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Sample records for concrete compressive strength

  1. Compressive strength of marine material mixed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan; Parung, H.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Djamaluddin, R.

    2017-11-01

    Many cement factories have been incorporated fly ash with clinker cement to produce blended cement. PCC is a type of blended cement incorporated fly ash that produced in Indonesia cement factories. To promote the sustainable development in the remote islands this present paper attempted to study the suitability of sea water, marine sand that available abundantly surround the remote island with Portland Composite Cement (PCC) and crushed river stone to produce concrete. Slump test was conducted to evaluate the workability of fresh concrete and also compressive strength with stress-strain relationship was carried out to evaluate the hardened concrete that cured with two curing condition (e.g. sea water curing, and tap water-wet burlap curing). Test result indicated that fresh concrete had proper workability and all hardened specimens appeared a good compaction result. Compressive strength of specimens cured which sea water was higher than the specimens which cured by tap water-wet burlap where stress-strain behavior of specimens made with sea water, marine sand, and PCC had similar behavior with specimens which made with PCC and tap water.

  2. Effect of core geometry and size on concrete compressive strength.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the in-place concrete strength for acceptance for a structural member with : potentially substandard strength, the compressive strength of cores may be required for : assessment. Depending on the geometry and size of the core specimen, th...

  3. Effect of concrete strength gradation to the compressive strength of graded concrete, a numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, M. Mirza Abdillah; Aylie, Han; Gan, Buntara Sthenly; Umniati, B. Sri; Risdanareni, Puput; Fauziyah, Shifa

    2017-09-01

    Concrete casting, compacting method, and characteristic of the concrete material determine the performance of concrete as building element due to the material uniformity issue. Previous studies show that gradation in strength exists on building member by nature and negatively influence the load carrying capacity of the member. A pilot research had modeled the concrete gradation in strength with controllable variable and observed that the weakest material determines the strength of graded concrete through uniaxial compressive loading test. This research intends to confirm the recent finding by a numerical approach with extensive variables of strength disparity. The finite element analysis was conducted using the Strand7 nonlinear program. The results displayed that the increase of strength disparity in graded concrete models leads to the slight reduction of models strength. A substantial difference in displacement response is encountered on the models for the small disparity of concrete strength. However, the higher strength of concrete mix in the graded concrete models contributes to the rise of material stiffness that provides a beneficial purpose for serviceability of building members.

  4. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  5. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  6. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  7. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  8. Compressive strength and hydration processes of concrete with recycled aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, Eduardus A.B., E-mail: e.a.b.koenders@coc.ufrj.br; Microlab, Delft University of Technology; Pepe, Marco, E-mail: mapepe@unisa.it

    2014-02-15

    This paper deals with the correlation between the time evolution of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength of Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC) for different water to cement ratios and initial moisture conditions of the Recycled Concrete Aggregates (RCAs). Particularly, the influence of such moisture conditions is investigated by monitoring the hydration process and determining the compressive strength development of fully dry or fully saturated recycled aggregates in four RAC mixtures. Hydration processes are monitored via temperature measurements in hardening concrete samples and the time evolution of the degree of hydration is determined through a 1D hydration and heatmore » flow model. The effect of the initial moisture condition of RCAs employed in the considered concrete mixtures clearly emerges from this study. In fact, a novel conceptual method is proposed to predict the compressive strength of RAC-systems, from the initial mixture parameters and the hardening conditions. -- Highlights: •The concrete industry is more and more concerned with sustainability issues. •The use of recycled aggregates is a promising solution to enhance sustainability. •Recycled aggregates affect both hydration processes and compressive strength. •A fundamental approach is proposed to unveil the influence of recycled aggregates. •Some experimental comparisons are presented to validate the proposed approach.« less

  9. Investigation of low compressive strengths of concrete in paving, precast and structural concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-08-01

    This research examines the causes for a high incidence of catastrophically low compressive strengths, primarily on structural concrete, during the 1997 construction season. The source for the low strengths was poor aggregate-paste bond associated wit...

  10. Compression Strength of Sulfur Concrete Subjected to Extreme Cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur concrete cubes were cycled between liquid nitrogen and room temperature to simulate extreme exposure conditions. Subsequent compression testing showed the strength of cycled samples to be roughly five times less than those non-cycled. Fracture surface examination showed de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material in the cycled samples but not in those non-cycled. The large discrepancy found, between the samples is attributed to the relative thermal properties of the materials constituting the concrete.

  11. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-12-08

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete's compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  12. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete’s compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength. PMID:28788279

  13. Compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption of concrete containing palm oil kernel shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Xiang-ONG, Jun; Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Hamid, Noor Azlina Abdul; Kuzaiman, Salsabila; Ali, Adiwijaya

    2017-11-01

    Effect of inclusion of palm oil kernel shell (PKS) and palm oil fibre (POF) in concrete was investigated on the compressive strength and flexural strength. In addition, investigation of palm oil kernel shell on concrete water absorption was also conducted. Total of 48 concrete cubes and 24 concrete prisms with the size of 100mm × 100mm × 100mm and 100mm × 100mm × 500mm were prepared, respectively. Four (4) series of concrete mix consists of coarse aggregate was replaced by 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% palm kernel shell and each series were divided into two (2) main group. The first group is without POF, while the second group was mixed with the 5cm length of 0.25% of the POF volume fraction. All specimen were tested after 7 and 28 days of water curing for a compression test, and flexural test at 28 days of curing period. Water absorption test was conducted on concrete cube age 28 days. The results showed that the replacement of PKS achieves lower compressive and flexural strength in comparison with conventional concrete. However, the 25% replacement of PKS concrete showed acceptable compressive strength which within the range of requirement for structural concrete. Meanwhile, the POF which should act as matrix reinforcement showed no enhancement in flexural strength due to the balling effect in concrete. As expected, water absorption was increasing with the increasing of PKS in the concrete cause by the porous characteristics of PKS

  14. Compressive and tensile strength for concrete containing coal bottom ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliki, A. I. F. Ahmad; Shahidan, S.; Ali, N.; Ramzi Hannan, N. I. R.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Azmi, M. A. Mohammad; Rahim, M. Abdul

    2017-11-01

    The increasing demand in the construction industry will lead to the depletion of materials used in construction sites such as sand. Due to this situation, coal bottom ash (CBA) was selected as a replacement for sand. CBA is a by-product of coal combustion from power plants. CBA has particles which are angular, irregular and porous with a rough surface texture. CBA also has the appearance and particle size distribution similar to river sand. Therefore, these properties of CBA make it attractive to be used as fine aggregate replacement in concrete. The objectives of this study were to determine the properties of CBA concrete and to evaluate the optimum percentage of CBA to be used in concrete as fine aggregate replacement. The CBA was collected at Tanjung Bin power plant. The mechanical experiment (compressive and tensile strength test) was conducted on CBA concrete. Before starting the mechanical experiment, cubic and cylindrical specimens with dimensions measuring 100 × 100 × 100 mm and 150 × 300 mm were produced based on the percentage of coal bottom ash in this study which is 0% as the control specimen. Meanwhile 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90% and 100% of CBA were used to replace the fine aggregates. The CBA concrete samples were cured for 7 days and 28 days respectively to maintain the rate of hydration and moisture. After the experimental work was done, it can be concluded that the optimum percentage of CBA as fine aggregate is 60% for a curing period of both 7 days and 28 days with the total compressive strength of 36.4 Mpa and 46.2 Mpa respectively. However, the optimum percentage for tensile strength is at 70% CBA for a curing period of both 7 days and 28 days with a tensile strength of 3.03 MPa and 3.63 MPa respectively.

  15. Correlation between compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of high strength concrete incorporating chopped basalt fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, Nasir; Fadhilnuruddin, Muhd; Elshekh, Ali Elheber Ahmed; Fathi, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV), is considered as the most important test for non-destructive techniques that are used to evaluate the mechanical characteristics of high strength concrete (HSC). The relationship between the compressive strength of HSC containing chopped basalt fibre stands (CBSF) and UPV was investigated. The concrete specimens were prepared using a different ratio of CBSF as internal strengthening materials. The compressive strength measurements were conducted at the sample ages of 3, 7, 28, 56 and 90 days; whilst, the ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured at 28 days. The result of HSC's compressive strength with the chopped basalt fibre did not show any improvement; instead, it was decreased. The UPV of the chopped basalt fibre reinforced concrete has been found to be less than that of the control mix for each addition ratio of the basalt fibre. A relationship plot is gained between the cube compressive strength for HSC and UPV with various amounts of chopped basalt fibres.

  16. Influence of bottom ash of palm oil on compressive strength of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, Andika Ade Indra; Basyaruddin, Laksono, Muhamad Hasby; Muntaha, Mohamad

    2017-11-01

    The technological development of concrete demands innovation regarding the alternative material as a part of the effort in improving quality and minimizing reliance on currently used raw materials such as bottom ash of palm oil. Bottom ash known as domestic waste stemming from palm oil cultivation in East Kalimantan contains silica. Like cement in texture and size, bottom ash can be mixed with concrete in which the silica in concrete could help increase the compressive strength of concrete. This research was conducted by comparing between normal concrete and concrete containing bottom ash as which the materials were apart of cement replacement. The bottom ash used in this research had to pass sieve size (#200). The composition tested in this research involved ratio between cement and bottom ash with the following percentages: 100%: 0%, 90%: 10%, 85%: 15% and 80%: 20%. Planned to be within the same amount of compressive strength (fc 25 MPa), the compressive strength of concrete was tested at the age of 7, 14, and 28 days. Research result shows that the addition of bottom ash to concrete influenced workability in concrete, but it did not significantly influence the compressive strength of concrete. Based on the result of compressive strength test, the optimal compressive strength was obtained from the mixture of 100% cement and 0% bottom ash.

  17. The increase of compressive strength of natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilorini, Rr. M. I. Retno; Santosa, Budi; Rejeki, V. G. Sri; Riangsari, M. F. Devita; Hananta, Yan's. Dianaga

    2017-03-01

    Polymer modified concrete is one of some concrete technology innovations to meet the need of strong and durable concrete. Previous research found that Moringa oleifera can be applied as natural polymer modifiers into mortars. Natural polymer modified mortar using Moringa oleifera is proven to increase their compressive strength significantly. In this resesearch, Moringa oleifera seeds have been grinded and added into concrete mix for natural polymer modified concrete, based on the optimum composition of previous research. The research investigated the increase of compressive strength of polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera as natural polymer modifiers. There were 3 compositions of natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera referred to previous research optimum compositions. Several cylinder of 10 cm x 20 cm specimens were produced and tested for compressive strength at age 7, 14, and, 28 days. The research meets conclusions: (1) Natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera, with and without skin, has higher compressive strength compared to natural polymer modified mortar with Moringa oleifera and also control specimens; (2) Natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera without skin is achieved by specimens contains Moringa oleifera that is 0.2% of cement weight; and (3) The compressive strength increase of natural polymer modified concrete with Moringa oleifera without skin is about 168.11-221.29% compared to control specimens

  18. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions. PMID:28787998

  19. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-03-18

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions.

  20. A probabilistic mechanical model for prediction of aggregates’ size distribution effect on concrete compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miled, Karim; Limam, Oualid; Sab, Karam

    2012-06-01

    To predict aggregates' size distribution effect on the concrete compressive strength, a probabilistic mechanical model is proposed. Within this model, a Voronoi tessellation of a set of non-overlapping and rigid spherical aggregates is used to describe the concrete microstructure. Moreover, aggregates' diameters are defined as statistical variables and their size distribution function is identified to the experimental sieve curve. Then, an inter-aggregate failure criterion is proposed to describe the compressive-shear crushing of the hardened cement paste when concrete is subjected to uniaxial compression. Using a homogenization approach based on statistical homogenization and on geometrical simplifications, an analytical formula predicting the concrete compressive strength is obtained. This formula highlights the effects of cement paste strength and aggregates' size distribution and volume fraction on the concrete compressive strength. According to the proposed model, increasing the concrete strength for the same cement paste and the same aggregates' volume fraction is obtained by decreasing both aggregates' maximum size and the percentage of coarse aggregates. Finally, the validity of the model has been discussed through a comparison with experimental results (15 concrete compressive strengths ranging between 46 and 106 MPa) taken from literature and showing a good agreement with the model predictions.

  1. An Exploratory Compressive Strength Of Concrete Containing Modified Artificial Polyethylene Aggregate (MAPEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadipramana, J.; Mokhatar, S. N.; Samad, A. A. A.; Hakim, N. F. A.

    2016-11-01

    Concrete is widely used in the world as building and construction material. However, the constituent materials used in concrete are high cost when associated with the global economic recession. This exploratory aspires to have an alternative source of replacing natural aggregate with plastic wastes. An investigation of the Modified Artificial Polyethylene Aggregate (MAPEA) as natural aggregate replacement in concrete through an experimental work was conducted in this study. The MAPEA was created to improve the bonding ability of Artificial Polyethylene Aggregate (APEA) with the cement paste. The concrete was mixed with 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12% of APEA and MAPEA for 14 and 28 curing days, respectively. Furthermore, the compressive strength test was conducted to find out the optimum composition of MAPEA in concrete and compared to the APEA concrete. Besides, this study observed the influence and behaviour of MAPEA in concrete. Therefore, the Scanning Electron Microscopy was applied to observe the microstructure of MAPEA and APEA concrete. The results showed the use of high composition of an artificial aggregate resulted inferior strength on the concrete and 3% MAPEA in the concrete mix was highest compressive strength than other content. The modification of APEA (MAPEA) concrete increased its strength due to its surface roughness. However, the interfacial zone cracking was still found and decreased the strength of MAPEA concrete especially when it was age 28 days.

  2. Estimating the concrete compressive strength using hard clustering and fuzzy clustering based regression techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagwani, Naresh Kumar; Deo, Shirish V

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the compressive strength of concrete is important for activities like construction arrangement, prestressing operations, and proportioning new mixtures and for the quality assurance. Regression techniques are most widely used for prediction tasks where relationship between the independent variables and dependent (prediction) variable is identified. The accuracy of the regression techniques for prediction can be improved if clustering can be used along with regression. Clustering along with regression will ensure the more accurate curve fitting between the dependent and independent variables. In this work cluster regression technique is applied for estimating the compressive strength of the concrete and a novel state of the art is proposed for predicting the concrete compressive strength. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that clustering along with regression ensures less prediction errors for estimating the concrete compressive strength. The proposed technique consists of two major stages: in the first stage, clustering is used to group the similar characteristics concrete data and then in the second stage regression techniques are applied over these clusters (groups) to predict the compressive strength from individual clusters. It is found from experiments that clustering along with regression techniques gives minimum errors for predicting compressive strength of concrete; also fuzzy clustering algorithm C-means performs better than K-means algorithm.

  3. Estimating the Concrete Compressive Strength Using Hard Clustering and Fuzzy Clustering Based Regression Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nagwani, Naresh Kumar; Deo, Shirish V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the compressive strength of concrete is important for activities like construction arrangement, prestressing operations, and proportioning new mixtures and for the quality assurance. Regression techniques are most widely used for prediction tasks where relationship between the independent variables and dependent (prediction) variable is identified. The accuracy of the regression techniques for prediction can be improved if clustering can be used along with regression. Clustering along with regression will ensure the more accurate curve fitting between the dependent and independent variables. In this work cluster regression technique is applied for estimating the compressive strength of the concrete and a novel state of the art is proposed for predicting the concrete compressive strength. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that clustering along with regression ensures less prediction errors for estimating the concrete compressive strength. The proposed technique consists of two major stages: in the first stage, clustering is used to group the similar characteristics concrete data and then in the second stage regression techniques are applied over these clusters (groups) to predict the compressive strength from individual clusters. It is found from experiments that clustering along with regression techniques gives minimum errors for predicting compressive strength of concrete; also fuzzy clustering algorithm C-means performs better than K-means algorithm. PMID:25374939

  4. Effects of heating durations on normal concrete residual properties: compressive strength and mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed; Shahidan, Shahiron; Khaida Baharuddin, Nur; Beddu, Salmia; Hisyam Abu Bakar, Badorul

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the effects of high temperature with five different heating durations on residual properties of 30 MPa normal concrete. Concrete cubes were being heated up to 600°C for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes. The temperature will keep constant for 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 minutes. The standard temperature-time curve ISO 834 is referred to. After heating the specimen were left to cool in the furnace and removed. After cooling down to ambient temperature, the residual mass and residual compressive strength were observed. The obtained result shows that, the compressive strength of concrete decrease as the heating duration increases. This heating duration influence, might affects the loss of free water present and decomposition of hydration products in concrete. As the heating duration increases, the amount of water evaporated also increases led to loss in concrete mass. Conclusively, the percentage of mass and compressive strength loss increased as the heating duration increased.

  5. Evaluation of Early-Age Concrete Compressive Strength with Ultrasonic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Seok; Kang, Jun Won; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2017-08-07

    Surface wave velocity measurement of concrete using ultrasonic sensors requires testing on only one side of a member. Thus, it is applicable to concrete cast inside a form and is often used to detect flaws and evaluate the compressive strength of hardened concrete. Predicting the in situ concrete strength at a very early stage inside the form helps with determining the appropriate form removal time and reducing construction time and costs. In this paper, the feasibility of using surface wave velocities to predict the strength of in situ concrete inside the form at a very early stage was evaluated. Ultrasonic sensors were used to measure a series of surface waves for concrete inside a form in the first 24 h after placement. A continuous wavelet transform was used to compute the travel time of the propagating surface waves. The cylindrical compressive strength and penetration resistance tests were also performed during the test period. Four mixtures and five curing temperatures were used for the specimens. The surface wave velocity was confirmed to be applicable to estimating the concrete strength at a very early age in wall-like elements. An empirical formula is proposed for evaluating the early-age compressive strength of concrete considering the 95% prediction intervals.

  6. Evaluation of Early-Age Concrete Compressive Strength with Ultrasonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Seok; Kang, Jun Won; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2017-01-01

    Surface wave velocity measurement of concrete using ultrasonic sensors requires testing on only one side of a member. Thus, it is applicable to concrete cast inside a form and is often used to detect flaws and evaluate the compressive strength of hardened concrete. Predicting the in situ concrete strength at a very early stage inside the form helps with determining the appropriate form removal time and reducing construction time and costs. In this paper, the feasibility of using surface wave velocities to predict the strength of in situ concrete inside the form at a very early stage was evaluated. Ultrasonic sensors were used to measure a series of surface waves for concrete inside a form in the first 24 h after placement. A continuous wavelet transform was used to compute the travel time of the propagating surface waves. The cylindrical compressive strength and penetration resistance tests were also performed during the test period. Four mixtures and five curing temperatures were used for the specimens. The surface wave velocity was confirmed to be applicable to estimating the concrete strength at a very early age in wall-like elements. An empirical formula is proposed for evaluating the early-age compressive strength of concrete considering the 95% prediction intervals. PMID:28783128

  7. Influence of Waste Tyre Crumb Rubber on Compressive Strength, Static Modulus of Elasticity and Flexural Strength of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haridharan, M. K.; Bharathi Murugan, R.; Natarajan, C.; Muthukannan, M.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the experimental investigations was carried out to find the compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and flexural strength of concrete mixtures, in which natural sand was partially replaced with Waste Tyre Crumb Rubber (WTCR). River sand was replaced with five different percentages (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%) of WTCR by volume. The main objective of the experimental investigation is to find the relationship between static modulus of elasticity and flexural strength with compressive strength of concrete with WTCR. The experimentally obtainedstatic modulus of elasticity and flexural strength results comparing with the theoretical values (various country codes recommendations).

  8. Foamed concrete containing rice husk ash as sand replacement: an experimental study on compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rum, R. H. M.; Jaini, Z. M.; Boon, K. H.; Khairaddin, S. A. A.; Rahman, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    This study presents the utilization of rice husk ash (RHA) as sand replacement in foamed concrete. The study focuses on the effect of RHA on the compressive strength of foamed concrete. RHA contains high pozzolanic material that reacts with cementitious to enhance the strength and durability of foamed concrete. RHA also acts as filler causing the foamed concrete to become denser while retaining its unique low density. A total 243 cube specimens was prepared for the compression test. Two sets of mix design were employed at water-cement (W/C) ratio of 0.55, 0.60 and cement-sand ratio of 0.50, 0.33. The results revealed that the presence of RHA as sand replacement resulted in an increase in the compressive strength of foamed concrete. Moreover, 30% to 40% RHA was the optimum content level, contributing to the compressive strength of 18.1 MPa to 22.4 MPa. The W/C ratio and superplasticiser dosage play small roles in improving workability. In contrast, density governs the compressive strength of foamed concrete.

  9. Modeling of Compressive Strength for Self-Consolidating High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    PubMed Central

    Safiuddin, Md.; Raman, Sudharshan N.; Abdus Salam, Md.; Jumaat, Mohd. Zamin

    2016-01-01

    Modeling is a very useful method for the performance prediction of concrete. Most of the models available in literature are related to the compressive strength because it is a major mechanical property used in concrete design. Many attempts were taken to develop suitable mathematical models for the prediction of compressive strength of different concretes, but not for self-consolidating high-strength concrete (SCHSC) containing palm oil fuel ash (POFA). The present study has used artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict the compressive strength of SCHSC incorporating POFA. The ANN model has been developed and validated in this research using the mix proportioning and experimental strength data of 20 different SCHSC mixes. Seventy percent (70%) of the data were used to carry out the training of the ANN model. The remaining 30% of the data were used for testing the model. The training of the ANN model was stopped when the root mean square error (RMSE) and the percentage of good patterns was 0.001 and ≈100%, respectively. The predicted compressive strength values obtained from the trained ANN model were much closer to the experimental values of compressive strength. The coefficient of determination (R2) for the relationship between the predicted and experimental compressive strengths was 0.9486, which shows the higher degree of accuracy of the network pattern. Furthermore, the predicted compressive strength was found very close to the experimental compressive strength during the testing process of the ANN model. The absolute and percentage relative errors in the testing process were significantly low with a mean value of 1.74 MPa and 3.13%, respectively, which indicated that the compressive strength of SCHSC including POFA can be efficiently predicted by the ANN. PMID:28773520

  10. Modeling of Compressive Strength for Self-Consolidating High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Palm Oil Fuel Ash.

