occupancy can effectively balance the traffic of multiple flows without the large overhead that would be needed if round-trip delay was used. In addition, energy-aware routing is also studied under this scheme as well as link selection based on their expected level of security.

  20. Flat-ramp vs. convex-concave thrust geometries in a deformable hanging wall: new insights from analogue modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Tomas, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Different modes of strain accommodation affecting a deformable hanging-wall in a flat-ramp-flat thrust system were previously addressed through several (sandbox) analog modeling studies, focusing on the influence of different variables, such as: a) thrust ramp dip angle and friction (Bonini et al, 2000); b) prescribed thickness of the hanging-wall (Koy and Maillot, 2007); and c) sin-thrust erosion (compensating for topographic thrust edification, e.g. Persson and Sokoutis, 2002). In the present work we reproduce the same experimental procedure to investigate the influence of two different parameters on hanging-wall deformation: 1) the geometry of the thrusting surface; and 2) the absence of a velocity discontinuity (VD) that is always present in previous similar analogue modeling studies. Considering the first variable we use two end member ramp geometries, flat-ramp-flat and convex-concave, to understand the control exerted by the abrupt ramp edges in the hanging-wall stress-strain distribution, comparing the obtain results with the situation in which such edge singularities are absent (convex-concave thrust ramp). Considering the second investigated parameter, our motivation was the recognition that the VD found in the different analogue modeling settings simply does not exist in nature, despite the fact that it has a major influence on strain accommodation in the deformable hanging-wall. We thus eliminate such apparatus artifact from our models and compare the obtained results with the previous ones. Our preliminary results suggest that both investigated variables play a non-negligible role on the structural style characterizing the hanging-wall deformation of convergent tectonic settings were such thrust-ramp systems were recognized. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013. Pedro Almeida wants to thank to FCT for the Ph.D. grant (SFRH/BD/52556/2014) under the

  1. Concave gold nanocube assemblies as nanotraps for surface-enhanced Raman scattering-based detection of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; de Angelis, Marella; Ulivi, Lorenzo; Centi, Sonia; Pini, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    SERS detection of proteins is typically performed by using labeling agents with stable and high Raman scattering cross sections. This is a valuable approach for trace detection and quantification of a target protein but is unsuitable for inspecting its inherent structural and functional properties. On the other hand, direct SERS of proteins has been mainly devoted to the study of short peptides and aminoacid sequences or of prosthetic groups with intense Raman signals, which is of scarce interest for a thorough characterization of most proteins. Here we try to overcome these limitations by setting-up an effective platform for the structural SERS analysis of proteins. The platform consists of an extended bidimensional array of gold concave nanocubes (CNCs) supported on a PDMS film. CNCs are closely-packed through face-face and face-corner interactions generating a monolayered arrangement featuring well distributed nanoholes. Here the protein homogeneously experiences an E-field enhancement outward from the metal surfaces surrounding it, which causes a large number of vibrations to be contemporarily amplified. The proposed platform provides stable and detailed SERS spectra and confers rapidity and reproducibility to the analysis.SERS detection of proteins is typically performed by using labeling agents with stable and high Raman scattering cross sections. This is a valuable approach for trace detection and quantification of a target protein but is unsuitable for inspecting its inherent structural and functional properties. On the other hand, direct SERS of proteins has been mainly devoted to the study of short peptides and aminoacid sequences or of prosthetic groups with intense Raman signals, which is of scarce interest for a thorough characterization of most proteins. Here we try to overcome these limitations by setting-up an effective platform for the structural SERS analysis of proteins. The platform consists of an extended bidimensional array of gold concave

  2. A wear simulation study of nanostructured CVD diamond-on-diamond articulation involving concave/convex mating surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul A.; Thompson, Raymond G.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2015-01-01

    Using microwave-plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), a 3-micron thick nanostructured-diamond (NSD) layer was deposited onto polished, convex and concave components that were machined from Ti-6Al-4V alloy. These components had the same radius of curvature, 25.4mm. Wear testing of the surfaces was performed by rotating articulation of the diamond-deposited surfaces (diamond-on-diamond) with a load of 225N for a total of 5 million cycles in bovine serum resulting in polishing of the diamond surface and formation of very shallow, linear wear grooves of less than 50nm depth. The two diamond surfaces remained adhered to the components and polished each other to an average surface roughness that was reduced by as much as a factor of 80 for the most polished region located at the center of the condyle. Imaging of the surfaces showed that the initial wearing-in phase of diamond was only beginning at the end of the 5 million cycles. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and surface profilometry were used to characterize the surfaces and verify that the diamond remained intact and uniform over the surface, thereby protecting the underlying metal. These wear simulation results show that diamond deposition on Ti alloy has potential application for joint replacement devices with improved longevity over existing devices made of cobalt chrome and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). PMID:26989457

  3. An investigation of student understanding of the real image formed by a converging lens or concave mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Fred M.; McDermott, Lillian C.

    1987-02-01

    Student understanding of the real images produced by converging lenses and concave mirrors was investigated both before and after instruction in geometrical optics. The primary data were gathered through interviews in which undergraduates taking introductory physics were asked to perform a set of prescribed tasks based on a simple demonstration. The criterion used to assess understanding was the ability to apply appropriate concepts and principles, including ray diagrams, to predict and explain image formation by an actual lens or mirror. Performance on the tasks, especially by students who had not had college instruction in geometrical optics, suggested the presence of certain naive conceptions. Students who had just completed the study of geometrical optics in their physics courses were frequently unable to relate the concepts, principles, and ray-tracing techniques that had been taught in class to an actual physical system consisting of an object, a lens or a mirror, and a screen. Many students did not seem to understand the function of the lens, mirror, or screen, nor the uniqueness of the relationship among the components of the optical system. Difficulties in drawing and interpreting ray diagrams indicated inadequate understanding of the concept of a light ray and its graphical representation.

  4. Establishment and experimental verification of the photoresist model considering interface slip between photoresist and concave spherical substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S. E-mail: guozhongupenn@gmail.com; Zhao, X. L.; Jiang, Y. X.; Bayanheshig, E-mail: guozhongupenn@gmail.com; Wu, N.; Jiao, Q. B.; Li, W. H.; Tan, X.; Xing, S. E-mail: guozhongupenn@gmail.com

    2015-07-15

    A thickness distribution model of photoresist spin-coating on concave spherical substrate (CSS) has been developed via both theoretical studies and experimental verification. The stress of photoresist on rotating CSS is analyzed and the boundary conditions of hydrodynamic equation are presented under the non-lubricating condition. Moreover, a multivariable polynomial equation of photoresist-layer thickness distribution is derived by analyzing and deducing the flow equation where the evaporation rate, substrate topography, interface slip between liquid and CSS, and the variation of rotational speed and photoresist parameters are considered in detail. Importantly, the photoresist-layer thickness at various CSS rotational speeds and liquid concentrations can be obtained according to the theoretical equation. The required photoresist viscosity and concentration parameters of different photoresist coating thickness under a certain coating speeds can be also solved through this equation. It is noted that the calculated theoretical values are well consistent with the experimental results which were measured with various CSS rotational speeds and liquid concentrations at steady state. Therefore, both our experimental results and theoretical analysis provide the guidance for photoresist dilution and pave the way for potential improvements and microfabrication applications in the future.

  5. Numerical investigation of oscillatory thermocapillary flows under zero gravity in a circular liquid film with concave free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    NASA astronaut Pettit has conducted thermocapillary flow experiments in water films suspended in a solid ring onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003 and 2011. In one of these experiments, an oscillatory thermocapillary flow was observed. The developed flow broke its symmetry along the centerline of the film. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies on such oscillatory thermocapillary flows in thin films, and the flow-mechanism giving rise to such oscillatory flows is also not well understood. In order to shed light on the subject, we have carried out a numerical simulation study. The simulation results have shown that the water film geometry (film surface shape; being concave) is an important parameter and give rise to three oscillatory flow structures in the film, namely, a hydrothermal wave developing near the heated section, a symmetric oscillatory flow due to temperature variations, and a symmetry breaking flow due to the hydrodynamic instability along the free boundary layer (mixing layer) and the development of the hydrothermal waves. Simulation results show that the symmetry-breaking phenomenon observed in the thin film experiment on the ISS can be explained by the hydrodynamic instability and the development of hydrothermal waves.

  6. A Linear Programming Approach to Routing Control in Networks of Constrained Nonlinear Positive Systems with Concave Flow Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arneson, Heather M.; Dousse, Nicholas; Langbort, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    We consider control design for positive compartmental systems in which each compartment's outflow rate is described by a concave function of the amount of material in the compartment.We address the problem of determining the routing of material between compartments to satisfy time-varying state constraints while ensuring that material reaches its intended destination over a finite time horizon. We give sufficient conditions for the existence of a time-varying state-dependent routing strategy which ensures that the closed-loop system satisfies basic network properties of positivity, conservation and interconnection while ensuring that capacity constraints are satisfied, when possible, or adjusted if a solution cannot be found. These conditions are formulated as a linear programming problem. Instances of this linear programming problem can be solved iteratively to generate a solution to the finite horizon routing problem. Results are given for the application of this control design method to an example problem. Key words: linear programming; control of networks; positive systems; controller constraints and structure.

  7. Simulation of concave-convex imaging mirror system for development of a compact and achromatic full-field x-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jumpei; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2017-02-01

    We propose the use of two pairs of concave-convex mirrors as imaging optics for the compact full-field x-ray microscope with high resolution and magnification factors. The optics consists of two pairs of hyperbolic convex and elliptical concave mirrors with the principal surface near the object, consequently enabling the focal length to be 10 times shorter than conventional advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics. This paper describes characteristics of the optics calculated by ray-tracing and wave-optical simulators. The expected spatial resolution is approximately 40 nm with a wide field of view of more than 10 μm and a total length of about 2 m, which may lead to the possibility of laboratory-sized, achromatic, and high-resolution full-field x-ray microscopes.

  8. Hydrazine-linked convergent self-assembly of sophisticated concave polyhedrons of beta-Ni(OH)(2) and NiO from nanoplate building blocks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Yao, Meng; Guo, Lin; Li, Yueming; Li, Jinghong; Yang, Shihe

    2009-03-04

    Intelligent self-assembly of nanobuilding blocks during the formation of Ni(OH)(2) single crystals with concave polyhedron structure was studied. The nickel hydroxide nanoplates pile up together with the aid of hydrazine molecules and grow along the [001] direction to form the brand-new geometry of concave polyhedrons. The novel nanostructure looks like a regularly twisted triangular prism wringed smoothly in the middle and could be attributed to the inherent spatial asymmetry of the nickel hydroxide crystal structure and the hydrogen bonds linked with the added hydrazine molecules. On the basis of the putative mechanism, polyhedrons with different longitudinal sizes (0.3-1 mum) were synthesized by adjusting the quantities of hydrazine. We also obtained NiO polyhedron crystals with similarly piled plates by calcinations of the Ni(OH)(2) polyhedrons. Our preliminary electrochemical experiments show that the Ni(OH)(2) polyhedrons have potential applications in electrochemical storage.

  9. Retrospective study of the bone morphology in the posterior mandibular region. Evaluation of the prevalence and the degree of lingual concavity and their possible complications

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Marques, José; Almendros-Marqués, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to choose the appropriate implant size and to prevent complications, an oral surgeon must know the size and shape of the mandible. In the posterior mandibular region, a lingual undercut is often found and could represent a difficulty hard to manage if a lingual or buccal perforation occur. A large series of computed tomography (CT) images of the mandibular first molar was evaluated and the bone morphology, the prevalence and the degree of the lingual concavity in the first molar region were studied. Material and Methods One hundred and fifty-one computed tomography (CT) examinations of patients were retrospectively evaluated to determine anatomical variations in bone morphology in the submandibular fossa region. Results A total of 151 subjects were included, consisting of 64 males (M) (42.4%) and 87 females (F) (57.6%). The under-cut type ridge was present in 64.2% of the cases. The concavity angle was 66.6 ± 8.9° (M) and 71.6 ± 8.4° (F) and the linear concavity depth 4.5 ± 2.3 mm (M) and 3.1 ± 1.7 mm (F) (p>0.05). Conclusions Mandibles with any lingual concavity present a potential increased risk of lingual cortical perforation during implant placement surgery. CT imaging allows characterizing the anatomy of the submandibular fossa and provides other important information for the preoperative assessment of the posterior mandible for dental implants placement. Key words:Anatomy, computed tomography, dental implants, intraoperative complications, mandible, panoramic radiography, radiographic examination. PMID:27694785

  10. In-cylinder flows of a motored four-stroke engine with flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.F.; Yang, H.S.; Yeh, C.-N.

    2008-04-15

    The temporal and spatial evolution processes of the in-cylinder flow structures and turbulence intensities in the symmetry and offset planes of a motored four-valve, four-stroke engine during the intake and compression strokes are diagnosed by using a particle image velocimeter. Two pistons of different crown shapes (flat-crown and slightly concave-crown pistons) are studied. The inception, establishment, and evolution of the tumbling vortical flow structures during the intake and compression strokes are clearly depicted. Quantitative strengths of the rotating vortical flow motions are presented by a dimensionless parameter, the tumble ratio, which can represent the mean angular velocity of the vortices in the target plane. The turbulence intensity of the in-cylinder flow is also calculated by using the measured time-varying velocity data. The results show that the flat-crown piston induces higher bulk-averaged tumble ratio and turbulence intensity than the slightly concave-crown piston does because the tumble ratio and turbulence generated by the flat-crown piston in the offset planes during the compression stroke are particularly large. The engine with the flat-crown piston also presents larger torque and power outputs and lower hydrocarbon emission than that with the slightly concave-crown piston. This might be caused by the enhanced combustion in the engine cylinder due to the stronger tumble ratio and turbulence intensity. (author)

  11. Solution structure of histone chaperone ANP32B: interaction with core histones H3-H4 through its acidic concave domain.

    PubMed

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Takashi; Munemasa, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Shin; Tsuda, Kengo; Koshiba, Seizo; Kigawa, Takanori; Nagai, Ryozo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2010-08-06

    Eukaryotic gene expression is regulated by histone deposition onto and eviction from nucleosomes, which are mediated by several chromatin-modulating factors. Among them, histone chaperones are key factors that facilitate nucleosome assembly. Acidic nuclear phosphoprotein 32B (ANP32B) belongs to the ANP32 family, which shares N-terminal leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a C-terminal variable anionic region. The C-terminal region functions as an inhibitor of histone acetylation, but the functional roles of the LRR domain in chromatin regulation have remained elusive. Here, we report that the LRR domain of ANP32B possesses histone chaperone activity and forms a curved structure with a parallel beta-sheet on the concave side and mostly helical elements on the convex side. Our analyses revealed that the interaction of ANP32B with the core histones H3-H4 occurs on its concave side, and both the acidic and hydrophobic residues that compose the concave surface are critical for histone binding. These results provide a structural framework for understanding the functional mechanisms of acidic histone chaperones.

  12. 2D numerical simulation of impinging jet onto the concave surface by k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Zeinab; Nazari, Mohammad Reza; Khalaji, Erfan

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, the characteristics of turbulent jet impinging onto a concave surface is studied using k - w - overline{{v2 }} - f turbulence model. Dependent parameters such as inlet Reynolds number (2960 < Re < 12,000), nozzle-plate distance (4 < H/B < 10), concavity (D/B = 30, 60) of confined and unconfined impinging jet are scrutinized to find out whether this approach would bring any privileges compared to other investigations or not. The obtained results indicate better performance in low nozzle-plate distance in comparison with those mentioned in other literatures. Furthermore, the average Nusselt number of confined impinging jet overtakes unconfined one (similar circumstances) while this trend will decline as relative concavity increases. Moreover, local heat transfer of stagnation area and wall jet goes up and down through nozzle-plate distance enhancement respectively. Finally, the effects of sinusoidal pulsed inlet profile on heat transfer of unconfined impinging jet indicate direct affiliation of amplitude and neutral impact of frequency on Nusselt number distribution.

  13. Cost goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoag, J.

    1981-01-01

    Cost goal activities for the point focusing parabolic dish program are reported. Cost goals involve three tasks: (1) determination of the value of the dish systems to potential users; (2) the cost targets of the dish system are set out; (3) the value side and cost side are integrated to provide information concerning the potential size of the market for parabolic dishes. The latter two activities are emphasized.

  14. Tracking Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  15. A development of red internal mirror He-Ne lasers with near critical concave-convex stable resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xianshu; Chen Yuchuan; Li Taoyu; Wang Yongni; He Yongjun; Gao Yangqiu; Cao Huiying; Deng Shousong

    1996-12-31

    Basic properties of the concave-convex stable resonator (CCSR) with cavity parameter g{sub 1}g{sub 2} near to 1 are discussed in the infinite aperture approximation. The field distributions and diffraction losses of the low order transverse modes of related resonators with finite aperture are analyzed numerically. The stability of the output power of the lasers with CCSR are studied experimentally. The authors have made a total of 120 red internal mirror He-Ne lasers with CCSR (g{sub 1}g{sub 2} {ge} 0.90) whose cavity lengths are approximately 63 cm and the effective lengths of discharge tubes are about 52 cm. Most of the lasers operate with TEM{sub 00} stably, and the highest output power is 30 mw. The laser beam waist lies outside the resonator at a distance of 1.0m from the convex mirror, and the beam divergence is 0.45mrad. For the TEM{sub 00} lasers operate normally, the misalignment angle of the resonator mirrors must be less than 10{sup {minus}5} rad. The following facts are of particular value. (1) When the resonant frequency spacing between two successive transverse modes of a CCSR {Delta}{nu} is so small that its effect on the competition among transverse modes in the lasers with the CCSR can be negligible, such a CCSR is called near critical CCSR (NCSR). It is observed that even if the round trip total loss (including the transmission loss and so on) of TEM{sub 01} is only about 0.2 round trip small signal gain of the laser, and the round trip diffraction loss of TEM{sub 00} is only about 0.001, still the laser with the NCSR operate with pure TEM{sub 00} stably. It is clear that the mode competition in a laser with NCSR is extraordinarily favorable for TEM{sub 00}. (2) While the TEM{sub 00} lasers operate normally, the center frequency of every longitudinal mode is stable, its drift per hour is less than 0.1 longitudinal mode spacing ({approx}2.4 {times} 10{sup 7} Hz). (3) The superradiant transition at 3.30 {micro}m is suppressed.

  16. Troubleshooting Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornacki, Jeffrey L.

    Seventy-six million cases of foodborne disease occur each year in the United States alone. Medical and lost productivity costs of the most common pathogens are estimated to be 5.6-9.4 billion. Product recalls, whether from foodborne illness or spoilage, result in added costs to manufacturers in a variety of ways. These may include expenses associated with lawsuits from real or allegedly stricken individuals and lawsuits from shorted customers. Other costs include those associated with efforts involved in finding the source of the contamination and eliminating it and include time when lines are shut down and therefore non-productive, additional non-routine testing, consultant fees, time and personnel required to overhaul the entire food safety system, lost market share to competitors, and the cost associated with redesign of the factory and redesign or acquisition of more hygienic equipment. The cost associated with an effective quality assurance plan is well worth the effort to prevent the situations described.

  17. Constructing minimum-cost flow-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Doreen A.; Weng, Jia F.

    2002-09-01

    In the construction of a communication network, the length of the network is an important but not unique factor determining the cost of the network. Among many possible network models, Gilbert proposed a flow-dependent model in which flow demands are assigned between each pair of points in a given point set A, and the cost per unit length of a link in the network is a function of the flow through the link. In this paper we first investigate the properties of this Gilbert model: the concavity of the cost function, decomposition, local minimality, the number of Steiner points and the maximum degree of Steiner points. Then we propose three heuristics for constructing minimum cost Gilbert networks. Two of them come from the fact that generally a minimum cost Gilbert network stands between two extremes: the complete network G(A) on A and the edge-weighted Steiner minimal tree W(A) on A. The first heuristic starts with G(A) and reduces the cost by splitting angles; the second one starts with both G(A) and W(A), and reduces the cost by selecting low cost paths. As a generalisation of the second heuristic, the third heuristic constructs a new Gilbert network of less cost by hybridising known Gilbert networks. Finally we discuss some considerations in practical applications.

