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Sample records for concerted movement akin

  1. Conformational polymorphism in a heteromolecular single crystal leads to concerted movement akin to collective rack-and-pinion gears at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Swenson, Dale C; MacGillivray, Leonard R

    2008-02-12

    We describe a heteromolecular single crystal that exhibits three reversible and concerted reorganizations upon heating and cooling. The products of the reorganizations are conformational polymorphs. The reorganizations are postulated to proceed through three motions: (i) alkyl translations, (ii) olefin rotations, and (iii) rotational tilts. The motions are akin to rack-and-pinion gears at the molecular level. The rack-like movement is based on expansions and compressions of alkyl chains that are coupled with pinion-like 180 degree rotations of olefins. To accommodate the movements, phenol and thiophene components undergo rotational tilts about intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The movements are collective, being propagated in close-packed repeating units. This discovery marks a step to understanding how organic solids can support the development of crystalline molecular machines and devices through correlated and collective movements.

  2. Sheriff Corbett Akins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Charles, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Panola County, Texas Sheriff Corbett Akins wrote a weekly column for the "Panola Watchman" in which he chronicled the adventures and mishaps of his force. He provides a wealth of information about East Texas life on everything from making fiddles, to running bloodhounds, to finding moonshine stills. The columns reprinted appeared from…

  3. An Efficient Algorithm to Perform Local Concerted Movements of a Chain Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Zamuner, Stefano; Rodriguez, Alex; Seno, Flavio; Trovato, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The devising of efficient concerted rotation moves that modify only selected local portions of chain molecules is a long studied problem. Possible applications range from speeding the uncorrelated sampling of polymeric dense systems to loop reconstruction and structure refinement in protein modeling. Here, we propose and validate, on a few pedagogical examples, a novel numerical strategy that generalizes the notion of concerted rotation. The usage of the Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for chain description allows all possible choices for the subset of degrees of freedom to be modified in the move. They can be arbitrarily distributed along the chain and can be distanced between consecutive monomers as well. The efficiency of the methodology capitalizes on the inherent geometrical structure of the manifold defined by all chain configurations compatible with the fixed degrees of freedom. The chain portion to be moved is first opened along a direction chosen in the tangent space to the manifold, and then closed in the orthogonal space. As a consequence, in Monte Carlo simulations detailed balance is easily enforced without the need of using Jacobian reweighting. Moreover, the relative fluctuations of the degrees of freedom involved in the move can be easily tuned. We show different applications: the manifold of possible configurations is explored in a very efficient way for a protein fragment and for a cyclic molecule; the “local backbone volume”, related to the volume spanned by the manifold, reproduces the mobility profile of all-α helical proteins; the refinement of small protein fragments with different secondary structures is addressed. The presented results suggest our methodology as a valuable exploration and sampling tool in the context of bio-molecular simulations. PMID:25825903

  4. An efficient algorithm to perform local concerted movements of a chain molecule.

    PubMed

    Zamuner, Stefano; Rodriguez, Alex; Seno, Flavio; Trovato, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The devising of efficient concerted rotation moves that modify only selected local portions of chain molecules is a long studied problem. Possible applications range from speeding the uncorrelated sampling of polymeric dense systems to loop reconstruction and structure refinement in protein modeling. Here, we propose and validate, on a few pedagogical examples, a novel numerical strategy that generalizes the notion of concerted rotation. The usage of the Denavit-Hartenberg parameters for chain description allows all possible choices for the subset of degrees of freedom to be modified in the move. They can be arbitrarily distributed along the chain and can be distanced between consecutive monomers as well. The efficiency of the methodology capitalizes on the inherent geometrical structure of the manifold defined by all chain configurations compatible with the fixed degrees of freedom. The chain portion to be moved is first opened along a direction chosen in the tangent space to the manifold, and then closed in the orthogonal space. As a consequence, in Monte Carlo simulations detailed balance is easily enforced without the need of using Jacobian reweighting. Moreover, the relative fluctuations of the degrees of freedom involved in the move can be easily tuned. We show different applications: the manifold of possible configurations is explored in a very efficient way for a protein fragment and for a cyclic molecule; the "local backbone volume", related to the volume spanned by the manifold, reproduces the mobility profile of all-α helical proteins; the refinement of small protein fragments with different secondary structures is addressed. The presented results suggest our methodology as a valuable exploration and sampling tool in the context of bio-molecular simulations.

  5. Leukocyte integrin αLβ2 headpiece structures: The αI domain, the pocket for the internal ligand, and concerted movements of its loops.

    PubMed

    Sen, Mehmet; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-03-15

    High-resolution crystal structures of the headpiece of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (integrin αLβ2) reveal how the αI domain interacts with its platform formed by the α-subunit β-propeller and β-subunit βI domains. The αLβ2 structures compared with αXβ2 structures show that the αI domain, tethered through its N-linker and a disulfide to a stable β-ribbon pillar near the center of the platform, can undergo remarkable pivoting and tilting motions that appear buffered by N-glycan decorations that differ between αL and αX subunits. Rerefined β2 integrin structures reveal details including pyroglutamic acid at the β2 N terminus and bending within the EGF1 domain. Allostery is relayed to the αI domain by an internal ligand that binds to a pocket at the interface between the β-propeller and βI domains. Marked differences between the αL and αX subunit β-propeller domains concentrate near the binding pocket and αI domain interfaces. Remarkably, movement in allostery in the βI domain of specificity determining loop 1 (SDL1) causes concerted movement of SDL2 and thereby tightens the binding pocket for the internal ligand.

  6. Leukocyte integrin αLβ2 headpiece structures: The αI domain, the pocket for the internal ligand, and concerted movements of its loops

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Mehmet; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution crystal structures of the headpiece of lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (integrin αLβ2) reveal how the αI domain interacts with its platform formed by the α-subunit β-propeller and β-subunit βI domains. The αLβ2 structures compared with αXβ2 structures show that the αI domain, tethered through its N-linker and a disulfide to a stable β-ribbon pillar near the center of the platform, can undergo remarkable pivoting and tilting motions that appear buffered by N-glycan decorations that differ between αL and αX subunits. Rerefined β2 integrin structures reveal details including pyroglutamic acid at the β2 N terminus and bending within the EGF1 domain. Allostery is relayed to the αI domain by an internal ligand that binds to a pocket at the interface between the β-propeller and βI domains. Marked differences between the αL and αX subunit β-propeller domains concentrate near the binding pocket and αI domain interfaces. Remarkably, movement in allostery in the βI domain of specificity determining loop 1 (SDL1) causes concerted movement of SDL2 and thereby tightens the binding pocket for the internal ligand. PMID:26936951

  7. Concerts for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthers, Louie

    2008-01-01

    Concerts designed to introduce young children to music and live performance are staged by a variety of organisations and ensembles across Australia. Shows featuring a wide range of performers are advertised for young children. Such concerts include Babies' Proms, Family Concerts by symphony orchestras, Play School Concerts, performances by…

  8. Improving Young People's Concerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Harvey

    1998-01-01

    Stresses that symphony orchestras and other professional arts organizations need to improve young people's concerts by accounting for student learning and becoming partners with music educators. Provides an experience hierarchy that helps artists and arts organizations benefit from music teachers' knowledge and a list of five elements to consider…

  9. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  10. Teaching bioinformatics in concert.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anya L; Dekhtyar, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Can biology students without programming skills solve problems that require computational solutions? They can if they learn to cooperate effectively with computer science students. The goal of the in-concert teaching approach is to introduce biology students to computational thinking by engaging them in collaborative projects structured around the software development process. Our approach emphasizes development of interdisciplinary communication and collaboration skills for both life science and computer science students.

  11. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynda S.

    This document summarizes 20 articles and books which stress the importance of movement in the overall development of the human species. Each summary ranges in length from 100 to 200 words and often includes direct quotations. A wide range of movement activities suitable for people of all ages (from infants to adults) are discussed. Many summaries…

  12. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  13. Evaluation of Hallux Valgus Correction With Versus Without Akin Proximal Phalanx Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Thorud, Jakob C; Martin, Lanster R; Plemmons, Britton S; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Although the efficacy of Akin proximal phalanx closing wedge osteotomy as a sole procedure for correction of hallux valgus deformity is questionable, when used in combination with other osseous corrective procedures, the procedure has been believed to be efficacious. However, a limited number of comparative studies have confirmed the value of this additional procedure. We identified patients who had undergone osseous hallux valgus correction with first metatarsal osteotomy or first tarsometatarsal joint arthrodesis with (n = 73) and without (n = 81) Akin osteotomy and evaluated their radiographic measurements at 3 points (preoperatively, within 3 months after surgery, and ≥6 months after surgery). We found that those people who had undergone the Akin procedure tended to have a larger hallux abduction angle and a more laterally deviated tibial sesamoid position preoperatively. Although the radiographic correction of the deformity was promising immediately after corrective surgery with the Akin osteotomy, maintenance of the correction was questionable in our cohort. The value of additional Akin osteotomy for correction of hallux valgus deformity is uncertain.

  14. Case Study: William Charles Akins High School. High Schools That Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Akins High School is the newest and second largest high school in the Austin Independent School District in Austin, Texas. This report describes how the school has used small learning communities and the "HSTW" framework of Key Practices to improve the school culture, personalize the learning environment, improve student achievement and…

  15. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Objects Including Amorphous Metal Using Techniques Akin to Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention fabricate objects including amorphous metals using techniques akin to additive manufacturing. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes an amorphous metal includes: applying a first layer of molten metallic alloy to a surface; cooling the first layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a first layer including amorphous metal; subsequently applying at least one layer of molten metallic alloy onto a layer including amorphous metal; cooling each subsequently applied layer of molten metallic alloy such that it solidifies and thereby forms a layer including amorphous metal prior to the application of any adjacent layer of molten metallic alloy; where the aggregate of the solidified layers including amorphous metal forms a desired shape in the object to be fabricated; and removing at least the first layer including amorphous metal from the surface.

  16. Not your grandfather's concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Russell; Malenka, Richard; Griffith, Charles; Friedlander, Steven

    2001-05-01

    The opening of Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall on 12 September 2003, restores Andrew Carnegie's original 1891 concept of having three outstanding auditoriums of different sizes under one roof, and creates a 21st-century venue for music performance and education. With concerts ranging from early music to avant-garde multimedia productions, from jazz to world music, and from solo recitals to chamber music, Zankel Hall expands the breadth and depth of Carnegie Hall's offerings. It allows for the integration of programming across three halls with minifestivals tailored both to the size and strengths of each hall and to the artists and music to be performed. The new flexible space also provides Carnegie Hall with an education center equipped with advanced communications technology. This paper discusses the unique program planned for this facility and how the architects, theatre consultants, and acousticians developed a design that fulfilled the client's expectations and coordinated the construction of the facility under the floor of the main Isaac Stern Auditorium without having to cancel a single performance.

  17. Not your grandfather's concert hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Russell; Malenka, Richard; Griffith, Charles; Friedlander, Steven

    2004-05-01

    The opening of Judy and Arthur Zankel Hall on 12 September 2003, restores Andrew Carnegie's original 1891 concept of having three outstanding auditoriums of different sizes under one roof, and creates a 21st-century venue for music performance and education. With concerts ranging from early music to avant-garde multimedia productions, from jazz to world music, and from solo recitals to chamber music, Zankel Hall expands the breadth and depth of Carnegie Hall's offerings. It allows for the integration of programming across three halls with minifestivals tailored both to the size and strengths of each hall and to the artists and music to be performed. The new flexible space also provides Carnegie Hall with an education center equipped with advanced communications technology. This paper discusses the unique program planned for this facility and how the architects, theatre consultants, and acousticians developed a design that fulfilled the client's expectations and coordinated the construction of the facility under the floor of the main Isaac Stern Auditorium without having to cancel a single performance.

  18. Live concerts reduce cancer inpatients' anxiety.

    PubMed

    Toccafondi, A; Bonacchi, A; Mambrini, A; Miccinesi, G; Prosseda, R; Cantore, M

    2016-10-10

    In Italy a new experience of music medicine called "The Music Givers" is spreading among Oncology Units; it aims to organise weekly live concerts (length 45-60 min) followed by a buffet. Purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the format of The Music Givers on cancer in-patients' anxiety. State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y) was administered to 111 in-patients before and after the concerts. After the concerts we observed a 3.87 point decrease in state anxiety (p < .001) and statistically significant differences in most of the domains assessed by STAI-Y. These results invite a reflection on the importance of offering to inpatients events such as live music concerts, in order to improve their psychological condition during hospitalisation.

  19. Outcome of Critically ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury using the AKIN Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, Tal; Scott, Daniel J; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G.; Malhotra, Atul; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Howell, Michael D.; Talmor, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5–7% of all hospitalized patients with a much higher incidence in the critically ill. The Acute Kidney Injury Network proposed a definition in which serum creatinine rises (>0.3mg/dl) and/or oliguria (<0.5/ml/kg/h) for a period of 6 hours are used to detect AKI. Accurate urine output measurements as well as serum creatinine values from our database were used to detect patients with AKI and calculate their corresponding mortality risk and length of stay. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 7 intensive care units at, a large, academic, tertiary medical center. Patients Adult patients without evidence of end stage renal disease, with more than 2 creatinine measurements and at least a 6 hours urine output recording, who were admitted to the ICU between 2001 and 2007. Interventions Medical records of all the patients were reviewed. Demographic information, lab results, charted data, discharge diagnoses, physiological data and patient outcomes were extracted from the MIMIC-II database using a SQL query. Measurements and main results From 19,677 adult patient records, 14,524 patients met the inclusion criteria. 57% developed AKI during their ICU stay. In-hospital mortality rates were: 13.9%, 16.4%, 33.8% for AKI 1, 2 and 3 respectively compared to only 6.2% in patients without AKI (p<0.0001). After adjusting for multiple covariates AKI was associated with increased hospital mortality (OR 1.4 and 1.3 for AKI1 and AKI2 and 2.5 for AKI3; p<0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that in patients who developed AKI, urine output alone was a better mortality predictor than creatinine alone or the combination of both. Conclusions More than 50% of our critically ill patients developed some stage of AKI resulting in stage-wise increased mortality risk. However, the mortality risk associated with AKI stages 1 and 2 does not differ significantly. In light of these findings reevaluation of the AKIN staging

  20. Concerted versus Stepwise Mechanism in Thymidylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) catalyzes the intracellular de novo formation of thymidylate (a DNA building block) in most living organisms, making it a common target for chemotherapeutic and antibiotic drugs. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the rate-limiting hydride transfer step in TSase catalysis: a stepwise mechanism in which the hydride transfer precedes the cleavage of the covalent bond between the enzymatic cysteine and the product and a mechanism where both happen concertedly. Striking similarities between the enzyme-bound enolate intermediates formed in the initial and final step of the reaction supported the first mechanism, while QM/MM calculations favored the concerted mechanism. Here, we experimentally test these two possibilities using secondary kinetic isotope effect (KIE), mutagenesis study, and primary KIEs. The findings support the concerted mechanism and demonstrate the critical role of an active site arginine in substrate binding, activation of enzymatic nucleophile, and the hydride transfer studied here. The elucidation of this reduction/substitution sheds light on the critical catalytic step in TSase and may aid future drug or biomimetic catalyst design. PMID:24949852

  1. Concerted molecular displacements in a thermally-induced solid-state transformation in crystals of DL-norleucine.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Jamshed; Tuble, Sigrid C; Kendrick, John

    2007-03-07

    Martensitic transformations are of considerable technological importance, a particularly promising application being the possibility of using martensitic materials, possibly proteins, as tiny machines. For organic crystals, however, a molecular level understanding of such transformations is lacking. We have studied a martensitic-type transformation in crystals of the amino acid DL-norleucine using molecular dynamics simulation. The crystal structures of DL-norleucine comprise stacks of bilayers (formed as a result of strong hydrogen bonding) that translate relative to each other on transformation. The simulations reveal that the transformation occurs by concerted molecular displacements involving entire bilayers rather than on a molecule-by-molecule basis. These observations can be rationalized on the basis that at sufficiently high excess temperatures, the free energy barriers to concerted molecular displacements can be overcome by the available thermal energy. Furthermore, in displacive transformations, the molecular displacements can occur by the propagation of a displacement wave (akin to a kink in a carpet), which requires the molecules to overcome only a local barrier. Concerted molecular displacements are therefore considered to be a significant feature of all displacive transformations. This finding is expected to be of value toward developing strategies for controlling or modulating martensitic-type transformations.

  2. Concerted Signaling by Retinal Ganglion Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Markus; Lagnado, Leon; Baylor, Denis A.

    1995-11-01

    To analyze the rules that govern communication between eye and brain, visual responses were recorded from an intact salamander retina. Parallel observation of many retinal ganglion cells with a microelectrode array showed that nearby neurons often fired synchronously, with spike delays of less than 10 milliseconds. The frequency of such synchronous spikes exceeded the correlation expected from a shared visual stimulus up to 20-fold. Synchronous firing persisted under a variety of visual stimuli and accounted for the majority of action potentials recorded. Analysis of receptive fields showed that concerted spikes encoded information not carried by individual cells; they may represent symbols in a multineuronal code for vision.

  3. A grateful dead analysis: the relationship between concert and listening behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Marko A; Gintautas, Vadas; Pepe, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Grateful Dead was an American band born out of the 1960s San Francisco, California psychedelic movement, that played music together from 1965 to 1995. Despite relatively little popular radio airtime, while on tour the Grateful Dead enjoyed a cult-like following from a fan base that numbered in the millions. Still today, some ten years after dissolution, the band remains popular according to online music services, such as last.fm. This article presents a comparative analysis between 1,590 of the Grateful Dead's live concert set lists from 1972 to 1995 and 2,616,990 Grateful Dead listening events by last.fm users from August 2005 to October 2007. While there is a strong correlation between how songs were played in concert and how they were listened to by last.fm members, the outlying songs in this trend identify interesting aspects of the band and their present-day fans.

  4. Listening to the acoustics in concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Leo L.; Griesinger, David

    2001-05-01

    How does acoustics affect the symphonic music performed in a concert hall? The lecture begins with an illustrated discussion of the architectural features that influence the acoustics. Boston Symphony Hall, which was built in 1900 when only one facet of architectural design was known, now rates as one of the world's great halls. How this occurred will be presented. Music is composed with some acoustical environment in mind and this varies with time from the Baroque to the Romantic to the Modern musical period. Conductors vary their interpretation according to the hall they are in. Well-traveled listeners and music critics have favorite halls. The lecture then presents a list of 58 halls rank ordered according to their acoustical quality based on interviews of music critics and conductors. Modern acoustical measurements made in these halls are compared with their rankings. Music recordings will be presented that demonstrate how halls sound that have different measured acoustical parameters. Photographs of a number of recently built halls are shown as examples of how these known acoustical factors have been incorporated into architectural design.

  5. Synergistic Synthetic Biology: Units in Concert.

    PubMed

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims at translating the methods and strategies from engineering into biology in order to streamline the design and construction of biological devices through standardized parts. Modular synthetic biology devices are designed by means of an adequate elimination of cross-talk that makes circuits orthogonal and specific. To that end, synthetic constructs need to be adequately optimized through in silico modeling by choosing the right complement of genetic parts and by experimental tuning through directed evolution and craftsmanship. In this review, we consider an additional and complementary tool available to the synthetic biologist for innovative design and successful construction of desired circuit functionalities: biological synergies. Synergy is a prevalent emergent property in biological systems that arises from the concerted action of multiple factors producing an amplification or cancelation effect compared with individual actions alone. Synergies appear in domains as diverse as those involved in chemical and protein activity, polypharmacology, and metabolic pathway complementarity. In conventional synthetic biology designs, synergistic cross-talk between parts and modules is generally attenuated in order to verify their orthogonality. Synergistic interactions, however, can induce emergent behavior that might prove useful for synthetic biology applications, like in functional circuit design, multi-drug treatment, or in sensing and delivery devices. Synergistic design principles are therefore complementary to those coming from orthogonal design and may provide added value to synthetic biology applications. The appropriate modeling, characterization, and design of synergies between biological parts and units will allow the discovery of yet unforeseeable, novel synthetic biology applications.

  6. Listening to the acoustics in concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Leo L.; Griesinger, David

    2004-05-01

    How does acoustics affect the symphonic music performed in a concert hall? The lecture begins with an illustrated discussion of the architectural features that influence the acoustics. Boston Symphony Hall, which was built in 1900 when only one facet of architectural design was known, now rates as one of the world's great halls. How this occurred will be presented. Music is composed with some acoustical environment in mind and this varies with time from the Baroque to the Romantic to the Modern musical period. Conductors vary their interpretation according to the hall they are in. Well-traveled listeners and music critics have favorite halls. The lecture then presents a list of 58 halls rank ordered according to their acoustical quality based on interviews of music critics and conductors. Modern acoustical measurements made in these halls are compared with their rankings. Music recordings will be presented that demonstrate how halls sound that have different measured acoustical parameters. Photographs of a number of recently built halls are shown as examples of how these known acoustical factors have been incorporated into architectural design.

  7. New Light on a Prism: The Concert for All Reasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linaberry, Robin

    2004-01-01

    The prism concert concept was introduced in this country at the Eastman School of Music in 1975. The development of Eastman's inaugural prism concert is commonly attributed to Donald Hunsberger and Gustav Meier, conductors of the wind ensemble and orchestra, respectively. The basic idea is that different styles of music performed by different…

  8. Mini-Concerts: Creating Space for Student-Initiated Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Cody; Johnson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Mini-concerts are regularly occurring, low-stakes curricular events in the classroom where students perform music of their choice for their peers. An idea generated by music educators in domestic and international K-12 schools who strive to meet the needs of diverse student populations, mini-concerts have helped generate student excitement and…

  9. Becoming Accomplished: Concerted Cultivation among Privately Educated Young Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Claire; Aggleton, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper takes as its starting point the concept of concerted cultivation as coined by Annette Lareau. It examines whether a focus on concerted cultivation adequately captures the various practices observed in young women's experiences of being privately educated in four schools in one area of England. We suggest that a variety of practices of…

  10. The acoustics of a concert hall as a linear problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokki, Tapio; Pätynen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of a concert hall is to convey sound from musicians to listeners and to reverberate the music for more pleasant experience in the audience area. This process is linear and can be represented with impulse responses. However, by studying measured and simulated impulse responses for decades, researchers have not been able to exhaustively explain the success and reputation of certain concert halls.

  11. Multimodal interaction in real and virtual concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Pontus; Västfjäll, Daniel; Kleiner, Mendel

    2004-05-01

    Recently, researchers within the field of room acoustics have shown an increased interest for the understanding of how different modalities, especially vision and audition, interact in the concert hall experience. Computer auralization and virtual reality technology have brought means to efficiently study such auditory-visual interaction phenomena in concert halls. However, an important question to address is to what extent the results from such studies agree with real, unmediated situations. In this paper, we discuss some of the auditory-visual cross-modal effects discovered in previous experiments, and an account of cross-modal phenomena in room acoustic perception is proposed. Moreover, the importance of measuring simulation fidelity when performing cross-modal experiments in virtual concert halls is discussed. The conclusions are that one can expect auditory-visual interaction effects to occur in both real and virtual rooms, but that simulation fidelity might affect the results when performing experiments in virtual conditions.

  12. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  13. A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert Band Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergee, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert band performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different bands rated two high school band performances (a "first"…

  14. The 1975-76 Concert Season: A Prediction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Robert

    The Association of College, University and Community Arts Administrators, Inc. (ACUCAA) surveyed 162 colleges and universities and 33 nonprofit institutions that will present professional performing arts programs in the 1975-76 concert season. Some highlights are: (1) 195 institutions will present 3,515 performances that cost $12,015,119 in artist…

  15. Family Music Concerts: Bringing Families, Music Students, and Music Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Susan Hobson

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how conductors of the top performing groups and music education faculty at one university collaborated to create a Family Concert Series for parents and children of all ages, including infants in arms. Recognizing the conflict between "The first three years of life are the most important for educating a young child in…

  16. Parenting Priorities and Pressures: Furthering Understanding of "Concerted Cultivation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Carol; Maxwell, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper re-examines the purposes of a planned and intentional parenting style--"concerted cultivation"--for different middle-class groups, highlighting that social class fraction, ethnicity, and also individual family disposition, guides understandings of the purposes of enrolling children in particular enrichment activities. We…

  17. Concert halls with strong lateral reflections enhance musical dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Robinson, Philip W.; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    One of the most thrilling cultural experiences is to hear live symphony-orchestra music build up from a whispering passage to a monumental fortissimo. The impact of such a crescendo has been thought to depend only on the musicians’ skill, but here we show that interactions between the concert-hall acoustics and listeners’ hearing also play a major role in musical dynamics. These interactions contribute to the shoebox-type concert hall’s established success, but little prior research has been devoted to dynamic expression in this three-part transmission chain as a complete system. More forceful orchestral playing disproportionately excites high frequency harmonics more than those near the note’s fundamental. This effect results in not only more sound energy, but also a different tone color. The concert hall transmits this sound, and the room geometry defines from which directions acoustic reflections arrive at the listener. Binaural directional hearing emphasizes high frequencies more when sound arrives from the sides of the head rather than from the median plane. Simultaneously, these same frequencies are emphasized by higher orchestral-playing dynamics. When the room geometry provides reflections from these directions, the perceived dynamic range is enhanced. Current room-acoustic evaluation methods assume linear behavior and thus neglect this effect. The hypothesis presented here is that the auditory excitation by reflections is emphasized with an orchestra forte most in concert halls with strong lateral reflections. The enhanced dynamic range provides an explanation for the success of rectangularly shaped concert-hall geometry. PMID:24591584

  18. Pathfinder: A parallel search algorithm for concerted atomistic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    2007-02-01

    An algorithm has been designed to search for the escape paths with the lowest activation barriers when starting from a local minimum-energy configuration of a many-atom system. The pathfinder algorithm combines: (1) a steered eigenvector-following method that guides a constrained escape from the convex region and subsequently climbs to a transition state tangentially to the eigenvector corresponding to the lowest negative Hessian eigenvalue; (2) discrete abstraction of the atomic configuration to systematically enumerate concerted events as linear combinations of atomistic events; (3) evolutionary control of the population dynamics of low activation-barrier events; and (4) hybrid task + spatial decompositions to implement massive search for complex events on parallel computers. The program exhibits good scalability on parallel computers and has been used to study concerted bond-breaking events in the fracture of alumina.

  19. Reaction mechanism of guanidinoacetate methyltransferase, concerted or step-wise

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Bruice, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics investigation of the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase catalyzed reaction, which shows that proton transfer from guanidinoacetate (GAA) to Asp-134 and methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) to GAA are concerted. By self-consistent-charge density functional tight binding/molecular mechanics, the bond lengths in the concerted mechanism's transition state are 1.26 Å for both the OD1 (Asp-134)–HE (GAA) and HE (GAA)–NE (GAA) bonds, and 2.47 and 2.03 Å for the S8 (AdoMet)–C9 (AdoMet) and C9 (AdoMet)–NE (GAA) bonds, respectively. The potential-energy barrier (ΔE‡) determined by single-point B3LYP/6–31+G*//MM is 18.9 kcal/mol. The contributions of the entropy (−TΔS‡) and zero-point energy corrections Δ(ZPE)‡ by normal mode analysis are 2.3 kcal/mol and −1.7 kcal/mol, respectively. Thus, the activation enthalpy of this concerted mechanism is predicted to be ΔH‡ = ΔE‡ + Δ(ZPE)‡ = 17.2 kcal/mol. The calculated free-energy barrier for the concerted mechanism is ΔG‡ = 19.5 kcal/mol, which is in excellent agreement with the value of 19.0 kcal/mol calculated from the experimental rate constant (3.8 ± 0.2·min−1). PMID:17053070

  20. The mosh pit experience: emergency medical care for concert injuries.

    PubMed

    Janchar, T; Samaddar, C; Milzman, D

    2000-01-01

    Effective planning is essential for medical personnel preparing to provide emergency care at mass gatherings. At large concerts where audience members participate in "moshing," crowd surfing, and stage diving, there may be a potential for a dramatic increase in injuries requiring medical attention. Injuries seen at emergency medical stations at 3 concerts, all with large mosh pits, over 4 event days were recorded and evaluated. Each event day had over 60,000 attendees. A total of 1,542 medical incidents (82.9 per 10,000) were reported over the 4 event days. There were 37% (466 patients, 25.1 per 10,000) of incidents related to moshing activity. Hospital transport was required for 2.5% (39 patients, 2.1 per 10,000) of medical visits with 74% (29 patients, 1.5 per 10,000) of those transported being for mosh pit-related injuries. When planning emergency medical care for such concerts with mosh pits, the potential for an increase in the number of medical incidents and injuries requiring medical attention and hospital transport should be taken into account for efficient medical coverage.

  1. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas; Møller Petersen, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Noise generated by the audience during musical performances is audible and sometimes disturbing. In this study, an attempt to estimate such audience noise was carried out. From the recordings of performances in five performance spaces (four concert halls and one opera house), probability density functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L(90) of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended.

  2. Concerted and Birth-and-Death Evolution of Multigene Families*

    PubMed Central

    Nei, Masatoshi; Rooney, Alejandro P.

    2006-01-01

    Until around 1990, most multigene families were thought to be subject to concerted evolution, in which all member genes of a family evolve as a unit in concert. However, phylogenetic analysis of MHC and other immune system genes showed a quite different evolutionary pattern, and a new model called birth-and-death evolution was proposed. In this model, new genes are created by gene duplication and some duplicate genes stay in the genome for a long time, whereas others are inactivated or deleted from the genome. Later investigations have shown that most non-rRNA genes including highly conserved histone or ubiquitin genes are subject to this type of evolution. However, the controversy over the two models is still continuing because the distinction between the two models becomes difficult when sequence differences are small. Unlike concerted evolution, the model of birth-and-death evolution can give some insights into the origins of new genetic systems or new phenotypic characters. PMID:16285855

  3. Subjective ranking of concert halls substantiated through orthogonal objective parameters.

    PubMed

    Cerdá, Salvador; Giménez, Alicia; Cibrián, Rosa; Girón, Sara; Zamarreño, Teófilo

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the global subjective assessment, obtained from mean values of the results of surveys addressed to members of the audience of live concerts in Spanish auditoriums, through the mean values of the three orthogonal objective parameters (Tmid, IACCE3, and LEV), expressed in just noticeable differences (JNDs), regarding the best-valued hall. Results show that a linear combination of the relative variations of orthogonal parameters can largely explain the overall perceived quality of the sample. However, the mean values of certain orthogonal parameters are not representative, which shows that an alternative approach to the problem is necessary. Various possibilities are proposed.

  4. Architectural shape and early acoustic efficiency in concert halls (L).

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Yann; Wulfrank, Thomas; Kahle, Eckhard

    2012-09-01

    Supplying sufficient early reflections to audience members is an important prerequisite to good acoustic quality in performing arts spaces. However, the relationship between the geometry of a room and its acoustic efficiency in terms of early energy has rarely been investigated using basic geometrical principles. The present study demonstrates the possibility of predicting the average value of early reflected energy across the audience area using solid angles. The formulas obtained display the influence of various factors on average early energy; in particular, the direction of arrival of early reflections is found to play a significant role, which highlights interesting implications for the acoustic design of concert halls.

  5. Lowering energy barriers in surface reactions through concerted reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sakong, Sung; Mosch, Christian; Lozano, Ariel; Busnengo, H Fabio; Gross, Axel

    2012-10-22

    Any technologically important chemical reaction typically involves a number of different elementary reaction steps consisting of bond-breaking and bond-making processes. Usually, one assumes that such complex chemical reactions occur in a step-wise fashion where one single bond is made or broken at a time. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory we show that the barriers of rate-limiting steps for technologically relevant surface reactions are significantly reduced if concerted reaction mechanisms are taken into account.

  6. Non-concerted ITS evolution in Mammillaria (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Harpke, Doerte; Peterson, Angela

    2006-12-01

    Molecular studies of 21 species of the large Cactaceae genus Mammillaria representing a variety of intrageneric taxonomic levels revealed a high degree of intra-individual polymorphism of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, ITS2). Only a few of these ITS copies belong to apparently functional genes, whereas most are probably non-functional (pseudogenes). As a multiple gene family, the ITS region is subjected to concerted evolution. However, the high degree of intra-individual polymorphism of up to 36% in ITS1 and up to 35% in ITS2 suggests a non-concerted evolution of these loci in Mammillaria. Conserved angiosperm motifs of ITS1 and ITS2 were compared between genomic and cDNA ITS clones of Mammillaria. Some of these motifs (e.g., ITS1 motif 1, 'TGGT' within ITS2) in combination with the determination of GC-content, length comparisons of the spacers and ITS2 secondary structure (helices II and III) are helpful in the identification of pseudogene rDNA regions.

  7. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  8. Movement - uncontrollable

    MedlinePlus

    ... peripheral nervous system References Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders: diagnosis and assessment. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 21. Lang AE. Other movement disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  9. Reduction of GPSM3 expression akin to the arthritis-protective SNP rs204989 differentially affects migration in a neutrophil model

    PubMed Central

    Gall, BJ; Schroer, AB; Gross, JD; Setola, V; Siderovski, DP

    2016-01-01

    G Protein Signaling Modulator-3 (GPSM3) is a leukocyte-specific regulator of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which binds inactivated Gαi·GDP subunits and precludes their reassociation with Gβγ subunits. GPSM3 deficiency protects mice from inflammatory arthritis and, in humans, GPSM3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are inversely associated with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis development; recently, these polymorphisms were linked to one particular SNP (rs204989) that decreases GPSM3 transcript abundance. However, the precise role of GPSM3 in leukocyte biology is unknown. Here we show that GPSM3 is induced in the human promyelocytic leukemia NB4 cell line following retinoic acid treatment, which differentiates this cell line into a model of neutrophil physiology (NB4*). Reducing GPSM3 expression in NB4* cells, akin to the effect ascribed to the rs204989 C>T transition, disrupts cellular migration toward leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and (to a lesser extent) interleukin-8 (a.k.a. IL-8 or CXCL8), but not migration toward formylated peptides (fMLP). As the chemoattractants LTB4 and CXCL8 are involved in recruitment of neutrophils to the arthritic joint, our results suggest that the arthritis-protective GPSM3 SNP rs204989 may act to decrease neutrophil chemoattractant responsiveness. PMID:27307211

  10. Concerted Motions Networking Pores and Distant Ferroxidase Centers Enable Bacterioferritin Function and Iron Traffic£ξ

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Rui, Huan; Kumar, Ritesh; Eshelman, Kate; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Im, Wonpil; Rivera, Mario

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and biochemistry were utilized to investigate the effect of introducing hydrophobic interactions in the 4-fold (N148L and Q151L) and B-pores (D34F) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin B (BfrB) on BfrB function. The structures show only local structural perturbations and confirm the anticipated hydrophobic interactions. Surprisingly, structures obtained after soaking crystals in Fe2+-containing crystallization solution revealed that although iron loads into the ferroxidase centers of the mutants, the side chains of ferroxidase ligands E51 and H130 do not reorganize to bind the iron ions, as is seen in the wt BfrB structures. Similar experiments with a double mutant (C89S/K96C) prepared to introduce changes outside the pores show competent ferroxidase centers that function akin to those in wt BfrB. MD simulations comparing wt BfrB with the D34F and N148L mutants show that the mutants exhibit significantly reduced flexibility, and reveal a network of concerted motions linking ferroxidase centers and 4-fold and B-pores, which are important for imparting ferroxidase centers in BfrB with the required flexibility to function efficiently. In agreement, the efficiency of Fe2+ oxidation and uptake of the 4-fold and B-pore mutants in solution is significantly compromised relative to wt or C89S/K96C BfrB. Finally, our structures show a large number of previously unknown iron binding sites in the interior cavity and B-pores of BfrB, which reveal in unprecedented detail conduits followed by iron and phosphate ions across the BfrB shell, as well as paths in the interior cavity that may facilitate nucleation of the iron phosphate mineral. PMID:25640193

  11. One young woman's campaign: rock concerts and graffiti.

    PubMed

    Malewska, J

    1993-05-01

    Prevailing law and church dictum in 1989 Poland precluded talking about condoms and sex on the radio. Accordingly, a young woman who did a radio-theater drama with some friends about how to avoid HIV infection was thrown out of school. This youth, however, knew that her audience found the emission to be provocative and interesting, and that people were having unprotected sex at concerts in toilet stalls with unknown partners. The Ministry of Health nonetheless said funds were unavailable for condom distribution. Undeterred, the author, her younger brother, and 2 friends joined forces to make large banners with pictures of condoms, bought 500 condoms with their own money, and went to the largest rock festival in Warsaw. She described on stage what AIDS is and how to contract it while friends handed out condoms and leaflets. Their success how has them cooperating with 20 other groups and going to concerts to talk about AIDS and hand out condoms. They have also sprayed graffiti across Warsaw aimed at preventing HIV transmission and provide leaflets and condoms with money from France to ticket holders at area clubs; letters requesting cooperative action have been received. Despite the success of these activities, the Ministry of Health requires receipt of a project and budget proposal before they may consider funding. Graffiti, however, is illegal in Poland and the new Catholic government made is impossible to obtain cheap Polish condoms in shops. The activists continued to develop banners and graffiti, but failed to keep people from engaging in high risk sex with multiple partners. 3 of the author's attractive and healthy female friends therefore began going to concerts and night clubs where they feigned soliciting sexual relations and being HIV-seropositive. Unsuspecting takers without condoms were informed of the girls contrived HIV serostatus and told they must surely desire death if they are ready to have unprotected intercourse. The desire to use condoms has

  12. How to compare movement? A review of physical movement similarity measures in geographic information science and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ranacher, Peter; Tzavella, Katerina

    2014-05-27

    In geographic information science, a plethora of different approaches and methods is used to assess the similarity of movement. Some of these approaches term two moving objects similar if they share akin paths. Others require objects to move at similar speed and yet others consider movement similar if it occurs at the same time. We believe that a structured and comprehensive classification of movement comparison measures is missing. We argue that such a classification not only depicts the status quo of qualitative and quantitative movement analysis, but also allows for identifying those aspects of movement for which similarity measures are scarce or entirely missing. In this review paper we, first, decompose movement into its spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal movement parameters. A movement parameter is a physical quantity of movement, such as speed, spatial path, or temporal duration. For each of these parameters we then review qualitative and quantitative methods of how to compare movement. Thus, we provide a systematic and comprehensive classification of different movement similarity measures used in geographic information science. This classification is a valuable first step toward a GIS toolbox comprising all relevant movement comparison methods.

  13. How to compare movement? A review of physical movement similarity measures in geographic information science and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ranacher, Peter; Tzavella, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    In geographic information science, a plethora of different approaches and methods is used to assess the similarity of movement. Some of these approaches term two moving objects similar if they share akin paths. Others require objects to move at similar speed and yet others consider movement similar if it occurs at the same time. We believe that a structured and comprehensive classification of movement comparison measures is missing. We argue that such a classification not only depicts the status quo of qualitative and quantitative movement analysis, but also allows for identifying those aspects of movement for which similarity measures are scarce or entirely missing. In this review paper we, first, decompose movement into its spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal movement parameters. A movement parameter is a physical quantity of movement, such as speed, spatial path, or temporal duration. For each of these parameters we then review qualitative and quantitative methods of how to compare movement. Thus, we provide a systematic and comprehensive classification of different movement similarity measures used in geographic information science. This classification is a valuable first step toward a GIS toolbox comprising all relevant movement comparison methods. PMID:27019646

  14. [Stereotypic movements].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  15. The efficacy of sound regulations on the listening levels of pop concerts.

    PubMed

    Gjestland, Truls; Tronstad, Tron Vedul

    2017-01-01

    This analysis of new and previously collected data was done to validate the efficacy of recommendations for limits regarding sound exposure levels at live pop concerts. After the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended limiting the sound levels at such concerts to avoid noise induced hearing damage among the audience, the actual levels at concerts where these recommendations are observed, have stabilized around 100 dBA. This is a level that is considered acceptable by WHO. At concerts where there are no limitations, however, the sound levels in the audience area are still increasing far beyond safe limits and thus the exposure may represent a serious threat to people's hearing.

  16. Chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu

    2003-01-01

    The study of chloroplast movement made a quantum leap at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Research based on reverse-genetic approaches using targeted mutants has brought new concepts to this field. One of the most exciting findings has been the discovery of photoreceptors for both accumulation and avoidance responses in Arabidopsis and in the fern Adiantum. Evidence for the adaptive advantage of chloroplast avoidance movements in plant survival has also been found. Additional discoveries include mechano-stress-induced chloroplast movement in ferns and mosses, and microtubule-mediated chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella. The possible ecological significance of chloroplast movement is discussed in the final part of this review.

  17. Operational modal analysis applied to the concert harp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomette, B.; Le Carrou, J.-L.

    2015-05-01

    Operational modal analysis (OMA) methods are useful to extract modal parameters of operating systems. These methods seem to be particularly interesting to investigate the modal basis of string instruments during operation to avoid certain disadvantages due to conventional methods. However, the excitation in the case of string instruments is not optimal for OMA due to the presence of damped harmonic components and low noise in the disturbance signal. Therefore, the present study investigates the least-square complex exponential (LSCE) and the modified least-square complex exponential methods in the case of a string instrument to identify modal parameters of the instrument when it is played. The efficiency of the approach is experimentally demonstrated on a concert harp excited by some of its strings and the two methods are compared to a conventional modal analysis. The results show that OMA allows us to identify modes particularly present in the instrument's response with a good estimation especially if they are close to the excitation frequency with the modified LSCE method.

  18. Intramolecular Alkene Aminocarbonylation Using Concerted Cycloadditions of Amino-Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Ivanovich, Ryan A; Clavette, Christian; Vincent-Rocan, Jean-François; Roveda, Jean-Grégoire; Gorelsky, Serge I; Beauchemin, André M

    2016-06-01

    The ubiquity of nitrogen heterocycles in biologically active molecules challenges synthetic chemists to develop a variety of tools for their construction. While developing metal-free hydroamination reactions of hydrazine derivatives, it was discovered that carbazates and semicarbazides can also lead to alkene aminocarbonylation products if nitrogen-substituted isocyanates (N-isocyanates) are formed in situ as reactive intermediates. At first this reaction required high temperatures (150-200 °C), and issues included competing hydroamination and N-isocyanate dimerization pathways. Herein, improved conditions for concerted intramolecular alkene aminocarbonylation with N-isocyanates are reported. The use of βN-benzyl carbazate precursors allows the effective minimization of N-isocyanate dimerization. Diminished dimerization leads to higher yields of alkene aminocarbonylation products, to reactivity at lower temperatures, and to an improved scope for a reaction sequence involving alkene aminocarbonylation followed by 1,2-migration of the benzyl group. Furthermore, fine-tuning of the blocking (masking) group on the N-isocyanate precursor, and reaction conditions relying on base catalysis for N-isocyanate formation from simpler precursors resulted in room temperature reactivity, consequently minimizing the competing hydroamination pathway. Collectively, this work highlights that controlled reactivity of aminoisocyanates is possible, and provides a broadly applicable alkene aminocarbonylation approach to heterocycles possessing the β-aminocarbonyl motif.

  19. Calsyntenins Function as Synaptogenic Adhesion Molecules in Concert with Neurexins

    PubMed Central

    Um, Ji Won; Pramanik, Gopal; Ko, Ji Seung; Song, Min-Young; Lee, Dongmin; Kim, Hyun; Park, Kang-Sik; Südhof, Thomas C.; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Ko, Jaewon

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Multiple synaptic adhesion molecules govern synapse formation. Here, we propose calsyntenin-3/alcadein-β as a synapse organizer that specifically induces presynaptic differentiation in heterologous synapse-formation assays. Calsyntenin-3 (CST-3) was highly expressed during various postnatal periods of mouse brain development. The simultaneous knockdown of all three CSTs, but not CST-3 alone, decreased inhibitory, but not excitatory, synapse densities in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, the knockdown of CSTs specifically reduced inhibitory synaptic transmission in vitro and in vivo. Remarkably, the loss of CSTs induced a concomitant decrease in neuron soma size in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Furthermore, α-neurexins (α-Nrxs) were affinity-purified as components of a CST-3 complex involved in CST-3-mediated presynaptic differentiation. However, CST-3 did not directly bind to Nrxs. Viewed together, these data suggest that the three CSTs redundantly regulate inhibitory synapse formation, inhibitory synapse function, and neuron development in concert with Nrxs. PMID:24613359

  20. Concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution with 19F- and 18F-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Constanze N.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) is widely used by organic chemists to functionalize aromatic molecules, and it is the most commonly used method to generate arenes that contain 18F for use in positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging. A wide range of nucleophiles exhibit SNAr reactivity, and the operational simplicity of the reaction means that the transformation can be conducted reliably and on large scales. During SNAr, attack of a nucleophile at a carbon atom bearing a ‘leaving group’ leads to a negatively charged intermediate called a Meisenheimer complex. Only arenes with electron-withdrawing substituents can sufficiently stabilize the resulting build-up of negative charge during Meisenheimer complex formation, limiting the scope of SNAr reactions: the most common SNAr substrates contain strong π-acceptors in the ortho and/or para position(s). Here we present an unusual concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction (CSNAr) that is not limited to electron-poor arenes, because it does not proceed via a Meisenheimer intermediate. We show a phenol deoxyfluorination reaction for which CSNAr is favoured over a stepwise displacement. Mechanistic insights enabled us to develop a functional-group-tolerant 18F-deoxyfluorination reaction of phenols, which can be used to synthesize 18F-PET probes. Selective 18F introduction, without the need for the common, but cumbersome, azeotropic drying of 18F, can now be accomplished from phenols as starting materials, and provides access to 18F-labelled compounds not accessible through conventional chemistry.

  1. Alkane desaturation by concerted double hydrogen atom transfer to benzyne.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dawen; Willoughby, Patrick H; Woods, Brian P; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R

    2013-09-26

    The removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from an alkane to produce an alkene is a challenge for synthetic chemists. In nature, desaturases and acetylenases are adept at achieving this essential oxidative functionalization reaction, for example during the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, gibberellins and carotenoids. Alkane-to-alkene conversion almost always involves one or more chemical intermediates in a multistep reaction pathway; these may be either isolable species (such as alcohols or alkyl halides) or reactive intermediates (such as carbocations, alkyl radicals, or σ-alkyl-metal species). Here we report a desaturation reaction of simple, unactivated alkanes that is mechanistically unique. We show that benzynes are capable of the concerted removal of two vicinal hydrogen atoms from a hydrocarbon. The discovery of this exothermic, net redox process was enabled by the simple thermal generation of reactive benzyne intermediates through the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder cycloisomerization reaction of triyne substrates. We are not aware of any single-step, bimolecular reaction in which two hydrogen atoms are simultaneously transferred from a saturated alkane. Computational studies indicate a preferred geometry with eclipsed vicinal C-H bonds in the alkane donor.

  2. Concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution with 19F− and 18F−

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Constanze N.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) is widely used by organic chemists to functionalize aromatic molecules, and it is the most commonly used method to generate arenes that contain a 18F for use in PET imaging.1 A wide range of nucleophiles exhibit SNAr reactivity, and the operational simplicity of the reaction means that the transformation can be conducted reliably and on large scales.2 During SNAr, attack of a nucleophile at a carbon atom bearing a ‘leaving group’ leads to a negatively charged intermediate called a Meisenheimer complex. Only arenes with electron-withdrawing substituents can sufficiently stabilize the resulting build-up of negative charge during Meisenheimer complex formation, limiting the scope of SNAr reactions: the most common SNAr substrates contain strong π-acceptors in the ortho and/or para position(s).3 In this manuscript, we present an unusual concerted nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction (CSNAr) that is not limited to electron-poor arenes, because it does not proceed via a Meisenheimer intermediate. We show a phenol deoxyfluorination reaction for which CSNAr is favored over a stepwise displacement. Mechanistic insights enabled us to develop a functional group–tolerant 18F-deoxyfluorination reaction of phenols, which can be used to synthesize 18F-PET probes. Selective 18F introduction, without the need for the common, but cumbersome, azeotropic drying of 18F, can now be accomplished from phenols as starting materials, and provides access to 18F-labeled compounds not accessible through conventional chemistry. PMID:27281221

  3. The first vineyard concert hall in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Christopher; Rivera, Carlos

    2002-11-01

    The first vineyard or surround concert hall designed and built in the Western Hemisphere is the Sala Nezahualcoyotl in Mexico City. The Hall was completed in 1976 and is part of the Cultural Center at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. The hall was named after a Toltec poet, architect, and musician who lived in the 15th century and was the Renaissance man of his day. In order to provide the familiar traditional sound of the rectangular (shoebox) European Hall, the acoustic designers set the criteria for reverberation times through the frequency spectrum and the Initial Time Delay Gap at every seat in the house to match the measurements taken at the Grosser Musik vereinssaal in Vienna and Boston Symphony Hall. In this paper we discuss the techniques used to create the traditional sound in a vineyard hall and the reaction of musicians and audiences to the completed facility. The Sala was the model for Suntory Hall in Japan which in turn spawned a number of vineyard halls in Japan. Most recently, the vineyard style seems to be appealing to more and more symphonic organizations in Europe and North America.