    PubMed

    Safiuddin, Md; Raman, Sudharshan N; Abdus Salam, Md; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2016-05-20

    Modeling is a very useful method for the performance prediction of concrete. Most of the models available in literature are related to the compressive strength because it is a major mechanical property used in concrete design. Many attempts were taken to develop suitable mathematical models for the prediction of compressive strength of different concretes, but not for self-consolidating high-strength concrete (SCHSC) containing palm oil fuel ash (POFA). The present study has used artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict the compressive strength of SCHSC incorporating POFA. The ANN model has been developed and validated in this research using the mix proportioning and experimental strength data of 20 different SCHSC mixes. Seventy percent (70%) of the data were used to carry out the training of the ANN model. The remaining 30% of the data were used for testing the model. The training of the ANN model was stopped when the root mean square error (RMSE) and the percentage of good patterns was 0.001 and ≈100%, respectively. The predicted compressive strength values obtained from the trained ANN model were much closer to the experimental values of compressive strength. The coefficient of determination ( R ²) for the relationship between the predicted and experimental compressive strengths was 0.9486, which shows the higher degree of accuracy of the network pattern. Furthermore, the predicted compressive strength was found very close to the experimental compressive strength during the testing process of the ANN model. The absolute and percentage relative errors in the testing process were significantly low with a mean value of 1.74 MPa and 3.13%, respectively, which indicated that the compressive strength of SCHSC including POFA can be efficiently predicted by the ANN.

  11. Compressive Strength and Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete with Cubed Waste Tire Rubbers as Coarse Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryanto, Y.; Hermanto, N. I. S.; Pamudji, G.; Wardana, K. P.

    2017-11-01

    One feasible solution to overcome the issue of tire disposal waste is the use of waste tire rubber to replace aggregate in concrete. We have conducted an experimental investigation on the effect of rubber tire waste aggregate in cuboid form on the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity of concrete. The test was performed on 72 cylindrical specimens with the height of 300 mm and diameter of 150 mm. We found that the workability of concrete with waste tire rubber aggregate has increased. The concrete density with waste tire rubber aggregate was decreased, and so was the compressive strength. The decrease of compressive strength is up to 64.34%. If the content of waste tire rubber aggregate is more than 40%, then the resulting concrete cannot be categorized as structural concrete. The modulus of elasticity decreased to 59.77%. The theoretical equation developed to determine the modulus of elasticity of concrete with rubber tire waste aggregate has an accuracy of 84.27%.

  12. Effect of mineral admixtures on kinetic property and compressive strength of self Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagalur Mahalingasharma, Srishaila; Prakash, Parasivamurthy; Vishwanath, K. N.; Jawali, Veena

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents experimental investigations made on the influence of chemical, physical, morphological and mineralogical properties of mineral admixtures such as fly ash, ground granulate blast furnace slag, metakaoline and micro silica used as a replacement of cement in self compacting concrete on workability and compressive strength. Nineteen concrete mixes were cast by replacing with cement by fly ash or ground granulated blast furnace slag as binary blend at 30%, 40%, 50% and with addition of micro silica and metakaoline at 10% as a ternary blend with fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag and obtained results were compare with control mix. Water powder ratio 0.3 and super plasticizer dosage 1% of cementitious material was kept constant for all the mixes. The self compacting concrete tested for slump flow, V-funnel, L-Box, J-Ring, T50, and compressive strength on concrete cube were determined at age of 3, 7, 28, 56, 90 days.

  13. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods. PMID:28772472

  14. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC) Concrete.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yong

    2017-01-26

    Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC) concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel-space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  15. Early age compressive strength, porosity, and sorptivity of concrete using peat water to produce and cure concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivia, Monita; Ismeddiyanto, Wibisono, Gunawan; Sitompul, Iskandar R.

    2017-09-01

    Construction in peatland has faced scarce water sources for mixing and curing concrete. It is known that peat water has high organic content and low pH that can be harmful to concrete in the environment. In some remote areas in Riau Province, contractors used peat water directly without sufficient treatments to comply with SKSNI requirements of concrete mixing water. This paper presents a study of compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and blended OPC-Palm Oil Fuel Ash (OPC-POFA) concrete. The specimens were mixed using natural water and peat water, then some of them were cured in fresh water and peat water. Six mixtures were investigated using a variation of cement, mixing water and curing water. Tap water is used as control mixing and curing water for all specimens. The compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity were calculated at seven and 28 days. Results indicate that the use of peat water will cause low compressive strength, high porosity and sorptivity for both OPC and OPC-POFA concrete. Using peat water and curing the specimens in tap water could improve the early strength, porosity and sorptivity of OPC concrete; however, it has an adverse effect on OPC-POFA specimens. The properties of early age concrete of both types (OPC and OPC-POFA) using peat water were as good as those with tap water. Therefore, it is suggested that peat water should be considered as mixing and curing water for concrete where tap water resources are scarce. Investigation of its long-term properties, as well as extending the observed age of concrete is recommended before any use of peat water.

  16. Effect of rice husk ash and fly ash on the compressive strength of high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lam, Tang; Bulgakov, Boris; Aleksandrova, Olga; Larsen, Oksana; Anh, Pham Ngoc

    2018-03-01

    The usage of industrial and agricultural wastes for building materials production plays an important role to improve the environment and economy by preserving nature materials and land resources, reducing land, water and air pollution as well as organizing and storing waste costs. This study mainly focuses on mathematical modeling dependence of the compressive strength of high performance concrete (HPC) at the ages of 3, 7 and 28 days on the amount of rice husk ash (RHA) and fly ash (FA), which are added to the concrete mixtures by using the Central composite rotatable design. The result of this study provides the second-order regression equation of objective function, the images of the surface expression and the corresponding contours of the objective function of the regression equation, as the optimal points of HPC compressive strength. These objective functions, which are the compressive strength values of HPC at the ages of 3, 7 and 28 days, depend on two input variables as: x1 (amount of RHA) and x2 (amount of FA). The Maple 13 program, solving the second-order regression equation, determines the optimum composition of the concrete mixture for obtaining high performance concrete and calculates the maximum value of the HPC compressive strength at the ages of 28 days. The results containMaxR28HPC = 76.716 MPa when RHA = 0.1251 and FA = 0.3119 by mass of Portland cement.

  17. Compressive and flexural strength of concrete containing palm oil biomass clinker and polypropylene fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. H. Wan; Mangi, Sajjad Ali; Burhanudin, M. K.; Ridzuan, M. B.; Jamaluddin, N.; Shahidan, S.; Wong, YH; Faisal, SK; Fadzil, M. A.; Ramadhansyah, P. J.; Ayop, S. S.; Othman, N. H.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the effects of using palm oil biomass (POB) clinker with polypropylene (PP) fibres in concrete on its compressive and flexural strength performances. Due to infrastructural development works, the use of concrete in the construction industry has been increased. Simultaneously, it raises the demand natural sand, which causes depletion of natural resources. While considering the environmental and economic benefits, the utilization of industrial waste by-products in concrete will be the alternative solution of the problem. Among the waste products, one of such waste by-product is the palm oil biomass clinker, which is a waste product from burning processes of palm oil fibres. Therefore, it is important to utilize palm oil biomass clinker as partial replacement of fine aggregates in concrete. Considering the facts, an experimental study was conducted to find out the potential usage of palm oil fibres in concrete. In this study, total 48 number of specimens were cast to evaluate the compressive and flexural strength performances. Polypropylene fibre was added in concrete at the rate of 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%, and sand was replaced at a constant rate of 10% with palm oil biomass clinker. The flexural strength of concrete was noticed in the range of 2.25 MPa and 2.29 MPa, whereas, the higher value of flexural strength was recorded with 0.4% polypropylene fibre addition. Hence, these results show that the strength performances of concrete containing POB clinker could be improved with the addition of polypropylene fibre.

  18. Effect of silica fume on compressive strength of oil-polluted concrete in different marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabadi, Hamid; Sayareh, Sina; Sarkardeh, Hamed

    2017-12-01

    In the present research, effect of silica fume as an additive and oil polluted sands as aggregates on compressive strength of concrete were investigated experimentally. The amount of oil in the designed mixtures was assumed to be constant and equal to 2% of the sand weight. Silica fume accounting for 10%, 15% and 20% of the weight is added to the designed mixture. After preparation and curing, concrete specimens were placed into the three different conditions: fresh, brackish and saltwater environments (submerged in fresh water, alternation of exposed in air & submerged in sea water and submerged in sea water). The result of compressive strength tests shows that the compressive strength of the specimens consisting of silica fume increases significantly in comparison with the control specimens in all three environments. The compressive strength of the concrete with 15% silica fume content was about 30% to 50% higher than that of control specimens in all tested environments under the condition of using polluted aggregates in the designed mixture.

  19. Dataset on predictive compressive strength model for self-compacting concrete.

    PubMed

    Ofuyatan, O M; Edeki, S O

    2018-04-01

    The determination of compressive strength is affected by many variables such as the water cement (WC) ratio, the superplasticizer (SP), the aggregate combination, and the binder combination. In this dataset article, 7, 28, and 90-day compressive strength models are derived using statistical analysis. The response surface methodology is used toinvestigate the effect of the parameters: Varying percentages of ash, cement, WC, and SP on hardened properties-compressive strengthat 7,28 and 90 days. Thelevels of independent parameters are determinedbased on preliminary experiments. The experimental values for compressive strengthat 7, 28 and 90 days and modulus of elasticity underdifferent treatment conditions are also discussed and presented.These dataset can effectively be used for modelling and prediction in concrete production settings.

  20. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete. PMID:29565830

  1. Influence of Selected Factors on the Relationship between the Dynamic Elastic Modulus and Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Jurowski, Krystian; Grzeszczyk, Stefania

    2018-03-22

    In this paper, the relationship between the static and dynamic elastic modulus of concrete and the relationship between the static elastic modulus and compressive strength of concrete have been formulated. These relationships are based on investigations of different types of concrete and take into account the type and amount of aggregate and binder used. The dynamic elastic modulus of concrete was tested using impulse excitation of vibration and the modal analysis method. This method could be used as a non-destructive way of estimating the compressive strength of concrete.

  2. Generalized Fracture Toughness and Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Including Low Calcium Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Golewski, Grzegorz Ludwik

    2017-12-06

    The paper presents the results of tests on the effect of the low calcium fly ash (LCFA) addition, in the amounts of: 0% (LCFA-00), 20% (LCFA-20) and 30% (LCFA-30) by weight of cement, on fracture processes in structural concretes. In the course of the experiments, compressive strength of concrete and fracture toughness for: I (tensile), II (in-plane shear) and III (anti-plane shear) models of cracking were measured. The tests determined the effect of age of concretes modified with LCFA on the analyzed parameters. The experiments were carried out after: 3, 7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of curing. Fracture toughness of concretes was determined in terms of the critical stress intensity factors: K I c S , K I I c , K I I I c and then a generalized fracture toughness K c was specified. The obtained results are significant for the analysis of concrete structures subjected to complex loading. The properties of composites with the additive of LCFA depend on the age of the concrete tested. Mature concretes exhibit high fracture toughness at 20% additive of LCFA, while the additive of LCFA in the amount of 30% weight of cement has a beneficial effect on the parameters of concrete only after half a year of curing.

  3. Generalized Fracture Toughness and Compressive Strength of Sustainable Concrete Including Low Calcium Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of tests on the effect of the low calcium fly ash (LCFA) addition, in the amounts of: 0% (LCFA-00), 20% (LCFA-20) and 30% (LCFA-30) by weight of cement, on fracture processes in structural concretes. In the course of the experiments, compressive strength of concrete and fracture toughness for: I (tensile), II (in-plane shear) and III (anti-plane shear) models of cracking were measured. The tests determined the effect of age of concretes modified with LCFA on the analyzed parameters. The experiments were carried out after: 3, 7, 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of curing. Fracture toughness of concretes was determined in terms of the critical stress intensity factors: KIcS, KIIc, KIIIc and then a generalized fracture toughness Kc was specified. The obtained results are significant for the analysis of concrete structures subjected to complex loading. The properties of composites with the additive of LCFA depend on the age of the concrete tested. Mature concretes exhibit high fracture toughness at 20% additive of LCFA, while the additive of LCFA in the amount of 30% weight of cement has a beneficial effect on the parameters of concrete only after half a year of curing. PMID:29211029

  4. The pore characteristics of geopolymer foam concrete and their impact on the compressive strength and modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuhua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The pore characteristics of GFCs manufactured in the laboratory with 0-16% foam additions were examined using image analysis (IA) and vacuum water saturation techniques. The pore size distribution, pore shape and porosity were obtained. The IA method provides a suitable approach to obtain the information of large pores, which are more important in affecting the compressive strength of GFC. By examining the applicability of the existing models of predicting compressive strength of foam concrete, a modified Ryshkevitch’s model is proposed for GFC, in which only the porosity that is contributed by the pores over a critical diameter (>100 μm) is considered. This “critical void model” is shown to have very satisfying prediction capability in the studied range of porosity. A compression-modulus model for Portland cement concrete is recommended for predicting the compression modulus elasticity of GFC. This study confirms that GFC have similar pore structures and mechanical behavior as those Portland cement foam concrete and can be used alternatively in the industry for the construction and insulation purposes.

  5. Experimental data on compressive strength and durability of sulfur concrete modified by styrene and bitumen.

    PubMed

    Dehestani, M; Teimortashlu, E; Molaei, M; Ghomian, M; Firoozi, S; Aghili, S

    2017-08-01

    In this data article experimental data on the compressive strength, and the durability of styrene and bitumen modified sulfur concrete against acidic water and ignition are presented. The percent of the sulfur cement and the gradation of the aggregates used are according to the ACI 548.2R-93 and ASTM 3515 respectively. For the styrene modified sulfur concrete different percentages of styrene are used. Also for the bitumen modified sulfur concrete, different percentages of bitumen and the emulsifying agent (triton X-100) are utilized. From each batch three 10×10×10 cm cubic samples were casted. One of the samples was used for the compressive strength on the second day of casting, and one on the twenty-eighth day. Then the two samples were put under the high pressure flame of the burning liquid gas for thirty seconds and their ignition resistances were observed. The third sample was put into the acidic water and after twenty eight days immersion in water was dried in the ambient temperature. After drying its compressive strength has been evaluated.

  6. Monitoring biocalcification potential of Lysinibacillus sp. isolated from alluvial soils for improved compressive strength of concrete.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Rajneesh; Attri, Sampan; Sharma, Deepak; Shukla, Abhilash; Goel, Gunjan

    2018-03-01

    The present study reports the potential of newly isolated calcite precipitating bacteria isolated from alluvial soil to improve the strength and durability of concrete. A total of sixteen samples of alluvial soil and sewage were collected from the different locations of province Solan (India). For isolation, enrichment culture technique was used to enrich calcite precipitating strains in Urea broth. After enrichment, fourteen distinct bacterial strains were obtained on Urea agar. Based on qualitative and quantitative screening for urease activity, five isolates were obtained possessing higher calcite formation and urease activities (38-77 μmhos/cm) as compared with standard strain of Bacillus megaterium MTCC 1684 (77 μmhos/cm). An isolate I13 identified as Lysinibacillus sp. was selected for self healing property in the concrete mix of M20. An improved compressive strength of 1.5 fold was observed in concrete samples amended with Lysinibacillus sp. over the concrete amended with B. megaterium MTCC 1684 after 28 days of curing. The higher calcite precipitation activity was indicated in Lysinibacillus sp. by FE-SEM micrographs and EDX analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Compressive strength of concrete by partial replacement of cement with metakaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Y. S. V.; Durgaiyya, P.; Shivanarayana, Ch.; Prasad, D. S. V.

    2017-07-01

    Metakaolin or calcined kaolin, other type of pozzolan, produced by calcination has the capability to replace silica fume as an alternative material. Supplementary cementitious materials have been widely used all over the world in concrete due to their economic and environmental benefits; hence, they have drawn much attention in recent years. Mineral admixtures such as fly ash, rice husk ash, silica fume etc. are more commonly used SCMs. They help in obtaining both higher performance and economy. Metakaolin is also one of such non - conventional material, which can be utilized beneficially in the construction industry. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigations carried out to find the suitability of metakaolin in production of concrete. In the present work, the results of a study carried out to investigate the effects of Metakaolin on compressive strength of concrete are presented. The referral concrete M30 was made using 43 grade OPC and the other mixes were prepared by replacing part of OPC with Metakaolin. The replacement levels were 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%(by weight) for Metakaolin. The various results, which indicate the effect of replacement of cement by metakalion on concrete, are presented in this paper to draw useful conclusions.

  8. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  9. Influence of Eco-Friendly Mineral Additives on Early Age Compressive Strength and Temperature Development of High-Performance Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszynska, Maria; Skibicki, Szymon

    2017-12-01

    High-performance concrete (HPC) which contains increased amount of both higher grade cement and pozzolanic additives generates more hydration heat than the ordinary concrete. Prolonged periods of elevated temperature influence the rate of hydration process in result affecting the development of early-age strength and subsequent mechanical properties. The purpose of the presented research is to determine the relationship between the kinetics of the heat generation process and the compressive strength of early-age high performance concrete. All mixes were based on the Portland Cement CEM I 52.5 with between 7.5% to 15% of the cement mass replaced by the silica fume or metakaolin. Two characteristic for HPC water/binder ratios of w/b = 0.2 and w/b = 0.3 were chosen. A superplasticizer was used to maintain a 20-50 mm slump. Compressive strength was determined at 8h, 24h, 3, 7 and 28 days on 10x10x10 cm specimens that were cured in a calorimeter in a constant temperature of T = 20°C. The temperature inside the concrete was monitored continuously for 7 days. The study determined that the early-age strength (t<24h) of concrete with reactive mineral additives is lower than concrete without them. This is clearly visible for concretes with metakaolin which had the lowest compressive strength in early stages of hardening. The amount of the superplasticizer significantly influenced the early-age compressive strength of concrete. Concretes with additives reached the maximum temperature later than the concretes without them.

  10. Developing the elastic modulus measurement of asphalt concrete using the compressive strength test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Arief; Suparma, Latif Budi; Mulyono, Agus Taufik

    2017-11-01

    Elastic modulus is a fundamental property of an asphalt mixture. An analytical method of the elastic modulus is needed to determine the thickness of flexible pavement. It has a role as one of the input values on a stress-strain analysis in the finite element method. The aim of this study was to develop the measurement of the elastic modulus by using compressive strength testing. This research used a set of specimen mold tool and Delta Dimensi software to record strain changes occurring in the proving ring of compression machine and the specimens. The elastic modulus of the five types of aggregate gradation and 2 types of asphalt were measured at optimum asphalt content. Asphalt Cement 60/70 and Elastomer Modified Asphalt (EMA) were used as a binder. Manufacturing success indicators of the specimens used void-in-the-mix (VIM) 3-5 % criteria. The success rate of the specimen manufacturing was more than 76%. Thus, the procedure and the compressive strength test equipment could be used for the measurement of the elastic modulus. The aggregate gradation and asphalt types significantly affected the elastic modulus of the asphalt concrete.

  11. Behaviour of square FRP-Confined High-Strength Concrete Columns under Eccentric Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah Pour, Ali; Gholampour, Aliakbar; Zheng, Junai; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the effect of load eccentricity on the axial compressive behaviour of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP)- confined high-strength concrete (HSC) columns with a square cross-section. The axial loading was applied to the specimens at six different load eccentricities ranging from zero to 50 mm. The results show that the load eccentricity significantly influences the axial load-displacement and axial stress-strain behaviour of FRP-confined HSC. Increasing the load eccentricity leads to an increase in the ultimate axial strain but a decrease in the ultimate axial stress and second branch slope of the axial stress-strain curve.

  12. Optimization and influence of parameter affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate: using full factorial design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Thulasirajan; Purushothaman, Revathi

    2017-07-01

    There are several parameters that influence the properties of geopolymer concrete, which contains recycled concrete aggregate as the coarse aggregate. In the present study, the vital parameters affecting the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete containing recycled concrete aggregate are analyzedby varying four parameters with two levels using full factorial design in statistical software Minitab® 17. The objective of the present work is to gain an idea on the optimization, main parameter effects, their interactions and the predicted response of the model generated using factorial design. The parameters such as molarity of sodium hydroxide (8M and 12M), curing time (6hrs and 24 hrs), curing temperature (60°C and 90°C) and percentage of recycled concrete aggregate (0% and 100%) are considered. The results show that the curing time, molarity of sodium hydroxide and curing temperature were the orderly significant parameters and the percentage of Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) was statistically insignificant in the production of geopolymer concrete. Thus, it may be noticeable that the RCA content had negligible effect on the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. The expected responses from the generated model showed a satisfactory and rational agreement to the experimental data with the R2 value of 97.70%. Thus, geopolymer concrete comprising recycled concrete aggregate can solve the major social and environmental concerns such as the depletion of the naturally available aggregate sources and disposal of construction and demolition waste into the landfill.

  13. The influence of using accelerator addition on High strength self-compacting concrete (HSSCC) in case of enhancement early compressive strength and filling ability parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo; Fadillah, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Efficiency in a construction works is a very important thing. Concrete with ease of workmanship and rapid achievement of service strength will to determine the level of efficiency. In this research, we studied the optimization of accelerator usage in achieving performance on compressive strength of concrete in function of time. The addition of variation of 0.3% - 2.3% to the weight of cement gives a positive impact of the rapid achievement of hardened concrete, however the speed of increasing of concrete strength achievement in term of time influence present increasing value of filling ability parameter of self-compacting concrete. The right composition of accelerator aligned with range of the values standard of filling ability parameters of HSSCC will be an advantage guidance for producers in the ready-mix concrete industry.