  18. On the piecewise convex or concave nature of ground state energy as a function of fractional number of electrons for approximate density functionals.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Yang, Weitao

    2017-02-21

    We provide a rigorous proof that the Hartree Fock energy, as a function of the fractional electron number, E(N), is piecewise concave. Moreover, for semi-local density functionals, we show that the piecewise convexity of the E(N) curve, as stated in the literature, is not generally true for all fractions. By an analysis based on exchange-only local density approximation and careful examination of the E(N) curve, we find for some systems, there exists a very small concave region, corresponding to adding a small fraction of electrons to the integer system, while the remaining E(N) curve is convex. Several numerical examples are provided as verification. Although the E(N) curve is not convex everywhere in these systems, the previous conclusions on the consequence of the delocalization error in the commonly used density functional approximations, in particular, the underestimation of ionization potential, and the overestimation of electron affinity, and other related issues, remain unchanged. This suggests that instead of using the term convexity, a modified and more rigorous description for the delocalization error is that the E(N) curve lies below the straight line segment across the neighboring integer points for these approximate functionals.

  19. Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow and Pressure Gradient on Boundary Layer Transition Along the Concave Surface of a Curved Plate. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Radke, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Boundary layer transition and development on a turbomachinery blade is subjected to highly periodic unsteady turbulent flow, pressure gradient in longitudinal as well as lateral direction, and surface curvature. To study the effects of periodic unsteady wakes on the concave surface of a turbine blade, a curved plate was utilized. On the concave surface of this plate, detailed experimental investigations were carried out under zero and negative pressure gradient. The measurements were performed in an unsteady flow research facility using a rotating cascade of rods positioned upstream of the curved plate. Boundary layer measurements using a hot-wire probe were analyzed by the ensemble-averaging technique. The results presented in the temporal-spatial domain display the transition and further development of the boundary layer, specifically the ensemble-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity. As the results show, the turbulent patches generated by the wakes have different leading and trailing edge velocities and merge with the boundary layer resulting in a strong deformation and generation of a high turbulence intensity core. After the turbulent patch has totally penetrated into the boundary layer, pronounced becalmed regions were formed behind the turbulent patch and were extended far beyond the point they would occur in the corresponding undisturbed steady boundary layer.

  20. Cost Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Education administrators involved in construction initiatives unanimously agree that when it comes to change orders, less is more. Change orders have a negative rippling effect of driving up building costs and producing expensive project delays that often interfere with school operations and schedules. Some change orders are initiated by schools…

  1. Focused, phased-array plane piston and spherically-shaped concave piston transducers: comparison for the same aperture and focal point.

    PubMed

    Warriner, Renée K; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2012-04-01

    It has sometimes been assumed that the phased-array plane piston transducer and the spherically-shaped concave piston transducer are equivalent structures when both have the same aperture and focal point. This assumption has not been previously examined, nor has an expression for the on-axis impulse response of the focused, phased-array plane piston transducer been derived. It is shown in this paper how such an expression can be obtained. Comparisons of the impulse response for both structures show similarities, as well as some differences that could be significant as the observation point approaches the focal point. Comparisons are also performed for wide-band pulses close to the focus as well as for sinusoidal excitation. A physical explanation for the cause of the impulse response discrepancy is shown to be due to the nature of the piston focusing delay and its effect on the Rayleigh integral.

  2. 3D modelling of interaction of strongly nonlinear internal seiches with a concave lake topography and a phenomenon of the "lake monsters".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Kateryna; Maderich, Vladimir; Brovchenko, Igor; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2013-04-01

    In the freshwater lakes in moderate latitudes stratification occurs as a result of the seasonal warming of the surface water layer. Than the intense wind surges (usually in autumn) tilt the surface and generate long basin-scale low-frequency standing internal waves (seiches). Depending on the initial interface tilt and stratification wide spectra of possible flow regimes can be observed [1]-[2].They varied from small amplitude symmetric seiches to large amplitude nonlinear waves.Nonlinearity leads to an asymmetry of internal waves and appearance of the surge or bore and further disintegration of it on a sequence of solitary waves. In present study degeneration of the strongly nonlinear internal seiches in elongated lakes with a concave "spoon-like" topography is investigated.Two different three-dimensional non-hydrostatic free-surface numerical models are used to investigate degeneration of large internal waves and its subsequent interaction with the concave lake slope. One of this model is non-hydrostatic model [3] and the other is a well-known MIT model. At first we consider idealized elongated elliptic-shape lake with the dimension of 5 km X 1 km with the maximal depth 30 m. The stratification in lake is assumed to be given in a form of the tangent function with a density difference between upper and lower layers 2 kgm-3 . It is assumed that motion in such lake is initiated by inclination of thermocline on a certain angle. Than lake adjusts to return to its original state producing internal seiches which begin interacting with a bottom topography. The process of degeneration of internal seiches in the lake with concave ends consist of chain of elementary processes: 1) steeping of long basin scale large amplitude wave, that evolve into internal surge, 2) surge interact with concave lake ends that leads the concentration of the flow and formation of down slope bottom jet along the lake axis, 3) due to cumulative effect local velocity in the jet accelerates up to

  3. Exploiting concave-convex linear resonators to design end-pumped solid-state lasers with flexible cavity lengths: Application for exploring the self-mode-locked operation.

    PubMed

    Tuan, P H; Chang, C C; Lee, C Y; Cho, C Y; Liang, H C; Chen, Y F

    2016-11-14

    The characteristics of a convex-concave linear resonator under the thermal lensing effect are theoretically analyzed to find an analytical model for designing end-pumped solid-state lasers with flexible cavity lengths. By exploiting the design model, the power scaling for continuous-wave operation under strong thermal lensing can be easily achieved in the proposed resonator with different cavity lengths. Furthermore, the proposed resonator is applied to explore the exclusive influence of cavity length on the self-mode-locked (SML) operation. It is discovered that the lasing longitudinal modes will split into multiple groups in optical spectrum to lead to a multi-pulse mode-locked temporal state when the cavity length increases. Finally, a theoretical model is derived to reconstruct the experimental results of SML operation to deduce a simple relationship between the group number of lasing modes and the cavity length.

  4. Preparation of concave magnetoplasmonic core-shell supraparticles of gold-coated iron oxide via ion-reducible layer-by-layer method for surface enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Song, Younseong; Tran, Van Tan; Kim, Jeonghyo; Park, Enoch Y; Lee, Jaebeom

    2017-03-23

    Preparation of suprastructure assemblies with unique colloidal and optical properties remains challenging. Non-uniform covering of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with an external inert Au shell has been attempted to protect the magnetic core against oxidation as well as to produce multifunctional supraparticles (SPs) possessing respective optical and magnetic properties. In this study, a concave Au NP coating was deposited on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with precise control of the shell thickness and roughness through a layer-by-layer (LbL) assisted ionic reduction method termed ion-reducible LbL (IR-LbL) method. Surface enhanced Raman spectra were obtained using graphene quantum dots (GQDs) on the magnetically aligned structure of the prepared core-shell SPs. It is probable that this synthesis method and the generated SPs are essential for characterizing the merge of electronics and magnetism in the nano-regime and may be applicable for further electronics, magnetic storage, and biomedical applications.

  5. The Economics of NASA Mission Cost Reserves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Sally; Shinn, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Increases in NASA mission costs are well-noted but not well-understood, and there is little evidence that they are decreasing in frequency or amount over time. The need to control spending has led to analysis of the causes and magnitude of historical mission overruns, and many program control efforts are being implemented to attempt to prevent or mitigate the problem (NPR 7120). However, cost overruns have not abated, and while some direct causes of increased spending may be obvious (requirements creep, launch delays, directed changes, etc.), the underlying impetus to spend past the original budget may be more subtle. Gaining better insight into the causes of cost overruns will help NASA and its contracting organizations to avoid .them. This paper hypothesizes that one cause of NASA mission cost overruns is that the availability of reserves gives project team members an incentive to make decisions and behave in ways that increase costs. We theorize that the presence of reserves is a contributing factor to cost overruns because it causes organizations to use their funds less efficiently or to control spending less effectively. We draw a comparison to the insurance industry concept of moral hazard, the phenomenon that the presence of insurance causes insureds to have more frequent and higher insurance losses, and we attempt to apply actuarial techniques to quantifY the increase in the expected cost of a mission due to the availability of reserves. We create a theoretical model of reserve spending motivation by defining a variable ReserveSpending as a function of total reserves. This function has a positive slope; for every dollar of reserves available, there is a positive probability of spending it. Finally, the function should be concave down; the probability of spending each incremental dollar of reserves decreases progressively. We test the model against available NASA CADRe data by examining missions with reserve dollars initially available and testing whether

  6. Parametric Cost Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis is a mathematical approach to estimating cost. Parametric cost analysis uses non-cost parameters, such as quality characteristics, to estimate the cost to bring forth, sustain, and retire a product. This paper reviews parametric cost analysis and shows how it can be used within the cost deployment process.

  7. Recent developments in finishing of deep concave, aspheric, and plano surfaces utilizing the UltraForm 5-axes computer controlled system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambrick, Scott; Bechtold, Mike; DeFisher, Scott; Mohring, David; Meisenzahl, Joe

    2009-05-01

    OptiPro Systems has developed a robust 5-axes computer controlled platform, for implementation of the sub-aperture UltraForm Finishing (UFF) process specifically focused on finishing AlON, spinel and transparent polycrystalline alumina (PCA) steep concave, convex and ogive shaped infrared domes and aspheres. Traditional manufacturing of optical components typically involves a three-stage process: grinding, lapping and polishing. The lapping and polishing stages are focused at reducing the surface roughness while preserving the integrity of the form acquired during grinding. Polishing of non spherical and irregular shapes is nearly impossible using traditional full aperture techniques. However, finishing these non-spherical and irregular shapes is possible using UltraForm Finishing. A brief description of the evolution of the UltraForm hardware and processes will be presented, with the current hardware developments. A review of the results with regard to form/figure and roughness improvements on glass, AlON and transparent PCA will be presented using a variety of grinding and finishing abrasives. Differences in the abrasive materials, some bound, and others loose in a slurry have a large impact on the process cycle time and resultant surface roughness.

  8. Costs and cost containment in nursing homes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H L; Fottler, M D

    1981-01-01

    The study examines the impact of structural and process variables on the cost of nursing home care and the utilization of various cost containment methods in 43 california nursing homes. Several predictors were statistically significant in their relation to cost per patient day. A diverse range of cost containment techniques was discovered along with strong predictors of the utilization of these techniques by nursing home administrators. The trade-off between quality of care and cost of care is discussed. PMID:7228713

  9. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  10. Costs and cost-minimisation analysis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R

    1993-09-18

    Whatever kind of economic evaluation you plan to undertake, the costs must be assessed. In health care these are first of all divided into costs borne by the NHS (like drugs), by patients and their families (like travel), and by the rest of society (like health education). Next the costs have to be valued in monetary terms; direct costs, like wages, pose little problem, but indirect costs (like time spent in hospital) have to have values imputed to them. And that is not all: costs must be further subdivided into average, marginal, and joint costs, which help decisions on how much of a service should be provided. Capital costs (investments in plant, buildings, and machinery) are also important, as are discounting and inflation. In this second article in the series Ray Robinson defines the types of costs, their measurement, and how they should be valued in monetary terms.

  11. Equipment Cost Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-24

    The ECE application forecasts annual costs of preventive and corrective maintenance for budgeting purposes. Features within the application enable the user to change the specifications of the model to customize your forecast to best fit their needs and support “what if” analysis. Based on the user's selections, the ECE model forecasts annual maintenance costs. Preventive maintenance costs include the cost of labor to perform preventive maintenance activities at the specific frequency and labor rate. Corrective maintenance costs include the cost of labor and the cost of replacement parts. The application presents forecasted maintenance costs for the next five years in two tables: costs by year and costs by site.

  12. Velocity of closure of Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave mitral valves: effect of mitral annulus orientation and rate of left ventricular pressure rise.

    PubMed

    Blick, E F; Wieting, D W; Inderbitzen, R; Schreck, S; Stein, P D

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine analytically the hemodynamic factors that affect the closing velocity of the disc of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) prosthetic mitral valves. The motion of the BSCC disk was modelled by Newton's second law written in the form of a second order differential equation which expressed the instantaneous angle of the disc with respect to the valve ring as a function of the instantaneous pressure drop across the mitral valve, delta P(t), and the angle of the pressure gradient vector acting upon the disc during closure. The disc closes in response to the negative pressure drop created by the crossover of left atrial and left ventricular (LV) pressures. The rate of closure depends on the rate of development of the pressure drop across the valve, d delta P/dt, which is largely dependent upon the rate of change of left ventricular pressure during isovolumic contraction, LV dP/dt. The closure rate is also strongly dependent on the initial angle of the pressure drop vector with respect to the disc. The disc was predicted to reach its highest velocity at the moment of impact, based on the Runge-Kutta solution. Modelling suggests that a high LV dP/dt during valve closure or distorted LV geometry, causing the angle between the fully open disc and the pressure drop vector to shift, will cause the valve to have a high velocity at the moment of impact and may produce high impact loads.

  13. Predicting hospital accounting costs

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Cretin, Shan; Witsberger, Christina J.

    1989-01-01

    Two alternative methods to Medicare Cost Reports that provide information about hospital costs more promptly but less accurately are investigated. Both employ utilization data from current-year bills. The first attaches costs to utilization data using cost-charge ratios from the previous year's cost report; the second uses charges from current year's bills. The first method is the more accurate of the two, but even using it, only 40 percent of hospitals had predicted costs within plus or minus 5 percent of actual costs. The feasibility and cost of obtaining cost reports from a small, fast-track sample of hospitals should be investigated. PMID:10313352

  14. Price and cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  15. Measuring Library Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlynarczyk, Frank, Jr.

    Based on the premise that cost measurement for a library can be performed in the same manner as for an industrial organization, this paper presents a hypothetical cost determination problem of a small company which produces bricks. A summary of the five steps taken to develop the various cost figures are: (1) Assign all cost items to the…

  16. Design-to-cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, F. E.

    1974-01-01

    Attempts made to design to costs equipment, vehicles and subsystems for various space projects are discussed. A systematic approach, based on mission requirement analysis, definition of a mission baseline design, benefit and cost analysis, and a benefit-cost analysis was proposed for implementing the cost control program.

  17. GME: at what cost?

    PubMed

    Young, David W

    2003-11-01

    Current computing methods impede determining the real cost of graduate medical education. However, a more accurate estimate could be obtained if policy makers would allow for the application of basic cost-accounting principles, including consideration of department-level costs, unbundling of joint costs, and other factors.

  18. Estimating airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    A review was made of the factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs. From this work, an airline operating cost model was developed which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model, similar in some respects to the standard Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Direct Operating Cost Model, permits estimates of aircraft-related costs not now included in the standard ATA model (e.g., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees). A study of the cost of aircraft delay was also made and a method for estimating the cost of certain types of airline delay is described.

  19. Estimating Airline Operating Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs were used to develop an airline operating cost model which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model permits estimates of aircraft related costs, i.e., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees. A method for estimating the costs of certain types of airline delay is also described.

  20. OOTW COST TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  1. Total Cost Management: Analyzing Operational Support Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    Total cost management, an innovation useful in higher education, is best implemented in the institution's support services. Total cost management is the practice of analyzing and improving an institution's financial and qualitative performance when producing a particular product or service, paying attention to the complete work process and all…

  2. Cost Benefit Analysis vs Cost Consequences Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David

    1999-01-01

    Describes cost consequences analysis as a means to estimate whether the value of results obtained is worth the investment. Discusses how CCA differs from other evaluation tools, return on investment, and theoretical underpinnings of cost benefit analysis (CBA), and contends that there is no substantive difference between CCA and CBA. (Author/LRW)

  3. Measurement of costs.

    PubMed

    Riewpaiboon, Arthorn

    2008-06-01

    Costing plays an important role in health economics, particularly economic evaluation. However, there are some controversial issues: concepts, methods and reference values. Hence, it is pivotal to standardize can be con costing methods and use these as national guidelines to produce comparable studies. This report is divided perspectives. into 3 parts: theoretical issues, international guidelines comparison, and recommendations for the Thai technology assessment guidelines. Each section is composed of three general costing steps: identification, appropriate, measuring and valuation. It is recommended to measure economic or opportunity cost mainly in societal perspective. Cost category is composed of direct medical, direct non-medical and indirect costs. The level of reliability of each kind of costing source data is provided. Valuation of resource use based on national government, standard cost menu is recommended for national policy making. The recommendations on cost measurement are appropriate for the Thai context and in the current situation.

  4. Structure of drying costs

    SciTech Connect

    Sztabert, Z.T.

    1996-05-01

    A knowledge of cost structure and cost behavior is necessary in the management activities, particularly in the domain of investment or production decision making, as well as in the areas of production cost planning and control. Prediction and analysis of values of cost components for different technologies of drying are important when selection of a drying method and drying equipment should be done. Cost structures of lumber and coal drying processes together with an application of the factor method for prediction of the drying cost are presented.

  5. Managing Information On Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taulbee, Zoe A.

    1990-01-01

    Cost Management Model, CMM, software tool for planning, tracking, and reporting costs and information related to costs. Capable of estimating costs, comparing estimated to actual costs, performing "what-if" analyses on estimates of costs, and providing mechanism to maintain data on costs in format oriented to management. Number of supportive cost methods built in: escalation rates, production-learning curves, activity/event schedules, unit production schedules, set of spread distributions, tables of rates and factors defined by user, and full arithmetic capability. Import/export capability possible with 20/20 Spreadsheet available on Data General equipment. Program requires AOS/VS operating system available on Data General MV series computers. Written mainly in FORTRAN 77 but uses SGU (Screen Generation Utility).

  6. Estimating 'costs' for cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Miners, Alec

    2008-01-01

    Since 1999, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Technology Appraisal Programme has been charged with producing guidance for the NHS in England and Wales on the appropriate use of new and existing healthcare programmes. Guidance is based on an assessment of a number of factors, including cost effectiveness. The identification, measurement and valuation of costs are important components of any cost-effectiveness analysis. However, working through these steps raises a number of important methodological questions. For example, how should 'future' resource use be estimated, and is there a need to consider all 'future' costs? Given that NICE produces national guidance, should national unit cost data be used to value resources or should local variations in negotiated prices be taken into account? This paper was initially prepared as a briefing paper as part of the process of updating NICE's 2004 Guide to the Methods of Technology Appraisal for a workshop on 'costs'. It outlines the issues that were raised in the original briefing paper and the subsequent questions that were discussed at the workshop.

  7. Cost Planning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Brian

    1974-01-01

    The third installment of a Building Cost File points out the necessity of providing a framework for overall cost control during design. A cost analysis (see EA 504 571) illustrates how the use of construction elements or subsystems provide a suitable means. Other related articles are EA 503 949, 950, 951, and EA 504 578-579. (MF)

  8. Costing and pricing.

    PubMed

    Jones, T

    1993-01-01

    With spreadsheets at the ready, accountants in the NHS are waiting to apply the uniform costing methodology emerging from the National Steering Group on Costing. Before the money-number-crunchers hijack its eventual final report Costing for contracts, general managers need to work out the implications for their role in pricing services and contracts.

  9. Opportunity Cost: A Reexamination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Is opportunity cost an ambiguous and arbitrary concept or a simple, straightforward, and fruitful one? This reexamination of opportunity cost addresses this question, and shows that opportunity cost is an ambiguous concept because "two" definitions are in widespread use. One of the definitions is indeed simple, fruitful, and one that…

  10. COST OF MTBE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread contamination of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in ground water has raised concerns about the increased cost of remediation of MTBE releases compared to BTEX-only sites. To evaluate these cost, cost information for 311 sites was furnished by U.S. EPA Office of Undergr...