  4. Some characteristics of the concert harp's acoustic radiation.

    PubMed

    Le Carrou, Jean-Loic; Leclere, Quentin; Gautier, Francois

    2010-05-01

    The way a musical instrument radiates plays an important part in determining the instrument's sound quality. For the concert harp, the soundboard has to radiate the string's vibration over a range of 7 octaves. Despite the effort of instrument makers, this radiation is not uniform throughout this range. In a recent paper, Waltham and Kotlicki [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 1774-1780 (2008)] proposed an interesting approach for the study of the string-to-string variance based on the relationship between the string attachment position and the operating deflection shapes of the soundboard. Although the soundboard vibrational characteristics determine a large part of the instrument's radiation, it is also important to study directly its radiation to conclude on the origins of the string-to-string variation in the sound production. This is done by computing the equivalent acoustical sources on the soundboard from the far field sound radiation measured around the harp, using the acoustic imaging technique inverse frequency response function. Results show that the radiated sound depends on the correlation between these sources, and the played string's frequency and location. These equivalent sources thus determine the magnitude and directivity of each string's partial in the far field, which have consequences on the spectral balance of the perceived sound for each string.

  5. "Iitaohkanao'pi--The Meeting Place Project": An Alternative Approach to Young People's Concerts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasiak, Edwin B.

    2005-01-01

    This study explored alternative approaches to young people's concerts aimed at extending musical appreciations and cultural understandings while promoting interest in concert attendance among upper elementary students. The project, an artistic and cross-cultural collaboration grounded in a spirit of mutual respect, consisted of three components:…

  6. What Did You Do to Teach Good Concert Behavior at Your School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Music, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how she taught concert etiquette to her students. The author started by having her students research concert etiquette online. She then created a music Web site bibliography, beginning with the MENC site (www.menc.org/guides/etiquette /etiquette_home.html). She relates that the teaching approach she used has…

  7. The 2003 Music in Our School's Month and World's Largest Concert Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    On March 13, 2003 millions of school children, teachers, and citizens from around the world participate simultaneously in the "World's Largest Concert" (WLC). This concert, a sing-along program, is broadcast on PBS and the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network overseas. Participating in the WLC is a way to celebrate Music in Our…

  8. General Music as a Cure for the High-Stakes Concert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    The author argues that concerts create pressures on the music curriculum similar to those high-stakes tests generate on the general curriculum. Three similarities are presented and discussed using the example of a concert the author organized: first, teaching to the test and the narrowing of curricular goals; second, evaluation by a single source…

  9. Science 101: How Do Acoustics Dictate the Design of a Concert Hall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This column provides background science information for elementary teachers. When the author was young he used to think that the ideal design for a concert hall would contain walls that were composed of sound-absorbing material, like foam or egg cartons or such. He noticed, though, that this was not the case. Most concert halls contain curtains…

  10. Movement - uncoordinated

    MedlinePlus

    Lack of coordination; Loss of coordination; Coordination impairment; Ataxia; Clumsiness; Uncoordinated movement ... are passed through families (such as congenital cerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia , ataxia - telangiectasia , or Wilson disease ) Multiple ...

  11. [Public music concerts in a psychiatric hospital: effects on public opinion and as therapy for patients].

    PubMed

    Takasaka, Y; Yokota, O; Tanioka, T; Nagata, K; Yasuoka, K; Toda, H

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of music therapy concerts, which were held 60 times over a four year period, 1992 to 1996, in Geiyo Psychiatric Hospital, Kochi Prefecture and found that; 1) Musicians who performed at the concerts were not only from Kochi prefecture but also from other prefectures (10 times) and from four foreign countries (7 times). 2) Live concerts in a small hall had a positive influence on patients and drew the patient's attention and interest away from their hallucinations and delusions to the real world. Moreover, the concerts provided the patients with chances to acquire social graces such as being well-groomed. 3) Explanations by the musicians, interviews with the musicians and the seasonal choruses accompanied by the musicians were helpful to give the patients motives for recovering communication skills and to interact with society. 4) Inquiries to the patients about the concerts indicated discrepancies between the poor observed estimations during the concerts (83.3%) and the good subjective impressions expressed by the patients (82.0%), suggesting that the patients were not good at expressing their internal emotions through facial expressions or attitudes. 5) Many citizens including children came to the concerts and/or gave aid to the hospital because the concerts were open to the public and we suggest that this contributed to improving the general publics' image of psychiatric hospitals. Questionnaires revealed that 90% of people in a control group had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals in Japan, but only 32% of the members of the general public who attended our concerts had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals. In addition, the revolving ratio of the hospital beds rose from 0.4 to 1.2 over the four years, which also suggests a beneficial effect on the patients.

  12. Concerted proton-electron transfer in the oxidation of hydrogen-bonded phenols.

    PubMed

    Rhile, Ian J; Markle, Todd F; Nagao, Hirotaka; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Lam, Oanh P; Lockwood, Mark A; Rotter, Katrina; Mayer, James M

    2006-05-10

    Three phenols with pendant, hydrogen-bonded bases (HOAr-B) have been oxidized in MeCN with various one-electron oxidants. The bases are a primary amine (-CPh(2)NH(2)), an imidazole, and a pyridine. The product of chemical and quasi-reversible electrochemical oxidations in each case is the phenoxyl radical in which the phenolic proton has transferred to the base, (*)OAr-BH(+), a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) process. The redox potentials for these oxidations are lower than for other phenols, predominately from the driving force for proton movement. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism, based on thermochemical arguments, isotope effects, and DeltaDeltaG(++)/DeltaDeltaG degrees . The data rule out stepwise paths involving initial electron transfer to form the phenol radical cations [(*)(+)HOAr-B] or initial proton transfer to give the zwitterions [(-)OAr-BH(+)]. The rate constant for heterogeneous electron transfer from HOAr-NH(2) to a platinum electrode has been derived from electrochemical measurements. For oxidations of HOAr-NH(2), the dependence of the solution rate constants on driving force, on temperature, and on the nature of the oxidant, and the correspondence between the homogeneous and heterogeneous rate constants, are all consistent with the application of adiabatic Marcus theory. The CPET reorganization energies, lambda = 23-56 kcal mol(-)(1), are large in comparison with those for electron transfer reactions of aromatic compounds. The reactions are not highly non-adiabatic, based on minimum values of H(rp) derived from the temperature dependence of the rate constants. These are among the first detailed analyses of CPET reactions where the proton and electron move to different sites.

  13. Chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated.

  14. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hruschka, Daniel  J.; Branford, Simon; Smith, Eric  D.; Wilkins, Jon; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2014-12-18

    Background: Concerted evolution is normally used to describe parallel changes at different sites in a genome, but it is also observed in languages where a specific phoneme changes to the same other phoneme in many words in the lexicon—a phenomenon known as regular sound change. We develop a general statistical model that can detect concerted changes in aligned sequence data and apply it to study regular sound changes in the Turkic language family. Results: Linguistic evolution, unlike the genetic substitutional process, is dominated by events of concerted evolutionary change. Our model identified more than 70 historical events of regular sound change that occurred throughout the evolution of the Turkic language family, while simultaneously inferring a dated phylogenetic tree. Including regular sound changes yielded an approximately 4-fold improvement in the characterization of linguistic change over a simpler model of sporadic change, improved phylogenetic inference, and returned more reliable and plausible dates for events on the phylogenies. The historical timings of the concerted changes closely follow a Poisson process model, and the sound transition networks derived from our model mirror linguistic expectations. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a model with no prior knowledge of complex concerted or regular changes can nevertheless infer the historical timings and genealogical placements of events of concerted change from the signals left in contemporary data. Our model can be applied wherever discrete elements—such as genes, words, cultural trends, technologies, or morphological traits—can change in parallel within an organism or other evolving group.

  15. Evidence for concerted pathways in ion-pairing coupled electron transfers.

    PubMed

    Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2008-04-09

    Ion-pairing with electro-inactive metal ions may change drastically the thermodynamic and kinetic reactivity of electron transfer in chemical and biochemical processes. Besides the classical stepwise pathways (electron-transfer first, followed by ion-pairing or vice versa), ion-pairing may also occur concertedly with electron transfer. The latter pathway avoids high-energy intermediates but a key issue is that of the kinetic price to pay to benefit from this thermodynamic advantage. A model is proposed leading to activation/driving force relationships characterizing such concerted associative electron transfers for intermolecular and intramolecular homogeneous reactions and for electrochemical reactions. Contrary to previous assertions, the driving force of the reaction (defined as the opposite of the reaction standard free energy), as well as the intrinsic barrier, does not depend on the concentration of the ion-pairing agent, which simply plays the role of one of the reactants. Besides solvent and intramolecular reorganization, the energy of the bond being formed is the main component of the intrinsic barrier. Application of these considerations to reactions reported in recent literature illustrates how concerted ion-pairing electron-transfer reactions can be diagnosed and how competition between stepwise and concerted pathways can be analyzed. It provided the first experimental evidence of the viability of concerted ion-pairing electron-transfer reactions.

  16. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Hruschka, Daniel  J.; Branford, Simon; Smith, Eric  D.; ...

    2014-12-18

    Background: Concerted evolution is normally used to describe parallel changes at different sites in a genome, but it is also observed in languages where a specific phoneme changes to the same other phoneme in many words in the lexicon—a phenomenon known as regular sound change. We develop a general statistical model that can detect concerted changes in aligned sequence data and apply it to study regular sound changes in the Turkic language family. Results: Linguistic evolution, unlike the genetic substitutional process, is dominated by events of concerted evolutionary change. Our model identified more than 70 historical events of regular soundmore » change that occurred throughout the evolution of the Turkic language family, while simultaneously inferring a dated phylogenetic tree. Including regular sound changes yielded an approximately 4-fold improvement in the characterization of linguistic change over a simpler model of sporadic change, improved phylogenetic inference, and returned more reliable and plausible dates for events on the phylogenies. The historical timings of the concerted changes closely follow a Poisson process model, and the sound transition networks derived from our model mirror linguistic expectations. Conclusions: We demonstrate that a model with no prior knowledge of complex concerted or regular changes can nevertheless infer the historical timings and genealogical placements of events of concerted change from the signals left in contemporary data. Our model can be applied wherever discrete elements—such as genes, words, cultural trends, technologies, or morphological traits—can change in parallel within an organism or other evolving group.« less

  17. Dance Education as an Aspect of Movement and Mobility in Everyday Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Susan R.

    2005-01-01

    Dance Education can be considered an aspect of everyday living when using the correct definition of dance education. Rather than referring to the rarified form of movement that we encounter on the concert stage, dance education is the education of our moving selves with the goal as self expression. This can be initiated as an aspect of the initial…

  18. Popular Education for Movement Building: A Resource Guide. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illenberger, Abbie, Ed.; Wallach, Jason, Ed.

    Popular education is "political education for everyday people." It is"people coming together to discuss problems of injustice and inequality and learning how to confront these problems collectively." To be effective in movement building, this guide calls for people who can act in concert to fundamentally change the world. It…

  19. Degradation of hyaluronate by the concerted action of ozone and sunlight.

    PubMed

    Schmut, O; Ansari, A N; Faulborn, J

    1994-01-01

    The influence of ozone and sunlight in a concerted reaction on hyaluronate solutions was investigated. The kinematic viscosity of hyaluronate solutions is decreased by ozone-air mixtures and simultaneous radiation with sun rays within a few minutes, indicating a depolymerization of the hyaluronate molecule. The reaction is dependent on the concentration of ozone and on the time of exposure to ozone and sunlight. The concerted degradation of hyaluronate is more effective than the reaction with each component, ozone and sun rays, alone. We conclude that hyaluronate depolymerization by ozone and sunlight may be one factor for irritations of the eye by photochemical smog and increased exposure to sun rays.

  20. The patient movement as an emancipation movement

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To suggest that the patient movement is an emancipation movement. Background  The patient movement is young and fragmented; and it can seem confusing because it lacks an explicit ideology with intellectual and theoretical underpinnings. Methods  Drawing mainly on the experiences and the published writings of patient activists, the author identified eight aspects of the patient movement that could be compared with aspects of recognized emancipation movements: the radicalization of activists; the creation of new knowledge; the identification of guiding principles; the sense of direction; the unmasking of new issues; schisms within the movement and allies outside it; and the gradual social acceptance of some of the ideas (here standards of health care) that activists work to promote. Results  Similarities between certain aspects of the patient movement and of the recognized emancipation movements were close. Conclusion  The patient movement can be regarded as an emancipation movement, albeit an immature one. PMID:18494955

  1. Paul Wittgenstein's right arm and his phantom: the saga of a famous concert pianist and his amputation.

    PubMed

    Boller, François; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Reports of postamputation pain and problems linked to phantom limbs have increased in recent years, particularly in relation to war-related amputations. These problems are still poorly understood and are considered rather mysterious, and they are difficult to treat. In addition, they may shed light on brain physiology and neuropsychology. Functional neuroimaging techniques now enable us to better understand their pathophysiology and to consider new rehabilitation techniques. Several artists have suffered from postamputation complications and this has influenced not only their personal life but also their artistic work. Paul Wittgenstein (1887-1961), a pianist whose right arm was amputated during the First World War, became a famous left-handed concert performer. His case provides insight into Post-World War I musical and political history. More specifically, the impact on the artistic life of this pianist illustrates various postamputation complications, such as phantom limb, stump pain, and especially moving phantom. The phantom movements of his right hand helped him develop the dexterity of his left hand. Wittgenstein played piano works that were written especially for him (the most famous being Ravel's Concerto for the Left Hand) and composed some of his own. Additionally, several famous composers had previously written for the left hand.

  2. Evaluation of stage acoustics in Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall by measuring stage support.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Barron, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Stage acoustics is an important characteristic for concert halls, both for the acoustic quality on stage and for the audience. However, relatively little research has been conducted into the question. This study was based on the investigation of an actual concert hall stage, that of the Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall in Korea. The stage acoustics was evaluated in the actual hall, and with two models: a 1:25 scale model and a computer model. The study was based on the stage support parameter ST1 proposed by Gade as a measure of support for individual performers [Acustica 65, 193-203 (1989)]. The variation of support was measured on the empty stage of the actual hall and in the two models. The effect of musicians on stage, the effect of moving the orchestra, the effect of ceiling height and of stage-wall profile were also investigated. Conclusions are drawn both relating to the Seoul Concert Hall stage and stages in general.

  3. Living Room vs. Concert Hall: Patterns of Music Consumption in Flanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roose, Henk; Stichele, Alexander Vander

    2010-01-01

    In this article we probe the interplay between public and private music consumption using a large-scale survey of the Flemish population in Belgium. We analyze whether public and private music consumption have different correlates and to what extent there is convergence between the genres that people listen to at home and at concerts. Results show…

  4. Unequal Academic Achievement in High School: The Mediating Roles of Concerted Cultivation and Close Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carolan, Brian V.

    2016-01-01

    Building from the classic Wisconsin model of status attainment, this study examines whether a specific style of parenting, concerted cultivation, and a close friend's school-related attitudes and behaviors mediate the relationship between a family's socioeconomic status and their child's academic achievement in the United States. Using a recursive…

  5. Managing Risk in Producing Concerts and Other Major Campus Events: A Guide for Student Programmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German, Carol J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers suggestions for campus-activities programmers on how to minimize liability for problems with concerts and other student-planned campus events. Discussion covers prevention of monetary loss, breach of contract issues, and preventing personal injuries and property damage. Specific preventive actions and policies are discussed. (MSE)

  6. Regioselective de novo synthesis of cyanohydroxypyridines with a concerted cycloaddition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin-Yong; Keith, John A; Shen, Wei-Zheng; Schürmann, Markus; Preut, Hans; Jacob, Timo; Arndt, Hans-Dieter

    2008-10-08

    An efficient cycloaddition reaction of 1-alkoxy-1-azadienes with alpha,alpha-dicyanoalkenes is described, which gives facile access to highly substituted 3-hydroxypyridines in very good yields and with complete regiocontrol and chemoselectivity. The reaction path was investigated in detail by quantum mechanics calculations, reporting that a concerted cycloaddition mechanism and thermodynamic control synergistically contribute to the observed selectivity.

  7. Carbon Based Lifeforms @ Cosmonova: A Concert in Sight and Sound for IYA2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, T.

    2012-05-01

    Replacing its conventional analogue planetarium with a digital fulldome system, the Cosmonova theatre at the Swedish Museum of Natural History sought to come up with a variety of public offerings for the International Year of Astronomy 2009. Besides several fulldome shows it was decided that a concert of live music would both celebrate the year as well as attempt to attract a new audience.

  8. Movement - unpredictable or jerky

    MedlinePlus

    ... uncontrolled); Hyperkinetic movements References Jankovic J, Lang AE. Movement disorders. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta ... Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 21. Lang AE. Other movement disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  9. KCNQ1 Channels Do Not Undergo Concerted but Sequential Gating Transitions in Both the Absence and the Presence of KCNE1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Eshcar; Dvir, Meidan; Haitin, Yoni; Giladi, Moshe; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1 produces IKS, a K+ current, crucial for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in these channel subunits lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. However, very little is known about the gating mechanisms underlying KCNQ1 channel activation. Shaker channels have provided a powerful tool to establish the basic gating mechanisms of voltage-dependent K+ channels, implying prior independent movement of all four voltage sensor domains (VSDs) followed by channel opening via a last concerted cooperative transition. To determine the nature of KCNQ1 channel gating, we performed a thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis by constructing a concatenated tetrameric KCNQ1 channel and by introducing separately a gain and a loss of function mutation, R231W and R243W, respectively, into the S4 helix of the VSD of one, two, three, and four subunits. The R231W mutation destabilizes channel closure and produces constitutively open channels, whereas the R243W mutation disrupts channel opening solely in the presence of KCNE1 by right-shifting the voltage dependence of activation. The linearity of the relationship between the shift in the voltage dependence of activation and the number of mutated subunits points to an independence of VSD movements, with each subunit incrementally contributing to channel gating. Contrary to Shaker channels, our work indicates that KCNQ1 channels do not experience a late cooperative concerted opening transition. Our data suggest that KCNQ1 channels in both the absence and the presence of KCNE1 undergo sequential gating transitions leading to channel opening even before all VSDs have moved. PMID:22908235

  10. KCNQ1 channels do not undergo concerted but sequential gating transitions in both the absence and the presence of KCNE1 protein.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Eshcar; Dvir, Meidan; Haitin, Yoni; Giladi, Moshe; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2012-10-05

    The co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1 produces I(KS), a K(+) current, crucial for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in these channel subunits lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. However, very little is known about the gating mechanisms underlying KCNQ1 channel activation. Shaker channels have provided a powerful tool to establish the basic gating mechanisms of voltage-dependent K(+) channels, implying prior independent movement of all four voltage sensor domains (VSDs) followed by channel opening via a last concerted cooperative transition. To determine the nature of KCNQ1 channel gating, we performed a thermodynamic mutant cycle analysis by constructing a concatenated tetrameric KCNQ1 channel and by introducing separately a gain and a loss of function mutation, R231W and R243W, respectively, into the S4 helix of the VSD of one, two, three, and four subunits. The R231W mutation destabilizes channel closure and produces constitutively open channels, whereas the R243W mutation disrupts channel opening solely in the presence of KCNE1 by right-shifting the voltage dependence of activation. The linearity of the relationship between the shift in the voltage dependence of activation and the number of mutated subunits points to an independence of VSD movements, with each subunit incrementally contributing to channel gating. Contrary to Shaker channels, our work indicates that KCNQ1 channels do not experience a late cooperative concerted opening transition. Our data suggest that KCNQ1 channels in both the absence and the presence of KCNE1 undergo sequential gating transitions leading to channel opening even before all VSDs have moved.

  11. Reverse engineering the euglenoid movement

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Marino; Heltai, Luca; Millán, Daniel; DeSimone, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Euglenids exhibit an unconventional motility strategy amongst unicellular eukaryotes, consisting of large-amplitude highly concerted deformations of the entire body (euglenoid movement or metaboly). A plastic cell envelope called pellicle mediates these deformations. Unlike ciliary or flagellar motility, the biophysics of this mode is not well understood, including its efficiency and molecular machinery. We quantitatively examine video recordings of four euglenids executing such motions with statistical learning methods. This analysis reveals strokes of high uniformity in shape and pace. We then interpret the observations in the light of a theory for the pellicle kinematics, providing a precise understanding of the link between local actuation by pellicle shear and shape control. We systematically understand common observations, such as the helical conformations of the pellicle, and identify previously unnoticed features of metaboly. While two of our euglenids execute their stroke at constant body volume, the other two exhibit deviations of about 20% from their average volume, challenging current models of low Reynolds number locomotion. We find that the active pellicle shear deformations causing shape changes can reach 340%, and estimate the velocity of the molecular motors. Moreover, we find that metaboly accomplishes locomotion at hydrodynamic efficiencies comparable to those of ciliates and flagellates. Our results suggest new quantitative experiments, provide insight into the evolutionary history of euglenids, and suggest that the pellicle may serve as a model for engineered active surfaces with applications in microfluidics. PMID:23047705

  12. Mechanism of Concerted RNA-DNA Primer Synthesis by the Human Primosome.

    PubMed

    Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Zhang, Yinbo; Gu, Jianyou; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2016-05-06

    The human primosome, a 340-kilodalton complex of primase and DNA polymerase α (Polα), synthesizes chimeric RNA-DNA primers to be extended by replicative DNA polymerases δ and ϵ. The intricate mechanism of concerted primer synthesis by two catalytic centers was an enigma for over three decades. Here we report the crystal structures of two key complexes, the human primosome and the C-terminal domain of the primase large subunit (p58C) with bound DNA/RNA duplex. These structures, along with analysis of primase/polymerase activities, provide a plausible mechanism for all transactions of the primosome including initiation, elongation, accurate counting of RNA primer length, primer transfer to Polα, and concerted autoregulation of alternate activation/inhibition of the catalytic centers. Our findings reveal a central role of p58C in the coordinated actions of two catalytic domains in the primosome and ultimately could impact the design of anticancer drugs.

  13. Mosh pits and Circle pits: Collective motion at heavy metal concerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Matthew; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    Heavy metal concerts present an extreme environment in which large crowds (~102 -105) of humans experience very loud music (~ 130 dB) in sync with bright, flashing lights, often while intoxicated. In this setting, we find two types of collective motion: mosh pits, in which participants collide with each other randomly in a manner resembling an ideal gas, and circle pits, in which participants run collectively in a circle forming a vortex of people. We model these two collective behaviors using a flocking model and find qualitative and quantitative agreement with the behaviors found in videos of metal concerts. Futhermore, we find a phase diagram showing the transition from a mosh pit to a circle pit as well as a predicted third phase, lane formation.

  14. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfer from a metal-hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bourrez, Marc; Steinmetz, Romain; Ott, Sascha; Gloaguen, Frederic; Hammarström, Leif

    2014-02-01

    Metal hydrides are key intermediates in the catalytic reduction of protons and CO2 as well as in the oxidation of H2. In these reactions, electrons and protons are transferred to or from separate acceptors or donors in bidirectional protoncoupled electron transfer (PCET) steps. The mechanistic interpretation of PCET reactions of metal hydrides has focused on the stepwise transfer of electrons and protons. A concerted transfer may, however, occur with a lower reaction barrier and therefore proceed at higher catalytic rates. Here we investigate the feasibility of such a reaction by studying the oxidation–deprotonation reactions of a tungsten hydride complex. The rate dependence on the driving force for both electron transfer and proton transfer—employing different combinations of oxidants and bases—was used to establish experimentally the concerted, bidirectional PCET of a metal-hydride species. Consideration of the findings presented here in future catalyst designs may lead to more-efficient catalysts.

  15. Measured Early Lateral Energy Fractions in Concert Halls and Opera Houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BARRON, M.

    2000-04-01

    In the 30 years since early lateral reflections were first suggested as important for concert halls, spatial impression and source broadening have become almost universally accepted as essential characteristics of halls with good acoustics. Two objective measures of source broadening have been proposed. Measured values of the best defined of these measures, the early lateral energy fraction (LF), are considered here. Results from two independent measurement surveys are discussed. Comparisons of LF values by hall show a significant link between hall mean LF and hall width. There is however considerable overlap between measured LF values in different halls so the relevance of describing halls by their mean early lateral energy fraction values is questionable. The behaviour of LF values within auditoria is discussed for different concert hall plan forms and within opera houses. A measure of source broadening including sound level is proposed and results considered in the context of auditorium design.

  16. The Concert system - Compiler and runtime technology for efficient concurrent object-oriented programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Andrew A.; Karamcheti, Vijay; Plevyak, John; Sahrawat, Deepak

    1993-01-01

    Concurrent object-oriented languages, particularly fine-grained approaches, reduce the difficulty of large scale concurrent programming by providing modularity through encapsulation while exposing large degrees of concurrency. Despite these programmability advantages, such languages have historically suffered from poor efficiency. This paper describes the Concert project whose goal is to develop portable, efficient implementations of fine-grained concurrent object-oriented languages. Our approach incorporates aggressive program analysis and program transformation with careful information management at every stage from the compiler to the runtime system. The paper discusses the basic elements of the Concert approach along with a description of the potential payoffs. Initial performance results and specific plans for system development are also detailed.

  17. Palladium(II)-catalyzed direct alkoxylation of arenes: evidence for solvent-assisted concerted metalation deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Anand, Megha; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2011-09-16

    Density functional theory investigations on the mechanism of palladium acetate catalyzed direct alkoxylation of N-methoxybenzamide in methanol reveal that the key steps involve solvent-assisted N-H as well as C-H bond activations. The transition state for the critical palladium-carbon bond formation through a concerted metalation deprotonation (CMD) process leading to a palladacycle intermediate has been found to be more stable in the methanol-assisted pathway as compared to an unassisted route.

  18. Collective motion of humans in mosh and circle pits at heavy metal concerts.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jesse L; Bierbaum, Matthew; Sethna, James P; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-31

    Human collective behavior can vary from calm to panicked depending on social context. Using videos publicly available online, we study the highly energized collective motion of attendees at heavy metal concerts. We find these extreme social gatherings generate similarly extreme behaviors: a disordered gaslike state called a mosh pit and an ordered vortexlike state called a circle pit. Both phenomena are reproduced in flocking simulations demonstrating that human collective behavior is consistent with the predictions of simplified models.

  19. Collective Motion of Humans in Mosh and Circle Pits at Heavy Metal Concerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Jesse L.; Bierbaum, Matthew; Sethna, James P.; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Human collective behavior can vary from calm to panicked depending on social context. Using videos publicly available online, we study the highly energized collective motion of attendees at heavy metal concerts. We find these extreme social gatherings generate similarly extreme behaviors: a disordered gaslike state called a mosh pit and an ordered vortexlike state called a circle pit. Both phenomena are reproduced in flocking simulations demonstrating that human collective behavior is consistent with the predictions of simplified models.

  20. The link between independent acquisition of intracellular gamma-endosymbionts and concerted evolution in Tremblaya princeps

    PubMed Central

    López-Madrigal, Sergio; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Gil, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Many insect species establish mutualistic symbiosis with intracellular bacteria that complement their unbalanced diets. The betaproteobacterium “Candidatus Tremblaya” maintains an ancient symbiosis with mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), which are classified in subfamilies Phenacoccinae and Pseudococcinae. Most Phenacoccinae mealybugs have “Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola” as their unique endosymbiont, while most Pseudococcinae mealybugs show a nested symbiosis (a bacterial symbiont placed inside another one) where every “Candidatus Tremblaya princeps” cell harbors several cells of a gammaproteobacterium. Genomic characterization of the endosymbiotic consortium from Planococcus citri, composed by “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” and “Candidatus Moranella endobia,” unveiled several atypical features of the former's genome, including the concerted evolution of paralogous loci. Its comparison with the genome of “Ca. Tremblaya phenacola” PAVE, single endosymbiont of Phenacoccus avenae, suggests that the atypical reductive evolution of “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” could be linked to the acquisition of “Ca. Moranella endobia,” which possess an almost complete set of genes encoding proteins involved in homologous recombination. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed comparative genomics between “Ca. Tremblaya phenacola” and “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” and searched for the co-occurrence of concerted evolution and homologous recombination genes in endosymbiotic consortia from four unexplored mealybug species, Dysmicoccus boninsis, Planococcus ficus, Pseudococcus longispinus, and Pseudococcus viburni. Our results support a link between concerted evolution and nested endosymbiosis. PMID:26161080

  1. Disentangling preference ratings of concert hall acoustics using subjective sensory profiles.

    PubMed

    Lokki, Tapio; Pätynen, Jukka; Kuusinen, Antti; Tervo, Sakari

    2012-11-01

    Subjective evaluation of acoustics was studied by recording nine concert halls with a simulated symphony orchestra on a seat 12 m from the orchestra. The recorded music was spatially reproduced for subjective listening tests and individual vocabulary profiling. In addition, the preferences of the assessors and objective parameters were gathered. The results show that concert halls were discriminated using perceptual characteristics, such as Envelopment/Loudness, Reverberance, Bassiness, Proximity, Definition, and Clarity. With these perceptual dimensions the preference ratings can be explained. Seventeen assessors were divided into two groups based on their preferences. The first group preferred concert halls with relatively intimate sound, in which it is quite easy to hear individual instruments and melody lines. In contrast, the second group preferred a louder and more reverberant sound with good envelopment and strong bass. Even though all halls were recorded exactly at the same distance, the preference is best explained with subjective Proximity and with Bassiness, Envelopment, and Loudness to some extent. Neither the preferences nor the subjective ratings could be fully explained by objective parameters (ISO3382-1:2009), although some correlations were found.

  2. Ethanol dehydration in HZSM-5 studied by density functional theory: evidence for a concerted process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Beckham, Gregg T; Paton, Robert S; Nimlos, Mark R

    2015-04-16

    Dehydration over acidic zeolites is an important reaction class for the upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors to hydrocarbon fuels or to precursors for myriad chemical products. Here, we examine the dehydration of ethanol at a Brønsted acid site, T12, found in HZSM-5 using density functional theory (DFT). The geometries of both cluster and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) models are prepared from the ZSM-5 crystal structure. Comparisons between these models and different DFT methods are conducted to show similar results among the models and methods used. Inclusion of the full catalyst cavity through a QM:MM approach is found to be important, since activation barriers are computed on average as 7 kcal mol(-1) lower than those obtained with a smaller cluster model. Two different pathways, concerted and stepwise, have been considered when examining dehydration and deprotonation steps. The current study shows that a concerted dehydration process is possible with a lower (4-5 kcal mol(-1)) activation barrier while previous literature studies have focused on a stepwise mechanism. Overall, this work demonstrates that fairly high activation energies (∼50 kcal mol(-1)) are required for ethanol dehydration. A concerted mechanism is favored over a stepwise mechanism because charge separation in the transition state is minimized. QM:MM approaches appear to provide superior results to cluster calculations due to a more accurate representation of charges on framework oxygen atoms.

  3. Movement disorders and sleep.

    PubMed

    Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes what is currently known about sleep disturbances in several movement disorders including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, parkinsonism, dystonia, Huntington disease, myoclonus, and ataxias. There is an association between movement disorders and sleep. In some cases the prevalence of sleep disorders is much higher in patients with movement disorder, such as rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease. In other cases, sleep difficulties worsen the involuntary movements. In many cases the medications used to treat patients with movement disorder disturb sleep or cause daytime sleepiness. The importance of discussing sleep issues in patients with movement disorders cannot be underestimated.

  4. Relationship Between Type of Bow Holding and Propagation of Performed Sound in Small Concert Hall in Violin Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2005-03-01

    The propagation of violin sound performed by eight amateur players was compared in the front and rear seats of a small concert hall. It was found that the propagation of the performed sound in the hall is different according to the type of bow holding of the players and the difference of the instrument. The relationship between the player and the instrument influences the listeners’ impressions in the concert hall. It is important to perform a sound that is adjusted to the characteristics of the concert hall to minimize the decrease in the sound level in the rear seats of the hall.

  5. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. PMID:26138457

  6. Biomechanics of foetal movement.

    PubMed

    Nowlan, N C

    2015-01-02

    Foetal movements commence at seven weeks of gestation, with the foetal movement repertoire including twitches, whole body movements, stretches, isolated limb movements, breathing movements, head and neck movements, jaw movements (including yawning, sucking and swallowing) and hiccups by ten weeks of gestational age. There are two key biomechanical aspects to gross foetal movements; the first being that the foetus moves in a dynamically changing constrained physical environment in which the freedom to move becomes increasingly restricted with increasing foetal size and decreasing amniotic fluid. Therefore, the mechanical environment experienced by the foetus affects its ability to move freely. Secondly, the mechanical forces induced by foetal movements are crucial for normal skeletal development, as evidenced by a number of conditions and syndromes for which reduced or abnormal foetal movements are implicated, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip, arthrogryposis and foetal akinesia deformation sequence. This review examines both the biomechanical effects of the physical environment on foetal movements through discussion of intrauterine factors, such as space, foetal positioning and volume of amniotic fluid, and the biomechanical role of gross foetal movements in human skeletal development through investigation of the effects of abnormal movement on the bones and joints. This review also highlights computational simulations of foetal movements that attempt to determine the mechanical forces acting on the foetus as it moves. Finally, avenues for future research into foetal movement biomechanics are highlighted, which have potential impact for a diverse range of fields including foetal medicine, musculoskeletal disorders and tissue engineering.

  7. The effect of diffuse reflections on spatial discrimination in a simulated concert hall.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip; Pätynen, Jukka; Lokki, Tapio

    2013-05-01

    This letter presents results from a study on diffusive architectural surfaces and auditory perception. Spatial discrimination of multiple sources is investigated in a simulated performance venue with various diffusive surface treatments. Simulations were generated with closely spaced sound sources on the stage of a concert hall and a listener in the audience area. Subjects were asked to distinguish signals in which pairs of simultaneous talkers were presented at various lateral separations, in halls with flat or diffusive surfaces. The experiments reveal that discriminating differences in the lateral arrangement of sources is possible at narrower separation angles when reflections come from flat rather than diffusive surfaces.

  8. Atom-by-Atom and Concerted Hopping of Adatom Pairs on an Open Metal Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bogicevic, A.; Ovesson, S.; Lundqvist, B.I.; Jennison, D.R.

    1999-08-25

    Atom-by-atom and concerted hopping of ad-dimers on the open (100) surface of fcc metals are studied by means of density-functional calculations. The adatom interaction is relatively short-ranged, and beyond next-nearest neighbors ad-dimers are effectively dissociated. Diffusion takes place by a simple shearing process, favored because it maximizes adatom coordination at the transition state This holds for Al, Au, and Rh, and is likely a general result because geometrical arguments dominate over details of the electronic structure.

  9. Beyond music: auditory temporary threshold shift in rock musicians after a heavy metal concert.

    PubMed

    Drake-Lee, A B

    1992-10-01

    Audiometry was undertaken before and within half an hour following a heavy metal concert to assess evidence of noise damage. Of the four members tested, one member wore an ear defender in his right ear during the period of noise exposure. All unprotected ears showed a temporary threshold shift which was maximum in the lower frequencies. There was some evidence that early noise damage had occurred with a dip at 6 kHz. The role of music as noise and its potential to damage the cochlea are discussed.

  10. A Coordinated Emergency Response: A Color Dust Explosion at a 2015 Concert in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    In June 2015, nearly 500 concert attendees suffered injuries from smoke inhalation and severe burns following a color-dust explosion at a waterpark in Taiwan. We report on the progressions of the incident and government responses, share cross-departmental mobilization and case management lessons, and reflect on clinical and complex policy issues emerged. The timely and coordinated emergency responses, a high-quality universal health care system, and dedicated clinicians voluntarily working overtime resulted in an unprecedented 2.4% mortality rate (international statistics predicted 26.8%). PMID:27459446

  11. Continuous cost movement models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limp, W. Fredrick

    1991-01-01

    Use of current space imaging systems and airborne platforms has direct use in survey design and site location when used in concert with a comprehensive GIS environment. Local conditions and site physical and chemical properties are key factors in successful applications. Conjoining of environmental constraints and site properties are present for the later prehistoric occupations in the Arkansas and Mississippi River areas. Direct linkages between comprehensive site databases and satellite images can be used to evaluate site distributions for research and management.

  12. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  13. Functional Movement Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... that controls muscles during contraction and at rest. Electroencephalography (EEG) can correlate the movement and detect any ... that controls muscles during contraction and at rest. Electroencephalography (EEG) can correlate the movement and detect any ...

  14. Eye Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  15. Predicate Movements in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shou-hsin, Teng

    1975-01-01

    The movements of such higher predicates as time, locative, and complementation verbs are studied, and Tai's Predicate Placement Constraint is rejected as an incorrect account of predicate movements in Chinese. It is proposed, on the other hand, that there is only leftward movement involving predicates in Chinese. (Author)

  16. Linking Literacy and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  17. Eye Movements and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Larry L.

    Research on the use of eye movement indices (such as number of fixations, the average fixation duration, and saccadic movements) as a measure of cognitive processing is reviewed in this paper. Information is provided on the physiology of the eye, computer applications to eye movement study, the influence of stimulus materials and intelligence on…

  18. Bringing Astronomy Directly to New Audiences (50,000 People) at Outdoor Concerts and Music Festivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.

    2014-07-01

    My NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) has brought astronomy to 50,000 music lovers at the National Mall (co-sponsor OSTP); Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Ravinia, or Tanglewood music festivals; and classical, folk, pop/rock, opera, Caribbean, or county-western concerts in parks assisted by astronomy clubs (55 events since 2009). Yo-Yo-Ma, the Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Tony Orlando, and Wilco performed at these events. MAUS combines solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; large posters/banners (From the Earth to the Universe; Visions of the Universe); videos; hands-on activities (Night Sky Network; Harvard-Smithsonian CfA); imaging with a cell phone mount; and hand-outs (info on science museums, astronomy clubs, and citizen science) before and after the concerts or at intermission. MAUS reached underserved groups and attracted large enthusiastic crowds. Many young children participated in this family learning experience-often the first time they looked through a telescope. Outcomes: While < 50% of the participants took part in a science museum or activity in the past year (survey result), they found MAUS enjoyable and understandable; learned about astronomy; wanted to learn more; and increased their interest in science (ave. rating 3.6/4). Taking science directly to people is effective in promoting science education!

  19. Extraordinary ribosomal spacer length heterogeneity in a neotyphodium endophyte hybrid: implications for concerted evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Ganley, A R; Scott, B

    1998-01-01

    An extraordinary level of length heterogeneity was found in the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of an asexual hybrid Neotyphodium grass endophyte, isolate Lp1. This hybrid Neotyphodium endophyte is an interspecific hybrid between two grass endophytes, Neotyphodium lolii, and a sexual form, Epichlöe typhina, and the length heterogeneity was not found in either of these progenitor species. The length heterogeneity in the hybrid is localized to the intergenic spacer (IGS) and is the result of copy-number variation of a tandemly repeated subrepeat class within the IGS, the 111-/119-bp subrepeats. Copy number variation of this subrepeat class appears to be a consequence of mitotic unequal crossing over that occurs between these subrepeats. This implies that unequal crossing over plays a role in the concerted evolution of the whole rDNA. Changes in the pattern of IGS length variants occurred in just two rounds of single-spore purification. Analysis of the IGS length heterogeneity revealed features that are unexpected in a simple model of unequal crossing over. Potential refinements of the molecular details of unequal crossing over are presented, and we also discuss evidence for a combination of homogenization mechanisms that drive the concerted evolution of the Lp1 rDNA. PMID:9832538

  20. Concerted dihedral rotations give rise to internal friction in unfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Ignacia; Makarov, Dmitrii E; Papoian, Garegin A

    2014-06-18

    Protein chains undergo conformational diffusion during folding and dynamics, experiencing both thermal kicks and viscous drag. Recent experiments have shown that the corresponding friction can be separated into wet friction, which is determined by the solvent viscosity, and dry friction, where frictional effects arise due to the interactions within the protein chain. Despite important advances, the molecular origins underlying dry friction in proteins have remained unclear. To address this problem, we studied the dynamics of the unfolded cold-shock protein at different solvent viscosities and denaturant concentrations. Using extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations we estimated the internal friction time scales and found them to agree well with the corresponding experimental measurements (Soranno et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2012, 109, 17800-17806). Analysis of the reconfiguration dynamics of the unfolded chain further revealed that hops in the dihedral space provide the dominant mechanism of internal friction. Furthermore, the increased number of concerted dihedral moves at physiological conditions suggest that, in such conditions, the concerted motions result in higher frictional forces. These findings have important implications for understanding the folding kinetics of proteins as well as the dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  1. Extensive gene amplification and concerted evolution within the CPR family of cuticular proteins in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Cornman, R Scott; Willis, Judith H

    2008-06-01

    Annotation of the Anopheles gambiae genome has revealed a large increase in the number of genes encoding cuticular proteins with the Rebers and Riddiford Consensus (the CPR gene family) relative to Drosophila melanogaster. This increase reflects an expansion of the RR-2 group of CPR genes, particularly the amplification of sets of highly similar paralogs. Patterns of nucleotide variation indicate that extensive concerted evolution is occurring within these clusters. The pattern of concerted evolution is complex, however, as sequence similarity within clusters is uncorrelated with gene order and orientation, and no comparable clusters occur within similarly compact arrays of the RR-1 group in mosquitoes or in either group in D. melanogaster. The dearth of pseudogenes suggests that sequence clusters are maintained by selection for high gene-copy number, perhaps due to selection for high expression rates. This hypothesis is consistent with the apparently parallel evolution of compact gene architectures within sequence clusters relative to single-copy genes. We show that RR-2 proteins from sequence-cluster genes have complex repeats and extreme amino-acid compositions relative to single-copy CPR proteins in An. gambiae, and that the amino-acid composition of the N-terminal and C-terminal sequence flanking the chitin-binding consensus region evolves in a correlated fashion.

  2. Stepwise Versus Concerted Mechanisms in General-Base Catalysis by Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Uritsky, Neta; Shokhen, Michael; Albeck, Amnon

    2016-01-26

    General-base catalysis in serine proteases still poses mechanistic challenges despite decades of research. Whether proton transfer from the catalytic Ser to His and nucleophilic attack on the substrate are concerted or stepwise is still under debate, even for the classical Asp-His-Ser catalytic triad. To address these key catalytic steps, the transformation of the Michaelis complex to tetrahedral complex in the covalent inhibition of two prototype serine proteases was studied: chymotrypsin (with the catalytic triad) inhibition by a peptidyl trifluoromethane and GlpG rhomboid (with Ser-His dyad) inhibition by an isocoumarin derivative. The sampled MD trajectories of averaged pKa  values of catalytic residues were QM calculated by the MD-QM/SCRF(VS) method on molecular clusters simulating the active site. Differences between concerted and stepwise mechanisms are controlled by the dynamically changing pKa  values of the catalytic residues as a function of their progressively reduced water exposure, caused by the incoming ligand.

  3. Analysis of concert hall acoustics via visualizations of time-frequency and spatiotemporal responses.

    PubMed

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Lokki, Tapio

    2013-02-01

    Acousticians and other practitioners alike often describe acoustic conditions in performance spaces with standard objective parameters. Apart from a few exceptions, the parameters are calculated by integrating the sound energy of the impulse responses over time; this makes them inadequate for researching the acoustics in detail, especially in the early part of the room impulse response. This paper proposes a method based on time-frequency and spatiotemporal presentations to overcome the lack of detail in the standard analysis. In brief, the proposed methods visualize the cumulative development of the sound field as a function of frequency or direction by forward-integrating the energy in the impulse response in short time frames. Analysis on the measurements from six concert halls concentrates particularly on interpreting the results in light of the seat dip effect. Earlier research has concluded that the seat dip effect is reduced by reflection from low overhead surfaces. In contrast, the current results indicate that the seat dip attenuation in the frequency response is corrected the best when the hall provides most lateral reflections. These findings suggest that the proposed analysis is suitable for explaining concert hall acoustics in detail.

  4. Concerted Evolution of Duplicate Control Regions in the Mitochondria of Species of the Flatfish Family Bothidae (Teleostei: Pleuronectiformes).

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-He; Shi, Wei; Munroe, Thomas A; Gong, Li; Kong, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Mitogenomes of flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) exhibit the greatest diversity of gene rear-rangements in teleostean fishes. Duplicate control regions (CRs) have been found in the mito-genomes of two flatfishes, Samariscus latus (Samaridae) and Laeops lanceolata (Bothidae), which is rare in teleosts. It has been reported that duplicate CRs have evolved in a concerted fashion in fishes and other animals, however, whether concerted evo-lution exists in flatfishes remains unknown. In this study, based on five newly sequenced and six previously reported mitogenomes of lefteye flounders in the Bothidae, we explored whether duplicate CRs and concerted evolution exist in these species. Results based on the present study and previous reports show that four out of eleven bothid species examined have duplicate CRs of their mitogenomes. The core regions of the duplicate CRs of mitogenomes in the same species have identical, or nearly identical, sequences when compared to each other. This pattern fits the typical characteristics of concerted evolution. Additionally, phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis also provided evidence to support the hypothesis that duplicate CRs evolved concertedly. The core region of concerted evolution is situated at the conserved domains of the CR of the mitogenome from the termination associated sequences (TASs) to the conserved sequence blocks (CSBs). Commonly, this region is con-sidered to regulate mitochondrial replication and transcription. Thus, we hypothesize that the cause of concerted evolution of the duplicate CRs in the mtDNAs of these four bothids may be related to some function of the conserved sequences of the CRs during mitochondrial rep-lication and transcription. We hope our results will provide fresh insight into the molecular mechanisms related to replication and evolution of mitogenomes.

  5. Functional eye movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, D; Bronstein, A M

    2017-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) eye movement disorders are perhaps less established in the medical literature than other types of functional movement disorders. Patients may present with ocular symptoms (e.g., blurred vision or oscillopsia) or functional eye movements may be identified during the formal examination of the eyes in patients with other functional disorders. Convergence spasm is the most common functional eye movement disorder, but functional gaze limitation, functional eye oscillations (also termed "voluntary nystagmus"), and functional convergence paralysis may be underreported. This chapter reviews the different types of functional eye movement abnormalities and provides a practical framework for their diagnosis and management.

  6. Evolution of dinoflagellate unigenic minicircles and the partially concerted divergence of their putative replicon origins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoduo; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Green, Beverley R

    2002-04-01

    Dinoflagellate chloroplast genes are unique in that each gene is on a separate minicircular chromosome. To understand the origin and evolution of this exceptional genomic organization we completely sequenced chloroplast psbA and 23S rRNA gene minicircles from four dinoflagellates: three closely related Heterocapsa species (H. pygmaea, H. rotundata, and H. niei) and the very distantly related Amphidinium carterae. We also completely sequenced a Protoceratium reticulatum minicircle with a 23S rRNA gene of novel structure. Comparison of these minicircles with those previously sequenced from H. triquetra and A. operculatum shows that in addition to the single gene all have noncoding regions of approximately a kilobase, which are likely to include a replication origin, promoter, and perhaps segregation sequences. The noncoding regions always have a high potential for folding into hairpins and loops. In all six dinoflagellate strains for which multiple minicircles are fully sequenced, parts of the noncoding regions, designated cores, are almost identical between the psbA and 23S rRNA minicircles, but the remainder is very different. There are two, three, or four cores per circle, sometimes highly related in sequence, but no sequence identity is detectable between cores of different species, even within one genus. This contrast between very high core conservation within a species, but none among species, indicates that cores are diverging relatively rapidly in a concerted manner. This is the first well-established case of concerted evolution of noncoding regions on numerous separate chromosomes. It differs from concerted evolution among tandemly repeated spacers between rRNA genes, and that of inverted repeats in plant chloroplast genomes, in involving only the noncoding DNA cores. We present two models for the origin of chloroplast gene minicircles in dinoflagellates from a typical ancestral multigenic chloroplast genome. Both involve substantial genomic reduction and

  7. An analysis of concert saxophone vibrato through the examination of recordings by eight prominent soloists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinninger, Thomas

    This study examines concert saxophone vibrato through the analysis of several recordings of standard repertoire by prominent soloists. The vibrato of Vincent Abato, Arno Bornkamp, Claude Delangle, Jean-Marie Londeix, Marcel Mule, Otis Murphy, Sigurd Rascher, and Eugene Rousseau is analyzed with regards to rate, extent, shape, and discretionary use. Examination of these parameters was conducted through both general observation and precise measurements with the aid of a spectrogram. Statistical analyses of the results provide tendencies for overall vibrato use, as well as the effects of certain musical attributes (note length, tempo, dynamic, range) on vibrato. The results of this analysis are also compared among each soloist and against pre-existing theories or findings in vibrato research.

  8. Efficacy of role play in concert with lecture to enhance student learning of immunology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Samantha L

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous reports that active learning increases student understanding, many barriers still exist that prevent faculty from shedding the traditional passive lecture and adopting active learning strategies in the classroom. This study looks at the use of role play as an active learning technique to convey new material, or as reinforcement to traditional lecture. A pre- and post-test survey was utilized to determine student learning gains, along with an anonymous survey to determine student attitudes about role play. Student learning gains are similar regardless of class size, role-playing participation or learning style, and reflect an increase in lower order cognition. Attitudes and learning gains indicate role play is preferable as a reinforcement technique, although the order does not matter if both lecture and role play are utilized to convey information. These data provide insight into the best practices of role-playing implementation in concert with traditional lecture format.

  9. Several posttranslational modifications act in concert to regulate gephyrin scaffolding and GABAergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Himanish; Auguadri, Luca; Battaglia, Sereina; Simone Thirouin, Zahra; Zemoura, Khaled; Messner, Simon; Acuña, Mario A.; Wildner, Hendrik; Yévenes, Gonzalo E.; Dieter, Andrea; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; O. Hottiger, Michael; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.