  14. High Strength Concrete Columns under Axial Compression Load: Hybrid Confinement Efficiency of High Strength Transverse Reinforcement and Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Perceka, Wisena; Liao, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yo-de

    2016-01-01

    Addition of steel fibers to high strength concrete (HSC) improves its post-peak behavior and energy absorbing capability, which can be described well in term of toughness. This paper attempts to obtain both analytically and experimentally the efficiency of steel fibers in HSC columns with hybrid confinement of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. Toughness ratio (TR) to quantify the confinement efficiency of HSC columns with hybrid confinement is proposed through a regression analysis by involving sixty-nine TRs of HSC without steel fibers and twenty-seven TRs of HSC with hybrid of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. The proposed TR equation was further verified by compression tests of seventeen HSC columns conducted in this study, where twelve specimens were reinforced by high strength rebars in longitudinal and transverse directions. The results show that the efficiency of steel fibers in concrete depends on transverse reinforcement spacing, where the steel fibers are more effective if the spacing transverse reinforcement becomes larger in the range of 0.25–1 effective depth of the section column. Furthermore, the axial load–strain curves were developed by employing finite element software (OpenSees) for simulating the response of the structural system. Comparisons between numerical and experimental axial load–strain curves were carried out. PMID:28773391

  15. Concrete probe-strength study : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1969-12-01

    The Windsor probe - test system was evaluated for determining compressive strength of concrete by comparing probe strengths against cylinder and core strengths from both laboratory and field-poured concrete. Advantages and disadvantages of this syste...

  16. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  17. The influence of using volcanic ash and lime ash as filler on compressive strength in self compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolina, Rahmi; Panatap Simanjuntak, Murydrischy

    2018-03-01

    Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) is a technology which is developing today in which concrete solidifies by itself without using vibrator. Casting conventional concrete which has a lot of reinforcement bars sometimes finds difficulty in achieving optimal solidity. The method used to solve this problem is by using SCC technology. SCC was made by using filler, volcanic ash, and lime ash as the filling materials so that the concrete became more solid and hollow space could be filled up. The variation of using these two materials was 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% of the cementitious mass and using 1% of superplasticizer from cementitious material. The supporting testing was done by using the test when the concrete was still fluid and when it was solid. Malleable concrete was tested by using EFNARC 2002 standard in slump flow test, v-funnel test, l-shaped box test, and j-ring test to obtain filling ability and passing ability. In this malleable lime concrete test, there was the decrease, compared with normal SCC concrete without adding volcanic ash and lime ash. Testing was also done in solid concrete in compressive strength, tensile strength, and concrete absorption. The result of the testing showed that the optimum tensile strength in Variation 1, without volcanic ash and lime ash – with 1% of superplasticizer was 39.556 MPa, the optimum tensile strength in Variation 1, without volcanic ash and lime ash- with 1% of super-plasticizer was 3.563 MPa, while the value of optimum absorption which occurred in Variation 5 (25% of volcanic ash + 25% of lime ash + 50% of cement + 1% of superplasticizer) was 1.313%. This was caused by the addition of volcanic ash and lime ash which had high water absorption.

  18. Embedded NMR Sensor to Monitor Compressive Strength Development and Pore Size Distribution in Hydrating Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Díaz, Floriberto; de J. Cano-Barrita, Prisciliano F.; Balcom, Bruce J.; Solís-Nájera, Sergio E.; Rodríguez, Alfredo O.

    2013-01-01

    In cement-based materials porosity plays an important role in determining their mechanical and transport properties. This paper describes an improved low–cost embeddable miniature NMR sensor capable of non-destructively measuring evaporable water loss and porosity refinement in low and high water-to-cement ratio cement-based materials. The sensor consists of two NdFeB magnets having their North and South poles facing each other, separated by 7 mm to allow space for a Faraday cage containing a Teflon tube and an ellipsoidal RF coil. To account for magnetic field changes due to temperature variations, and/or the presence of steel rebars, or frequency variation due to sample impedance, an external tuning circuit was employed. The sensor performance was evaluated by analyzing the transverse magnetization decay obtained with a CPMG measurement from different materials, such as a polymer phantom, fresh white and grey cement pastes with different w/c ratios and concrete with low (0.30) and high (0.6) w/c ratios. The results indicated that the sensor is capable of detecting changes in water content in fresh cement pastes and porosity refinement caused by cement hydration in hardened materials, even if they are prepared with a low w/c ratio (w/c = 0.30). The short lifetime component of the transverse relaxation rate is directly proportional to the compressive strength of concrete determined by destructive testing. The r2 (0.97) from the linear relationship observed is similar to that obtained using T2 data from a commercial Oxford Instruments 12.9 MHz spectrometer.

  19. Compressive strength performance of OPS lightweight aggregate concrete containing coal bottom ash as partial fine aggregate replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, K.; Mohamad Hafizuddin, R.; Mat Yahaya, F.; Sulaiman, M. A.; Syed Mohsin, S. M.; Tukimat, N. N.; Omar, R.; Chin, S. C.

    2018-04-01

    Concerns regarding the negative impact towards environment due to the increasing use of natural sand in construction industry and dumping of industrial solid wastes namely coal bottom ash (CBA) and oil palm shell (OPS) has resulted in the development of environmental friendly lightweight concrete. The present study investigates the effect of coal bottom ash as partial fine aggregate replacement towards workability and compressive strength of oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete (OPS LWAC). The fresh and mechanical properties of this concrete containing various percentage of coal bottom ash as partial fine aggregate replacement were investigated. The result was compared to OPS LWAC with 100 % sand as a control specimen. The concrete workability investigated by conducting slump test. All specimens were cast in form of cubes and water cured until the testing age. The compressive strength test was carried out at 7 and 28 days. The finding shows that integration of coal bottom ash at suitable proportion enhances the strength of oil palm shell lightweight aggregate concrete.

  20. Effect of palm oil fuel ash on compressive strength of palm oil boiler stone lightweight aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, K.; Zamri, N. A.; Kusbiantoro, A.; Lim, N. H. A. S.; Ariffin, M. A. Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Both palm oil fuel ash (POFA) and palm oil boiler stone (POBS) are by-products which has been continuously generated by local palm oil mill in large amount. Both by products is usually disposed as profitless waste and considered as nuisance to environment. The present research investigates the workability and compressive strength performance of lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC) made of palm oil boiler stone (POBS) known as palm oil boiler stone lightweight aggregate concrete (POBS LWAC) containing various content of palm oil fuel ash. The control specimen that is POBS LWAC of grade 60 were produced using 100% OPC. Then, another 4 mixes were prepared by varying the POFA percentage from 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% by weight of cement. Fresh mixes were subjected to slump test to determine its workability before casted in form of cubes. Then, all specimens were subjected to water curing up to 28 days and then tested for its compressive strength. It was found out that utilizing of optimum amount of POFA in POBS LWAC would improve the workability and compressive strength of the concrete. However, inclusion of POFA more than optimum amount is not recommended as it will increase the water demand leading to lower workability and strength reduction.

  1. The effect of different parameters on the development of compressive strength of oil palm shell geopolymer concrete.

    PubMed

    Kupaei, Ramin Hosseini; Alengaram, U Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of an on-going research project on geopolymer lightweight concrete using two locally available waste materials--low calcium fly ash (FA) and oil palm shell (OPS)--as the binder and lightweight coarse aggregate, respectively. OPS was pretreated with three different alkaline solutions of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide, and sodium silicate as well as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for 30 days; afterwards, oil palm shell geopolymer lightweight concrete (OPSGPC) was cast by using both pretreated and untreated OPSs. The effect of these solutions on the water absorption of OPS, and the development of compressive strength in different curing conditions of OPSGPC produced by pretreated OPS were investigated; subsequently the influence of NaOH concentration, alkaline solution to FA ratio (A/FA), and different curing regimes on the compressive strength and density of OPSGPC produced by untreated OPS was inspected. The 24-hour water absorption value for OPS pretreated with 20% and 50% PVA solution was about 4% compared to 23% for untreated OPS. OPSGPC produced from OPS treated with 50% PVA solution produced the highest compressive strength of about 30 MPa in ambient cured condition. The pretreatment with alkaline solution did not have a significant positive effect on the water absorption of OPS aggregate and the compressive strength of OPSGPC. The result revealed that a maximum compressive strength of 32 MPa could be obtained at a temperature of 65°C and curing period of 4 days. This investigation also found that an A/FA ratio of 0.45 has the optimum amount of alkaline liquid and it resulted in the highest level of compressive strength.

  2. The Effect of Different Parameters on the Development of Compressive Strength of Oil Palm Shell Geopolymer Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Kupaei, Ramin Hosseini; Alengaram, U. Johnson; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of an on-going research project on geopolymer lightweight concrete using two locally available waste materials—low calcium fly ash (FA) and oil palm shell (OPS)—as the binder and lightweight coarse aggregate, respectively. OPS was pretreated with three different alkaline solutions of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide, and sodium silicate as well as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for 30 days; afterwards, oil palm shell geopolymer lightweight concrete (OPSGPC) was cast by using both pretreated and untreated OPSs. The effect of these solutions on the water absorption of OPS, and the development of compressive strength in different curing conditions of OPSGPC produced by pretreated OPS were investigated; subsequently the influence of NaOH concentration, alkaline solution to FA ratio (A/FA), and different curing regimes on the compressive strength and density of OPSGPC produced by untreated OPS was inspected. The 24-hour water absorption value for OPS pretreated with 20% and 50% PVA solution was about 4% compared to 23% for untreated OPS. OPSGPC produced from OPS treated with 50% PVA solution produced the highest compressive strength of about 30 MPa in ambient cured condition. The pretreatment with alkaline solution did not have a significant positive effect on the water absorption of OPS aggregate and the compressive strength of OPSGPC. The result revealed that a maximum compressive strength of 32 MPa could be obtained at a temperature of 65°C and curing period of 4 days. This investigation also found that an A/FA ratio of 0.45 has the optimum amount of alkaline liquid and it resulted in the highest level of compressive strength. PMID:25531006

  3. Use of steel fibres recovered from waste tyres as reinforcement in concrete: pull-out behaviour, compressive and flexural strength.

    PubMed

    Aiello, M A; Leuzzi, F; Centonze, G; Maffezzoli, A

    2009-06-01

    The increasing amount of waste tyres worldwide makes the disposition of tyres a relevant problem to be solved. In the last years over three million tons of waste tyres were generated in the EU states [ETRA, 2006. Tyre Technology International - Trends in Tyre Recycling. http://www.etra-eu.org]; most of them were disposed into landfills. Since the European Union Landfill Directive (EU Landfill, 1999) aims to significantly reduce the landfill disposal of waste tyres, the development of new markets for the tyres becomes fundamental. Recently some research has been devoted to the use of granulated rubber and steel fibres recovered from waste tyres in concrete. In particular, the concrete obtained by adding recycled steel fibres evidenced a satisfactory improvement of the fragile matrix, mostly in terms of toughness and post-cracking behaviour. As a consequence RSFRC (recycled steel fibres reinforced concrete) appears a promising candidate for both structural and non-structural applications. Within this context a research project was undertaken at the University of Salento (Italy) aiming to investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete reinforced with RSF (recycled steel fibres) recovered from waste tyres by a mechanical process. In the present paper results obtained by the experimental work performed up to now are reported. In order to evaluate the concrete-fibres bond characteristics and to determine the critical fibre length, pull-out tests were initially carried out. Furthermore compressive strength of concrete was evaluated for different volume ratios of added RSF and flexural tests were performed to analyze the post-cracking behaviour of RSFRC. For comparison purposes, samples reinforced with industrial steel fibres (ISF) were also considered. Satisfactory results were obtained regarding the bond between recycled steel fibres and concrete; on the other hand compressive strength of concrete seems unaffected by the presence of fibres despite their irregular

  4. Study on effects of different patterns and cracking for wastes FRP (used banner) wrapping on compressive strength of confined concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazani Leman, Alif; Shahidan, Shahiron; Azmi, M. A. M.; Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Ali, N.; Abdullah, S. R.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan; Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed

    2017-11-01

    Previous researches have shown that FRP are being introduce into wide variety of civil engineering applications. Fibre Reinforce Concrete (FRP) are also used as repairing method in concrete structures. FRP such as S-glass, AR-glass, E-glass, C-glass, and Aramid Fibre are the common material used in industry. The FRP strips provide the necessary longitudinal and hoop reinforcement. However, there are lots waste materials that can be form as fibre and used in repairing. Banner is a type of waste material fibre that can be used in repairing. In this study, banner will be used as the replacement of the common FRP. The confined concrete (cylinder) of 300mm height and 150mm diameter were cast with M35 grade concrete and tested until it is crack. Next banner are used as the wrapping along the cracking of the concrete with three different pattern that are full wrapping, two band wrapping and cross wrapping using epoxy. Epoxy is a common name for a type of strong adhesive used for sticking things together and covering surface. The objective of this study is to determine the maximum strength and the effect of different patterns wrapping of FRP (banner) on the compressive strength of confined concrete. The results are shows that banner are suitable as a replacement of material for FRP.

  5. Effect of Molarity of Sodium Hydroxide and Curing Method on the Compressive Strength of Ternary Blend Geopolymer Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish Kumar, V.; Ganesan, N.; Indira, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete plays a vital role in the development of infrastructure and buildings all over the world. Geopolymer based cement-less concrete is one of the current findings in the construction industry which leads to a green environment. This research paper deals with the results of the use of Fly ash (FA), Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) and Metakaolin (MK) as a ternary blend source material in Geopolymer concrete (GPC). The aspects that govern the compressive strength of GPC like the proportion of source material, Molarity of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) and Curing methods were investigated. The purpose of this research is to optimise the local waste material and use them effectively as a ternary blend in GPC. Seven combinations of binder were made in this study with replacement of FA with GGBS and MK by 35%, 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5% and 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%, 35% respectively. The molarity of NaOH solution was varied by 12M, 14M and 16M and two types of curing method were adopted, viz. Hot air oven curing and closed steam curing for 24 hours at 60°C (140°F). The samples were kept at ambient temperature till testing. The compressive strength was obtained after 7 days and 28 days for the GPC cubes. The test data reveals that the ternary blend GPC with molarity 14M cured by hot air oven produces the maximum compressive strength. It was also observed that the compressive strength of the oven cured GPC is approximately 10% higher than the steam cured GPC using the ternary blend.

  6. Strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with various types of non-metallic fiber and rods reinforcement under static loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevskii, A. V.; Baldin, I. V.; Kudyakov, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of modern building materials based on non-metallic fibers and their application in concrete structures represent one of the important issues in construction industry. This paper presents results of investigation of several types of raw materials selected: basalt fiber, carbon fiber and composite fiber rods based on glass and carbon. Preliminary testing has shown the possibility of raw materials to be effectively used in compressed concrete elements. Experimental program to define strength and deformability of compressed concrete elements with non-metallic fiber reinforcement and rod composite reinforcement included design, manufacture and testing of several types of concrete samples with different types of fiber and longitudinal rod reinforcement. The samples were tested under compressive static load. The results demonstrated that fiber reinforcement of concrete allows increasing carrying capacity of compressed concrete elements and reducing their deformability. Using composite longitudinal reinforcement instead of steel longitudinal reinforcement in compressed concrete elements insignificantly influences bearing capacity. Combined use of composite rod reinforcement and fiber reinforcement in compressed concrete elements enables to achieve maximum strength and minimum deformability.

  7. Compressive strength and interfacial transition zone of sugar cane bagasse ash concrete: A comparison to the established pozzolans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Asma Abd Elhameed; Shafiq, Nasir; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil

    2015-05-01

    Agricultural and industrial by-products are commonly used in concrete production as cement replacement materials (CRMs) or as admixtures to enhance both fresh and hardened properties of concrete as well as to save the environment from the negative effects caused by their disposal. Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash (SCBA) is one of the promising CRMs, it is used as a partial replacement of cement for producing concrete; properties of such concrete depend on the chemical composition, fineness, and burning temperature of SCBA. Approximately 1500 Million tons of sugarcane are annually produced over all the world which leave about 40-45% bagasse after juice crushing for sugar industry giving an average annual production of about 600 Million tons of bagasse as a waste material. This paper presents some findings on the effect of SCBA on workability, compressive strength and microstructure of interfacial zone of concrete and its performance is compared to some of the established CRMs namely Densified Silica Fume, Fly Ash and Microwave Incinerated Rice Husk Ash.

  8. Influences of cement source and sample of cement source on compressive strength variability of gravel aggregate concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    The strength of concrete is influenced by each constituent material used in the concrete : mixture and the proportions of each ingredient. Water-cementitious ratio, cementitious materials, air : content, chemical admixtures, and type of coarse aggreg...

  9. Effects of increasing the allowable compressive stress at release on the shear strength of prestressed concrete girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, several research projects have been conducted to study the feasibility of increasing the allowable : compressive stress in concrete at prestress transfer, currently defined as 0.60f'ci in the AASHTO LRFD Bridge : Design Specification...

  10. Compressive strength and resistance to chloride ion penetration and carbonation of recycled aggregate concrete with varying amount of fly ash and fine recycled aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jongsung; Park, Cheolwoo

    2011-11-01

    Construction and demolition waste has been dramatically increased in the last decade, and social and environmental concerns on the recycling have consequently been increased. Recent technology has greatly improved the recycling process for waste concrete. This study investigates the fundamental characteristics of concrete using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for its application to structural concrete members. The specimens used 100% coarse RCA, various replacement levels of natural aggregate with fine RCA, and several levels of fly ash addition. Compressive strength of mortar and concrete which used RCA gradually decreased as the amount of the recycled materials increased. Regardless of curing conditions and fly ash addition, the 28 days strength of the recycled aggregate concrete was greater than the design strength, 40 MPa, with a complete replacement of coarse aggregate and a replacement level of natural fine aggregate by fine RCA up to 60%. The recycled aggregate concrete achieved sufficient resistance to the chloride ion penetration. The measured carbonation depth did not indicate a clear relationship to the fine RCA replacement ratio but the recycled aggregate concrete could also attain adequate carbonation resistance. Based on the results from the experimental investigations, it is believed that the recycled aggregate concrete can be successfully applied to structural concrete members. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. High-strength self-consolidating concrete girders subjected to elevated compressive fiber stresses.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-08-01

    There are limited measurements documented in the literature related to long-term prestress losses in self consolidated concrete : (SCC) members. Recorded test data has shown variations in mechanical property behavior of SCC compared to conventional :...

  12. Development of rational pay factors based on concrete compressive strength data

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-06-01

    This research project addresses the opportunity to contain the escalating costs of concrete materials in construction projects. Both statistical process control and rational acceptance criteria show that quality improvement and cost savings can be ac...

  13. Effects of synthetic air entraining agents on compressive strength of Portland cement concrete : mechanism of interaction and remediation strategy

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-07-01

    This document reports the results of a comprehensive study pertaining to the determination of causes and mechanisms resulting in a reduction strength in concrete mixtures containing synthetic air entraining admixtures. The study involved experimentat...

  14. Evaluation of capping systems for high-strength concrete cylinders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2006-03-01

    This study focused on the effects of capping systems on the compressive strength of high-strength concrete. The compressive strength levels ranged from 6,000 psi to 14,000 psi. The three systems investigated were ground ends, bonded caps, and unbonde...

  15. The assessment of bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahid, M. Z. A. Mohd; Muhamad, K.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete (HPFRC). Firstly, this paper presents the various steps taken to prepare the HPFRC with self-compacting property. The minimum targeted slump flow is 600 mm and minimum targeted compressive strength is 80 MPa. The key mix variables considered are such as type of superplasticizer, water cement ratio and silica fume content. Then, the bond strength between the heat damaged concrete with HPFRC was examined. The experimental parameters are heating temperature, surface treatment technique and curing method and the results show that, all experimental parameters are significantly affected the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and HPFRC.

  16. Strength of masonry blocks made with recycled concrete aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Pierre; Dalati, Rouba El

    The idea of recycling concrete of demolished buildings aims at preserving the environment. Indeed, the reuse of concrete as aggregate in new concrete mixes helped to reduce the expenses related to construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and, especially, to protect the environment by reducing the development rate of new quarries. This paper presents the results of an experimental study conducted on masonry blocks containing aggregates resulting from concrete recycling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of recycled aggregates on compressive strength of concrete blocks. Tests were performed on series of concrete blocks: five series each made of different proportions of recycled aggregates, and one series of reference blocks exclusively composed of natural aggregates. Tests showed that using recycled aggregates with addition of cement allows the production of concrete blocks with compressive strengths comparable to those obtained on concrete blocks made exclusively of natural aggregates.

  17. Strength development of pervious concrete containing engineered biomass aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, A. A. M.; Shahidan, S.; Koh, H. B.; Kandash, A.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Pervious concrete with high porosity has good permeability and low mechanical strengths are commonly used in controlling storm water management. It is different from normal concrete. It is only containing single size of coarse aggregate and has lower density compared with normal concrete. This study was focused on the effect of Engineered Biomass Aggregate (EBA) on the compressive strength, void ratio and water permeability of pervious concrete. EBA was prepared by coating the biomass aggregate with epoxy resin. EBA was used to replace natural coarse aggregate ranging from 0% to 25%. 150 mm cube specimens were prepared and used to study the compressive strength, void ratio and water permeability. Compressive strength was tested at 7, 14 and 28 days. Meanwhile, void ratio and permeability tests were carried out on 28 days. The experimental results showed that pervious concrete containing EBA gained lower compressive strength. The compressive strength was reduced gradually by increasing the percentage of EBA. Overall, Pervious concrete containing EBA achieved higher void ratio and permeability.