  11. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  12. Ion propulsion cost effectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zafran, S.; Biess, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Ion propulsion modules employing 8-cm thrusters and 30-cm thrusters were studied for Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) applications. Recurring and nonrecurring cost elements were generated for these modules. As a result, ion propulsion cost drivers were identified to be Shuttle charges, solar array, power processing, and thruster costs. Cost effective design approaches included short length module configurations, array power sharing, operation at reduced thruster input power, simplified power processing units, and power processor output switching. The MMS mission model employed indicated that nonrecurring costs have to be shared with other programs unless the mission model grows. Extended performance missions exhibited the greatest benefits when compared with monopropellant hydrazine propulsion.

  13. Net Shape Spin Formed Cryogenic Aluminum Lithium Cryogenic Tank Domes for Lower Cost Higher Performance Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Hoffman, Eric; Domack, Marcia; Brewster, Jeb; Russell, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of lower cost (simplified manufacturing and lower part count) and higher performance (higher strength to weight alloys) the NASA Technical Maturation Program in 2006 funded a proposal to investigate spin forming of space launch vehicle cryogenic tank domes. The project funding continued under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program through completion in FY12. The first phase of the project involved spin forming of eight, 1 meter diameter "path finder" domes. Half of these were processed using a concave spin form process (MT Aerospace, Augsburg Germany) and the other half using a convex process (Spincraft, Boston MA). The convex process has been used to produce the Ares Common Bulkhead and the concave process has been used to produce dome caps for the Space Shuttle light weight external tank and domes for the NASDA H2. Aluminum Lithium material was chosen because of its higher strength to weight ratio than the Aluminum 2219 baseline. Aluminum lithium, in order to obtain the desired temper (T8), requires a cold stretch after the solution heat treatment and quench. This requirement favors the concave spin form process which was selected for scale up. This paper describes the results of processing four, 5.5 meter diameter (upper stage scale) net shaped spin formed Aluminum Lithium domes. In order to allow scalability beyond the limits of foundry and rolling mills (about 12 foot width) the circular blank contained one friction stir weld (heavy lifter scales require a flat blank containing two welds). Mechanical properties data (tensile, fracture toughness, stress corrosion, and simulated service testing) for the parent metal and weld will also be discussed.

  14. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly.

  15. Cost optimization in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Bach, A; Martin, E; Böttiger, B W

    2001-04-01

    As a result of the progress which has been made in medicine and technology and the increase in morbidity associated this demographic development, the need and thus the costs for medical care have increased as well. The financial resources which are available for medical care, however, are still limited and hence the funds which are available must be distributed more efficiently. Cost optimisation measures can help make better use of the profitability reserves in hospitals. The authors show how costs can be optimised in the anaesthesiology department of a clinic. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of the new inhalation anaesthetics shows an example of how the cost structures in anaesthesia can be made more obvious and potential ways savings be implemented. To reduce material and personnel costs, a more rational means of internal process management is presented. According to cost-effectiveness analysis, medications are not divided into the categories inexpensive and expensive but rather cost-effective or non-cost-effective. By selecting a cost-effective drug it is possible to reduce cost at a hospital. For example, sevoflurane at a fresh gas flow of below 3 l/min has been shown to be a cost-effective inhalation anaesthetic which, in terms of the economics, is also superior to intravenous anaesthesia with propofol. In addition to these measures of reducing material costs, other examples are given of how personnel costs can be reduced by optimising work procedures: e.g. effective operating theatre co-ordination, short switchover times by overlapping anaesthesia induction and the use of multifunctional personnel. The gain in productivity which is a result of these measures can positively affect profits, and by optimising the organisation of procedures to shorten the times required to carry out a procedure, costs can be reduced.

  16. Concepts of Cost and Cost Analysis for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Paul T.; Allen, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    Concepts of costs and cost analysis in higher education are examined, along with how to prepare for a cost study. Specific cost analysis techniques are identified, along with types of data generated and potential problems. In preparing for cost studies, it is important to consider: purpose, types of cost analysis, types of cost, common…

  17. 77 FR 43542 - Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413-Cost Accounting Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... BUDGET Office of Federal Procurement Policy 48 CFR Part 9904 Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413--Cost Accounting Standards Pension Harmonization Rule AGENCY: Cost Accounting... correcting amendments. SUMMARY: The Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP), Cost Accounting...

  18. Flash xenon CPV simulator with low-cost elastic bent-trough mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Noboru; Okamoto, Kazuya; Ijiro, Toshikazu; Kiryu, Mitsugu; Yoshida, Takanori

    2013-09-01

    In the research and development of concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) systems, a highly collimated artificial sunlight source with a wide irradiated area is very helpful in the reliable evaluation of module efficiency and optical performance. To collimate the light, a conventional flash xenon CPV simulator uses an expensive large concave mirror. This paper introduces a new flash xenon CPV simulator that consists of two low-cost elastic bent-trough mirrors. The prototype simulator achieved an irradiance deviation of less than 10%, collimation of 0.228° - 0.330°, and good spectral matching at an irradiated area of 700 mm × 500 mm. The major drawback of the present concept is that the flash lamp must provide higher emissive power than the conventional method because of the light attenuation caused by the two reflections from the mirrors.

  19. Heliostat cost optimization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Reeken, Finn; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Keck, Thomas; Balz, Markus

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for a heliostat cost optimization study. First different variants of small, medium sized and large heliostats are designed. Then the respective costs, tracking and optical quality are determined. For the calculation of optical quality a structural model of the heliostat is programmed and analyzed using finite element software. The costs are determined based on inquiries and from experience with similar structures. Eventually the levelised electricity costs for a reference power tower plant are calculated. Before each annual simulation run the heliostat field is optimized. Calculated LCOEs are then used to identify the most suitable option(s). Finally, the conclusions and findings of this extensive cost study are used to define the concept of a new cost-efficient heliostat called `Stellio'.

  20. Cost Index Flying

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    continually alter applicable cost indexes . Computed KC-10 Cost Index Equation Using the dollar figures given above, our CI equation reads : CI = CT / C...COST INDEX FLYING GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER John M. Mirtich, Major, USAF AFIT/IMO/ENS/11-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED

  1. Designer's unified cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, William T.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Swanson, G. D.; Gutowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual and preliminary designers' cost prediction model has been initiated. The model will provide a technically sound method for evaluating the relative cost of different composite structural designs, fabrication processes, and assembly methods that can be compared to equivalent metallic parts or assemblies. The feasibility of developing cost prediction software in a modular form for interfacing with state of the art preliminary design tools and computer aided design programs is being evaluated. The goal of this task is to establish theoretical cost functions that relate geometric design features to summed material cost and labor content in terms of process mechanics and physics. The output of the designers' present analytical tools will be input for the designers' cost prediction model to provide the designer with a data base and deterministic cost methodology that allows one to trade and synthesize designs with both cost and weight as objective functions for optimization. The approach, goals, plans, and progress is presented for development of COSTADE (Cost Optimization Software for Transport Aircraft Design Evaluation).

  2. Designers' unified cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, W.; Ilcewicz, L.; Swanson, G.; Gutowski, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Structures Technology Program Office (STPO) at NASA LaRC has initiated development of a conceptual and preliminary designers' cost prediction model. The model will provide a technically sound method for evaluating the relative cost of different composite structural designs, fabrication processes, and assembly methods that can be compared to equivalent metallic parts or assemblies. The feasibility of developing cost prediction software in a modular form for interfacing with state-of-the-art preliminary design tools and computer aided design programs is being evaluated. The goal of this task is to establish theoretical cost functions that relate geometric design features to summed material cost and labor content in terms of process mechanics and physics. The output of the designers' present analytical tools will be input for the designers' cost prediction model to provide the designer with a database and deterministic cost methodology that allows one to trade and synthesize designs with both cost and weight as objective functions for optimization. This paper presents the team members, approach, goals, plans, and progress to date for development of COSTADE (Cost Optimization Software for Transport Aircraft Design Evaluation).

  3. ''When Cost Measures Contradict''

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P. M.

    2003-05-09

    When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

  4. Cost model for biobanks.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, M Beatriz; Lopez-Valeiras, Ernesto; Morente, Manuel M; Fernández Lago, Orlando

    2013-10-01

    Current economic conditions and budget constraints in publicly funded biomedical research have brought about a renewed interest in analyzing the cost and economic viability of research infrastructures. However, there are no proposals for specific cost accounting models for these types of organizations in the international scientific literature. The aim of this paper is to present the basis of a cost analysis model useful for any biobank regardless of the human biological samples that it stores for biomedical research. The development of a unique cost model for biobanks can be a complicated task due to the diversity of the biological samples they store. Different types of samples (DNA, tumor tissues, blood, serum, etc.) require different production processes. Nonetheless, the common basic steps of the production process can be identified. Thus, the costs incurred in each step can be analyzed in detail to provide cost information. Six stages and four cost objects were obtained by taking the production processes of biobanks belonging to the Spanish National Biobank Network as a starting point. Templates and examples are provided to help managers to identify and classify the costs involved in their own biobanks to implement the model. The application of this methodology will provide accurate information on cost objects, along with useful information to give an economic value to the stored samples, to analyze the efficiency of the production process and to evaluate the viability of some sample collections.

  5. ECOM - ESA's cost modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatelnig, Peter K.

    1996-01-01

    ESA, as an international procurement agency dealing with more than 1200 companies at the same time, must have the ability to assess the price for a product independently from other sources. Especially in the today's environment of flat or even declining budgets ESA has to ensure the value of the contributions coming from their member states. The paper presents a software tool developed by the Cost Analysis Division of ESTEC/ESA, which fits exactly the need for precise and retracable cost estimates for space business projects and components. As an introduction the driving needs and basic cost estimation techniques are presented. ECOM was conceived as a tool for independent price assessment and cost estimation. The gem within ECOM is the database, it contains historical data from ESA projects. The items are grouped in classes and the available data comprises the cost breakdown and the technical description, which are the main performance parameter, number of models, design status and beside the comments, also pictures are available. On the estimate part of ECOM it features all the well-known cost estimation techniques, like estimating using analogy, cost estimating relationship, parametric cost modelling, and includes links to commercial products (PCM, Price-H) as well. ECOM is capable of escalating for any given economical condition and any member state. To prepare reliable prize estimates, the cost analysts need the product tree, the work-package description, the technical description and the HW-matrix. The paper shows examples for the important steps of producing an estimate and is enhanced with authentical screen prints. ECOM is used by the Cost Analysis Division as an expert tool for professional cost estimation for space business projects.

  6. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost threshold and cost limit. 149.115 Section 149... REQUIREMENTS FOR THE EARLY RETIREE REINSURANCE PROGRAM Reinsurance Amounts § 149.115 Cost threshold and cost limit. The following cost threshold and cost limits apply individually, to each early retiree as...

  7. What Does it Really Cost? Allocating Indirect Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert; Davenport, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    Better managerial control in terms of decision making and understanding the costs of a system/service result from allocating indirect costs. Allocation requires a three-step process: selecting cost objectives, pooling related overhead costs, and selecting costs bases to connect the objectives to the pooled costs. Argues that activity-based costing…

  8. Analyzing Bilingual Education Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Joe J.

    This paper examines the particular problems involved in analyzing the costs of bilingual education and suggests that cost analysis of bilingual education requires a fundamentally different approach than that followed in other recent school finance studies. Focus of the discussion is the Intercultural Development Research Association's (IDRA)…

  9. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  10. An Eye on Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2000-01-01

    Presents the 11th annual residence hall construction report showing larger sized residence halls are costing less to construct. Statistics are presented of cost ranges for residence hall construction, the amenities being added to today's residence halls, and classroom- and science-building construction. (GR)

  11. Designing for Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Unal, Resit

    1991-01-01

    Designing for cost is a state of mind. Of course, a lot of technical knowledge is required and the use of appropriate tools will improve the process. Unfortunately, the extensive use of weight based cost estimating relationships has generated a perception in the aerospace community that the primary way to reduce cost is to reduce weight. Wrong! Based upon an approximation of an industry accepted formula, the PRICE H (tm) production-production equation, Dean demonstrated theoretically that the optimal trajectory for cost reduction is predominantly in the direction of system complexity reduction, not system weight reduction. Thus the phrase "keep it simple" is a primary state of mind required for reducing cost throughout the design process.

  12. Transmission line capital costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

  13. Mask cost and specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hisashi; Higashikawa, Iwao

    2003-12-01

    At the panel discussion of Photomask Japan 2003, we discussed about Mask cost and specification. The topics are (1) Mask price trend and its impact, (2) How to reduce the mask costs; solutions from a mask shop, mask writing tool and mask inspection tool 3) Partnering mask suppliers with mask users; reasonable mask specification and OPC strategies. The choice of DUV laser writer instead of e-beam writer is one solution for reduction of mask cost. The continuous improvement of e-beam writer and resist sensitivity for high throughput is another solution. The partnership between designer, EDA vender, mask maker and wafer lithographer becomes more important.

  14. Biosimilar Insulin and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The costs for insulin treatment are high, and the steady increase in the number of patients with diabetes on insulin presents a true challenge to health care systems. Therefore, all measures to lower these costs are welcomed by patients, physicians, and health care providers. The market introduction of biosimilar insulins presents an option to lower treatment costs as biosimilars are usually offered at a lower price than the originator product. However, the assumption that a drastic reduction in insulin prices will take place, as was observed with many generic drugs, is most probably not realistic. As the first biosimilar insulin has now been approved in the EU, this commentary discusses a number of aspects that are relevant when it comes to the potential cost reduction we will see with the use of biosimilar insulins. PMID:26350722

  15. Planning for Cost Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlaebitz, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A heat pump life-cycle cost analysis is used to explain the technique. Items suggested for the life-cycle analysis approach include lighting, longer-life batteries, site maintenance, and retaining experts to inspect specific building components. (MLF)

  16. Analyzing EUV mask costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lercel, Michael; Kasprowicz, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) as a replacement for multiple patterning is based on improvements of cycle time, yield, and cost. Earlier cost studies have assumed a simple assumption that EUV masks (being more complex with the multilayer coated blank) are not more than three times as expensive as advanced ArFi (ArF immersion) masks. EUV masks are expected to be more expensive during the ramp of the technology because of the added cost of the complex mask blank, the use of EUV specific mask tools, and a ramp of yield learning relative to the more mature technologies. This study concludes that, within a range of scenarios, the hypothesis that EUV mask costs are not more than three times that of advanced ArFi masks is valid and conservative.

  17. Operational cost drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Arthur L.; Dickinson, William J.

    1988-01-01

    To be economically viable, the operations cost of launch vehicles must be reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to the Space Transportation System (STS). A summary of propulsion-related operations cost drivers derived from a two-year study of Shuttle ground operations is presented. Examples are given of the inordinate time and cost of launch operations caused by propulsion systems designs that did not adequately consider impacts on prelaunching processing. Typical of these cost drivers are those caused by central hydraulic systems, storable propellants, gimballed engines, multiple propellants, He and N2 systems and purges, hard starts, high maintenance turbopumps, accessibility problems, and most significantly, the use of multiple, nonintegrated RCS, OMS, and main propulsion systems. Recovery and refurbishment of SRBs have resulted in expensive crash and salvage operations. Vehicle system designers are encouraged to be acutely aware of these cost drivers and to incorporate solutions (beginning with the design concepts) to avoid business as usual and costs as usual.

  18. How much does curation cost?

    PubMed

    Karp, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    NIH administrators have recently expressed concerns about the cost of curation for biological databases. However, they did not articulate the exact costs of curation. Here we calculate the cost of biocuration of articles for the EcoCyc database as $219 per article over a 5-year period. That cost is 6-15% of the cost of open-access publication fees for publishing biomedical articles, and we estimate that cost is 0.088% of the cost of the overall research project that generated the experimental results. Thus, curation costs are small in an absolute sense, and represent a miniscule fraction of the cost of the research.

  19. How much does curation cost?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    NIH administrators have recently expressed concerns about the cost of curation for biological databases. However, they did not articulate the exact costs of curation. Here we calculate the cost of biocuration of articles for the EcoCyc database as $219 per article over a 5-year period. That cost is 6–15% of the cost of open-access publication fees for publishing biomedical articles, and we estimate that cost is 0.088% of the cost of the overall research project that generated the experimental results. Thus, curation costs are small in an absolute sense, and represent a miniscule fraction of the cost of the research. PMID:27504008

  20. Costs of predicting IDDM.

    PubMed

    Hahl, J; Simell, T; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Simell, O

    1998-01-01

    Programmes aiming at prediction and prevention of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), a multifactorial autoimmune disease, have been launched or are in the planning phase in several countries. We hypothesized that the costs of finding the correct target subjects for preventive interventions are likely to vary markedly according to the prediction strategy chosen. Average direct costs accruing in the Finnish IDDM Prediction and Prevention Project (DIPP) were analysed from the health care provider's viewpoint. The genetically targeted strategy included costs of assessing genetic IDDM susceptibility followed by measurement of marker(s) of islet autoimmunity in the susceptibility restricted population at 3 to 6-month intervals. In the pure immunological strategy markers of autoimmunity were repeatedly analysed in the entire population. The data were finally exposed to sensitivity analysis. The genetically targeted prediction strategy is cost-saving in the first year if autoimmune markers are analysed as frequently as under the DIPP project, and in all circumstances later. The 10-year direct costs per child are US$ 245 (present value $ 217, 5% discount rate) if the genetically targeted approach is used and $ 733 (present value $ 619) if the pure immunological strategy is chosen. In sensitivity analysis the 10-year costs (present value) per child of the genetically targeted strategy and of the pure immunological strategy varied from $ 152 to $ 241 and from $ 430 to $ 788, respectively. The genetically targeted IDDM prediction strategy is remarkably cost-saving as compared with the pure immunological strategy mainly because fewer subjects will need retesting during the follow-up.

  1. Tokamak reactor cost model based on STARFIRE/WILDCAT costing

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A cost model is presented which is useful for survey and comparative studies of tokamak reactors. The model is heavily based on STARFIRE and WILDCAT costing guidelines, philosophies, and procedures and reproduces the costing for these devices quite accurately.

  2. Reducing Life-Cycle Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roodvoets, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Presents factors to consider when determining roofing life-cycle costs, explaining that costs do not tell the whole story; discussing components that should go into the decision (cost, maintenance, energy use, and environmental costs); and concluding that important elements in reducing life-cycle costs include energy savings through increased…

  3. Containing Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Derzon, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    As the federal government shifted from its traditional roles in health to the payment for personal health care, the relationship between public and private sectors has deteriorated. Today federal and state revenue funds and trusts are the largest purchasers of services from a predominantly private health system. This financing or “gap-filling” role is essential; so too is the purchaser's concern for the costs and prices it must meet. The cost per person for personal health care in 1980 is expected to average $950, triple for the aged. Hospital costs vary considerably and inexplicably among states; California residents, for example, spend 50 percent more per year for hospital care than do state of Washington residents. The failure of each sector to understand the other is potentially damaging to the parties and to patients. First, and most important, differences can and must be moderated through definite changes in the attitudes of the protagonists. PMID:6770551

  4. Sweetener lowers costs

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, T.; Rosenstock, G.

    1983-10-01

    Mericat sweetening was used to get increased capacity needed by debottlenecking the FCCU at the Ruhr Refinery, Deutsche BP. A low conversion cost initiated the decision to adapt an existing copper chloride sweetener to Mericat but operating experience underscores the value of the choice because operating costs have been only 84% of design while anticipated capacity has been exceeded. Consequently, payout was accelerated to only about four months. Design specifications required that Light Cat Cracked Naphtha (LCCN) containing a maximum of 100 ppmw of mercaptan sulfur be sweetened to a maximum of 10 ppmw while caustic carryover sodium content not exceed 5 ppmw and that the sweetened LCCN meet Copper Strip No. 1 rating. Official tests based on runs with two different crude sources resulted in performance as shown in this paper. Operating costs of the copper chloride sweetening system before conversion and the Mericat system after conversion are also shown.