    2016-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) mediate the majority of fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain via synergistic association with the postsynaptic scaffolding protein gephyrin and its interaction partners. However, unlike their counterparts at glutamatergic synapses, gephyrin and its binding partners lack canonical protein interaction motifs; hence, the molecular basis for gephyrin scaffolding has remained unclear. In this study, we identify and characterize two new posttranslational modifications of gephyrin, SUMOylation and acetylation. We demonstrate that crosstalk between SUMOylation, acetylation and phosphorylation pathways regulates gephyrin scaffolding. Pharmacological intervention of SUMO pathway or transgenic expression of SUMOylation-deficient gephyrin variants rescued gephyrin clustering in CA1 or neocortical neurons of Gabra2-null mice, which otherwise lack gephyrin clusters, indicating that gephyrin SUMO modification is an essential determinant for scaffolding at GABAergic synapses. Together, our results demonstrate that concerted modifications on a protein scaffold by evolutionarily conserved yet functionally diverse signalling pathways facilitate GABAergic transmission. PMID:27819299

  10. Concerted hydrogen-bond breaking by quantum tunneling in the water hexamer prism.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Pérez, Cristóbal; Lobsiger, Simon; Reid, Adam A; Temelso, Berhane; Shields, George C; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Wales, David J; Pate, Brooks H; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-18

    The nature of the intermolecular forces between water molecules is the same in small hydrogen-bonded clusters as in the bulk. The rotational spectra of the clusters therefore give insight into the intermolecular forces present in liquid water and ice. The water hexamer is the smallest water cluster to support low-energy structures with branched three-dimensional hydrogen-bond networks, rather than cyclic two-dimensional topologies. Here we report measurements of splitting patterns in rotational transitions of the water hexamer prism, and we used quantum simulations to show that they result from geared and antigeared rotations of a pair of water molecules. Unlike previously reported tunneling motions in water clusters, the geared motion involves the concerted breaking of two hydrogen bonds. Similar types of motion may be feasible in interfacial and confined water.

  11. Is the Beckmann rearrangement a concerted or stepwise reaction? A computational study.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Shinichi; Tsuchida, Noriko; Yamazaki, Shoko

    2005-12-23

    [reaction: see text] RB3LYP calculations were performed on the Beckman rearrangement by the use of three substrates, acetone oxime (1), acetophenone oxime (2), and cyclohexanone oxime (3). Acidic solvents were modeled by H+ (CH3COOH)3 and H3O+ (H2O)6, and reaction paths were determined precisely. For 1, a two-step process involving a sigma-type cationic complex was obtained. For 2, a three-step process with pi- and sigma-type complexes was found in H+ (CH3COOH)3 and a two-step process involving a sigma-type cationic complex was obtained in H3O+ (H2O)6. However, for 3, a concerted process without pi and sigma complexes was calculated, which leads to the product, epsilon-caprolactam. Three different mechanisms were explained in terms of FMO theory.

  12. Congenital mirror movements.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, G D; Wyke, M A

    1981-01-01

    In this report are described seven patients assessed clinically and neuropsychologically in whom mirror movements affecting predominantly the hands occurred as a congenital disorder. These mirror movements, representing a specific type of abnormal synkinesia, may arise as a hereditary condition, in the presence of a recognisable underlying neurological abnormality, and sporadically, and the seven patients provide more or less satisfactory examples of each of these three groups. Despite the apparent uniformity of the disorder, the heterogeneity and variability may be marked, examples in some of our patients including the pronounced increase in tone that developed with arm movement, and the capacity for modulation of the associated movement by alteration of neck position and bio-feedback. Various possible mechanisms are considered; these include impaired cerebral inhibition of unwanted movements, and functioning of abnormal motor pathways. Emphasis has been placed on the putative role of the direct, crossed corticomotoneurone pathways and on the unilateral and bilateral cerebral events that precede movement. PMID:7288446

  13. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD.

  14. State-resolved imaging of CO from propenal photodissociation: Signatures of concerted three-body dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Arghya; Fernando, Ravin; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-04-21

    State-selected DC sliced images of propenal photodissociation show clear signatures of a novel synchronous concerted three-body dissociation of propenal recently proposed by Lee and co-workers to give C{sub 2}H{sub 2} + H{sub 2} + CO [S. H. Lee, C. H. Chin, C. Chaudhuri, ChemPhysChem 12, 753 (2011)]. Unlike any prior example of a concerted 3-body dissociation event, this mechanism involves breaking three distinct bonds and yields 3 distinct molecules. DC sliced images of CO fragments were recorded for a range of rotational levels for both v = 0 and v = 1. The results show formation of two distinct CO product channels having dissimilar translational energy distributions with characteristic rovibrational state distributions. The images for CO (v = 0) show a large contribution of slower CO fragments at lower rotational levels (J = 5–25). This slow component is completely absent from the v = 1 CO images. The images for the higher rotational levels of the v = 0 and v = 1 CO are nearly identical, and this provides a basis for decomposing the two channels for v = 0. The quantum state and translational energy distributions for the slow channel are readily assigned to the 3-body dissociation based on the properties of the transition state. The faster CO fragments dominating the higher rotational levels in both v = 0 and v = 1 are attributed to formation of CH{sub 3}CH + CO, also in agreement with the inferences based on previous non-state-resolved measurements with supporting theoretical calculations.

  15. Detecting concerted demographic response across community assemblages using hierarchical approximate Bayesian computation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne L; Schanzenbach, David; Hickerson, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Methods that integrate population-level sampling from multiple taxa into a single community-level analysis are an essential addition to the comparative phylogeographic toolkit. Detecting how species within communities have demographically tracked each other in space and time is important for understanding the effects of future climate and landscape changes and the resulting acceleration of extinctions, biological invasions, and potential surges in adaptive evolution. Here, we present a statistical framework for such an analysis based on hierarchical approximate Bayesian computation (hABC) with the goal of detecting concerted demographic histories across an ecological assemblage. Our method combines population genetic data sets from multiple taxa into a single analysis to estimate: 1) the proportion of a community sample that demographically expanded in a temporally clustered pulse and 2) when the pulse occurred. To validate the accuracy and utility of this new approach, we use simulation cross-validation experiments and subsequently analyze an empirical data set of 32 avian populations from Australia that are hypothesized to have expanded from smaller refugia populations in the late Pleistocene. The method can accommodate data set heterogeneity such as variability in effective population size, mutation rates, and sample sizes across species and exploits the statistical strength from the simultaneous analysis of multiple species. This hABC framework used in a multitaxa demographic context can increase our understanding of the impact of historical climate change by determining what proportion of the community responded in concert or independently and can be used with a wide variety of comparative phylogeographic data sets as biota-wide DNA barcoding data sets accumulate.

  16. Complete Genome Viral Phylogenies Suggests the Concerted Evolution of Regulatory Cores and Accessory Satellites

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade Zanotto, Paolo Marinho; Krakauer, David C.

    2008-01-01

    We consider the concerted evolution of viral genomes in four families of DNA viruses. Given the high rate of horizontal gene transfer among viruses and their hosts, it is an open question as to how representative particular genes are of the evolutionary history of the complete genome. To address the concerted evolution of viral genes, we compared genomic evolution across four distinct, extant viral families. For all four viral families we constructed DNA-dependent DNA polymerase-based (DdDp) phylogenies and in addition, whole genome sequence, as quantitative descriptions of inter-genome relationships. We found that the history of the polymerase gene was highly predictive of the history of the genome as a whole, which we explain in terms of repeated, co-divergence events of the core DdDp gene accompanied by a number of satellite, accessory genetic loci. We also found that the rate of gene gain in baculovirus and poxviruses proceeds significantly more quickly than the rate of gene loss and that there is convergent acquisition of satellite functions promoting contextual adaptation when distinct viral families infect related hosts. The congruence of the genome and polymerase trees suggests that a large set of viral genes, including polymerase, derive from a phylogenetically conserved core of genes of host origin, secondarily reinforced by gene acquisition from common hosts or co-infecting viruses within the host. A single viral genome can be thought of as a mutualistic network, with the core genes acting as an effective host and the satellite genes as effective symbionts. Larger virus genomes show a greater departure from linkage equilibrium between core and satellites functions. PMID:18941535

  17. Detecting Concerted Demographic Response across Community Assemblages Using Hierarchical Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne L.; Schanzenbach, David; Hickerson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Methods that integrate population-level sampling from multiple taxa into a single community-level analysis are an essential addition to the comparative phylogeographic toolkit. Detecting how species within communities have demographically tracked each other in space and time is important for understanding the effects of future climate and landscape changes and the resulting acceleration of extinctions, biological invasions, and potential surges in adaptive evolution. Here, we present a statistical framework for such an analysis based on hierarchical approximate Bayesian computation (hABC) with the goal of detecting concerted demographic histories across an ecological assemblage. Our method combines population genetic data sets from multiple taxa into a single analysis to estimate: 1) the proportion of a community sample that demographically expanded in a temporally clustered pulse and 2) when the pulse occurred. To validate the accuracy and utility of this new approach, we use simulation cross-validation experiments and subsequently analyze an empirical data set of 32 avian populations from Australia that are hypothesized to have expanded from smaller refugia populations in the late Pleistocene. The method can accommodate data set heterogeneity such as variability in effective population size, mutation rates, and sample sizes across species and exploits the statistical strength from the simultaneous analysis of multiple species. This hABC framework used in a multitaxa demographic context can increase our understanding of the impact of historical climate change by determining what proportion of the community responded in concert or independently and can be used with a wide variety of comparative phylogeographic data sets as biota-wide DNA barcoding data sets accumulate. PMID:24925925

  18. Complete genome viral phylogenies suggests the concerted evolution of regulatory cores and accessory satellites.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Zanotto, Paolo Marinho; Krakauer, David C

    2008-01-01

    We consider the concerted evolution of viral genomes in four families of DNA viruses. Given the high rate of horizontal gene transfer among viruses and their hosts, it is an open question as to how representative particular genes are of the evolutionary history of the complete genome. To address the concerted evolution of viral genes, we compared genomic evolution across four distinct, extant viral families. For all four viral families we constructed DNA-dependent DNA polymerase-based (DdDp) phylogenies and in addition, whole genome sequence, as quantitative descriptions of inter-genome relationships. We found that the history of the polymerase gene was highly predictive of the history of the genome as a whole, which we explain in terms of repeated, co-divergence events of the core DdDp gene accompanied by a number of satellite, accessory genetic loci. We also found that the rate of gene gain in baculovirus and poxviruses proceeds significantly more quickly than the rate of gene loss and that there is convergent acquisition of satellite functions promoting contextual adaptation when distinct viral families infect related hosts. The congruence of the genome and polymerase trees suggests that a large set of viral genes, including polymerase, derive from a phylogenetically conserved core of genes of host origin, secondarily reinforced by gene acquisition from common hosts or co-infecting viruses within the host. A single viral genome can be thought of as a mutualistic network, with the core genes acting as an effective host and the satellite genes as effective symbionts. Larger virus genomes show a greater departure from linkage equilibrium between core and satellites functions.

  19. MOVEMENT IN THE CYANOPHYCEAE

    PubMed Central

    Burkholder, Paul R.

    1933-01-01

    The effect of pH upon the velocity of translatory movement of Oscillatoria formosa Bory in inorganic culture solutions was determined. Unhindered movement occurred in the range of about pH 6.4 to 9.5. Above and below these limits inhibition was marked. In the unfavorable acid and alkaline ranges inhibition was progressive with exposure time; in the favorable range continuous movement was maintained for 24 hours. PMID:19872745

  20. The mathematics of movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  1. Concerted evolution in the mitochondrial control region of the Amazon small-bodied frog Pseudopaludicola canga (Anura, Leiuperidae).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Camila; Rodrigues-Filho, Luis Fernando; Sodré, Davidson; Neckel-Oliveira, Selvino; Gordo, Marcelo; Gallati, Ulisses; Sequeira, Fernando; Vallinoto, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    This study presents evidence of concerted evolution in the mitochondrial control region of the frog Pseudopaludicola canga. Four repeat units of 88 bp (as well as a fifth, incomplete unit) were observed in the 5' domain, with the duplicated segments of the same specimen being more related to one another than to the equivalent regions in other specimens, as a result of concerted evolution. We highlight that drawing conclusions from phylogeographical analysis using the control region containing VNTRs must be interpreted with caution, because it violated a basic assumption of phylogeny, since the regions cannot be treated as independent characters.

  2. Reaction of Chlorosulfonyl Isocyanate (CSI) with Fluorosubstituted Alkenes: Evidence of a Concerted Pathway for Reaction of CSI with Fluorosubstituted Alkenes (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    ABSTRACT Concerted reactions are indicated for the electrophilic addition of chlorosulfonyl isocyanate with monofluoroalkenes. A vinyl fluorine atom on...SO2Cl R F O ‡ N SO2Cl F R O Abstract: Concerted reactions are indicated for the electrophilic addition of chlorosulfonyl isocyanate with...monofluoroalkenes. A vinyl fluorine atom on an alkene raises the energy of a step-wise transition state more than the energy of the competing concerted

  3. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases.

    PubMed

    Robert, Amélie; Herrmann, Harald; Davidson, Michael W; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2014-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form a dense and dynamic network that is functionally associated with microtubules and actin filaments. We used the GFP-tagged vimentin mutant Y117L to study vimentin-cytoskeletal interactions and transport of vimentin filament precursors. This mutant preserves vimentin interaction with other components of the cytoskeleton, but its assembly is blocked at the unit-length filament (ULF) stage. ULFs are easy to track, and they allow a reliable and quantifiable analysis of movement. Our results show that in cultured human vimentin-negative SW13 cells, 2% of vimentin-ULFs move along microtubules bidirectionally, while the majority are stationary and tightly associated with actin filaments. Rapid motor-dependent transport of ULFs along microtubules is enhanced ≥ 5-fold by depolymerization of actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin B. The microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin ULFs is further regulated by Rho-kinase (ROCK) and p21-activated kinase (PAK): ROCK inhibits ULF transport, while PAK stimulates it. Both kinases act on microtubule transport independently of their effects on actin cytoskeleton. Our study demonstrates the importance of the actin cytoskeleton to restrict IF transport and reveals a new role for PAK and ROCK in the regulation of IF precursor transport.-Robert, A., Herrmann, H., Davidson, M. W., and Gelfand, V. I. Microtubule-dependent transport of vimentin filament precursors is regulated by actin and by the concerted action of Rho- and p21-activated kinases.

  4. Mechanism of transport of IFT particles in C. elegans cilia by the concerted action of kinesin-II and OSM-3 motors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyu; Ou, Guangshuo; Civelekoglu-Scholey, Gul; Blacque, Oliver E; Endres, Nicholas F; Tao, Li; Mogilner, Alex; Leroux, Michel R; Vale, Ronald D; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2006-09-25

    The assembly and function of cilia on Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the action of two kinesin-2 motors, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3-kinesin, which cooperate to move the same intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles along microtubule (MT) doublets. Using competitive in vitro MT gliding assays, we show that purified kinesin-II and OSM-3 cooperate to generate movement similar to that seen along the cilium in the absence of any additional regulatory factors. Quantitative modeling suggests that this could reflect an alternating action mechanism, in which the motors take turns to move along MTs, or a mechanical competition, in which the motors function in a concerted fashion to move along MTs with the slow motor exerting drag on the fast motor and vice versa. In vivo transport assays performed in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) protein and IFT motor mutants favor a mechanical competition model for motor coordination in which the IFT motors exert a BBS protein-dependent tension on IFT particles, which controls the IFT pathway that builds the cilium foundation.

  5. Designing Preschool Movement Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Stephen W.

    This guide contains developmentally appropriate movement activities designed to help teachers of children ages 3 through 5 plan and administer a successful movement education program. The book is organized into three parts. The first part presents a model upon which teachers can base their selection of physical activities for children, addresses…

  6. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  7. National CARES Mentoring Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Harsh and cruel experiences have led many of our young to believe that they are alone in the world and that no one cares. In this article, Martin L Mitchell introduces us to the "National CARES Mentoring Movement" founded by Susan L.Taylor. This movement provides young people with role models who help shape their positive development.…

  8. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  9. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  10. Research for a Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Randy G.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the new era of the Religious Education Association (REA) and how it may be seen to function as a "movement" with purposes, scope, and connectivity that bring together diverse groups. The author contends that religious education as a movement needs: (1) Research that describes patterns and uniquenesses in the religious…

  11. Sound Pressure Levels Measured in a University Concert Band: A Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Nicholas V., III

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have reported public school band directors as experiencing noise-induced hearing loss. Little research has focused on collegiate band directors and university student musicians. The present study measures the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and compares sound levels with the criteria set by the…

  12. "Posh Music Should Equal Posh Dress": An Investigation into the Concert Dress and Physical Appearance of Female Soloists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Noola K.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of concert dress and physical appearance on perceptions of female classical soloists' musical abilities over a range of genres. Four female violinists were recorded playing three pieces, in four styles of dress of varying formality. Each combination of performer, piece and dress was recorded twice, once as the…

  13. The Messages behind the Methods: The Authoritarian Pedagogical Legacy in Western Concert Dance Technique Training and Rehearsals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Robin

    2005-01-01

    One of the great puzzles within the Western concert dance world is why so many artists who create revolutionary works onstage conduct their classes and rehearsals as demagogues. Such teachers are engaged in teaching practices that replicate and reproduce in the dance studio the very power relationships they are often critiquing as unjust and…

  14. Warm-Up Activities of Middle and High School Band Directors Participating in State-Level Concert Band Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Justin P.; Hancock, Carl B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the warm-ups chosen by concert band directors participating in state-level performance assessments. We observed 29 middle and high school bands and coded the frequency and duration of warm-up activities and behaviors. Results indicated that most bands rehearsed music and played scales, long tones, and…

  15. Excited singlet (S1) state interactions of calixarenes with chloroalkanes: A combination of concerted and stepwise dissociative electron transfer mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, J.; Pal, H.; Nayak, S. K.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Sapre, A. V.

    2002-12-01

    Both steady-state and time-resolved studies in acetonitrile (ACN) solutions show that the excited singlet (S1) states of calixarenes (CX) undergo quenching by chloroalkanes (CA). It has been revealed by characterizing the Cl ions in the photolyzed CX-CA systems in ACN solutions that the quenching occurs due to dissociative electron transfer (DET) mechanism, whereby a C-Cl bond of the CAs undergoes dissociation on acceptance of an electron from excited CX. The bimolecular quenching constants (kq) in the present systems were correlated with the free energy changes for the concerted DET reactions based on a suitable DET theory. Such a correlation results in the recovery of an intramolecular reorganization energy, which is substantially lower to account for the C-Cl bond dissociation energy of the CAs. Comparing present results with those of an another donor-acceptor system (e.g., biphenyldiol-CA systems) where a concerted DET mechanism is applicable, it is inferred that in CX-CA systems both concerted and stepwise DET mechanisms operate simultaneously. It is proposed that the interaction of excited CXs with encaged CAs follows the stepwise mechanism whereas that with the out of cage CAs follows the concerted mechanism.

  16. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  17. BRICS countries and the global movement for universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Tediosi, Fabrizio; Finch, Aureliano; Procacci, Christina; Marten, Robert; Missoni, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    This article explores BRICS' engagement in the global movement for Universal Health Coverage (UHC) and the implications for global health governance. It is based on primary data collected from 43 key informant interviews, complemented by a review of BRICS' global commitments supporting UHC. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire that included both closed- and open-ended questions. Question development was informed by insights from the literature on UHC, Cox's framework for action, and Kingdon's multiple-stream theory of policy formation. The closed questions were analysed with simple descriptive statistics and the open-ended questions using grounded theory approach. The analysis demonstrates that most BRICS countries implicitly supported the global movement for UHC, and that they share an active engagement in promoting UHC. However, only Brazil, China and to some extent South Africa, were recognized as proactively pushing UHC in the global agenda. In addition, despite some concerted actions, BRICS countries seem to act more as individual countries rather that as an allied group. These findings suggest that BRICS are unlikely to be a unified political block that will transform global health governance. Yet the documented involvement of BRICS in the global movement supporting UHC, and their focus on domestic challenges, shows that BRICS individually are increasingly influential players in global health. So if BRICS countries should probably not be portrayed as the centre of future political community that will transform global health governance, their individual involvement in global health, and their documented concerted actions, may give greater voice to low- and middle-income countries supporting the emergence of multiple centres of powers in global health.

  18. Eye movement tics.

    PubMed Central

    Shawkat, F; Harris, C M; Jacobs, M; Taylor, D; Brett, E M

    1992-01-01

    An 8-year-old girl presented with opsoclonus-like eye movement and an 18 month history of intermittent facial tics. Investigations were all normal. Electro-oculography showed the eye movements to be of variable amplitude (10-40 degrees), with no intersaccadic interval, and with a frequency of 3-4 Hz. Saccades, smooth pursuit, optokinetic, and vestibular reflexes were all normal. These abnormal eye movements eventually disappeared. It is thought that they were a form of ocular tics. PMID:1477052

  19. Concerted Breaking of Two Hydrogen Bonds in Water Hexamer Prism Revealed from Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.; Perez, Cristobal; Lobsiger, Simon; Reid, Adam A.; Temelso, Berhane; Shields, George C.; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Wales, David J.; Pate, Brooks; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few years, we have used H218O water substitution to determine the structures of water clusters by molecular rotational spectroscopy. In the case of the water hexamer, the energy difference between the cage and prism structures is calculated to be about 0.1 kcal/mol and this energy difference is of the order of the zero-point energy variation between the isomers. Using rotational spectroscopy we provided experimental evidence for three isomers, i.e, cage, prism and book and established their relative energy ordering. In the special case of the prism hexamer, cluster dynamics causes measurable splitting in rotational transitions resulting from tunneling between discernible equivalent minima. Multiple isotopic substitution measurements involving all 64 possible isotopologues of the water hexamer prism (H218O)n(H216O)6-n were performed in order to identify the water molecules involved in the tunneling motion. The analysis of these tunneling-rotation spectra suggests that there are two distinct tunneling paths that involve concerted motion of two water molecules, implying a prototype scenario involving the breaking of two hydrogen bonds. C. Pérez, et al, Science. 2012, 336 897-901 J. O. Richardson et al, Science. 2016, in press

  20. Classification of hydrogen bond flips in small water polyhedra applied to concerted proton tunneling.

    PubMed

    Kirov, M V

    2016-10-05

    Recently a new mechanism of proton tunneling in a prism-like water hexamer was revealed [Richardson et al., Science, 2016, 351, 1310]. The tunneling motion involves the concerted breaking of two hydrogen bonds and rotations of two nearest water molecules. Eventually, this structural transformation means flipping one of the hydrogen bonds without the creation of defects in the hydrogen bond network. On the surface of polyhedral water clusters, there are five essentially different types of hydrogen bonds, and only two of them can be changed in this manner. In this article, the topological classification of such transformations for five small water polyhedra: triangular, pentagonal, and hexagonal prisms as well as cube and polyhedron 4(4)5(4), consisting of four square and four pentagonal faces, is presented. Our classification includes the enumeration of all possible one-bond-flips with consideration of the types of hydrogen bonds on the polyhedral surface. Attention is paid to the most stable proton configurations which can be studied in experiments. It was established that a number of one-bond-flip transitions between the low energy configurations are possible in clusters in the shape of triangular and pentagonal prisms.

  1. Acinetobacter baumannii Virulence Is Mediated by the Concerted Action of Three Phospholipases D

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Julia; Bergmann, Holger; Göttig, Stephan; Ebersberger, Ingo; Averhoff, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii causes a broad range of opportunistic infections in humans. Its success as an emerging pathogen is due to a combination of increasing antibiotic resistance, environmental persistence and adaptation to the human host. To date very little is known about the molecular basis of the latter. Here we demonstrate that A. baumannii can use phosphatidylcholine, an integral part of human cell membranes, as sole carbon and energy source. We report on the identification of three phospholipases belonging to the PLD superfamily. PLD1 and PLD2 appear restricted to the bacteria and display the general features of bacterial phospholipases D. They possess two PLDc_2 PFAM domains each encompassing the HxKx4Dx6GS/GGxN (HKD) motif necessary for forming the catalytic core. The third candidate, PLD3, is found in bacteria as well as in eukaryotes and harbours only one PLDc_2 PFAM domain and one conserved HKD motif, which however do not overlap. Employing a markerless mutagenesis system for A. baumannii ATCC 19606T, we generated a full set of PLD knock-out mutants. Galleria mellonella infection studies as well as invasion experiments using A549 human lung epithelial cells revealed that the three PLDs act in a concerted manner as virulence factors and are playing an important role in host cell invasion. PMID:26379240

  2. DNA methylation and histone acetylation work in concert to regulate memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Courtney A; Campbell, Susan L; Sweatt, J David

    2008-05-01

    A clear understanding is developing concerning the importance of epigenetic-related molecular mechanisms in transcription-dependent long-term memory formation. Chromatin modification, in particular histone acetylation, is associated with transcriptional activation, and acetylation of histone 3 (H3) occurs in Area CA1 of the hippocampus following contextual fear conditioning training. Conversely, DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional repression, but is also dynamically regulated in Area CA1 following training. We recently reported that inhibition of the enzyme responsible for DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), in the adult rat hippocampus blocks behavioral memory formation. Here, we report that DNMT inhibition also blocks the concomitant memory-associated H3 acetylation, without affecting phosphorylation of its upstream regulator, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Interestingly, the DNMT inhibitor-induced deficit in memory consolidation, along with deficits in long-term potentiation, can be rescued by pharmacologically increasing levels of histone acetylation prior to DNMT inhibition. These observations suggest that DNMT activity is not only necessary for memory and plasticity, but that DNA methylation may work in concert with histone modifications to regulate plasticity and memory formation in the adult rat hippocampus.

  3. Concerted copy number variation balances ribosomal DNA dosage in human and mouse genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, John G.; Branco, Alan T.; Godinho, Susana A.; Yu, Shoukai; Lemos, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Tandemly repeated ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are among the most evolutionary dynamic loci of eukaryotic genomes. The loci code for essential cellular components, yet exhibit extensive copy number (CN) variation within and between species. CN might be partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance between the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays. The arrays are nonhomologous, physically unlinked in mammals, and encode functionally interdependent RNA components of the ribosome. Here we show that the 5S and 45S rDNA arrays exhibit concerted CN variation (cCNV). Despite 5S and 45S rDNA elements residing on different chromosomes and lacking sequence similarity, cCNV between these loci is strong, evolutionarily conserved in humans and mice, and manifested across individual genotypes in natural populations and pedigrees. Finally, we observe that bisphenol A induces rapid and parallel modulation of 5S and 45S rDNA CN. Our observations reveal a novel mode of genome variation, indicate that natural selection contributed to the evolution and conservation of cCNV, and support the hypothesis that 5S CN is partly determined by the requirement of dosage balance with the 45S rDNA array. We suggest that human disease variation might be traced to disrupted rDNA dosage balance in the genome. PMID:25583482

  4. Phosphoryl transfer by a concerted reaction mechanism in UMP/CMP-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, M. C.; Helms, V.

    2000-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by UMP/CMP-kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum was investigated by semiempirical AM1 molecular orbital computations of an active site model system derived from crystal structures that contain a transition state analog or a bisubstrate inhibitor. The computational results suggest that the nucleoside monophosphate must be protonated for the forward reaction while it is unprotonated in the presence of aluminium fluoride, a popular transition state analog for phosphoryl transfer reactions. Furthermore, a compactification of the active site model system during the reaction and for the corresponding complex containing AlF3 was observed. For the active site residues that are part of the LID domain, conformational flexibility during the reaction proved to be crucial. On the basis of the calculations, a concerted phosphoryl transfer mechanism is suggested that involves the synchronous shift of a proton from the monophosphate to the transferred PO3-group. The proposed mechanism is thus analogous to the phosphoryl transfer mechanism in cAMP-dependent protein kinase that phosphorylates the hydroxyl groups of serine residues. PMID:11152133

  5. Concerted hydrogen atom and electron transfer mechanism for catalysis by lysine-specific demethylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Higashi, Masahiro; Cembran, Alessandro; Gao, Jiali; Truhlar, Donald G

    2013-07-18

    We calculate the free energy profile for the postulated hydride transfer reaction mechanism for the catalysis of lysine demethylation by lysine-specific demethylase LSD1. The potential energy surface is obtained by using combined electrostatically embedded multiconfiguration molecular mechanics (EE-MCMM) and single-configuration molecular mechanics (MM). We employ a constant valence bond coupling term to obtain analytical energies and gradients of the EE-MCMM subsystem, which contains 45 quantum mechanics (QM) atoms and which is parametrized with density functional calculations employing specific reaction parameters obtained by matching high-level wave function calculations. In the MM region, we employ the Amber ff03 and TIP3P force fields. The free energy of activation at 300 K is calculated by molecular dynamics (MD) umbrella sampling on a system with 102,090 atoms as the maximum of the free energy profile along the reaction coordinate as obtained by the weighted histogram analysis method with 17 umbrella sampling windows. This yields a free energy of activation of only 10 kcal/mol, showing that the previously postulated direct hydride transfer reaction mechanism is plausible, although we find that it is better interpreted as a concerted transfer of a hydrogen atom and an electron.

  6. Modulators in concert for cognition: modulator interactions in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Lisa A.; Gritton, Howard; Howe, William M.; Young, Damon A.; Sarter, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Research on the regulation and function of ascending noradrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic systems has focused on the organization and function of individual systems. In contrast, evidence describing co-activation and interactions between multiple neuromodulatory systems has remained scarce. However, commonalities in the anatomical organization of these systems and overlapping evidence concerning the post-synaptic effects of neuromodulators strongly suggest that these systems are recruited in concert; they influence each other and simultaneously modulate their target circuits. Therefore, evidence on the regulatory and functional interactions between these systems is considered essential for revealing the role of neuromodulators. This postulate extends to contemporary neurobiological hypotheses of major neuropsychiatric disorders. These hypotheses have focused largely on aberrations in the integrity or regulation of individual ascending modulatory systems, with little regard for the likely possibility that dysregulation in multiple ascending neuromodulatory systems and their interactions contribute essentially to the symptoms of these disorders. This review will paradigmatically focus on neuromodulator interactions in the PFC and be further constrained by an additional focus on their role in cognitive functions. Recent evidence indicates that individual neuromodulators, in addition to their general state-setting or gating functions, encode specific cognitive operations, further substantiating the importance of research concerning the parallel recruitment of neuromodulator systems and interactions between these systems. PMID:17681661

  7. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N2 fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N2 fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism. PMID:23440170

  8. ITS non-concerted evolution and rampant hybridization in the legume genus Lespedeza (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Zeng, Xiao-Mao; Gao, Xin-Fen; Jin, Dong-Pil; Zhang, Li-Bing

    2017-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) as one part of nuclear ribosomal DNA is one of the most extensively sequenced molecular markers in plant systematics. The ITS repeats generally exhibit high-level within-individual homogeneity, while relatively small-scale polymorphism of ITS copies within individuals has often been reported in literature. Here, we identified large-scale polymorphism of ITS copies within individuals in the legume genus Lespedeza (Fabaceae). Divergent paralogs of ITS sequences, including putative pseudogenes, recombinants, and multiple functional ITS copies were sometimes detected in the same individual. Thirty-seven ITS pseudogenes could be easily detected according to nucleotide changes in conserved 5.8S motives, the significantly lower GC contents in at least one of three regions, and the lost ability of 5.8S rDNA sequence to fold into a conserved secondary structure. The distribution patterns of the putative functional clones were highly different between the traditionally recognized two subgenera, suggesting different rates of concerted evolution in two subgenera which could be attributable to their different extents/frequencies of hybridization, confirmed by our analysis of the single-copy nuclear gene PGK. These findings have significant implications in using ITS marker for reconstructing phylogeny and studying hybridization. PMID:28051161

  9. Overcoming limitations of current antiplatelet drugs: A concerted effort for more profitable strategies of intervention

    PubMed Central

    Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Guida, Anna; Camera, Marina; Colli, Susanna; Di Minno, Giovanni; Tremoli, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in the pathophysiology of atherothrombosis, an inappropriate platelet activation leading to acute ischemic complications (acute myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke). In view of this, platelets are a major target for pharmacotherapy. Presently, the main classes of antiplatelet agents approved for the use in such complications are aspirin and fhienopyridines. Although antiplatelet treatment with these two types of drugs, alone or in combination, leads to a significant reduction of non-fatal myocardial infarction (−32%), non-fatal stroke (−25%), and of cardiovascular death (−17%), a residual risk persists. Newer antiplatelet agents have addressed some, but not all, these limitations. Vis-à-vis their net clinical benefit, the higher potency of some of them is associated with a rise in bleeding complications. Moreover, newer fhienopyridines do not show advantages over and above the older ones as to reduction of stroke. A concerted effort that takes into consideration clinical, genetic, and laboratory information is increasingly recognized as a major direction to be pursued in the area. The well-established road signs of clinical epidemiology will provide major information to define newer potentially useful targets for platelet pharmacology. PMID:21815879

  10. The value of utilizing binaural dummy head recordings in evaluating physical acoustic changes in concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Christopher; Cooper, Russell; Rivera, Carlos

    2004-10-01

    In some instances, after a concert hall is built there may be a need to modify the physical environment of the space through the application of diffusion or absorptive surfaces, the addition of reflector systems or the repositioning of the orchestra in the space. Prior to moving forward with suggested changes to the physical environment, it has been customary to conduct evaluation rehearsals with physical mock-ups installed to confirm the acousticians recommendations. Questionnaires are given to the musicians, the conductor and the administration staff to document the effect of the changes, and physical measurements are taken before and after the installation of the mock-ups. The questionnaires can be difficult to correlate and the differences in data resulting from the physical measurements may be too small to properly evaluate. More recently, Jaffe Holden Acoustics has added dummy head recordings to the mix. These recordings are extremely representative of what a human hears and one can place these devices in various locations on stage and in the audience chamber. The recordings create a permanent record of the event and the results of subsequent A/B evaluation can be more closely correlated to render judgments.

  11. How orchestra members influence stage acoustic parameters on five different concert hall stages and orchestra pits.

    PubMed

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2016-12-01

    Stage acoustic parameters aim to quantify the amount of sound energy reflected by the stage and hall boundaries and the energy decay over time. In this research, the effect of orchestra presence on parameter values is investigated. The orchestra is simulated by dressed mannequins, which have been compared with humans with respect to acoustic properties. Impulse response measurements were performed in a concert hall, a theatre, a rehearsal room, and in two orchestra pits. Conditions were empty stage floors, stage floors with music stands and chairs only, and floors occupied by the mannequin orchestra. Results show that the direct and reflected sound levels and the energy decay are significantly affected by the orchestra compared to an empty stage or a stage with chairs and stands only. Both the direct sound and early reflected sound levels are reduced by the orchestra with the distance. The late reflected sound level is reduced considerably more than can be expected based on Barron's revised theory. It can be concluded that measurements on a stage without the orchestra being present results in significant differences. A practical method is presented to perform a "musician friendly" stage acoustic measurement with a real orchestra.

  12. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Molero, Gemma; Gilard, Françoise; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N(2) fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N(2)-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N(2) fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism.

  13. International concerted action on collaboration in telemedicine: G8 sub-project 4.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, A

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of G-7/8 Global Healthcare Applications sub-project 4 is to enable an international concerted action on collaboration in telemedicine. To promote and facilitate the implementation of telemedicine or health telematics networks around the world, it was felt necessary to solve certain key issues. Five thematic solution-seeking FORUMS are each addressing a specific item. The first FORUM held in Montréal, Canada on May 28-30 1998 focussed on Interoperability of telemedicine and telehealth systems. Other FORUMS address other themes such as: Impacts of Telemedicine on health care management (Regensburg, Germany, November 21-23 1998); Evaluation and Cost Effectiveness of Telemedicine (Melbourne, Australia, February 19-20 1999); Clinical and technical quality and standards (Washington, USA, April 29-30 1999); Medico-legal aspects of national and international applications (Oxford, UK, fall 1999). The main objective of these FORUMS is to arrive at best practices through consultation amongst experts who seek together the best solutions to facilitate global international telemedicine networks. Towards this goal, G-8 sub-project-4 will also conduct the IMPACT (International Multipoint Project of Advanced Communication in Telemedicine) feasibility study which will aim at conducting multipoint exchanges between telemedicine units in the academic centers of the participating G-8 and other countries. More detailed information on this project and summaries of the initial FORUMS are found on our Web site at www.g7sp4.org.

  14. Concerted effects of substituents in the reaction of •OH radicals with aromatics: The hydroxybenzaldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, Guadalupe; Mendoza, Edith; Schuler, Robert H.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we have examined the distribution of products in the radiolytic hydroxylation of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde to obtain information on the concerted effect of the -CHO and -OH groups at the addition site of •OH radicals. The •OH radical was found to selectively add to the free positions of the aromatic ring. Furthermore, the •OH radical reacts by substitution at the ipso position followed by elimination of the substituent, producing dihydroxybenzene compounds. Additionally, the formation of carboxylic acids as an initial product has been conclusively identified by retention times and UV and mass spectra. These acids are formed as a result of the radiolytic oxidation of the initial radical formed by the addition reaction of the •OH radicals to the meso position (exocyclic carbon). The identification of the products, dihydroxybenzaldehydes, dihydroxybenzenes and hydroxybenzoic acids and calculation of their yields were achieved through HPLC. The G values of each product are given, which reflect the charge distributions in the hydroxybenzaldehydes, such that the formyl group modifies the ortho-para directing effect of the -OH substituent. The 3 and 5 positions in 2- and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde showed increased the electronic density compared to that of phenol, indicating that the formyl group has a significant effect on the electronic structure of those hydroxybenzaldehydes. In 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde, the -OH substituent had a dominant ortho-directing effect similar to that observed for phenol.

  15. Probabilistic models of expectation violation predict psychophysiological emotional responses to live concert music.

    PubMed

    Egermann, Hauke; Pearce, Marcus T; Wiggins, Geraint A; McAdams, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a study testing the often-theorized role of musical expectations in inducing listeners' emotions in a live flute concert experiment with 50 participants. Using an audience response system developed for this purpose, we measured subjective experience and peripheral psychophysiological changes continuously. To confirm the existence of the link between expectation and emotion, we used a threefold approach. (1) On the basis of an information-theoretic cognitive model, melodic pitch expectations were predicted by analyzing the musical stimuli used (six pieces of solo flute music). (2) A continuous rating scale was used by half of the audience to measure their experience of unexpectedness toward the music heard. (3) Emotional reactions were measured using a multicomponent approach: subjective feeling (valence and arousal rated continuously by the other half of the audience members), expressive behavior (facial EMG), and peripheral arousal (the latter two being measured in all 50 participants). Results confirmed the predicted relationship between high-information-content musical events, the violation of musical expectations (in corresponding ratings), and emotional reactions (psychologically and physiologically). Musical structures leading to expectation reactions were manifested in emotional reactions at different emotion component levels (increases in subjective arousal and autonomic nervous system activations). These results emphasize the role of musical structure in emotion induction, leading to a further understanding of the frequently experienced emotional effects of music.

  16. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Brittany C; Brennaman, M Kyle; Concepcion, Javier J; Paul, Jared J; Bettis, Stephanie E; Hampton, Shaun D; Miller, Stephen A; Lebedeva, Natalia V; Forbes, Malcolm D E; Moran, Andrew M; Meyer, Thomas J; Papanikolas, John M

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons--electron-proton transfer (EPT)--is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H(+) is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck-Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated (+)H ─ B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  17. CO2 capture in ionic liquid 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate: a concerted mechanism without carbene.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fangyong; Dhumal, Nilesh R; Kim, Hyung J

    2017-01-04

    Ionic liquids (ILs) provide a promising medium for CO2 capture. Recently, the family of ILs comprising imidazolium-based cations and acetate anions, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMI(+)OAc(-)), has been found to react with CO2 and form carboxylate compounds. N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) is widely assumed to be responsible by directly reacting with CO2 though NHC has not been detected in these ILs. Herein, a computational analysis of CO2 capture in EMI(+)OAc(-) is presented. Quantum chemistry calculations predict that NHC is unstable in a polar environment, suggesting that NHC is not formed in EMI(+)OAc(-). Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that an EMI(+) ion "activated" by the approach of a CO2 molecule can donate its acidic proton to a neighboring OAc(-) anion and form a carboxylate compound with the CO2 molecule. Analysis of this termolecular process indicates that the EMI(+)-to-OAc(-) proton transfer and the formation of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-2-carboxylate occur essentially concurrently. Based on these findings, a novel concerted mechanism that does not involve NHC is proposed for CO2 capture.

  18. Determining the Effect of Concerted Elimination Reactions in the Pyrolysis of Lignin Using Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, D.; Clark, J.; Nimlos, M.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin pyrolysis is a significant impediment in forming liquid fuel from biomass. Lignin pyrolyzes at a higher temperature than other biomass components (ie cellulose, hemicellulose) and tends to form radicals which lead to cross linking and ultimately char formation. A primary step in advances biomass-to-fuel technology will be to discover mechanisms that can disassemble lignin at lower temperatures and depolymerize lignin into more stable products. We have investigated the thermochemistry of the various inter-linkage units found in lignin ({beta}-O4, {alpha}-O4, {beta}-{beta}, {beta}-O5, etc) using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2x/6-311++G(d,p) on a series of dimer model compounds. In addition to the usually-assumed bond homolysis reactions, we have investigated a variety of concerted elimination pathways that will tend to produce closed-shell stable products. Such a bottom-up approach could aid in the targeted development of catalysts that produce more desirable products under less severe reactor conditions.

  19. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Du, Fenglei; Shelton, Catherine L.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Li, Pingwei

    2016-01-01

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)–like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF binds to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses. PMID:27302953

  20. Perceptual significance of seat-dip effect related direct sound coloration in concert halls.

    PubMed

    Tahvanainen, Henna; Haapaniemi, Aki; Lokki, Tapio

    2017-03-01

    In concert halls, the spectrum of direct sound (here 0 to 15 ms) is influenced by the seat-dip effect that causes selective low frequency attenuation. The seat-dip effect has been considered to be detrimental to the acoustic quality of halls, yet there is little evidence about the perceptual significance of the effect. This paper studies the discrimination and preference of seat-dip effect related changes in the direct sound, with realistic auralization of multichannel anechoic orchestra recordings in halls measured with the loudspeaker orchestra. Comparisons are made with a free-field direct sound and direct sound magnitude changes typically associated with the seat-dip effect. Overall, the differences were not significantly audible, except with a subgroup of participants in one out of four halls, and two out of three comparisons. Furthermore, participants' preference for the uncolored direct sound was significant in the halls with less reflected energy, but non-significant in the halls with more reflected energy. The results imply that for most seats in adequately reverberant halls, typical seat-dip effect related coloration in the direct sound can be perceptually negligible.

  1. Movement and Coordination

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Fitness Nutrition Toilet Training Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Toddler > Movement and Coordination Ages & Stages Listen Español ...

  2. Concerted electron-proton transfer in the optical excitation of hydrogen-bonded dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Westlake, Brittany C.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Paul, Jared J.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Hampton, Shaun D.; Miller, Stephen A.; Lebedeva, Natalia V.; Forbes, Malcolm D. E.; Moran, Andrew M.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Papanikolas, John M.

    2011-05-24

    The simultaneous, concerted transfer of electrons and protons—electron-proton transfer (EPT)—is an important mechanism utilized in chemistry and biology to avoid high energy intermediates. There are many examples of thermally activated EPT in ground-state reactions and in excited states following photoexcitation and thermal relaxation. Here we report application of ultrafast excitation with absorption and Raman monitoring to detect a photochemically driven EPT process (photo-EPT). In this process, both electrons and protons are transferred during the absorption of a photon. Photo-EPT is induced by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation of hydrogen-bonded-base adducts with either a coumarin dye or 4-nitro-4'-biphenylphenol. Femtosecond transient absorption spectral measurements following ICT excitation reveal the appearance of two spectroscopically distinct states having different dynamical signatures. One of these states corresponds to a conventional ICT excited state in which the transferring H⁺ is initially associated with the proton donor. Proton transfer to the base (B) then occurs on the picosecond time scale. The other state is an ICT-EPT photoproduct. Upon excitation it forms initially in the nuclear configuration of the ground state by application of the Franck–Condon principle. However, due to the change in electronic configuration induced by the transition, excitation is accompanied by proton transfer with the protonated base formed with a highly elongated ⁺H–B bond. Coherent Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of a vibrational mode corresponding to the protonated base in the optically prepared state.

  3. Asymmetric patterns of reassortment and concerted evolution in Cardamom bushy dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Savory, F R; Ramakrishnan, U

    2014-06-01

    Nanoviruses are single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) plant viruses which have multipartite genomes consisting of discrete, individually encapsidated components. This multipartite strategy may lead to high rates of reassortment, whereby entire genome components are exchanged among different strains. However, few studies have explored the extent to which reassortment shapes the genetic diversity of nanovirus populations. Here we present an extensive analysis of reassortment among 163 Cardamom bushy dwarf virus (CBDV; Nanoviridae family, Babuvirus genus) isolates collected in Northeast India. We also examined evidence of recombination, which is known to play a role in the evolutionary dynamics of nanovirus populations. By sequencing six discrete genome components for each isolate, we demonstrate that over 40% of the isolates display evidence of at least one reassortment event during their evolutionary histories. Nevertheless, a bias in the frequencies at which different genome components reassort was observed, with the DNA-M and DNA-N components being the most predisposed to reassortment. This may reflect variation in the ability of different genome components to function efficiently in a foreign genomic background. Comparisons of the common regions of different genome components revealed signatures of concerted evolution mediated by frequent inter-component homologous recombination. This process, which has previously been reported in nanoviruses and other multipartite ssDNA viruses, may allow proteins which initiate replication to maintain control over distinct genome components. Notably, DNA-N, one of the genome components most prone to reassortment, also exhibited the most frequent inter-component homologous recombination. This supports the idea that inter-component homologous recombination may promote the efficient replication of novel components which are introduced into a genome via reassortment.

  4. Evidence for concerted ring opening and C-Br bond breaking in UV-excited bromocyclopropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Shubhrangshu; Preston, Thomas J.; King, Simon J.; Vallance, Claire; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.

    2016-06-01

    Photodissociation of gaseous bromocyclopropane via its A-band continuum has been studied at excitation wavelengths ranging from 230 nm to 267 nm. Velocity-map images of ground-state bromine atoms (Br), spin-orbit excited bromine atoms (Br∗), and C3H5 hydrocarbon radicals reveal the kinetic energies of these various photofragments. Both Br and Br∗ atoms are predominantly generated via repulsive excited electronic states in a prompt photodissociation process in which the hydrocarbon co-fragment is a cyclopropyl radical. However, the images obtained at the mass of the hydrocarbon radical fragment identify a channel with total kinetic energy greater than that deduced from the Br and Br∗ images, and with a kinetic energy distribution that exceeds the energetic limit for Br + cyclopropyl radical products. The velocity-map images of these C3H5 fragments have lower angular anisotropies than measured for Br and Br∗, indicating molecular restructuring during dissociation. The high kinetic energy C3H5 signals are assigned to allyl radicals generated by a minor photochemical pathway which involves concerted C-Br bond dissociation and cyclopropyl ring-opening following single ultraviolet (UV)-photon absorption. Slow photofragments also contribute to the velocity map images obtained at the C3H5 radical mass, but the corresponding slow Br atoms are not observed. These features in the images are attributed to C3H5+ from the photodissociation of the C3H5Br+ molecular cation following two-photon ionization of the parent compound. This assignment is confirmed by 118-nm vacuum ultraviolet ionization studies that prepare the molecular cation in its ground electronic state prior to UV photodissociation.