  18. Synthesis of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Effect on the Compressive Strength and Setting Time of Self-Compacted Concrete Paste as Cementitious Composites

    PubMed Central

    Arefi, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete were investigated after the addition of different amounts of ZnO nanoparticles. The zinc oxide nanoparticles, with an average particle size of about 30 nm, were synthesized and their properties studied with the help of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. The prepared nanoparticles were partially added to self-compacting concrete at different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0%), and the mechanical (flexural and split tensile) strength of the specimens measured after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, respectively. The present results have shown that the ZnO nanoparticles were able to improve the flexural strength of self-compacting concrete. The increased ZnO content of more than 0.2% could increase the flexural strength, and the maximum flexural and split tensile strength was observed after the addition of 0.5% nanoparticles. Finally, ZnO nanoparticles could improve the pore structure of the self-compacted concrete and shift the distributed pores to harmless and less-harmful pores, while increasing mechanical strength. PMID:22605981

  19. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles and their effect on the compressive strength and setting time of self-compacted concrete paste as cementitious composites.

    PubMed

    Arefi, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete were investigated after the addition of different amounts of ZnO nanoparticles. The zinc oxide nanoparticles, with an average particle size of about 30 nm, were synthesized and their properties studied with the help of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction. The prepared nanoparticles were partially added to self-compacting concrete at different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0%), and the mechanical (flexural and split tensile) strength of the specimens measured after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, respectively. The present results have shown that the ZnO nanoparticles were able to improve the flexural strength of self-compacting concrete. The increased ZnO content of more than 0.2% could increase the flexural strength, and the maximum flexural and split tensile strength was observed after the addition of 0.5% nanoparticles. Finally, ZnO nanoparticles could improve the pore structure of the self-compacted concrete and shift the distributed pores to harmless and less-harmful pores, while increasing mechanical strength.

  20. Compressive Properties and Anti-Erosion Characteristics of Foam Concrete in Road Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzhu; Huang, Hongxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Ding, Yifan

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the compression properties and anti-erosion characteristics of foam concrete, one dimensional compression tests were carried out using ring specimens of foam concrete, and unconfined compression tests were carried out using foam concrete specimens cured in different conditions. The results of one dimensional compression tests show that the compression curve of foam concrete has two critical points and three stages, which has significant difference with ordinary geotechnical materials such as soil. Based on the compression curve the compression modulus of each stage were determined. The results of erosion tests show that sea water has a slight influence on the long-term strength of foam concrete, while the sulphate solution has a significant influence on the long-term strength of foam concrete, which needs to pay more attention.

  1. Study on creep of fiber reinforced ultra-high strength concrete based on strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenjun; Wang, Tao

    2018-04-01

    To complement the creep performance of ultra-high strength concrete, the long creep process of fiber reinforced concrete was studied in this paper. The long-term creep process and regularity of ultra-high strength concrete with 0.5% PVA fiber under the same axial compression were analyzed by using concrete strength (C80/C100/C120) as a variable. The results show that the creep coefficient of ultra-high strength concrete decreases with the increase of concrete strength. Compared with ACI209R (92), GL2000 models, it is found that the predicted value of ACI209R (92) are close to the experimental value, and the creep prediction model suitable for this experiment is proposed based on ACI209R (92).

  2. Prediction of reinforced concrete strength by ultrasonic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbağ, Nevbahar; Uyanık, Osman

    2017-06-01

    This study was aimed to determine the strength of the reinforced concrete and to reveal the reinforcement effect on the concrete strength by Ultrasonic P and S wave velocities. Studies were conducted with prepared 9 different concrete designs of showing low, medium and high strength features. 4 kinds of cubic samples which unreinforced and including 10, 14 or 20 mm diameter reinforcement were prepared for these designs. Studies were carried out on total 324 samples including 9 samples for each design of these 4 kinds. The prepared samples of these designs were subjected to water curing. On some days of the 90-day period, P and S wave measurements were repeated to reveal the changes in seismic velocities of samples depending on whether reinforced or unreinforced of samples and diameter of reinforcement. Besides, comparisons were done by performing uniaxial compressive strength test with crushing of 3 samples on 7th, 28th and 90th days. As a result of studies and evaluations, it was seen that values of seismic velocities and uniaxial compressive strength increased depending on reinforcement and diameter of reinforcement in low strength concretes. However, while the seismic velocities were not markedly affected from reinforcement or reinforcement diameter in high strength concrete, uniaxial compressive strength values were negatively affected.

  3. (Finite) statistical size effects on compressive strength.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jérôme; Girard, Lucas; Gimbert, Florent; Amitrano, David; Vandembroucq, Damien

    2014-04-29

    The larger structures are, the lower their mechanical strength. Already discussed by Leonardo da Vinci and Edmé Mariotte several centuries ago, size effects on strength remain of crucial importance in modern engineering for the elaboration of safety regulations in structural design or the extrapolation of laboratory results to geophysical field scales. Under tensile loading, statistical size effects are traditionally modeled with a weakest-link approach. One of its prominent results is a prediction of vanishing strength at large scales that can be quantified in the framework of extreme value statistics. Despite a frequent use outside its range of validity, this approach remains the dominant tool in the field of statistical size effects. Here we focus on compressive failure, which concerns a wide range of geophysical and geotechnical situations. We show on historical and recent experimental data that weakest-link predictions are not obeyed. In particular, the mechanical strength saturates at a nonzero value toward large scales. Accounting explicitly for the elastic interactions between defects during the damage process, we build a formal analogy of compressive failure with the depinning transition of an elastic manifold. This critical transition interpretation naturally entails finite-size scaling laws for the mean strength and its associated variability. Theoretical predictions are in remarkable agreement with measurements reported for various materials such as rocks, ice, coal, or concrete. This formalism, which can also be extended to the flowing instability of granular media under multiaxial compression, has important practical consequences for future design rules.

  4. Study on the strength characteristics of High strength concrete with Micro steel fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowdham, K.; Sumathi, A.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The study of High Strength Concrete (HSC) has become interesting as concrete structures grow taller and larger. The usage of HSC in structures has been increased worldwide and has begun to make an impact in India. Ordinary cementitious materials are weak under tensile loads and fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs) have been developed to improve this weak point. High Strength concrete containing Alccofine as mineral admixture and reinforced with micro steel fibers were cast and tested to study the mechanical properties. The concrete were designed to have compressive strength of 60 MPa. Mixtures containing 0% and 10% replacement of cement by Alccofine and with 1%, 2% and 3% of micro steel fibers by weight of concrete were prepared. Mixtures incorporating Alccofine with fibers developed marginal increase in strength properties at all curing days when compared to control concrete.

  5. Influence of processing factors over concrete strength.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, K. A.; Dolzhenko, A. V.; Zharikov, I. S.

    2018-03-01

    Construction of facilities of cast in-situ reinforced concrete poses additional requirements to quality of material, peculiarities of the construction process may sometimes lead to appearance of lamination planes and inhomogeneity of concrete, which reduce strength of the material and structure as a whole. Technology compliance while working with cast in-situ concrete has a significant impact onto the concrete strength. Such process factors as concrete curing, vibration and compaction of the concrete mixture, temperature treatment, etc., when they are countered or inadequately followed lead to a significant reduction in concrete strength. Here, the authors experimentally quantitatively determine the loss of strength in in-situ cast concrete structures due to inadequate following of process requirements, in comparison with full compliance.

  6. Foam concrete of increased strength with the thermomodified peat additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Kopanitsa, N. O.; Sarkisov, Ju S.; Kasatkina, A. V.; Prischepa, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research of foam concrete with thermomodified peat additives. The aim of the research was to study the effect of modifying additives on cement stone and foam concrete properties. Peat additives are prepared by heat treatment of peat at 600 °C. Two approaches of obtaining additives are examined: in condition of open air access (TMT-600) and in condition of limited air access (TMT-600-k). Compressive strength of a cement stone with modifiers found to be increased by 28.9 - 65.2%. Introducing peat modifiers into foam concrete mix leads to increase of compressive strength by 44-57% at 28- day age and heat conductivity of foam concrete decreases by 0.089 W/(m·°C).

  7. Calcite-forming bacteria for compressive strength improvement in mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Yu-Mi; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2010-04-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar. However, very few studies have been conducted on the use of calcite-forming bacteria (CFB) to improve compressive strength. In this study, we discovered new bacterial genera that are capable of improving the compressive strength of concrete mortar. We isolated 4 CFB from 7 environmental concrete structures. Using sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, the CFB could be partially identified as Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404. Crystal aggregates were apparent in the bacterial colonies grown on an agar medium. Stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analyses illustrated both the crystal growth and the crystalline structure of the CaCO3 crystals. We used the isolates to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar cubes and found that KNUC403 offered the best improvement in compressive strength.

  8. Production and construction technology of C100 high strength concrete filled steel tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanli; Sun, Jinlin; Yin, Suhua; Liu, Yu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of the amount of cement, water cement ratio and sand ratio on compressive strength of C100 concrete was studied. The optimum mix ratio was applied to the concrete filled steel tube for the construction of Shenyang Huangchao Wanxin mansion. The results show that the increase of amount of cement, water cement ratio can improve the compressive strength of C100 concrete but increased first and then decreased with the increase of sand ratio. The compressive strength of C100 concrete can reach 110MPa with the amount of cement 600kg/m3, sand ratio 40% and water cement ratio 0.25.

  9. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  10. Heavyweight cement concrete with high stability of strength parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, Konstantin; Nevsky, Andrey; Danke, Ilia; Kudyakov, Aleksandr; Kudyakov, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    The present paper establishes regularities of basalt fibers distribution in movable cement concrete mixes under different conditions of their preparation and their selective introduction into mixer during the mixing process. The optimum content of basalt fibers was defined as 0.5% of the cement weight, which provides a uniform distribution of fibers in the concrete volume. It allows increasing compressive strength up to 51.2% and increasing tensile strength up to 28.8%. Micro-structural analysis identified new formations on the surface of basalt fibers, which indicates the good adhesion of hardened cement paste to the fibers. Stability of concrete strength parameters has significantly increased with introduction of basalt fibers into concrete mix.

  11. Effectiveness of fly ash for strength and durability of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D.W.S.; Lewis, R.K.

    1985-09-01

    The effectiveness, K, of a fly ash can be defined as the ratio of the amount of cement replaced to the amount of fly ash added, provided the specified requirements of the concrete are maintained. It is generally assumed that the effectiveness of a fly ash can be treated as a constant. This paper presents results on concrete made with various mix proportions using three different cements and fly ash from three different sources. It was found that the K factor of each fly ash in achieving common 28-day compressive strength varies over a wide range depending on the amountmore » of fly ash used, the type of cement, the incorporation of chemical admixtures and the particular strength level chosen. Besides strength, K can also be calculated for other properties. For the materials used in this investigation, the K factors with respect to carbonation were found to be unequal to K factors for strength.« less

  12. Studies for understanding effects of additions on the strength of cement concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, R. D.; Barbuta, M.; Konvalina, P.; Serbanoiu, A. A.; Bernas, J.

    2017-09-01

    The paper analyzes the effects of different types of additions introduced in concrete mix on the compressive strength. The current studies show that additions contribute to improve some characteristics of concrete and to reduce the cement dosage, so it can obtain concretes which are cheaper and friendlier with environment. In the experimental mixes were introduced: crushed natural aggregates, slag aggregates, silica fume, fly ash, chopped tire, polystyrene granule, glass fibers and metallic fibers. The experimental values of compressive strengths were compared for two concrete grades (C20/25 and C25/30). The study shown that near the well-known possibilities of improving mechanical strengths of cement concrete by increasing cement dosage and strength, by using crushed aggregates and by reducing the water/cement ratio, there are other methods in which less cement is used by replacing it with different wastes or by adding fiber.

  13. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  14. High early strength latex modified concrete overlay.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the condition of the first high early strength latex modified concrete (LMC-HE) overlay to be constructed for the Virginia Department of Transportation. The overlay was prepared with type III cement and with more cement and less...

  15. Constitutive Relations of Randomly Oriented Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete under Multiaxial Compressive Loadings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    This was done to observe the effect of specimen age on strength after the curing period of 7 days in the humidity room and the remaining time in air in... fatigue resistance. Although the compressive strength is not much improved, the brittle behavior that would occur in plain concrete after peak strength...such as fracture toughness, fatigue resistance, impact resistance and flexural strength (82). The idea of fiber reinforcement applications is not new

  16. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  17. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures. PMID:28788011

  18. Analysis of Within-Test Variability of Non-Destructive Test Methods to Evaluate Compressive Strength of Normal Vibrated and Self-Compacting Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomuceno, Miguel C. S.; Lopes, Sérgio M. R.

    2017-10-01

    Non-destructive tests (NDT) have been used in the last decades for the assessment of in-situ quality and integrity of concrete elements. An important step in the application of NDT methods concerns to the interpretation and validation of the test results. In general, interpretation of NDT results should involve three distinct phases leading to the development of conclusions: processing of collected data, analysis of within-test variability and quantitative evaluation of property under investigation. The analysis of within-test variability can provide valuable information, since this can be compared with that of within-test variability associated with the NDT method in use, either to provide a measure of the quality control or to detect the presence of abnormal circumstances during the in-situ application. This paper reports the analysis of the experimental results of within-test variability of NDT obtained for normal vibrated concrete and self-compacting concrete. The NDT reported includes the surface hardness test, ultrasonic pulse velocity test, penetration resistance test, pull-off test, pull-out test and maturity test. The obtained results are discussed and conclusions are presented.

  19. Dynamic compressive strength of epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastinin, A. V.; Sil'vestrov, V. V.

    1996-11-01

    The strength of laminated and unidirectionally reinforced composite materials was investigated in conditions of dynamic uniaxial compression with a strain rate of 50-1000 sec-1 using the split Hopkinson pressure bar method. It was shown that in conditions of dynamic compression, glass/epoxy, aramid/epoxy, and carbon/epoxy composites exhibit elastic-brittle behavior with anisotropy of the strength and elastic properties. The effect of the strain rate on the strength characteristics of fiberglass-reinforced plastics was demonstrated.

  20. Compressive and flexural strength of high strength phase change mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Qingyao; Fang, Changle

    2018-04-01

    High-strength cement produces a lot of hydration heat when hydrated, it will usually lead to thermal cracks. Phase change materials (PCM) are very potential thermal storage materials. Utilize PCM can help reduce the hydration heat. Research shows that apply suitable amount of PCM has a significant effect on improving the compressive strength of cement mortar, and can also improve the flexural strength to some extent.

  1. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Maniar, A; Suganya, O M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper.

  2. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Maniar, A.; Suganya, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper. PMID:26644928

  3. Porosimetric, Thermal and Strength Tests of Aerated and Nonaerated Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzałkowski, Jarosław; Garbalińska, Halina

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of porosimetry tests of lightweight concretes, obtained with three research methods. Impact of different porosity structures on the basic thermal and strength properties was also evaluated. Tests were performed, using the pressure gauge method on fresh concrete mixes, as well as using the mercury porosimetry test and optic RapidAir method on specimens prepared from mature composites. The study was conducted on lightweight concretes, based on expanded clay aggregate and fly ash aggregate, in two variants: with non-aerated and aerated cement matrix. In addition, two reference concretes, based on normal aggregate, were prepared, also in two variants of matrix aeration. Changes in thermal conductivity λ and volumetric specific heat cv throughout the first three months of curing of the concretes were examined. Additionally, tests for compressive strength on cubic samples were performed during the first three months of curing. It was found that the pressure gauge method, performed on a fresh mix, gave lowered values of porosity, compared to the other methods. The mercury porosity tests showed high sensitivity in evaluation of pores smaller than 30μm. Unfortunately, this technique is not suitable for analysing pores greater than 300μm. On the other hand, the optical method proves good in evaluation of large pores, greater than 300μm. The paper also presents results of correlation of individual methods of porosity testing. A consolidated graph of the pore structure, derived from both mercury and optical methods, was presented, too. For the all of six tested concretes, differential graphs of porosity, prepared with both methods, show a very broad convergence. The thermal test results indicate usefulness of aeration of the cement matrix of the composites based on lightweight aggregates for the further reduction of the thermal conductivity coefficient λ of the materials. The lowest values of the λ coefficient were obtained for the aerated

  4. A review in high early strength concrete and local materials potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, A. K.; Bayuaji, R.; Susanto, T. E.

    2017-11-01

    High early strength concrete is one of the type in high performance concrete. A high early strength concrete means that the compressive strength of the concrete at the first 24 hours after site-pouring could achieve structural concrete quality (compressive strength > 21 MPa). There are 4 (four) important factors that must be considered in the making process, those factors including: portland cement type, cement content, water to cement ratio, and admixture. In accordance with its high performance, the production cost is estimated to be 25 to 30% higher than conventional concrete. One effort to cut the production cost is to utilize local materials. This paper will also explain about the local materials which were abundantly available, cheap, and located in strategic coast area of East Java Province, that is: Gresik, Tuban and Bojonegoro city. In addition, the application of this study is not limited only to a large building project, but also for a small scale building which has one to three-story. The performance of this concrete was apparently able to achieve the quality of compressive strength of 27 MPa at the age of 24 hours, which qualified enough to support building structurally.

  5. The influence of the compression interface on the failure behavior and size effect of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmann, Raphael

    The failure behavior of concrete materials is not completely understood because conventional test methods fail to assess the material response independent of the sample size and shape. To study the influence of strength and strain affecting test conditions, four typical concrete sample types were experimentally evaluated in uniaxial compression and analyzed for strength, deformational behavior, crack initiation/propagation, and fracture patterns under varying boundary conditions. Both low friction and conventional compression interfaces were assessed. High-speed video technology was used to monitor macrocracking. Inferential data analysis proved reliably lower strength results for reduced surface friction at the compression interfaces, regardless of sample shape. Reciprocal comparisons revealed statistically significant strength differences between most sample shapes. Crack initiation and propagation was found to differ for dissimilar compression interfaces. The principal stress and strain distributions were analyzed, and the strain domain was found to resemble the experimental results, whereas the stress analysis failed to explain failure for reduced end confinement. Neither stresses nor strains indicated strength reductions due to reduced friction, and therefore, buckling effects were considered. The high-speed video analysis revealed localize buckling phenomena, regardless of end confinement. Slender elements were the result of low friction, and stocky fragments developed under conventional confinement. The critical buckling load increased accordingly. The research showed that current test methods do not reflect the "true'' compressive strength and that concrete failure is strain driven. Ultimate collapse results from buckling preceded by unstable cracking.

  6. Comparison of Thermal Stability of Dry High-strength Concrete and Wet High-strength Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musorina, Tatiana; Katcay, Aleksandr; Selezneva, Anna; Kamskov, Victor

    2018-03-01

    High-strength concrete is a modern material, which occupies it`s own niche on the construction material market. It is applicable in a large-scale high-rise construction, particularly an underground construction is a frequently used solution for a space saving. Usually underground structure is related to a wet usage environment. Though not all properties of the high-strength concrete are investigated to the full extent. Under adverse climatic conditions of the Russian Federation one of the most important properties for constructional materials is a thermal capacity. Therefore, the main purpose of the paper is to compare a thermal capacity of the high-strength concrete in humid conditions and a thermal capacity of the high-strength concrete in dry operational condition. During the study dependency between thermal capacity and design wall thickness and ambient humidity has to be proven with two experiments. As a result the theoretical relation between thermal capacity characteristic - thermal inertia and wall thickness and ambient humidity was confirmed by the experimental data. The thermal capacity of a building is in direct ratio to the construction thickness. It follows from the experiments and calculations that wet high-strength concrete has less thermal stability.

  7. High Early-Age Strength Concrete for Rapid Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maler, Matthew O.

    The aim of this research was to identify High Early-Age Strength (HES) concrete batch designs, and evaluate their suitability for use in the rapid repair of highways and bridge decks. To this end, two criteria needed to be met; a minimum compressive strength of 20.68 MPa (3000 psi) in no later than 12 hours, and a drying shrinkage of less than 0.06 % at 28 days after curing. The evaluations included both air-entrained, and non-air-entrained concretes. The cement types chosen for this study included Type III and Type V Portland cement and "Rapid Set"--a Calcium Sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement. In addition, two blended concretes containing different ratios of Type V Portland cement and CSA cement were investigated. The evaluation of the studied concretes included mechanical properties and transport properties. Additionally, dimensional stability and durability were investigated. Evaluations were conducted based on cement type and common cement factor. Fresh property tests showed that in order to provide a comparable workability, and still remain within manufactures guideline for plasticizer, the water-to-cement ratio was adjusted for each type of cement utilized. This resulted in the need to increase the water-to-cement ratio as the Blaine Fineness of the cement type increased (0.275 for Type V Portland cement, 0.35 for Type III Portland cement, and 0.4 for Rapid Set cement). It was also observed that negligible changes in setting time occurred with increasing cement content, whereas changes in cement type produced notable differences. The addition of air-entrainment had beneficial effect on workability for the lower cement factors. Increasing trends for peak hydration heat were seen with increases in cement factor, cement Blaine Fineness, and accelerator dosage. Evaluation of hardened properties revealed opening times as low as 5 hours for Type V Portland cement with 2.0 % accelerator per cement weight and further reduction in opening time by an hour when accelerator

  8. Research on strength attenuation law of concrete in freezing - thawing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, qianhui; Cao, zhiyuan; Li, qiang

    2018-03-01

    By rapid freezing and thawing method, the experiments of concrete have been 300 freeze-thaw cycles specimens in the water. The cubic compression strength value under different freeze-thaw cycles was measured. By analyzing the test results, the water-binder ratio of the concrete under freeze-thaw environments, fly ash and air entraining agent is selected dosage recommendations. The exponential attenuation prediction model and life prediction model of compression strength of concrete under freezing-thawing cycles considering the factors of water-binder ratio, fly ash content and air-entraining agent dosage were established. The model provides the basis for predicting the durability life of concrete under freezing-thawing environment. It also provides experimental basis and references for further research on concrete structures with antifreeze requirements.