  5. Technology and healthcare costs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Medicine in the 21st century is increasingly dependent on technology. Unlike in many other areas, the cost of medical technology is not declining and its increasing use contributes to the spiraling healthcare costs. Many medical professionals equate progress in medicine to increasing use of sophisticated technology that is often expensive and beyond the reach of the average citizen. Pediatric heart care is very technology-intensive and therefore very expensive and beyond the reach of the vast majority of children in the developing world. There is an urgent need to address this situation through development and use of appropriate technology in accordance with the needs and priorities of the society. A number of simple and inexpensive quality measures that have the potential of improving outcomes substantially without the need for expensive equipment should be instituted before embracing high-end technology. Innovations to reduce costs that are commonly used in limited resource environments should be tested systematically. PMID:21677816

  6. General methodology: Costing, budgeting, and techniques for benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stretchberry, D. M.; Hein, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    The general concepts of costing, budgeting, and benefit-cost ratio and cost-effectiveness analysis are discussed. The three common methods of costing are presented. Budgeting distributions are discussed. The use of discounting procedures is outlined. The benefit-cost ratio and cost-effectiveness analysis is defined and their current application to NASA planning is pointed out. Specific practices and techniques are discussed, and actual costing and budgeting procedures are outlined. The recommended method of calculating benefit-cost ratios is described. A standardized method of cost-effectiveness analysis and long-range planning are also discussed.

  7. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  8. COSTS OF URBAN STORMWATER CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents information on the cost of stormwater pollution control facilities in urban areas, including collection, control, and treatment systems. Information on prior cost studies of control technologies and cost estimating models used in these studies was collected, r...

  9. The Cost of Online Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2001-01-01

    Examines development considerations and tips for controlling costs when a university decides to develop an online distance learning service. Use of the interactive Web Site for Determining Costs tool for unveiling hidden costs is highlighted. (GR)

  10. Underestimation of Project Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    Large projects almost always exceed their budgets. Estimating cost is difficult and estimated costs are usually too low. Three different reasons are suggested: bad luck, overoptimism, and deliberate underestimation. Project management can usually point to project difficulty and complexity, technical uncertainty, stakeholder conflicts, scope changes, unforeseen events, and other not really unpredictable bad luck. Project planning is usually over-optimistic, so the likelihood and impact of bad luck is systematically underestimated. Project plans reflect optimism and hope for success in a supposedly unique new effort rather than rational expectations based on historical data. Past project problems are claimed to be irrelevant because "This time it's different." Some bad luck is inevitable and reasonable optimism is understandable, but deliberate deception must be condemned. In a competitive environment, project planners and advocates often deliberately underestimate costs to help gain project approval and funding. Project benefits, cost savings, and probability of success are exaggerated and key risks ignored. Project advocates have incentives to distort information and conceal difficulties from project approvers. One naively suggested cure is more openness, honesty, and group adherence to shared overall goals. A more realistic alternative is threatening overrun projects with cancellation. Neither approach seems to solve the problem. A better method to avoid the delusions of over-optimism and the deceptions of biased advocacy is to base the project cost estimate on the actual costs of a large group of similar projects. Over optimism and deception can continue beyond the planning phase and into project execution. Hard milestones based on verified tests and demonstrations can provide a reality check.

  11. Cost efficient command management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Theresa; Murphy, C. W.; Kuntz, Jon; Barlett, Tom

    1996-01-01

    The design and implementation of a command management system (CMS) for a NASA control center, is described. The technology innovations implemented in the CMS provide the infrastructure required for operations cost reduction and future development cost reduction through increased operational efficiency and reuse in future missions. The command management design facilitates error-free operations which enables the automation of the routine control center functions and allows for the distribution of scheduling responsibility to the instrument teams. The reusable system was developed using object oriented methodologies.

  12. Drilling cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Capuano, L.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Louis E. Capuano, Jr., President, ThermaSource, Inc., discusses cost-cutting in the drilling phase of geothermal energy exploration and production. All aspects of a geothermal project including the drilling must be streamlined to make it viable and commercial. If production could be maximized from each well, there would be a reduction in drilling costs. This could be achieved in several ways, including big hole and multi-hole completion, directional drilling, better knowledge of the resource and where to penetrate, etc.

  13. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  14. Cost Validation Using PRICE H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, John; Kwan, Eric; Wood, Milana

    2011-01-01

    PRICE H was introduced into the JPL cost estimation tool set circa 2003. It became more available at JPL when IPAO funded the NASA-wide site license for all NASA centers. PRICE H was mainly used as one of the cost tools to validate proposal grassroots cost estimates. Program offices at JPL view PRICE H as an additional crosscheck to Team X (JPL Concurrent Engineering Design Center) estimates. PRICE H became widely accepted ca, 2007 at JPL when the program offices moved away from grassroots cost estimation for Step 1 proposals. PRICE H is now one of the key cost tools used for cost validation, cost trades, and independent cost estimates.

  15. Curbing Workers' Comp Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, William S.

    1998-01-01

    An actuarial study revealed that Pasadena Schools had an unfunded worker's compensation liability of over $10 million and 400 open claims. Advised to implement strong cost-containment measures (an early return-to-work program) and equally strong accountability measures (strict performance guides and safe work practices), the district achieved…

  16. Cost Is Not Everything.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Russell T.

    1985-01-01

    Reports results of survey of 21 smaller to medium-sized (50,000-200,000 volumes) libraries which was conducted to determine factors used to make selection decisions in purchase of automated turnkey systems from established vendors. Factors examined include costs, software, hardware, and vendors for parts A (actual experience) and B (hypothetical…

  17. Cost Effective Prototyping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickman, Jerry L.; Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory exercise seeks to develop a cost effective prototype development. The exercise has the potential of linking part design, CAD, mold development, quality control, metrology, mold flow, materials testing, fixture design, automation, limited parts production and other issues as related to plastics manufacturing.

  18. Opportunity Cost: A Reply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The author's objective for this reply in reexamining opportunity cost was to draw attention to two conflicting definitions of the concept in current use and to argue the case for dropping one of them. The comments of Daniel Arce, Rod O'Donnell, and Daniel Stone might be read as demonstration that the author has failed on both counts. Such a…

  19. Cutting Transportation Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Barbara

    1982-01-01

    Beginning on the front cover, this article tells how school districts are reducing their transportation costs. Particularly effective measures include the use of computers for bus maintenance and scheduling, school board ownership of buses, and the conversion of gasoline-powered buses to alternative fuels. (Author/MLF)

  20. Student Housing Cost Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Univ. Residential Building System.

    Target costs for the University Residential Building System (URBS) Project of the University of California are presented. Findings depict the effectiveness of building design and material applications and should be useful in guiding future student housing design work, whether the design utilizes the URBS system or not. Ten recently constructed…

  1. Covering Construction Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    1997-01-01

    A 1996 U.S. General Accounting Office report indicates one-third of the nation's schools need $111 billion worth of repairs or partial replacement. Local school districts cannot keep up with enrollment increases or construction costs and will receive little help from federal or state governments. Capital improvement funding inequities are heating…

  2. Understanding Higher Education Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Public discussion of higher education costs frequently confuses price with expenditure. This article examines factors associated with increases in the sticker price of a college education and the expenditures incurred by institutions in delivering that education. The discussion suggests that while growth in college tuition is real, access to…

  3. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David; Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  4. Costs and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two models of cost benefit analysis are illustrated and the application of these models to assessing the economic scope of space applications programs was discussed. Four major areas cited as improvable through space derived information - food supply and distribution, energy sources, mineral reserves, and communication and navigation were - discussed. Specific illustrations are given for agriculture and maritime traffic.

  5. Educational Costs and Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallak, Jacques, Comp.

    This seminar focused on costs and productivity as they are defined within both education and economics. Some topics that received special attention were: definition problems, estimating methods, analysis methods, existing research results, and examples of improvement in educational efficiency. The document groups seminar papers under (1) general…

  6. Cost Recovery Through Depreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Robert T.; Wesolowski, Leonard V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of adopting depreciation rather than use allowance in order to recover more accurately the cost of college buildings and equipment used on federal projects is considered. It is suggested that depreciation will offer most colleges and universities a higher annual recovery rate, and an opportunity for better facilities planning. For…

  7. 76 FR 53378 - Cost Accounting Standards: Accounting for Insurance Costs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... the measurement and allocation of the cost of infrequent and difficult to predict events. The FAR at... BUDGET Office of Federal Procurement Policy 48 CFR Part 9904 Cost Accounting Standards: Accounting for Insurance Costs AGENCY: Cost Accounting Standards Board (Board), Office of Federal Procurement Policy...

  8. Manned Mars mission cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaker, Joseph; Smith, Keith

    1986-01-01

    The potential costs of several options of a manned Mars mission are examined. A cost estimating methodology based primarily on existing Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) parametric cost models is summarized. These models include the MSFC Space Station Cost Model and the MSFC Launch Vehicle Cost Model as well as other modes and techniques. The ground rules and assumptions of the cost estimating methodology are discussed and cost estimates presented for six potential mission options which were studied. The estimated manned Mars mission costs are compared to the cost of the somewhat analogous Apollo Program cost after normalizing the Apollo cost to the environment and ground rules of the manned Mars missions. It is concluded that a manned Mars mission, as currently defined, could be accomplished for under $30 billion in 1985 dollars excluding launch vehicle development and mission operations.

  9. Tapping Transaction Costs to Forecast Acquisition Cost Breaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    transaction costs are not explicitly measured for MDAPs, the authors use estimates of systems engineering and program management (SE/PM) costs as a...the original baseline estimate as a threshold against which to measure cost growth (National Defense, 2006). The new standard prevents DoD from...transaction costs ( costs associated with “source selection,… contract negotiation and management, performance measuring and monitoring, and dispute

  10. Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study

    SciTech Connect

    Szymczak, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

  11. Cost Realism Handbook for Assuring More Realistic Contractor Cost Proposals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    realism. Solicitation: Specify cost realism in addition ,:) Government estimated cost as cost evaluation sub- - ieria in the solicitation and specify the...Analogy techniques involve extrapolations from actual costs for similar systems. Other techniques may include the use of industry wide factors. Parametric...of sources (e.g., actual costs for similar systems and industry wide factors) may be used to supplement the estimates based on specific contractor

  12. Cost Accounting for Decision Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneklides, Ann L.

    1985-01-01

    Underscores the importance of informed decision making through accurate anticipation of cost incurrence in light of changing economic and environmental conditions. Explains the concepts of cost accounting, full allocation of costs, the selection of an allocation base, the allocation of indirect costs, depreciation, and implications for community…

  13. Elements of Designing for Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Unal, Resit

    1992-01-01

    During recent history in the United States, government systems development has been performance driven. As a result, systems within a class have experienced exponentially increasing cost over time in fixed year dollars. Moreover, little emphasis has been placed on reducing cost. This paper defines designing for cost and presents several tools which, if used in the engineering process, offer the promise of reducing cost. Although other potential tools exist for designing for cost, this paper focuses on rules of thumb, quality function deployment, Taguchi methods, concurrent engineering, and activity based costing. Each of these tools has been demonstrated to reduce cost if used within the engineering process.

  14. Elements of designing for cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.; Unal, Resit

    1992-01-01

    During recent history in the United States, government systems development has been performance driven. As a result, systems within a class have experienced exponentially increasing cost over time in fixed year dollars. Moreover, little emphasis has been placed on reducing cost. This paper defines designing for cost and presents several tools which, if used in the engineering process, offer the promise of reducing cost. Although other potential tools exist for designing for cost, this paper focuses on rules of thumb, quality function deployment, Taguchi methods, concurrent engineering, and activity-based costing. Each of these tools has been demonstrated to reduce cost if used within the engineering process.

  15. Space station: Cost and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Costs for developing, producing, operating, and supporting the initial space station, a 4 to 8 man space station, and a 4 to 24 man space station are estimated and compared. These costs include contractor hardware; space station assembly and logistics flight costs; and payload support elements. Transportation system options examined include orbiter modules; standard and extended duration STS fights; reusable spacebased perigee kick motor OTV; and upper stages. Space station service charges assessed include crew hours; energy requirements; payload support module storage; pressurized port usage; and OTV service facility. Graphs show costs for science missions, space processing research, small communication satellites; large GEO transportation; OVT launch costs; DOD payload costs, and user costs.

  16. Alignment-Insensitive Lower-Cost Telescope Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Hagopian, John; Dean, Bruce; Howard, Joe

    2008-01-01

    This architecture features an active wavefront sensing and control scheme along with methods for measuring the relative positions of the primary to aft optics, such as the secondary mirror, and should enable larger and cheaper telescope architectures needed for future applications. A wavefront source/sensor is placed at the center of curvature of the primary mirror. The system provides continuous light onto a primary mirror that is retro-reflected onto itself. This allows the wavefront controller to constantly update the positions of the primary mirror segments (or deformable mirror actuators). Another function of this innovation involves using a concave mirror on the back of the secondary mirror (or other aft optic) that has the same center-of-curvature location (in defocus) as the primary mirror. The two return beams can be aligned next to each other on a detector, or radially on top of each other. This provides a means with which to measure the relative position of the primary to the secondary (or other aft optics), thus allowing for the removal of misalignment of the center-of-curvature source/sensor (meaning it doesn't need precision placement) and also provides a means with which to monitor the relative alignment over time. This innovation does not require extremely good thermal stability on the primary mirror and can thus be used in any thermal environment and with cheaper materials. In addition to this, the architecture lets one phase (or align) the primary mirror independent of whether a star or scene is in the field. The segmented, spherical primary allows for cost-effective three-meter class (e.g. Midex and Discovery) missions as well as enabling 30-meter telescope solutions that can be manufactured in a reasonable amount of time. The continuous wavefront sensing and control architecture enables missions for low-Earth-orbit.

  17. Solar energy systems cost

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Five major areas of work currently being pursued in the United States in solar energy which will have a significant impact on the world's energy situation in the future are addressed. The five significant areas discussed include a technical description of several solar technologies, current and projected cost of the selected solar systems, and cost methodologies which are under development. In addition, sensitivity considerations which are unique to solar energy systems and end user applications are included. A total of six solar technologies - biomass, photovoltaics, wind, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), solar thermal, and industrial process heat (IPH) have been included in a brief technical description to present the variety of systems and their techncial status. System schematics have been included of systems which have been constructed, are currently in the detail design and test stage of development, or are of a conceptual nature.

  18. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orren, L. H.; Ziman, G. M.; Jones, S. C.; Lee, T. K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model was used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents was analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance were examined.

  19. Exploration cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Huttrer, J.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Jerry Huttrer, President, Geothermal Management Company, discusses the general state of exploration in the geothermal industry today, and mentions some ways to economize and perhaps save costs of geothermal exploration in the future. He suggests an increased use of satellite imagery in the mapping of geothermal resources and the identification of hot spots. Also, coordinating with oil and gas exploration efforts, the efficiency of the exploration task could be optimized.

  20. Cost and Price Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    Management and currently teaches acquisition and program management courses for the Defense Acquisition University (DAU). Rao is part of the faculty of...Engineering and Management , Air Force Institute of Technology Cost and Price Collaboration Venkat Rao, Professor, Defense Acquisition University David Holm...the 12 states within the Midwest. Rao is also the Site Lead for the DAU-Midwest Sterling Heights office and has broad program management and product

  1. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orren, L. H.; Ziman, G. M.; Jones, S. C.; Lee, T. K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-01-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model was used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents was analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance were examined.

  2. Integrated Cost Accounting System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-27

    few other companies. Harvard Business Review contained articles explaining the ideas behind the new costing methods and examples of applications...technical report. Peter Drucker in an article in Harvard Business Review ’carefully explains that accounting must change in response to the changes in...Kaplan in a Harvard Business Review article develop the idea of four levels of activities: facility sustaining activities; product-sustaining activities

  3. Cost-utility analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, R

    1993-01-01

    Decisions have to be made about allocating health resources. Currently the best economic evaluation method for doing this is cost-utility analysis. This compares the costs of different procedures with their outcomes measured in "utility based" units--that is, units that relate to a person's level of wellbeing. The most commonly used unit is the quality adjusted life year (QALY). QALYs are calculated by estimating the total life years gained from a procedure and weighting each year to reflect the quality of life in that year. To compare outcomes of different programmes the Rosser index is one measure that is widely used to assign quality of life scores to patients. Combined with a measure of life years gained from a procedure, this enables QALYs to be calculated and procedures ranked according to cost per QALY gained. In this article Ray Robinson explains the measures used and discusses how QALY league tables can be used to guide decisions on resource allocation. Images p862-a PMID:8401133

  4. The costs of rape.

    PubMed

    Perilloux, Carin; Duntley, Joshua D; Buss, David M

    2012-10-01

    The current study examined costs experienced by victims of completed rape (n=49) and attempted sexual assault (n=91) using quantitative analyses of 13 domains: health, self-esteem, self-perceived attractiveness, self-perceived mate value, family relationships,work life, social life, social reputation, sexual reputation, desire to have sex, frequency of sex, enjoyment of sex, and long-term, committed relationships. Women also provided descriptive accounts of their experiences, and we used these to illustrate the costs in the victims' own words.Compared to victims of an attempted sexual assault, victims of a completed rape reported significantly more negative outcomes in 11 of the 13 domains. The most negatively affected domains were self-esteem, sexual reputation, frequency of sex, desire to have sex, and self-perceived mate value. Although victims of rape experienced more negative effects than victims of attempted sexual assault,both groups of victims reported negative effects in every domain.Discussion focuses on the implications of the differing degrees and patterns of the costs of attempted and completed sexual victimization.

  5. Proposed reliability cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1973-01-01

    The research investigations which were involved in the study include: cost analysis/allocation, reliability and product assurance, forecasting methodology, systems analysis, and model-building. This is a classic example of an interdisciplinary problem, since the model-building requirements include the need for understanding and communication between technical disciplines on one hand, and the financial/accounting skill categories on the other. The systems approach is utilized within this context to establish a clearer and more objective relationship between reliability assurance and the subcategories (or subelements) that provide, or reenforce, the reliability assurance for a system. Subcategories are further subdivided as illustrated by a tree diagram. The reliability assurance elements can be seen to be potential alternative strategies, or approaches, depending on the specific goals/objectives of the trade studies. The scope was limited to the establishment of a proposed reliability cost-model format. The model format/approach is dependent upon the use of a series of subsystem-oriented CER's and sometimes possible CTR's, in devising a suitable cost-effective policy.

  6. Equipment life cycle costs minimised.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, Sharon

    2004-11-01

    With the cost of energy now a major component of building operating costs, NHS Trust managers increasingly focus on estimating total life cycle costs of equipment such as boiler room and heat, steam and incineration plant. "Life cycle costing" is a broad term and encompasses a wide range of techniques that take into account both initial and future costs as well as the savings of an investment over a period of time.

  7. Accounting for future costs in medical cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, D

    1997-02-01

    Most medical cost-effectiveness analyses include future costs only for related illnesses, but this approach is controversial. This paper demonstrates that cost-effectiveness analysis is consistent with lifetime utility maximization only if it includes all future medical and non-medical expenditures. Estimates of the magnitude of these future costs suggest that they may substantially alter both the absolute and relative cost-effectiveness of medical interventions, particularly when an intervention increases length of life more than quality of life. In older populations, current methods overstate the cost-effectiveness of interventions which extend life compared to interventions which improve the quality of life.

  8. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  9. Low cost space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    It is pointed out that a contradiction between boundless space and limited resources has put the space program in the distressing position of cutting good and worthy projects from its activities during this decade. One approach to ameliorate the situation is to increase the productivity of space activities by greater utilization of the equipment developed for its projects. The Space Shuttle constitutes the first big step in that direction. The reusable character of the Shuttle orbiter will cut operational costs by permitting recovery and reuse of payload equipment through routine round-trip operations to space.