  5. Concerted Proton Transfer Mechanism of Clostridium thermocellum Ribose-5-phosphate Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Yang, Weitao

    2013-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi) catalyzes the interconversion of D-ribose-5-phosphate and D-ribulose-5-phosphate and plays an essential role in the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. RpiB, one of the two isoforms of Rpi, is also a potential drug target for some pathogenic bacteria. Clostridium thermocellum ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (CtRpi), belonging to RpiB family, has recently been employed to the industrial production of rare sugars because of it fast reactions kinetics and narrow substrate specificity. It is known this enzyme adopts proton transfer mechanism. It was suggested that the deprotonated Cys65 attracts the proton at C2 of substrate to initiate the isomerization reaction and this step is the rate-limiting step. However the elaborate catalytic mechanism is still unclear. We have performed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations of this rate-limiting step of the reaction catalyzed by CtRpi with the substrate D-ribose. Our results demonstrate that the deprotonated Cys65 is not a stable reactant. Instead, our calculations revealed a concerted proton-transfer mechanism: Asp8, a highly conserved residue in the RpiB family performs as the base to abstract the proton at Cys65 and Cys65 in turn abstracts the proton of the D-ribose simultaneously. Moreover, we found Thr67 cannot catalyze the proton transfer from O2 to O1 of the D-ribose alone. Water molecule(s) may assist this proton transfer with Thr67. Our findings lead to a clear understanding of the catalysis mechanism of RpiB family and should guide the experiments to increase the catalysis efficiency. This study also highlights the importance of initial protonation states of cysteines. PMID:23875675

  6. Dosage Sensitivity of RPL9 and Concerted Evolution of Ribosomal Protein Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Devis, Deborah; Firth, Sue M.; Liang, Zhe; Byrne, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome in higher eukaryotes is a large macromolecular complex composed of four rRNAs and eighty different ribosomal proteins. In plants, each ribosomal protein is encoded by multiple genes. Duplicate genes within a family are often necessary to provide a threshold dose of a ribosomal protein but in some instances appear to have non-redundant functions. Here, we addressed whether divergent members of the RPL9 gene family are dosage sensitive or whether these genes have non-overlapping functions. The RPL9 family in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises two nearly identical members, RPL9B and RPL9C, and a more divergent member, RPL9D. Mutations in RPL9C and RPL9D genes lead to delayed growth early in development, and loss of both genes is embryo lethal, indicating that these are dosage-sensitive and redundant genes. Phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 as well as RPL4, RPL5, RPL27a, RPL36a, and RPS6 family genes in the Brassicaceae indicated that multicopy ribosomal protein genes have been largely retained following whole genome duplication. However, these gene families also show instances of tandem duplication, small scale deletion, and evidence of gene conversion. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 genes in angiosperm species showed that genes within a species are more closely related to each other than to RPL9 genes in other species, suggesting ribosomal protein genes undergo convergent evolution. Our analysis indicates that ribosomal protein gene retention following whole genome duplication contributes to the number of genes in a family. However, small scale rearrangements influence copy number and likely drive concerted evolution of these dosage-sensitive genes. PMID:26734020

  7. Evidence for concerted kinetic oxidation of progesterone by purified rat hepatic cytochrome P-450g

    SciTech Connect

    Swinney, D.C.; Ryan, D.E.; Thomas, P.E.; Levin, W.

    1988-07-26

    Purified cytochrome P-450g, a male-specific rat hepatic isozyme, was observed to metabolize progesterone to two primary metabolites (6..beta..-hydroxyprogesterone and 16..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone), two secondary metabolites (6..beta..,16..cap alpha..-dihydroxyprogesterone and 6-ketoprogesterone), and one tertiary metabolite (6-keto-16..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone). The K/sub m,app/ for the formation of these products from progesterone was determined to be approximately 0.5 ..mu..M, while the K/sub m,app/ for metabolism of 6..beta..- and 16..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone was found to be 5-10 ..mu..M. The ratio of primary to secondary metabolites did not change significantly at progesterone concentrations from 6 to 150 ..mu..M, and a lag in formation of secondary metabolites was not observed in 1-min incubations. Concerted oxidation of progesterone to secondary products without the intermediate products leaving the active site was suggested by these results and confirmed by isotopic dilution experiments in which little or no dilution of metabolically formed 6..beta..,16..cap alpha..-dihydroxyprogesterone and 6-keto-16..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone was observed in incubations containing a mixture of radiolabeled progesterone and unlabeled 6..beta..-hydroxyprogesterone or 16..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone. Incubation of 6..beta..-hydroxyprogesterone with a reconstituted system in an atmosphere of /sup 18/I/sub 2/ resulted in > 90% incorporation of /sup 18/O in the 16..cap alpha..-position of 6..beta..,16..cap alpha..-dihydroxyprogesterone but no incorporation of /sup 18/O into 6-ketoprogesterone, even though the reaction was dependent upon enzyme and O/sub 2/, and not inhibited by mannitol, catalase, or superoxide dismutase. Factors which characterize the metabolism of progesterone by cytochrome P-450g in terms of active-site constraints and the catalytic competence of the enzyme in microsomes were also explored.

  8. Concerted modulation of alanine and glutamate metabolism in young Medicago truncatula seedlings under hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Limami, Anis M; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Ricoult, Claudie; Cliquet, Jean-Bernard; Planchet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The modulation of primary nitrogen metabolism by hypoxic stress was studied in young Medicago truncatula seedlings. Hypoxic seedlings were characterized by the up-regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) and mitochondrial alanine aminotransferase (mAlaAT), and down-regulation of glutamine synthetase 1b (GS1b), NADH-glutamate synthase (NADH-GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase 3 (GDH3), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) gene expression. Hypoxic stress severely inhibited GS activity and stimulated NADH-GOGAT activity. GDH activity was lower in hypoxic seedlings than in the control, however, under either normoxia or hypoxia, the in vivo activity was directed towards glutamate deamination. (15)NH(4) labelling showed for the first time that the adaptive reaction of the plant to hypoxia consisted of a concerted modulation of nitrogen flux through the pathways of both alanine and glutamate synthesis. In hypoxic seedlings, newly synthesized (15)N-alanine increased and accumulated as the major amino acid, asparagine synthesis was inhibited, while (15)N-glutamate was synthesized at a similar rate to that in the control. A discrepancy between the up-regulation of GDH1 expression and the down-regulation of GDH activity by hypoxic stress highlighted for the first time the complex regulation of this enzyme by hypoxia. Higher rates of glycolysis and ethanol fermentation are known to cause the fast depletion of sugar stores and carbon stress. It is proposed that the expression of GDH1 was stimulated by hypoxia-induced carbon stress, while the enzyme protein might be involved during post-hypoxic stress contributing to the regeneration of 2-oxoglutarate via the GDH shunt.

  9. Divergent origins and concerted expansion of two segmental duplications on chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Eichler, E E; Johnson, M E; Alkan, C; Tuzun, E; Sahinalp, C; Misceo, D; Archidiacono, N; Rocchi, M

    2001-01-01

    An unexpected finding of the human genome was the large fraction of the genome organized as blocks of interspersed duplicated sequence. We provide a comparative and phylogenetic analysis of a highly duplicated region of 16p12.2, which is composed of at least four different segmental duplications spanning in excess of 160 kb. We contrast the dispersal of two different segmental duplications (LCR16a and LCR16u). LCR16a, a 20 kb low-copy repeat sequence A from chromosome 16, was shown previously to contain a rapidly evolving novel hominoid gene family (morpheus) that had expanded within the last 10 million years of great ape/human evolution. We compare the dispersal of this genomic segment with a second adjacent duplication called LCR16u. The duplication contains a second putative gene family (KIAA0220/SMG1) that is represented approximately eight times within the human genome. A high degree of sequence identity (approximately 98%) was observed among the various copies of LCR16u. Comparative analyses with Old World monkey species show that LCR16a and LCR16u originated from two distinct ancestral loci. Within the human genome, at least 70% of the LCR16u copies were duplicated in concert with the LCR16a duplication. In contrast, only 30% of the chimpanzee loci show an association between LCR16a and LCR16u duplications. The data suggest that the two copies of genomic sequence were brought together during the chimpanzee/human divergence and were subsequently duplicated as a larger cassette specifically within the human lineage. The evolutionary history of these two chromosome-specific duplications supports a model of rapid expansion and evolutionary turnover among the genomes of man and the great apes.

  10. Retinal blood flow during hyperoxia in humans revisited: concerted results using different measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Dorner, Guido; Polak, Kaija; Findl, Oliver; Mayrl, Gabriele Fuchsjäger; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2002-07-01

    Retinal vasculature shows pronounced vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia, which appears to be related to the constant oxygen demand of the retina. However, the exact amount of blood flow reduction and the exact time course of this phenomenon are still a matter of debate. We set out to investigate the retinal response to hyperoxia using innovative techniques for the assessment of retinal hemodynamics. In a total of 48 healthy volunteers we studied the effect of 100% O(2) breathing on retinal blood flow using two methods. Red blood cell movement in larger retinal veins was quantified with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal vessel size measurement. Retinal white blood cell movement was quantified with the blue field entoptic technique. The time course of retinal vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia was assessed by continuous vessel size determination using the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. The response to hyperoxia as measured with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and vessel size measurement was almost twice as high as that observed with the blue field technique. Vasoconstriction in response to 100% O(2) breathing occurred within the first 5 min and no counterregulatory or adaptive mechanisms were observed. Based on these results we hypothesize that hyperoxia-induced vasoconstriction differentially affects red and white blood cell movement in the human retina. This hypothesis is based on the complex interactions between red and white blood cells in microcirculation, which have been described in detail for other vascular beds.

  11. Psychostimulants and Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Asser, Andres; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants are a diverse group of substances with their main psychomotor effects resembling those of amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, or cathinone. Due to their potential as drugs of abuse, recreational use of most of these substances is illegal since 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances. In recent years, new psychoactive substances have emerged mainly as synthetic cathinones with new molecules frequently complementing the list. Psychostimulant related movement disorders are a known entity often seen in emergency rooms around the world. These admissions are becoming more frequent as are fatalities associated with drug abuse. Still the legal constraints of the novel synthetic molecules are bypassed. At the same time, chronic and permanent movement disorders are much less frequently encountered. These disorders frequently manifest as a combination of movement disorders. The more common symptoms include agitation, tremor, hyperkinetic and stereotypical movements, cognitive impairment, and also hyperthermia and cardiovascular dysfunction. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind the clinical manifestations have been researched for decades. The common denominator is the monoaminergic signaling. Dopamine has received the most attention but further research has demonstrated involvement of other pathways. Common mechanisms linking psychostimulant use and several movement disorders exist. PMID:25941511

  12. [Sleep and movement disorders].

    PubMed

    Poryazova, R; Bassetti, C L

    2007-01-01

    The three different states of being (wakefulness, NREM and REM sleep) are associated with profound neurophysiological and neurochemical changes in the brain. These changes explain the existence of movement disorders appearing only or preferentially during sleep, and the effects of sleep on movement disorders. Sleep-related movement disorders are of clinical relevance for multiple reasons: 1) high frequency (e.g. restless legs syndrome (RLS)); 2) diagnostic relevance (e.g. REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) as first manifestation of Parkinson disorder); 3) diagnostic uncertainty (e.g. parasomnias vs nocturnal epilepsy); 4) association with injuries (e.g. RBD, sleepwalking), sleep disruption/daytime sleepiness (e.g. RLS), and psycho-social burden (e.g. enuresis); 5) requirement of specific treatments (e.g. nocturnal epilepsy, stridor, RBD). This article gives an overview on clinical manifestations, pathophysiology, work-up and treatment of sleep-related movement disorders (e.g. RLS, bruxism), parasomnias (e.g. sleepwalking, RBD), sleep-related epilepsies, and on sleep-associated manifestations of movement disorders (e.g. Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy).

  13. Posttraumatic functional movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Ganos, C; Edwards, M J; Bhatia, K P

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the nervous system may account for a range of neurologic symptoms. Trauma location and severity are important determinants of the resulting symptoms. In severe head injury with structural brain abnormalities, the occurrence of trauma-induced movement disorders, most commonly hyperkinesias such as tremor and dystonia, is well recognized and its diagnosis straightforward. However, the association of minor traumatic events, which do not lead to significant persistent structural brain damage, with the onset of movement disorders is more contentious. The lack of clear clinical-neuroanatomic (or symptom lesion) correlations in these cases, the variable timing between traumatic event and symptom onset, but also the presence of unusual clinical features in a number of such patients, which overlap with signs encountered in patients with functional neurologic disorders, contribute to this controversy. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the movement disorders, most notably dystonia, that have been associated with peripheral trauma and focus on their unusual characteristics, as well as their overlap with functional neurologic disorders. We will then provide details on pathophysiologic views that relate minor peripheral injuries to the development of movement disorders and compare them to knowledge from primary organic and functional movement disorders. Finally, we will comment on the appropriate management of these disorders.

  14. Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauzlis, Rich; Stone, Leland; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    When viewing objects, primates use a combination of saccadic and pursuit eye movements to stabilize the retinal image of the object of regard within the high-acuity region near the fovea. Although these movements involve widespread regions of the nervous system, they mix seamlessly in normal behavior. Saccades are discrete movements that quickly direct the eyes toward a visual target, thereby translating the image of the target from an eccentric retinal location to the fovea. In contrast, pursuit is a continuous movement that slowly rotates the eyes to compensate for the motion of the visual target, minimizing the blur that can compromise visual acuity. While other mammalian species can generate smooth optokinetic eye movements - which track the motion of the entire visual surround - only primates can smoothly pursue a single small element within a complex visual scene, regardless of the motion elsewhere on the retina. This ability likely reflects the greater ability of primates to segment the visual scene, to identify individual visual objects, and to select a target of interest.

  15. Desorption of hydrogen from light metal hydrides: concerted electronic rearrangement and role of H···H interactions.

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, David J; Roy, Matthew M D; Thomas, Michael E; McGrady, G Sean

    2014-04-14

    A theoretical study of the desorption of hydrogen from rhombic Group 1 metal hydride dimers reveals a concerted reorganisation of the electron density for the M-H and H-H moieties as the reaction coordinate is traversed and a closed-shell H···H interaction evolves into a covalent H2 bond. The central role played by homopolar dihydrogen bonding in this process is revealed and analysed.

  16. Variational transition state theory calculations of tunneling effects on concerted hydrogen motion in water clusters and formaldehyde/water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, B.C. ); Melius, C.F. )

    1990-08-01

    The direct participation of water molecules in aqueous phase reaction processes has been postulated to occur via both single-step mechanisms as well as concerted hydrogen atom or proton shifts. In the present work, simple prototypes of concerted hydrogen atom transfer processes are examined for small hydrogen-bonded water clusters -- cyclic trimers and tetramers -- and hydrogen-bonded clusters of formaldehyde with one and two water molecules. Rate constants for the rearrangement processes are computed using variational transition state theory, accounting for quantum mechanical tunneling effects by semiclassical ground-state adiabatic transmission coefficients. The variational transition state theory calculations directly utilize selected information about the potential energy surface along the minimum energy path as parameters of the reaction path Hamiltonian. The potential energy information is obtained from ab ignite electronic structure calculations with an empirical bond additivity correction (the BAC-MP4 method). Tunneling is found to be very important for these concerted rearrangement processes -- the semiclassical ground-state adiabatic transmission coefficients are estimated to be as high as four order of magnitude at room temperature. Effects of the size of the cluster (number of water molecules in the cyclic complex) are also dramatic -- addition of a water molecule is seen to change the calculated rates by orders of magnitude. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Computational Analysis of the Pyrolysis of ..beta..-O4 Lignin Model Compounds: Concerted vs. Homolytic Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels is a very attractive technology for expanding the utilization of carbon neutral processes and reducing dependency on fossil fuel resources. As with all such emerging technologies, biomass conversion through gasification or pyrolysis has a number of obstacles that need to be overcome to make these processes cost competitive with the refining of fossil fuels. Our current efforts have focused on the investigation of the thermochemistry of the linkages between lignin units using ab initio calculations on dimeric lignin model compounds. All calculations were carried out using M062X density functional theory at the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The M062X method has been shown to be consistent with the CBS-QB3 method while being significantly less computationally expensive. To date we have only completed the study on the b-O4 compounds. The theoretical calculations performed in the study indicate that concerted elimination pathways dominate over bond homolysis reactions under typical pyrolysis conditions. However, this does not mean that concerted elimination will be the dominant loss process for lignin. Bimolecular radical chemistry could very well dwarf the unimolecular pathways investigated in this study. These concerted pathways tend to form stable, reasonably non-reactive products that would be more suited producing a fungible bio-oil for the production of liquid transportation fuels.

  18. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  19. Legacy of the Environmental Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Stan L.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to select an important contemporary social movement (the environmental movement) and to assess some of the important impacts it has had on the larger society. This review of the environmental movement indicates it may be following a path similiar to the life-cycle of previous movements. (Author/BT)

  20. Movement as utopia.

    PubMed

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination.

  1. On a path to unfolding the biological mechanisms of orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, V; Davidovitch, Z

    2009-07-01

    Orthodontic forces deform the extracellular matrix and activate cells of the paradental tissues, facilitating tooth movement. Discoveries in mechanobiology have illuminated sequential cellular and molecular events, such as signal generation and transduction, cytoskeletal re-organization, gene expression, differentiation, proliferation, synthesis and secretion of specific products, and apoptosis. Orthodontists work in a unique biological environment, wherein applied forces engender remodeling of both mineralized and non-mineralized paradental tissues, including the associated blood vessels and neural elements. This review aims at identifying events that affect the sequence, timing, and significance of factors that determine the nature of the biological response of each paradental tissue to orthodontic force. The results of this literature review emphasize the fact that mechanoresponses and inflammation are both essential for achieving tooth movement clinically. If both are working in concert, orthodontists might be able to accelerate or decelerate tooth movement by adding adjuvant methods, whether physical, chemical, or surgical.

  2. Psychogenic movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Thenganatt, Mary Ann; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMDs) can present with varied phenomenology that may resemble organic movement disorders. The diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation with a supporting history and classic features on neurologic examination. Ancillary testing, such as imaging and neurophysiologic studies, can provide supplementary information but is not necessary for diagnosis. There is no standard protocol for the treatment of PMDs, but a multidisciplinary approach has been recommended. This review discusses the clinical characteristics of various PMDs as well as ancillary testing, treatment, and research in the pathophysiology of this complex group of disorders.

  3. Resolution of concerted versus sequential mechanisms in photo-induced double-proton transfer reaction in 7-azaindole H-bonded dimer

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Javier; del Valle, Juan Carlos; Kasha, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical bases for a synchronous or concerted double-proton transfer in centro-symmetric H-bonded electronically excited molecular dimers are presented. The prototype model is the 7-azaindole dimer. New research offers confirmation of a concerted mechanism for excited-state biprotonic transfer. Recent femtosecond photoionization and coulombic explosion techniques have given rise to time-of-flight MS observations suggesting sequential two-step biprotonic transfer for the same dimer. We interpret the overall species observed in the time-of-flight experiments as explicable without conflict with the concerted mechanism of proton transfer. PMID:10411876

  4. Overlap of movement planning and movement execution reduces reaction time.

    PubMed

    Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques; Legrain, Valéry; Lefèvre, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Motor planning is the process of preparing the appropriate motor commands in order to achieve a goal. This process has largely been thought to occur before movement onset and traditionally has been associated with reaction time. However, in a virtual line bisection task we observed an overlap between movement planning and execution. In this task performed with a robotic manipulandum, we observed that participants (n = 30) made straight movements when the line was in front of them (near target) but often made curved movements when the same target was moved sideways (far target, which had the same orientation) in such a way that they crossed the line perpendicular to its orientation. Unexpectedly, movements to the far targets had shorter reaction times than movements to the near targets (mean difference: 32 ms, SE: 5 ms, max: 104 ms). In addition, the curvature of the movement modulated reaction time. A larger increase in movement curvature from the near to the far target was associated with a larger reduction in reaction time. These highly curved movements started with a transport phase during which accuracy demands were not taken into account. We conclude that an accuracy demand imposes a reaction time penalty if processed before movement onset. This penalty is reduced if the start of the movement consists of a transport phase and if the movement plan can be refined with respect to accuracy demands later in the movement, hence demonstrating an overlap between movement planning and execution.

  5. Managing Movement as Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrell, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The associate director of education at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago recounts her learning and teaching through managing the Movement as Partnership program. Included are detailed descriptions of encounters with teachers and students as they create choreography reflective of their inquiry into integrating dance and literacy arts curriculum in the…

  6. The Hopi Traditionalist Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Richard O.

    1994-01-01

    Traces development of Hopi Traditionalism since 1906 as a social movement within the context of Hopi culture and sociopolitical history. Discusses the role of ideology in mediating political and economic conditions of history and collective cultural consciousness. Offers conclusions about the political role of indigenous culture and culturally…

  7. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  8. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment.

  9. Teaching the Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jamal Eric

    2012-01-01

    Every January, Charles Cobb Jr. makes the 1,100-mile trek from sunny Jacksonville, Florida, to chilly Providence, Rhode Island. For the past eight years, Cobb--a veteran of the civil rights movement who in the 1960s served as a field secretary for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Mississippi--becomes a visiting professor of…

  10. Movement Disorders in 2012

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Okun, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Standfirst Research in movement disorders in 2012 had led to advances in understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of disease and to development of potential novel therapeutic approaches. Key advances include elucidating mechanisms of spreading neurodegenerative pathology, immunotherapy, stem cells, genetics and deep brain stimulation in Parkinsonisms and related disorders. PMID:23296342

  11. Posture and Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  12. Measuring Facial Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  13. [Architecture and movement].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel

    2012-01-01

    Leading an architectural project means accompanying the movement which it induces within the teams. Between questioning, uncertainty and fear, the organisational changes inherent to the new facility must be subject to constructive and ongoing exchanges. Ethics, safety and training are revised and the unit projects are sometimes modified.

  14. Frequent Bowel Movements

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sanjoaquin MA, et al. Nutrition and lifestyle in relation to bowel movement frequency: A cross-sectional study of 20,630 men and women in EPIC-Oxford. Public Health Nutrition. 2004;7:77. Evaluation of the GI patient. The Merck Manual Professional ...

  15. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  16. Concerted action of neuroepithelial basal shrinkage and active epithelial migration ensures efficient optic cup morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Norden, Caren

    2017-01-01

    Organ formation is a multi-scale event that involves changes at the intracellular, cellular and tissue level. Organogenesis often starts with the formation of characteristically shaped organ precursors. However, the cellular mechanisms driving organ precursor formation are often not clear. Here, using zebrafish, we investigate the epithelial rearrangements responsible for the development of the hemispherical retinal neuroepithelium (RNE), a part of the optic cup. We show that in addition to basal shrinkage of RNE cells, active migration of connected epithelial cells into the RNE is a crucial player in its formation. This cellular movement is driven by progressive cell-matrix contacts and actively translocates prospective RNE cells to their correct location before they adopt neuroepithelial fate. Failure of this migration during neuroepithelium formation leads to ectopic determination of RNE cells and consequently impairs optic cup formation. Overall, this study illustrates how spatiotemporal coordination between morphogenic movements and fate determination critically influences organogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22689.001 PMID:28372636

  17. Mechanistic role of movement and strain sensitivity in muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Julien S.; Epstein, Neal D.

    2009-01-01

    Tension generation can be studied by applying step perturbations to contracting muscle fibers and subdividing the mechanical response into exponential phases. The de novo tension-generating isomerization is associated with one of these phases. Earlier work has shown that a temperature jump perturbs the equilibrium constant directly to increase tension. Here, we show that a length jump functions quite differently. A step release (relative movement of thick and thin filaments) appears to release a steric constraint on an ensemble of noncompetent postphosphate release actomyosin cross-bridges, enabling them to generate tension, a concentration jump in effect. Structural studies [Taylor KA, et al. (1999) Tomographic 3D reconstruction of quick-frozen, Ca2+-activated contracting insect flight muscle. Cell 99:421–431] that map to these kinetics indicate that both catalytic and lever arm domains of noncompetent myosin heads change angle on actin, whereas lever arm movement alone mediates the power stroke. Together, these kinetic and structural observations show a 13-nm overall interaction distance of myosin with actin, including a final 4- to 6-nm power stroke when the catalytic domain is fixed on actin. Raising fiber temperature with both perturbation techniques accelerates the forward, but slows the reverse rate constant of tension generation, kinetics akin to the unfolding/folding of small proteins. Decreasing strain, however, causes both forward and reverse rate constants to increase. Despite these changes in rate, the equilibrium constant is strain-insensitive. Activation enthalpy and entropy data show this invariance to be the result of enthalpy–entropy compensation. Reaction amplitudes confirm a strain-invariant equilibrium constant and thus a strain-insensitive ratio of pretension- to tension-generating states as work is done. PMID:19325123

  18. Concerted proton-coupled electron transfers in aquo/hydroxo/oxo metal complexes: Electrochemistry of [OsII(bpy)2py(OH2)]2+ in water

    PubMed Central

    Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel; Teillout, Anne-Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic analysis of the successive oxidative cyclic voltammetric responses of [OsII(bpy)2py(OH2)]2+ in buffered water, together with determination of H/D isotope effects, has allowed the determination of the mechanisms of the successive proton-coupled electron transfers that convert the OsII-aquo complex into the OsIII-hydroxo complex and the later into the OsIV-oxo complex. The stepwise pathways prevail over the concerted pathway in the first case. However, very large concentrations of a base, such as acetate, trigger the beginning of a concerted reaction. The same trend appears, but to a much larger extent, when high local concentration of carboxylates are attached close to the Os complex. The OsIII-hydroxo/OsIV-oxo couple is globally much slower and concerted pathways predominate over the stepwise pathways. Water is, however, not an appropriate proton acceptor in this respect. Other bases, such as citrate or phosphate, are instead quite effective for triggering concerted pathways. Here, we suggest factors causing these contrasting behaviors, providing a practical illustration of the prediction that concerted processes are an efficient way of avoiding high-energy intermediates. Observation of a strong decelerating effect of inactive ions together with the positive role of high local concentrations of carboxylates to initiate a concerted route underscores the variety of structural and medium factors that may operate to modulate and control the occurrence of concerted pathways. These demonstrations and analyses of the occurrence of concerted pathways in an aquo–hydroxo–oxo series are expected to serve as guidelines for studies in term of methodology and factor analysis. PMID:19584254

  19. Movement and Movement Patterns of Early Childhood. [Complete Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Caroline

    This study investigated the progressive development in movement and movement patterns of children ages 2-6. Data were collected over a 3-year period at six-month intervals, based on films of 57 children performing 25 motor tasks. The results are presented along two dimensions: (1) Descriptive analysis of progress of young children in movement with…

  20. On quantifying insect movements

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, J.A.; Crist, T.O. ); Milne, B.T. )

    1993-08-01

    We elaborate on methods described by Turchin, Odendaal Rausher for quantifying insect movement pathways. We note the need to scale measurement resolution to the study insects and the questions being asked, and we discuss the use of surveying instrumentation for recording sequential positions of individuals on pathways. We itemize several measures that may be used to characterize movement pathways and illustrate these by comparisons among several Eleodes beetles occurring in shortgrass steppe. The fractal dimension of pathways may provide insights not available from absolute measures of pathway configuration. Finally, we describe a renormalization procedure that may be used to remove sequential interdependence among locations of moving individuals while preserving the basic attributes of the pathway.

  1. Automatic Chloroplast Movement Analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henrik; Zeidler, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In response to low or high intensities of light, the chloroplasts in the mesophyll cells of the leaf are able to increase or decrease their exposure to light by accumulating at the upper and lower sides or along the side walls of the cell respectively. This movement, regulated by the phototropin blue light photoreceptors phot1 and phot2, results in a decreased or increased transmission of light through the leaf. This way the plant is able to optimize harvesting of the incoming light or avoid damage caused by excess light. Here we describe a method that indirectly measures the movement of chloroplasts by taking advantage of the resulting change in leaf transmittance. By using a microplate reader, quantitative measurements of chloroplast accumulation or avoidance can be monitored over time, for multiple samples with relatively little hands-on time.

  2. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  3. [Ergonomic movement in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Bos-Huizer, J J A; Bolderman, F W

    2014-02-01

    'Ergonomic movement in dentistry' is a recently developed ergonomic programme for dental healthcare professionals which is intended to prevent work-related complaints and assist in recovering from them. The programme is recommended by disability insurers in cases of specific physical complaints, limitations or disability, as a consequence of which a dental healthcare professional is unable to carry out his or her work. In a four-day training programme, in one's own workplace, skills are taught in the areas of work organization, work attitude and movement. These skills are directly applied in the treatment ofpatients and, if necessary, further improved. In this way, one advances step by step to an ergonomic way of working. Evaluations have shown that the programme is advantageous for the attitude toward work, the workplace and the work organization as well as the reduction of disability.

  4. Outreach for Families and Girls- Astronomy at Outdoor Concerts and at Super Bowl or Halloween Star Parties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2011-05-01

    Bring telescope to where the people are! Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) is a NASA-funded as astronomy outreach program at community parks and music festivals (1000 - 25,000 people/event). While there have been many astronomy outreach activities and telescope observations at sidewalks and parks, this program targets a different audience - music lovers who are attending concerts in community parks or festivals. These music lovers who may not have visited science museums, planetariums, or star parties are exposed to telescope observations and astronomy information with no additional travel costs. MAUS includes solar observing, telescope observations including a live imaging system, an astronomical video, astronomy banners/posters, and hands-on activities. MAUS increased awareness, engagement, and interest in astronomy at classical, pop, rock, and ethnic music concerts. Since 2009 over 50,000 people have participated in these outreach activities including a significant number of families and young girls. In addition to concerts in local Long Island parks, there were MUAS events at Tanglewood (summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra), Jazz in Central Park, and Astronomy Night on the National Mall (co-sponsored by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy). In 2011 MUAS will be expanded to include Ravinia (summer home of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra), the Newport Folk Festival, and the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts (site of the 1969 Woodstock festival). According to our survey results, music lovers became more informed about astronomy. Expanding Hofstra University's successful outreach programs, I propose the creation of a National Halloween Stars event targeting children and a National Super Bowl Star Party targeting girls, women, and the 2/3 of Americans who do not watch the Super Bowl. This can be combined with astronomers or amateur astronomers bringing telescopes to Super Bowl parties for football fans to stargaze during

  5. Direct Estimation of the Surface Location of Immobilized Functional Groups for Concerted Catalysis Using a Probe Molecule.

    PubMed

    Noda, Hiroto; Motokura, Ken; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Kaori; Tajiri, Hiroo; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Yamaguchi, Sho; Baba, Toshihide

    2016-04-04

    The location of active sites during concerted catalysis by a metal complex and tertiary amine on a SiO2 surface is discussed based on the interaction between the functionalized SiO2 surface and a probe molecule, p-formyl phenylboronic acid. The interactions of the probe molecule with the surface functionalities, diamine ligand, and tertiary amine, were analyzed by FT-IR and solid-state (13)C and (11)B MAS NMR. For the catalyst exhibiting high 1,4-addition activity, the diamine ligand and tertiary amine base exist in closer proximity than in the catalyst with low activity.

  6. Stability of Dynamic Trunk Movement

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; England, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Nonlinear systems analyses of trunk kinematics were performed to estimate control of dynamic stability during repetitive flexion and extension movements. Objective. Determine whether movement pace and movement direction of dynamic trunk flexion and extension influence control of local dynamic stability. Summary of Background Data. Spinal stability has been previously characterizedz in static, but not in dynamic movements. Biomechanical models make inferences about static spinal stability, but existing analyses provide limited insight into stability of dynamic movement. Stability during dynamic movements can be estimated from Lyapunov analyses of empirical data. Methods. There were 20 healthy subjects who performed repetitive trunk flexion and extension movements at 20 and 40 cycles per minute. Maximum Lyapunov exponents describing the expansion of the kinematic state-space were calculated from the measured trunk kinematics to estimate stability of the dynamic system. Results. The complexity of torso movement dynamics required at least 5 embedded dimensions, which suggests that stability components of lumbar lordosis may be empirically measurable in addition to global stability of trunk dynamics. Repeated trajectories from fast paced movements diverged more quickly than slower movement, indicating that local dynamic stability is limited in fast movements. Movements in the midsagittal plane showed higher multidimensional kinematic divergence than asymmetric movements. Conclusion. Nonlinear dynamic systems analyses were successfully applied to empirically measured data, which were used to characterize the neuromuscular control of stability during repetitive dynamic trunk movements. Movement pace and movement direction influenced the control of spinal stability. These stability assessment techniques are recommended for improved workplace design and the clinical assessment of spinal stability in patients with low back pain. PMID:16648732

  7. Recognizing People from Their Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loula, Fani; Prasad, Sapna; Harber, Kent; Shiffrar, Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Human observers demonstrate impressive visual sensitivity to human movement. What defines this sensitivity? If motor experience influences the visual analysis of action, then observers should be most sensitive to their own movements. If view-dependent visual experience determines visual sensitivity to human movement, then observers should be most…

  8. Foundations in Elementary Education: Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    The eight chapters in this book explain a teaching model to help students develop their kinesthetic intelligence through purposeful movement education. The major focus is the kindergarten through third grade child, but because in movement one can be a "beginner" at any age, movement experiences of both older and younger learners are occasionally…

  9. Educators Assess "Open Content" Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the open-content movement in education. A small but growing movement of K-12 educators is latching on to educational resources that are "open," or free for others to use, change, and republish on web sites that promote sharing. The open-content movement is fueled partly by digital creation tools that make it easy…

  10. FUNdamental Movement in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linley

    2001-01-01

    Noting that the development of fundamental movement skills is basic to children's motor development, this booklet provides a guide for early childhood educators in planning movement experiences for children between 4 and 8 years. The booklet introduces a wide variety of appropriate practices to promote movement skill acquisition and increased…

  11. Concerted stimuli regulating osteo-chondral differentiation from stem cells: phenotype acquisition regulated by microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gordeladze, Jan O; Djouad, Farida; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Noël, Daniele; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Apparailly, Florence; Jorgensen, Christian

    2009-10-01

    Bone and cartilage are being generated de novo through concerted actions of a plethora of signals. These act on stem cells (SCs) recruited for lineage-specific differentiation, with cellular phenotypes representing various functions throughout their life span. The signals are rendered by hormones and growth factors (GFs) and mechanical forces ensuring proper modelling and remodelling of bone and cartilage, due to indigenous and programmed metabolism in SCs, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, as well as osteoclasts and other cell types (eg T helper cells).This review focuses on the concerted action of such signals, as well as the regulatory and/or stabilizing control circuits rendered by a class of small RNAs, designated microRNAs. The impact on cell functions evoked by transcription factors (TFs) via various signalling molecules, also encompassing mechanical stimulation, will be discussed featuring microRNAs as important members of an integrative system. The present approach to cell differentiation in vitro may vastly influence cell engineering for in vivo tissue repair.

  12. Concerted stimuli regulating osteo-chondral differentiation from stem cells: phenotype acquisition regulated by microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gordeladze, Jan O; Djouad, Farida; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Noël, Daniele; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Apparailly, Florence; Jorgensen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Bone and cartilage are being generated de novo through concerted actions of a plethora of signals. These act on stem cells (SCs) recruited for lineage-specific differentiation, with cellular phenotypes representing various functions throughout their life span. The signals are rendered by hormones and growth factors (GFs) and mechanical forces ensuring proper modelling and remodelling of bone and cartilage, due to indigenous and programmed metabolism in SCs, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, as well as osteoclasts and other cell types (eg T helper cells). This review focuses on the concerted action of such signals, as well as the regulatory and/or stabilizing control circuits rendered by a class of small RNAs, designated microRNAs. The impact on cell functions evoked by transcription factors (TFs) via various signalling molecules, also encompassing mechanical stimulation, will be discussed featuring microRNAs as important members of an integrative system. The present approach to cell differentiation in vitro may vastly influence cell engineering for in vivo tissue repair. PMID:19801995

  13. Stereotypic movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Singer, Harvey S

    2011-01-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive, rhythmic, fixed, patterned in form, amplitude, and localization, but purposeless (e.g., hand shaking, waving, body rocking, head nodding). They are commonly seen in children; both in normal children (primary stereotypy) and in individuals with additional behavioral or neurological signs and symptoms (secondary stereotypy). They should be differentiated from compulsions (OCD), tics (tic disorders), trichotillomania, skin picking disorder, or the direct physiological effect of a substance. There is increasing evidence to support a neurobiological mechanism. Response to behavioral and pharmacological therapies is variable.

  14. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases.

  15. Movement disorders in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Movement disorders can occur as primary (idiopathic) or genetic disease, as a manifestation of an underlying neurodegenerative disorder, or secondary to a wide range of neurological or systemic diseases. Cerebrovascular diseases represent up to 22% of secondary movement disorders, and involuntary movements develop after 1-4% of strokes. Post-stroke movement disorders can manifest in parkinsonism or a wide range of hyperkinetic movement disorders including chorea, ballism, athetosis, dystonia, tremor, myoclonus, stereotypies, and akathisia. Some of these disorders occur immediately after acute stroke, whereas others can develop later, and yet others represent delayed-onset progressive movement disorders. These movement disorders have been encountered in patients with ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformations, and dural arteriovenous fistula affecting the basal ganglia, their connections, or both.

  16. Movement disorders in childhood.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review movement disorders in children. They are common but have etiology and phenomenology different than in adults. Tics are the most common phenomena although in most instances they are mild and have a favorable long-term prognosis. Dystonia is the second most common phenomena but when present it is usually genetic or idiopathic and causes meaningful disability. Sydenham's chorea is the most common cause of chorea in children worldwide. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a much rarer cause of chorea but it is always to be ruled out given the lack of a specific diagnostic marker for Sydenham's chorea. Tremor, usually caused by drugs or essential tremor, is regarded as rather uncommon in children. Arguably, most pediatric patients with tremor do not seek medical attention because of the lack of disability. Stereotypies are relatively uncommon but their recognition is clinically relevant since they are usually associated with severe conditions such as autism and Rett syndrome. Parkinsonism is quite rare in children and either results from encephalitis or is a side effect of medications. Wilson's disease must be ruled out in all children with movement disorders.

  17. [Primary versus secondary stereotypic movements].

    PubMed

    Fernandez Alvarez, E

    2004-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movements whose physiopathology and relations to other neurobehavioural disorders are still only poorly understood. In this paper our aim is to distinguish between primary stereotypic movements, which are the sole manifestation of an anomaly, while the complementary examinations, except for those involving molecular genetics, are normal; associated stereotypic movements, when they meet primary disorder criteria but there are other coexisting independent neurological signs, that is to say, they are neither the cause nor the consequence of the movement disorder; and secondary stereotypic movements, when they are the consequence of a lesion or acquired neurological dysfunction. Examples of primary stereotypic movements include episodes of parasomnia, such as head rocking, in subjects who are otherwise normal, and stereotypic movements due to emotional disorders, severe environmental deprivation or in institutionalised infants. Examples of associated stereotypic movements are those observed in Rett syndrome, in subjects with sensory defects or with mental retardation due to a variety of causes. And as instances of secondary stereotypic movements we have those that can be seen in infinite like syndrome caused by congenital cerebellar lesions. The purpose of the classification is to lay the foundations for the identification of new syndromes, which would without a doubt facilitate research into their physiopathology, their aetiology and the possible therapeutic attitude to be adopted.

  18. The Effect of an Eye Movement Recorder on Head Movements,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    in several research settings. For example, the NAC Eye Mark (e Recorder system (an eye movement recorder that utilizes the cor- neal reflection...reported that the NAC system could be used with a large number of subjects and that normal eye movement patterns were not altered by the use of’ this...equipment (2,4); however, no mention has been made of the extent to which the NAC system alters normal head movement patterns. It has been shown that head

  19. The Put-and-Fetch Ambiguity: How Magicians Exploit the Principle of Exclusive Allocation of Movements to Intentions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In many magic tricks, magicians fool their audience by performing a mock action (a so-called “ruse”), which merely serves the purpose of providing a seemingly natural explanation for visible movements that are actually part of the secret move they want to hide from the audience. Here, we discuss a special magic ruse in which the action of secretly putting something somewhere is “explained away” by the mock action of fetching something from the same place, or vice versa. Interestingly, the psychological principles underlying the amazing potency and robustness of this technique seem to be very similar to the general perceptual principles underlying figure–ground perception and the assignment of border ownership. This analogy may be useful for exploring the possibility that this and similar magical effects involve immediate “unconscious inferences” about intentions more akin to perceptual processing than to explicit deliberations based on a reflective “theory” of mind. PMID:28299166

  20. Fetal movement and fetal presentation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Yamamuro, T

    1985-09-01

    Fetal movements were analyzed by means of ultrasonography in an attempt to clarify the causative factor of frank breech presentation. Fetal posture, position, presentation and movements, as well as posture of the extremities and the volume of amniotic cavity were analyzed by ultrasonography in 112 fetuses ranging from 12 to 42 weeks of gestation. There existed three different fetal states: inactivity; slow sporadic movements without changes of presentations; active whole body movements with changes of presentations. It appears likely that version of fetal presentation from breech to cephalic occurs as the fetus tries to accommodate itself to the shape of the uterus during the state of active whole body movements, and the frank breech presentation of the fetus might result when the whole body movements are weak or absent.

  1. Decoding intentions from movement kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Andrea; Koul, Atesh; Ansuini, Caterina; Capozzi, Francesca; Becchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    How do we understand the intentions of other people? There has been a longstanding controversy over whether it is possible to understand others’ intentions by simply observing their movements. Here, we show that indeed movement kinematics can form the basis for intention detection. By combining kinematics and psychophysical methods with classification and regression tree (CART) modeling, we found that observers utilized a subset of discriminant kinematic features over the total kinematic pattern in order to detect intention from observation of simple motor acts. Intention discriminability covaried with movement kinematics on a trial-by-trial basis, and was directly related to the expression of discriminative features in the observed movements. These findings demonstrate a definable and measurable relationship between the specific features of observed movements and the ability to discriminate intention, providing quantitative evidence of the significance of movement kinematics for anticipating others’ intentional actions. PMID:27845434

  2. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) Criteria Applied in Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    and reported the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, end-stage renal disease ) criteria in 2004.4 Since this report, the RIFLE criteria...end-stage renal disease , or did not have burn injury and/or inhala- tion injury. If a patient was re-admitted, only the first hospitalization was...and creatinine continued to trend upward, then we backcalculated using the modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD) equation assuming a baseline

  3. Polarized localization of voltage-gated Na+ channels is regulated by concerted FGF13 and FGF14 action.

    PubMed

    Pablo, Juan Lorenzo; Wang, Chaojian; Presby, Matthew M; Pitt, Geoffrey S

    2016-05-10

    Clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) within the neuronal axon initial segment (AIS) is critical for efficient action potential initiation. Although initially inserted into both somatodendritic and axonal membranes, VGSCs are concentrated within the axon through mechanisms that include preferential axonal targeting and selective somatodendritic endocytosis. How the endocytic machinery specifically targets somatic VGSCs is unknown. Here, using knockdown strategies, we show that noncanonical FGF13 binds directly to VGSCs in hippocampal neurons to limit their somatodendritic surface expression, although exerting little effect on VGSCs within the AIS. In contrast, homologous FGF14, which is highly concentrated in the proximal axon, binds directly to VGSCs to promote their axonal localization. Single-point mutations in FGF13 or FGF14 abrogating VGSC interaction in vitro cannot support these specific functions in neurons. Thus, our data show how the concerted actions of FGF13 and FGF14 regulate the polarized localization of VGSCs that supports efficient action potential initiation.

  4. SiCN nanofibers with a diameter below 100 nm synthesized via concerted block copolymer formation, microphase separation, and crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Saravana K T; Kretschmer, Winfried P; Denner, Christine; Motz, Günter; Hund, Markus; Fery, Andreas; Trebbin, Martin; Förster, Stefan; Kempe, Rhett

    2013-04-08

    SiCN fibers with a mean diameter of 50 nm and an aspect ratio of up to 100 are produced in a two-step process by R. Kempe and co-workers. The key step to fabricate the longitudinal and cross-sectional views of the mesofibers shown here is a concerted block-copolymer synthesis, microphase separation, and cross linking at 140 °C followed by pyrolysis at 1100 °C. Inexpensive components like a commercially available silazane and polyethylene are linked. The fibers may find application in electronic devices, as components of ceramic matrix composites, as fiber beds in high-temperature nano-filtering like diesel fine dust removal, or as thermally robust and chemically inert catalyst supports. Furthermore, the SiCN nanofibers introduced on page 984 are a promising alternative to ultrathin carbon fibers, due to their oxidation resistance.

  5. Polarized localization of voltage-gated Na+ channels is regulated by concerted FGF13 and FGF14 action

    PubMed Central

    Pablo, Juan Lorenzo; Wang, Chaojian; Presby, Matthew M.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) within the neuronal axon initial segment (AIS) is critical for efficient action potential initiation. Although initially inserted into both somatodendritic and axonal membranes, VGSCs are concentrated within the axon through mechanisms that include preferential axonal targeting and selective somatodendritic endocytosis. How the endocytic machinery specifically targets somatic VGSCs is unknown. Here, using knockdown strategies, we show that noncanonical FGF13 binds directly to VGSCs in hippocampal neurons to limit their somatodendritic surface expression, although exerting little effect on VGSCs within the AIS. In contrast, homologous FGF14, which is highly concentrated in the proximal axon, binds directly to VGSCs to promote their axonal localization. Single-point mutations in FGF13 or FGF14 abrogating VGSC interaction in vitro cannot support these specific functions in neurons. Thus, our data show how the concerted actions of FGF13 and FGF14 regulate the polarized localization of VGSCs that supports efficient action potential initiation. PMID:27044086

  6. Concerted spatial-frequency and polarization-phase filtering of laser images of polycrystalline networks of blood plasma smears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Yu A.

    2012-11-01

    The complex technique of concerted polarization-phase and spatial-frequency filtering of blood plasma laser images is suggested. The possibility of obtaining the coordinate distributions of phases of linearly and circularly birefringent protein networks of blood plasma separately is presented. The statistical (moments of the first to fourth orders) and scale self-similar (logarithmic dependences of power spectra) structure of phase maps of different types of birefringence of blood plasma of two groups of patients-healthy people (donors) and those suffering from rectal cancer-is investigated. The diagnostically sensitive parameters of a pathological change of the birefringence of blood plasma polycrystalline networks are determined. The effectiveness of this technique for detecting change in birefringence in the smears of other biological fluids in diagnosing the appearance of cholelithiasis (bile), operative differentiation of the acute and gangrenous appendicitis (exudate), and differentiation of inflammatory diseases of joints (synovial fluid) is shown.

  7. Concerted spatial-frequency and polarization-phase filtering of laser images of polycrystalline networks of blood plasma smears.

    PubMed

    Ushenko, Yu A

    2012-11-01

    The complex technique of concerted polarization-phase and spatial-frequency filtering of blood plasma laser images is suggested. The possibility of obtaining the coordinate distributions of phases of linearly and circularly birefringent protein networks of blood plasma separately is presented. The statistical (moments of the first to fourth orders) and scale self-similar (logarithmic dependences of power spectra) structure of phase maps of different types of birefringence of blood plasma of two groups of patients--healthy people (donors) and those suffering from rectal cancer--is investigated. The diagnostically sensitive parameters of a pathological change of the birefringence of blood plasma polycrystalline networks are determined. The effectiveness of this technique for detecting change in birefringence in the smears of other biological fluids in diagnosing the appearance of cholelithiasis (bile), operative differentiation of the acute and gangrenous appendicitis (exudate), and differentiation of inflammatory diseases of joints (synovial fluid) is shown.

  8. Physiology of Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMDs) are common, but their physiology is largely unknown. In most situations, the movement is involuntary, but in a minority, when the disorder is malingering or factitious, the patient is lying and the movement is voluntary. Physiologically, we cannot tell the difference between voluntary and involuntary. The Bereitschaftspotential (BP) is indicative of certain brain mechanisms for generating movement, and is seen with ordinarily voluntary movements, but by itself does not indicate that a movement is voluntary. There are good clinical neurophysiological methods available to determine whether myoclonus or tremor is a PMD. For example, psychogenic myoclonus generally has a BP, and psychogenic stimulus-sensitive myoclonus has a variable latency with times similar to normal reaction times. Psychogenic tremor will have variable frequency over time, be synchronous in the two arms, and might well be entrained with voluntary rhythmic movements. These facts suggest that PMDs share voluntary mechanisms for movement production. There are no definitive tests to differentiate psychogenic dystonia from organic dystonia, although one has been recently reported. Similar physiological abnormalities are seen in both groups. The question arises as to how a movement can be produced with voluntary mechanisms, but not be considered voluntary. PMID:20493708

  9. Physiology of psychogenic movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Mark

    2010-08-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders (PMDs) are common, but their physiology is largely unknown. In most situations, the movement is involuntary, but in a minority, when the disorder is malingering or factitious, the patient is lying and the movement is voluntary. Physiologically, we cannot tell the difference between voluntary and involuntary. The Bereitschaftspotential (BP) is indicative of certain brain mechanisms for generating movement, and is seen with ordinarily voluntary movements, but by itself does not indicate that a movement is voluntary. There are good clinical neurophysiological methods available to determine whether myoclonus or tremor is a PMD. For example, psychogenic myoclonus generally has a BP, and psychogenic stimulus-sensitive myoclonus has a variable latency with times similar to normal reaction times. Psychogenic tremor will have variable frequency over time, be synchronous in the two arms, and might well be entrained with voluntary rhythmic movements. These facts suggest that PMDs share voluntary mechanisms for movement production. There are no definitive tests to differentiate psychogenic dystonia from organic dystonia, although one has been recently reported. Similar physiological abnormalities are seen in both groups. The question arises as to how a movement can be produced with voluntary mechanisms, but not be considered voluntary.

  10. Preprosthetic movement of anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Melsen, B

    1982-05-01

    Preprosthetic movement of anterior teeth is often performed on patients with missing anterior teeth, providing a better basis for subsequent bridgework. This can often be achieved by horizontal tooth movements of a tipping or translatory art whilst other patients present problems of a vertical nature with a deep overbite inconsistent with a healthy periodontal status. Intrusive tooth movements are needed as changes in facial height are not tolerated. The importance of understanding the biological basis for tooth movements in the planning of the biomechanics is stressed. Forces should be monitored according to the amount of general and local bone loss.