  9. Prediction of shear critical behavior of high-strength reinforced concrete columns using finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrasyid, Harun; Safi, Fahrudin; Iranata, Data; Chen-Ou, Yu

    2017-11-01

    This research shows the prediction of shear behavior of High-Strength Reinforced Concrete Columns using Finite-Element Method. The experimental data of nine half scale high-strength reinforced concrete were selected. These columns using specified concrete compressive strength of 70 MPa, specified yield strength of longitudinal and transverse reinforcement of 685 and 785 MPa, respectively. The VecTor2 finite element software was used to simulate the shear critical behavior of these columns. The combination axial compression load and monotonic loading were applied at this prediction. It is demonstrated that VecTor2 finite element software provides accurate prediction of load-deflection up to peak at applied load, but provide similar behavior at post peak load. The shear strength prediction provide by VecTor 2 are slightly conservative compare to test result.

  10. The effect of steel slag as a coarse aggregate and Sinabung volcanic ash a filler on high strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolina, R.; Putra, A. L. A.

    2018-02-01

    The Development of concrete technology is continues to grow. The requisite for efficient constructions that are often viewed in terms of concrete mechanical behavior, application on the field, and cost estimation of implementation increasingly require engineers to optimize construction materials, especially for concrete materials. Various types of concrete have now been developed according to their needs, such as high strength concrete. On high strength concrete design, it is necessary to consider several factors that will affect the reach of the quality strength, Those are cement, water cement ratio (w/c), aggregates, and proper admixture. In the use of natural mineral, it is important for an engineer to keep an eye on the natural conditions that have been explored. So the selection of aggregates as possible is a material that is not causing nature destruction. On this experiment the use of steel slag from PT.Growth Sumatra Industry as a substitute of coarse and fine aggregate, and volcanic ash of mount Sinabung as microsilka in concrete mixture substituted to create high strength concrete that is harmless for the environment. The use of mount sinabung volcanic ash as microsilika coupled with the use of Master Glenium Sky 8614 superplasticizer. This experiment intend to compare high strength concrete based slag steel as the main constituent aggregates and high strength concrete with a conventional mixture. The research result for 28 days old concrete shows that conventional concrete compressive strength is 67.567 MPa, slag concrete 75.958 Mpa, conventional tensile strength 5.435 Mpa while slag concrete 5.053 Mpa, conventional concrete bending strength 44064.96 kgcm while concrete slag 51473.94 kgcm and modulus of conventional concrete fracture 124.978 kg / cm2 while slag concrete 145.956 kg / cm2. Both concrete slump values shows similar results due to the use of superplasticizer.

  11. Repair of heat damaged reinforced concrete slab with High Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain Hamiruddin, Nur; Razak, Rafiza Abd; Muhammad, Khairunnisa; Zahid, Muhd Zulham Affendi Mohd

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the flexural behaviour of heat damaged reinforced concrete (RC) slab by using High Strength Fibre Reinforced Concrete (HSFRC) as repair materials. The slab samples consist of twelve one-way columns heated at 200 ° C, 400 ° C and 600 ° C for 120 minutes. The thickness of the HSFRC layer used to heat damaged slab samples is 40 mm thick. Two distinct curing methods were implement during this study: i.e. normal curing (standard room temperature 26°C) and heat curing (temperature of 90°C for 48 hours). The center-point loading flexural strength test based on ASTM C 293 were referred to examine the flexural strength of the slab samples other than evaluated the mechanical properties of repaired samples (i.e. flexural strength, secant stiffness, toughness and ductility). The HSFRC's results showed that compressive strength at 28 days was 88.66 MPa. Whereas the flexural strength of heat damage repaired samples that exposed to 200°C (R200), 400°C (RNC400) and 400°C (RHC400) were gained by about 3.06% (34.93 MPa), 14.47% (38.79 MPa) and 30.95% (44.38 MPa) respectively, contrasted to the control sample (CS) which is 33.89 MPa. However, heat damage for non-repaired samples that exposed to 200 ° C (NR200) and 400°C (NR400) decline by about 0.77% (33.63 MPa) and 8.13% (31.14 MPa) respectively. Therefore, the utilized of HSFRC as repair materials can improve the flexural strength than control sample (CS). This is clearly indicate that HSFRC can enhance the mechanical properties of heat damaged reinforced concrete (RC) slab which can illustrate that the results of flexural behaviour reflected the superiority by using HSFRC as repair materials.

  12. Evaluation of workability and strength of green concrete using waste steel scrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeraja, D.; Arshad, Shaik Mohammed; Nawaz Nadaf, Alisha K.; Reddy, Mani Kumar

    2017-11-01

    This project works on the study of workability and mechanical properties of concrete using waste steel scrap from the lathe industry. Lathe industries produce waste steel scrap from the lathe machines. In this study, an attempt is made to use this waste in concrete, as accumulation of waste steel scrap cause disposal problem. Tests like compressive test, split tensile test, NDT test (UPV test) were conducted to determine the impact of steel scrap in concrete. The percentages of steel scrap considered in the study were 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, and 2% respectively by volume of concrete, 7 day, 28 days test were conducted to find out strength of steel scrap concrete. It is observed that split tensile strength of steel scrap concrete is increased slightly. Split tensile strength of Steel scrap concrete is found to be maximum with volume fraction of 2.0% steel scrap. The steel scrap gives good result in split tensile strength of concrete. From the study concluded that steel scrap can be used in concrete to reduce brittleness of concrete to some extent.

  13. Changes of strength characteristics of pervious concrete due to variations in water to cement ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, M.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    Pervious concrete is considered to be a sustainable pavement material due to high water permeability. The experiment presented in this paper was aimed at study the influence of water to cement ratio on both the compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete. Typically, less water content in concrete mixture leads to less porosity of cement paste and thus it provides desirable mechanical properties. In case of conventional dense concrete, the lower is the water to cement ratio, the higher or better is the strength, density and durability of concrete. This behaviour is not quite clear in case of pervious concrete because of low amount of cement paste present. Results of compressive and splitting tensile strength of pervious concrete are discussed in the paper while taking into account values measured after 2 and 28 days of hardening and variations in water to cement ratio. The results showed that changes of water to cement ratio from 0.25 to 0.35 caused only slight differences in strength characteristics, and this applied to both types of tested strength.

  14. Evaluation on Compression Properties of Different Shape and Perforated rHDPE in Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhazri, M. Y.; Hafiz, K. M.; Myia, Y. Z. A.; Jia, C. P.; Sihombing, H.; Sapuan, S. M.; Badarulzaman, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a concrete structure by incorporating waste HDPE plastic as the main reinforcement material and cement as the matrix via standard casting technique. There are eight different shapes of rHDPE reinforcing structure were used to investigate the compression properties of produced concrete composites. Experimental result shown that the highest shape in compressive strength of rHDPE reinforcing structure were the concrete with the addition of X-perforated beam (18.22 MPa), followed by X-beam (17.7 MPa), square perforated tube (17.54 MPa), round tube (17.42 MPa) and round perforated tube (16.69 MPa). In terms of their compressive behavior, the average concrete containing rHDPE reinforcement was successfully improved by 6 % of the mechanical characteristic compared to control concrete. It is shown that the addition of waste plastic as reinforcement structure can provide better compressive strength based on their shape and pattern respectively.

  15. The effect of slag addition on strength development of Class C fly ash geopolymer concrete at normal temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardhono, Arie; Law, David W.; Sutikno, Dani, Hasan

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the effect of slag addition on strength development and workability of fly ash/slag based geopolymer (FASLG) concrete cured at normal temperature. Class C fly ash with high ferrite (Fe) content was used as the primary material. The proportions of fly ash (FA) to slag (SL) are: 1 FA : 0 SL, 0.9 FA : 0.1 SL, 0.7 FA : 0.3 SL, and 0.5 FA : 0.5 SL. The workability and strength properties were determined by slump, vikat, and compressive strength tests. The result shows that the highest compressive strength was achieved by FASLG-3 concrete with 30% slag addition and exhibited a comparable strength to that normal concrete at 28 days. The 30% slag addition also improve the workability and increase the setting time of FASLG concrete specimens. It can be concluded that the slag inclusion on fly ash will improve the performance of geopolymer concrete at normal temperature.

  16. Properties of Refractory Concrete in Tension and Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Refractory concrete on the LC-39A Flame Deflector has been damaged during multiple Space Shuttle launches (e.g. STS-124, STS-126, STS-119, and STS-125, STS-127). These events have prompted a better understanding of the system via an analytical model of the Flame Deflector assembly to include the Fondu Fyre refractory concrete. This model requires test data inputs of the refractory concrete's mechanical properties, which include stress versus strain curves in tension and compression, modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio. Sections of Fondu Fyre refractory concrete removed from the LC-39A Flame Deflector were provided for this testing.

  17. Strength and Microstructure of Concrete with Iron Ore Tailings as Replacement for River Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umara Shettima, Ali; Ahmad, Yusof; Warid Hussin, Mohd; Zakari Muhammad, Nasiru; Eziekel Babatude, Ogunbode

    2018-03-01

    River Sand is one of the basic ingredients used in the production of concrete. Consequently, continuous consumption of sand in construction industry contributes significantly to depletion of natural resources. To achieve more sustainable construction materials, this paper reports the use of iron ore tailings (IOT) as replacement for river sand in concrete production. IOT is a waste product generated from the production of iron ore and disposed to land fill without any economic value. Concrete mixtures containing different amount of IOT were designed for grade C30 with water to cement ratio of 0.60. The percentage ratios of the river sand replacements by IOT were 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. Concrete microstructure test namely, XRD and Field Emission Scanned Electron Microscopic/Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (FESEM/EDX) were conducted for control and IOT concretes in order to determine the interaction and performance of the concrete containing IOT. Test results indicated that the slump values of 130 mm and 80 to 110 mm were recorded for the control and IOT concretes respectively. The concrete sample of 50% IOT recorded the highest compressive strength of 37.7 MPa at 28 days, and the highest flexural strength of 5.5 MPa compared to 4.7 MPa for reference concrete. The texture of the IOT is rough and angular which was able to improve the strength of the concrete.

  18. Estimates of the effective compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. V.; Osipenko, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    One problem encountered when determining the effective mechanical properties of large-scale objects, which requires calculating their strength in processes of mechanical interaction with other objects, is related to the possible variability in their local properties including those due to the action of external physical factors. Such problems comprise the determination of the effective strength of bodies one of whose dimensions (thickness) is significantly less than the others and whose properties and/or composition can vary with the thickness. A method for estimating the effective strength of such bodies is proposed and illustrated with example of ice cover strength under longitudinal compression with regard to a partial loss of the ice bearing capacity in deformation. The role of failure localization processes is shown. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach can be used in other problems of fracture mechanics.

  19. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minho; Kim, Gyuyong; Kim, Youngsun; Lee, Taegyu; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Hwang, Euichul; Nam, Jeongsoo

    2017-07-11

    Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W-B) ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressive strength, elastic modulus, and creep behavior were evaluated at target temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 500, and 800 °C for high-strength concretes with W-B ratios of 30%, 26%, and 23%. The loading conditions were set as non-loading and 0.33f cu . It was found that as the compressive strength of the concrete increased, the mechanical characteristics deteriorated and transient creep increased. Furthermore, when the point at which creep strain occurred at elevated temperatures after the occurrence of transient creep was considered, greater shrinkage strain occurred as the compressive strength of the concrete increased. At a heating temperature of 800 °C, the 80 and 100 MPa test specimens showed creep failure within a shrinkage strain range similar to the strain at the maximum load.

  20. Creep Behavior of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Minho; Kim, Gyuyong; Kim, Youngsun; Lee, Taegyu; Choe, Gyeongcheol; Hwang, Euichul; Nam, Jeongsoo

    2017-01-01

    Strain is generated in concrete subjected to elevated temperatures owing to the influence of factors such as thermal expansion and design load. Such strains resulting from elevated temperatures and load can significantly influence the stability of a structure during and after a fire. In addition, the lower the water-to-binder (W–B) ratio and the smaller the quantity of aggregates in high-strength concrete, the more likely it is for unstable strain to occur. Hence, in this study, the compressive strength, elastic modulus, and creep behavior were evaluated at target temperatures of 100, 200, 300, 500, and 800 °C for high-strength concretes with W–B ratios of 30%, 26%, and 23%. The loading conditions were set as non-loading and 0.33fcu. It was found that as the compressive strength of the concrete increased, the mechanical characteristics deteriorated and transient creep increased. Furthermore, when the point at which creep strain occurred at elevated temperatures after the occurrence of transient creep was considered, greater shrinkage strain occurred as the compressive strength of the concrete increased. At a heating temperature of 800 °C, the 80 and 100 MPa test specimens showed creep failure within a shrinkage strain range similar to the strain at the maximum load. PMID:28773144

  1. Reliable early opening strength for concrete pavements and patch work

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-06-01

    Early opening strengths for concrete vary greatly around the country for many different reasons. DOTD specifies early opening strengths and will benefit from understanding the latest thinking and practices adopted by similar agencies. Knowing the bes...

  2. An Experimental Study on Shrinkage Strains of Normal-and High-Strength Concrete-Filled Frp Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Thomas; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2017-09-01

    It is now well established that concrete-filled fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) tubes (CFFTs) are an attractive construction technique for new columns, however studies examining concrete shrinkage in CFFTs remain limited. Concrete shrinkage may pose a concern for CFFTs, as in these members the curing of concrete takes place inside the FRP tube. This paper reports the findings from an experimental study on concrete shrinkage strain measurements for CFFTs manufactured with normal- and high-strength concrete (NSC and HSC). A total of 6 aramid FRP (AFRP)-confined concrete specimens with circular cross-sections were manufactured, with 3 specimens each manufactured using NSC and HSC. The specimens were instrumented with surface and embedded strain gauges to monitor shrinkage development of exposed concrete and concrete sealed inside the CFFTs, respectively. All specimens were cylinders with a 152 mm diameter and 305 mm height, and their unconfined concrete strengths were 44.8 or 83.2 MPa. Analysis of the shrinkage measurements from concrete sealed inside the CFFTs revealed that embedment depth and concrete compressive strength only had minor influences on recorded shrinkage strains. However, an analysis of shrinkage measurements from the exposed concrete surface revealed that higher amounts of shrinkage can occur in HSC. Finally, it was observed that shrinkage strains are significantly higher for concrete exposed at the surface compared to concrete sealed inside the CFFTs.

  3. Concrete Behavior under Dynamic Tensile-Compressive Load.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    be reviewed as well. Although structural concrete does not possess the thermal cracking problems during curing to the extent that mass concrete does...reasonable bounds for these unknown properties were assumed, suggests that the extent of cracking induced by seismic ground motion can be very...space. But an understanding of biaxial tension-compression be- havior is the foremost concern, since the stress state of a dam’s cracked regions occur in

  4. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Hwang, Soo-Duck; Xing, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC) of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration. PMID:28788223

  5. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete.

    PubMed

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Hwang, Soo-Duck; Xing, Feng

    2014-10-10

    With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC) of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration.

  6. Post impact compressive strength in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuts, Edvins; Sandhu, Raghbir S.; Daniels, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Presented in this paper are the plan, equipment, procedures, and findings of an experimental investigation of the tolerance to low velocity impact of a graphite epoxy (AS4/3501-6) and graphite bismaleimide (M6/CYCOM3100) advanced composites. The applied impacts were governed by the Air Force Guide Specification 87221. Specimens of each material system having a common nominal layup (10% 0 deg; 80% +/-45 deg; 10% 90 deg), a common 7 inch (17.78 cm) by 10 inch (25.40 cm) size, five different thicknesses (9, 26, 48, 74, and 96 plies), and ambient moisture content were impacted and strength tested at room temperature. Damaged areas and post impact compression strengths (PICS) were among the most significant findings obtained. While the undamaged per ply compression strength of both materials is a strong function of laminate thickness, the per ply PICS is not. The average difference in per ply PICS between the two material systems is about seven percent. Although a smaller percentage of the applied kinetic energy was absorbed by the Gr/BMI than by the Gr/Epoxy composites, larger damaged areas were produced in the Gr/BMI than in Gr/Epoxy. Within the limitations of this investigation, the Gr/BMI system seems to offer no advantage in damage tolerance over the Gr/Epoxy system examined.

  7. Rapid curing and strength relationships of concrete : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-05-01

    The rapid rate of construction has created a need to have information on the strength of concrete at the earliest possible time. Having to wait 28 days before the strength can be determined can cause serious problems if inferior concrete had been use...

  8. The influence of aggregates type on W/C ratio on the strength and other properties of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaiskiene, J.; Skripkiunas, G.; Vaiciene, M.; Karpova, E.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of different types of aggregates and W/C ratio on concrete properties is analysed. In order to achieve this aim, lightweight (with expanded clay aggregate) and normal concrete (with gravel aggregate) mixtures are prepared with different W/C ratios. Different W/C ratios are selected by reducing the amount of cement when the amount of water is constant. The following properties of concrete have been determined: density, compressive strength and water absorption. Additionally, the statistical data analysis is performed and influence of aggregate type and W/C ratio on concrete properties is determined. The empirical equations indicating dependence between concrete strength and W/C and strength of aggregate are obtained for normal concrete and light-weight concrete.

  9. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, S. P.; Singh, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  10. Confinement of NORMAL- AND HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholampour, A.; Ozbakkaloglu, T.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the axial compressive behaviour of normal- and high-strength concrete (NSC and HSC) confined by shape memory alloy (SMA) spirals. A spiral pitch space of 36 and 20 mm was used for SMA confinement of NSC and HSC columns, respectively. The confining pressure was applied on the concrete cylinders by SMA spirals that were prestrained at 0, 5.5, and 9.5%. The compression test results on the SMA-confined specimens indicate that the prestrain level of SMA significantly affects the axial compressive behaviour of both NSC and HSC. An increase in the level of prestrain leads to an increase in the peak axial stress and corresponding strain of SMA-confined concrete.

  11. Changes in the Strength of the Polymer Concrete Used in the Electroplating Vats Under Operational Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radna, Lidia; Sakharov, Volodymyr

    2017-12-01

    Due to the strong and aggressive electrolyte media and thermal load, design of the electroplating vats in the copper industry often relies on the resin concrete. The article presents the results of the strength tests of the polymer concrete based on the "Derakane" resin, used in the construction of electroplating vats. Samples were taken from the real vats - both new and 17-year old. Strength tests included compression and bending tensile strength test. To assess the effect of operational conditions the tests were performed on the same-age vats, some of which were never used while others were subjected to the operational load. During the operation, the vats sustained load of the anode and cathode weights, cyclic electrolyte loading with a temperatures up to 60°C. As a result, it was noted that the operational conditions led to the increased strength of the polymer concrete material.

  12. Utilization of fly ash and ultrafine GGBS for higher strength foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowri, R.; Anand, K. B.

    2018-02-01

    Foam concrete is a widely accepted construction material, which is popular for diverse construction applications such as, thermal insulation in buildings, lightweight concrete blocks, ground stabilization, void filling etc. Currently, foam concrete is being used for structural applications with a density above 1800kg/m3. This study focuses on evolving mix proportions for foam concrete with a material density in the range of 1200 kg/m3 to 1600 kg/m3, so as to obtain strength ranges that will be sufficient to adopt it as a structural material. Foam concrete is made lighter by adding pre-formed foam of a particular density to the mortar mix. The foaming agent used in this study is Sodium Lauryl Sulphate and in order to densify the foam generated, Sodium hydroxide solution at a normality of one is also added. In this study efforts are made to make it a sustainable construction material by incorporating industrial waste products such as ultrafine GGBS as partial replacement of cement and fly ash for replacement of fine aggregate. The fresh state and hardened state properties of foam concrete at varying proportions of cement, sand, water and additives are evaluated. The proportion of ultrafine GGBS and fly ash in the foam concrete mix are varied aiming at higher compressive strength. Studies on air void-strength relationship of foam concrete are also included in this paper.

  13. Compressive strength of delaminated aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard; Rhead, Andrew T; Liu, Wenli; Kontis, Nikolaos

    2012-04-28

    An efficient analytical model is described which predicts the value of compressive strain below which buckle-driven propagation of delaminations in aerospace composites will not occur. An extension of this efficient strip model which accounts for propagation transverse to the direction of applied compression is derived. In order to provide validation for the strip model a number of laminates were artificially delaminated producing a range of thin anisotropic sub-laminates made up of 0°, ±45° and 90° plies that displayed varied buckling and delamination propagation phenomena. These laminates were subsequently subject to experimental compression testing and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) using cohesive elements. Comparison of strip model results with those from experiments indicates that the model can conservatively predict the strain at which propagation occurs to within 10 per cent of experimental values provided (i) the thin-film assumption made in the modelling methodology holds and (ii) full elastic coupling effects do not play a significant role in the post-buckling of the sub-laminate. With such provision, the model was more accurate and produced fewer non-conservative results than FEA. The accuracy and efficiency of the model make it well suited to application in optimum ply-stacking algorithms to maximize laminate strength.