  10. Cost Improvement Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    aaencies to aid in estimating the cost of selected Government hardware items. Its application has been quite conspicuous ir airframe production where...O r.0 OCCO I0 C COO.. - - . g ** *.~~~~. . .* . . .a .a e . . r . . C.Ot . .~C -0~O0 ag g 88-etc tea -c- ss..-e r este ~¶¶~ n:s a::: 9--t Tie~ c. a...qudntLt,-i Oil the fol lowing: LUT TOTAL LAuOR HIOURS AVLRAGL LABUR HOURS LOT SIZE PER LOT FOR LUT 1 8 2312 289 2 16 2672 167 3 26 3120 120 4 32 3040 95 5

  11. Cataract, cost: curious questions.

    PubMed

    Moran, D J

    1999-02-01

    An investigation of the pricing of implantable prosthetic devices in Australia reveals some alarming practices. A governmental mechanism exists to prop up the pricing of 7500 listed devices to levels that are unacceptably high by world standards. Private hospitals and doctors are able, legally, to profit by marking up the cost of these devices from the market price to this artificially inflated price. Even the open market prices of implantable prosthetic items, such as intra-ocular lenses, are high by international standards. In a time of budgetary constraint for health spending and rapidly increasing use of these devices, these issues urgently need to be addressed in Australia.

  12. The cost of IT security.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Mac

    2015-04-01

    Breaches in data security have become commonplace in health care, making IT security a necessary cost for healthcare organizations. Organizations that do not invest proactively in IT security face a significant risk of incurring much greater costs from incidents involving compromised data security. Direct costs of security breaches include the costs of discovery, response, investigation, and notification and also can include state or federal penalties and costs of compliance with corrective action plans and resolution agreements. Hidden costs can include damage to brand, loss of consumer confidence, reduced HCAHPS scores, and--by extension--reduced value-based purchasing payments.

  13. Activity-Based Costing: A Cost Management Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    In college and university administration, overhead costs are often charged to programs indiscriminately, whereas the support activities that underlie those costs remain unanalyzed. It is time for institutions to decrease ineffective use of resources. Activity-based management attributes costs more accurately and can improve efficiency. (MSE)

  14. Cost-Plus-Percentage-of-Costs in Government Contracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    you estimate what this research would have cost if it had been accomplished under contract or if it had been done in-house *. - in terms of manpower...Prohibition Based on Cost Type Contracts . .. .. .. .. .. ... .81 Safeguards to Prevent CPPC Cost manipulations................82 * VII. COMPENSATION UNDER ...ILLEGAL CPPC CONTRACTS ... *... . . .. .. .. .. . 85 Plain Illegality Rule .. ..... . . . . 85 * Implied Contract Recovery Under the Tucker Act

  15. Costs in Perspective: Understanding Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Detsky

    1996-01-01

    This paper covers five questions: (1) What is cost-effectiveness analysis;quest; (2) How can cost-effectiveness analysis help policymakers allocate scarce resources;quest; (3) What are misconceptions about the cost effectiveness of health care interventions;quest; (4) What is an attractive cost-effectiveness ratio;quest; (5) What is the relevance of cost effectiveness to clinicians? The cost side of the equation includes more than simply the cost of the intervention, but rather the cost of all of the downstream clinical events that occur with either therapeutic alternative. Cost-effectiveness analyses are used to help decisionmakers rank programs competing for scarce resources in order to achieve the following objective: to maximize the net health benefits derived from a fixed budget for a target population. A simple example is shown. Measured cost-effectiveness ratios for selected cardiovascular interventions are displayed. The systematic use of information on effectiveness and cost effectiveness should help those involved in setting policies to have a more rational basis for funding of new programs and discontinuation of funding for old programs. In Canadian health care it is important that we use this information to make room for innovations that are effective and efficient, and to remove funding from programs that are either known to be ineffective and costly or inefficient use of resources. More energy should be put toward generating the information necessary to make these kinds of decisions.

  16. The cost of linearization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Danielle; Levy, William B.

    2006-03-01

    Information processing in the brain is metabolically expensive and energy usage by the different components of the nervous system is not well understood. In a continuing effort to explore the costs and constraints of information processing at the single neuron level, dendritic processes are being studied. More specifically, the role of various ion channel conductances is explored in terms of integrating dendritic excitatory synaptic input. Biophysical simulations of dendritic behavior show that the complexity of voltage-dependent, non-linear dendritic conductances can produce simplicity in the form of linear synaptic integration. Over increasing levels of synaptic activity, it is shown that two types of voltage-dependent conductances produce linearization over a limited range. This range is determined by the parameters defining the ion channel and the 'passive' properties of the dendrite. A persistent sodium and a transient A-type potassium channel were considered at steady-state transmembrane potentials in the vicinity of and hyperpolarized to the threshold for action potential initiation. The persistent sodium is seen to amplify and linearize the synaptic input over a short range of low synaptic activity. In contrast, the A-type potassium channel has a broader linearization range but tends to operate at higher levels of synaptic bombardment. Given equivalent 'passive' dendritic properties, the persistent sodium is found to be less costly than the A-type potassium in linearizing synaptic input.

  17. Beyond managed costs.

    PubMed

    Savage, G T; Campbell, K S; Patman, T; Nunnelley, L L

    2000-01-01

    Managed care organizations (MCOs) face an uncertain future. While consolidation and price competition have expanded their market share, health care expenditures are expected to rise in the near future, and the cost containment premise--and promise--of MCOs is being threatened by mixed blessing and nonsupportive stakeholders. To shed light on MCOs' situation, we discuss four drivers for change in health management in the U.S.: technology, regulation, consumerism, and demographics. Using those four drivers, we then assess the various stakeholders in the industry through a competitive analysis and a stakeholder analysis. These analyses suggest that the munificence of the MCO business environment has significantly declined, especially among supplier and buyer stakeholders. Hence, MCOs cannot continue to manage health care costs alone as this will no longer generate sufficient support among buyer and supplier stakeholders. Instead, MCOs must tackle five critical health care issues by working closely with other stakeholders and also by learning what they can from innovative health care initiatives both inside and outside the United States.

  18. Costing and cost analysis in randomized controlled trials: caveat emptor.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Daniel; Glick, Henry

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the central issues regarding cost valuation and analysis for a decision maker's evaluation of costing performed within randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Costing involves specific choices for valuation and analysis that involve trade-offs. Understanding these choices and their implications is necessary for proper evaluation of how costs are valued and analyzed within an RCT and cannot be assessed through a checklist of adherence to general principles. Resource costing, the most common method of costing, involves measuring medical service use in study case report forms and translating this use into a cost by multiplying the number of units of each medical service by price weights for those services. A choice must be made as to how detailed the measurement of resources will be. Micro-costing improves the specificity of the cost estimate, but it is often impractical to precisely measure resources at this level and the price weights for these micro-units may not be available. Gross-costing may be more practical, and price weights are often easier to find and are more reliable, but important resource differences between treatment groups may be lost in the bundling of resources. Price weights can either be nationally determined or centre specific, but the appropriate price weight will depend on perspective, convenience, completeness and accuracy. Identifying the resource types and the appropriate price weights for these resources are the essential elements to an accurate valuation of costs. Once medical services are valued, the resulting individual patient cost estimates must be analysed. The difference in the mean cost between treatment groups is the important summary statistic for cost-effectiveness analysis from both the budgetary and the social perspectives. The statistical challenges with cost data typically stem from its skewed distribution and the resulting possibility that the sample mean may be inefficient and possibly

  19. National Variation in Urethroplasty Cost and Predictors of Extreme Cost: A Cost Analysis with Policy Implications

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Catherine R.; Osterberg, E. Charles; Sanford, Thomas; Alwaal, Amjad; Gaither, Thomas W.; McAninch, Jack W.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine which factors are associated with higher urethroplasty procedural costs and whether they have been increasing or decreasing over time. Identification of determinants of extreme costs may help reduce cost while maintaining quality. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using the 2001–2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project - Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The HCUP-NIS captures hospital charges which we converted to cost using the HCUP Cost-to-Charge Ratio. Log cost linear regression with sensitivity analysis was used to determine variables associated with increased costs. Extreme cost was defined as the top 20th percentile of expenditure, analyzed with logistic regression and expressed as Odds Ratios (OR). Results A total of 2298 urethroplasties were recorded in NIS over the study period. The median (interquartile range) calculated costs was $7321 ($5677–$10000). Patients with multiple comorbid conditions were associated with extreme costs (OR 1.56 95% CI 1.19–2.04, p=0.02) compared to patients with no comorbid disease. Inpatient complications raised the odds of extreme costs OR 3.2 CI 2.14–4.75, p<0.001). Graft urethroplasties were associated with extreme costs (OR 1.78 95% CI 1.2–2.64, p=0.005). Variation in patient age, race, hospital region, bed size, teaching status, payer type, and volume of urethroplasty cases were not associated with extremes of cost. Conclusion Cost variation for perioperative inpatient urethroplasty procedures is dependent on preoperative patient comorbidities, postoperative complications and surgical complexity related to graft usage. Procedural cost and cost variation are critical for understanding which aspects of care have the greatest impact on cost. PMID:27107626

  20. The many costs of sex.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Jussi; Jennions, Michael D; Kokko, Hanna

    2012-03-01

    Explaining the evolution of sex is challenging for biologists. A 'twofold cost' compared with asexual reproduction is often quoted. If a cost of this magnitude exists, the benefits of sex must be large for it to have evolved and be maintained. Focusing on benefits can be misleading, as this sidelines important questions about the cost of sex: what is the source of the twofold cost: males, genome dilution or both? Does the cost deviate from twofold? What other factors make sex costly? How should the costs of sex be empirically measured? The total cost of sex and how it varies in different contexts must be known to determine the benefits needed to account for the origin and maintenance of sex.

  1. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  2. Army Manpower Cost System (AMCOS) Economic and Budget Cost Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-30

    STANDARDS - 963 - A ZRDMServices0opaiy in (o FINAL REPORT Tm ARMY MANPOWER COST SYSTEM4 (ANCOS) ECONOMIC AND BUDGET I COST MODELS CONTRACT NO. N00014...34-- . . .+r7’’ .•. .’. FINAL REPORT ARMY MANPOWER COST SYSTEM (AMCOS) ECONOMIC AND BUDGET COST MODELS CONTRACT NO. N00014-84-C-0712 - JUNE 30, 1985...lack, the Army Research Institute is supporting the development of a family of models in the Army Manpower Cost System -AMCOS). .. ": The work reported

  3. The Costs of Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prusak, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Acquiring knowledge-genuinely learning something new-requires the consent and commitment of the person you're trying to learn from. In contrast to information, which can usually be effectively transmitted in a document or diagram, knowledge comes from explaining, clarifying, questioning, and sometimes actually working together. Getting this kind of attention and commitment often involves some form of negotiation, since even the most generous person's time and energy are limited. Few experts sit around waiting to share their knowledge with strangers or casual acquaintances. In reasonably collaborative enterprises- I think NASA is one-this sort of negotiation isn't too onerous. People want to help each other and share what they know, so the "cost" of acquiring knowledge is relatively low. In many organizations (and many communities and countries), however, there are considerable costs associated with this activity, and many situations in which negotiations fail. The greatest knowledge cost is in and adopting knowledge to one's own use. Sometimes this means formally organizing what one learns in writing. Sometimes it means just taking time to reflect on someone else's thoughts and experiences-thinking about knowledge that is not exactly what you need but can lead you to develop ideas that will be useful. A long, discursive conversation, with all the back-and-forth that defines conversation, can be a mechanism of knowledge exchange. I have seen many participants at NASA APPEL Masters Forums talking, reflecting, and thinking-adapting what they are hearing to their own needs. Knowledge transfer is not a simple proposition. An enormous amount of information flows through the world every day, but knowledge is local, contextual, and "stickyn-that is, it takes real effort to move it from one place to another. There is no way around this. To really learn a subject, you have to work at it, you have to pay your "knowledge dues." So while, thanks to advances in technology

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  5. Attrition Cost Model Instruction Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanagiura, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This instruction manual explains in detail how to use the Attrition Cost Model program, which estimates the cost of student attrition for a state's higher education system. Programmed with SAS, this model allows users to instantly calculate the cost of attrition and the cumulative attrition rate that is based on the most recent retention and…

  6. Creative Control of Building Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, William Dudley, Jr., Ed.

    Architects and other authorities interested in cost control examine the importance and use of its methods and principles. They outline the major factors in design and construction that determine building costs. The discussions include those elements of maintenance, repair, and replacement that add to the cost of a finished building during its…

  7. Reliability and cost analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suich, Ronald C.

    1991-01-01

    In the design phase of a system, how does a design engineer or manager choose between a subsystem with .990 reliability and a more costly subsystem with .995 reliability? When is the increased cost justified? High reliability is not necessarily an end in itself but may be desirable in order to reduce the expected cost due to subsystem failure. However, this may not be the wisest use of funds since the expected cost due to subsystem failure is not the only cost involved. The subsystem itself may be very costly. We should not consider either the cost of the subsystem or the expected cost due to subsystem failure separately but should minimize the total of the two costs, i.e., the total of the cost of the subsystem plus the expected cost due to subsystem failure. This final report discusses the Combined Analysis of Reliability, Redundancy, and Cost (CARRAC) methods which were developed under Grant Number NAG 3-1100 from the NASA Lewis Research Center. CARRAC methods and a CARRAC computer program employ five models which can be used to cover a wide range of problems. The models contain an option which can include repair of failed modules.

  8. An introduction to cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Camponovo, Ernest

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basics of cost accounting for healthcare providers and how these concepts relate to decision making in medical practice. By understanding cost accounting and cost analysis, providers can be better prepared to compete and survive in a changing healthcare environment.

  9. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the systems integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  10. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  11. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Michael G.

    1988-01-01

    Diverse cost-estimating techniques and data combined into single program. Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM 1.0) is interactive accounting software tool providing means for combining several independent cost-estimating programs into fully-integrated mathematical model capable of assessing costs, analyzing benefits, providing file-handling utilities, and putting out information in text and graphical forms to screen, printer, or plotter. Program based on Lotus 1-2-3, version 2.0. Developed to provide clear, concise traceability and visibility into methodology and rationale for estimating costs and benefits of operations of Space Station tether deployer system.

  12. Solar power satellite cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harron, R. J.; Wadle, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The solar power configuration costed is the 5 GW silicon solar cell reference system. The subsystems identified by work breakdown structure elements to the lowest level for which cost information was generated. This breakdown divides into five sections: the satellite, construction, transportation, the ground receiving station and maintenance. For each work breakdown structure element, a definition, design description and cost estimate were included. An effort was made to include for each element a reference that more thoroughly describes the element and the method of costing used. All costs are in 1977 dollars.

  13. Costing blood products and services.

    PubMed

    Wallace, E L

    1991-05-01

    At present, blood centers and transfusion services have limited alternatives for offsetting the ever-rising costs of health care inputs. In the face of current revenue constraints, cost reduction or cost containment through efficiency improvements or service reduction is the principal available means. Such methods ought to be pursued vigorously by blood bankers with the aid of well-designed costing and other physical measurements systems. Experience indicates, however, that blood bankers, in their attempts to reduce or contain costs, are likely to place undue reliance on cost accounting systems as the means of capturing sought-for benefits. Management must learn enough about methods of costing to judge directly the uses and limitations of the information produced. Such understanding begins with recognition that all costs and cost comparisons should be specific to the purpose for which they are developed. No costing procedure is capable of producing measures generally applicable to all management decisions. A measure relevant to a planning decision is unlikely to be appropriate for performance evaluation. Useful comparisons among sets of organizations of costs, or of measures of physical inputs and outputs, require assurance that the methods of measurement employed are the same and that the sets of organizations from which the measures are drawn are reasonably comparable.

  14. 76 FR 81295 - Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413-Cost Accounting Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Accounting Standard (CAS) 412, ``Composition and Measurement of Pension Cost,'' and CAS 413, ``Adjustment and Allocation of Pension Cost.'' This revision will harmonize the measurement and period assignment of the... cost objectives in accordance with CAS, and the measurement and period assignment requirements...

  15. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Al Juaied, Mohammed . Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam )

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding

  16. Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Plasmodium vivax Control

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael T.; Yeung, Shunmay; Patouillard, Edith; Cibulskis, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The continued success of efforts to reduce the global malaria burden will require sustained funding for interventions specifically targeting Plasmodium vivax. The optimal use of limited financial resources necessitates cost and cost-effectiveness analyses of strategies for diagnosing and treating P. vivax and vector control tools. Herein, we review the existing published evidence on the costs and cost-effectiveness of interventions for controlling P. vivax, identifying nine studies focused on diagnosis and treatment and seven studies focused on vector control. Although many of the results from the much more extensive P. falciparum literature can be applied to P. vivax, it is not always possible to extrapolate results from P. falciparum–specific cost-effectiveness analyses. Notably, there is a need for additional studies to evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of radical cure with primaquine for the prevention of P. vivax relapses with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase testing. PMID:28025283

  17. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  18. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  19. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  20. Solid rocket motor cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harney, A. G.; Raphael, L.; Warren, S.; Yakura, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic and standardized procedure for estimating life cycle costs of solid rocket motor booster configurations. The model consists of clearly defined cost categories and appropriate cost equations in which cost is related to program and hardware parameters. Cost estimating relationships are generally based on analogous experience. In this model the experience drawn on is from estimates prepared by the study contractors. Contractors' estimates are derived by means of engineering estimates for some predetermined level of detail of the SRM hardware and program functions of the system life cycle. This method is frequently referred to as bottom-up. A parametric cost analysis is a useful technique when rapid estimates are required. This is particularly true during the planning stages of a system when hardware designs and program definition are conceptual and constantly changing as the selection process, which includes cost comparisons or trade-offs, is performed. The use of cost estimating relationships also facilitates the performance of cost sensitivity studies in which relative and comparable cost comparisons are significant.

  1. 20 CFR 627.435 - Cost principles and allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... members; (11) Acquisitions of capital assets; (12) Building space costs, including rent, repairs, and... organizational management studies conducted by outside individuals or firms; and (16) Taxes....

  2. 20 CFR 627.435 - Cost principles and allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... members; (11) Acquisitions of capital assets; (12) Building space costs, including rent, repairs, and... organizational management studies conducted by outside individuals or firms; and (16) Taxes....

  3. A model for the cost of doing a cost estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    A model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate for Deep Space Network (DSN) projects that range from $0.1 to $100 million is presented. The cost of the cost estimate in thousands of dollars, C(sub E), is found to be approximately given by C(sub E) = K((C(sub p))(sup 0.35)) where C(sub p) is the cost of the project being estimated in millions of dollars and K is a constant depending on the accuracy of the estimate. For an order-of-magnitude estimate, K = 24; for a budget estimate, K = 60; and for a definitive estimate, K = 115. That is, for a specific project, the cost of doing a budget estimate is about 2.5 times as much as that for an order-of-magnitude estimate, and a definitive estimate costs about twice as much as a budget estimate. Use of this model should help provide the level of resources required for doing cost estimates and, as a result, provide insights towards more accurate estimates with less potential for cost overruns.

  4. Cost-effective nursing practice: cost-awareness and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, P

    1993-12-01

    Cost-effective nursing practice is essential to succeed today as resources allocated to health care are declining. Realizing that any change poses a threat to our security, it is imperative that stakeholders be permitted to participate in decision-making processes affecting their work. An honest, open exchange of ideas towards cost-effective practices should be encouraged. Cost-effective behaviours are influenced significantly by negative attitudes with regard to loss of human resources, increased workload, and potential pay cuts. This article describes innovative strategies which could promote successful cost-effective nursing practice, including working smarter, not working harder. Topics addressed are attitude, awareness and empowerment.

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis in markets with high fixed costs.