  11. Concerted O atom–proton transfer in the O—O bond forming step in water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier J.; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao; Hoertz, Paul G.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    As the terminal step in photosystem II, and a potential half-reaction for artificial photosynthesis, water oxidation (2H2O → O2 + 4e- + 4H+) is key, but it imposes a significant mechanistic challenge with requirements for both 4e-/4H+ loss and O—O bond formation. Significant progress in water oxidation catalysis has been achieved recently by use of single-site Ru metal complex catalysts such as [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine]. When oxidized from to RuV = O3+, these complexes undergo O—O bond formation by O-atom attack on a H2O molecule, which is often the rate-limiting step. Microscopic details of O—O bond formation have been explored by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations the results of which provide detailed insight into mechanism and a strategy for enhancing catalytic rates. It utilizes added bases as proton acceptors and concerted atom–proton transfer (APT) with O-atom transfer to the O atom of a water molecule in concert with proton transfer to the base (B). Base catalyzed APT reactivity in water oxidation is observed both in solution and on the surfaces of oxide electrodes derivatized by attached phosphonated metal complex catalysts. These results have important implications for catalytic, electrocatalytic, and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation. PMID:20360565

  12. Concerted O atom-proton transfer in the O—O bond forming step in water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier C.; Hu, Xiangqian; Yang, Weitao; Hoertz, Paul G.; Meyer, Thomas J

    2010-04-20

    As the terminal step in photosystem II, and a potential half-reaction for artificial photosynthesis, water oxidation (2H2O → O2 + 4e- + 4H+) is key, but it imposes a significant mechanistic challenge with requirements for both 4e-/4H- loss and O—O bond formation. Significant progress in water oxidation catalysis has been achieved recently by use of single-site Ru metal complex catalysts such as [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine]. When oxidized from RuII-OH22+ to RuV = O3+, these complexes undergo O—O bond formation by O-atom attack on a H2O molecule, which is often the rate-limiting step. Microscopic details of O—O bond formation have been explored by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations the results of which provide detailed insight into mechanism and a strategy for enhancing catalytic rates. It utilizes added bases as proton acceptors and concerted atom–proton transfer (APT) with O-atom transfer to the O atom of a water molecule in concert with proton transfer to the base (B). Base catalyzed APT reactivity in water oxidation is observed both in solution and on the surfaces of oxide electrodes derivatized by attached phosphonated metal complex catalysts. These results have important implications for catalytic, electrocatalytic, and photoelectrocatalytic water oxidation.

  13. Intersubunit Concerted Cooperative and cis-Type Mechanisms Modulate Allosteric Gating in Two-Pore-Domain Potassium Channel TREK-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    In response to diverse stimuli, two-pore-domain potassium channel TREK-2 regulates cellular excitability, and hence plays a key role in mediating neuropathic pain, mood disorders and ischemia through. Although more and more input modalities are found to achieve their modulations via acting on the channel, the potential role of subunit interaction in these modulations remains to be explored. In the current study, the deletion (lack of proximal C-terminus, ΔpCt) or point mutation (G312A) was introduced into TREK-2 subunits to limit K+ conductance and used to report subunit stoichiometry. The constructs were then combined with wild type (WT) subunit to produce concatenated dimers with defined composition, and the gating kinetics of these channels to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and extracellular pH (pHo) were characterized. Our results show that combination of WT and ΔpCt/G312A subunits reserves similar gating properties to that of WT dimmers, suggesting that the WT subunit exerts dominant and positive effects on the mutated one, and thus the two subunits controls channel gating via a concerted cooperative manner. Further introduction of ΔpCt into the latter subunit of heterodimeric channel G312A-WT or G312A-G312A attenuated their sensitivity to 2-APB and pHo alkalization, implicating that these signals were transduced by a cis-type mechanism. Together, our findings elucidate the mechanisms for how the two subunits control the pore gating of TREK-2, in which both intersubunit concerted cooperative and cis-type manners modulate the allosteric regulations induced by 2-APB and pHo alkalization. PMID:27242438

  14. Molecular characterization and concerted evolution of two genes encoding RING-C2 type proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Lim, Sung Don; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2012-08-15

    RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger proteins are believed to play a critical role in mediating the transfer of ubiquitin to heterogeneous substrate(s). While the two canonical types, RING-H2 and RING-HC, have been well-characterized, the molecular functions of the modified types, particularly the RING-C2 types, remain elusive. We isolated two rice genes harboring the RING-C2 domain on the distal parts of rice chromosomes 11 and 12, termed OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2, respectively. A comparison of sequence divergences between 10 duplicate pairs on the distal parts of rice chromosomes 11 and 12 and randomly selected duplicate pairs suggested that OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2 have evolved in concert via gene conversion. An in vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that both proteins possess E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the innate functions of these RING domains have not been affected by their modifications during evolution. Subcellular localizations were strikingly different; OsRINGC2-1 was found only in the cytoplasm with many punctate complexes, whereas OsRINGC2-2 was observed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The expression patterns of both genes showed striking differences in response to salt stress, whereas plants heterogeneous for both genes mediated salt tolerance in Arabidopsis, supporting the notion of concerted evolution. These results shed light on the molecular functions of OsRINGC2-1 and OsRINGC2-2 and provide insight into their molecular evolution.

  15. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Esboui, Mounir

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  16. Evidence of positive selection and concerted evolution in the rapidly evolving PRDM9 zinc finger domain in goats and sheep.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Sharma, P; Sharma, R; Arora, R; Verma, N K; Brahma, B; Mishra, P; De, S

    2016-12-01

    Meiotic recombination contributes to augmentation of genetic diversity, exclusion of deleterious alleles and proper segregation of chromatids. PRDM9 has been identified as the gene responsible for specifying the location of recombination hotspots during meiosis and is also the only known vertebrate gene associated with reproductive isolation between species. PRDM9 encodes a protein with a highly variable zinc finger (ZF) domain that varies between as well as within species. In the present study, the ZF domain of PRDM9 on chromosome 1 was characterized for the first time in 15 goat breeds and 25 sheep breeds of India. A remarkable variation in the number and sequence of ZF domains was observed. The number of ZF repeats in the ZF array varied from eight to 12 yielding five homozygous and 10 heterozygous genotypes. The number of different ZF domains was 84 and 52 producing 36 and 26 unique alleles in goats and sheep respectively. The posterior mean of dN/dS or omega values were calculated using the codeml tool of pamlx to identify amino acids that are evolving positively in goats and sheep, as positions -1, +3 and +6 in the ZF domain have been reported to experience strong positive selection across different lineages. Our study identified sites -5, -1, +3, +4 and +6 to be experiencing positive selection. Small ruminant zinc fingers were also found to be evolving under concerted evolution. Our results demonstrate the existence of a vast diversity of PRDM9 in goats and sheep, which is in concert with reports in many metazoans.

  17. Top-down Proteomics Reveals Concerted Reductions in Myofilament and Z-disc Protein Phosphorylation after Acute Myocardial Infarction*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Valeja, Santosh G.; Zhang, Han; Cai, Wenxuan; Chen, Yi-Chen; Guner, Huseyin; Chen, Albert J.; Schwahn, Denise J.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Liu, Xiaowen; Ge, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and is most often precipitated by myocardial infarction. However, the molecular changes driving cardiac dysfunction immediately after myocardial infarction remain poorly understood. Myofilament proteins, responsible for cardiac contraction and relaxation, play critical roles in signal reception and transduction in HF. Post-translational modifications of myofilament proteins afford a mechanism for the beat-to-beat regulation of cardiac function. Thus it is of paramount importance to gain a comprehensive understanding of post-translational modifications of myofilament proteins involved in regulating early molecular events in the post-infarcted myocardium. We have developed a novel liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry-based top-down proteomics strategy to comprehensively assess the modifications of key cardiac proteins in the myofilament subproteome extracted from a minimal amount of myocardial tissue with high reproducibility and throughput. The entire procedure, including tissue homogenization, myofilament extraction, and on-line LC/MS, takes less than three hours. Notably, enabled by this novel top-down proteomics technology, we discovered a concerted significant reduction in the phosphorylation of three crucial cardiac proteins in acutely infarcted swine myocardium: cardiac troponin I and myosin regulatory light chain of the myofilaments and, unexpectedly, enigma homolog isoform 2 (ENH2) of the Z-disc. Furthermore, top-down MS allowed us to comprehensively sequence these proteins and pinpoint their phosphorylation sites. For the first time, we have characterized the sequence of ENH2 and identified it as a phosphoprotein. ENH2 is localized at the Z-disc, which has been increasingly recognized for its role as a nodal point in cardiac signaling. Thus our proteomics discovery opens up new avenues for the investigation of concerted signaling between myofilament and Z-disc in the early

  18. Movement Matters: Observing the Benefits of Movement Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Melani Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Montessori's first premise is that movement and cognition are closely entwined, and movement can enhance thinking and learning (Lillard, 2005). Children must move, and practice moving, to develop strength, balance, and the stability needed to fully participate in the rigors of daily life. It is imperative for young children's motor…

  19. Movement Education For Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Maida L., Ed.; And Others

    This booklet explores why movement education is important for preschool children, what activities to include in a program, how and where to conduct a program, and criteria that can help to structure the program environment. The first section presents a rationale for the use of movement education for helping preschool children to develop…

  20. Antecedents of the Theory Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbertson, Jack A.

    1981-01-01

    Traces the conceptual roots of the theory movement in educational administration, highlighting the ideas of Auguste Comte and the logical positivists. Explains how core concepts that shaped the theory movement were diffused into educational administration and sets forth implications for future study. (Author/WD)

  1. Developing Movement as Inclusive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Melanie; Walter, Ofra

    2010-01-01

    This article details the emergence of a training framework to support professional development in inclusive Movement teaching. This arose from a collaborative research project in spring 2008 (supported by the Training and Development Agency, UK), between two universities in England and Israel. Movement education is surprisingly underused globally,…

  2. Music and Movement. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Moore, Thomas; Carlton, Elizabeth B.; Kranowitz, Carol Stock

    2000-01-01

    Four articles address music and movement in early childhood education: (1) "For the Love of Music--and Children"(Cindy Smith); (2) "Music: The Great Connector" (Thomas Moore); (3) "Learning through Music: The Support of Brain Research" (Elizabeth B. Carlton); and (4) "Music and Movement Bring Together Children of…

  3. Spatial memory and animal movement.

    PubMed

    Fagan, William F; Lewis, Mark A; Auger-Méthé, Marie; Avgar, Tal; Benhamou, Simon; Breed, Greg; LaDage, Lara; Schlägel, Ulrike E; Tang, Wen-wu; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Forester, James; Mueller, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Memory is critical to understanding animal movement but has proven challenging to study. Advances in animal tracking technology, theoretical movement models and cognitive sciences have facilitated research in each of these fields, but also created a need for synthetic examination of the linkages between memory and animal movement. Here, we draw together research from several disciplines to understand the relationship between animal memory and movement processes. First, we frame the problem in terms of the characteristics, costs and benefits of memory as outlined in psychology and neuroscience. Next, we provide an overview of the theories and conceptual frameworks that have emerged from behavioural ecology and animal cognition. Third, we turn to movement ecology and summarise recent, rapid developments in the types and quantities of available movement data, and in the statistical measures applicable to such data. Fourth, we discuss the advantages and interrelationships of diverse modelling approaches that have been used to explore the memory-movement interface. Finally, we outline key research challenges for the memory and movement communities, focusing on data needs and mathematical and computational challenges. We conclude with a roadmap for future work in this area, outlining axes along which focused research should yield rapid progress.

  4. On biometrics with eye movements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youming; Juhola, Martti

    2016-04-07

    Eye movements are a relatively novel data source for biometric identification. When video cameras applied to eye tracking become smaller and more efficient, this data source could offer interesting opportunities for the development of eye movement biometrics. In the present article, we study primarily biometric identification as seen as a classification task of multiple classes, and secondarily biometric verification considered as binary classification. Our research is based on the saccadic eye movement signal measurements from 109 young subjects. In order to test the data measured, we use a procedure of biometric identification according to the one-versus-one (subject) principle. In a development from our previous research, which also involved biometric verification based on saccadic eye movements, we now apply another eye movement tracker device with a higher sampling frequency of 250 Hz. The results obtained are good, with correct identification rates at 80-90% at their best.

  5. Uranus Cloud Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Time-lapse Voyager 2 images of Uranus show the movement of two small, bright, streaky clouds -- the first such features ever seen on the planet. The clouds were detected in this series of orange-filtered images taken Jan. 14, 1986, over a 4.6-hour interval (from top to bottom). At the time, the spacecraft was about 12.9 million kilometers (8.0 million miles) from the planet, whose pole of rotation is near the center of each disk. Uranus, which is tipped on its side with respect to the other planets, is rotating in a counterclockwise direction, as are the two clouds seen here as bright streaks. (The occasional donut-shaped features that show up are shadows cast by dust in the camera optics. The processing necessary to bring out the faint features on the planet also brings out these camera blemishes.) The larger of the two clouds is at a latitude of 33 degrees; the smaller cloud, seen faintly in the three lower images, lies at 26 degrees (a lower latitude and hence closer to the limb). Their counterclockwise periods of rotation are 16.2 and 16.9 hours, respectively. This difference implies that the lower-latitude feature is lagging behind the higher-latitude feature at a speed of almost 100 meters per second (220 mph). Latitudinal bands are also visible in these images. The faint bands, more numerous now than in previous Voyager images from longer range, are concentric with the pole of rotation -- that is, they circle the planet in lines of constant latitude. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  6. Kinetic Data and Quantum Chemical Calculation Studies on the Stepwise vs. Concerted Pathways for Reaction of Chlorosulfonyl Isocyanate Reactions with Monofluoroalkenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-17

    synthetic utility of CSI reactions with unreactive hydrocarbon and monofluoroalkenes is enhanced by running the reactions at a lower temperature where...public release; distribution unlimited. Free Energy vs. Reaction Coordinate Diagram Solid line: Pathways available to hydrocarbon alkenes with CSI...stepwise vs. concerted pathways for reaction of chlorosulfonyl isocyanate reactions with monofluoroalkenes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT

  7. An Investigation of the Relationship between Instructor and Institutional Characteristics and the Concert Report Assignment in Music in General Studies Courses in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Kirsten Fedje

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between institutional and instructor characteristics and the assignment of the concert report within American college music in general studies courses. Four research questions were addressed: (1) Do significant differences exist in instructor practices regarding the assignment of, and…

  8. Pioneers of eye movement research

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology affording eye movement recordings carry the risk of neglecting past achievements. Without the assistance of this modern armoury, great strides were made in describing the ways the eyes move. For Aristotle the fundamental features of eye movements were binocular, and he described the combined functions of the eyes. This was later given support using simple procedures like placing a finger over the eyelid of the closed eye and culminated in Hering's law of equal innervation. However, the overriding concern in the 19th century was with eye position rather than eye movements. Appreciating discontinuities of eye movements arose from studies of vertigo. The characteristics of nystagmus were recorded before those of saccades and fixations. Eye movements during reading were described by Hering and by Lamare in 1879; both used similar techniques of listening to sounds made during contractions of the extraocular muscles. Photographic records of eye movements during reading were made by Dodge early in the 20th century, and this stimulated research using a wider array of patterns. In the mid-20th century attention shifted to the stability of the eyes during fixation, with the emphasis on involuntary movements. The contributions of pioneers from Aristotle to Yarbus are outlined. PMID:23396982

  9. Control of arm movements for quick change of movement direction.

    PubMed

    Takatoku, Nozomi; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the control strategy for changing movement direction during arm movements by analyzing the changes in a triphasic electromyographic pattern. Subjects performed a 40° flexion (basic) and a 40° flexion-extension to return to the start position (return) under two conditions: performing a predetermined task (SF) and performing each task in response to a signal (ST). The results revealed the agonist burst for the return task under the ST condition resembled that of the basic task under the SF condition, and the antagonist burst increased after presenting the modification signal. In conclusion, the strategy for quick change of movement direction was to increase the antagonist burst by an additional command from the central nervous system without cancelling the planned movement.

  10. Biological soliton in multicellular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Ishida, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Solitons have been observed in various physical phenomena. Here, we show that the distinct characteristics of solitons are present in the mass cell movement of non-chemotactic mutants of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. During starvation, D. discoideum forms multicellular structures that differentiate into spore or stalk cells and, eventually, a fruiting body. Non-chemotactic mutant cells do not form multicellular structures; however, they do undergo mass cell movement in the form of a pulsatile soliton-like structure (SLS). We also found that SLS induction is mediated by adhesive cell-cell interactions. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms of biological solitons in multicellular movement.

  11. Movement disorders in systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Poewe, Werner; Djamshidian-Tehrani, Atbin

    2015-02-01

    Movement disorders, classically involving dysfunction of the basal ganglia commonly occur in neurodegenerative and structural brain disorders. At times, however, movement disorders can be the initial manifestation of a systemic disease. In this article we discuss the most common movement disorders which may present in infectious, autoimmune, paraneoplastic, metabolic and endocrine diseases. Management often has to be multidisciplinary involving primary care physicians, neurologists, allied health professionals including nurses, occupational therapists and less frequently neurosurgeons. Recognizing and treating the underlying systemic disease is important in order to improve the neurological symptoms.

  12. Concerted growth and ordering of cobalt nanorod arrays as revealed by tandem in situ SAXS-XAS studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cormary, Benoit; Li, Tao; Liakakos, Nikos; Peres, Laurent; Fazzini, Pier -Francesco; Blon, Thomas; Respaud, Marc; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Chaudret, Bruno; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Mader, Elizabeth A.; Soulantica, Katerina

    2016-06-14

    The molecular and ensemble dynamics for the growth of hierarchical supercrystals of cobalt nanorods have been studied by in situ tandem X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy – Small Angle X-ray Scattering (XAS - SAXS). The super-crystals were obtained by reducing a Co(II) precursor under H2 in the presence of a long chain amine and a long chain carboxylic acid. Complementary time-dependent ex situ TEM studies were also performed. The experimental data provide critical insights into the nanorod growth mechanism, and unequivocal evidence for a concerted growth-organization process. Nanorod formation involves cobalt nucleation, a fast atom by atom anisotropic growth and a slower oriented attach-ment process that continues well after cobalt reduction is complete. As a result, smectic-like ordering of the nanorods appears very early in the process, as soon as nanoparticle elongation appears, and nanorod growth takes place inside organized super-lattices, which can be regarded as mesocrystals.

  13. Biomarkers for Uranium Risk Assessment for the Development of the CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) Molecular Epidemiological Protocol.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Yann; Roy, Laurence; Hornhardt, Sabine; Badie, Christophe; Hall, Janet; Baatout, Sarah; Pernot, Eileen; Tomasek, Ladislav; Laurent, Olivier; Ebrahimian, Teni; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Grison, Stephane; Kabacik, Sylwia; Laurier, Dominique; Gomolka, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial experimental and epidemiological research, there is limited knowledge of the uranium-induce health effects after chronic low-dose exposures in humans. Biological markers can objectively characterize pathological processes or environmental responses to uranium and confounding agents. The integration of such biological markers into a molecular epidemiological study would be a useful approach to improve and refine estimations of uranium-induced health risks. To initiate such a study, Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE) was established, and involves biologists, epidemiologists and dosimetrists. The aims of the biological work package of CURE were: 1. To identify biomarkers and biological specimens relevant to uranium exposure; 2. To define standard operating procedures (SOPs); and 3. To set up a common protocol (logistic, questionnaire, ethical aspects) to perform a large-scale molecular epidemiologic study in uranium-exposed cohorts. An intensive literature review was performed and led to the identification of biomarkers related to: 1. retention organs (lungs, kidneys and bone); 2. other systems/organs with suspected effects (cardiovascular system, central nervous system and lympho-hematopoietic system); 3. target molecules (DNA damage, genomic instability); and 4. high-throughput methods for the identification of new biomarkers. To obtain high-quality biological materials, SOPs were established for the sampling and storage of different biospecimens. A questionnaire was developed to assess potential confounding factors. The proposed strategy can be adapted to other internal exposures and should improve the characterization of the biological and health effects that are relevant for risk assessment.

  14. The evolution of increased competitive ability, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons act in concert for a tropical invader.

    PubMed

    Qin, Rui-Min; Zheng, Yu-Long; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Callaway, Ragan M; Barclay, Gregor F; Pereyra, Carlos Silva; Feng, Yu-Long

    2013-02-01

    There are many non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for exotic invasions but few studies have concurrently tested more than one hypothesis for the same species. Here, we tested the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis in two common garden experiments in which Chromolaena odorata plants originating from native and nonnative ranges were grown in competition with natives from each range, and the novel weapons hypothesis in laboratory experiments with leachates from C. odorata. Compared with conspecifics originating from the native range, C. odorata plants from the nonnative range were stronger competitors at high nutrient concentrations in the nonnative range in China and experienced far more herbivore damage in the native range in Mexico. In both China and Mexico, C. odorata was more suppressed by species native to Mexico than by species native to China. Species native to China were much more inhibited by leaf extracts from C. odorata than species from Mexico, and this difference in allelopathic effects may provide a possible explanation for the biogeographic differences in competitive ability. Our results indicate that EICA, innate competitive advantages, and novel biochemical weapons may act in concert to promote invasion by C. odorata, and emphasize the importance of exploring multiple, non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for invasions.

  15. The Symbiosis-Related ERN Transcription Factors Act in Concert to Coordinate Rhizobial Host Root Infection1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cerri, Marion R.; Frances, Lisa; Kelner, Audrey; Middleton, Patrick H.; Auriac, Marie-Christine; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Erard, Monique; Barker, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Legumes improve their mineral nutrition through nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with soil rhizobia. Rhizobial infection of legumes is regulated by a number of transcription factors, including ERF Required for Nodulation1 (ERN1). Medicago truncatula plants defective in ERN1 are unable to nodulate, but still exhibit early symbiotic responses including rhizobial infection. ERN1 has a close homolog, ERN2, which shows partially overlapping expression patterns. Here we show that ern2 mutants exhibit a later nodulation phenotype than ern1, being able to form nodules but with signs of premature senescence. Molecular characterization of the ern2-1 mutation reveals a key role for a conserved threonine for both DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In contrast to either single mutant, the double ern1-1 ern2-1 line is completely unable to initiate infection or nodule development. The strong ern1-1 ern2-1 phenotype demonstrates functional redundancy between these two transcriptional regulators and reveals the essential role of ERN1/ERN2 to coordinately induce rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. While ERN1/ERN2 act in concert in the root epidermis, only ERN1 can efficiently allow the development of mature nodules in the cortex, probably through an independent pathway. Together, these findings reveal the key roles that ERN1/ERN2 play at the very earliest stages of root nodule development. PMID:27208242

  16. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA.

    PubMed

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H; Naika, Gajendra S; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2015-07-07

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms.

  17. In Vitro Characterization and Concerted Function of Three Core Enzymes of a Glycyl Radical Enzyme - Associated Bacterial Microcompartment

    PubMed Central

    Zarzycki, Jan; Sutter, Markus; Cortina, Niña Socorro; Erb, Tobias J.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    Many bacteria encode proteinaceous bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) that encapsulate sequential enzymatic reactions of diverse metabolic pathways. Well-characterized BMCs include carboxysomes for CO2-fixation, and propanediol- and ethanolamine-utilizing microcompartments that contain B12-dependent enzymes. Genes required to form BMCs are typically organized in gene clusters, which promoted their distribution across phyla by horizontal gene transfer. Recently, BMCs associated with glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) were discovered; these are widespread and comprise at least three functionally distinct types. Previously, we predicted one type of these GRE-associated microcompartments (GRMs) represents a B12-independent propanediol-utilizing BMC. Here we functionally and structurally characterize enzymes of the GRM of Rhodopseudomonas palustris BisB18 and demonstrate their concerted function in vitro. The GRM signature enzyme, the GRE, is a dedicated 1,2-propanediol dehydratase with a new type of intramolecular encapsulation peptide. It forms a complex with its activating enzyme and, in conjunction with an aldehyde dehydrogenase, converts 1,2-propanediol to propionyl-CoA. Notably, homologous GRMs are also encoded in pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Our high-resolution crystal structures of the aldehyde dehydrogenase lead to a revised reaction mechanism. The successful in vitro reconstitution of a part of the GRM metabolism provides insights into the metabolic function and steps in the assembly of this BMC. PMID:28202954

  18. Concerted growth and ordering of cobalt nanorod arrays as revealed by tandem in situ SAXS-XAS studies

    DOE PAGES

    Cormary, Benoit; Li, Tao; Liakakos, Nikos; ...

    2016-06-14

    The molecular and ensemble dynamics for the growth of hierarchical supercrystals of cobalt nanorods have been studied by in situ tandem X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy – Small Angle X-ray Scattering (XAS - SAXS). The super-crystals were obtained by reducing a Co(II) precursor under H2 in the presence of a long chain amine and a long chain carboxylic acid. Complementary time-dependent ex situ TEM studies were also performed. The experimental data provide critical insights into the nanorod growth mechanism, and unequivocal evidence for a concerted growth-organization process. Nanorod formation involves cobalt nucleation, a fast atom by atom anisotropic growth and a slowermore » oriented attach-ment process that continues well after cobalt reduction is complete. As a result, smectic-like ordering of the nanorods appears very early in the process, as soon as nanoparticle elongation appears, and nanorod growth takes place inside organized super-lattices, which can be regarded as mesocrystals.« less

  19. Evaluation of the TRCRtest NV-W for norovirus detection in stools by the Transcription-Reverse Transcription Concerted method.

    PubMed

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Albonetti, Valeria; Pinardi, Federica; Ferraglia, Francesca; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-11-01

    A novel molecular assay, TRCRtest NV-W, based on a transcription-reverse transcription concerted reaction (TRC) for isothermal amplification and real-time detection of norovirus in stools was assessed and compared with an RT-nPCR. Archived stools positive for either different types or variants of norovirus genogroups I and II or other enteric viruses were used to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the novel assay. The TRC assay was 100% specific since it detected all the noroviruses tested and it did not display cross reactivity with other enteric viruses. When screening a collection of 387 stools with the TRC and RT-nPCR assays, the TRC displayed concordance, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 96.6%, 81%, 99.7%, 98.1%, and 96.3%, respectively, after retesting the negative specimens. Additional PCRs and/or sequencing, used to understand inconsistent results between TRC and RT-nPCR, confirmed all positive results and did not reveal nucleotide variations in the TRC probe and primers binding sites. The TRC assay may be a rapid and ease of use tool for the detection of noroviruses in clinical virology laboratories even in the face of rapidly evolving noroviruses.

  20. Concerted Rattling in CsAg5 Te3 Leading to Ultralow Thermal Conductivity and High Thermoelectric Performance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Tan, Gangjian; Shen, Jin-Ni; Hao, Shiqiang; Wu, Li-Ming; Calta, Nicholas; Malliakas, Christos; Wang, Si; Uher, Ctirad; Wolverton, Christopher; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-09-12

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials convert heat energy directly into electricity, and introducing new materials with high conversion efficiency is a great challenge because of the rare combination of interdependent electrical and thermal transport properties required to be present in a single material. The TE efficiency is defined by the figure of merit ZT=(S(2) σ) T/κ, where S is the Seebeck coefficient, σ is the electrical conductivity, κ is the total thermal conductivity, and T is the absolute temperature. A new p-type thermoelectric material, CsAg5 Te3 , is presented that exhibits ultralow lattice thermal conductivity (ca. 0.18 Wm(-1)  K(-1) ) and a high figure of merit of about 1.5 at 727 K. The lattice thermal conductivity is the lowest among state-of-the-art thermoelectrics; it is attributed to a previously unrecognized phonon scattering mechanism that involves the concerted rattling of a group of Ag ions that strongly raises the Grüneisen parameters of the material.

  1. Concerted action of endogenous and heterologous phytase on phytic acid degradation in seed of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Hatzack, Frank; Sørensen, Lisbeth D; Holm, Preben B

    2003-12-01

    Expression of heterologous phytases in crops offers a great potential for improving phosphate and mineral bioavailability in food and feed. In this context it is of relevance to describe the concerted action of endogenous and hetrologous phytases on the transgenic seed inositol phosphate profile. Here we report metal-dye detection HPLC analysis of inositol phosphate degradation in flour from transgenic wheat materials possessing wheat endogenous 6-phytase [EC 3.1.3.26] and Aspergillus 3-phytase [EC 3.1.3.8] activities under the control of the maize ubiquitin-1 promoter and the wheat high molecular weight glutenin subunit 1DX5 promoter respectively. During 50 min incubation there is an accumulation of InsP5 to InsP2 breakdown products in non-transgenic material. Aspergillus niger phytase specific breakdown products are transiently detected in transgenic material but after 50 min incubation virtually all InsP5, InsP4 and InsP3 isomers are hydrolysed.

  2. Mean-free-paths in concert and chamber music halls and the correct method for calibrating dodecahedral sound sources.

    PubMed

    Beranek, Leo L; Nishihara, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    The Eyring/Sabine equations assume that in a large irregular room a sound wave travels in straight lines from one surface to another, that the surfaces have an average sound absorption coefficient αav, and that the mean-free-path between reflections is 4 V/Stot where V is the volume of the room and Stot is the total area of all of its surfaces. No account is taken of diffusivity of the surfaces. The 4 V/Stot relation was originally based on experimental determinations made by Knudsen (Architectural Acoustics, 1932, pp. 132-141). This paper sets out to test the 4 V/Stot relation experimentally for a wide variety of unoccupied concert and chamber music halls with seating capacities from 200 to 5000, using the measured sound strengths Gmid and reverberation times RT60,mid. Computer simulations of the sound fields for nine of these rooms (of varying shapes) were also made to determine the mean-free-paths by that method. The study shows that 4 V/Stot is an acceptable relation for mean-free-paths in the Sabine/Eyring equations except for halls of unusual shape. Also demonstrated is the proper method for calibrating the dodecahedral sound source used for measuring the sound strength G, i.e., the reverberation chamber method.

  3. Acetic Acid Can Catalyze Succinimide Formation from Aspartic Acid Residues by a Concerted Bond Reorganization Mechanism: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Manabe, Noriyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Succinimide formation from aspartic acid (Asp) residues is a concern in the formulation of protein drugs. Based on density functional theory calculations using Ace-Asp-Nme (Ace = acetyl, Nme = NHMe) as a model compound, we propose the possibility that acetic acid (AA), which is often used in protein drug formulation for mildly acidic buffer solutions, catalyzes the succinimide formation from Asp residues by acting as a proton-transfer mediator. The proposed mechanism comprises two steps: cyclization (intramolecular addition) to form a gem-diol tetrahedral intermediate and dehydration of the intermediate. Both steps are catalyzed by an AA molecule, and the first step was predicted to be rate-determining. The cyclization results from a bond formation between the amide nitrogen on the C-terminal side and the side-chain carboxyl carbon, which is part of an extensive bond reorganization (formation and breaking of single bonds and the interchange of single and double bonds) occurring concertedly in a cyclic structure formed by the amide NH bond, the AA molecule and the side-chain C=O group and involving a double proton transfer. The second step also involves an AA-mediated bond reorganization. Carboxylic acids other than AA are also expected to catalyze the succinimide formation by a similar mechanism. PMID:25588215

  4. Mechanism of Deletion Removing All Dystrophin Exons in a Canine Model for DMD Implicates Concerted Evolution of X Chromosome Pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    VanBelzen, D Jake; Malik, Alock S; Henthorn, Paula S; Kornegay, Joe N; Stedman, Hansell H

    2017-03-17

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the large, 2.4-Mb dystrophin gene. The majority of DMD-causing mutations are sporadic, multi-exon, frameshifting deletions, with the potential for variable immunological tolerance to the dystrophin protein from patient to patient. While systemic gene therapy holds promise in the treatment of DMD, immune responses to vectors and transgenes must first be rigorously evaluated in informative preclinical models to ensure patient safety. A widely used canine model for DMD, golden retriever muscular dystrophy, expresses detectable amounts of near full-length dystrophin due to alternative splicing around an intronic point mutation, thereby confounding the interpretation of immune responses to dystrophin-derived gene therapies. Here we characterize a naturally occurring deletion in a dystrophin-null canine, the German shorthaired pointer. The deletion spans 5.6 Mb of the X chromosome and encompasses all coding exons of the DMD and TMEM47 genes. The sequences surrounding the deletion breakpoints are virtually identical, suggesting that the deletion occurred through a homologous recombination event. Interestingly, the deletion breakpoints are within loci that are syntenically conserved among mammals, yet the high homology among this subset of ferritin-like loci is unique to the canine genome, suggesting lineage-specific concerted evolution of these atypical sequence elements.

  5. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of cattle not otherwise provided for in...

  6. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of cattle not otherwise provided for in...

  7. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of cattle not otherwise provided for in...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital mirror movement disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital mirror movement disorder is a condition in which intentional movements of one side of the body are mirrored by involuntary movements ...

  9. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  10. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  11. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  12. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon request in specific cases, permit the interstate movement of bison not otherwise provided for in...

  13. Special Education as a Social Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, M. Stephen; Smith, Paula

    1980-01-01

    Social movements are defined, the extent to which special education fits common definitions of social movements is assessed, and the life cycle of social movements is examined with particular focus on implications for special education. (Author)

  14. Emergence and Development of Bulgaria's Environmental Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Uday; Snavely, Keith

    1998-01-01

    Bulgaria's environmental movement played a role in ending communist rule, but environmental issues were not completely resolved. Social movements may never achieve their objectives in totality but instead enter a new cycle of the movement. (SK)

  15. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies.

  16. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  17. Invarient patterns in articulatory movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Patrizia

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the reported study is to discover an effective method of characterizing movement patterns of the crucial articulator as the function of an abstract syllable magnitude and the adjacent boundary, and at the same time to investigate effects of prosodic control on utterance organization. In particular, the speed of movement when a flesh point on the tongue blade or the lower lip crosses a selected position relative to the occlusion plane is examined. The time of such crossing provides an effective measure of syllable timing and syllable duration according to previous work. In the present work, using a very limited vocabulary with only a few consonants and one vowel as the key speech materials, effects of contrastive emphasis on demisyllabic movement patterns were studied. The theoretical framework for this analysis is the C/D model of speech production in relation to the concept of an invariant part of selected articulatory movements. The results show evidence in favor of the existence of ``iceberg'' patterns, but a linear dependence of slope on the total excursion of the demisyllabic movement, instead of the approximate constancy of the threshold crossing speed as suggested in the original proposal of the iceberg, has been found. Accordingly, a revision of the original concept of iceberg, seems necessary. This refinement is consistent with the C/D model assumption on ``prominence control'' that the syllable magnitude determines the movement amplitude, accompanying directly related syllable duration change. In this assumption, the movement of a consonantal component should also be proportional to syllable magnitude. The results suggests, however, systematic outliers deviating from the linear dependence of movement speed on excursion. This deviation may be caused by the effect of the immediately following boundary, often referred to as phrase-final elongation. Thesis advisor: Osamu Fujimura Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from

  18. Eye Movements in Risky Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, Frouke; Matthews, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We asked participants to make simple risky choices while we recorded their eye movements. We built a complete statistical model of the eye movements and found very little systematic variation in eye movements over the time course of a choice or across the different choices. The only exceptions were finding more (of the same) eye movements when choice options were similar, and an emerging gaze bias in which people looked more at the gamble they ultimately chose. These findings are inconsistent with prospect theory, the priority heuristic, or decision field theory. However, the eye movements made during a choice have a large relationship with the final choice, and this is mostly independent from the contribution of the actual attribute values in the choice options. That is, eye movements tell us not just about the processing of attribute values but also are independently associated with choice. The pattern is simple—people choose the gamble they look at more often, independently of the actual numbers they see—and this pattern is simpler than predicted by decision field theory, decision by sampling, and the parallel constraint satisfaction model. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27522985

  19. Stochastic modelling of animal movement

    PubMed Central

    Smouse, Peter E.; Focardi, Stefano; Moorcroft, Paul R.; Kie, John G.; Forester, James D.; Morales, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Modern animal movement modelling derives from two traditions. Lagrangian models, based on random walk behaviour, are useful for multi-step trajectories of single animals. Continuous Eulerian models describe expected behaviour, averaged over stochastic realizations, and are usefully applied to ensembles of individuals. We illustrate three modern research arenas. (i) Models of home-range formation describe the process of an animal ‘settling down’, accomplished by including one or more focal points that attract the animal's movements. (ii) Memory-based models are used to predict how accumulated experience translates into biased movement choices, employing reinforced random walk behaviour, with previous visitation increasing or decreasing the probability of repetition. (iii) Lévy movement involves a step-length distribution that is over-dispersed, relative to standard probability distributions, and adaptive in exploring new environments or searching for rare targets. Each of these modelling arenas implies more detail in the movement pattern than general models of movement can accommodate, but realistic empiric evaluation of their predictions requires dense locational data, both in time and space, only available with modern GPS telemetry. PMID:20566497

  20. The movement ecology of seagrasses.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-Jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A; Krauss, Siegfried L; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-11-22

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space-time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified.

  1. The movement ecology of seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kathryn; van Dijk, Kor-jent; Ruiz-Montoya, Leonardo; Kendrick, Gary A.; Krauss, Siegfried L.; Waycott, Michelle; Verduin, Jennifer; Lowe, Ryan; Statton, John; Brown, Eloise; Duarte, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A movement ecology framework is applied to enhance our understanding of the causes, mechanisms and consequences of movement in seagrasses: marine, clonal, flowering plants. Four life-history stages of seagrasses can move: pollen, sexual propagules, vegetative fragments and the spread of individuals through clonal growth. Movement occurs on the water surface, in the water column, on or in the sediment, via animal vectors and through spreading clones. A capacity for long-distance dispersal and demographic connectivity over multiple timeframes is the novel feature of the movement ecology of seagrasses with significant evolutionary and ecological consequences. The space–time movement footprint of different life-history stages varies. For example, the distance moved by reproductive propagules and vegetative expansion via clonal growth is similar, but the timescales range exponentially, from hours to months or centuries to millennia, respectively. Consequently, environmental factors and key traits that interact to influence movement also operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. Six key future research areas have been identified. PMID:25297859

  2. The Contribution of Head Movement to the Externalization and Internalization of Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Brimijoin, W. Owen; Boyd, Alan W.; Akeroyd, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background When stimuli are presented over headphones, they are typically perceived as internalized; i.e., they appear to emanate from inside the head. Sounds presented in the free-field tend to be externalized, i.e., perceived to be emanating from a source in the world. This phenomenon is frequently attributed to reverberation and to the spectral characteristics of the sounds: those sounds whose spectrum and reverberation matches that of free-field signals arriving at the ear canal tend to be more frequently externalized. Another factor, however, is that the virtual location of signals presented over headphones moves in perfect concert with any movements of the head, whereas the location of free-field signals moves in opposition to head movements. The effects of head movement have not been systematically disentangled from reverberation and/or spectral cues, so we measured the degree to which movements contribute to externalization. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed two experiments: 1) Using motion tracking and free-field loudspeaker presentation, we presented signals that moved in their spatial location to match listeners’ head movements. 2) Using motion tracking and binaural room impulse responses, we presented filtered signals over headphones that appeared to remain static relative to the world. The results from experiment 1 showed that free-field signals from the front that move with the head are less likely to be externalized (23%) than those that remain fixed (63%). Experiment 2 showed that virtual signals whose position was fixed relative to the world are more likely to be externalized (65%) than those fixed relative to the head (20%), regardless of the fidelity of the individual impulse responses. Conclusions/Significance Head movements play a significant role in the externalization of sound sources. These findings imply tight integration between binaural cues and self motion cues and underscore the importance of self motion for spatial auditory

  3. Thinking-in-Concert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I examine the concept of thinking in Hannah Arendt's writings. Arendt's interest in the experience of thinking allowed her to develop a concept of thinking that is distinct from other forms of mental activity such as cognition and problem solving. For her, thinking is an unending, unpredictable and destructive activity without fixed…

  4. Mindful movement and skilled attention.

    PubMed

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel "mind-body connection" has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage "higher-order" inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer's spectrum of mindful learning that spans from "mindlessness" to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais' suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other populations.

  5. Psychopathology and Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Martinez, Valeria; Ameli, Rezvan; Hallett, Mark; Voon, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic movement disorder is defined as abnormal movements unrelated to a medical cause and presumed related to underlying psychological factors. Although psychological factors are of both clinical and pathophysiological relevance, very few studies to date have systematically assessed their role in psychogenic movement disorder. We sought to assess the role of previous life stress using validated quantitative measures in patients with psychogenic movement disorder compared with age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers as well as a convenience sample of patients with focal hand dystonia. Sixty-four patients with psychogenic movement disorder (72% female; mean age, 45.2 years [standard deviation, 15.2 years]), 38 healthy volunteers (74% female; mean age, 49 years [standard deviation, 13.7 years]), and 39 patients with focal hand dystonia (37% female; mean age, 48.7 years [standard deviation, 11.7 years]) were evaluated using a standardized psychological interview as well as validated quantitative scales to assess trauma and previous stressors, depression, anxiety, and personality traits. Patients with psychogenic movement disorder reported higher rates of childhood trauma, specifically greater emotional abuse and physical neglect, greater fear associated with traumatic events, and a greater number of traumatic episodes compared with healthy volunteers and patients with focal hand dystonia controlled for depressive symptoms and sex (Bonferroni corrected P < .005). There were no differences in categorical psychiatric diagnoses or scores on childhood physical or sexual abuse subscales, personality traits, or the dissociative experience scale. Our findings highlight a biopsychosocial approach toward the pathophysiology of psychogenic movement disorder, although the association with psychological issues is much less prominent than expected compared with the nonepileptic seizure population. A careful psychological assessment is indicated to optimize therapeutic

  6. Mindful movement and skilled attention

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Dav; Schumann, Frank; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily movement has long been employed as a foundation for cultivating mental skills such as attention, self-control or mindfulness, with recent studies documenting the positive impacts of mindful movement training, such as yoga and tai chi. A parallel “mind-body connection” has also been observed in many developmental disorders. We elaborate a spectrum of mindfulness by considering ADHD, in which deficient motor control correlates with impaired (disinhibited) behavioral control contributing to defining features of excessive distractibility and impulsivity. These data provide evidence for an important axis of variation for wellbeing, in which skillful cognitive control covaries with a capacity for skillful movement. We review empirical and theoretical literature on attention, cognitive control, mind wandering, mindfulness and skill learning, endorsing a model of skilled attention in which motor plans, attention, and executive goals are seen as mutually co-defining aspects of skilled behavior that are linked by reciprocal inhibitory and excitatory connections. Thus, any movement training should engage “higher-order” inhibition and selection and develop a repertoire of rehearsed procedures that coordinate goals, attention and motor plans. However, we propose that mindful movement practice may improve the functional quality of rehearsed procedures, cultivating a transferrable skill of attention. We adopt Langer’s spectrum of mindful learning that spans from “mindlessness” to engagement with the details of the present task and contrast this with the mental attitudes cultivated in standard mindfulness meditation. We particularly follow Feldenkrais’ suggestion that mindful learning of skills for organizing the body in movement might transfer to other forms of mental activity. The results of mindful movement training should be observed in multiple complementary measures, and may have tremendous potential benefit for individuals with ADHD and other

  7. Effect of basic site substituents on concerted proton-electron transfer in hydrogen-bonded pyridyl-phenols.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Tronic, Tristan A; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M

    2012-12-20

    Separated concerted proton-electron transfer (sCPET) reactions of two series of phenols with pendent substituted pyridyl moieties are described. The pyridine is either attached directly to the phenol (HOAr-pyX) or connected through a methylene linker (HOArCH(2)pyX) (X = 4-NO(2), 5-CF(3), 4-CH(3), and 4-NMe(2)). Electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents have a substantial effect on the chemical environment of the transferring proton, as indicated by IR and (1)H NMR spectra, X-ray structures, and computational studies. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs concomitantly with proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen to the pyridyl nitrogen. The oxidation potentials vary linearly with the pK(a) of the free pyridine (pyX), with slopes slightly below the Nerstian value of 59 mV/pK(a). For the HOArCH(2)pyX series, the rate constants k(sCPET) for oxidation by NAr(3)(•+) or [Fe(diimine)(3)](3+) vary primarily with the thermodynamic driving force (ΔG°(sCPET)), whether ΔG° is changed by varying the potential of the oxidant or the substituent on the pyridine, indicating a constant intrinsic barrier λ. In contrast, the substituents in the HOAr-pyX series affect λ as well as ΔG°(sCPET), and compounds with electron-withdrawing substituents have significantly lower reactivity. The relationship between the structural and spectroscopic properties of the phenols and their CPET reactivity is discussed.

  8. Probing quantum and dynamic effects in concerted proton-electron transfer reactions of phenol-base compounds.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Tenderholt, Adam L; Mayer, James M

    2012-01-12

    The oxidation of three phenols, which contain an intramolecular hydrogen bond to a pendent pyridine or amine group, has been shown, in a previous experimental study, to undergo concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET). In this reaction, the electron is transferred to an outer-sphere oxidant, and the proton is transferred from the oxygen to nitrogen atom. In the present study, this reaction is studied computationally using a version of Hammes-Schiffer's multistate continuum theory where CPET is formulated as a transmission frequency between neutral and cation vibrational-electronic states. The neutral and cation proton vibrational wave functions are computed from one-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the transferring proton in a fixed heavy atom framework. The overlap integrals for these neutral/cation wave functions, considering several initial (i.e., neutral) and final (i.e., cation) vibrational states, are used to evaluate the relative rates of oxidation. The analysis is extended to heavy atom configurations with various proton donor-acceptor (i.e., O-N) distances to assess the importance of heavy atom "gating". Such changes in d(ON) dramatically affect the nature of the proton PESs and wave functions. Surprisingly, the most reactive configurations have similar donor-acceptor distances despite the large (~0.2 Å) differences in the optimized structures. These theoretical results qualitatively reproduce the experimental faster reactivity of the reaction of the pyridyl derivative 1 versus the CH(2)-pyridyl 2, but the computed factor of 5 is smaller than the experimental 10(2). The amine derivative is calculated to react similarly to 1, which does not agree with the experiments, likely due to some of the simplifying assumptions made in applying the theory. The computed kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence are in agreement with experimental results.

  9. The climate impact from contrails and cirrus clouds - overview from the CONCERT (CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Christiane; Schumann, Ulrich; Gayet, Jean Francois; Petzold, Andreas; Krämer, Martina; Schlager, Hans; Borrmann, Stephan; Jurkat, Tina; Jeßberger, Philipp; Schäuble, Dominik

    2010-05-01

    Contrails and cirrus clouds were detected during the CONCERT-2CONTRAILS campaign (CONtrail and Cirrus ExpeRimenT) in November 2008 with the research aircraft Falcon. The Falcon was equipped with instruments to measure particle properties such as particle size distribution, extinction and particle shape as well as trace gas distributions of ozone, reactive nitrogen and halogen species and sulfur dioxide. During 5 mission flights over Western Europe numerous cirrus clouds and contrails were probed at altitudes between 9 and 11.5 km and temperatures between 213 and 237 K. 22 contrails from 11 different aircraft with ages below 10 minutes were detected in the vortex and early dispersion regime near and slightly below ice saturation. The contrail data are compared to nearby cirrus observations in terms of particle size distribution, shape, optical depth and extinction to discuss differences in their climate impact. In particular we present new observations of the contrail from a large aircraft, the A380. The evolution of the A380 contrail within its first 6 minutes of its lifetime has been observed. The A380 contrail observations are compared to contrail measurements from smaller aircraft in order to investigate the influence of the aircraft type on climate active contrail properties under similar meteorological conditions. Further, the specific climate impact from each of the measured contrail cases is assessed with the help of a new contrail cirrus prediction tool (CoCiP). The model computes the integral of the radiative forcing of the contrail over the computed life-time of the contrail and is tested with the detected contrails. It will be shown that the climate impact of contrails depends on both aircraft and meteorological parameters.

  10. Galectin-3 and soluble fibrinogen act in concert to modulate neutrophil activation and survival: involvement of alternative MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Ilarregui, Juan M; Rubel, Carolina J; Toscano, Marta A; Gómez, Sonia A; Beigier Bompadre, Macarena; Isturiz, Martín A; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-05-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a member of a family of highly conserved carbohydrate-binding proteins, has recently emerged as a novel cellular modulator at inflammatory foci. Here we investigated the effects of Gal-3 on central effector functions of human neutrophils, including phagocytosis, exocytosis of secretory granules, and survival. We examined the effects of Gal-3 alone or in combination with soluble fibrinogen (sFbg), an extracellular mediator that plays a key role during the early phase of the inflammatory response through binding to integrin receptors. In addition we evaluated the intracellular signals triggered by these mediators in human neutrophils. Human neutrophils incubated with recombinant Gal-3 alone increased their phagocytic activity and CD66 surface expression. In contrast to the known antiapoptotic effect of Gal-3 on many cellular types, Gal-3 enhanced PMN apoptotic rate. Preincubation with Gal-3 primed neutrophils to the effects of sFbg, resulting in a synergistic action on degranulation. On the other hand, Gal-3 and sFbg had opposite effects on PMN survival, and the simultaneous action of both agonists partially counteracted the proapoptotic effects of Gal-3. In addition, although sFbg induced its effects through the activation of the ERKs, Gal-3 led to p38 phosphorylation. Disruption of this signaling pathway abrogated Gal-3-mediated modulation of neutrophil degranulation, phagocytosis, and apoptosis. Together, our results support the notion that Gal-3 and sFbg are two physiological mediators present at inflammatory sites that activate different components of the MAPK pathway and could be acting in concert to modulate the functionality and life span of neutrophils.