  14. Isolation and identification of bacteria to improve the strength of concrete.

    PubMed

    Krishnapriya, S; Venkatesh Babu, D L; G, Prince Arulraj

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this research work is to isolate and identify calcite precipitating bacteria and to check the suitability of these bacteria for use in concrete to improve its strength. Bacteria to be incorporated in concrete should be alkali resistant to endure the high pH of concrete and endospore forming to withstand the mechanical stresses induced in concrete during mixing. They must exhibit high urease activity to precipitate calcium carbonate in the form of calcite. Bacterial strains were isolated from alkaline soil samples of a cement factory and were tested for urease activity, potential to form endospores and precipitation of calcium carbonate. Based on these results, three isolates were selected and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. They were identified as Bacillus megaterium BSKAU, Bacillus licheniformis BSKNAU and Bacillus flexus BSKNAU. The results were compared with B. megaterium MTCC 1684 obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection and Gene Bank, Chandigarh, India. Experimental work was carried out to assess the influence of bacteria on the compressive strength and tests revealed that bacterial concrete specimens showed enhancement in compressive strength. The efficiency of bacteria toward crack healing was also tested. Substantial increase in strength and complete healing of cracks was observed in concrete specimens cast with B. megaterium BSKAU, B. licheniformis BSKNAU and B. megaterium MTCC 1684. This indicates the suitability of these bacterial strains for use in concrete. The enhancement of strength and healing of cracks can be attributed to the filling of cracks in concrete by calcite which was visualized by scanning electron microscope. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Properties of High Strength Concrete Applied on Semarang - Bawen Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiyawan, Prabowo; Antonius; Wedyowibowo, R. Hawik Jenny

    2018-04-01

    To fulfill the needs of highway construction then a high quality concrete is expected to be produced by a short time and high workability, therefore the addition of additive chemicals needs to be conducted. The objective of the study was to find out the properties of high quality concrete including slump value, compressive strength, flexural strength, elasticity modulus and stress-strain diagrams with the addition of fly ash and superplasticizer. There were five types of mixtures were made in this study with a fas (cement water factor) was 0,41 and an additional 15% of fly ash and a varied superplasticizer of 0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2% towards the weight/volume and cement/water. Test samples of cylinders and prisms or beams were tested in the laboratory at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. The test results were then compared with the test results made without additional additives. Based on the result of this research, it can be concluded that the increase of slump value due to the addition of 15% fly ash is 0,53 cm of the base slump value. The use of superplasticizer causes the weight of the type to be greater. The optimum dose of superplasticizer is 1,2%, it is still in the usage level according to the F-type admixture brochure (water reducing, high-range admixture) such as 0,6 % -1,5 %. All mixture types which use addition materials for flexural strength (fr'=45kg/cm2) can be achieved at 3 days.

  16. The relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength of pavement geopolymer grouting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Han, X. X.; Ge, J.; Wang, C. H.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength of pavement geopolymer grouting material, 20 groups of geopolymer grouting materials were prepared, the compressive strength and flexural strength were determined by mechanical properties test. On the basis of excluding the abnormal values through boxplot, the results show that, the compressive strength test results were normal, but there were two mild outliers in 7days flexural strength test. The compressive strength and flexural strength were linearly fitted by SPSS, six regression models were obtained by linear fitting of compressive strength and flexural strength. The linear relationship between compressive strength and flexural strength can be better expressed by the cubic curve model, and the correlation coefficient was 0.842.

  17. Flexural strength of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete beams using polypropylene fiber: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisantono, Ade; Praja, Baskoro Abdi; Hermawan, Billy Nouwen

    2017-11-01

    One of the methods to increase the tensile strength of concrete is adding a fiber material into the concrete. While to reduce a noise in a construction project, a self compacting concrete was a good choices in the project. This paper presents an experimental study of flexural behavior and strength of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete (RC) beams using polypropylene fiber. The micro monofilament polypropylene fibers with the proportion 0.9 kg/m3 of concrete weight were used in this study. Four beam specimens were cast and tested in this study. Two beams were cast of self compacting reinforced concrete without fiber, and two beams were cast of self compacting fiber reinforced concrete using polypropylene. The beams specimen had the section of (180×260) mm and the length was 2000 mm. The beams had simple supported with the span of 1800 mm. The longitudinal reinforcements were using diameter of 10 mm. Two reinforcements of Ø10 mm were put for compressive reinforcement and three reinforcements of Ø10 mm were put for tensile reinforcement. The shear reinforcement was using diameter of 8 mm. The shear reinforcements with spacing of 100 mm were put in the one fourth near to the support and the spacing of 150 mm were put in the middle span. Two points loading were used in the testing. The result shows that the load-carrying capacity of the self compacting reinforced concrete beam using polypropylene was a little bit higher than the self compacting reinforced concrete beam without polypropylene. The increment of load-carrying capacity of self compacting polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete was not so significant because the increment was only 2.80 % compare to self compacting non fiber reinforced concrete. And from the load-carrying capacity-deflection relationship curves show that both the self compacting polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete beam and the self compacting non fiber reinforced concrete beam were ductile beams.

  18. Compressive and bonding strength of fly ash based geopolymer mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zailani, Warid Wazien Ahmad; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Zainol, Mohd Remy Rozainy Mohd Arif; Razak, Rafiza Abd.; Tahir, Muhammad Faheem Mohd

    2017-09-01

    Geopolymer which is produced by synthesizing aluminosilicate source materials with an alkaline activator solution promotes sustainable and excellent properties of binder. The purpose of this paper is to determine the optimum binder to sand ratio of geopolymer mortars based on mechanical properties. In order to optimize the formulation of geopolymer mortar, various binder to sand ratios (0.25, 0.33, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0) are prepared. The investigation on the effect of sand inclusion to the compressive and bonding strength of geopolymer mortar is approached. The experimental results show that the bonding strength performance of geopolymer is also depends on the various binder to sand ratio, where the optimum ratio 0.5 gives a highest strength of 12.73 MPa followed by 12.35 MPa, which corresponds the ratio 1.0 for geopolymer, while the compared value of OPC bonding strength is given by 9.3 MPa. The morphological structure at the interface zone is determined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the homogenous bonding between geopolymer and substrate can be observed. Fly ash based geopolymers reveal a new category of mortar which has high potential to be used in the field of concrete repair and rehabilitation.

  19. Evaluating the strength of concrete structure on terrace houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasbullah, Mohd. Amran; Yusof, Rohana; Rahman, Mohd Nazaruddin Yusoff @ Abdul

    2016-08-01

    The concrete structure is the main component to support the structure of the building, but when concrete has been used for an extended period hence, it needs to be evaluated to determine the current strength, durability and how long it can last. The poor quality of concrete structures will cause discomfort to the user and, the safety will be affected due to lack of concrete strength. If these issues are not monitored or not precisely known performance, and no further action done then, the concrete structure will fail and eventually it will collapse. Five units of terrace houses that are built less than 10 years old with extension or renovations and have cracks at Taman Samar Indah, Samarahan, Sarawak have been selected for this study. The instrument used in this research is Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), with the objective to determine the current strength and investigate the velocity of a pulse at the concrete cracks. The data showed that the average velocity of the pulse is less than 3.0 km/s and has shown that the quality of the concrete in the houses too weak scale / doubt in the strength of concrete. It also indicates that these houses need to have an immediate repair in order to remain secure other concrete structures.

  20. Strength and compressibility of returned lunar soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, W. D., III; Bromwell, L. G.; Martin, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Two oedometer and three direct shear tests have been performed in vacuum on a 200 g sample of lunar soil from Apollo 12 (12001, 119). The compressibility data have been used to calculate bulk density and shear wave velocity versus depth on the lunar surface. The shear wave velocity was found to increase approximately with the one-fourth power of the depth, and the results suggest that the Apollo 14 Active Seismic Experiment may not have detected the Fra Mauro formation at a depth of 8.5 m, but only naturally consolidated lunar soil. The shear data indicate that the strength of the lunar soil sample is about 65% that of a ground basalt simulant at the same void ratio.

  1. The effect of various pozzolanic additives on the concrete strength index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitola, L.; Sahmenko, G.; Erdmane, D.; Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.

    2017-10-01

    The concrete industry is searching continuously for new effective mineral additives to improve the concrete properties. Replacing cement with the pozzolanic additives in most cases has resulted not only in positive impact on the environment but also has improved strength and durability of the concrete. Effective pozzolanic additives can be obtained from natural resources such as volcanic ashes, kaolin and other sediments as well as from different production industries that create various by-products with high pozzolanic reactivity. Current research deals with effectiveness evaluation of various mineral additives/wastes, such as coal combustion bottom ash, barley bottom ash, waste glass and metakaolin containing waste as well as calcined illite clays as supplementary cementitious materials, to be used in concrete production as partial cement replacement. Most of the examined materials are used as waste stream materials with potential reactive effect on the concrete. Milling time and fineness of the tested supplementary material has been evaluated and effectiveness was detected. Results indicate that fineness of the tested materials has crucial effect on the concrete compressive strength index. Not in all cases the prolonged milling time can increase fineness and reactivity of the supplementary materials; however the optimal milling time and fineness of the pozolanic additives increased the strength index of concrete up to 1.16 comparing to reference, even in cases when cement was substituted by 20 w%.

  2. Influence of surface modified basalt fiber on strength of cinder lightweight aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liguang; Li, Jiheng; Liu, Qingshun

    2017-12-01

    In order to improve the bonding and bridging effect between volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete cement and basalt fiber, The basalt fiber was subjected to etching and roughening treatment by NaOH solution, and the surface of the basalt fiber was treated with a mixture of sodium silicate and micro-silica powder. The influence of modified basalt fiber on the strength of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete was systematically studied. The experimental results show that the modified basalt fiber volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete has a flexural strength increased by 47%, the compressive strength is improved by 16% and the toughness is increased by 27% compared with that of the non-fiber.

  3. Effect of fly ash on the strength of porous concrete using recycled coarse aggregate to replace low-quality natural coarse aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifi, Eva; Cahya, Evi Nur; Christin Remayanti, N.

    2017-09-01

    The performance of porous concrete made of recycled coarse aggregate was investigated. Fly ash was used as cement partial replacement. In this study, the strength of recycled aggregate was coMPared to low quality natural coarse aggregate which has high water absorption. Compression strength and tensile splitting strength test were conducted to evaluate the performance of porous concrete using fly ash as cement replacement. Results have shown that the utilization of recycled coarse aggregate up to 75% to replace low quality natural coarse aggregate with high water absorption increases compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of porous concrete. Using fly ash up to 25% as cement replacement improves compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of porous concrete.

  4. The optimum content of rubber ash in concrete: flexural strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senin, M. S.; Shahidan, S.; Shamsuddin, S. M.; Ariffin, S. F. A.; Othman, N. H.; Rahman, R.; Khalid, F. S.; Nazri, F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Discarded scrap tyres have become one of the major environmental problems nowadays. Several studies have been carried out to reuse waste tires as an additive or sand replacement in concrete with appropriate percentages of tire rubber, called as rubberized concrete to solve this problem. The main objectives of this study are to investigate the flexural strength performance of concrete when adding the rubber ash and also to analyse the optimum content of rubber ash in concrete prisms. The performance total of 30 number of concrete prisms in size of 100mm x 100mm x 500 mm were investigated, by partially replacement of rubber ash with percentage of 0%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9% from the volume of the sand. The flexural strength is increased when percentage of rubber ash is added 3% from control concrete prism, RA 0 for both concrete prism age, 7 days and 28 days with value 1.21% and 0.976% respectively. However, for RA 5, RA 7 and RA 9, the flexural strength was decreased compared to the control for both age, 7 days and 28 days. In conclusion, 3% is the optimum content of rubber ash in concrete prism for both concrete age

  5. Very-early-strength latex-modified concrete overlay.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes the installation and condition of the first two very-early-strength latex modified concrete (LMC-VE) overlays constructed for the Virginia Department of Transportation. The overlays were prepared with a special blended cement rat...

  6. Evaluation of acceptance strength tests for concrete pavements.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-06-30

    The North Carolina Department of Transportation has used traditionally flexural strength tests for acceptance : testing of Portland cement concrete pavements. This report summarizes a research project implemented to : investigate the feasibility of u...

  7. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    36 Thermal Contraction . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Summary of Sulfur Concrete (unmodified) . . . 39 Modified Sulfur Concrete............ 40...Compressive strength of PCPD- modified sulfur concrete 47 20 Functional connection between reaction time and temperature in making DCPD- modified sulfur concrete...39 MODIFIED SULFUR CONCRETE In the previous section it was shown that sulfur concrete exhibits several undesirable properties, such as 1 poor

  8. Evaluation of crushed concrete base strength.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-12-01

    This research project was conducted with two primary objectives, which include: 1) determine whether current Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) requirements for recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) provide adequate materials for a roadway ...

  9. Variations in Compressive Strength of Geopolymer due to the CaO Added Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuqing; Koumoto, Tatsuya; Kondo, Fumiyoshi

    Recently, geopolymer has been a noteworthy material which can be used as a replacement for portland cement. The mechanical characteristics and consistency of the geopolymer are strongly affected by its chemical components of fly ash. The variations in compressive strength of geopolymer due to the CaO added fly ash were investigated in this paper. The compressive strengths of geopolymer were increased with an increase in the curing period, and the characteristics changed from the one of plastic soil material to brittle material such as concrete, regardless of CaO content. Also, the results of compressive strength and modulus of deformation showed their maximum value in the case of 8-10% CaO content. From this result, the maximum characteristics of the strengths were assumed to be exerted in case which the water draining process of geopolymer was balanced with the water absorbing process of additional CaO.

  10. Ultra-high performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) for infrastructure rehabilitation Volume II : behavior of ultra-high strength concrete bridge deck panels compared to conventional stay-in-place deck panels

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-08-01

    The remarkable features of ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) have been reported. Its application in bridge construction has been an active research area in recent years, attributed to its higher compressive strength, higher ductility and reduced...

  11. The Effects of Bottom Ash on Setting Time and Compressive Strength of Fly Ash Geopolymer Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affandhie, B. A.; Kurniasari, P. T.; Darmawan, M. S.; Subekti, S.; Wibowo, B.; Husin, N. A.; Bayuaji, R.; Irawan, S.

    2017-11-01

    This research is to find out the contribution of waste energy utilization of fly ash and bottom ash coal as binding agent of geopolymer concrete. This research methodology uses experimental approach in laboratory by making cylinder paste test object with dimension diameter of 2.5 cm x height 5 cm with some combination of fly ash and bottom ash mix with time setting test (ASTM C 191-04a) and compressive strength (ASTM C 39-04a). The research concludes that the effect of bottom ash on fly ash-based geopolymer paste shows good results in setting time and compressive strength.

  12. Research on the Influence of Size Effect for the mechanical Performance of GFRP tube concrete steel tube composite column under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Tong; Na, Yu

    2017-08-01

    FRP tube-concrete-steel tube composite column (DSTC) was a new type of composite structures. The column consists of FRP outer tube and steel tube and concrete. Concrete was filled between FRP outer tube and steel tube. This column has the character of light and high strength and corrosion resistance. In this paper, properties of DSTC axial compression were studied in depth. The properties were studied by two groups DSTC short columns under axial compression performance experiment. The different size of DSTC short columns was importantly considered. According to results of the experiment, we can conclude that with the size of the column increases the ability of it to resist deformation drops. On the other hand, the size effect influences on properties of different concrete strength DSTC was different. The influence of size effect on high concrete strength was less than that of low concrete.

  13. Numerical Analysis on the High-Strength Concrete Beams Ultimate Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarzewski, Piotr; Stolarski, Adam

    2017-10-01

    Development of technologies of high-strength concrete (HSC) beams production, with the aim of creating a secure and durable material, is closely linked with the numerical models of real objects. The three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models of reinforced high-strength concrete beams with a complex geometry has been investigated in this study. The numerical analysis is performed using the ANSYS finite element package. The arc-length (A-L) parameters and the adaptive descent (AD) parameters are used with Newton-Raphson method to trace the complete load-deflection curves. Experimental and finite element modelling results are compared graphically and numerically. Comparison of these results indicates the correctness of failure criteria assumed for the high-strength concrete and the steel reinforcement. The results of numerical simulation are sensitive to the modulus of elasticity and the shear transfer coefficient for an open crack assigned to high-strength concrete. The full nonlinear load-deflection curves at mid-span of the beams, the development of strain in compressive concrete and the development of strain in tensile bar are in good agreement with the experimental results. Numerical results for smeared crack patterns are qualitatively agreeable as to the location, direction, and distribution with the test data. The model was capable of predicting the introduction and propagation of flexural and diagonal cracks. It was concluded that the finite element model captured successfully the inelastic flexural behaviour of the beams to failure.

  14. Improving Non-Destructive Concrete Strength Tests Using Support Vector Machines

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yi-Fan; Wang, Yu-Ren; Lin, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Chin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods are important alternatives when destructive tests are not feasible to examine the in situ concrete properties without damaging the structure. The rebound hammer test and the ultrasonic pulse velocity test are two popular NDT methods to examine the properties of concrete. The rebound of the hammer depends on the hardness of the test specimen and ultrasonic pulse travelling speed is related to density, uniformity, and homogeneity of the specimen. Both of these two methods have been adopted to estimate the concrete compressive strength. Statistical analysis has been implemented to establish the relationship between hammer rebound values/ultrasonic pulse velocities and concrete compressive strength. However, the estimated results can be unreliable. As a result, this research proposes an Artificial Intelligence model using support vector machines (SVMs) for the estimation. Data from 95 cylinder concrete samples are collected to develop and validate the model. The results show that combined NDT methods (also known as SonReb method) yield better estimations than single NDT methods. The results also show that the SVMs model is more accurate than the statistical regression model. PMID:28793627

  15. Experimental study on compressive strength of sediment brick masonry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woen, Ean Lee; Malek, Marlinda Abdul; Mohammed, Bashar S.; Chao-Wei, Tang; Tamunif, Muhammad Thaqif

    2018-02-01

    The effects of pre-wetted unit bricks, mortar type and slenderness ratio of prisms on the compressive strength and failure mode of newly developed sediment brick have been evaluated and compared to clay brick and cement-sand bricks. The results show that pre-wetted sediment brick masonry exhibits higher compressive strength of up to 20% compared to the dry sediment masonry. Using cement-lime mortar leads to lower compressive strength compared to cement mortar. However, the sediment brick masonry with the cement lime mortar exhibit higher compressive strength in comparison with cement mortar masonry. More of diagonal shear cracks have been observed in the failure mode of the sediment bricks masonry compared to clay and cement-sand bricks masonry that show mostly vertical cracks and crushing. The sediment unit bricks display compressive strength in between clay and cement-sand bricks.

  16. Prediction of residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Ashhad; Azad, Abul Kalam

    2016-09-01

    With the aim of providing experimental data on the shear capacity and behavior of corroded reinforced concrete beams that may help in the development of strength prediction models, the test results of 13 corroded and four un-corroded beams are presented. Corrosion damage was induced by accelerated corrosion induction through impressed current. Test results show that loss of shear strength of beams is mostly attributable to two important damage factors namely, the reduction in stirrups area due to corrosion and the corrosion-induced cracking of concrete cover to stirrups. Based on the test data, a method is proposed to predict the residual shear strength of corroded reinforced concrete beams in which residual shear strength is calculated first by using corrosion-reduced steel area alone, and then it is reduced by a proposed reduction factor, which collectively represents all other applicable corrosion damage factors. The method seems to yield results that are in reasonable agreement with the available test data.

  17. Development of Self-Consolidating High Strength Concrete Incorporating Treated Palm Oil Fuel Ash

    PubMed Central

    Alsubari, Belal; Shafigh, Payam; Jumaat, Mohd Zamin

    2015-01-01

    Palm oil fuel ash (POFA) has previously been used as a partial cement replacement in concrete. However, limited research has been undertaken to utilize POFA in high volume in concrete. This paper presents a study on the treatment and utilization of POFA in high volume of up to 50% by weight of cement in self-consolidating high strength concrete (SCHSC). POFA was treated via heat treatment to reduce the content of unburned carbon. Ordinary Portland cement was substituted with 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 50% treated POFA in SCHSC. Tests have been conducted on the fresh properties, such as filling ability, passing ability and segregation resistance, as well as compressive strength, drying shrinkage and acid attack resistance to check the effect of high volume treated POFA on SCHSC. The results revealed that compared to the control concrete mix, the fresh properties, compressive strength, drying shrinkage, and resistance against acid attack have been significantly improved. Conclusively, treated POFA can be used in high volume as a cement replacement to produce SCHSC with an improvement in its properties.

  18. Wireless Concrete Strength Monitoring of Wind Turbine Foundations.

    PubMed

    Perry, Marcus; Fusiek, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Pawel; Rubert, Tim; McAlorum, Jack

    2017-12-16

    Wind turbine foundations are typically cast in place, leaving the concrete to mature under environmental conditions that vary in time and space. As a result, there is uncertainty around the concrete's initial performance, and this can encourage both costly over-design and inaccurate prognoses of structural health. Here, we demonstrate the field application of a dense, wireless thermocouple network to monitor the strength development of an onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundation. Up-to-date methods in fly ash concrete strength and maturity modelling are used to estimate the distribution and evolution of foundation strength over 29 days of curing. Strength estimates are verified by core samples, extracted from the foundation base. In addition, an artificial neural network, trained using temperature data, is exploited to demonstrate that distributed concrete strengths can be estimated for foundations using only sparse thermocouple data. Our techniques provide a practical alternative to computational models, and could assist site operators in making more informed decisions about foundation design, construction, operation and maintenance.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  20. The maximum percentage of fly ash to replace part of original Portland cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallisa, Harun; Turuallo, Gidion

    2017-11-01

    This research investigates the maximum percent of fly ash to replace part of Orginal Portland Cement (OPC) in producing high strength concrete. Many researchers have found that the incorporation of industrial by-products such as fly ash as in producing concrete can improve properties in both fresh and hardened state of concrete. The water-binder ratio was used 0.30. The used sand was medium sand with the maximum size of coarse aggregate was 20 mm. The cement was Type I, which was Bosowa Cement produced by PT Bosowa. The percentages of fly ash to the total of a binder, which were used in this research, were 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30%; while the super platicizer used was typed Naptha 511P. The results showed that the replacement cement up to 25 % of the total weight of binder resulted compressive strength higher than the minimum strength at one day of high-strength concrete.

  1. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  2. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  3. Experimental Research of FRP Composite Tube Confined Steel-reinforced Concrete Stub Columns Under Axial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji Zhong; Cheng, Lu; Wang, Xin Pei

    2018-06-01

    A new column of FRP composite tube confined steel-reinforced concrete (FTCSRC) column was proposed. This paper elaborates on laboratorial and analytical studies on the behavior of FCTSRC columns subjected to axial compressive load. Eight circular FTCSRC stub columns and one circular steel tube confined concrete (STCC) stub column were tested to investigate the failure mode and axial compression performance of circular FTCRSC columns. Parametric analysis was implemented to inquire the influence of confinement material (CFRP-steel tube or CFRP-GFRP tube), internal steel and CFRP layers on the ultimate load capacity. CFRP-steel composite tube was composed of steel tube and CFRP layer which was wrapped outside the steel tube, while CFRP-GFRP composite tube was composite of GFRP tube and CFRP layer. The test results indicate that the confinement effect of CFRP-steel tube is greatly superior to CFRP-GFRP tube. The ductility performance of steel tube confined high-strength concrete column can be improved obviously by encasing steel in the core concrete. Furthermore, with the increase in the layers of FRP wraps, the axial load capacity increases greatly.