    PubMed

    Cutler, David M; Ericson, Keith M Marzilli

    2010-01-01

    We consider how to conduct cost-effectiveness analysis when the social cost of a resource differs from the posted price. From the social perspective, the true cost of a medical intervention is the marginal cost of delivering another unit of a treatment, plus the social cost (deadweight loss) of raising the revenue to fund the treatment. We focus on pharmaceutical prices, which have high markups over marginal cost due to the monopoly power granted to pharmaceutical companies when drugs are under patent. We find that the social cost of a branded drug is approximately one-half the market price when the treatment is paid for by a public insurance plan and one-third the market price for mandated coverage by private insurance. We illustrate the importance of correctly accounting for social costs using two examples: coverage for statin drugs and approval for a drug to treat kidney cancer (sorafenib). In each case, we show that the correct social perspective for cost-effectiveness analysis would be more lenient than researcher recommendations.

  6. Cost Impact Assessment of Cost Accounting Practice Changes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    7A0-A092 434 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/0 5/1 COST IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF COST ACCOUNTING PRACTICE CHANGES.(UlNL S EP 80 J S ANDERSONUN CL...MNGER 4. TITLE (mod Su&CEI* I. Tyss[ of REPORT & 11.1110 Coyenea Cost Impact Assessment of Cost Accounting Master’ s Thesis; September Practice Chages... Accounting ," IICASB,’I "Audits," IV"DCASŕ "Decision Models." 20. ASTMAC T (CO.COuMMO 10 GW 0ewr 0 Ite 00404.....VI 0114 id..CEF of 001111 inmb,) *This

  7. 42 CFR 417.540 - Enrollment costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Enrollment costs. 417.540 Section 417.540 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.540 Enrollment costs. (a) Principle. Enrollment costs are... of costs included. Enrollment costs include, but are not limited to, reasonable costs incurred...

  8. 42 CFR 417.540 - Enrollment costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Enrollment costs. 417.540 Section 417.540 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.540 Enrollment costs. (a) Principle. Enrollment costs are... of costs included. Enrollment costs include, but are not limited to, reasonable costs incurred...

  9. Marginal Costs and Formula-Based Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Ellen

    Marginal cost is the cost of producing an additional unit. In higher education, one marginal cost would be cost of educating an additional student. Formula-based budget determination for public higher education is usually based on average cost per student. This study estimates marginal cost and compares it with average cost. There are several…

  10. [The study of the costs of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Prot-Herczyńska, K

    1998-01-01

    The present paper considers the problems of measurement of the costs of psychiatric services. Classification of costs' studies includes cost of illness, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility studies. Costs should be comprehensively measured. Randomised clinical trial is recommended. Information of costs should be integrated with information on patient outcomes. The paper discusses the research which tries to estimate the costs and benefits of community care, using naturalistic or random patient sample methods.

  11. [The cost of severe dementia].

    PubMed

    Joël, Marie-Eve

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to analyse the methodological difficulties to assess the economic cost of severe dementia from the available data, and the shortcomings of an exclusively economic approach. It is very difficult to provide a reliable account of the cost of severe dementia, when ignoring the initial assessment of the severity and the socio-economic context of the care given to demented persons. When assessing the cost of severe dementia, one needs to know who are the affected individuals, and what medical care they are given - whether at home or inside an institution. While the direct cost can be easily assessed, the indirect cost is more difficult to calculate, and particularly the productivity loss for the caring persons, when they are in occupational activity. Setting up reliable indicators for the cost of dementia is a long process, which needs a clear definition of the target population of the measurement.

  12. Cost Modeling for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are an important tool for planning missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper presents on-going efforts to develop single variable and multi-variable cost models for space telescope optical telescope assembly (OTA). These models are based on data collected from historical space telescope missions. Standard statistical methods are used to derive CERs for OTA cost versus aperture diameter and mass. The results are compared with previously published models.

  13. Forage Harvest and Transport Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.; Downing, M.; Turhollow, A.

    1998-12-01

    An engineering-economic approach is used to calculate harvest, in-field transport, and over-the-road transport costs for hay as bales and modules, silage, and crop residues as bales and modules. Costs included are equipment depreciation interest; fuel, lube, and oil; repairs; insurance, housing, and taxes; and labor. Field preparation, pest control, fertilizer, land, and overhead are excluded from the costs calculated Equipment is constrained by power available, throughput or carrying capacity, and field speed.

  14. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  15. Video distribution system cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershkoff, I.; Haspert, J. K.; Morgenstern, B.

    1980-01-01

    A cost model that can be used to systematically identify the costs of procuring and operating satellite linked communications systems is described. The user defines a network configuration by specifying the location of each participating site, the interconnection requirements, and the transmission paths available for the uplink (studio to satellite), downlink (satellite to audience), and voice talkback (between audience and studio) segments of the network. The model uses this information to calculate the least expensive signal distribution path for each participating site. Cost estimates are broken downy by capital, installation, lease, operations and maintenance. The design of the model permits flexibility in specifying network and cost structure.

  16. Spacecraft platform cost estimating relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhl, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The three main cost areas of unmanned satellite development are discussed. The areas are identified as: (1) the spacecraft platform (SCP), (2) the payload or experiments, and (3) the postlaunch ground equipment and operations. The SCP normally accounts for over half of the total project cost and accurate estimates of SCP costs are required early in project planning as a basis for determining total project budget requirements. The development of single formula SCP cost estimating relationships (CER) from readily available data by statistical linear regression analysis is described. The advantages of single formula CER are presented.

  17. Testing the Cost Yardstick in Cost-Quality Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, James N.

    1967-01-01

    To discover how costs affect quality, 16 different methods of computing educational costs are developed and correlated with a cluster of "quality related" factors (QRC). Data for the correlation were obtained from 1,055 city school districts in 48 states. The QRC is composed of staffing adequacy variables, measures of teacher quality, and…

  18. Estimating the Cost of Doing a Cost Estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    This article provides a model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate...Our earlier work provided data for high technology projects. This article adds data from the construction industry which validates the model over a wider range of technology.

  19. 20 CFR 627.435 - Cost principles and allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system, including the costs of hearings and appeals, and related expenses such as lawyers' fees. Legal...) Legal expenses for the prosecution of claims against the Federal Government, including appeals to an... incurred by the SJTCC, HRIC, PIC's, and other advisory councils or committees; (3) Advertising costs;...

  20. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost threshold and cost limit. 149.115 Section 149.115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS... percentage increase in the Medical Care Component of the Consumer Price Index for all urban...

  1. 45 CFR 149.115 - Cost threshold and cost limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost threshold and cost limit. 149.115 Section 149.115 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS... percentage increase in the Medical Care Component of the Consumer Price Index for all urban...

  2. Low cost sensing of vegetation volume and structure with a Microsoft Kinect sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzari, G.; Goulden, M.

    2011-12-01

    The market for videogames and digital entertainment has decreased the cost of advanced technology to affordable levels. The Microsoft Kinect sensor for Xbox 360 is an infrared time of flight camera designed to track body position and movement at a single-articulation level. Using open source drivers and libraries, we acquired point clouds of vegetation directly from the Kinect sensor. The data were filtered for outliers, co-registered, and cropped to isolate the plant of interest from the surroundings and soil. The volume of single plants was then estimated with several techniques, including fitting with solid shapes (cylinders, spheres, boxes), voxel counts, and 3D convex/concave hulls. Preliminary results are presented here. The volume of a series of wild artichoke plants was measured from nadir using a Kinect on a 3m-tall tower. The calculated volumes were compared with harvested biomass; comparisons and derived allometric relations will be presented, along with examples of the acquired point clouds. This Kinect sensor shows promise for ground-based, automated, biomass measurement systems, and possibly for comparison/validation of remotely sensed LIDAR.

  3. Gauging Technology Costs and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Rich

    2007-01-01

    Regardless of the role technology plays in a school district, district personnel should know the costs associated with technology, understand the consequences of technology purchases, and be able to measure the benefits of technology, so they can make more informed decisions. However, determining costs and benefits of current technology or…

  4. Using Technology to Control Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Simon; Schoenberg, Doug; Richards, Dan; Morath, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors examines the use of technology to control costs in the child care industry. One of these technology solutions is Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). SaaS solutions can help child care providers save money in many aspects of center management. In addition to cost savings, SaaS solutions are also particularly appealing to…

  5. Health Cost Strain School Budgets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Joetta L.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how the rising cost of health insurance is being picked as the top budget concern of school businesses. These data were the result of a survey conducted by the Association of School Business Officials International. Schools report that the cost of insuring employees is outpacing increases in state and local budgets that…

  6. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  7. Learning/cost-improvement curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1976-01-01

    Review guide is an aid to manager or engineer who must determine production costs for components, systems, or services. Methods are described by which manufacturers may use historical data, task characteristics, and current cost data to estimate unit prices as function of number of units to be produced.

  8. How to Cut Publications Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Virginia L., Ed.; Alberger, Patricia A., Ed.

    This handbook on how to cut costs in college publications contains the following articles: "Stretching Your Publications Dollar: The Basics," by Kelvin J. Arden and William J. Whalen; "How to Print Cheaper," by M. Frederic Volkmann; "How Your Colleagues Cut Costs," by Robert S. Topor; "Printing Specifications: Writing Them Right," by M. Frederic…

  9. Program Tracks Cost Of Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III

    1993-01-01

    Travel Forecaster is menu-driven, easy-to-use computer program that plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost of business-related travel of division or branch of organization and compiles information into data base to aid travel planner. Ability of program to handle multiple trip entries makes it valuable time-saving device.

  10. The High Cost of Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasicot, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Describes how school districts, faced with shrinking resources, have cut costs for student transportation. To combat rising transportation costs, districts have charged fees for student transportation, entered into private contracts, cut transportation services, used alternative fuels, and streamlined bus routes and schedules. (LMI)

  11. Distance Education: A Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Judy I.; Simonson, Michael

    The costs of three types of transmission technology in distance education are compared, and the costs for equipping and installing a distance education classroom are estimated. Two of the technologies--fiber optics and microwave--deliver two-way, full motion video and two-way audio. The third technology, compressed video, also delivers two-way…

  12. Cost Benefit Studies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Arthur; Marson, Arthur A.

    This document applies Dr. Mehar Aurora's method for conducting cost benefit studies to the Food Manufacturing Technology-Dairy and the Food Manufacturing Technology-Canning and Freezing programs offered by the Moraine Park Technical Institute. Costs to individual students enrolled in the programs include tuition, fees, housing, travel, books,…

  13. Human Costs of Nuclear Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagan, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the human costs of producing and using nuclear fuel to generate electricity and...whether these costs are equitably compensated for and represented in the price of the electricity.'' Analysis considers estimates of the value of human life, lost productivity, and potential effects of radiation. (Author/AL)

  14. Ultimate Cost of Building Walls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Clayford T.; Gross, James G.

    The need for economic analysis of building walls is discussed, and the factors influencing the ultimate cost of exterior walls are studied. The present worth method is used to analyze three types of exterior non-loadbearing panel or curtain walls. Anticipated costs are expressed in terms of their present value per square foot of wall area. The…

  15. Library Automation: Guidelines to Costing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Geoffrey

    As with all new programs, the costs associated with library automation must be carefully considered before implementation. This document suggests guidelines to be followed and areas to be considered in the costing of library procedures. An existing system model has been suggested as a standard (Appendix A) and a classification of library tasks…

  16. Library Labor Cost Accounting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Bois, Dan

    The Library Labor Cost Accounting System will provide visibility on current costs of manually processing library materials, at each campus as well as system-wide. The scope of the study includes the following: (1) 100 individual activities, grouped into 14 functional areas, e.g., Ordering, Receiving; and into 3 major operations: Acquisitions,…

  17. [Costs and benefits of smoking].

    PubMed

    Polder, J J; van Gils, P F; Kok, L; Talhout, R; Feenstra, T L

    2017-01-01

    - Two recent societal cost-benefit analyses have documented the costs of smoking and the cost-effectiveness of preventing smoking.- Smoking costs the Netherlands society EUR 33 billion per year.- The majority of this is the monetary value of health loss; these are "soft" euros that cannot be re-spent.- There is not a great deal of difference between costs and benefits when expressed in "hard" euros, which means that there is no clear business case for anti-smoking policy.- The greatest benefit of discouraging smoking is improved health for the individual and increased productivity for the business sector; however, the benefits cannot be easily realised, because even in the most favourable scenario the number of smokers will decrease slowly.- Excise duties seem to offer the most promising avenue for combating smoking. The benefits of anti-smoking policy, therefore, consist mainly of tax revenues for the government.- Stringent policy is required to transform tax revenues into health gains.

  18. Sequential Construction of Costly Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gutfraind, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Natural disasters or attacks often disrupt infrastructure networks requiring a costly recovery. This motivates an optimization problem where the objecitve is to construct the nodes of a graph G(V;E), and the cost of each node is dependent on the number of its neighbors previously constructed, or more generally, any properties of the previously-completed subgraph. In this optimization problem the objective is to find a permutation of the nodes which results in the least construction cost. We prove that in the case where the cost of nodes is a convex function in the number of neighbors, the optimal construction sequence is to start at a single node and move outwards. We also introduce algorithms and heuristics for solving various instances of the problem. Those methods can be applied to help reduce the cost of recovering from disasters as well as to plan the deployment of new network infrastructure.

  19. Asymptotic cost in document conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blostein, Dorothea; Nagy, George

    2012-01-01

    In spite of a hundredfold decrease in the cost of relevant technologies, the role of document image processing systems is gradually declining due to the transition to an on-line world. Nevertheless, in some high-volume applications, document image processing software still saves millions of dollars by accelerating workflow, and similarly large savings could be realized by more effective automation of the multitude of low-volume personal document conversions. While potential cost savings, based on estimates of costs and values, are a driving force for new developments, quantifying such savings is difficult. The most important trend is that the cost of computing resources for DIA is becoming insignificant compared to the associated labor costs. An econometric treatment of document processing complements traditional performance evaluation, which focuses on assessing the correctness of the results produced by document conversion software. Researchers should look beyond the error rate for advancing both production and personal document conversion.

  20. Cost Estimation and Control for Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Vanhook, Michael E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good program management practices, cost analysis, cost estimation, and cost control for aerospace flight systems are interrelated and depend upon each other. The best cost control process cannot overcome poor design or poor systems trades that lead to the wrong approach. The project needs robust Technical, Schedule, Cost, Risk, and Cost Risk practices before it can incorporate adequate Cost Control. Cost analysis both precedes and follows cost estimation -- the two are closely coupled with each other and with Risk analysis. Parametric cost estimating relationships and computerized models are most often used. NASA has learned some valuable lessons in controlling cost problems, and recommends use of a summary Project Manager's checklist as shown here.

  1. Cost Overrun Optimism: Fact or Fiction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-29

    COST VARIANCE, TERMED COST OVERRUN COST NOW MONTHS EAC Overrun at Completion Current Overrun BAC ACWP BCWS...ALL 64 18 -3 109 36 -3 493 Equations 1, 2, and 3 define the current cost overrun, the projected cost overrun at completion, and final cost overrun. Of...completion cost . The others are simply the difference between the budget and actual cost of the work. Current overrun (CO) = Cumulative (Cum) BCWP -

  2. Top Level Space Cost Methodology (TLSCM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Work Breakdown Structure CEIT Cost Engineering Integrated Tool CER Cost Estimating Relationship CY$ Constant Year Dollar DCA Defense Communication...ATTACHMENT 6 Cost Models A. Hardware Models ACEIT PRICE SEER CEIT B. Ground Models Fixed and Transportable Earth Stations Model(FATES) Ground Station...Cost Model Cost Engineering Integrated Tool( CEIT ) C. Launch Models Aerospace Launch Cost Model Launch Vehicle Cost Model Cost Engineering Integrated

  3. The Psychology of Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Cost estimation for large (and even not so large) government programs is a challenge. The number and magnitude of cost overruns associated with large Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs highlight the difficulties in developing and promulgating accurate cost estimates. These overruns can be the result of inadequate technology readiness or requirements definition, the whims of politicians or government bureaucrats, or even as failures of the cost estimating profession itself. However, there may be another reason for cost overruns that is right in front of us, but only recently have we begun to grasp it: the fact that cost estimators and their customers are human. The last 70+ years of research into human psychology and behavioral economics have yielded amazing findings into how we humans process and use information to make judgments and decisions. What these scientists have uncovered is surprising: humans are often irrational and illogical beings, making decisions based on factors such as emotion and perception, rather than facts and data. These built-in biases to our thinking directly affect how we develop our cost estimates and how those cost estimates are used. We cost estimators can use this knowledge of biases to improve our cost estimates and also to improve how we communicate and work with our customers. By understanding how our customers think, and more importantly, why they think the way they do, we can have more productive relationships and greater influence. By using psychology to our advantage, we can more effectively help the decision maker and our organizations make fact-based decisions.

  4. 48 CFR 31.202 - Direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Direct costs. 31.202... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.202 Direct costs. (a) No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as a direct cost any cost, if other...

  5. 48 CFR 31.202 - Direct costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direct costs. 31.202... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.202 Direct costs. (a) No final cost objective shall have allocated to it as a direct cost any cost, if other...

  6. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.534 Section 417.534 Public... PLANS Medicare Payment: Cost Basis § 417.534 Allowable costs. (a) Definition—Allowable costs means the direct and indirect costs, including normal standby costs incurred by the HMO or CMP, that are proper...

  7. A Guide To Measuring College Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Gordon C.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that full-cost models in higher education fail to account correctly for capital and financial aid expenditures. Urges full accounting of all cost drivers that impact on higher education expenditures, e.g., operating costs, maintenance costs, physical capital costs, the current replacement value of capital stock, and the opportunity cost of…

  8. Cost analysis of emergency department.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Di Bella, E; Montefiori, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper is intended to examine both clinical and economic data concerning the activity of an emergency department of an Italian primary Hospital. Real data referring to arrivals, waiting times, service times, severity (according to triage classification) of patients' condition collected along the whole 2009 are matched up with the relevant accounting and economic information concerning the costs faced. A new methodological approach is implemented in order to identify a "standard production cost" and its variability. We believe that this kind of analysis well fits the federalizing process that Italy is experiencing. In fact the federal reform is driving our Country toward a decentralized provision and funding of local public services. The health care services are "fundamental" under the provisions of the law that in turn implies that a standard cost has to be defined for its funding. The standard cost (as it is defined by the law) relies on the concepts of appropriateness and efficiency in the production of the health care service, assuming a standard quality level as target. The identification and measurement of health care costs is therefore a crucial task propaedeutic to health services economic evaluation. Various guidelines with different amount of details have been set up for costing methods which, however, are defined in simplified frameworks and using fictious data. This study is a first attempt to proceed in the direction of a precise definition of the costs inherent to the emergency department activity.

  9. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  10. Implications of Transaction Costs for Acquisition Program Cost Breaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    scope of the work, communicating the basis on which the estimate is built, identifying the quality of the data, determining the level of risk, and...projects such as bases, schools, missile storage facilities, maintenance facilities, medical/ dental clinics, libraries, and military family housing...was established as a threshold for measuring cost growth. This prevents a program from rebaselining to avoid a Nunn- McCurdy cost threshold breach. In

  11. Orbital Space Plane Cost Credibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2003-01-01

    NASA's largest new start development program is the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. The program is currently in the formulation stage. One of the critical issues to be resolved, prior to initiating full-scale development, is establishing cost credibility of NASA s budget estimates for development, production, and operations of the OSP. This paper will discuss the processes, tools, and methodologies that NASA, along with its industry partners, are implementing to assure cost credibility for the OSP program. Results of benchmarking of current tools and the development of new cost estimating capabilities and approaches will be discussed.

  12. Low cost solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Mclennan, H.

    1975-01-01

    Limitations in both space and terrestial markets for solar cells are described. Based on knowledge of the state-of-the-art, six cell options are discussed; as a result of this discussion, the three most promising options (involving high, medium and low efficiency cells respectively) were selected and analyzed for their probable costs. The results showed that all three cell options gave promise of costs below $10 per watt in the near future. Before further cost reductions can be achieved, more R and D work is required; suggestions for suitable programs are given.