  11. Promoted reduction of tellurite and formation of extracellular tellurium nanorods by concerted reaction between iron and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    The reduction of tellurite (Te(IV)) by dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was promoted in the presence of Fe(III) in comparison with Te(IV) bioreduction in the absence of Fe(III). Electron microscopic analyses revealed that iron promoted Te(IV) reduction led to form exclusively extracellular crystalline Te(0) nanorods, as compared to the mostly intracellular formation of Te(0) nanorods in the absence of Fe(III). The Te K-edge X-ray absorption spectrometric analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis MR-1 in the presence of Fe(III) reduced Te(IV) to less harmful metallic Te(0) nanorods through the precipitation of tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex by the bacterial respiration of Fe(III) to Fe(II) under anaerobic conditions. However, Fe(II) ion itself was only able to precipitate the solid tellurite (Te(IV)Ox) complex from the Te(IV) solution, which was not further reduced to Te(0). The results clearly indicated that bacterial S. oneidensis MR-1 plays important roles in the reduction and crystallization of Te(0) nanorods by as yet undetermined biochemical mechanisms. As compared to the slow bacterial Te(IV) reduction in the absence of Fe(III), the rapid reduction of Te(IV) to Te(0) by the concerted biogeochemical reaction between Fe(II) and S. oneidensis MR-1 could be applied for the sequestration and detoxification of Te(IV) in the environments as well as for the preparation of extracellular Te(0) nanorod structures.

  12. Treatable high homocysteine alone or in concert with five other thrombophilias in 1014 patients with thrombotic events.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Smith, Domonique; Gandhi, Niral; Hemachandra, Kailash; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In 1014 patients with thrombotic events, we determined how often treatable high serum homocysteine alone, or in concert with five other thrombophilias, was associated with thrombotic events. We studied 1014 outpatients sequentially referred for evaluation of thrombotic events, all having six measures of thrombophilia--three PCR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T-A1298C, factor V Leiden G506A, prothrombin G20210A), and three serologic (factors VIII, XI, homocysteine). Of the 1014 patients, 198 (20%) had atherothrombosis, 199 (20%) ocular vascular thrombosis, 211 (21%) osteonecrosis, 180 (18%) pseudotumor cerebri, and 123 (12%) recurrent miscarriage. In 434 of 1014 (43%) patients, all six thrombophilic measures were normal. High homocysteine, present in 126 of 1014 patients (12.4%), was the sole thrombophilia in 50 (5%), accompanied only by methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase homozygosity-compound heterozygosity in 22 (2.2%), and accompanied by other thrombophilias in 54 (5%). Patients were more likely than 110 healthy controls to have high homocysteine (12 vs. 5%; P = 0.02) and high factor VIII (21 vs. 7%; P = 0.0003). On treatment for a median of 18 months with L-methyl folate (5 mg), vitamin B6 (100 mg), and vitamin B12 (2 mg/day), in 74 homocysteinemic patients, median homocysteine fell from 15.6 to 10.0 μmol/l (P < 0.0001), and in 56 (76%), homocysteine fell to normal on treatment. When homocysteinemia was the sole thrombophilia, normalization of homocysteine was accompanied by freedom from new thrombotic events in 38 of 41 patients (93%). In evaluation of 1014 patients with thrombotic events, 126 (12%) had treatable high serum homocysteine, and in 50 (5%), high homocysteine was the sole treatable thrombophilia.

  13. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA

    PubMed Central

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H.; Naika, Gajendra S.; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E.; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J.; Poubelle, Patrice E.; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H.; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms. PMID:26106157

  14. Concerted Trafficking Regulation of Kv2.1 and KATP Channels by Leptin in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Shyng, Show-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun

    2015-12-11

    In pancreatic β-cells, voltage-gated potassium 2.1 (Kv2.1) channels are the dominant delayed rectifier potassium channels responsible for action potential repolarization. Here, we report that leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes known to inhibit insulin secretion, causes a transient increase in surface expression of Kv2.1 channels in rodent and human β-cells. The effect of leptin on Kv2.1 surface expression is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of AMPK mimics whereas inhibition of AMPK occludes the effect of leptin. Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, a known upstream kinase of AMPK, also blocks the effect of leptin. In addition, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation. Inhibition of PKA prevents leptin or AMPK activators from increasing Kv2.1 channel density, whereas stimulation of PKA is sufficient to promote Kv2.1 channel surface expression. The increased Kv2.1 surface expression by leptin is dependent on actin depolymerization, and pharmacologically induced actin depolymerization is sufficient to enhance Kv2.1 surface expression. The signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation by leptin mirror those reported recently for ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, which are critical for coupling glucose stimulation with membrane depolarization. We show that the leptin-induced increase in surface KATP channels results in more hyperpolarized membrane potentials than control cells at stimulating glucose concentrations, and the increase in Kv2.1 channels leads to a more rapid repolarization of membrane potential in cells firing action potentials. This study supports a model in which leptin exerts concerted trafficking regulation of KATP and Kv2.1 channels to coordinately inhibit insulin secretion.

  15. Fire ant alarm pheromone and venom alkaloids act in concert to attract parasitic phorid flies, Pseudacteon spp.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kavita R; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2013-11-01

    Pseudacteon tricuspis, Pseudacteon obtusus and Pseudacteon curvatus are three species of parasitic phorid flies (Diptera: Phoridae), which have been introduced as classical biological control agents of imported, Solenopsis fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in the southern USA. Previous studies demonstrated the behavioral response of P. tricuspis to the venom alkaloids and alarm pheromone of the fire ant, S. invicta. In the present study, we compared the responses of P. tricuspis, P. obtusus and P. curvatus to Solenopsis invicta alarm pheromone, venom alkaloids, or a mixture of both chemicals in four-choice olfactometer bioassays. The main hypothesis tested was that the fire ant alarm pheromone and venom alkaloids act in concert to attract Pseudacteon phorid flies. Both sexes of all three Pseudacteon species were attracted to low doses of the fire ant alarm pheromone or venom alkaloids (i.e. 1 ant worker equivalent) alone. However, the flies were significantly more attracted to a mixture of both chemicals (i.e., 1:1 mixture of alarm pheromone+alkaloids) than to either chemical. The results suggest an additive rather than a synergistic effect of combining both chemicals. Comparing the fly species, P. tricuspis showed relatively greater attraction to cis alkaloids, whereas the alkaloid mixture (cis+trans) was preferred by P. obtusus and P. curvatus. In general, no key sexual differences were recorded, although females of P. tricuspis and P. obtusus showed slightly higher response than conspecific males to lower doses of the alarm pheromone. The ecological significance of these findings is discussed, and a host location model is proposed for parasitic phorid flies involving the use of fire ant alarm pheromone and venom alkaloids as long range and short range attractants, respectively.

  16. The Villain Team-Up or how Trichomonas vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis alter innate immunity in concert

    PubMed Central

    Fichorova, Raina N; Buck, Olivia R; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Fashemi, Titilayo; Dawood, Hassan Y; Fashemi, Bisiayo; Hayes, Gary R; Beach, David H; Takagi, Yuko; Delaney, Mary L; Nibert, Max L; Singh, Bibhuti N; Onderdonk, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Complex interactions of vaginal microorganisms with the genital tract epithelium shape mucosal innate immunity, which holds the key to sexual and reproductive health. Bacterial vaginosis (BV), a microbiome-disturbance syndrome prevalent in reproductive-age women, occurs commonly in concert with trichomoniasis, and both are associated with increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes and viral infections, largely attributable to inflammation. To investigate the causative relationships among inflammation, BV and trichomoniasis, we established a model of human cervicovaginal epithelial cells colonised by vaginal Lactobacillus isolates, dominant in healthy women, and common BV species (Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Prevotella bivia). Methods Colonised epithelia were infected with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) or exposed to purified TV virulence factors (membrane lipophosphoglycan (LPG), its ceramide-phosphoinositol-glycan core (CPI-GC) or the endosymbiont Trichomonas vaginalis virus (TVV)), followed by assessment of bacterial colony-forming units, the mucosal anti-inflammatory microbicide secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and chemokines that drive pro-inflammatory, antigen-presenting and T cells. Results TV reduced colonisation by Lactobacillus but not by BV species, which were found inside epithelial cells. TV increased interleukin (IL)-8 and suppressed SLPI, likely via LPG/CPI-GC, and upregulated IL-8 and RANTES, likely via TVV as suggested by use of purified pathogenic determinants. BV species A vaginae and G vaginalis induced IL-8 and RANTES, and also amplified the pro-inflammatory responses to both LPG/CPI-GC and TVV, whereas P bivia suppressed the TV/TVV-induced chemokines. Conclusions These molecular host–parasite–endosymbiont–bacteria interactions explain epidemiological associations and suggest a revised paradigm for restoring vaginal immunity and preventing BV/TV-attributable inflammatory sequelae in women. PMID

  17. Bimanual-vertical hand movements.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jay C; Cohen, Matthew L; Williamson, John; Burtis, Brandon; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2011-07-01

    Patients often demonstrate attentional and action-intentional biases in both the transverse and coronal planes. In addition, when making forelimb movements in the transverse plane, normal participants also have spatial and magnitude asymmetries, but forelimb spatial asymmetries have not been studied in coronal space. Thus, to learn if when normal people make vertical movements they have right-left spatial and magnitude biases, seventeen healthy, blindfolded volunteers had their hands (holding pens) placed vertically in their midsagittal plane, 10 inches apart, on pieces of paper positioned above, below, and at eye-level. Participants were asked to move their hands together vertically and meet in the middle. Participants demonstrated less angular deviation in the below-eye condition than in the other spatial conditions, when moving down than up, and with their right than left hand. Movements toward eye level from upper or lower space were also more accurate than movements in the other directions. Independent of hand, lines were longer with downward than upward movements and the right hand moved more distance than the left. These attentional-intentional asymmetries may be related to gravitational force, hand-hemispheric dominance, and spatial "where" asymmetries; however, the mechanisms accounting for these asymmetries must be ascertained by future research.

  18. Movement sequencing in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    GEORGIOU-KARISTIANIS, NELLIE; LONG, JEFFREY D.; LOURENS, SPENCER G.; STOUT, JULIE C.; MILLS, JAMES A.; PAULSEN, JANE S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine longitudinal changes in movement sequencing in prodromal Huntington’s disease (HD) participants (795 prodromal HD; 225 controls) from the PREDICT-HD study. Methods Prodromal HD participants were tested over seven annual visits and were stratified into three groups (low, medium, high) based on their CAG-Age Product (CAP) score, which indicates likely increasing proximity to diagnosis. A cued movement sequence task assessed the impact of advance cueing on response initiation and execution via three levels of advance information. Results Compared to controls, all CAP groups showed longer initiation and movement times across all conditions at baseline, demonstrating a disease gradient for the majority of outcomes. Across all conditions, the high CAP group had the highest mean for baseline testing, but also demonstrated an increase in movement time across the study. For initiation time, the high CAP group showed the highest mean baseline time across all conditions, but also faster decreasing rates of change over time. Conclusions With progress to diagnosis, participants may increasingly use compensatory strategies, as evidenced by faster initiation. However, this occurred in conjunction with slowed execution times, suggesting a decline in effectively accessing control processes required to translate movement into effective execution. PMID:24678867

  19. A Theatre Movement Bibliography, 1978 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Lynne

    Reference materials that deal with various aspects of theater movement are grouped in this partially annotated bibliography under the following headings: anatomy, kinesiology, and physiology; combat and martial arts; integrated approaches to movement; mime; miscellaneous acting and movement approaches; movement notations systems; movement…

  20. Movements of Yellowstone grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Bonnie M.; Knight, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    Ninety-seven grizzly bears Ursus arctos horribilis were radio-located 6299 times during 1975–1987. Annual range sizes differed by sex, age, reproductive status and amount of precipitation. Females exhibited greater fidelity to seasonal and annual ranges than males. Weaned female offspring generally remained in the vicinity of the maternal range, while weaned males often made substantial movements to unexplored country. Average total home range size was 884 km2 for females and 3757 km2 for males. Males consistently exhibited greater indices of movement and range sizes than females. All cohorts had larger mean ranges during this study than during the period 1959–1969 when the population had access to open garbage dumps. Movements and elevational distribution of all cohorts were related to availability of whitebark pine Pinus albicaulis seeds. We hypothesized that females with cubs-of-the-year and yearlings were displaced from most productive habitats during seasons and years of limited food availability.

  1. Chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements

    PubMed Central

    WADA, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts move toward weak light to increase photosynthetic efficiency, and migrate away from strong light to protect chloroplasts from photodamage and eventual cell death. These chloroplast behaviors were first observed more than 100 years ago, but the underlying mechanism has only recently been identified. Ideal plant materials, such as fern gametophytes for photobiological and cell biological approaches, and Arabidopsis thaliana for genetic analyses, have been used along with sophisticated methods, such as partial cell irradiation and time-lapse video recording under infrared light to study chloroplast movement. These studies have revealed precise chloroplast behavior, and identified photoreceptors, other relevant protein components, and novel actin filament structures required for chloroplast movement. In this review, our findings regarding chloroplast and nuclear movements are described. PMID:27840388

  2. Kinetic Studies on the Reaction of Chlorosulfonyl Isocyanate with Monofluoralkenes: Experimental Evidence for Both Stepwise and Concerted Mechanisms, and a Pre-equilibrium Complex on the Reaction Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    lactams that are readily reduced to β-lactams. Substitution of a vinyl hydrogen for a vinyl fluorine changes the dynamics for reaction with CSI so...hydrogen for a vinyl fluorine changes the dynamics for reaction with CSI so that a concerted pathway is favored. Rate constants were measured for...step pathway has not been demonstrated experimentally.3c In a recent paper, we found that substituting a hydrogen for a fluorine on the π-bond of an

  3. Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods

    DOEpatents

    Skorpik, James R.

    2006-10-31

    Wireless communication devices and movement monitoring methods are described. In one aspect, a wireless communication device includes a housing, wireless communication circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to communicate wireless signals, movement circuitry coupled with the housing and configured to provide movement data regarding movement sensed by the movement circuitry, and event processing circuitry coupled with the housing and the movement circuitry, wherein the event processing circuitry is configured to process the movement data, and wherein at least a portion of the event processing circuitry is configured to operate in a first operational state having a different power consumption rate compared with a second operational state.

  4. Movement Perception and Movement Production in Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kelly J.; Shiffrar, Maggie; Kerns, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether motor difficulties documented in Asperger's Syndrome (AS) are related to compromised visual abilities, this study examined perception and movement in response to dynamic visual environments. Fourteen males with AS and 16 controls aged 7-23 completed measures of motor skills, postural response to optic flow, and visual…

  5. Rapid eye movement dependent central apnea with periodic leg movements.

    PubMed

    Yüceege, Melike; Fırat, Hikmet; Kuyucu, Mutlu; Ardıç, Sadık

    2013-04-01

    Central sleep apnea is a period of at least 10 s without airflow, during which no ventilatory effort is present. Most of the central apneas occur in Non-Rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Central apnea occuring in Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is extremely rare. We present our patient who had a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in another sleep center since 2003. His Auto Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine was disrupted so he admitted to our center to renew his machine and for daytime sleepiness while using his machine. The polysomnography revealed central apneas ending with respiratory arousals and periodic leg movements in rapid eye movement (REM) stage. We found no cause for central apneas. The patient benefited from servo ventilator therapy. We present this case as an unusual form of central apnea with the review of the literatures. Even the patients diagnosed as obstructive sleep apnea should be analyzed carefully. The diagnosis and the therapeutic approach may change in the favor of the patient.

  6. Proprioceptive Control of Human Movement. The Human Movement Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, John

    Various research studies concerned with the feedback from proprioceptors which accompany movement and the way in which this information is relevant to the control of activity are brought together in this volume. It is intended for the use of those who have some basic knowledge of human anatomy and physiology as well as an acquaintance with…

  7. Movement disorders and MDMA abuse.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, James Allen; Wilcox, Aidee Herrera

    2009-06-01

    This article present the cases of two young men with chronic MDMA abuse who later developed movement disorders typical of the Parkinson's syndrome. It is worth noting that both men bought the presumed MDMA from the same illicit source. Potential risks of MDMA use and movement disorders are discussed. The risks inherent from contaminants and similar factors associated with illegal drug manufacture are discussed. The authors conclude that as long as nonpharmaceutical-grade MDMA is illicitly produced, health risks will be associated with its use.

  8. Distance dependence of bidirectional concerted proton-electron transfer in phenol-Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3(2+) dyads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2014-04-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) was investigated in three covalent donor-bridge-acceptor molecules with different bridge lengths. Upon photoexcitation of their Ru(bpy)3(2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) photosensitizer in acetonitrile, intramolecular long-range electron transfer from a phenolic unit to Ru(bpy)3(2+) occurs in concert with release of the phenolic proton to pyrrolidine base. The kinetics of this bidirectional concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) reaction were studied as a function of phenol-Ru(bpy)3(2+) distance by increasing the number of bridging p-xylene units. A distance decay constant (β) of 0.67±0.23 Å(-1) was determined. The distance dependence of the rates for CPET is thus not significantly steeper than that for ordinary (i.e., not proton coupled) electron transfer across the same bridges, despite the concerted motion of oppositely charged particles into different directions. Long-range bidirectional CPET is an important reaction in many proteins and plays a key role in photosynthesis; our results are relevant in the context of photoinduced separation of protons and electrons as a means of light-to-chemical energy conversion. This is the first determination of β for a bidirectional CPET reaction.

  9. Comparison of aminolysis of 2-pyridyl and 4-pyridyl x-substituted benzoates in acetonitrile: evidence for a concerted mechanism involving a cyclic transition state.

    PubMed

    Um, Ik-Hwan; Bae, Ae-Ri; Um, Tae-Il

    2014-02-07

    A kinetic study on reactions of 2-pyridyl X-substituted benzoates (6a-i) with a series of cyclic secondary amines in MeCN is reported. The Hammett plot for the reaction of 6a-i with piperidine consists of two intersecting straight lines while the Yukawa-Tsuno plot exhibits an excellent linear correlation with ρX = 1.28 and r = 0.63, indicating that the nonlinear Hammett plot is not caused by a change in the rate-determining step but rather by resonance stabilization of substrates possessing an electron-donating group (EDG) in the benzoyl moiety. The Brønsted-type plots are linear with βnuc = 0.59 ± 0.02, which is typical of reactions reported to proceed through a concerted mechanism. A cyclic transition state (TS), which forces the reaction to proceed through a concerted mechanism, is proposed. The deuterium kinetic isotope effect of 1.3 ± 0.1 is consistent with the proposed mechanism. Analysis of activation parameters reveals that ΔH(‡) increases linearly as the substituent X changes from an electron-withdrawing group (EWG) to an EDG, while TΔS(‡) remains nearly constant with a large negative value. The constant TΔS(‡) value further supports the proposal that the reaction proceeds through a concerted mechanism with a cyclic TS.

  10. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies: quasi-equivalence revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, D.L.D.

    1980-10-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called autostery, by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assembles of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements.

  11. Overlapping neural circuits for visual attention and eye movements in the human cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Striemer, Christopher L; Chouinard, Philippe A; Goodale, Melvyn A; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    Previous research in patients with cerebellar damage suggests that the cerebellum plays a role in covert visual attention. One limitation of some of these studies is that they examined patients with heterogeneous cerebellar damage. As a result, the patterns of reported deficits have been inconsistent. In the current study, we used functional neuroimaging (fMRI) in healthy adults (N=14) to examine whether or not the cerebellum plays a role in covert visual attention. Participants performed two covert attention tasks in which they were cued exogenously (with peripheral flashes) or endogenously (using directional arrows) to attend to marked locations in the visual periphery without moving their eyes. We compared BOLD activation in these covert attention conditions to a number of control conditions including: the same attention tasks with eye movements, a target detection task with no cueing, and a self-paced button-press task. Subtracting these control conditions from the covert attention conditions allowed us to effectively remove the contribution of the cerebellum to motor output. In addition to the usual fronto-parietal networks commonly engaged by these attention tasks, lobule VI of the vermis in the cerebellum was also activated when participants performed the covert attention tasks with or without eye movements. Interestingly, this effect was larger for exogenous compared to endogenous cueing. These results, in concert with recent patient studies, provide independent yet converging evidence that the same cerebellar structures that are involved in eye movements are also involved in visuospatial attention.

  12. Movement and self-control in protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Caspar, D L

    1980-01-01

    Purposeful switching among different conformational states exerts self-control in the construction and action of protein assemblies. Quasi-equivalence, conceived to explain icosahedral virus structure, arises by differentiation of identical protein subunits into different conformations that conserve essential bonding specificity. Mechanical models designed to represent the energy distribution in the structure, rather than just the arrangement of matter, are used to explore flexibility and self-controlled movements in virus particles. Information about the assembly of bacterial flagella, actin, tobacco mosaic virus and the T4 bacteriophage tail structure show that assembly can be controlled by switching the subunits from an inactive, unsociable form to an active, associable form. Energy to drive this change is provided by the intersubunit bonding in the growing structure; this self-control of assembly by conformational switching is called "autostery", by homology with allostery. A mechanical model of the contractile T4 tail sheath has been constructed to demonstrate how self-controlled activation of a latent bonding potential can drive a purposeful movement. The gradient of quasi-equivalent conformations modelled in the contracting tail sheath has suggested a workable mechanism for self-determination of tail tube length. Concerted action by assemblies of identical proteins may often depend on individually differentiated movements. Images Figure 4 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6894706

  13. KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels into two steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro-Soria, Rene; Rebolledo, Santiago; Liin, Sara I.; Perez, Marta E.; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2014-04-01

    The functional properties of KCNQ1 channels are highly dependent on associated KCNE-β subunits. Mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE subunits can cause congenital channelopathies, such as deafness, cardiac arrhythmias and epilepsy. The mechanism by which KCNE1-β subunits slow the kinetics of KCNQ1 channels is a matter of current controversy. Here we show that KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel activation occurs in two steps: first, mutually independent voltage sensor movements in the four KCNQ1 subunits generate the main gating charge movement and underlie the initial delay in the activation time course of KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents. Second, a slower and concerted conformational change of all four voltage sensors and the gate, which opens the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel. Our data show that KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement into two steps with widely different voltage dependences and kinetics. The two voltage sensor steps in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels can be pharmacologically isolated and further separated by a disease-causing mutation.

  14. Movement of Movements: Culture Moves in the Long Civil Rights Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, Larry

    2008-01-01

    In what way do movements move? What do we mean by the movement of movements? While still a rather unconventional stance, I advance the argument that social movements are, at root, culture production agents. Regardless of whatever else they may accomplish, movements produce new cultural forms in the course of struggle; they often change and augment…

  15. Toward Social Movement Activist Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Rhoda Rae; Lipman, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we grapple with possibilities and dilemmas of activist scholarship in the struggle for education justice and political power. As activists and scholars, our social movement praxis seeks to produce knowledge that shifts the dominant neoliberal policy discourse, exposes racism inherent in neoliberal education policies, and supports…

  16. Movement Exploration and Locomotor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 23 materials for teaching movement exploration and locomotor skills to handicapped students at all educational levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS…

  17. Women's Movements and Human Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Betty

    1975-01-01

    Two strands of futurism share values of equality, development, and peace, and can catalyze each other into potentially transformational forces. The path is re-education: World order thinking provides an appropriate content for adult learning, and women's movements provide the energy of commitment and a worldwide network for communicating policies.…

  18. Human Movement: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Joseph R.

    The study of human movement is presented from an integrated perspective influenced by the fields of motor learning, experimental psychology, neuropsychology, kinesiology, biomechanics, and human factors engineering. The level of presentation is directed toward upperclass undergraduate and graduate students in physical education and others pursuing…

  19. An Analysis of Overcorrection Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Pamela; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Results suggested that although overcorrection is a valuable technique in reducing stereotyped behavior in profoundly retarded adults, the overcorrection responses (e.g., restitutional acts, positive practice, functional movement training) may not increase in the absence of specific reinforcement contingencies. (DLS)

  20. Movement in the Choral Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Briana

    2007-01-01

    Associating movement with specific musical concepts is a natural way for people to broaden their musical understanding. Kinesthetic exercises in the choral rehearsal strengthen vocal technique and musicianship skills and enhance artistic expression. This approach helps all types of learners because it focuses attention and promotes active…

  1. Connecting with New Social Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the emergence of unions and social movements which provide opportunities for adult educators in forwarding their adult literacy campaigns. The author describes the recent World Social Forum (WSF), held at the end of January in Porto Alegre, that provides ample opportunities for adult educators to make…

  2. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  3. THE INTERNATIONAL WALDORF SCHOOL MOVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VON BARAVALLE, HERMANN

    AN HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE WALDORF SCHOOL PLAN TRACES THE MOVEMENT FROM ITS FOUNDING IN STUTTGART, GERMANY IN 1919, BY THE WALDORF ASTORIA COMPANY AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF RUDOLF STEINER, TO ITS INTRODUCTION INTO SWITZERLAND, OTHER EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, THE AMERICAS, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND SOUTH AFRICA, A TOTAL OF 175 SCHOOLS AS OF 1963. THE…

  4. Eye movements and information geometry.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Reiner

    2016-08-01

    The human visual system uses eye movements to gather visual information. They act as visual scanning processes and can roughly be divided into two different types: small movements around fixation points and larger movements between fixation points. The processes are often modeled as random walks, and recent models based on heavy tail distributions, also known as Levý flights, have been used in these investigations. In contrast to these approaches we do not model the stochastic processes, but we will show that the step lengths of the movements between fixation points follow generalized Pareto distributions (GPDs). We will use general arguments from the theory of extreme value statistics to motivate the usage of the GPD and show empirically that the GPDs provide good fits for measured eye tracking data. In the framework of information geometry the GPDs with a common threshold form a two-dimensional Riemann manifold with the Fisher information matrix as a metric. We compute the Fisher information matrix for the GPDs and introduce a feature vector describing a GPD by its parameters and different geometrical properties of its Fisher information matrix. In our statistical analysis we use eye tracker measurements in a database with 15 observers viewing 1003 images under free-viewing conditions. We use Matlab functions with their standard parameter settings and show that a naive Bayes classifier using the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix provides a high classification rate identifying the 15 observers in the database.

  5. Validation of Eye Movements Model of NLP through Stressed Recalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandhu, Daya S.

    Neurolinguistic Progamming (NLP) has emerged as a new approach to counseling and psychotherapy. Though not to be confused with computer programming, NLP does claim to program, deprogram, and reprogram clients' behaviors with the precision and expedition akin to computer processes. It is as a tool for therapeutic communication that NLP has rapidly…

  6. Automatic movement error detection and correction processes in reaching movements.

    PubMed

    Brière, Julien; Proteau, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Manual aiming movements can be amended during their execution. Recent evidence suggests that error detection and correction are based on automatic and even reflexive processing of afferent information. In this study, we wanted to determine whether these processes are affected by the occurrence of successive events requiring adjustments of the originally planned movement. To reach our goal, we used a video-aiming task. For a small proportion of the trials, the cursor moved by the participant was translated laterally by 15 mm (cursor jump) soon after movement initiation. For some of the cursor-jump trials, a second cursor jump occurred 100 ms after the first one and canceled or doubled the initial cursor translation. Results showed that participants were able to cancel or double the size of the correction in response to the second cursor jump. More importantly, in double-jump trials, the correction latency for the first and second cursor jumps did not differ from that of single-jump trials. Moreover, the correction for the second cursor jump blended seamlessly with the correction for the first cursor jump. These observations suggest that the processes leading of a correction for a cursor jump do not interfere with incoming visual information.

  7. Orthodontic movement in deciduous teeth

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Deciduous teeth exfoliate as a result of apoptosis induced by cementoblasts, a process that reveals the mineralized portion of the root while attracting clasts. Root resorption in deciduous teeth is slow due to lack of mediators necessary to speed it up; however, it accelerates and spreads in one single direction whenever a permanent tooth pericoronal follicle, rich in epithelial growth factor (EGF), or other bone resorption mediators come near. The latter are responsible for bone resorption during eruption, and deciduous teeth root resorption and exfoliation. Should deciduous teeth be subjected to orthodontic movement or anchorage, mediators local levels will increase. Thus, one should be fully aware that root resorption in deciduous teeth will speed up and exfoliation will early occur. Treatment planning involving deciduous teeth orthodontic movement and/or anchorage should consider: Are clinical benefits relevant enough as to be worth the risk of undergoing early inconvenient root resorption? PMID:25992982

  8. Zero-gravity movement studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.; Fishwick, P.; Taft, N.; Agrawala, M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate the movement of articulated animals and mechanisms has a number of uses ranging over many fields. Human motion simulation systems can be useful in education, medicine, anatomy, physiology, and dance. In biomechanics, computer displays help to understand and analyze performance. Simulations can be used to help understand the effect of external or internal forces. Similarly, zero-gravity simulation systems should provide a means of designing and exploring the capabilities of hypothetical zero-gravity situations before actually carrying out such actions. The advantage of using a simulation of the motion is that one can experiment with variations of a maneuver before attempting to teach it to an individual. The zero-gravity motion simulation problem can be divided into two broad areas: human movement and behavior in zero-gravity, and simulation of articulated mechanisms.

  9. Sensory aspects of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, Tourette's syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed.

  10. Orthodontic movement in deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Deciduous teeth exfoliate as a result of apoptosis induced by cementoblasts, a process that reveals the mineralized portion of the root while attracting clasts. Root resorption in deciduous teeth is slow due to lack of mediators necessary to speed it up; however, it accelerates and spreads in one single direction whenever a permanent tooth pericoronal follicle, rich in epithelial growth factor (EGF), or other bone resorption mediators come near. The latter are responsible for bone resorption during eruption, and deciduous teeth root resorption and exfoliation. Should deciduous teeth be subjected to orthodontic movement or anchorage, mediators local levels will increase. Thus, one should be fully aware that root resorption in deciduous teeth will speed up and exfoliation will early occur. Treatment planning involving deciduous teeth orthodontic movement and/or anchorage should consider: Are clinical benefits relevant enough as to be worth the risk of undergoing early inconvenient root resorption?

  11. Sensory aspects of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed. PMID:24331796

  12. Chinese Movements and Social Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    from challenging the official creed of the state.79 Falun Gong was derived from the practices and beliefs of qigong . Qi describes vital energies...or life forces. Qigong is the set of movements designed to stimulate the flow of qi throughout the body.80 Qigong quickly regained popularity and...ensure compliance with the new policies.89 In December 1990, the celebrated qigong master Zhang Xiangyu was arrested and charged with crimes

  13. Social Change Movements and Transformative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auretto, Vera

    2001-01-01

    Defines social change movements and the role played by individual and collective transformation. Addresses the debate over Mezirow's transformation theory and shows how transformative learning was used in the women's movement. (SK)

  14. The 5S rDNA family evolves through concerted and birth-and-death evolution in fish genomes: an example from freshwater stingrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ribosomal 5S genes are well known for the critical role they play in ribosome folding and functionality. These genes are thought to evolve in a concerted fashion, with high rates of homogenization of gene copies. However, the majority of previous analyses regarding the evolutionary process of rDNA repeats were conducted in invertebrates and plants. Studies have also been conducted on vertebrates, but these analyses were usually restricted to the 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes. The recent identification of divergent 5S rRNA gene paralogs in the genomes of elasmobranches and teleost fishes indicate that the eukaryotic 5S rRNA gene family has a more complex genomic organization than previously thought. The availability of new sequence data from lower vertebrates such as teleosts and elasmobranches enables an enhanced evolutionary characterization of 5S rDNA among vertebrates. Results We identified two variant classes of 5S rDNA sequences in the genomes of Potamotrygonidae stingrays, similar to the genomes of other vertebrates. One class of 5S rRNA genes was shared only by elasmobranches. A broad comparative survey among 100 vertebrate species suggests that the 5S rRNA gene variants in fishes originated from rounds of genome duplication. These variants were then maintained or eliminated by birth-and-death mechanisms, under intense purifying selection. Clustered multiple copies of 5S rDNA variants could have arisen due to unequal crossing over mechanisms. Simultaneously, the distinct genome clusters were independently homogenized, resulting in the maintenance of clusters of highly similar repeats through concerted evolution. Conclusions We believe that 5S rDNA molecular evolution in fish genomes is driven by a mixed mechanism that integrates birth-and-death and concerted evolution. PMID:21627815

  15. The perception of heading during eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royden, Constance S.; Banks, Martin S.; Crowell, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Warren and Hannon (1988, 1990), while studying the perception of heading during eye movements, concluded that people do not require extraretinal information to judge heading with eye/head movements present. Here, heading judgments are examined at higher, more typical eye movement velocities than the extremely slow tracking eye movements used by Warren and Hannon. It is found that people require extraretinal information about eye position to perceive heading accurately under many viewing conditions.

  16. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  17. Human Movement Potential: Its Ideokinetic Facilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweigard, Lulu E.

    This book focuses on the interdependence of postural alignment and the performance of movement. It provides an educational method (ideokinesis), which stresses the inherent capacity of the nervous system to determine the most efficient neuromuscular coordination for each movement. This method of teaching body balance and efficient movement has…

  18. Latino Movement: A Target for Harassment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Members of the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA), which translates to Chicano Student Movement of Aztlan, report that their movement is being targeted by school administrators across the country due to its demands for Chicano/Latino studies programs and protests against anti-immigration and anti-affirmative action movements.…

  19. Mexican-American: Movements and Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larralde, Carlos

    Biographical studies of 20 influential Chicano leaders trace Mexican American history from 1848 to the present. The book is organized chronologically by four historical periods: (1) The Cortinista Movement, 1848-1876; (2) The Teresita Movement, 1888-1905; (3) The Magonista Movement, 1904-1919; and (4) The Chicano Activists, 1920 ;o the present.…

  20. Music and Movement Make Natural Partners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Alicia K.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the use of movement in the music classroom to teach young children. Addresses the benefits of using movement and includes guidelines and teaching suggestions for incorporating movement into the music classroom. Offers a sample lesson for lower/middle elementary and middle/upper elementary students. (CMK)

  1. Recovering Disembodied Spirits: Teaching Movement to Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Understanding physical movement is an integral part of learning to make music. This article presents the action research that the author has pursued while teaching movement to musicians. The narrative provides a theoretical underpinning for the teaching practices discussed. It provides examples of musicians' movement with analyses of the…

  2. Abnormal movements associated with severe hyponatraemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nagaratnam, N.; Icao, E.; Peric, H.

    1997-01-01

    An elderly woman with severe hyponatraemia manifested transient choreoathetoid movements of the upper extremities and dyskinetic movements of the face and mouth. She showed more than one type of hyponatraemia and a precise diagnosis was not possible. The movements were abolished with treatment of the hyponatraemia with no recurrence or sequelae. PMID:9307743

  3. Abnormal movements associated with severe hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, N; Icao, E; Peric, H

    1997-08-01

    An elderly woman with severe hyponatraemia manifested transient choreoathetoid movements of the upper extremities and dyskinetic movements of the face and mouth. She showed more than one type of hyponatraemia and a precise diagnosis was not possible. The movements were abolished with treatment of the hyponatraemia with no recurrence or sequelae.

  4. Movement Education Framework (MEF) Made EZ!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiller-Abels, Karen; Bridges, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    All physical educators want to provide lessons that foster success. Particularly essential to the movement education framework is not only providing lessons that foster motor success, but also to develop knowledge about movement to help the learner develop skill in executing all different types of movement. The framework and examples provided in…

  5. Transformers: Movement Experiences for Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vagovic, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Transformers are simple movement experiences for the classroom that engage the mind and body, focus energy, and help children transition to the next activity. Teachers can use them throughout the day, every day. The author explains the basic movements and suggests ways to build on them. They range from deep breathing to gentle wake-up movements to…

  6. Teaching the Three R's Through Movement Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Anne Green

    This book, which is geared toward K-6 classroom teachers with little or no experience in movement education, emphasizes the integration of movement with the academic subjects taught in the classroom. Movement experiences are presented through specific problems that children can solve by using their bodies in a variety of ways. The problems can be…

  7. 49 CFR 236.774 - Movement, facing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Movement, facing. 236.774 Section 236.774 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Movement, facing. The movement of a train over the points of a switch which face in a direction opposite...

  8. 49 CFR 236.774 - Movement, facing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Movement, facing. 236.774 Section 236.774 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Movement, facing. The movement of a train over the points of a switch which face in a direction opposite...

  9. 49 CFR 236.776 - Movement, trailing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Movement, trailing. 236.776 Section 236.776 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Movement, trailing. The movement of a train over the points of a switch which face in the direction...

  10. 49 CFR 236.776 - Movement, trailing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Movement, trailing. 236.776 Section 236.776 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Movement, trailing. The movement of a train over the points of a switch which face in the direction...

  11. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  12. Techniques for the Analysis of Human Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieve, D. W.; And Others

    This book presents the major analytical techniques that may be used in the appraisal of human movement. Chapter 1 is devoted to the photopgraphic analysis of movement with particular emphasis on cine filming. Cine film may be taken with little or no restriction on the performer's range of movement; information on the film is permanent and…

  13. Eye Movement Disorders in Dyslexia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Festinger, Leon; And Others

    Eye movements of 18 male and seven female dyslexic children and 10 normal children were evaluated to determine if eye movement disorders may be the cause of some of the symptoms associated with dyslexia. Data on eye movements were collected while Ss moved their eyes from one fixation point to another in a nonreading situation. Errors in vertical…

  14. What makes a movement a gesture?

    PubMed

    Novack, Miriam A; Wakefield, Elizabeth M; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Theories of how adults interpret the actions of others have focused on the goals and intentions of actors engaged in object-directed actions. Recent research has challenged this assumption, and shown that movements are often interpreted as being for their own sake (Schachner & Carey, 2013). Here we postulate a third interpretation of movement-movement that represents action, but does not literally act on objects in the world. These movements are gestures. In this paper, we describe a framework for predicting when movements are likely to be seen as representations. In Study 1, adults described one of three scenes: (1) an actor moving objects, (2) an actor moving her hands in the presence of objects (but not touching them) or (3) an actor moving her hands in the absence of objects. Participants systematically described the movements as depicting an object-directed action when the actor moved objects, and favored describing the movements as depicting movement for its own sake when the actor produced the same movements in the absence of objects. However, participants favored describing the movements as representations when the actor produced the movements near, but not on, the objects. Study 2 explored two additional features-the form of an actor's hands and the presence of speech-like sounds-to test the effect of context on observers' classification of movement as representational. When movements are seen as representations, they have the power to influence communication, learning, and cognition in ways that movement for its own sake does not. By incorporating representational gesture into our framework for movement analysis, we take an important step towards developing a more cohesive understanding of action-interpretation.

  15. PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 and PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED1 Mediate Photorelocation Movements of Both Chloroplasts and Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Organelle movement and positioning play important roles in fundamental cellular activities and adaptive responses to environmental stress in plants. To optimize photosynthetic light utilization, chloroplasts move toward weak blue light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong blue light (the avoidance response). Nuclei also move in response to strong blue light by utilizing the light-induced movement of attached plastids in leaf cells. Blue light receptor phototropins and several factors for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been identified through molecular genetic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 (PMI1) is a plant-specific C2-domain protein that is required for efficient chloroplast photorelocation movement. There are two PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED (PMIR) genes, PMIR1 and PMIR2, in the Arabidopsis genome. However, the mechanism in which PMI1 regulates chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements and the involvement of PMIR1 and PMIR2 in these organelle movements remained unknown. Here, we analyzed chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mutant lines of PMI1, PMIR1, and PMIR2. In mesophyll cells, the pmi1 single mutant showed severe defects in both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements resulting from the impaired regulation of chloroplast-actin filaments. In pavement cells, pmi1 mutant plants were partially defective in both plastid and nuclear photorelocation movements, but pmi1pmir1 and pmi1pmir1pmir2 mutant lines lacked the blue light-induced movement responses of plastids and nuclei completely. These results indicated that PMI1 is essential for chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mesophyll cells and that both PMI1 and PMIR1 are indispensable for photorelocation movements of plastids and thus, nuclei in pavement cells.

  16. The Development of Movement Synthesis Ability through the Teaching of Creative Movement and Improvisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoraki, Kalliopi; Kampiotis, Spiridon

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the teaching of creative movement and improvisation can influence the development of movement synthesis ability. Movement synthesis ability refers to the production of a movement composition. Twenty-five female freshmen, physical education students, participated in the study. They created…

  17. Saccadic eye movement during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, John J.; Linder, Barry J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.; Thornton, William E.

    1989-01-01

    Saccadic eye movements were studied in six subjects during two Space Shuttle missions. Reaction time, peak velocity and accuracy of horizontal, visually-guided saccades were examined preflight, inflight and postflight. Conventional electro-oculography was used to record eye position, with the subjects responding to pseudo-randomly illuminated targets at 0 deg and + or - 10 deg and 20 deg visual angles. In all subjects, preflight measurements were within normal limits. Reaction time was significantly increased inflight, while peak velocity was significantly decreased. A tendency toward a greater proportion of hypometric saccades inflight was also noted. Possible explanations for these changes and possible correlations with space motion sickness are discussed.

  18. Movement disorders in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Troiano, André R; Micheli, Federico E; Alarcón, Fernando; Teive, Hélio A G

    2006-04-01

    The authors review some particularities of movement disorders (MDs) in the ethnically diverse population of Latin America. Although idiopathic diseases are evenly prevalent, access to treatment encounters difficulties that are worth discussing. Infectious-parasitic diseases observed throughout the continent occasionally present as MDs, and will be individually reviewed. Inherited MDs with regional foci of increased prevalence, particularly spinocerebellar ataxias, will also be considered. Whereas there is no treatment for genetic disorders, most of the other conditions are preventable or amenable to adequate treatment. Hope for better health standards for the Latin American population lies in profound social and political changes that are still to come.

  19. Visually Guided Control of Movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W. (Editor); Kaiser, Mary K. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The papers given at an intensive, three-week workshop on visually guided control of movement are presented. The participants were researchers from academia, industry, and government, with backgrounds in visual perception, control theory, and rotorcraft operations. The papers included invited lectures and preliminary reports of research initiated during the workshop. Three major topics are addressed: extraction of environmental structure from motion; perception and control of self motion; and spatial orientation. Each topic is considered from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Implications for control and display are suggested.

  20. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  1. Proteoglycans and orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Waddington, R J; Embery, G

    2001-12-01

    Proteoglycans represent an important and diverse family of extracellular matrix components within the connective tissues of the periodontium. This review focuses on the function and metabolism of the various proteoglycans in periodontal tissues, such as alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, and considers their potential fate in response to an orthodontic force. Such considerations provide an important background in evaluating the potential for proteoglycan metabolites, alongside other connective tissue metabolites, as biomarkers for assessing the deep-seated metabolic changes and as a diagnostic tool in monitoring orthodontic tooth movement.

  2. Conservation law for self-paced movements

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal control models of biological movements introduce external task factors to specify the pace of movements. Here, we present the dual to the principle of optimality based on a conserved quantity, called “drive,” that represents the influence of internal motivation level on movement pace. Optimal control and drive conservation provide equivalent descriptions for the regularities observed within individual movements. For regularities across movements, drive conservation predicts a previously unidentified scaling law between the overall size and speed of various self-paced hand movements in the absence of any external tasks, which we confirmed with psychophysical experiments. Drive can be interpreted as a high-level control variable that sets the overall pace of movements and may be represented in the brain as the tonic levels of neuromodulators that control the level of internal motivation, thus providing insights into how internal states affect biological motor control. PMID:27418602

  3. Concerted single-nanowire absorption and emission spectroscopy: Explaining the origin of the size-dependent Stokes shift in single cadmium selenide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietmeyer, F.; Chatterjee, R.; McDonald, M. P.; Kuno, M.

    2015-02-01

    Concerted single-nanowire (NW) absorption and emission spectroscopies have been used to measure Stokes shifts in the optical response of individual CdSe NWs. Obtained spectra are free of inhomogeneous broadening inherent to ensemble measurements. They reveal apparent size-dependent NW Stokes shifts with magnitudes on the order of 30 meV. Given that an effective mass model previously used to explain CdSe NW excited state progressions predicts no sizable emission Stokes shift, we have investigated modifications to the theory to rationalize their existence. This has entailed better accounting for the effects of crystal field splitting on NW band edge states. What results are important changes to the spectroscopic assignment of NW band edge transitions that arise from the crossing of hole levels. Furthermore, these modifications simultaneously predict Stokes shifts with size-dependent magnitudes up to 20 meV. However, quantitative agreement with experiment is only achieved by accounting for the role of exciton trap states. Consequently, we conclude that CdSe NW Stokes shifts contain both intrinsic and extrinsic contributions—the latter arising from band edge exciton potential energy fluctuations. At a broader level, these concerted absorption and emission measurements have provided detailed insight into the electronic structure of CdSe NWs, beyond what could be obtained using either single-particle absorption or emission spectroscopies alone.

  4. Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE): toward a collaborative project integrating dosimetry, epidemiology and radiobiology to study the effects of occupational uranium exposure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Olivier; Gomolka, Maria; Haylock, Richard; Blanchardon, Eric; Giussani, Augusto; Atkinson, Will; Baatout, Sarah; Bingham, Derek; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Tomasek, Ladislav; Ancelet, Sophie; Badie, Christophe; Bethel, Gary; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Bouet, Ségolène; Bull, Richard; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cécile; Cockerill, Rupert; Davesne, Estelle; Ebrahimian, Teni; Engels, Hilde; Gillies, Michael; Grellier, James; Grison, Stephane; Gueguen, Yann; Hornhardt, Sabine; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Kabacik, Sylwia; Kotik, Lukas; Kreuzer, Michaela; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Marsh, James; Nosske, Dietmar; O'Hagan, Jackie; Pernot, Eileen; Puncher, Matthew; Rage, Estelle; Riddell, Tony; Roy, Laurence; Samson, Eric; Souidi, Maamar; Turner, Michelle C; Zhivin, Sergey; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The potential health impacts of chronic exposures to uranium, as they occur in occupational settings, are not well characterized. Most epidemiological studies have been limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of harmonization of methods used to quantify radiation doses resulting from uranium exposure. Experimental studies have shown that uranium has biological effects, but their implications for human health are not clear. New studies that would combine the strengths of large, well-designed epidemiological datasets with those of state-of-the-art biological methods would help improve the characterization of the biological and health effects of occupational uranium exposure. The aim of the European Commission concerted action CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) was to develop protocols for such a future collaborative research project, in which dosimetry, epidemiology and biology would be integrated to better characterize the effects of occupational uranium exposure. These protocols were developed from existing European cohorts of workers exposed to uranium together with expertise in epidemiology, biology and dosimetry of CURE partner institutions. The preparatory work of CURE should allow a large scale collaborative project to be launched, in order to better characterize the effects of uranium exposure and more generally of alpha particles and low doses of ionizing radiation.

  5. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergei D. Grant, Ian M.; Marx, Dominik

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  6. Thiobis(hexamethyldisilazane) as a new precursor for the deposition of sulfur on gold: A one-step concerted adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koczkur, Kallum M.; Houmam, Abdelaziz

    2014-06-01

    Direct experimental evidence for the deposition of sulfur on gold surfaces using thiobis(hexamethyldisilazane) as a new precursor is provided. The modified surfaces are characterized using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. XPS and electrochemical results show that the modification process is very fast and that high coverage values are reached within a few minutes. The XPS does not show the initial deposition of fragments of thiobis(hexamethyldisilazane) but only shows the deposition of sulfur even after very short modification times. STM results confirm the formation of dense sulfur films and show the formation of the well-known rectangular structures. Images also show the formation of sulfur multilayers. The electrochemical characteristics of the precursor along with its theoretical investigation and the known chemical reactivity of sulfur transfer agents in organic synthesis rule out the dissociative reductive adsorption process. A concerted adsorption mechanism is proposed and is associated with the concerted cleavage of both SN chemical bonds.

  7. Action potential-independent and nicotinic receptor-mediated concerted release of multiple quanta at hippocampal CA3-mossy fiber synapses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Geeta; Grybko, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2008-03-05

    Presynaptic action potential-independent transmitter release is a potential means of information transfer across synapses. We show that in the hippocampal mossy fiber boutons, activation of the alpha7-subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7-nAChRs) results in a large increase in the amplitude of spontaneous events, resulting from concerted release of multiple quanta from the mossy fiber boutons. This amplitude increase is abolished at low temperatures. Activation of alpha7-nAChRs causes a rise in intraterminal calcium at mossy fiber boutons, involving ryanodine receptors. Regulation of concerted release requires the subsequent activation of presynaptic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Activation of CaMKII is required to drive presynaptic action potential-independent transmission at the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapse. The effects of alpha7-nAChR activation are mediated by biologically relevant doses of nicotine. Our results demonstrate a novel form of synaptic plasticity mediated by presynaptic alpha7-nAChRs and store calcium that is temporally different and might respond to a different history of synaptic activity than that mediated by incoming action potentials.

  8. Intraspecific concerted evolution of the rDNA ITS1 in Anopheles farauti sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae) reveals recent patterns of population structure.

    PubMed

    Bower, James E; Dowton, Mark; Cooper, Robert D; Beebe, Nigel W

    2008-10-01

    We examined the intraindividual variation present in the first ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) of Anopheles farauti to determine the level of divergence among populations for this important malarial vector. We isolated 187 clones from 70 individuals and found regional variation among four internal tandem repeats. The data were partitioned prior to analysis given the presence of a paralogous ITS2 sequence, called the 5'-subrepeat, inserted in the ITS1 of most clones. A high level of homogenization and population differentiation was observed for this repeat, which indicates a higher rate of turnover relative to the adjacent 'core' region. Bayesian analysis was performed using several substitutional models on both a combined and a partitioned data set. On the whole, the ITS1 phylogeny and geographic origin of the samples appear to be congruent. Some interesting exceptions indicate the spread of variant repeats between populations and the retention of ancestral polymorphism. Our data clearly demonstrate concerted evolution at the intraspecific level despite intraindividual variation and a complex internal repeat structure from a species that occupies a continuous coastal distribution. A high rate of genomic turnover in combination with a high level of sequence divergence appears to be a major factor leading to its concerted evolution within these populations.