  4. Ultimate strength capacity of a square hollow section filled with fibrous foamed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirah Azra Khairuddin, Siti; Rahman, Norashidah Abd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Jaini, Zainorizuan Mohd; Ali, Noorwirdawati

    2017-11-01

    Concrete-filled sections used as building columns have become popular due to their architectural and structural elements. In recent years, there has been a renewed call for the improvement of materials used as concrete to fill the composite columns. Among these materials, foamed concrete has received great attention due to its structural characteristics and its potential as a construction material used in hollow sections. However, its behaviors as infill material in a hollow section, such as its strength and failure mode, should be investigated. In this study, experimental research was conducted to compare the experimental and theoretical values of its ultimate strength capacity. Eight specimens of hollow steel sections with two different thicknesses were filled with fibrous foamed concrete and then subjected to compression load. The obtained results were compared with those obtained from a hollow section with the same thicknesses, but were filled with normal foamed concrete. Results show that the ultimate strength capacity of the experimental value is the same as that of the theoretical value based on Eurocode 4. The largest percentage values between theoretical and experimental results for thicknesses of 2 and 4 mm are 58% and 55%, respectively.

  5. Investigation of Tensile Creep of a Normal Strength Overlay Concrete.

    PubMed

    Drexel, Martin; Theiner, Yvonne; Hofstetter, Günter

    2018-06-12

    The present contribution deals with the experimental investigation of the time-dependent behavior of a typical overlay concrete subjected to tensile stresses. The latter develop in concrete overlays, which are placed on existing concrete structures as a strengthening measure, due to the shrinkage of the young overlay concrete, which is restrained by the substrate concrete. Since the tensile stresses are reduced by creep, creep in tension is investigated on sealed and unsealed specimens, loaded at different concrete ages. The creep tests as well as the companion shrinkage tests are performed in a climatic chamber at constant temperature and constant relative humidity. Since shrinkage depends on the change of moisture content, the evolution of the mass water content is determined at the center of each specimen by means of an electrolytic resistivity-based system. Together with the experimental results for compressive creep from a previous study, a consistent set of time-dependent material data, determined for the same composition of the concrete mixture and on identical specimens, is now available. It consists of the hygral and mechanical properties, creep and shrinkage strains for both sealed and drying conditions, the respective compliance functions, and the mass water contents in sealed and unsealed, loaded and load-free specimens.

  6. Strength properties of interlocking compressed earth brick units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, S.; Bakar, B. H. Abu; Surip, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    This study presents a laboratory investigation on the properties of interlocking compressed earth brick (ICEB) units. Compressive strength, which is one of the most important properties in masonry structures, is used to determine masonry performance. The compressive strength of the ICEB units was determined by applying a compressive strength test for 340 units from four types of ICEB. To analyze the strength of the ICEB units, each unit was capped by a steel plate at the top and bottom to create a flat surface, and then ICEB was loaded until failure. The average compressive strength of the corresponding ICEB units are as follows: wall brick, 19.15 N/mm2; beam brick, 16.99 N/mm2; column brick, 13.18 N/mm2; and half brick, 11.79 N/mm2. All the ICEB units had compressive strength of over 5 N/mm2, which is the minimum strength for a load-bearing brick. This study proves that ICEB units may be used as load-bearing bricks. The strength of ICEBs is equal to that of other common bricks and blocks that are currently available in the market.

  7. Advantage of using high strength self compacting concrete for precast product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdono, Ferryandy; Agustin, Winda; Soeprapto, Gambiro; Sunarso, Mukhlis

    2017-11-01

    According to the development in the world of construction, the need for precast concrete also increases. Now the day there are many products with narrow range reinforcement and difficult dimensions. The ordinary concrete is difficult to pour in a mold with narrow range reinforcement inside without vibrator because the concrete can't fill in the gaps between the bars. SCC (Self Compacting Concrete) is a concrete that precast concrete industry needs to. The using of SCC also supports the green construction through the cement reducing and reducing the use of vibrator that requires not less energy. This research is using EFNARC standard as a condition of admission SCC (filling ability, passing ability, segregation resistance), and performed well against the application of the product by the production of Railway Sleeper without using a vibrator. The results of this study, the LB-2 and LB-3 qualified as SCC and compressive strength is expected that greater than 70 MPa, as well as products quality, is equal to standard and can be mass produced with the efficiency of the price of concrete up to 11%.

  8. Concrete Quality Assurance Using Accelerated Strength Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    n , Office, Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army WAVA Washington. D. C. 20314 -.,ABORATORY Jnde CWIS Work Unit 31138 84 07 10 075 • ! Destoy hisreprt when...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 11iscellaneous Paper SL-84-4 9 i0LV". L- 4. TITLE (awd Subtitle) 5 . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED CONCRETE QUALITY ASSURANCE USING...Laboratory P_ 0. Rox 63l Vicksburg, Miss- 39g CWIS Work Unit No. 31138 I1. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Office, Chief of

  9. Wireless Concrete Strength Monitoring of Wind Turbine Foundations

    PubMed Central

    Niewczas, Pawel; Rubert, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbine foundations are typically cast in place, leaving the concrete to mature under environmental conditions that vary in time and space. As a result, there is uncertainty around the concrete’s initial performance, and this can encourage both costly over-design and inaccurate prognoses of structural health. Here, we demonstrate the field application of a dense, wireless thermocouple network to monitor the strength development of an onshore, reinforced-concrete wind turbine foundation. Up-to-date methods in fly ash concrete strength and maturity modelling are used to estimate the distribution and evolution of foundation strength over 29 days of curing. Strength estimates are verified by core samples, extracted from the foundation base. In addition, an artificial neural network, trained using temperature data, is exploited to demonstrate that distributed concrete strengths can be estimated for foundations using only sparse thermocouple data. Our techniques provide a practical alternative to computational models, and could assist site operators in making more informed decisions about foundation design, construction, operation and maintenance. PMID:29258176

  10. Studies of fiber-matrix adhesion on compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Nairn, John A.; Boll, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated on the effect of the matrix polymer and the fiber matrix bond strength of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites. The work includes tests with micro-composites, single ply composites, laminates, and multi-axial loaded cylinders. The results obtained thus far indicate that weak fiber-matrix adhesion dramatically reduces 0 degree compression strength. Evidence is also presented that the flaws in the carbon fiber that govern compression strength differ from those that determine fiber tensile strength. Examination of post-failure damage in the single ply tests indicates kink banding at the crack tip.

  11. Compressive residual strength of graphite/epoxy laminates after impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, Teresa A.; Lagace, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    The issue of damage tolerance after impact, in terms of the compressive residual strength, was experimentally examined in graphite/epoxy laminates using Hercules AS4/3501-6 in a (+ or - 45/0)(sub 2S) configuration. Three different impactor masses were used at various velocities and the resultant damage measured via a number of nondestructive and destructive techniques. Specimens were then tested to failure under uniaxial compression. The results clearly show that a minimum compressive residual strength exists which is below the open hole strength for a hole of the same diameter as the impactor. Increases in velocity beyond the point of minimum strength cause a difference in the damage produced and cause a resultant increase in the compressive residual strength which asymptotes to the open hole strength value. Furthermore, the results show that this minimum compressive residual strength value is independent of the impactor mass used and is only dependent upon the damage present in the impacted specimen which is the same for the three impactor mass cases. A full 3-D representation of the damage is obtained through the various techniques. Only this 3-D representation can properly characterize the damage state that causes the resultant residual strength. Assessment of the state-of-the-art in predictive analysis capabilities shows a need to further develop techniques based on the 3-D damage state that exists. In addition, the need for damage 'metrics' is clearly indicated.

  12. Strength Development of High-Strength Ductile Concrete Incorporating Metakaolin and PVA Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Shafiq, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers. PMID:24707202

  13. Strength development of high-strength ductile concrete incorporating Metakaolin and PVA fibers.

    PubMed

    Nuruddin, Muhammad Fadhil; Khan, Sadaqat Ullah; Shafiq, Nasir; Ayub, Tehmina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of high-strength ductile concrete (HSDC) have been investigated using Metakaolin (MK) as the cement replacing material and PVA fibers. Total twenty-seven (27) mixes of concrete have been examined with varying content of MK and PVA fibers. It has been found that the coarser type PVA fibers provide strengths competitive to control or higher than control. Concrete with coarser type PVA fibers has also refined microstructure, but the microstructure has been undergone with the increase in aspect ratio of fibers. The microstructure of concrete with MK has also more refined and packing of material is much better with MK. PVA fibers not only give higher stiffness but also showed the deflection hardening response. Toughness Index of HSDC reflects the improvement in flexural toughness over the plain concrete and the maximum toughness indices have been observed with 10% MK and 2% volume fraction of PVA fibers.

  14. Effects of Oil Palm Shell Coarse Aggregate Species on High Strength Lightweight Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Ming Kun; Bin Mahmud, Hilmi; Ang, Bee Chin; Yew, Ming Chian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS) coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC). Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera), in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3–5, 6–9, and 10–15 years old). The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC) increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10–15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days. PMID:24982946

  15. The dynamic properties behavior of high strength concrete under different strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Hasballah; Husin, Saiful; Umar, Hamdani; Rizal, Samsul

    2005-04-01

    This paper present a number experimental data and numerical technique used in the dynamic behavior of high strength concrete. A testing device is presented for the experimental study of dynamic behavior material under high strain rates. The specimen is loaded by means of a high carbon steel Hopkinson pressure bar (40 mm diameter, 3000 mm long input bar and 1500 mm long out put bar) allowing for the testing of specimen diameter is large enough in relation to the size of aggregates. The other method also proposed for measuring tensile strength, the measurement method based on the superposition and concentration of tensile stress wave reflected both from the free-free ends of striking bar and the specimen bar. The compression Hopkinson bar test, the impact tensile test of high strength concrete bars are performed, together with compression static strength test. In addition, the relation between break position under finite element simulation and impact tensile strength are examined. The three-dimensional simulation of the specimen under transient loading are presented and comparisons between the experimental and numerical simulation on strain rate effects of constitutive law use in experimental are study.

  16. Evaluation of Strength Characteristics of Laterized Concrete with Corn Cob Ash (CCA) Blended Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikponmwosa, E. E.; Salau, M. A.; Kaigama, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural wastes are dumped in landfills or left on land in which they constitute nuisance. This study presents the results of investigation of strength characteristics of reinforced laterized concrete beams with cement partially replaced with corn cob (agricultural wastes) ash (CCA). Laterized concrete specimen of 25% laterite and 75% sharp sand were made by blending cement with corn cob ash at 0 to 40% in steps of 10%. A concrete mix ratio of 1:2:4 was used to cast 54 cubes of 150×150×150mm size and 54 beams of dimension 750×150×150mm. The results show that the consistency and setting time of cement increased as the percentage replacement of cement with CCA increased while the workability and density of concrete decreased as the percentage of CCA increased. There was a decrease in compressive strength when laterite was introduced to the concrete from 25.04 to 22.96N/mm2 after 28 days and a continual reduction in strength when CCA was further added from 10% to 40% at steps of 10%. Generally, the beam specimens exhibited majorly shear failure with visible diagonal cracks extending from support points to the load points. The corresponding central deflection in beams, due to two points loading, increased as the laterite was added to the concrete mix but reduced and almost approaching that of the control as 10% CCA was added. The deflection then increased as the CCA content further increased to 20%, 30% and 40% in the mix. It was also noted that the deflection of all percentage replacement including 40% CCA is less than the standard recommended maximum deflection of the beam. The optimal flexural strength occurred with 10% CCA content.

  17. Very-Early-Strength Latex-Modified Concrete Overlays

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the installation and condition of the first two very-early-strength latex-modified concrete (LMC-VE) overlays to be constructed for the Virginia Department of Transportation. The overlays were prepared with a special blended cem...

  18. Shear in high strength concrete bridge girders : technical report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    Prestressed Concrete (PC) I-girders are used extensively as the primary superstructure components in Texas highway bridges. : A simple semi-empirical equation was developed at the University of Houston (UH) to predict the shear strength of PC I-girde...

  19. Study on Strength and Durability Characteristics of Concrete with Ternary Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissi Joy, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Snega, M.; Ramasundram, S.; Venkatasubramanian, C.; Muthu, D.

    2017-07-01

    In the present scenario to fulfill the demands of sustainable construction, concrete made with multi-blended cement system of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and different mineral admixtures is the wise choice for the construction industry. In this research work, M20 grade mix of concrete (with water - binder ratio as 0.48) is adopted with glass powder (GP) and Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash (SCBA) as partial replacement of cement. GP is an inert material, they occupy the landfill space for considerable amount of time unless there is a potential for recycling. Such glass wastes in the crushed form have a good potential in the infrastructure industry. Replacement of cement by GP from 30% to 0% by weight of cement in step of 5% and by SCBA from 0% to 30% in step of 5% respectively was adopted. In total, seven different combinations of mixes were studied at two different ages of concrete namely 7 and 28 days. Compressive strength of cubes for various percentage of replacement were investigated and compared with conventional concrete to find out the maximum mix ratio. Flexural strength of concrete for the maximum mix ratio was found out and durability parameters viz., water absorption and sorptivity were studied. From the experimental study, 20% SCBA and 10% GP combination was found to be the maximum mix ratio.

  20. Optimum mix for fly ash geopolymer binder based on workability and compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, S. A.; Ali, A. Z. M.; Awal, A. S. M. A.; Loon, L. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The request of concrete is increasing every day for sustaining the necessity of development of structure. The production of OPC not only consumes big amount of natural resources and energy, but also emit significant quantity of CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, it is necessary to find alternatives like Geopolymer to make the concrete environment friendly. Geopolymer is an inorganic alumino-silicate compound, produced from fly ash. This paper describes the experimental work conducted by casting 40 geopolymer paste mixes, and was cured at 80°C for 24 h to evaluate the effect of various parameters affecting the workability and compressive strength. Alkaline solution to fly ash ratio and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration were chosen as the key parameters of strength and workability. Laboratory investigation with different percentage of sodium hydroxide concentration and different alkaline liquid to fly ash ratio reveals that the optimum ratios are 10 M, AL/FA=0.5. It has generally been found that the workability decreased and the compressive strength increased with an increase in the concentration of sodium hydroxide solution. However, workability was increased and the compressive strength was decreased with the increase in the ratio of fly ash to alkaline solution.

  1. Parametric Study of Shear Strength of Concrete Beams Reinforced with FRP Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Job; Ramadass, S.

    2016-09-01

    Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) bars are being widely used as internal reinforcement in structural elements in the last decade. The corrosion resistance of FRP bars qualifies its use in severe and marine exposure conditions in structures. A total of eight concrete beams longitudinally reinforced with FRP bars were cast and tested over shear span to depth ratio of 0.5 and 1.75. The shear strength test data of 188 beams published in various literatures were also used. The model originally proposed by Indian Standard Code of practice for the prediction of shear strength of concrete beams reinforced with steel bars IS:456 (Plain and reinforced concrete, code of practice, fourth revision. Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi, 2000) is considered and a modification to account for the influence of the FRP bars is proposed based on regression analysis. Out of the 196 test data, 110 test data is used for the regression analysis and 86 test data is used for the validation of the model. In addition, the shear strength of 86 test data accounted for the validation is assessed using eleven models proposed by various researchers. The proposed model accounts for compressive strength of concrete ( f ck ), modulus of elasticity of FRP rebar ( E f ), longitudinal reinforcement ratio ( ρ f ), shear span to depth ratio ( a/ d) and size effect of beams. The predicted shear strength of beams using the proposed model and 11 models proposed by other researchers is compared with the corresponding experimental results. The mean of predicted shear strength to the experimental shear strength for the 86 beams accounted for the validation of the proposed model is found to be 0.93. The result of the statistical analysis indicates that the prediction based on the proposed model corroborates with the corresponding experimental data.

  2. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  3. Column compression strength of tubular packaging forms made from paper

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Urbanik; Sung K. Lee; Charles G. Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Tubular packaging forms fabricated and shaped from rolled paper are used as reinforcing corner posts for major appliances packaged in corrugated containers. Tests of column compression strength simulate the expected performance loads from appliances stacked in warehouses. Column strength depends on tube geometry, paper properties, basis weight, and number of...

  4. Comparison of Open-Hole Compression Strength and Compression After Impact Strength on Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Laminates for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Nettles, Alan T.; Jackson, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    Notched (open hole) composite laminates were tested in compression. The effect on strength of various sizes of through holes was examined. Results were compared to the average stress criterion model. Additionally, laminated sandwich structures were damaged from low-velocity impact with various impact energy levels and different impactor geometries. The compression strength relative to damage size was compared to the notched compression result strength. Open-hole compression strength was found to provide a reasonable bound on compression after impact.

  5. Shear capacity of high-strength concrete pre-stressed girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1998-05-01

    As part of a project at the University of Minnesota to investigate the application of high-strength concrete in prestressed girders, four shear tests were performed on high-strength concrete prestressed girders.

  6. Diametral and compressive strength of dental core materials.

    PubMed

    Cho, G C; Kaneko, L M; Donovan, T E; White, S N

    1999-09-01

    Strength greatly influences the selection of core materials. Many disparate material types are now recommended for use as cores. Cores must withstand forces due to mastication and parafunction for many years. This study compared the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of 8 core materials of various material classes and formulations (light-cured hybrid composite, autocured titanium containing composite, amalgam, glass ionomer, glass ionomer cermet, resin-modified glass ionomer, and polyurethane). Materials were manipulated according to manufacturers' instructions for use as cores. Mean compressive and diametral strengths with associated standard errors were calculated for each material (n = 10). Analyses of variance were computed (P <.0001) and multiple comparisons tests discerned many differences among materials. Compressive strengths varied widely from 61.1 MPa for a polyurethane to 250 MPa for a resin composite. Diametral tensile strengths ranged widely from 18.3 MPa for a glass ionomer cermet to 55.1 MPa for a resin composite. Some resin composites had compressive and tensile strengths equal to those of amalgam. Light-cured hybrid resin composites were stronger than autocured titanium containing composites. The strengths of glass ionomer-based materials and of a polyurethane material were considerably lower than for resin composites or amalgam.

  7. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1992-01-01

    A status report of work performed during the period May 1, 1992 to October 31, 1992 is presented. Research was conducted in three areas: delamination initiation in postbuckled dropped-ply laminates; stiffener crippling initiated by delamination; and pressure pillowing of an orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shell. The geometrically nonlinear response and delamination initiation of compression-loaded dropped-ply laminates is analyzed. A computational model of the stiffener specimens that includes the capability to predict the interlaminar response at the flange free edge in postbuckling is developed. The distribution of the interacting loads between the stiffeners and the shell wall, particularly at the load transfer at the stiffener crossing point, is determined.

  8. Strength of the cervical spine in compression and bending.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Andrzej S; Skrzypiec, Daniel; Pollintine, Phillip; Dolan, Patricia; Adams, Michael A

    2007-07-01

    Cadaveric motion segment experiment. To compare the strength in bending and compression of the human cervical spine and to investigate which structures resist bending the most. The strength of the cervical spine when subjected to physiologically reasonable complex loading is unknown, as is the role of individual structures in resisting bending. A total of 22 human cervical motion segments, 64 to 89 years of age, were subjected to complex loading in bending and compression. Resistance to flexion and to extension was measured in consecutive tests. Sagittal-plane movements were recorded at 50 Hz using an optical two-dimensional "MacReflex" system. Experiments were repeated 1) after surgical removal of the spinous process, 2) after removal of both apophyseal joints, and 3) after the disc-vertebral body unit had been compressed to failure. Results were analyzed using t tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Results were compared with published data for the lumbar spine. The elastic limit in flexion was reached at 8.5 degrees (SD, 1.7 degrees ) with a bending moment of 6.7 Nm (SD, 1.7 Nm). In extension, values were 9.5 degrees (SD, 1.6 degrees ) and 8.4 Nm (3.5 Nm), respectively. Spinous processes (and associated ligaments) provided 48% (SD, 17%) of the resistance to flexion. Apophyseal joints provided 47% (SD, 16%) of the resistance to extension. In compression, the disc-vertebral body units reached the elastic limit at 1.23 kN (SD, 0.46 Nm) and their ultimate compressive strength was 2.40 kN (SD, 0.96 kN). Strength was greater in male specimens, depended on spinal level and tended to decrease with age. The cervical spine has approximately 20% of the bending strength of the lumbar spine but 45% of its compressive strength. This suggests that the neck is relatively vulnerable in bending.

  9. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  10. Strength and Durability of Fly Ash-Based Fiber-Reinforced Geopolymer Concrete in a Simulated Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Rivera, Francisco Javier

    This research is aimed at investigating the corrosion durability of polyolefin fiberreinforced fly ash-based geopolymer structural concrete (hereafter referred to as GPC, in contradistinction to unreinforced geopolymer concrete referred to as simply geopolymer concrete), where cement is completely replaced by fly ash, that is activated by alkalis, sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate. The durability in a marine environment is tested through an electrochemical method for accelerated corrosion. The GPC achieved compressive strengths in excess of 6,000 psi. Fiber reinforced beams contained polyolefin fibers in the amounts of 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% by volume. After being subjected to corrosion damage, the GPC beams were analyzed through a method of crack scoring, steel mass loss, and residual flexural strength testing. Fiber reinforced GPC beams showed greater resistance to corrosion damage with higher residual flexural strength. This makes GPC an attractive material for use in submerged marine structures.