  13. Costs of pain in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Marsico, A; Atzeni, F; Piroddi, A; Cazzola, M; Stisi, S; Sarzi-Puttini, P

    2014-06-06

    Chronic pain has been identified as an important issue related to various rheumatic diseases. At the time of a major government spending review, it is appropriate to discuss the pain characterising rheumatic diseases and its related costs. It is clearly essential for healthcare authorities to rationalise their policies on the basis of the increasing expectations of the users of healthcare services while simultaneously balancing their books. There are few published studies concerning the costs of pain of any kind, and the same is true of the costs of the chronic pain associated with diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia.

  14. Reduction of Total Ownership Cost

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    overhaul intervals or criteria almost certainly will skew O&S cost data. 61 Stranges, Bill, Coleen ...Databases.” Briefing to Third Annual Naval VAMOSC User Conference. 9 July 2003. - 93 - 40. Stranges, Bill, Coleen Adamson, Andrea Nowicki, and

  15. Cost Sensitive Moving Target Consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Sisi; Li, Yun; Levitt, Karl N.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus is a fundamental approach to implementing fault-tolerant services through replication where there exists a tradeoff between the cost and the resilience. For instance, Crash Fault Tolerant (CFT) protocols have a low cost but can only handle crash failures while Byzantine Fault Tolerant (BFT) protocols handle arbitrary failures but have a higher cost. Hybrid protocols enjoy the benefits of both high performance without failures and high resiliency under failures by switching among different subprotocols. However, it is challenging to determine which subprotocols should be used. We propose a moving target approach to switch among protocols according to the existing system and network vulnerability. At the core of our approach is a formalized cost model that evaluates the vulnerability and performance of consensus protocols based on real-time Intrusion Detection System (IDS) signals. Based on the evaluation results, we demonstrate that a safe, cheap, and unpredictable protocol is always used and a high IDS error rate can be tolerated.

  16. Reductive Degradation: Versatile, Low Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Sewage Works, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article discusses the use of reductive degradation as an economical and effective treatment of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Comparisons with activated carbon treatment show lower capital equipment and treatment costs. (CS)

  17. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000878.htm Understanding your health care costs To use the sharing features on this ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ...

  18. Managing costs and managing care.

    PubMed

    Rivers, P A; Tsai, K L

    2001-01-01

    With a defined population served, contracted provider panels and the nature of care delivery integration, managed care has provided a solution, though not a panacea, to provide equitable services, standardized and prevention oriented cares to its enrolled members. Combined with the earmarked capitation reimbursement system and a series of cost containment and utilization review techniques, managed care has also demonstrated potently its capacity in cost-saving and quality promotion. Presents steps and measures related to managed care that federal government has taken to manage care and contain cost. It is crucial to identify and promulgate best practices continually, while managing utilization of resources for improving health care, containing cost, and equalizing medical care access to a greater proportion of the population. Concludes that it may take time for a universal adoption of managed care. However, Americans may actually benefit more from having a standard level of health care that managed care could achieve and provide.

  19. Managing Costs and Medical Information

    Cancer.gov

    People with cancer may face major financial challenges and need help dealing with the high costs of care. Cancer treatment can be very expensive, even when you have insurance. Learn ways to manage medical information, paperwork, bills, and other records.

  20. Cost and Outcome in Pediatric Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William; Huang, Haijuan; Seiber, Eric; Lo, Warren

    2015-10-01

    The cost of childhood stroke receives little notice. The authors examined potential drivers of cost and outcome to test whether (1) neonatal strokes cost less than childhood strokes, (2) associated diseases influence cost, (3) arterial ischemic stroke is more costly than sinovenous thrombosis, and (4) cost correlates with outcome. The authors reviewed records of 111 children who sustained arterial ischemic stroke or sinovenous thrombosis between 2005 and 2010 to identify costs for the following year. They assessed outcomes in 46 with the Recovery and Recurrence Questionnaire and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Neonatal strokes cost less than childhood stroke. Strokes associated with congenital heart disease or vasculopathy cost the most, while perinatal or idiopathic strokes cost the least. Higher costs are correlated with worse impairment and poorer quality of life. Stroke etiology significantly influences the cost of pediatric stroke. Future cost-benefit studies must consider etiology when estimating the incremental costs associated with stroke.

  1. Acquisition Cost/Price Estimating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    REVIEW AND VALIDATION, (3) RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY AND (4) DATA ANALYSIS. THESE FUNCTIONAL THRUSTS ARE IN TURN FOCUSED TO ESTIMATING AND ANALISIS ...RELATIONSHIPS, CERs, IS LARGELY A FUNCTION OF THE QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF DATA THAT IS AVAILABLE AT THE TINE OF FORMULATION. IN ORDER TO ENSURE THAT SUCH COST...HAVE BEEN DISCUSSED PREVIOUSLY AS GOOD SOURCES OF DATA FOR COST ESTIMATING. THEIR PRIMARY FUNCTION , HOWEVER, IS TO PROVIDE THE ARMY WITH EARLY

  2. Grounds Management Cost Reduction Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    be converted to prairie type vegetation (Aungst 1986). In many states wildflowers are used to improve aesthetics and reduce mowing frequency (Kuennen...m (October 1990). 16. Wilson, Diane " Wildflowers ’ Municipal Field Reports . Public Works (March 1990). 16 DISTRIBUTION LIST Copies CETSO/ESOF 36 Attn...mUIAZIDI YEARLY * SAVINGS A-28 Plant wildflowers to reduce grounds To be determined maintenance cost. A-28 AIR FORCE ROUiNDS AINTrENANCE COST

  3. Incentive Contracts and Cost Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-31

    compensation could not be obtained from the proposed fee, the added return was sought through the cost area. For the large companies very I few...has five sections: 1. Systems Management, 2. Configuration Management, 3. Consolidated Program Managieent , 4. Financial Management, and 5...resulted from increased efficiency and bette" cost control, or from larger U .targets secured by contractors to compensate for the increased risk. S•LThe

  4. Reservoir management cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article by Mohinder S. Gulati, Chief Engineer, Unocal Geothermal Operations, discusses cost cutting in geothermal reservoir management. The reservoir engineer or geoscientist can make a big difference in the economical outcome of a project by improving well performance and thus making geothermal energy more competitive in the energy marketplace. Bringing plants online in less time and proving resources to reduce the cycle time are some of the ways to reduce reservoir management costs discussed in this article.

  5. The social costs of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Bonnie L; Gourevitch, Jesse D; Polasky, Stephen; Isbell, Forest; Tessum, Chris W; Hill, Jason D; Marshall, Julian D

    2016-10-01

    Despite growing recognition of the negative externalities associated with reactive nitrogen (N), the damage costs of N to air, water, and climate remain largely unquantified. We propose a comprehensive approach for estimating the social cost of nitrogen (SCN), defined as the present value of the monetary damages caused by an incremental increase in N. This framework advances N accounting by considering how each form of N causes damages at specific locations as it cascades through the environment. We apply the approach to an empirical example that estimates the SCN for N applied as fertilizer. We track impacts of N through its transformation into atmospheric and aquatic pools and estimate the distribution of associated costs to affected populations. Our results confirm that there is no uniform SCN. Instead, changes in N management will result in different N-related costs depending on where N moves and the location, vulnerability, and preferences of populations affected by N. For example, we found that the SCN per kilogram of N fertilizer applied in Minnesota ranges over several orders of magnitude, from less than $0.001/kg N to greater than $10/kg N, illustrating the importance of considering the site, the form of N, and end points of interest rather than assuming a uniform cost for damages. Our approach for estimating the SCN demonstrates the potential of integrated biophysical and economic models to illuminate the costs and benefits of N and inform more strategic and efficient N management.

  6. The social costs of nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Bonnie L.; Gourevitch, Jesse D.; Polasky, Stephen; Isbell, Forest; Tessum, Chris W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing recognition of the negative externalities associated with reactive nitrogen (N), the damage costs of N to air, water, and climate remain largely unquantified. We propose a comprehensive approach for estimating the social cost of nitrogen (SCN), defined as the present value of the monetary damages caused by an incremental increase in N. This framework advances N accounting by considering how each form of N causes damages at specific locations as it cascades through the environment. We apply the approach to an empirical example that estimates the SCN for N applied as fertilizer. We track impacts of N through its transformation into atmospheric and aquatic pools and estimate the distribution of associated costs to affected populations. Our results confirm that there is no uniform SCN. Instead, changes in N management will result in different N-related costs depending on where N moves and the location, vulnerability, and preferences of populations affected by N. For example, we found that the SCN per kilogram of N fertilizer applied in Minnesota ranges over several orders of magnitude, from less than $0.001/kg N to greater than $10/kg N, illustrating the importance of considering the site, the form of N, and end points of interest rather than assuming a uniform cost for damages. Our approach for estimating the SCN demonstrates the potential of integrated biophysical and economic models to illuminate the costs and benefits of N and inform more strategic and efficient N management. PMID:27713926

  7. Distributed Wind Soft Costs: A Beginning

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Tony; Forsyth,Trudy; Preus, Robert; Christol, Corrie; Orrell, Alice; Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-06-14

    Tony Jimenez presented this overview of distributed wind soft costs at the 2016 Small Wind Conference in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, on June 14, 2016. Soft costs are any non-hardware project costs, such as costs related to permitting fees, installer/developer profit, taxes, transaction costs, permitting, installation, indirect corporate costs, installation labor, and supply chain costs. This presentation provides an overview of soft costs, a distributed wind project taxonomy (of which soft costs are a subset), an alpha data set project demographics, data summary, and future work in this area.

  8. 36 CFR 1210.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1210.27... Management § 1210.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost...

  9. 45 CFR 1183.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1183.22 Section 1183.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  10. 45 CFR 1157.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1157.22 Section 1157.22 Public... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form...

  11. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 1403.22 Section 1403.22 Food and....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  12. 29 CFR 102.171 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.171 Section 102.171 Labor Regulations... By Federal Income Tax Refund Offset § 102.171 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in... amount of the offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  13. 29 CFR 4221.10 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Costs. 4221.10 Section 4221.10 Labor Regulations Relating... PLANS ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES IN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4221.10 Costs. The costs of arbitration under... the costs of its own witnesses. (b) Other costs of arbitration. Except as provided in § 4221.6(d)...

  14. 34 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Education Office... and Program Management § 74.27 Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a set of cost principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs are determined in accordance with the...

  15. 50 CFR 85.41 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 85.41 Section 85.41... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.41 Allowable costs. (a) Allowable grant costs are limited to those costs... applicable Federal cost principles in 43 CFR 12.60(b). Purchase of informational signs, program signs,...

  16. 45 CFR 1174.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 1174.22 Section 1174.22 Public....22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  17. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form...

  18. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84....27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles...

  19. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 24.22 Section 24.22... Administration § 24.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in...

  20. 49 CFR 266.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 266.11 Section 266.11... TRANSPORTATION ACT § 266.11 Allowable costs. Allowable costs include only the following costs which are properly allocable to the work performed: Planning and program operation costs which are allowed under...

  1. 50 CFR 37.46 - Cost reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost reimbursement. 37.46 Section 37.46... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA General Administration § 37.46 Cost reimbursement. (a) Each applicant for... actual costs incurred, including, but not limited to, its direct costs and indirect costs as...

  2. 24 CFR 908.108 - Cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cost. 908.108 Section 908.108..., RENTAL VOUCHER, AND MODERATE REHABILITATION PROGRAMS § 908.108 Cost. (a) General. The costs of the... computer hardware or software, or both, the cost of contracting for those services, or the cost...

  3. 40 CFR 791.50 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Costs. 791.50 Section 791.50 Protection...) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.50 Costs. (a) All costs reasonable and necessary to... tests, are eligible for reimbursement. Necessary costs include: (1) Direct and indirect costs...

  4. 34 CFR 80.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 80.22 Section 80.22 Education Office... Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form...

  5. 29 CFR 4221.10 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Costs. 4221.10 Section 4221.10 Labor Regulations Relating... PLANS ARBITRATION OF DISPUTES IN MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4221.10 Costs. The costs of arbitration under... the costs of its own witnesses. (b) Other costs of arbitration. Except as provided in § 4221.6(d)...

  6. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...

  7. 24 CFR 208.112 - Cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cost. 208.112 Section 208.112... MULTIFAMILY SUBSIDIZED PROJECTS § 208.112 Cost. (a) The costs of the electronic transmission of the correctly... cost of contracting for those services, or the cost of centralizing the electronic...

  8. 38 CFR 49.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allowable costs. 49.27... costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles applicable to the...

  9. 2 CFR 215.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allowable costs. 215.27 Section 215.27... § 215.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost...

  10. 34 CFR 300.16 - Excess costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excess costs. 300.16 Section 300.16 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.16 Excess costs. Excess costs means those costs that... for an example of how excess costs must be calculated.) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(8))...

  11. 40 CFR 791.50 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Costs. 791.50 Section 791.50...) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Basis for Proposed Order § 791.50 Costs. (a) All costs reasonable and necessary to... tests, are eligible for reimbursement. Necessary costs include: (1) Direct and indirect costs...

  12. 7 CFR 3019.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allowable costs. 3019.27 Section 3019.27 Agriculture... Management § 3019.27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost...

  13. 29 CFR 102.165 - Cost shifting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost shifting. 102.165 Section 102.165 Labor Regulations... by Administrative Offset § 102.165 Cost shifting. Costs incurred by the Agency in connection with... offset. Such costs may include administrative costs and attorneys fees....

  14. 24 CFR 908.108 - Cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cost. 908.108 Section 908.108..., RENTAL VOUCHER, AND MODERATE REHABILITATION PROGRAMS § 908.108 Cost. (a) General. The costs of the... computer hardware or software, or both, the cost of contracting for those services, or the cost...

  15. 24 CFR 84.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Allowable costs. 84.27 Section 84....27 Allowable costs. For each kind of recipient, there is a set of Federal principles for determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with the cost principles...

  16. 42 CFR 417.534 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... typical “provider” costs, and costs (such as marketing, enrollment, membership, and operation of the HMO... principles applicable to provider costs, as set forth in § 417.536. (2) The allowability of other costs is determined in accordance with principles set forth in §§ 417.538 through 417.550. (3) Costs for...

  17. 2 CFR 200.474 - Travel costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Travel costs. 200.474 Section 200.474 Grants... REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Cost Principles General Provisions for Selected Items of Cost § 200.474 Travel costs. (a) General. Travel costs are the expenses for transportation, lodging, subsistence, and...

  18. Cost analysis of atmosphere monitoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The cost analyses of two leading atmospheric monitoring systems, namely the mass spectrometer and the gas chromatograph, are reported. A summary of the approach used in developing the cost estimating techinques is presented; included are the cost estimating techniques, the development of cost estimating relationships and the atmospheric monitoring system cost estimates.

  19. 13 CFR 143.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including... cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set...

  20. 21 CFR 1403.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles...

  1. 15 CFR 24.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles...

  2. 38 CFR 43.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors... profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is...

  3. 28 CFR 66.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type contractors...) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal principles...

  4. 40 CFR 31.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors... profit to cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or sub-grantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is...

  5. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including... cost-type contractors but not any fee or profit (or other increment above allowable costs) to the grantee or subgrantee. (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set...

  6. 14 CFR 1273.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors, including allowable costs in the form of payments to fixed-price contractors; and (2) Reasonable fees or profit to cost-type.... (b) Applicable cost principles. For each kind of organization, there is a set of Federal...

  7. Equity flotation cost adjustments in utilities' cost of service

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, H. Jr.; Hass, J.E.

    1984-03-01

    Recovery of the unavoidable costs of issuing new shares of stock is generally agreed to be appropriate in determining utility revenue requirements. This article suggests that the methods by which that is usually accomplished are of questionable accuracy. The conventional practice of adjusting the allowed rate of return on common equity is examined, and an improved adjustment formulation is presented. Acknowledging that application of the formula remains subject to considerable error, however, the authors propose yet another solution. Capitalization of flotation costs as intangible assets is suggested as a way of more accurately factoring such expenses into tariff determinations. 6 references.

  8. Metabolic Cost of Experimental Exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Although the type and duration of activity during decompression was well documented, the metabolic cost of 1665 subject-exposures with 8 activity profiles from 17 altitude decompression sickness (DCS) protocols at Brooks City-Base, TX from 1983-2005 was not determined. Female and male human volunteers (30 planned, 4 completed) performed activity profiles matching those 8 activity profiles at ground level with continuous monitoring of metabolic cost. A Cosmed K4b2 Cardio Pulmonary Exercise Testing device was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2) during the profiles. The results show levels of metabolic cost to the females for the profiles tested varied from 4.3 to 25.5 ml/kg/min and from 3.0 to 12.0 ml/kg/min to the males. The increase in VO2 from seated rest to the most strenuous of the 8 activity profiles was 3.6-fold for the females and 2.8-fold for the males. These preliminary data on 4 subjects indicate close agreement of oxygen uptake for activity performed during many subject-exposures as published earlier. The relatively low average oxygen uptake required to perform the most strenuous activity may imply the need for adjustment of modeling efforts using metabolic cost as a risk factor. Better definition of metabolic cost during exposure to altitude, a critical factor in DCS risk, may allow refinement of DCS prediction models.

  9. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  10. Cost Per Pound From Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional studies of Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) designs have focused on designs that are completely reusable except for the fuel. This may not be realistic with current technology . An alternate approach is to look at partially reusable launch vehicles. This raises the question of which parts should be reused and which parts should be expendable. One approach is to consider the cost/pound of returning these parts from orbit. With the shuttle, this cost is about three times the cost/pound of launching payload into orbit. A subtle corollary is that RLVs are much less practical for higher orbits, such as the one on which the International Space Station resides, than they are for low earth orbits.

  11. Low-cost microsensors program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John S.; Bradley, Daryl; Chen, Chungte W.; Chin, Richard; Jurgelewicz, K.; Radford, William A.; Kennedy, Adam; Murphy, Daniel F.; Ray, Michael; Wyles, Richard; Brown, James C.; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.

    2001-10-01

    The objectives of the Low Cost Microsensors (LCMS) Program are twofold. The first is to develop and deliver a long-range infrared (IR) sensor built upon an uncooled vanadium oxide (VOx) 640 X 512 format focal plane array (FPA) engine. The second is to develop an expendable microsensor built upon a VOx 160 X 128 format FPA engine. The 640 X 480 sensor is applicable to long-range surveillance and targeting missions and is a reusable asset. The 160 X 120 sensor is designed for applications where miniaturization is required as well as low cost and low power. The 160 X 120 is also intended for expendable military applications. The intent of this DUS&T effort is to further reduce the cost, weight, and power of uncooled IR sensors, and to increase the capability of these sensors, thereby expanding their applicability to military and commercial markets never before addressed by thermal imaging.

  12. Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

    2011-06-01

    This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

  13. 48 CFR 231.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Selected costs. 231.205... OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 231.205 Selected costs....

  14. 48 CFR 1231.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Selected costs. 1231.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1231.205 Selected costs....

  15. 48 CFR 931.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 931.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205 Selected costs....

  16. 48 CFR 31.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 31.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205 Selected costs....

  17. 48 CFR 31.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Selected costs. 31.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205 Selected costs....

  18. 48 CFR 1331.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 1331.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1331.205 Selected costs....

  19. 48 CFR 1331.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Selected costs. 1331.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1331.205 Selected costs....

  20. 48 CFR 931.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Selected costs. 931.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205 Selected costs....

  1. 48 CFR 631.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Selected costs. 631.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts with Commercial Organizations 631.205 Selected costs....

  2. 77 FR 11191 - Insurance Cost Information Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Insurance Cost Information Regulation AGENCY: National... insurance cost information booklet that all car dealers must make available to prospective purchasers... differences in passenger vehicle collision loss experience that could affect auto insurance costs....

  3. 48 CFR 1231.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 1231.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1231.205 Selected costs....

  4. Why Costing is Important on HBCU Grants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains why cost is important on Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Grants. The topics of discussion include: 1) Forward Funding; 2) Good and bad cost management; and 3) Recommendations for cost performance.