  9. Quantum free energy landscapes from ab initio path integral metadynamics: Double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer is concerted but not correlated.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergei D; Grant, Ian M; Marx, Dominik

    2015-09-28

    With the goal of computing quantum free energy landscapes of reactive (bio)chemical systems in multi-dimensional space, we combine the metadynamics technique for sampling potential energy surfaces with the ab initio path integral approach to treating nuclear quantum motion. This unified method is applied to the double proton transfer process in the formic acid dimer (FAD), in order to study the nuclear quantum effects at finite temperatures without imposing a one-dimensional reaction coordinate or reducing the dimensionality. Importantly, the ab initio path integral metadynamics technique allows one to treat the hydrogen bonds and concomitant proton transfers in FAD strictly independently and thus provides direct access to the much discussed issue of whether the double proton transfer proceeds via a stepwise or concerted mechanism. The quantum free energy landscape we compute for this H-bonded molecular complex reveals that the two protons move in a concerted fashion from initial to product state, yet world-line analysis of the quantum correlations demonstrates that the protons are as quantum-uncorrelated at the transition state as they are when close to the equilibrium structure.

  10. Evidence of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism, but not of parallel evolution, despite high levels of concerted evolution in the major histocompatibility complex of flamingo species.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, M A F; Courtiol, A; Teixeira, M; Galan, M; Bechet, A; Cezilly, F

    2016-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a cornerstone in the study of adaptive genetic diversity. Intriguingly, highly polymorphic MHC sequences are often not more similar within species than between closely related species. Divergent selection of gene duplicates, balancing selection maintaining trans-species polymorphism (TSP) that predate speciation and parallel evolution of species sharing similar selection pressures can all lead to higher sequence similarity between species. In contrast, high rates of concerted evolution increase sequence similarity of duplicated loci within species. Assessing these evolutionary models remains difficult as relatedness and ecological similarities are often confounded. As sympatric species of flamingos are more distantly related than allopatric species, flamingos represent an ideal model to disentangle these evolutionary models. We characterized MHC Class I exon 3, Class IIB exon 2 and exon 3 of the six extant flamingo species. We found up to six MHC Class I loci and two MHC Class IIB loci. As all six species shared the same number of MHC Class IIB loci, duplication appears to predate flamingo speciation. However, the high rate of concerted evolution has prevented the divergence of duplicated loci. We found high sequence similarity between all species regardless of codon position. The latter is consistent with balancing selection maintaining TSP, as under this mechanism amino acid sites under pathogen-mediated selection should be characterized by fewer synonymous codons (due to their common ancestry) than under parallel evolution. Overall, balancing selection maintaining TSP appears to result in high MHC similarity between species regardless of species relatedness and geographical distribution.

  11. Unraveling the Concerted Reaction Mechanism of the Noncatalyzed Mukaiyama Reaction between C,O,O-Tris(trimethylsilyl)ketene Acetal and Aldehydes Using Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Hadj Mohamed, Slim; Trabelsi, Mahmoud; Champagne, Benoît

    2016-07-21

    The uncatalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reaction between C,O,O-tris(trimethylsilyl)ketene acetal and aldehydes bearing alkyl, vinyl, and aromatic substituents has been studied theoretically using density functional theory with the M06-2X exchange-correlation functional. These DFT calculations mostly demonstrate that (i) the syn product is both kinetically and thermodynamically favored, (ii) the diastereoselectivity of the uncatalyzed reaction is larger than observed for the reaction catalyzed by HgI2 and it is inverted with respect to the latter, (iii) solvents with larger dielectric constants increase the activation barrier but reduce the diastereoselectivity, (iv) the concerted reaction is preferred over the stepwise reaction, and (v) the OSiMe3 group in geminal lowers the activation barrier and increases the energy of reaction. Analyzing the concerted mechanism unravels four types of cyclic transition states, two pro-anti and two pro-syn. Then, the relative energy of the most stable transition state of each type as well as of the corresponding anti and syn products shows that the syn reaction path is located at lower Gibbs enthalpy than the anti reaction path for all substituents.

  12. What makes a movement a gesture? ☆

    PubMed Central

    Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Theories of how adults interpret the actions of others have focused on the goals and intentions of actors engaged in object-directed actions. Recent research has challenged this assumption, and shown that movements are often interpreted as being for their own sake (Schachner & Carey, 2013). Here we postulate a third interpretation of movement—movement that represents action, but does not literally act on objects in the world. These movements are gestures. In this paper, we describe a framework for predicting when movements are likely to be seen as representations. In Study 1, adults described one of three scenes: (1) an actor moving objects, (2) an actor moving her hands in the presence of objects (but not touching them) or (3) an actor moving her hands in the absence of objects. Participants systematically described the movements as depicting an object-directed action when the actor moved objects, and favored describing the movements as depicting movement for its own sake when the actor produced the same movements in the absence of objects. However, participants favored describing the movements as representations when the actor produced the movements near, but not on, the objects. Study 2 explored two additional features—the form of an actor’s hands and the presence of speech-like sounds—to test the effect of context on observers’ classification of movement as representational. When movements are seen as representations, they have the power to influence communication, learning, and cognition in ways that movement for its own sake does not. By incorporating representational gesture into our framework for movement analysis, we take an important step towards developing a more cohesive understanding of action-interpretation. PMID:26513354

  13. The generalization of visuomotor learning to untrained movements and movement sequences based on movement vector and goal location remapping.

    PubMed

    Wu, Howard G; Smith, Maurice A

    2013-06-26

    The planning of goal-directed movements is highly adaptable; however, the basic mechanisms underlying this adaptability are not well understood. Even the features of movement that drive adaptation are hotly debated, with some studies suggesting remapping of goal locations and others suggesting remapping of the movement vectors leading to goal locations. However, several previous motor learning studies and the multiplicity of the neural coding underlying visually guided reaching movements stand in contrast to this either/or debate on the modes of motor planning and adaptation. Here we hypothesize that, during visuomotor learning, the target location and movement vector of trained movements are separately remapped, and we propose a novel computational model for how motor plans based on these remappings are combined during the control of visually guided reaching in humans. To test this hypothesis, we designed a set of experimental manipulations that effectively dissociated the effects of remapping goal location and movement vector by examining the transfer of visuomotor adaptation to untrained movements and movement sequences throughout the workspace. The results reveal that (1) motor adaptation differentially remaps goal locations and movement vectors, and (2) separate motor plans based on these features are effectively averaged during motor execution. We then show that, without any free parameters, the computational model we developed for combining movement-vector-based and goal-location-based planning predicts nearly 90% of the variance in novel movement sequences, even when multiple attributes are simultaneously adapted, demonstrating for the first time the ability to predict how motor adaptation affects movement sequence planning.

  14. Biomarkers in orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Anand; Saravanan, K; Kohila, K; Kumar, S Sathesh

    2015-08-01

    Tooth movement by orthodontic treatment is characterized by remodeling changes in the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, and gingiva. A reflection of these phenomenons can be found in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of moving teeth, with significant elevations in the concentrations of its components like, cytokines, neurotransmitters, growth Factors, and a arachidonic acid metabolites. GCF arises at the gingival margin and can be described as a transudate or an exudate. Several studies have focused on the composition of GCF and the changes that occur during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). GCF component analysis is a non-invasive method for studying the cellular response of the underlying periodontium. Clinically, GCF can be easily collected using platinum loops, filter paper strips, gingival washings, and micropipettes. A number of GCF biomarkers involve in bone remodeling during OTM. The data suggest that knowledge of all the biomarkers present in the GCF that can be used to mark the changes in tooth that is undergoing orthodontic treatment may be of clinical usefulness leading to proper choice of mechanical stress to improve and to shorten treatment time and avoid side effects.

  15. Movement hyperacuity in childhood amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, S.; Buckingham, T.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Amblyopia results in deficits in a number of visual functions in both the amblyopic and dominant eye. The present work describes oscillatory movement displacement thresholds (OMDT) in childhood amblyopia.
METHODS—The OMDT from the dominant and amblyopic eyes of 50 orthoptic patients (aged 74 (SD 16) months) were compared with those from a group of 24 controls (79 (21) months). OMDT were measured using a forced choice staircase procedure. Subjects were asked to identify which of the computer controlled monitors displayed the oscillating stimulus. Visual acuity and stereoscopic responses were noted from clinical records.
RESULTS—Amblyopic children demonstrating stereopsis showed no significant OMDT deficit in the amblyopic eye. Those children having no stereopsis had elevated OMDT in the amblyopic eye (p<0.05). Results suggest that the dominant eye of children with amblyopia may also have a pattern of visual development which is anomalous (difference in correlation coefficient with age; p <0.05).
CONCLUSION—OMDT deficits demonstrated in some amblyopic eyes indicate that amblyopia is incompletely described by its "clinical" definition. Results suggest that the dominant eye in those with unilateral amblyopia may not be "normal".

 Keywords: amblyopia; children; vision; movement hyperacuity; stereopsis PMID:9893586

  16. Mapping population and pathogen movements

    PubMed Central

    Tatem, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    For most of human history, populations have been relatively isolated from each other, and only recently has there been extensive contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both old and new worlds. The reach, volume and speed of modern travel are unprecedented, with human mobility increasing in high income countries by over 1000-fold since 1800. This growth is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases, and from completely new diseases, while ever more cases of the movement of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are being seen. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Equally however, we now have access to the most detailed and comprehensive datasets on human mobility and pathogen distributions ever assembled, in order to combat these threats. This short review paper provides an overview of these datasets, with a particular focus on low income regions, and covers briefly approaches used to combine them to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of population and pathogen movements. PMID:24480992

  17. Transperitoneal solute movement in children.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, A B; Rosenblum, H; Baluarte, H J; Morgenstern, B Z; Polinsky, M S; Perlman, S A

    1983-11-01

    The transperitoneal movement of solute in children was examined by means of a theoretical consideration of the peritoneal clearance formula and by the performance of peritoneal solute diffusion curves and measurement of peritoneal clearances of multiple solutes. Theoretical considerations led to the conclusion that when dialysis mechanics are held constant, peritoneal clearances scaled for weight are similar in individuals of widely varying weight when the volume of infused dialysate is also scaled for weight if peritoneal permeability and surface area are constant. In one group of studies, solute diffusion curves and weight-scaled peritoneal clearances of urea, phosphate, creatinine, and urate were similar in 3 children ages 4 to 18 months compared to 4 children ages 2.5 to 18.5 years. In a second group of studies, weight-scaled peritoneal clearances of inulin but not urea were shown to be marginally lower in 4 children who had been dialyzed longer than 6 months compared with 4 children dialyzed less than 1 month. Hypertonic glucose dialysis in these children was shown to enhance urea clearance but not that of inulin. It is concluded that comparative studies of peritoneal clearances can characterize the transperitoneal movement of solute in children of widely varying body size. Such studies are of greatest value when systematically performed and similar ratios of dialysate volumes to body pools of solute are used.

  18. Winter movement dynamics of Black Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindberg, Mark S.; Ward, David H.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Roser, John

    2007-01-01

    Although North American geese are managed based on their breeding distributions, the dynamics of those breeding populations may be affected by events that occur during the winter. Birth rates of capital breeding geese may be influenced by wintering conditions, mortality may be influenced by timing of migration and wintering distribution, and immigration and emigration among breeding populations may depend on winter movement and timing of pair formation. We examined factors affecting movements of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) among their primary wintering sites in Mexico and southern California, USA, (Mar 1998-Mar 2000) using capture-recapture models. Although brant exhibited high probability (>0.85) of monthly and annual fidelity to the wintering sites we sampled, we observed movements among all wintering sites. Movement probabilities both within and among winters were negatively related to distance between sites. We observed a higher probability both of southward movement between winters (Mar to Dec) and northward movement between months within winters. Between-winter movements were probably most strongly affected by spatial and temporal variation in habitat quality as we saw movement patterns consistent with contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., La Niña and El Niño southern oscillation cycles). Month-to-month movements were related to migration patterns and may also have been affected by differences in habitat conditions among sites. Patterns of winter movements indicate that a network of wintering sites may be necessary for effective conservation of brant.

  19. Winter movement dynamics of black brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindberg, Mark S.; Ward, David H.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Roser, John

    2007-01-01

    Although North American geese are managed based on their breeding distributions, the dynamics of those breeding populations may be affected by events that occur during the winter. Birth rates of capital breeding geese may be influenced by wintering conditions, mortality may be influenced by timing of migration and wintering distribution, and immigration and emigration among breeding populations may depend on winter movement and timing of pair formation. We examined factors affecting movements of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) among their primary wintering sites in Mexico and southern California, USA, (Mar 1998–Mar 2000) using capture–recapture models. Although brant exhibited high probability (>0.85) of monthly and annual fidelity to the wintering sites we sampled, we observed movements among all wintering sites. Movement probabilities both within and among winters were negatively related to distance between sites. We observed a higher probability both of southward movement between winters (Mar to Dec) and northward movement between months within winters. Between-winter movements were probably most strongly affected by spatial and temporal variation in habitat quality as we saw movement patterns consistent with contrasting environmental conditions (e.g., La Niña and El Niño southern oscillation cycles). Month-to-month movements were related to migration patterns and may also have been affected by differences in habitat conditions among sites. Patterns of winter movements indicate that a network of wintering sites may be necessary for effective conservation of brant.

  20. Eye movements may cause motor contagion effects.

    PubMed

    Constable, Merryn D; de Grosbois, John; Lung, Tiffany; Tremblay, Luc; Pratt, Jay; Welsh, Timothy N

    2016-10-26

    When a person executes a movement, the movement is more errorful while observing another person's actions that are incongruent rather than congruent with the executed action. This effect is known as "motor contagion". Accounts of this effect are often grounded in simulation mechanisms: increased movement error emerges because the motor codes associated with observed actions compete with motor codes of the goal action. It is also possible, however, that the increased movement error is linked to eye movements that are executed simultaneously with the hand movement because oculomotor and manual-motor systems are highly interconnected. In the present study, participants performed a motor contagion task in which they executed horizontal arm movements while observing a model making either vertical (incongruent) or horizontal (congruent) movements under three conditions: no instruction, maintain central fixation, or track the model's hand with the eyes. A significant motor contagion-like effect was only found in the 'track' condition. Thus, 'motor contagion' in the present task may be an artifact of simultaneously executed incongruent eye movements. These data are discussed in the context of stimulation and associative learning theories, and raise eye movements as a critical methodological consideration for future work on motor contagion.

  1. Effect of movement frequency on repetitive finger movements in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stegemöller, Elizabeth L; Simuni, Tanya; MacKinnon, Colum

    2009-06-15

    Performance of repetitive hand movements in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by slowness, reduced movement amplitude, and hesitation or arrests in ongoing movement. Currently, the factors and mechanisms contributing to impaired performance of these types of movement remain poorly understood. This study examined the effects of movement frequency and medication on the performance of unconstrained index finger flexion movements in patients with PD and matched control subjects. Movements were synchronized with an auditory tone as the frequency of the tone was increased from 1 to 3 Hz in 0.25 Hz increments. Movement performance was quantified based upon finger kinematics and electromyography (EMG) recorded from the index finger flexors and extensors. The principal finding was that patients with PD showed a dramatic reduction in movement amplitude, an increase in movement frequency, and a loss of phase when the movement frequency reached or exceeded 2 Hz. This deficit was not significantly improved with medications. In contrast, all control subjects could synchronize to 3 Hz. These findings show that movement frequency is a major determinant of hypokinesia during repetitive movements and may contribute to hesitations and movement arrest during clinical testing of bradykinesia in the upper limb of patients with PD.

  2. Physical constraints for pathogen movement.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-10-01

    In this pedagogical review, we discuss the physical constraints that pathogens experience when they move in their host environment. Due to their small size, pathogens are living in a low Reynolds number world dominated by viscosity. For swimming pathogens, the so-called scallop theorem determines which kinds of shape changes can lead to productive motility. For crawling or gliding cells, the main resistance to movement comes from protein friction at the cell-environment interface. Viruses and pathogenic bacteria can also exploit intracellular host processes such as actin polymerization and motor-based transport, if they present the appropriate factors on their surfaces. Similar to cancer cells that also tend to cross various barriers, pathogens often combine several of these strategies in order to increase their motility and therefore their chances to replicate and spread.

  3. [Periodontal reaction versus dental movement].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Ecaterina; Preoteasa, Elena; Duduca, Ioana

    2005-01-01

    In orthodontics the relation between the force (natural or artificial) and the structures that must be modified or led towards a normal situation is in fact a complex equation would multiple aspects determined by the biological part. The orthodontic forces imply, both in action as in effect, all the elements of the dental system, meaning bones, teeth, periodontal tissue. On the other side, the structures of the dental system may help, limit ate, or even erase the action of the orthodontic forces. Our article brings into discussion the relation between the teeth' sustaining structures and their movements determined by the orthodontic forces both as a reaction to a therapeutical treatment and as their direct implication into the result and the stability of the orthodontic treatment, on a long-term.

  4. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    PubMed

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes.

  5. Development of visual and somatosensory attention of the reach-to-eat movement in human infants aged 6 to 12 months.

    PubMed

    Sacrey, Lori-Ann R; Karl, Jenni M; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2012-11-01

    The reach-to-eat movement is a natural act in which an object or food item is grasped and brought to the mouth. It is one of the earliest forelimb behaviours displayed by human infants, who bring almost all grasped objects to the mouth, and is used daily by adults. In adults, there is a tight coupling between visual attention and the advance phase of the reach-to-eat movement. The target is visually engaged just as hand advance is initiated and visually disengaged just as the target is grasped. This coupling of vision and hand advance suggests that advance is mediated by visual attention and withdrawal by somatosensation. The present study examined when the tight coupling between visual attention and the advance phase of the movement develops in infancy. In a longitudinal study, eight infants, aged 6-12 months, and 20 adults reached for familiar inanimate objects and food items. Visual gaze, hand movement and hand accuracy were measured using frame-by-frame video scoring and 2D kinematic analysis. The study found that the youngest infants (6-8 months) visually engaged the target well before initiating a reaching movement and continued to fixate on the target after it was grasped and as it was brought to the mouth. Between 10 and 12 months of age, infants began to visually engage the target just as the reaching movement was initiated and visually disengaged the target as it was grasped, as did the adults. Over the same developmental time period, the infants developed rotatory hand shaping movements, precision grasping, and improved targeting accuracy both for grasping the object and placing it into the mouth. The results suggest that visual guidance of advance and somatosensory guidance of withdrawal develop together and in concert with hand movement ability and skill.

  6. Air movement preferences observed in office buildings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Fard, Sahar Abbaszadeh; Huizenga, Charlie; Paliaga, Gwelen; Brager, Gail; Zagreus, Leah

    2007-05-01

    Office workers' preferences for air movement have been extracted from a database of indoor environmental quality surveys performed in over 200 buildings. Dissatisfaction with the amount of air motion is very common, with too little air movement cited far more commonly than too much air movement. Workers were also surveyed in a detailed two-season study of a single naturally ventilated building. About one-half the building's population wanted more air movement and only 4% wanted less. This same ratio applied when the air movement in workspaces was higher than 0.2 m/s, the de facto draft limit in the current ASHRAE and ISO thermal environment standards. Preference for "less air motion" exceeded that for "more" only at thermal sensations of -2 (cool) or colder. These results raise questions about the consequences of the ASHRAE and ISO standards' restrictions on air movement, especially for neutral and warm conditions.

  7. Air movement preferences observed in office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Fard, Sahar Abbaszadeh; Huizenga, Charlie; Paliaga, Gwelen; Brager, Gail; Zagreus, Leah

    2007-05-01

    Office workers’ preferences for air movement have been extracted from a database of indoor environmental quality surveys performed in over 200 buildings. Dissatisfaction with the amount of air motion is very common, with too little air movement cited far more commonly than too much air movement. Workers were also surveyed in a detailed two-season study of a single naturally ventilated building. About one-half the building’s population wanted more air movement and only 4% wanted less. This same ratio applied when the air movement in workspaces was higher than 0.2 m/s, the de facto draft limit in the current ASHRAE and ISO thermal environment standards. Preference for “less air motion” exceeded that for “more” only at thermal sensations of -2 (cool) or colder. These results raise questions about the consequences of the ASHRAE and ISO standards’ restrictions on air movement, especially for neutral and warm conditions.

  8. How Create an Astronomy Outreach Program to Bring Astronomy to Thousands of People at Outdoor Concerts Astronomy Festivals, or Tourist Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    I describe how to create an astronomy program for thousands of people at outdoor concerts based on my $308,000 NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program (60 events 2009 - 2013), and the Astronomy Festival on the National Mall (AFNM, 10,000 people/yr).MAUS reached 50,000 music lovers at local parks and at the Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Ravinia, or Tanglewood Music Festivals with classical, folk, pop/rock, opera, Caribbean, or county-western concerts assisted by astronomy clubs. Yo-Yo-Ma, the Chicago and Boston Symphony Orchestras, Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Tony Orlando, and Wilco performed at these events. AFNM was started in 2010 with co-sponsorship by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. MAUS and AFMN combine solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; large posters/banners; hands-on activities, imaging with a cell phone mount; citizen science activities; hand-outs; and teacher info packet. Representatives from scientific institutions participated. Tyco Brahe, Johannes Kepler, and Caroline Herschel made guest appearances.MAUS reached underserved groups and attracted large crowds. Young kids participated in this family learning experience-often the first time they looked through a telescope. While < 50% of the participants took part in a science activity in the past year, they found MAUS enjoyable and understandable; learned about astronomy; wanted to learn more; and increased their interest in science (ave. rating 3.6/4). MAUS is effective in promoting science education!Lessons learned: plan early; create partnerships with parks, concert organizers, and astronomy clubs; test equipment; have backup equipment; create professional displays; select the best location to obtain a largest number of participants; use social media/www sites to promote the events; use many telescopes for multiple targets; project a live image or video; select equipment that is easy to

  9. Mapping sound intensities by seating position in a university concert band: A risk of hearing loss, temporary threshold shifts, and comparisons with standards of OSHA and NIOSH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Nicholas Vedder, III

    Exposure to loud sounds is one of the leading causes of hearing loss in the United States. The purpose of the current research was to measure the sound pressure levels generated within a university concert band and determine if those levels exceeded permissible sound limits for exposure according to criteria set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Time-weighted averages (TWA) were obtained via a dosimeter during six rehearsals for nine members of the ensemble (plus the conductor), who were seated in frontal proximity to "instruments of power" (trumpets, trombones, and percussion; (Backus, 1977). Subjects received audiometer tests prior to and after each rehearsal to determine any temporary threshold shifts (TTS). Single sample t tests were calculated to compare TWA means and the maximum sound intensity exposures set by OSHA and NIOSH. Correlations were calculated between TWAs and TTSs, as well as TTSs and the number of semesters subjects reported being seated in proximity to instruments of power. The TWA-OSHA mean of 90.2 dBA was not significantly greater than the specified OSHA maximum standard of 90.0 dBA (p > .05). The TWA-NIOSH mean of 93.1 dBA was, however, significantly greater than the NIOSH specified maximum standard of 85.0 dBA (p < .05). The correlation between TWAs and TTSs was considered weak (r = .21 for OSHA, r = .20 for NIOSH); the correlation between TTSs and semesters of proximity to instruments of power was also considered weak (r = .13). TWAs cumulatively exceeded both association's sound exposure limits at 11 specified locations (nine subjects and both ears of the conductor) throughout the concert band's rehearsals. In addition, hearing acuity, as determined by TTSs, was substantially affected negatively by the intensities produced in the concert band. The researcher concluded that conductors, as well as their performers, must be aware of possible

  10. Design and evaluation of a higher-order spherical microphone/ambisonic sound reproduction system for the acoustical assessment of concert halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Samuel W.

    Previous studies of the perception of concert hall acoustics have generally employed two methods for soliciting listeners' judgments. One method is to have listeners rate the sound in a hall while physically present in that hall. The other method is to make recordings of different halls and seat positions, and then recreate the environment for listeners in a laboratory setting via loudspeakers or headphones. In situ evaluations offer a completely faithful rendering of all aspects of the concert hall experience. However, many variables cannot be controlled and the short duration of auditory memory precludes an objective comparison of different spaces. Simulation studies allow for more control over various aspects of the evaluations, as well as A/B comparisons of different halls and seat positions. The drawback is that all simulation methods suffer from limitations in the accuracy of reproduction. If the accuracy of the simulation system is improved, then the advantages of the simulation method can be retained, while mitigating its disadvantages. Spherical microphone array technology has received growing interest in the acoustics community in recent years for many applications including beamforming, source localization, and other forms of three-dimensional sound field analysis. These arrays can decompose a measured sound field into its spherical harmonic components, the spherical harmonics being a set of spatial basis functions on the sphere that are derived from solving the wave equation in spherical coordinates. Ambisonics is a system for two- and three-dimensional spatialized sound that is based on recreating a sound field from its spherical harmonic components. Because of these shared mathematical underpinnings, ambisonics provides a natural way to present fully spatialized renderings of recordings made with a spherical microphone array. Many of the previously studied applications of spherical microphone arrays have used a narrow frequency range where the array

  11. Cortical Tremor (CT) with coincident orthostatic movements.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Frucht, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Cortical tremor (CT) is a form of cortical reflex myoclonus that can mimic essential tremor (ET). Clinical features that are helpful in distinguishing CT from ET are the irregular and jerky appearance of the movements. We report two patients with CT with coexisting orthostatic movements, either orthostatic tremor (OT) or myoclonus, who experienced functional improvement in both cortical myoclonus and orthostatic movements when treated with levetiracetam.

  12. The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A.

    1986-11-01

    The Earth surface slide movement at Soledad is a mountain-slide type of movement. Estimations of the thickness of the layer which is moving range between 10 and 100 m. There is no proof that the movement is water induced, but it could be influenced by the water household. The slope of the slide area is H: D = 1: 2. The height difference in the moving area studied, according to this paper, is 1 km. The actual rate of movement is about 12 cm/yr.

  13. Exclusive lower extremity mirror movements and diastematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Smyth, Matthew D; Dure, Leon S; Oakes, W Jerry

    2004-01-01

    Mirror movements usually seen in the Klippel-Feil syndrome are most commonly appreciated in the upper extremities. Lower extremity involvement is seen rarely and when observed, is found in conjunction with upper extremity mirror movements. We report what we believe to be the first case of mirror movements found exclusively in the lower extremities in a female patient presenting with tethered cord syndrome. Our hopes are that this report will help elucidate mechanisms involved with these anomalous movements, as currently there is no commonly accepted etiology.

  14. Sensorimotor organization of a sustained involuntary movement

    PubMed Central

    De Havas, Jack; Ghosh, Arko; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Involuntary movements share much of the motor control circuitry used for voluntary movement, yet the two can be easily distinguished. The Kohnstamm phenomenon (where a sustained, hard push produces subsequent involuntary arm raising) is a useful experimental model for exploring differences between voluntary and involuntary movement. Both central and peripheral accounts have been proposed, but little is known regarding how the putative Kohnstamm generator responds to afferent input. We addressed this by obstructing the involuntary upward movement of the arm. Obstruction prevented the rising EMG pattern that characterizes the Kohnstamm. Importantly, once the obstruction was removed, the EMG signal resumed its former increase, suggesting a generator that persists despite peripheral input. When only one arm was obstructed during bilateral involuntary movements, only the EMG signal from the obstructed arm showed the effect. Upon release of the obstacle, the obstructed arm reached the same position and EMG level as the unobstructed arm. Comparison to matched voluntary movements revealed a preserved stretch response when a Kohnstamm movement first contacts an obstacle, and also an overestimation of the perceived contact force. Our findings support a hybrid central and peripheral account of the Kohnstamm phenomenon. The strange subjective experience of this involuntary movement is consistent with the view that movement awareness depends strongly on efference copies, but that the Kohnstamm generator does not produces efference copies. PMID:26283934

  15. Creating a movement heuristic for voluntary action: electrophysiological correlates of movement-outcome learning.

    PubMed

    Bednark, Jeffery G; Reynolds, John N J; Stafford, Tom; Redgrave, Peter; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2013-03-01

    Performance of voluntary behavior requires the selection of appropriate movements to attain a desired goal. We propose that the selection of voluntary movements is often contingent on the formation of a movement heuristic or set of internal rules governing movement selection. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to identify the electrophysiological correlates of the formation of movement heuristics during movement-outcome learning. In two experiments, ERPs from non-learning control tasks were compared to a movement-learning task in which a movement heuristic was formed. We found that novelty P3 amplitude was negatively correlated with improved performance in the movement-learning task. Additionally, enhancement of novelty P3 amplitude was observed during learning even after controlling for memory, attentional and inter-stimulus interval parameters. The feedback correct-related positivity (fCRP) was only elicited by sensory effects following intentional movements. These findings extend previous studies demonstrating the role of the fCRP in performance monitoring and the role of the P3 in learning. In particular, the present study highlights an integrative role of the fCRP and the novelty P3 for the acquisition of movement heuristics. While the fCRP indicates that the goal of intentional movements has been attained, the novelty P3 engages stimulus-driven attentional mechanisms to determine the primary aspects of movement and context required to elicit the sensory effect.

  16. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore–Imidazole–Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2016-08-18

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII) inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)(tBu)2)]2+, in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the RuIII/IIcouple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise or concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 107 s₋1 and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm₋1 consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is < 2 kcal mol₋1. In conclusion, the reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ~ 22 cm₋1 (H) and 49 cm₋1 (D)), concerted, and exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE of 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.

  17. Testing for shared biogeographic history in the lower Central American freshwater fish assemblage using comparative phylogeography: concerted, independent, or multiple evolutionary responses?

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Justin C; Johnson, Jerald B

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of comparative phylogeography is determining whether codistributed species experienced (1) concerted evolutionary responses to past geological and climatic events, indicated by congruent spatial and temporal patterns (“concerted-response hypothesis”); (2) independent responses, indicated by spatial incongruence (“independent-response hypothesis”); or (3) multiple responses (“multiple-response hypothesis”), indicated by spatial congruence but temporal incongruence (“pseudocongruence”) or spatial and temporal incongruence (“pseudoincongruence”). We tested these competing hypotheses using DNA sequence data from three livebearing fish species codistributed in the Nicaraguan depression of Central America (Alfaro cultratus, Poecilia gillii, and Xenophallus umbratilis) that we predicted might display congruent responses due to co-occurrence in identical freshwater drainages. Spatial analyses recovered different subdivisions of genetic structure for each species, despite shared finer-scale breaks in northwestern Costa Rica (also supported by phylogenetic results). Isolation-with-migration models estimated incongruent timelines of among-region divergences, with A. cultratus and Xenophallus populations diverging over Miocene–mid-Pleistocene while P. gillii populations diverged over mid-late Pleistocene. Approximate Bayesian computation also lent substantial support to multiple discrete divergences over a model of simultaneous divergence across shared spatial breaks (e.g., Bayes factor [B10] = 4.303 for Ψ [no. of divergences] > 1 vs. Ψ = 1). Thus, the data support phylogeographic pseudoincongruence consistent with the multiple-response hypothesis. Model comparisons also indicated incongruence in historical demography, for example, support for intraspecific late Pleistocene population growth was unique to P. gillii, despite evidence for finer-scale population expansions in the other taxa. Empirical tests for phylogeographic congruence

  18. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Strongly Coupled Photosystem II-Inspired Chromophore–Imidazole–Phenol Complex: Stepwise Oxidation and Concerted Reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Fujita, Etsuko; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2016-08-18

    Proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions were studied in acetonitrile for a Photosystem II (PSII) inspired [Ru(bpy)2(phen-imidazole-Ph(OH)(tBu)2)]2+, in which Ru(III) generated by a flash-quench sequence oxidizes the appended phenol and the proton is transferred to the hydrogen bonded imidazole base. In contrast to related systems, the donor and acceptor are strongly coupled, as indicated by the shift in the RuIII/IIcouple upon phenol oxidation, and intramolecular oxidation of the phenol by Ru(III) is energetically favorable by both stepwise or concerted pathways. The phenol oxidation occurs via a stepwise ET-PT mechanism with kET = 2.7 × 107 s₋1 and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE)more » of 0.99 ± 0.03. The electron transfer reaction was characterized as adiabatic with λDA = 1.16 eV and 280 < HDA < 540 cm₋1 consistent with strong electronic coupling and slow solvent dynamics. Reduction of the phenoxyl radical by the quencher radical was examined as the analogue of the redox reaction between the PSII tyrosyl radical and the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). In our PSII-inspired complex, the recombination reaction activation energy is < 2 kcal mol₋1. In conclusion, the reaction is nonadiabatic (VPCET ~ 22 cm₋1 (H) and 49 cm₋1 (D)), concerted, and exhibits an unexpected inverse KIE of 0.55 that is attributed to greater overlap of the reactant vibronic ground state with the OD vibronic states of the proton acceptor due to the smaller quantum spacing of the deuterium vibrational levels.« less

  19. Movement-related cortical potentials preceding repetitive and random-choice hand movements in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Touge, T; Werhahn, K J; Rothwell, J C; Marsden, C D

    1995-06-01

    The movement-related cortical electroencephalographic potential was recorded from scalp electrodes in 8 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease studied at least 12 hours after withdrawal of their normal drug therapy, and compared with the results from a group of 8 age-matched control subjects. Two types of self-paced voluntary arm movements were examined: repetitive forward movement of a joystick, and random-choice movements of the same joystick in which subjects had to choose freely the direction in which they were to move the stick (forward, backward, left, or right). In normal subjects, the movement-related cortical potential was larger prior to random-choice movements, whereas in the patients, the amplitude was the same in both tasks. The implication is that processes involved in self-selection of movement are abnormal in Parkinson's disease. This may contribute to the difficulty that patients have in initiating voluntary movement in the absence of any external cues.

  20. Molecular imaging of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Chen, Wei; De Salles, Antonio A

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography measures the activity of radioactively labeled compounds which distribute and accumulate in central nervous system regions in proportion to their metabolic rate or blood flow. Specific circuits such as the dopaminergic nigrostriatal projection can be studied with ligands that bind to the pre-synaptic dopamine transporter or post-synaptic dopamine receptors (D1 and D2). Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) measures the activity of similar tracers labeled with heavy radioactive species such as technetium and iodine. In essential tremor, there is cerebellar hypermetabolism and abnormal GABAergic function in premotor cortices, dentate nuclei and ventral thalami, without significant abnormalities in dopaminergic transmission. In Huntington’s disease, there is hypometabolism in the striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. Disease progression is accompanied by reduction in striatal D1 and D2 binding that correlates with trinucleotide repeat length, disease duration and severity. In dystonia, there is hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, supplementary motor areas and cerebellum at rest. Thalamic and cerebellar hypermetabolism is seen during dystonic movements, which can be modulated by globus pallidus deep brain stimulation (DBS). Additionally, GABA-A receptor activity is reduced in motor, premotor and somatosensory cortices. In Tourette’s syndrome, there is hypermetabolism in premotor and sensorimotor cortices, as well as hypometabolism in the striatum, thalamus and limbic regions at rest. During tics, multiple areas related to cognitive, sensory and motor functions become hypermetabolic. Also, there is abnormal serotoninergic transmission in prefrontal cortices and bilateral thalami, as well as hyperactivity in the striatal dopaminergic system which can be modulated with thalamic DBS. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), there is asymmetric progressive decline in striatal dopaminergic tracer accumulation, which follows a

  1. Molecular imaging of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Chen, Wei; De Salles, Antonio A

    2016-03-28

    Positron emission tomography measures the activity of radioactively labeled compounds which distribute and accumulate in central nervous system regions in proportion to their metabolic rate or blood flow. Specific circuits such as the dopaminergic nigrostriatal projection can be studied with ligands that bind to the pre-synaptic dopamine transporter or post-synaptic dopamine receptors (D1 and D2). Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) measures the activity of similar tracers labeled with heavy radioactive species such as technetium and iodine. In essential tremor, there is cerebellar hypermetabolism and abnormal GABAergic function in premotor cortices, dentate nuclei and ventral thalami, without significant abnormalities in dopaminergic transmission. In Huntington's disease, there is hypometabolism in the striatum, frontal and temporal cortices. Disease progression is accompanied by reduction in striatal D1 and D2 binding that correlates with trinucleotide repeat length, disease duration and severity. In dystonia, there is hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, supplementary motor areas and cerebellum at rest. Thalamic and cerebellar hypermetabolism is seen during dystonic movements, which can be modulated by globus pallidus deep brain stimulation (DBS). Additionally, GABA-A receptor activity is reduced in motor, premotor and somatosensory cortices. In Tourette's syndrome, there is hypermetabolism in premotor and sensorimotor cortices, as well as hypometabolism in the striatum, thalamus and limbic regions at rest. During tics, multiple areas related to cognitive, sensory and motor functions become hypermetabolic. Also, there is abnormal serotoninergic transmission in prefrontal cortices and bilateral thalami, as well as hyperactivity in the striatal dopaminergic system which can be modulated with thalamic DBS. In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is asymmetric progressive decline in striatal dopaminergic tracer accumulation, which follows a caudal

  2. Degeneration of rapid eye movement sleep circuitry underlies rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Dillon; Peever, John

    2017-04-10

    During healthy rapid eye movement sleep, skeletal muscles are actively forced into a state of motor paralysis. However, in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder-a relatively common neurological disorder-this natural process is lost. A lack of motor paralysis (atonia) in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder allows individuals to actively move, which at times can be excessive and violent. At first glance this may sound harmless, but it is not because rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients frequently injure themselves or the person they sleep with. It is hypothesized that the degeneration or dysfunction of the brain stem circuits that control rapid eye movement sleep paralysis is an underlying cause of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The link between brain stem degeneration and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder stems from the fact that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder precedes, in the majority (∼80%) of cases, the development of synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy, which are known to initially cause degeneration in the caudal brain stem structures where rapid eye movement sleep circuits are located. Furthermore, basic science and clinical evidence demonstrate that lesions within the rapid eye movement sleep circuits can induce rapid eye movement sleep-specific motor deficits that are virtually identical to those observed in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review examines the evidence that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is caused by synucleinopathic neurodegeneration of the core brain stem circuits that control healthy rapid eye movement sleep and concludes that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is not a separate clinical entity from synucleinopathies but, rather, it is the earliest symptom of these disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Movement Precision and Amplitude as Separate Factors in the Control of Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Robert

    The purpose of this study was to assess Welford's dual controlling factor interpretation of Fitts' Law--describing movement time as being a linear function of movement distance (or amplitude) and the required precision of the movement (or target width). Welford's amplification of the theory postulates that two separate processes ought to be…

  4. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  5. An Annotated Bibliography on Movement Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzitiello, Theresa, G.

    This bibliography is a collection of selected resources significant to a deeper understanding of the many aspects and definitions of movement education. The one hundred seventy-three annotations are arranged and ordered in a pattern to reflect an overview of both theory and practice, the latter examined under the headings of basic movement,…

  6. Malcolm X: Another Side of the Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Mark

    This biography for younger readers describes the life of Malcolm X, the African American religious and political leader who was prominent in a movement to unite black people throughout the world. The book presents an overview of the civil rights movement and documents Malcolm's role as an advocate for black separatism, black nationalism, and the…

  7. Social Movements in Post-Revolutionary Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Iranian revolution, itself, planted their seeds in post-revolutionary Iran by its outcomes, which created political opportunities, mobilizing ...Iran, Islamic Republic of Iran, Iranian Domestic Politics, Social Movements, Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures and Resources, Framing...political opportunities, mobilizing structures, resources, and framing. Social movements became an alternative way of political participation

  8. Advances in Relating Eye Movements and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayhoe, Mary M.

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of eye movements is a powerful tool for investigating perceptual and cognitive function in both infants and adults. Straightforwardly, eye movements provide a multifaceted measure of performance. For example, the location of fixations, their duration, time of occurrence, and accuracy all are potentially revealing and often allow…

  9. The Chicano Movement: Paths to Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Jose Angel

    2011-01-01

    This article is a quick overview of the Chicano Movement (CM) with specific analyses of the five major strategies employed by its adherents to effect social change. The CM was a social movement that occurred in the United States with increased activity in the southwest and midwest during a time frame: 1950s to 1980s. Persons of Mexican ancestry…

  10. Visual perception of writing and pointing movements.

    PubMed

    Méary, David; Chary, Catherine; Palluel-Germain, Richard; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Studies of movement production have shown that the relationship between the amplitude of a movement and its duration varies according to the type of gesture. In the case of pointing movements the duration increases as a function of distance and width of the target (Fitts' law), whereas for writing movements the duration tends to remain constant across changes in trajectory length (isochrony principle). We compared the visual perception of these two categories of movement. The participants judged the speed of a light spot that portrayed the motion of the end-point of a hand-held pen (pointing or writing). For the two types of gesture we used 8 stimulus sizes (from 2.5 cm to 20 cm) and 32 durations (from 0.2 s to 1.75 s). Viewing each combination of size and duration, participants had to indicate whether the movement speed seemed "fast", "slow", or "correct". Results showed that the participants' perceptual preferences were in agreement with the rules of movement production. The stimulus size was more influential in the pointing condition than in the writing condition. We consider that this finding reflects the influence of common representational resources for perceptual judgment and movement production.

  11. Whatever Happened to the Free School Movement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Robert D.

    1973-01-01

    Looks at the free school movement within and outside the realm of public education. Presents an historical perspective on the radical private free school movement evidence suggesting that the development of educational options within the public school system has come from within the system. (DN)

  12. Fundamental Movement Skill Proficiency amongst Adolescent Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O' Brien, Wesley; Belton, Sarahjane; Issartel, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Background: Literature suggests that physical education programmes ought to provide intense instruction towards basic movement skills needed to enjoy a variety of physical activities. Fundamental movement skills (FMS) are basic observable patterns of behaviour present from childhood to adulthood (e.g. run, skip and kick). Recent evidence indicates…

  13. 9 CFR 78.34 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Swine Because of Brucellosis § 78.34 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon... spread of brucellosis. The Administrator shall promptly notify the State animal health officials of...

  14. 9 CFR 78.25 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Bison Because of Brucellosis § 78.25 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon... brucellosis. The Administrator shall promptly notify the State animal health officials of the States...

  15. 9 CFR 78.13 - Other movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS BRUCELLOSIS Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.13 Other movements. The Administrator may, upon... brucellosis. The Administrator shall promptly notify the State animal health officials of the States...

  16. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this journal's Fall 2009 issue, the Forum section included an article by Gordon Selman and Mark Selman arguing that although Canadian adult education had existed as a social movement in the middle part of the 20th century, it is no longer a social movement. They also speculated about the causes of this change. In the Spring 2011 issue, Tom…

  17. Achieving Racial Integration Through Movement Oriented Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheffers, John T.F.; And Others

    This study evaluated the city of Boston's Magnet Movement Athletics Program, which brought together inner city children with suburban children in a movement oriented program designed to facilitate racial harmony and the growth of positive interracial attitudes. Four hundred seventh and eighth grade black, white, and oriental children underwent a…

  18. 40 CFR 262.84 - Movement document.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... transporter to handle the waste in the United States if exported by rail. (b) The movement document must....84 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Waste...

  19. 40 CFR 262.84 - Movement document.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... transporter to handle the waste in the United States if exported by rail. (b) The movement document must....84 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Waste...

  20. 40 CFR 262.84 - Movement document.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... transporter to handle the waste in the United States if exported by rail. (b) The movement document must....84 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Waste...

  1. Biomechanical analysis of jaw-closing movements.

    PubMed

    Koolstra, J H; van Eijden, T M

    1995-09-01

    This study concerns the complex interaction between active muscle forces and passive guiding structures during jaw-closing movements. It is generally accepted that the ligaments of the joint play a major role in condylar guidance during these movements. While these ligaments permit a wide range of motions, it was assumed that they are not primarily involved in force transmission in the joints. Therefore, it was hypothesized that muscle forces and movement constraints caused by the articular surfaces imply a necessary and sufficient condition to generate ordinary jaw-closing movements. This hypothesis was tested by biomechanical analysis. A dynamic six-degrees-of-freedom mathematical model of the human masticatory system has been developed for qualitative analysis of the contributions of the different masticatory muscles to jaw-closing movements, it was found that the normally observed movement, which includes a swing-slide condylar movement along the articular eminence, can be generated by various separate pairs of masticatory muscles, among which the different parts of the masseter as well as the medial pterygoid muscle appeared to be the most suitable to complete this action. The results seem to be in contrast to the general opinion that a muscle with a forward-directed force component may not be suitable for generating jaw movements in which the condyle moves backward. The results can be explained, however, by biomechanical analysis which includes not only muscle and joint forces as used in standard textbooks of anatomy, but also the torques generated by these forces.

  2. Fundamental Movement Skills and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Kerri L.; Reid, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Delays and deficits may both contribute to atypical development of movement skills by children with ASD. Fundamental movement skills of 25 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (ages 9-12 years) were compared to three typically developing groups using the "Test of Gross Motor Development" ("TGMD-2"). The group matched on chronological age…

  3. Movement disorders induced by deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baizabal-Carvallo, José Fidel; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation represents a major advance in the treatment of several types of movement disorders. However, during stimulation new movement disorders may emerge, thus limiting the positive effects of this therapy. These movement disorders may be induced by: 1) stimulation of the targeted nucleus, 2) stimulation of surrounding tracts and nuclei, and 3) as a result of dose adjustment of accompanying medications, such as reduction of dopaminergic drugs in patients with Parkinson's disease. Various dyskinesias, blepharospasm, and apraxia of eyelid opening have been described mainly with subthalamic nucleus stimulation, whereas hypokinesia and freezing of gait have been observed with stimulation of the globus pallidus internus. Other deep brain stimulation-related movement disorders include dyskinesias associated with stimulation of the globus pallidus externus and ataxic gait as a side effect of chronic bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of thalamus. These movement disorders are generally reversible and usually resolved once the stimulation is reduced or turned off. This, however, typically leads to loss of benefit of the underlying movement disorder which can be re-gained by using different contacts, changing targets or stimulation parameters, and adjusting pharmacological therapy. New and innovative emerging technologies and stimulation techniques may help to prevent or overcome the various deep brain stimulation-induced movement disorders. In this review we aim to describe the clinical features, frequency, pathophysiology, and strategies for treatment of these iatrogenic movement disorders.

  4. The Movement of Composition: Dance and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This piece, created at the Digital Media and Composition Institute in June 2012, is a multimodal attempt to capture and compare both the physical and conceptual movement involved in dance and writing. The project is my first step towards exploring the non-linear nature of composition as expressed in the movement of the body and of the mind.

  5. Digital Movement Analysis in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets offer applications (apps) that make digital movement analysis simple and efficient in physical education. Highly sophisticated movement analysis software has been available for many years but has mainly appealed to coaches of elite athletes and biomechanists. Apps on mobile devices are less expensive…

  6. The Primacy of Movement in Art Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrill, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The author is naturally a kinesthetic learner. As a child she was steeped in the wilds of seashore, fields, and woods in which she was free to roam, explore, and imagine in a deeply sensual, movement-oriented world. Because of these first experiences of freedom of movement and spontaneity in the highly intense natural world, she found the…

  7. The Pioneer of the Group Encounter Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Thomas; Treadwell, Jean

    The purpose of this paper was to (1) identify the Pioneer of the Group Encounter Movement, and (2) expose and clarify some of the ambiguities, contradictions and backbiting evident in the Group Encounter Field. The origins of the group encounter movement are examined with a particularly strong emphasis on J. L. Moreno and his introduction of…

  8. Eye Movement Analysis of Second Grade Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankins, Huana; Thompson, Richard A.

    An investigation was undertaken to measure objectively children's eye movements to determine whether the effect of fatigue of the average school day decreases eye movement efficiency, suggesting that children might benefit more from reading instruction in the morning than in the afternoon. Using a photoelectric instrument designed to graph eye…

  9. Model of Emotional Expressions in Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozaliev, Vladimir L.; Orlova, Yulia A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to automated identification of human emotions based on analysis of body movements, a recognition of gestures and poses. Methodology, models and automated system for emotion identification are considered. To characterize the person emotions in the model, body movements are described with linguistic variables and a…

  10. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five…

  11. Eye Movements During Action Observation

    PubMed Central

    Gredebäck, Gustaf; Falck-Ytter, Terje

    2015-01-01

    An important element in social interactions is predicting the goals of others, including the goals of others’ manual actions. Over a decade ago, Flanagan and Johansson demonstrated that, when observing other people reaching for objects, the observer’s gaze arrives at the goal before the action is completed. Moreover, those authors proposed that this behavior was mediated by an embodied process, which takes advantage of the observer’s motor knowledge. Here, we scrutinize work that has followed that seminal article. We include studies on adults that have used combined eye tracking and transcranial magnetic stimulation technologies to test causal hypotheses about underlying brain circuits. We also include developmental studies on human infants. We conclude that, although several aspects of the embodied process of predictive eye movements remain to be clarified, current evidence strongly suggests that the motor system plays a causal role in guiding predictive gaze shifts that focus on another person’s future goal. The early emergence of the predictive gaze in infant development underlines its importance for social cognition and interaction. PMID:26385998

  12. Eye Movements in Strategic Choice

    PubMed Central

    Gächter, Simon; Noguchi, Takao; Mullett, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In risky and other multiattribute choices, the process of choosing is well described by random walk or drift diffusion models in which evidence is accumulated over time to threshold. In strategic choices, level‐k and cognitive hierarchy models have been offered as accounts of the choice process, in which people simulate the choice processes of their opponents or partners. We recorded the eye movements in 2 × 2 symmetric games including dominance‐solvable games like prisoner's dilemma and asymmetric coordination games like stag hunt and hawk–dove. The evidence was most consistent with the accumulation of payoff differences over time: we found longer duration choices with more fixations when payoffs differences were more finely balanced, an emerging bias to gaze more at the payoffs for the action ultimately chosen, and that a simple count of transitions between payoffs—whether or not the comparison is strategically informative—was strongly associated with the final choice. The accumulator models do account for these strategic choice process measures, but the level‐k and cognitive hierarchy models do not. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27513881

  13. Foraging spots of streaked shearwaters in relation to ocean surface currents as identified using their drift movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Ken; Shiomi, Kozue; Sato, Katsufumi

    2014-03-01

    Ocean currents are in continuous motion and strongly influence oceanic ecosystems. In situ observation of currents is of primary importance for understanding how marine animals respond to ocean surface currents at various scales and for realizing effective ecosystem-based management and realistic oceanographic modelling. We developed a new method for obtaining in situ current measurements by using seabirds as Lagrangian current sensors akin to drifting buoys. We deployed high-resolution global positioning system (GPS) loggers on streaked shearwaters (Calonectris leucomelas) foraging in the Oyashio-Tsugaru Warm Current confluence in Japan, which is one of the most productive oceans in the world. The seabirds repeatedly performed foraging trips, including searching for prey and resting on the sea surface, over several hundred kilometres. The seabirds spent half of their time resting on the water surface and tended to be passive drifters. We inferred that the drift movements of C. leucomelas provided a direct and detailed description of the ocean surface currents, because currents deduced from their drift movements were in good agreement with ocean surface currents derived from in situ and satellite data. In addition, we extracted details of shearwaters’ intense searching flights associated with feeding (i.e. foraging spots) from GPS tracks. C. leucomelas did not forage at the core of anticyclonic eddies; rather, they used the boundary areas between eddies and the edge of eddies where primary productivity and prey density are thought to be high. Our study demonstrated that animal-borne GPS data can provide a detailed and cost-efficient tool for observing ocean surface currents and can reveal the ways in which marine animals respond to these currents at a fine scale.

  14. Slow Movements of Bio-Inspired Limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babikian, Sarine; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Kanso, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Slow and accurate finger and limb movements are essential to daily activities, but the underlying mechanics is relatively unexplored. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to examine slow movements of tendon-driven limbs that are produced by modulating the tendons' stiffness parameters. Slow limb movements are driftless in the sense that movement stops when actuations stop. We demonstrate, in the context of a planar tendon-driven system representing a finger, that the control of stiffness suffices to produce stable and accurate limb postures and quasi-static (slow) transitions among them. We prove, however, that stable postures are achievable only when tendons are pretensioned, i.e., they cannot become slack. Our results further indicate that a non-smoothness in slow movements arises because the precision with which individual stiffnesses need to be altered changes substantially throughout the limb's motion.

  15. Fundamental movement skills and autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Staples, Kerri L; Reid, Greg

    2010-02-01

    Delays and deficits may both contribute to atypical development of movement skills by children with ASD. Fundamental movement skills of 25 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (ages 9-12 years) were compared to three typically developing groups using the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2). The group matched on chronological age performed significantly better on the TGMD-2. Another comparison group matched on movement skill demonstrated children with ASD perform similarly to children approximately half their age. Comparisons to a third group matched on mental age equivalence revealed the movement skills of children with ASD are more impaired than would be expected given their cognitive level. Collectively, these results suggest the movement skills of children with ASD reflect deficits in addition to delays.

  16. Eye Movements in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Robert J.; Ko, Philip C.; Ally, Brandon A.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature has investigated changes in eye movements as a result of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). When compared to healthy, age-matched controls, patients display a number of remarkable alterations to oculomotor function and viewing behavior. In this article, we review AD-related changes to fundamental eye movements, such as saccades and smooth pursuit motion, in addition to changes to eye movement patterns during more complex tasks like visual search and scene exploration. We discuss the cognitive mechanisms that underlie these changes and consider the clinical significance of eye movement behavior, with a focus on eye movements in mild cognitive impairment. We conclude with directions for future research. PMID:25182738

  17. Molecular basis of chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    PubMed

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is an essential physiological response for sessile plant survival and the optimization of photosynthetic ability. Simple but effective experiments on the physiological, cell biological and molecular genetic aspects have been widely used to investigate the signaling components of chloroplast photorelocation movement in Arabidopsis for the past few decades. Although recent knowledge on chloroplast photorelocation movement has led us to a deeper understanding of its physiological and molecular basis, the biochemical roles of the downstream factors remain largely unknown. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances regarding chloroplast photorelocation movement and propose that a new high-resolution approach is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying actin-based chloroplast photorelocation movement.

  18. Rotation-independent representations for haptic movements.

    PubMed

    Shioiri, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takanori; Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The existence of a common mechanism for visual and haptic representations has been reported in object perception. In contrast, representations of movements might be more specific to modalities. Referring to the vertical axis is natural for visual representations whereas a fixed reference axis might be inappropriate for haptic movements and thus also inappropriate for its representations in the brain. The present study found that visual and haptic movement representations are processed independently. A psychophysical experiment examining mental rotation revealed the well-known effect of rotation angle for visual representations whereas no such effect was found for haptic representations. We also found no interference between processes for visual and haptic movements in an experiment where different stimuli were presented simultaneously through visual and haptic modalities. These results strongly suggest that (1) there are separate representations of visual and haptic movements, and (2) the haptic process has a rotation-independent representation.

  19. Learning optimal eye movements to unusual faces

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Matthew F.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2014-01-01

    Eye movements, which guide the fovea’s high resolution and computational power to relevant areas of the visual scene, are integral to efficient, successful completion of many visual tasks. How humans modify their eye movements through experience with their perceptual environments, and its functional role in learning new tasks, has not been fully investigated. Here, we used a face identification task where only the mouth discriminated exemplars to assess if, how, and when eye movement modulation may mediate learning. By interleaving trials of unconstrained eye movements with trials of forced fixation, we attempted to separate the contributions of eye movements and covert mechanisms to performance improvements. Without instruction, a majority of observers substantially increased accuracy and learned to direct their initial eye movements towards the optimal fixation point. The proximity of an observer’s default face identification eye movement behavior to the new optimal fixation point and the observer’s peripheral processing ability were predictive of performance gains and eye movement learning. After practice in a subsequent condition in which observers were directed to fixate different locations along the face, including the relevant mouth region, all observers learned to make eye movements to the optimal fixation point. In this fully learned state, augmented fixation strategy accounted for 43% of total efficiency improvements while covert mechanisms accounted for the remaining 57%. The findings suggest a critical role for eye movement planning to perceptual learning, and elucidate factors that can predict when and how well an observer can learn a new task with unusual exemplars. PMID:24291712

  20. Movement consistency during repetitive tool use action

    PubMed Central

    Baber, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The consistency and repeatability of movement patterns has been of long-standing interest in locomotor biomechanics, but less well explored in other domains. Tool use is one of such a domain; while the complex dynamics of the human-tool-environment system have been approached from various angles, to date it remains unknown how the rhythmicity of repetitive tool-using action emerges. To examine whether the spontaneously adopted movement frequency is a variable susceptible to individual execution approaches or emerges as constant behaviour, we recorded sawing motion across a range of 14 experimental conditions using various manipulations. This was compared to free and pantomimed arm movements. We found that a mean (SD) sawing frequency of 2.0 (0.4) Hz was employed across experimental conditions. Most experimental conditions did not significantly affect the sawing frequency, signifying the robustness of this spontaneously emerging movement. Free horizontal arm translation and miming of sawing was performed at half the movement frequency with more than double the excursion distance, showing that not all arm movements spontaneously emerge at the observed sawing parameters. Observed movement frequencies across all conditions could be closely predicted from movement time reference data for generic arm movements found in the Methods Time Measurement literature, highlighting a generic biomechanical relationship between the time taken for a given distance travelled underlying the observed behaviour. We conclude that our findings lend support to the hypothesis that repetitive movements during tool use are executed according to generic and predictable musculoskeletal mechanics and constraints, albeit in the context of the general task (sawing) and environmental constraints such as friction, rather than being subject to task-specific control or individual cognitive schemata. PMID:28278273

  1. Does movement planning follow Fitts' law? Scaling anticipatory postural adjustments with movement speed and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, M; Cesari, P

    2010-11-24

    We wanted to determine whether movement planning followed Fitts' law by investigating the relationship between movement planning and movement performance in experienced dancers executing a typical classical ballet step in which the big toe was pointed to targets at different distances and of different widths so as to obtain several indices of difficulty (ID). Movement time, velocity and variability at the target were the variables of movement performance kinematics; movement planning was evaluated by analysis of anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) to assess their modulation at different IDs. Movement time and peak of velocity were found to scale with the ID only when individual movement distance across target widths was entered into the analysis. APA magnitude and duration both scaled according to movement parameters but not in the same way. APA magnitude scaled with movement velocity, while APA duration was sensitive to the amplitude-to-accuracy ratio following the ID for movements performed in the shortest time interval when on-line feedback control is probably not available. Here we show that timing of muscle activation acts as an independent central command that triggers fine-tuning for speed-accuracy trade-off.

  2. Time quantified detection of fetal movements using a new fetal movement algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lowery, C L; Russell, W A; Baggot, P J; Wilson, J D; Walls, R C; Bentz, L S; Murphy, P

    1997-01-01

    Primarily, the objective is to develop an automated ultrasound fetal movement detection system that will better characterize fetal movements. Secondarily, the objective is to develop an improved method of quantifying the performance of fetal movement detectors. We recorded 20-minute segments of fetal movement on 101 patients using a UAMS-developed fetal movement detection algorithm (Russell algorithm) and compared this to a Hewlett-Packard (HP) M-1350-A. Movements were recorded on a second-per-second basis by an expert examiner reviewing videotaped real-time ultrasound images. Videotape (86,592 seconds) was scored and compared with the electronic movement-detection systems. The Russell algorithm detected 95.53% of the discrete movements greater than 5 seconds, while the HP system (M-1350-A) detected only 86.08% of the discrete movements (p = 0.012). Both devices were less efficient at detecting the short discrete movements, obtaining sensitivities of 57.39 and 35.22, respectively. Neither system fully identifies fetal movement based on the second-per-second system. Improved methods of quantifying performance indicated that the Russell algorithm performed better than the HP on these patients.

  3. Movement preparation improves touch perception without awareness.

    PubMed

    van Ede, Freek; van Doren, Thomas I; Damhuis, Jochem; de Lange, Floris P; Maris, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Movements are often directed at external objects, such as when reaching out for a glass to drink from. Surprisingly, however, it is largely unknown how movement plans influence the identification of such external somatosensory stimuli. To address this, we cued participants to prepare for a speeded button press with their left/right thumb and presented a spatially-patterned somatosensory stimulus at either the same or the opposite thumb with equal probability. In contrast to many previous investigations that focused on self-produced somatosensory input and reported attenuated perception, we show that the identification of external stimuli (touch perception) is facilitated by movement preparation. In line with analogous studies in vision, this suggests that movement preparation automatically allocates processing resources (attention) to the location and/or body part of the planned movement. We further show that, in contrast to deliberate somatosensory preparation, participants do not become more confident in their touch perception following movement preparation. These data suggest that the perceptual improvement during movement preparation occurs outside of awareness. Such an unconscious facilitatory process will ensure that relevant parts of the environment are processed with high fidelity, while sparing conscious resources for monitoring other processes in the course of action.

  4. Brain-machine interface for eye movements.

    PubMed

    Graf, Arnulf B A; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-12-09

    A number of studies in tetraplegic humans and healthy nonhuman primates (NHPs) have shown that neuronal activity from reach-related cortical areas can be used to predict reach intentions using brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) and therefore assist tetraplegic patients by controlling external devices (e.g., robotic limbs and computer cursors). However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies that have applied BMIs to eye movement areas to decode intended eye movements. In this study, we recorded the activity from populations of neurons from the lateral intraparietal area (LIP), a cortical node in the NHP saccade system. Eye movement plans were predicted in real time using Bayesian inference from small ensembles of LIP neurons without the animal making an eye movement. Learning, defined as an increase in the prediction accuracy, occurred at the level of neuronal ensembles, particularly for difficult predictions. Population learning had two components: an update of the parameters of the BMI based on its history and a change in the responses of individual neurons. These results provide strong evidence that the responses of neuronal ensembles can be shaped with respect to a cost function, here the prediction accuracy of the BMI. Furthermore, eye movement plans could be decoded without the animals emitting any actual eye movements and could be used to control the position of a cursor on a computer screen. These findings show that BMIs for eye movements are promising aids for assisting paralyzed patients.

  5. Human Movement Is Both Diffusive and Directed

    PubMed Central

    Padgham, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the influence of the built environment on human movement requires quantifying spatial structure in a general sense. Because of the difficulty of this task, studies of movement dynamics often ignore spatial heterogeneity and treat movement through journey lengths or distances alone. This study analyses public bicycle data from central London to reveal that, although journey distances, directions, and frequencies of occurrence are spatially variable, their relative spatial patterns remain largely constant, suggesting the influence of a fixed spatial template. A method is presented to describe this underlying space in terms of the relative orientation of movements toward, away from, and around locations of geographical or cultural significance. This produces two fields: one of convergence and one of divergence, which are able to accurately reconstruct the observed spatial variations in movement. These two fields also reveal categorical distinctions between shorter journeys merely serving diffusion away from significant locations, and longer journeys intentionally serving transport between spatially distinct centres of collective importance. Collective patterns of human movement are thus revealed to arise from a combination of both diffusive and directed movement, with aggregate statistics such as mean travel distances primarily determined by relative numbers of these two kinds of journeys. PMID:22666388

  6. Dance recognition system using lower body movement.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Travis T; Wiesner, Susan L; Bennett, Bradford C

    2014-02-01

    The current means of locating specific movements in film necessitate hours of viewing, making the task of conducting research into movement characteristics and patterns tedious and difficult. This is particularly problematic for the research and analysis of complex movement systems such as sports and dance. While some systems have been developed to manually annotate film, to date no automated way of identifying complex, full body movement exists. With pattern recognition technology and knowledge of joint locations, automatically describing filmed movement using computer software is possible. This study used various forms of lower body kinematic analysis to identify codified dance movements. We created an algorithm that compares an unknown move with a specified start and stop against known dance moves. Our recognition method consists of classification and template correlation using a database of model moves. This system was optimized to include nearly 90 dance and Tai Chi Chuan movements, producing accurate name identification in over 97% of trials. In addition, the program had the capability to provide a kinematic description of either matched or unmatched moves obtained from classification recognition.

  7. Does movement proficiency impact on exergaming performance?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jess E; Thornton, Ashleigh L; Lay, Brendan S; Braham, Rebecca; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-04-01

    There is growing interest in the use of consumer level exergames in movement skill acquisition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between movement proficiency and performance in virtual exergaming. Twenty seven children, aged 10-15years participated in an experiment completing the Movement Assessment Battery for Children 2 (MABC-2) and a series of XBOX360 Kinect Sports exergaming tasks. Significant correlations were observed between MABC-2 aiming and catching percentile and exergame javelin and target kick, where the more proficient movers tended to perform better in the exergame. Statistically significant correlations were observed between MABC-2 balance percentile and exergaming sprint and target kick performance. In this study children who scored better in real life gross motor movement tasks performed better in most related exergaming activities. This suggests current exergaming technology has advanced to a point where body movement unencumbered by a physical or remote game device tether can extract movements resembling real life tasks, translate them into game play and reward proficient movers with higher in-game performance. It is possible that benefit gained in an exergaming environment by more proficient movers was a result of either their more proficient movement, or a greater ability to adapt to the exergame.

  8. Gravitoinertial force level influences arm movement control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, J.; Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The ability to move the forearm between remembered elbow joint angles immediately after rapid increases or decreases of the background gravitoinertial force (G) level was measured. The movements had been well-practiced in a normal 1G environment before the measurements in high-(1.8G) and low-force (0G) environments. The forearm and upper arm were always unsupported to maximize the influence of altered G-loading and to minimize extraneous cues about arm position. 2. Horizontal and vertical movement planes were studied to measure the effects of varying the G load in the movement plane within a given G background. Rapid and slow movements were studied to assess the role of proprioceptive feedback. 3. G level did not affect the amplitude of rapid movements, indicating that subjects were able to plan and to generate appropriate motor commands for the new G loading of the arm. The amplitude of slow movements was affected by G level, indicating that proprioceptive feedback is influenced by G level. 4. The effects of G level were similar for horizontal and vertical movements, indicating that proprioceptive information from supporting structures, such as the shoulder joint and muscles, had a role in allowing generation of the appropriate motor commands. 5. The incidence and size of dynamic overshoots were greater in 0G and for rapid movements. This G-related change in damping suggests a decrease in muscle spindle activity in 0G. A decrease in muscle spindle activity in 0G and an increase in 1.8G are consistent with the results of our prior studies on the tonic vibration reflex, locomotion, and perception of head movement trajectory in varying force backgrounds.

  9. Time optimal movement of cooperating robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. M.; Bobrow, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    The maximization of the speed of movement along a prescribed path, of the system formed by a set of robot arms and the object they hold is examined. The actuator torques that maximize the acceleration of the system are shown to be determined by the solution to a standard linear programming problem. The combination of this result with the known control strategy for time optimal movement of a single robot arm yields an algorithm for time optimal movement of multiple robot arms holding the same workpiece.

  10. Developmental and benign movement disorders in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Cecilia; Roubertie, Agathe; Doummar, Diane; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Cochen de Cock, Valérie; Roze, Emmanuel

    2010-07-30

    Developmental and benign movement disorders are a group of movement disorders with onset in the neonatal period, infancy, or childhood. They are characterized by the absence of associated neurological manifestations and by their favorable outcome, although developmental abnormalities can be occasionally observed. Knowledge of the clinical, neurophysiological, and pathogenetic aspects of these disorders is poor. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature and our practical experience, this article summarizes current knowledge in this area. We pay special attention to the recognition and management of these movement disorders in children.

  11. Multiple-site concerted proton-electron transfer reactions of hydrogen-bonded phenols are nonadiabatic and well described by semiclassical Marcus theory.

    PubMed

    Schrauben, Joel N; Cattaneo, Mauricio; Day, Thomas C; Tenderholt, Adam L; Mayer, James M

    2012-10-10

    Photo-oxidations of hydrogen-bonded phenols using excited-state polyarenes are described to derive fundamental understanding of multiple-site concerted proton-electron transfer reactions (MS-CPET). Experiments have examined phenol bases having -CPh(2)NH(2), -Py, and -CH(2)Py groups ortho to the phenol hydroxyl group and tert-butyl groups in the 4,6-positions for stability (HOAr-NH(2), HOAr-Py, and HOAr-CH(2)Py, respectively; Py = pyridyl; Ph = phenyl). The photo-oxidations proceed by intramolecular proton transfer from the phenol to the pendent base concerted with electron transfer to the excited polyarene. For comparison, 2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2)OH, a phenol without a pendent base and tert-butyl groups in the 2,4,6-positions, has also been examined. Many of these bimolecular reactions are fast, with rate constants near the diffusion limit. Combining the photochemical k(CPET) values with those from prior thermal stopped-flow kinetic studies gives data sets for the oxidations of HOAr-NH(2) and HOAr-CH(2)Py that span over 10(7) in k(CPET) and nearly 0.9 eV in driving force (ΔG(o)'). Plots of log(k(CPET)) vs ΔG(o)', including both excited-state anthracenes and ground state aminium radical cations, define a single Marcus parabola in each case. These two data sets are thus well described by semiclassical Marcus theory, providing a strong validation of the use of this theory for MS-CPET. The parabolas give λ(CPET) ≅ 1.15-1.2 eV and H(ab) ≅ 20-30 cm(-1). These experiments represent the most direct measurements of H(ab) for MS-CPET reactions to date. Although rate constants are available only up to the diffusion limit, the parabolas clearly peak well below the adiabatic limit of ca. 6 × 10(12) s(-1). Thus, this is a very clear demonstration that the reactions are nonadiabatic. The nonadiabatic character slows the reactions by a factor of ~45. Results for the oxidation of HOAr-Py, in which the phenol and base are conjugated, and for oxidation of 2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2

  12. Concerted regulation of renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate by renal dopamine and NOS I in rats on high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Mariano E; Albertoni Borghese, Maria F; Majowicz, Mónica P; Ortiz, María C; Loidl, Fabián; Rey-Funes, Manuel; Di Ciano, Luis A; Ibarra, Fernando R

    2017-03-01

    Under high sodium intake renal dopamine (DA) increases while NOS I expression in macula densa cells (MD) decreases. To explore whether renal DA and NOS I, linked to natriuresis and to the stability of the tubuloglomerular feedback, respectively, act in concert to regulate renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Male Wistar rats were studied under a normal sodium intake (NS, NaCl 0.24%) or a high sodium intake (HS, NaCl 1% in drinking water) during the 5 days of the study. For the last two days, the specific D1-like receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (1 mg kg bwt(-1) day(-1), sc) or a vehicle was administered. HS intake increased natriuresis, diuresis, and urinary DA while it decreased cortical NOS I expression (P < 0.05 vs. NS), Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) activity in MD (P < 0.001 vs. NS) and cortical nitrates+nitrites (NOx) production (NS 2.04 ± 0.22 vs. HS 1.28 ± 0.10 nmol mg protein(-1), P < 0.01). Treatment with SCH 23390 to rats on HS sharply decreased hydroelectrolyte excretion (P < 0.001 vs. HS) while NOS I expression, NADPH-d activity and NOx production increased (P < 0.05 vs. HS for NOS I and P < 0.001 vs. HS for NADPH-d and NOx). SCH 23390 increased RPF and GFR in HS rats (P < 0.01 HS+SCH vs. HS). It did not cause variations in NS rats. Results indicate that when NS intake is shifted to a prolonged high sodium intake, renal DA through the D1R, and NOS I in MD cells act in concert to regulate RPF and GFR to stabilize the delivery of NaCl to the distal nephron.

  13. Investigation of Icelandic rift zones reveals systematic changes in hydrothermal outflow in concert with seismic and magmatic events: Implications for investigation of Mid-Ocean Ridge hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curewitz, D.; Karson, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Co-registration of several generations of geological data was carried out for hydrothermal fields along active rift zones of the Iceland plate boundary zone. Significant short- and long-term changes in vent locations, flow rates and styles, and fluid characteristics over short periods take place in concert with recorded earthquakes, dike intrusions, and fissure eruptions. Higher resolution, more detailed analysis of the Icelandic hydrothermal sites will inform investigation of similar data from mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems along the RIDGE 2000 focus sites. Initial results from the Hengill and Krafla geothermal areas covering a time-span of nearly 40 years at ~10 year intervals reveal limited changes in the surface expression of fault populations, with the exception of local fault and fracture systems. The location and population density of individual vents and groups of vents underwent significant changes over the same time period, with either vents shifting location, or new vents opening and old vents closing. Registration of changes in vent fluid temperatures, vent field ground temperatures, fluid flow rates, and vent eruptive styles reveal changes in hydrothermal flow systematics in concert with the observed changes in vent location and vent population density. Significant local seismic and volcanological events (earthquakes, earthquake swarms, dike intrusions, eruptions, inflation/deflation) that are potential triggers for the observed changes take place in intervening years between production of successive maps. Changes in modeled stress intensities and local fracture/fault density and geometry associated with these tectono-magmatic events correspond well to inferred locations of increased or decreased shallow permeability thought to control hydrothermal outflow behavior. Recent seismic events are strongly linked to well-mapped changes in fracture/fault population and hydrothermal flow behavior in the Hveragerdi region, near Hengill, and provide higher

  14. The Largest Response Component in the Motor Cortex Reflects Movement Timing but Not Movement Type

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Ryu, Stephen I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural activity in monkey motor cortex (M1) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) can reflect a chosen movement well before that movement begins. The pattern of neural activity then changes profoundly just before movement onset. We considered the prediction, derived from formal considerations, that the transition from preparation to movement might be accompanied by a large overall change in the neural state that reflects when movement is made rather than which movement is made. Specifically, we examined “components” of the population response: time-varying patterns of activity from which each neuron’s response is approximately composed. Amid the response complexity of individual M1 and PMd neurons, we identified robust response components that were “condition-invariant”: their magnitude and time course were nearly identical regardless of reach direction or path. These condition-invariant response components occupied dimensions orthogonal to those occupied by the “tuned” response components. The largest condition-invariant component was much larger than any of the tuned components; i.e., it explained more of the structure in individual-neuron responses. This condition-invariant response component underwent a rapid change before movement onset. The timing of that change predicted most of the trial-by-trial variance in reaction time. Thus, although individual M1 and PMd neurons essentially always reflected which movement was made, the largest component of the population response reflected movement timing rather than movement type. PMID:27761519

  15. Data Movement Dominates: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Bruce L.

    2015-07-01

    Over the past three years in this project, what we have observed is that the primary reason for data movement in large-scale systems is that the per-node capacity is not large enough—i.e., one of the solutions to the data-movement problem (certainly not the only solution that is required, but a significant one nonetheless) is to increase per-node capacity so that inter-node traffic is reduced. This unfortunately is not as simple as it sounds. Today’s main memory systems for datacenters, enterprise computing systems, and supercomputers, fail to provide high per-socket capacity [Dirik & Jacob 2009; Cooper-Balis et al. 2012], except at extremely high price points (factors of 10–100x the cost/bit of consumer main-memory systems) [Stokes 2008]. The reason is that our choice of technology for today’s main memory systems—i.e., DRAM, which we have used as a main-memory technology since the 1970s [Jacob et al. 2007]—can no longer keep up with our needs for density and price per bit. Main memory systems have always been built from the cheapest, densest, lowest-power memory technology available, and DRAM is no longer the cheapest, the densest, nor the lowest-power storage technology out there. It is now time for DRAM to go the way that SRAM went: move out of the way for a cheaper, slower, denser storage technology, and become a cache instead. This inflection point has happened before, in the context of SRAM yielding to DRAM. There was once a time that SRAM was the storage technology of choice for all main memories [Tomasulo 1967; Thornton 1970; Kidder 1981]. However, once DRAM hit volume production in the 1970s and 80s, it supplanted SRAM as a main memory technology because it was cheaper, and it was denser. It also happened to be lower power, but that was not the primary consideration of the day. At the time, it was recognized that DRAM was much slower than SRAM, but it was only at the supercomputer level (For instance the Cray X-MP in the 1980s and its follow

  16. The influence of movement segment difficulty on movements with two-stroke sequence.

    PubMed

    Rand, M K; Alberts, J L; Stelmach, G E; Bloedel, J R

    1997-06-01

    Arm movements in the horizontal plane consisting of two segments were examined to determine whether the difficulty of the second segment influenced the kinematic characteristics of the first segment. The direction of the first segment was an elbow extension movement away from the trunk and remained constant throughout the experiment. The direction of the second segment varied between forearm extension and flexion movements. Based on Fitts' law, two different indexes of difficulty (ID) of the second segment were utilized by changing target size and movement amplitude. The effects of changing ID were examined for two different movement amplitudes. All movements were single-joint movements employing elbow flexion/extension and were recorded by an x-y digitizer. Variations in the ID of the second segment produced context-dependent kinematic changes in the performance of the initial segment. Movement duration increased when the ID was increased by reducing target size for both extension-extension sequence and extension-flexion sequences. Peak velocity also decreased for higher ID targets in the extension-flexion sequence. However, there was an interaction between the ID and movement amplitude in the extension-flexion sequence. In this sequence the duration of movement for the high ID/large movement amplitude condition increased substantially compared with the low ID/small movement amplitude condition. In addition, changing ID of the second segment influenced the time between the two segments (intersegment interval) in the extension-flexion sequence. Collectively, these data suggest that the planning of complex movements is based in part on the accuracy demands of multiple segments of the sequence.

  17. The Orff-Schulwerk Approach to Movement and Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nancy Ann

    1982-01-01

    The Orff Schulwerk Approach is an ordered framework in which children create speech, movement, and music as part of their daily learning processes. The approach entails movement training and movement forms, improvisation, dance, and music and language play. (JN)

  18. [The anti-asylum movement in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Lüchmann, Lígia Helena Hahn; Rodrigues, Jefferson

    2007-01-01

    This study reviews the history of the national anti-asylum struggle in Brazil. It analyzes some of the movement's difficulties, achievements and challenges. The theory of social movements is used here as an important analytical tool to understand this collective action, to the degree in which theory allows an appraisal of this type of social action rooted in its many configurations, evidencing the complexity of the contemporary world. The anti-asylum movement is composed of many stakeholders whose struggles and conflicts have been developed through different social-political-institutional dimensions. It encompasses at different moments and to different degrees, a movement which articulates solidarity and conflict relations and social denunciations in an attempt to transform relations and conceptions that are discriminatory and which are intended to control the "insane" and "insanity" in our country.

  19. Sensory systems in the control of movement.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Arthur; Ellaway, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Animal movement is immensely varied, from the simplest reflexive responses to the most complex, dexterous voluntary tasks. Here, we focus on the control of movement in mammals, including humans. First, the sensory inputs most closely implicated in controlling movement are reviewed, with a focus on somatosensory receptors. The response properties of the large muscle receptors are examined in detail. The role of sensory input in the control of movement is then discussed, with an emphasis on the control of locomotion. The interaction between central pattern generators and sensory input, in particular in relation to stretch reflexes, timing, and pattern forming neuronal networks is examined. It is proposed that neural signals related to bodily velocity form the basic descending command that controls locomotion through specific and well-characterized relationships between muscle activation, step cycle phase durations, and biomechanical outcomes. Sensory input is crucial in modulating both the timing and pattern forming parts of this mechanism.

  20. Laban Movement Analysis towards Behavior Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Luís; Dias, Jorge

    This work presents a study about the use of Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) as a robust tool to describe human basic behavior patterns, to be applied in human-machine interaction. LMA is a language used to describe and annotate dancing movements and is divided in components [1]: Body, Space, Shape and Effort. Despite its general framework is widely used in physical and mental therapy [2], it has found little application in the engineering domain. Rett J. [3] proposed to implement LMA using Bayesian Networks. However LMA component models have not yet been fully implemented. A study on how to approach behavior using LMA is presented. Behavior is a complex feature and movement chain, but we believe that most basic behavior primitives can be discretized in simple features. Correctly identifying Laban parameters and the movements the authors feel that good patterns can be found within a specific set of basic behavior semantics.

  1. A Movement Approach to Teaching Folk Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figley, Grace

    1981-01-01

    The importance of learning new movement skills is shown in relation to learning folk dances. Folk dancing not only improves physical skills, but also results in an understanding and appreciation of the richness of other cultures. (JN)

  2. Anticipation skill and susceptibility to deceptive movement.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robin C; Warren, Simon; Abernethy, Bruce

    2006-11-01

    The ability to detect deceptive movement was examined in skilled and novice rugby players. Participants (14 per group) attempted to predict direction change from video of expert and recreational rugby players changing direction with and without deceptive movement. Confidence associated with judgments was recorded on each trial to seek evidence regarding use of inferential (heuristic-based) and direct-perceptual (invariant-based) judgments. Novices were found to be susceptible to deceptive movement whereas skilled participants were not; however, both skilled and novice participants were more confident on trials containing deceptive movement. The data suggest that the skill-level difference in sensitivity to advance visual information extends to deceptive information. The implications of this finding, and the importance of considering the underlying process of anticipation skill, are discussed.

  3. Control and Functions of Fixational Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Rucci, Michele; Poletti, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Humans and other species explore a visual scene by rapidly shifting their gaze 2-3 times every second. Although the eyes may appear immobile in the brief intervals in between saccades, microscopic (fixational) eye movements are always present, even when attending to a single point. These movements occur during the very periods in which visual information is acquired and processed and their functions have long been debated. Recent technical advances in controlling retinal stimulation during normal oculomotor activity have shed new light on the visual contributions of fixational eye movements and their degree of control. The emerging body of evidence, reviewed in this article, indicates that fixational eye movements are important components of the strategy by which the visual system processes fine spatial details, enabling both precise positioning of the stimulus on the retina and encoding of spatial information into the joint space-time domain. PMID:27795997

  4. New Parkinson's Drug May Combat Movement Difficulties

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162855.html New Parkinson's Drug May Combat Movement Difficulties Opicapone, added to ... HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that people with Parkinson's disease may achieve better and more reliable motor ...

  5. The Environmental Movement: Beyond Earth Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Beth

    1995-01-01

    This collection of articles looks at the history of Earth Day and the future of the environmental movement and environmental organizations. Examines reasons environmental organizations are losing support while the public remains committed to the environment. (LZ)

  6. EMDR effects on pursuit eye movements.

    PubMed

    Kapoula, Zoi; Yang, Qing; Bonnet, Audrey; Bourtoire, Pauline; Sandretto, Jean

    2010-05-21

    This study aimed to objectivize the quality of smooth pursuit eye movements in a standard laboratory task before and after an Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) session run on seven healthy volunteers. EMDR was applied on autobiographic worries causing moderate distress. The EMDR session was complete in 5 out of the 7 cases; distress measured by SUDS (Subjective Units of Discomfort Scale) decreased to a near zero value. Smooth pursuit eye movements were recorded by an Eyelink II video system before and after EMDR. For the five complete sessions, pursuit eye movement improved after their EMDR session. Notably, the number of saccade intrusions-catch-up saccades (CUS)-decreased and, reciprocally, there was an increase in the smooth components of the pursuit. Such an increase in the smoothness of the pursuit presumably reflects an improvement in the use of visual attention needed to follow the target accurately. Perhaps EMDR reduces distress thereby activating a cholinergic effect known to improve ocular pursuit.

  7. The Trajectories of Saccadic Eye Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahill, A. Terry; Stark, Lawrence

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the trajectories of saccadic eye movements, the control signals of the eye, and nature of the mechanisms that generate them, using the techniques of bioengineering in collecting the data. (GA)

  8. Inhibitory control of reaching movements in humans.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Giovanni; Pani, Pierpaolo; Paré, Martin; Ferraina, Stefano

    2006-09-01

    Behavioral flexibility provides a very large repertoire of actions and strategies, however, it carries a cost: a potential interference between different options. The voluntary control of behavior starts exactly with the ability of deciding between alternatives. Certainly inhibition plays a key role in this process. Here we examined the inhibitory control of reaching arm movements with the countermanding paradigm. Right-handed human subjects were asked to perform speeded reaching movements toward a visual target appearing either on the same or opposite side of the reaching arm (no-stop trials), but to withhold the commanded movement whenever an infrequent stop signal was presented (stop trials). As the delay between go and stop signals increased, subjects increasingly failed to inhibit the movement. From this inhibitory function and the reaction times of movements in no-stop trials, we estimated the otherwise unobservable duration of the stopping process, the stop signal reaction time (SSRT). We found that the SSRT for reaching movements was, on average, 206 ms and that it varied with the reaching arm and the target position even though the stop signal was a central stimulus. In fact, subjects were always faster to withhold reaching movements toward visual targets appearing on the same side of the reaching arm. This behavior strictly parallels the course of the reaction times of no-stop trials. These data show that the stop and go processes interacting in this countermanding task are independent, but most likely influenced by a common factor when under the control of the same hemisphere. In addition, we show that the point beyond which the response cannot be inhibited, the so-called point-of-no-return that divides controlled and ballistic phases of movement processing, lies after the inter-hemispheric transfer.

  9. Electrocorticogram encoding of upper extremity movement duration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; McCrimmon, Colin M; Shaw, Susan J; Millett, David E; Liu, Charles Y; Chui, Luis A; Nenadic, Zoran; Do, An H

    2014-01-01

    Electrocorticogram (ECoG) is a promising long-term signal acquisition platform for brain-computer interface (BCI) systems such as upper extremity prostheses. Several studies have demonstrated decoding of arm and finger trajectories from ECoG high-gamma band (80-160 Hz) signals. In this study, we systematically vary the velocity of three elementary movement types (pincer grasp, elbow and shoulder flexion/extension) to test whether the high-gamma band encodes for the entirety of the movements, or merely the movement onset. To this end, linear regression models were created for the durations and amplitudes of high-gamma power bursts and velocity deflections. One subject with 8×8 high-density ECoG grid (4 mm center-to-center electrode spacing) participated in the experiment. The results of the regression models indicated that the power burst durations varied directly with the movement durations (e.g. R(2)=0.71 and slope=1.0 s/s for elbow). The persistence of power bursts for the duration of the movement suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is likely active for the entire duration of a movement, instead of providing a marker for the movement onset. On the other hand, the amplitudes were less co-varied. Furthermore, the electrodes of maximum R(2) conformed to somatotopic arrangement of the brain. Also, electrodes responsible for flexion and extension movements could be resolved on the high-density grid. In summary, these findings suggest that M1 may be directly responsible for activating the individual muscle motor units, and future BCI may be able to utilize them for better control of prostheses.

  10. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    PubMed

    Harris, Christopher M

    2009-09-01

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  11. Visual gravity influences arm movement planning.

    PubMed

    Sciutti, Alessandra; Demougeot, Laurent; Berret, Bastien; Toma, Simone; Sandini, Giulio; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Pozzo, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    When submitted to a visuomotor rotation, subjects show rapid adaptation of visually guided arm reaching movements, indicated by a progressive reduction in reaching errors. In this study, we wanted to make a step forward by investigating to what extent this adaptation also implies changes into the motor plan. Up to now, classical visuomotor rotation paradigms have been performed on the horizontal plane, where the reaching motor plan in general requires the same kinematics (i.e., straight path and symmetric velocity profile). To overcome this limitation, we considered vertical and horizontal movement directions requiring specific velocity profiles. This way, a change in the motor plan due to the visuomotor conflict would be measurable in terms of a modification in the velocity profile of the reaching movement. Ten subjects performed horizontal and vertical reaching movements while observing a rotated visual feedback of their motion. We found that adaptation to a visuomotor rotation produces a significant change in the motor plan, i.e., changes to the symmetry of velocity profiles. This suggests that the central nervous system takes into account the visual information to plan a future motion, even if this causes the adoption of nonoptimal motor plans in terms of energy consumption. However, the influence of vision on arm movement planning is not fixed, but rather changes as a function of the visual orientation of the movement. Indeed, a clear influence on motion planning can be observed only when the movement is visually presented as oriented along the vertical direction. Thus vision contributes differently to the planning of arm pointing movements depending on motion orientation in space.

  12. Temporal eye movement strategies during naturalistic viewing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Helena X.; Freeman, Jeremy; Merriam, Elisha P.; Hasson, Uri; Heeger, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The deployment of eye movements to complex spatiotemporal stimuli likely involves a variety of cognitive factors. However, eye movements to movies are surprisingly reliable both within and across observers. We exploited and manipulated that reliability to characterize observers’ temporal viewing strategies. Introducing cuts and scrambling the temporal order of the resulting clips systematically changed eye movement reliability. We developed a computational model that exhibited this behavior and provided an excellent fit to the measured eye movement reliability. The model assumed that observers searched for, found, and tracked a point-of-interest, and that this process reset when there was a cut. The model did not require that eye movements depend on temporal context in any other way, and it managed to describe eye movements consistently across different observers and two movie sequences. Thus, we found no evidence for the integration of information over long time scales (greater than a second). The results are consistent with the idea that observers employ a simple tracking strategy even while viewing complex, engaging naturalistic stimuli. PMID:22262911

  13. Development of eye-movement control.

    PubMed

    Luna, Beatriz; Velanova, Katerina; Geier, Charles F

    2008-12-01

    Cognitive control of behavior continues to improve through adolescence in parallel with important brain maturational processes including synaptic pruning and myelination, which allow for efficient neuronal computations and the functional integration of widely distributed circuitries supporting top-down control of behavior. This is also a time when psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and mood disorders, emerge reflecting a particularly vulnerability to impairments in development during adolescence. Oculomotor studies provide a unique neuroscientific approach to make precise associations between cognitive control and brain circuitry during development that can inform us of impaired systems in psychopathology. In this review, we first describe the development of pursuit, fixation, and visually-guided saccadic eye movements, which collectively indicate early maturation of basic sensorimotor processes supporting reflexive, exogenously-driven eye movements. We then describe the literature on the development of the cognitive control of eye movements as reflected in the ability to inhibit a prepotent eye movement in the antisaccade task, as well as making an eye movement guided by on-line spatial information in working memory in the oculomotor delayed response task. Results indicate that the ability to make eye movements in a voluntary fashion driven by endogenous plans shows a protracted development into adolescence. Characterizing the transition through adolescence to adult-level cognitive control of behavior can inform models aimed at understanding the neurodevelopmental basis of psychiatric disorders.

  14. Predictive eye movements in natural vision

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Travis; Chajka, Kelly; Pelz, Jeff B.

    2012-01-01

    In the natural world, the brain must handle inherent delays in visual processing. This is a problem particularly during dynamic tasks. A possible solution to visuo-motor delays is prediction of a future state of the environment based on the current state and properties of the environment learned from experience. Prediction is well known to occur in both saccades and pursuit movements and is likely to depend on some kind of internal visual model as the basis for this prediction. However, most evidence comes from controlled laboratory studies using simple paradigms. In this study, we examine eye movements made in the context of demanding natural behavior, while playing squash. We show that prediction is a pervasive component of gaze behavior in this context. We show in addition that these predictive movements are extraordinarily precise and operate continuously in time across multiple trajectories and multiple movements. This suggests that prediction is based on complex dynamic visual models of the way that balls move, accumulated over extensive experience. Since eye, head, arm, and body movements all co-occur, it seems likely that a common internal model of predicted visual state is shared by different effectors to allow flexible coordination patterns. It is generally agreed that internal models are responsible for predicting future sensory state for control of body movements. The present work suggests that model-based prediction is likely to be a pervasive component in natural gaze control as well. PMID:22183755

  15. Movement disorders secondary to craniocerebral trauma.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Joachim K

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades it has been recognized that traumatic brain injury may result in various movement disorders. In survivors of severe head injury, post-traumatic movement disorders were reported in about 20%, and they persisted in about 10% of patients. The most frequent persisting movement disorder in this population is kinetic cerebellar outflow tremor in about 9%, followed by dystonia in about 4%. While tremor is associated most frequently with cerebellar or mesencephalic lesions, patients with dystonia frequently have basal ganglia or thalamic lesions. Moderate or mild traumatic brain injury only rarely causes persistent post-traumatic movement disorders. It appears that the frequency of post-traumatic movement disorders overall has been declining which most likely is secondary to improved treatment of brain injury. In patients with disabling post-traumatic movement disorders which are refractory to medical treatment, stereotactic neurosurgery can provide long-lasting benefit. While in the past the primary option for severe kinetic tremor was thalamotomy and for dystonia thalamotomy or pallidotomy, today deep brain stimulation has become the preferred treatment. Parkinsonism is a rare consequence of single head injury, but repeated head injury such as seen in boxing can result in chronic encephalopathy with parkinsonian features. While there is still controversy whether or not head injury is a risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease, recent studies indicate that genetic susceptibility might be relevant.

  16. Space transformation for understanding group movement.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, Natalia; Andrienko, Gennady; Barrett, Louise; Dostie, Marcus; Henzi, Peter

    2013-12-01

    We suggest a methodology for analyzing movement behaviors of individuals moving in a group. Group movement is analyzed at two levels of granularity: the group as a whole and the individuals it comprises. For analyzing the relative positions and movements of the individuals with respect to the rest of the group, we apply space transformation, in which the trajectories of the individuals are converted from geographical space to an abstract 'group space'. The group space reference system is defined by both the position of the group center, which is taken as the coordinate origin, and the direction of the group's movement. Based on the individuals' positions mapped onto the group space, we can compare the behaviors of different individuals, determine their roles and/or ranks within the groups, and, possibly, understand how group movement is organized. The utility of the methodology has been evaluated by applying it to a set of real data concerning movements of wild social animals and discussing the results with experts in animal ethology.

  17. Movement disorder symptoms associated with Unified ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objectives: The UPDRS is a commonly used neurological measurement to assess the presence and severity of parkinsonian symptoms. It has also been used to assess symptoms associated with Mn exposure. Objectives: to determine 1) if movement disorder symptoms were associated with UPDRS: Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Motor abnormalities; and 2) which symptoms were most related to increased abnormalities on these UPDRS subscales. Participants & Methods: Correlations between self-reported movement disorder symptoms from a health questionnaire and scores obtained on UPDRS: ADL and Motor subscales, and the Bradykinesia domain of the Motor subscale, were assessed during a medical examination among 185 Mn-exposed participants from two Ohio towns. Partial correlations were used for statistical analyses, controlling for age, sex, education and a history of musculoskeletal disease.Results: The presence of movement disorder symptoms was positively associated with ADL (pr =0.647, p = <0.001), Motor (pr =0.449, p = <0.001), and Bradykinesia (pr =0.418, p = <0.001) domains on the UPDRS. Specific movement disorder symptoms most strongly associated with increased ADL and Motor scores included having difficulty getting out of chairs (pr =0.458, p = <0.001), writing (pr =0.481, p = <0.001), skilled movements (pr =0.478, p = <0.001), loss of coordination/balance (pr =0.457, p = <0.001), changes in walking (pr =0.412, p = <0.001) and slowness of movement (pr =0.539, p = <0.0

  18. The bHLH protein ROX acts in concert with RAX1 and LAS to modulate axillary meristem formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Wang, Quan; Schmitz, Gregor; Müller, Dörte; Theres, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    During post-embryonic shoot development, new meristems are initiated in the axils of leaves. They produce secondary axes of growth that determine morphological plasticity and reproductive efficiency in higher plants. In this study, we describe the role of the bHLH-protein-encoding Arabidopsis gene REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEM FORMATION (ROX), which is the ortholog of the branching regulators LAX PANICLE1 (LAX1) in rice and barren stalk1 (ba1) in maize. rox mutants display compromised axillary bud formation during vegetative shoot development, and combination of rox mutants with mutations in RAX1 and LAS, two key regulators of axillary meristem initiation, enhances their branching defects. In contrast to lax1 and ba1, flower development is unaffected in rox mutants. Over-expression of ROX leads to formation of accessory side shoots. ROX mRNA accumulates at the adaxial boundary of leaf and flower primordia. However, in the vegetative phase, axillary meristems initiate after ROX expression has terminated, suggesting an indirect role for ROX in meristem formation. During vegetative development, ROX expression is dependent on RAX1 and LAS activity, and all three genes act in concert to modulate axillary meristem formation.

  19. Documentation of reticulate evolution in peonies (Paeonia) using internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA: implications for biogeography and concerted evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Sang, T; Crawford, D J; Stuessy, T F

    1995-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA of 33 species of genus Paeonia (Paeoniaceae) were sequenced. In section Paeonia, different patterns of nucleotide additivity were detected in 14 diploid and tetraploid species at sites that are variable in the other 12 species of the section, suggesting that reticulate evolution has occurred. Phylogenetic relationships of species that do not show additivity, and thus ostensibly were not derived through hybridization, were reconstructed by parsimony analysis. The taxa presumably derived through reticulate evolution were then added to the phylogenetic tree according to additivity from putative parents. The study provides an example of successfully using ITS sequences to reconstruct reticulate evolution in plants and further demonstrates that the sequence data could be highly informative and accurate for detecting hybridization. Maintenance of parental sequences in the species of hybrid origin is likely due to slowing of concerted evolution caused by the long generation time of peonies. The partial and uneven homogenization of parental sequences displayed in nine species of putative hybrid origin may have resulted from gradients of gene conversion. The documented hybridizations may have occurred since the Pleistocene glaciations. The species of hybrid origin and their putative parents are now distantly allopatric. Reconstruction of reticulate evolution with sequence data, therefore, provides gene records for distributional histories of some of the parental species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7624325

  20. Maintenance of very long telomeres by recombination in the Kluyveromyces lactis stn1-M1 mutant involves extreme telomeric turnover, telomeric circles, and concerted telomeric amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianing; McEachern, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Some cancers utilize the recombination-dependent process of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to maintain long heterogeneous telomeres. Here, we studied the recombinational telomere elongation (RTE) of the Kluyveromyces lactis stn1-M1 mutant. We found that the total amount of the abundant telomeric DNA in stn1-M1 cells is subject to rapid variation and that it is likely to be primarily extrachromosomal. Rad50 and Rad51, known to be required for different RTE pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were not essential for the production of either long telomeres or telomeric circles in stn1-M1 cells. Circles of DNA containing telomeric repeats (t-circles) either present at the point of establishment of long telomeres or introduced later into stn1-M1 cells each led to the formation of long tandem arrays of the t-circle's sequence, which were incorporated at multiple telomeres. These tandem arrays were extraordinarily unstable and showed evidence of repeated rounds of concerted amplification. Our results suggest that the maintenance of telomeres in the stn1-M1 mutant involves extreme turnover of telomeric sequences from processes including both large deletions and the copying of t-circles.