  5. 24 CFR 908.108 - Cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... computer hardware or software, or both, the cost of contracting for those services, or the cost of... operating budget. At the HA's option, the cost of the computer software may include service contracts...

  6. The costs of schizophrenia in Spain.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Moreno, Juan; López-Bastida, Julio; Osuna-Guerrero, Rubén; Montejo-González, Angel Luis; Duque-González, Beatriz

    2006-09-01

    This study estimated the economic impact of schizophrenia-related direct costs (medical and nonmedical costs) in Spain. Direct medical costs (hospitalizations, outpatient consultations, drug costs) and direct nonmedical costs (costs of informal care) were estimated based on prevalence costs for 2002. The total costs of schizophrenia were estimated at euro 1,970.8 million; direct medical costs accounted for 53% and informal care costs 47%. Despite having implemented a conservative approach, the health care costs associated with schizophrenia account for 2.7% of total public health care expenditure in Spain. The sum of medical and nonmedical costs give us a better definition of the magnitude of the problem in Spain as well as contributing to helping make the debate on this issue more transparent.

  7. Cost and color of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Marosvölgyi, Marcell A; van Gorkom, Hans J

    2010-02-01

    The question of why plants are green has been revisited in several articles recently. A common theme in the discussions is to explain why photosynthesis appears to absorb less of the available green sunlight than expected. The expectation is incorrect, however, because it fails to take the energy cost of the photosynthetic apparatus into account. Depending on that cost, the red absorption band of the chlorophylls may be closely optimized to provide maximum growth power. The optimization predicts a strong influence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar irradiance on the spectral shape of the optimized absorption band, which appears to be correct. It does not predict any absorption at other wavelengths.

  8. Low-cost microsensors program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John S.; Bradley, Daryl; Chen, Chungte W.; Chin, Richard; Hegg, Ronald G.; Kennedy, Adam; Murphy, Daniel F.; Ray, Michael; Wyles, Richard; Brown, James C.; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.

    2002-07-01

    The Low Cost Microsensors (LCMS) Program recently demonstrated state-of-the-art imagery in a long-range infrared (IR) sensor built upon an uncooled vanadium oxide (VOx) 640 X 480 format focal plane array (FPA) engine. The 640 X 480 sensor is applicable to long-range surveillance and targeting missions. The intent of this DUS&T effort is to further reduce the cost, weight, and power of uncooled IR sensors, and to increase the capability of these sensors, thereby expanding their applicability to military and commercial markets never before addressed by thermal imaging.

  9. Cost of a dry well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebele, Elaine

    How much is drinking water worth? How should irrigation water be priced? What is the value of the water circulating through an ecosystem? How much does it cost to clean up a contaminated aquifer? Currently, there are no ready answers to these questions. Groundwater, which supplies more than half of the nation's drinking water and a substantial portion of agricultural and industrial needs, is undervalued because there is no widely accepted means to measure its benefits to society, according to a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). That may change, as the NRC explores ways to assess the economic value of groundwater and the costs of contaminating or depleting this resource.

  10. New Low Cost Resin Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    difference between resins 1 and 2 was the type of phosphorous containing compound, where resin 3 was the same as resin 1 with the addition of melamine ...SBIR N03-120 New Low Cost Resin Systems Applied Poleramic, Inc. Final Report Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...Feb 2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE New Low Cost Resin Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N00014-03-M-0304 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  11. Conveyor skirting can cut costs

    SciTech Connect

    Stahura, R.P.

    1985-02-01

    Conveyor skirting is discussed as a secondary job that is often overlooked by the designers of conveyor belts. To fully understand the economic impact, as well as skirting's role in controlling fugitive material, the author clarifies the term ''skirting'', which is the lower portion of the loading chute that deposits the coal onto the conveyor belt. Priorities that guide the designer are listed and include: keeping the cost of the conveyor down; keeping the power requirements down; and keeping the fabricating and construction costs down. This article also addresses the problem of material leakage through rubber seals and lists priorities of design considerations.

  12. Non-medical costs of colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kempiński, Radosław; Michałowicz, Jerzy; Poniewierka, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in Europe and North America. Colonoscopy done every 10 years beginning at age 50 is the preferred method of screening. In Poland and some other countries examinations are offered to subjects free of charge. However, as well as direct medical costs there are direct non-medical costs, which include the cost of transportation and costs related to caregivers’ time, and indirect costs, which are costs related to patients’ time. These costs essentially augment the total societal costs of colonoscopy. PMID:25396000

  13. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  14. Unintended Consequences of Cost Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercey, David

    2010-01-01

    An Alberta school district that used a cost-recovery model to finance school services for 20 years is finding that the model produces unintended negative results. Some schools didn't spend this money on services but used it for other school operations. Some spent the money on external consultants. Professional relationships were damaged, and…

  15. Low Cost Graphics. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert F.

    This manual describes the CALM TV graphics interface, a low-cost means of producing quality graphics on an ordinary TV. The system permits the output of data in graphic as well as alphanumeric form and the input of data from the face of the TV using a light pen. The integrated circuits required in the interface can be obtained from standard…

  16. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  17. Hawaiian Tourism: Costs, Benefits, Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, John S.

    1975-01-01

    Hawaiian tourism has greatly increased in the past ten years. With this increase, the island has been economically developed to attract and accommodate tourists. Now, citizen groups are becoming aware of the environmental costs of this business and are asking for a tourist reduction to save their natural resources. (MA)

  18. THE HIGH COST OF DISCRIMINATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROPER, ELMO

    ON THE BASIS OF EMPLOYEE SURVEYS AND IN-PLANT RESEARCH, THE TOTAL COST OF DISCRIMINATION TO AMERICAN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY IN ACTUAL DOLLARS IS ESTIMATED AT ROUGHLY $30 BILLION ANNUALLY. DISCRIMINATION IN INDUSTRY BEGINS AT THE HIRING GATE WHERE MINORITY GROUPS ARE REFUSED EMPLOYMENT BECAUSE OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, NATIONALITY, POLITICAL…

  19. Independent Study Course Development Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Clayton R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses actual costs for developing independent study print courses for use in learning centers or for distance delivery, and presents a resource allocation guideline based on figures from Grant MacEwan Community College (Alberta). Topics discussed include the course writer/developer, clerical support, copyright clearance, instructional design,…

  20. Aerobraking Cost and Risk Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, David A.; Tolson, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Four missions have successfully employed aerobraking at Venus and Mars to reduce the spacecraft orbit period and achieve the desired orbit geometry. The propellant mass reductions enabled by the aerobraking technique allow the use of smaller launch systems, which translate to significant savings in launch costs for flight projects. However, there is a significant increase in mission risk associated with the use of aerobraking. Flying a spacecraft through a planetary atmosphere hundreds of times during months of around-the-clock operations places the spacecraft in harm's way, and is extraordinarily demanding on the flight team. There is a cost/risk trade that must be evaluated when a project is choosing between a mission baseline that includes aerobraking, or selecting a larger launch vehicle to enable purely propulsive orbit insertion. This paper provides a brief history of past and future aerobraking missions, describes the aerobraking technique, summarizes the costs associated with aerobraking, and concludes with a suggested methodology for evaluating the cost/risk trade when considering the aerobraking approach.

  1. Computers, Costs, and Civil Liberties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Verne R.; Weston, Hanna B.

    1975-01-01

    The need to control costs has led many state mental health systems to set up automated data banks in which a patient's name is directly linked with his record. Many consider this a primary threat to confidentiality and civil liberties. (Author)

  2. Commentary on NTIS Document Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Robert J.

    1973-01-01

    The author believes it would be appropriate to review the current National Technical Information Service (NTIS) pricing policy in terms of its rationale, legality, and the possibility of mitigating or reversing the demonstrated pattern of repeated cost increases. (Author/SJ)

  3. Demystifying the Cost Estimation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obi, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    In manufacturing today, nothing is more important than giving a customer a clear and straight-forward accounting of what their money has purchased. Many potentially promising return business orders are lost because of unclear, ambiguous, or improper billing. One of the best ways of resolving cost bargaining conflicts is by providing a…

  4. Radar altimetry systems cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escoe, D.; Heuring, F. T.; Denman, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    This report discusses the application and cost of two types of altimeter systems (spaceborne (satellite and shuttle) and airborne) to twelve user requirements. The overall design of the systems defined to meet these requirements is predicated on an unconstrained altimetry technology; that is, any level of altimeter or supporting equipment performance is possible.

  5. Saving Green on Energy Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tacke, Diane L.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, colleges and universities have begun efforts to reduce their energy costs, an initiative that can not only save an institution money, but also strengthen relationships across campus. Board leadership has been central to this endeavor in setting goals, prioritizing projects, and financing those projects. Using her experiences with…

  6. On the cost of shame

    PubMed Central

    Tieffenbach, Emma

    2014-01-01

    In his editorial, Nir Eyal argues that a nudge can exploit our propensity to feel shame in order to steer us toward certain choices. We object that shame is a cost and therefore cannot figure in the apparatus of a nudge. PMID:25489599

  7. Regulatory cost-risk study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This study is intended to provide some quantitative perspective by selecting certain examples of criteria for which estimates of risks and costs can be obtained, and the balance of the various risks, (i.e., internal versus external risks), can be put into perspective. 35 refs., 39 tabs. (JDB)

  8. Low Cost Sensor Calibration Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-cost sensors ($1 D0-500) represent a unique class of air monitoring devices that may provide for more ubiquitous pollutant monitoring. They vary widely in design and measure pollutants, ranging from ozone, particulate matter, to volatile organic compounds. Many of these senso...

  9. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  10. Patterns and Costs of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Alan Jay

    1984-01-01

    Presents results of the Library Crime Research Project, a three-year study of crime and disruption patterns in public libraries in all 50 states. Patterns of crime, costs of crime (direct, indirect), losses due to crime, patterns of security use, and effects of victimization are covered. Three references are listed. (EJS)

  11. He Who Hesitates Fears Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzeniowski, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Voice over IP (VoIP) has been infiltrating campus networks, but more like stray weeds in an unattended garden than like a well-planned crop. Trouble is, in most instances, moving directly from a PBX or Centrex service to VoIP represents a shift too costly and dramatic for many academic institutions to undertake. Instead, schools have been…

  12. The Costs of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickstein, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Children with autism are likely to have unmet health care needs and live in families that have financial problems. Preschoolers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder receive 2 to 4 times in health services than those without the disease. Cost effective treatments for childhood and adolescent depression are also discussed.

  13. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

  14. Bioventing reduces soil cleanup costs

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, M.C.; Erickson, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    An offshoot technology from soil venting, bioventing offers a win-win solution for soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nonvolatile contaminants such as diesel and fuel oil. Using low air flowrates through permeable soils, bioventing injects sufficient oxygen to support naturally-occurring bacteria, which biodegraded the VOCs and other contaminants into benign byproducts. Waste gas can be directly discharged to atmosphere without further treatment. This results in no offgas treatment required. Bioventing is a cost-effective alternative to traditional soil-venting techniques. Soil venting uses air to volatilize organic-compound contamination from the vadose zone, the unsaturated soil layer above groundwater. Unfortunately, this simple-and-fast approach creates a waste offgas that requires further treatment before discharge, thus adding significantly to overall project costs. In contrast, bioventing uses low air flowrates, which require lower capital and operating costs. No offgas treatment further reduces equipment and operating costs and often eliminates air permitting. As in all treatment strategies, the process must meet the cleanup objectives. Bioventing is an alternative technique making inroads into refining and petrochemical soil-remediation applications.

  15. Integrated analysis considered mitigation cost, damage cost and adaptation cost in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Lee, D. K.; Kim, H. G.; Sung, S.; Jung, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Various studies show that raising the temperature as well as storms, cold snap, raining and drought caused by climate change. And variety disasters have had a damage to mankind. The world risk report(2012, The Nature Conservancy) and UNU-EHS (the United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security) reported that more and more people are exposed to abnormal weather such as floods, drought, earthquakes, typhoons and hurricanes over the world. In particular, the case of Korea, we influenced by various pollutants which are occurred in Northeast Asian countries, China and Japan, due to geographical meteorological characteristics. These contaminants have had a significant impact on air quality with the pollutants generated in Korea. Recently, around the world continued their effort to reduce greenhouse gas and to improve air quality in conjunction with the national or regional development goals priority. China is also working on various efforts in accordance with the international flows to cope with climate change and air pollution. In the future, effect of climate change and air quality in Korea and Northeast Asia will be change greatly according to China's growth and mitigation policies. The purpose of this study is to minimize the damage caused by climate change on the Korean peninsula through an integrated approach taking into account the mitigation and adaptation plan. This study will suggest a climate change strategy at the national level by means of a comprehensive economic analysis of the impacts and mitigation of climate change. In order to quantify the impact and damage cost caused by climate change scenarios in a regional scale, it should be priority variables selected in accordance with impact assessment of climate change. The sectoral impact assessment was carried out on the basis of selected variables and through this, to derive the methodology how to estimate damage cost and adaptation cost. And then, the methodology was applied in Korea

  16. Hydrogen Station Cost Estimates: Comparing Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator Results with other Recent Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Penev, M.

    2013-09-01

    This report compares hydrogen station cost estimates conveyed by expert stakeholders through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculation (HSCC) to a select number of other cost estimates. These other cost estimates include projections based upon cost models and costs associated with recently funded stations.

  17. Assessing the Costs of Adequacy in California Public Schools: A Cost Function Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cost function is used to estimate the costs for California districts to meet the achievement goals set out for them by the state. I calculate estimates of base costs (i.e., per pupil costs in a district with relatively low levels of student need) and marginal costs (i.e., the additional costs associated with specific student…

  18. Strapdown cost trend study and forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, A. J.; Savage, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The potential cost advantages offered by advanced strapdown inertial technology in future commercial short-haul aircraft are summarized. The initial procurement cost and six year cost-of-ownership, which includes spares and direct maintenance cost were calculated for kinematic and inertial navigation systems such that traditional and strapdown mechanization costs could be compared. Cost results for the inertial navigation systems showed that initial costs and the cost of ownership for traditional triple redundant gimbaled inertial navigators are three times the cost of the equivalent skewed redundant strapdown inertial navigator. The net cost advantage for the strapdown kinematic system is directly attributable to the reduction in sensor count for strapdown. The strapdown kinematic system has the added advantage of providing a fail-operational inertial navigation capability for no additional cost due to the use of inertial grade sensors and attitude reference computers.

  19. Estimating nursing costs--a methodological review.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bea

    2009-05-01

    A critical cost accounting issue relating to nursing costs is that nursing costs are currently averaged into the daily room rate in the hospitals. This accounting practice treats nursing units as cost centers as nursing costs are bundled into a per diem rate instead of billed separately. As a result, all patients in a given care unit of the hospital are presumed to consume the same amount of nursing care resources. This costing and billing system creates a mismatch between resources consumption and billed charges. The objective of this paper is to (1) demonstrate current practice to estimate nursing costs, (2) classify nursing costs into direct and indirect costs in order to refine the existing approaches and (3) argue that a system of billing nursing costs separately better reflects the costs of patient care.

  20. Cost Estimating Cases: Educational Tools for Cost Analysts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    only appropriate documentation should be provided. In other words, students should not submit all of the documentation possible using ACEIT , only that...case was their lack of understanding of the ACEIT software used to conduct the estimate. Specifically, many students misinterpreted the cost...estimating relationships (CERs) embedded in the 49 software. Additionally, few of the students were able to properly organize the ACEIT documentation output

  1. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

    2009-10-16

    A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was

  2. BMP COST ANALYSIS FOR SOURCE WATER PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cost equations are developed to estimate capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) for commonly used best management practices (BMPS). Total BMP volume and/or surface area is used to predict these costs. ENR construction cost index was used to adjust cost data to December 2000...

  3. 39 CFR 491.5 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Costs. 491.5 Section 491.5 Postal Service UNITED... RATE COMMISSION § 491.5 Costs. The Postal Service's administrative costs in executing the garnishment action shall be added to each garnishment and the costs recovered shall be retained as...

  4. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  5. 45 CFR 92.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 92.22 Section 92.22 Public... Financial Administration § 92.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors,...

  6. 24 CFR 700.115 - Program costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program costs. 700.115 Section 700... PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING PROGRAMS) CONGREGATE HOUSING SERVICES PROGRAM § 700.115 Program costs. (a) Allowable costs. (1) Allowable costs for direct provision of supportive services includes the provision...

  7. Understanding the Cost of Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Peter; Shulenburger, David

    2010-01-01

    This article explains the cost of education in public research universities. "Price," meaning "tuition," is often incorrectly substituted for "cost," meaning expenditures by the university that make the education possible. University cost is disaggregated to enable readers to distinguish between the costs associated with providing education to…

  8. 45 CFR 74.27 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 74.27 Section 74.27 Public... Allowable costs. (a) For each kind of recipient, there is a particular set of Federal principles that applies in determining allowable costs. Allowability of costs shall be determined in accordance with...

  9. 50 CFR 85.40 - Cost sharing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost sharing. 85.40 Section 85.40 Wildlife... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.40 Cost sharing. (a) The Federal share shall not exceed 75% of total costs approved in the grant agreement. (b) The provisions of 43 CFR 12.64 apply to cost sharing...

  10. 42 CFR 417.802 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Allowable costs. 417.802 Section 417.802 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.802 Allowable costs. (a) General rule. The costs that are considered allowable for HCPP reimbursement are the same as those for reasonable cost HMOs and CMPs...

  11. 24 CFR 35.1135 - Eligible costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eligible costs. 35.1135 Section 35....1135 Eligible costs. A PHA may use financial assistance received under the modernization program (CIAP....112 of this title. Eligible costs include: (a) Evaluation and insurance costs. Evaluation and...

  12. 45 CFR 95.519 - Cost disallowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost disallowance. 95.519 Section 95.519 Public... PROGRAMS (PUBLIC ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Cost Allocation Plans § 95.519 Cost disallowance. If costs under a Public Assistance program are not claimed...

  13. 32 CFR 203.6 - Cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cost principles. 203.6 Section 203.6 National... Cost principles. (a) Non-profit contractors must comply with the cost principles in OMB Circular A-122...) For-profit contractors and subcontractors must comply with the cost principles in the FAR (48 CFR...

  14. 29 CFR 1470.22 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 1470.22 Section 1470.22 Labor Regulations... Financial Administration § 1470.22 Allowable costs. (a) Limitation on use of funds. Grant funds may be used only for: (1) The allowable costs of the grantees, subgrantees and cost-type contractors,...

  15. 42 CFR 417.804 - Cost apportionment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost apportionment. 417.804 Section 417.804 Public... PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.804 Cost apportionment. (a) The HCPP follows the cost apportionment principles specified in §§ 417.552 through 417.566, except for provisions on provider costs...

  16. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education... allowable expenditures by projects funded under the program: (a) Cost of attendance, as defined in Title...

  17. 7 CFR 330.107 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Costs. 330.107 Section 330.107 Agriculture Regulations...; GARBAGE General Provisions § 330.107 Costs. All costs (including those incurred under § 330.106 of this... usual places of duty shall be furnished without cost to the person requesting the services, unless...

  18. 7 CFR 352.14 - Costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Costs. 352.14 Section 352.14 Agriculture Regulations... OF AGRICULTURE PLANT QUARANTINE SAFEGUARD REGULATIONS § 352.14 Costs. All costs incident to the... assigned hours of duty at the usual places of duty shall be furnished without cost to the person...

  19. 23 CFR 140.505 - Reimbursable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reimbursable costs. 140.505 Section 140.505 Highways... Administrative Settlement Costs-Contract Claims § 140.505 Reimbursable costs. (a) Federal funds may participate in administrative settlement costs which are: (1) Incurred after notice of claim, (2)...

  20. 34 CFR 304.21 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Allowable costs. 304.21 Section 304.21 Education... Grantee § 304.21 Allowable costs. In addition to the allowable costs established in the Education... allowable expenditures by projects funded under the program: (a) Cost of attendance, as defined in Title...