  11. Comparison of Static and Dynamic Elastic Modules of Different Strength Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyanık, Osman; Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the static and dynamic elastic (Young) modules of concrete with different strength was intended to compare. For this purpose 150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples prepared and they were subjected to water cure during 28 days. After Seismic Ultrasonic P and S wave travel time measurements of samples, P and S wave velocities and taking advantage of elasticity theory the dynamic elastic modules were calculated. Concrete strength was obtained from the uniaxial compression tests in order to calculate the static elastic modules of the samples. The static elastic modulus is calculated by using the empirical relationships used in international standards. The obtained static and dynamic elastic modules have been associated. A curve was obtained from this association result that approximately similar to the stress-strain curve of obtaining at failure criterion of the sample. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete Strength, P and S wave Velocities, Static, Dynamic, Young Modules

  12. Durability and Strength of Sustainable Self-Consolidating Concrete Containing Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, O.; Hawat, W. Al

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the durability and strength of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is assessed through development and testing of six binary mixes at fixed water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.36. In each of the six SCC mixes, a different percentage of cement is replaced with fly ash. The development of compressive strength for each of the mixes is assessed by testing samples after 3, 7, and 28 days of curing. Durability of each of the six SCC mixes is assessed by measuring the charge passed in Rapid Chloride Permeability (RCP) test. Charge passed was measured in samples cured for 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 40 days of curing. All mixes out-performed the control mix in terms of resistance to chloride penetration. Binary mix in which 20% of cement is replaced with fly ash exhibited 28-day strength slightly surpassing the control mix.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on Bond Strength of GFRP Rebars in Normal and High Strength Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eswanth, P.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    Bond behavior between GFRP bars and concrete is the most important parameter for constructing corrosion free structures by implementing the material. Serviceability of reinforced concrete structures are controlled by bond behavior. GFRP materials behave differently from reinforcing steel in terms of bond. They are of non-homogeneous and anisotropic. Due to this outstanding behavior, there is a difference in transfer of loads between GFRP bars and concrete which made it as an idealized choice of a material. In the present work, the bond strength of GFRP bars in normal and high strength concrete was studied. In total, 12 specimens containing 12 mm, 16 mm diameter rebars which were embedded in 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm cubes were investigated. The specimens were subjected to direct tension pull out test in accordance with IS 2770 part 1. The comparison of bond properties of GFRP rebar in normal and high strength concrete showed that pull out load of non-metallic rebar fell well within the range.

  14. The strength of compressed structures with CFRP materials reinforcement when exceeding the cross-section size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polskoy, Petr; Mailyan, Dmitry; Georgiev, Sergey; Muradyan, Viktor

    2018-03-01

    The increase of high-rise construction volume or «High-Rise Construction» requires the use of high-strength concrete and that leads to the reduction in section size of structures and to the decrease in material consumption. First of all, it refers to the compressed elements for which, when the transverse dimensions are reduced, their flexibility and deformation increase but the load bearing capacity decreases. Growth in construction also leads to the increase of repair and restoration works or to the strengthening of structures. The most effective method of their strengthening in buildings of «High-Rise Construction» is the use of composite materials which reduces the weight of reinforcement elements and labour costs on execution of works. In this article the results of experimental research on strength and deformation of short compressed reinforced concrete structures, reinforced with external carbon fiber reinforcement, are presented. Their flexibility is λh=10, and the cross-section dimensions ratio b/h is 2, that is 1,5 times more, than recommended by standards in Russia. The following research was being done for three kinds of strained and deformed conditions with different variants of composite reinforcement. The results of the experiment proved the real efficiency of composite reinforcement of the compressed elements with sides ratio equal to 2, increasing the bearing capacity of pillars till 1,5 times. These results can be used for designing the buildings of different number of storeys.

  15. Testing compression strength of wood logs by drilling resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalny, Gerda; Rados, Kristijan; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2017-04-01

    Soil bioengineering is a construction technique using biological components for hydraulic and civil engineering solutions, based on the application of living plants and other auxiliary materials including among others log wood. Considering the reliability of the construction it is important to know about the durability and the degradation process of the wooden logs to estimate and retain the integral performance of a soil bioengineering system. An important performance indicator is the compression strength, but this parameter is not easy to examine by non-destructive methods. The Rinntech Resistograph is an instrument to measure the drilling resistance by a 3 mm wide needle in a wooden log. It is a quasi-non-destructive method as the remaining hole has no weakening effects to the wood. This is an easy procedure but result in values, hard to interpret. To assign drilling resistance values to specific compression strengths, wooden specimens were tested in an experiment and analysed with the Resistograph. Afterwards compression tests were done at the same specimens. This should allow an easier interpretation of drilling resistance curves in future. For detailed analyses specimens were investigated by means of branch inclusions, cracks and distances between annual rings. Wood specimens are tested perpendicular to the grain. First results show a correlation between drilling resistance and compression strength by using the mean drilling resistance, average width of the annual rings and the mean range of the minima and maxima values as factors for the drilling resistance. The extended limit of proportionality, the offset yield strength and the maximum strength were taken as parameters for compression strength. Further investigations at a second point in time strengthen these results.

  16. Effects of slag on flexural strength of slurry infiltrated fibrous concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elavarasi, D.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.; Parthasarathy, P.; Dinesh, T.

    2017-07-01

    Slurry infiltrated fibrous concrete is one of the new advanced concrete composite which differs from method of fabrication and composition of the matrix. Extensive research is being carried out on alternative binders or supplements to cement aiming to reduce environmental impact. However, little has been published to investigate the structural behaviour of SIFCON incorporating with mineral admixtures, particularly as regards its ultrahigh ductility, which may alter the mode of failure from brittle to the more desirable ductile. An experimental study was carried out to investigate the flexural behavior of SIFCON containing three different percentage of fibre content 6%,8% &10% with incorporation of optimum dosage of blast furnace slag replaced by cement. Strength characteristics such as Compressive strength and splitting tensile strength test were carry out for SIFCON incorporating 10% of fibre content and different percentage of slag (0, 15, 30, 45, 60%&75%) to optimize the replacement level. The test results found that the maximum strengths were attained at 30% of blast furnace slag replaced by cement. To study the flexural behavior of SIFCON beam of size 1.2x0.1x0.2m containing different percentages (6%, 8% & 10%) fibre content incorporating with and without the optimum percentage of slag were cast and tested. Both flexural strength and Load displacement characteristics of the specimens were studied under flexure. The outcomespresentedfromtest resultshave been compared. The test results reveals that the flexural strength, toughness, ductility and stiffness characteristics were significantly improved due to incorporation of optimum dosage of slag enhancing when compared to without mineral admixtures also compared to conventional concrete(RCC). Major conclusions were drawn from the investigations which are presented.

  17. On the Processing of Spalling Experiments. Part I: Identification of the Dynamic Tensile Strength of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.; Lukić, B.

    2017-11-01

    The spalling technique based on the use of a single Hopkinson bar put in contact with the tested sample has been widely adopted as a reliable method for obtaining the tensile response of concrete and rock-like materials at strain rates up-to 200 s- 1. However, the traditional processing method, based on the use of Novikov acoustic approach and the rear face velocity measurement, remains quite questionable due to strong approximations of this data processing method. Recently a new technique for deriving cross-sectional stress fields of a spalling sample filmed with an ultra-high speed camera and based on using the full field measurements and the virtual fields method (VFM) was proposed. In the present work, this topic is perused by performing several spalling tests on ordinary concrete at high acquisition speed of 1Mfps to accurately measure the tensile strength, Young's modulus, strain-rate at failure and stress-strain response of concrete at high strain-rate. The stress-strain curves contain more measurement points for a more reliable identification. The observed tensile stiffness is up-to 50% lower than the initial compressive stiffness and the obtained peak stress was about 20% lower than the one obtained by applying the Novikov method. In order to support this claim, numerical simulations were performed to show that the change of stiffness between compression and tension highly affects the rear-face velocity profile. This further suggests that the processing based only on the velocity "pullback" is quite sensitive and can produce an overestimate of the tensile strength in concrete and rock-like materials.

  18. Properties of Cement Mortar and Ultra-High Strength Concrete Incorporating Graphene Oxide Nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the effect of graphene oxide nanosheet (GONS) additives on the properties of cement mortar and ultra-high strength concrete (UHSC) is reported. The resulting GONS-cement composites were easy to prepare and exhibited excellent mechanical properties. However, their fluidity decreased with increasing GONS content. The UHSC specimens were prepared with various amounts of GONSs (0–0.03% by weight of cement). Results indicated that using 0.01% by weight of cement GONSs caused a 7.82% in compressive strength after 28 days of curing. Moreover, adding GONSs improved the flexural strength and deformation ability, with the increase in flexural strength more than that of compressive strength. Furthermore, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to observe the morphology of the hardened cement paste and UHSC samples. FE-SEM observations showed that the GONSs were well dispersed in the matrix and the bonding of the GONSs and the surrounding cement matrix was strong. Furthermore, FE-SEM observation indicated that the GONSs probably affected the shape of the cement hydration products. However, the growth space for hydrates also had an important effect on the morphology of hydrates. The true hydration mechanism of cement composites with GONSs needs further study. PMID:28726750

  19. Properties of Cement Mortar and Ultra-High Strength Concrete Incorporating Graphene Oxide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liulei; Ouyang, Dong

    2017-07-20

    In this work, the effect of graphene oxide nanosheet (GONS) additives on the properties of cement mortar and ultra-high strength concrete (UHSC) is reported. The resulting GONS-cement composites were easy to prepare and exhibited excellent mechanical properties. However, their fluidity decreased with increasing GONS content. The UHSC specimens were prepared with various amounts of GONSs (0-0.03% by weight of cement). Results indicated that using 0.01% by weight of cement GONSs caused a 7.82% in compressive strength after 28 days of curing. Moreover, adding GONSs improved the flexural strength and deformation ability, with the increase in flexural strength more than that of compressive strength. Furthermore, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to observe the morphology of the hardened cement paste and UHSC samples. FE-SEM observations showed that the GONSs were well dispersed in the matrix and the bonding of the GONSs and the surrounding cement matrix was strong. Furthermore, FE-SEM observation indicated that the GONSs probably affected the shape of the cement hydration products. However, the growth space for hydrates also had an important effect on the morphology of hydrates. The true hydration mechanism of cement composites with GONSs needs further study.

  20. Carbon Nanofiber Cement Sensors to Detect Strain and Damage of Concrete Specimens Under Compression.

    PubMed

    Galao, Oscar; Baeza, F Javier; Zornoza, Emilio; Garcés, Pedro

    2017-11-24

    Cement composites with nano-additions have been vastly studied for their functional applications, such as strain and damage sensing. The capacity of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) cement paste has already been tested. However, this study is focused on the use of CNF cement composites as sensors in regular concrete samples. Different measuring techniques and humidity conditions of CNF samples were tested to optimize the strain and damage sensing of this material. In the strain sensing tests (for compressive stresses up to 10 MPa), the response depends on the maximum stress applied. The material was more sensitive at higher loads. Furthermore, the actual load time history did not influence the electrical response, and similar curves were obtained for different test configurations. On the other hand, damage sensing tests proved the capability of CNF cement composites to measure the strain level of concrete samples, even for loads close to the material's strength. Some problems were detected in the strain transmission between sensor and concrete specimens, which will require specific calibration of each sensor one attached to the structure.

  1. Carbon Nanofiber Cement Sensors to Detect Strain and Damage of Concrete Specimens Under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, F. Javier; Garcés, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cement composites with nano-additions have been vastly studied for their functional applications, such as strain and damage sensing. The capacity of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) cement paste has already been tested. However, this study is focused on the use of CNF cement composites as sensors in regular concrete samples. Different measuring techniques and humidity conditions of CNF samples were tested to optimize the strain and damage sensing of this material. In the strain sensing tests (for compressive stresses up to 10 MPa), the response depends on the maximum stress applied. The material was more sensitive at higher loads. Furthermore, the actual load time history did not influence the electrical response, and similar curves were obtained for different test configurations. On the other hand, damage sensing tests proved the capability of CNF cement composites to measure the strain level of concrete samples, even for loads close to the material’s strength. Some problems were detected in the strain transmission between sensor and concrete specimens, which will require specific calibration of each sensor one attached to the structure. PMID:29186797

  2. Axial Compression Behavior of a New Type of Prefabricated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qun, Xie; Shuai, Wang; Chun, Liu

    2018-03-01

    A novel type of prefabricated concrete sandwich wall panel which could be used as a load-bearing structural element in buildings has been presented in this paper. Compared with the traditional sandwich panels, there are several typical characteristics for this wall system, including core columns confined by spiral stirrup along the cross-section of panel with 600mm spacing, precast foamed concrete block between two structural layers as internal insulation part, and a three-dimensional (3D) steel wire skeleton in each layer which is composed of two vertical steel wire meshes connected by horizontally short steel bar. All steel segments in the panel are automatically prefabricated in factory and then are assembled to form steel system in site. In order to investigate the structural behavior of this wall panel, two full-scale panels have been experimentally studied under axial compressive load. The test results show that the wall panel presents good load-bearing capacity and integral stiffness without out-of-plane flexural failure. Compared to the panel with planar steel wire mesh in concrete layer, the panel with 3D steel wire skeleton presents higher strength and better rigidity even in the condition of same steel ratio in panels which verifies that the 3D steel skeleton could greatly enhance the structural behavior of sandwich panel.

  3. [Compressive and bend strength of experimental admixed high copper alloys].

    PubMed

    Sourai, P; Paximada, H; Lagouvardos, P; Douvitsas, G

    1988-01-01

    Mixed alloys for dental amalgams have been used mainly in the form of admixed alloys, where eutectic spheres are blend with conventional flakes. In the present study the compressive strength, bend strength and microstructure of two high-copper alloys (Tytin, Ana-2000) is compared with three experimental alloys prepared of the two high copper by mixing them in proportions of 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 by weight. The results revealed that experimental alloys inherited high early and final strength values without any significant change in their microstructure.

  4. Creep and cracking of concrete hinges: insight from centric and eccentric compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Schlappal, Thomas; Schweigler, Michael; Gmainer, Susanne; Peyerl, Martin; Pichler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Existing design guidelines for concrete hinges consider bending-induced tensile cracking, but the structural behavior is oversimplified to be time-independent. This is the motivation to study creep and bending-induced tensile cracking of initially monolithic concrete hinges systematically. Material tests on plain concrete specimens and structural tests on marginally reinforced concrete hinges are performed. The experiments characterize material and structural creep under centric compression as well as bending-induced tensile cracking and the interaction between creep and cracking of concrete hinges. As for the latter two aims, three nominally identical concrete hinges are subjected to short-term and to longer-term eccentric compression tests. Obtained material and structural creep functions referring to centric compression are found to be very similar. The structural creep activity under eccentric compression is significantly larger because of the interaction between creep and cracking, i.e. bending-induced cracks progressively open and propagate under sustained eccentric loading. As for concrete hinges in frame-like integral bridge construction, it is concluded (i) that realistic simulation of variable loads requires consideration of the here-studied time-dependent behavior and (ii) that permanent compressive normal forces shall be limited by 45% of the ultimate load carrying capacity, in order to avoid damage of concrete hinges under sustained loading.

  5. Modelling the effect of shear strength on isentropic compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Stuart; Howell, Peter; Ockendon, John; Ockendon, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) are a way of obtaining equation of state information for metals undergoing violent plastic deformation. In a typical experiment, millimetre thick metal samples are subjected to pressures on the order of 10 - 102 GPa, while the yield strength of the material can be as low as 10-2 GPa. The analysis of such experiments has so far neglected the effect of shear strength, instead treating the highly plasticised metal as an inviscid compressible fluid. However making this approximation belies the basic elastic nature of a solid object. A more accurate method should strive to incorporate the small but measurable effects of shear strength. Here we present a one-dimensional mathematical model for elastoplasticity at high stress which allows for both compressibility and the shear strength of the material. In the limit of zero yield stress this model reproduces the hydrodynamic models currently used to analyse ICEs. Numerical solutions of the governing equations will then be presented for problems relevant to ICEs in order to investigate the effects of shear strength compared with a model based purely on hydrodynamics.

  6. The effect of shear strength on isentropic compression experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Stuart; Howell, Peter; Ockendon, John; Ockendon, Hilary

    2015-06-01

    Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) are a novel way of obtaining equation of state information for metals undergoing violent plastic deformation. In a typical experiment, millimetre thick metal samples are subjected to pressures on the order of 10 -102 GPa, while the yield strength of the material can be as low as 10-1GPa. The analysis of such experiments has so far neglected the effect of shear strength, instead treating the highly plasticised metal as an inviscid compressible fluid. However making this approximation belies the basic elastic nature of a solid object. A more accurate method should strive to incorporate the small but measurable effects of shear strength. Here we present a one-dimensional mathematical model for elastoplasticity at high stress which allows for both compressibility and the shear strength of the material. In the limit of zero yield stress this model reproduces the hydrodynamic models currently used to analyse ICEs. We will also show using a systematic asymptotic analysis that entropy changes are universally negligible in the absence of shocks. Numerical solutions of the governing equations will then be presented for problems relevant to ICEs in order to investigate the effects of shear strength over a model based purely on hydrodynamics.

  7. Compression and flexural strength of bone cement mixed with blood.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H; Koh, B Th; Ramruttun, A K; Wang, W

    2016-08-01

    To assess the compression and flexural strength of bone cement mixed with 0 ml, 1 ml, or 2 ml of blood. High viscosity polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) loaded with or without gentamicin was used. Blood was collected from total knee arthroplasty patients. In the same operating room, one pack of cement each was mixed with 0 ml (control), 1 ml, or 2 ml of blood for 1 minute during the dough phase. The dough was extruded into cylindrical and rectangular moulds for 20 minutes of setting, and then cured in phosphate buffered saline at 37±1ºC for 7 days. The samples were visually inspected for fractures and areas of weakness, and then scanned using microcomputed tomography. 48 gentamicin-loaded and 59 non-gentamicin-loaded samples mixed with 0 ml (control), 1 ml, or 2 ml of blood were randomised for flexural and compression strength testing; each group had at least 6 samples. In samples loaded with or without gentamicin, the flexural and compressive strength was highest in controls, followed by samples mixed with 1 ml or 2 ml of blood. In samples mixed with 2 ml of blood, the flexural strength fell below the standard of 50 MPa. In samples mixed with 2 ml of blood and all gentamicin-loaded samples, the compressive strength fell below the standard of 70 MPa. Microcomputed tomography revealed areas of voids and pores indicating the presence of laminations and partitions within. The biomechanical strength of PMMA contaminated with blood may decrease. Precautions such as saline lavage, pack drying the bone, change of gloves, and prompt insertion of the implant should be taken to prevent blood from contaminating bone cement.

  8. Behavior of hollow-core FRP-concrete-steel columns subjected to cyclic axial compression.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study that was conducted to investigate the effects of key parameters on the compressive behavior of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP)-concrete-steel double-skin tubular columns (FSDT). Hybrid FSDT col...

  9. Evaluation of a Highway Bridge Constructed Using High Strength Lightweight Concrete Bridge Girders : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    The use of high performance concretes to provide longer bridge spans has been limited due to the capacity of existing infrastructure to handle the load of the girders during transportation. The use of High Strength Lightweight Concrete (HSLW) can pro...

  10. Early strength prediction of concrete based on accelerated curing methods : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-12-01

    Concrete mix designs and components may currently be changed during the course of a project. The possible negative effects of such changes on concrete strength, are not determined under the current plant control/project control process. Also, the cur...

  11. Evaluation of a highway bridge constructed using high strength lightweight concrete bridge girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    The use of high performance concretes to provide longer bridge spans has been limited due to the capacity of existing infrastructure to handle the load of the girders during transportation. The use of High Strength Lightweight Concrete (HSLW) can pro...

  12. Strength and texture of Pt compressed to 63 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Susannah M.; Shieh, Sean R.; Duffy, Thomas S.

    2015-02-01

    Angle- and energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments in a radial geometry were performed in the diamond anvil cell on polycrystalline platinum samples at pressures up to 63 GPa. Observed yield strength and texture depend on grain size. For samples with 70-300-nm particle size, the yield strength is 5-6 GPa at ˜60 GPa. Coarse-grained (˜2-μm particles) Pt has a much lower yield strength of 1-1.5 GPa at ˜60 GPa. Face-centered cubic metals Pt and Au have lower strength to shear modulus ratio than body-centered cubic or hexagonal close-packed metals. While a 300-nm particle sample exhibits the <110> texture expected of face-centered-cubic metals under compression, smaller and larger particles show a weak mixed <110> and <100> texture under compression. Differences in texture development may also occur due to deviations from uniaxial stress under compression in the diamond anvil cell.

  13. Ultra-high performance concrete for Michigan bridges, material performance : phase I.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-13

    One of the latest advancements in concrete technology is Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). UHPC is : defined as concretes attaining compressive strengths exceeding 25 ksi (175 MPa). It is a fiber-reinforced, denselypacked : concrete material wh...

  14. Compressive Strength of Cometary Surfaces Derived from Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElShafie, A.; Heggy, E.

    2014-12-01

    Landing on a comet nucleus and probing it, mechanically using harpoons, penetrometers and drills, and electromagnetically using low frequency radar waves is a complex task that will be tackled by the Rosetta mission for Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The mechanical properties (i.e. density, porosity and compressive strength) and the electrical properties (i.e. the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant) of the comet nucleus, constrain both the mechanical and electromagnetic probing capabilities of Rosetta, as well as the choice of landing site, the safety of the landing, and subsurface data interpretation. During landing, the sounding radar data that will be collected by Rosetta's CONSERT experiment can be used to probe the comet's upper regolith layer by assessing its dielectric properties, which are then inverted to retrieve the surface mechanical properties. These observations can help characterize the mechanical properties of the landing site, which will optimize the operation of the anchor system. In this effort, we correlate the mechanical and electrical properties of cometary analogs to each other, and derive an empirical model that can be used to retrieve density, porosity and compressive strength from the dielectric properties of the upper regolith inverted from CONSERT observations during the landing phase. In our approach we consider snow as a viable cometary material analog due to its low density and its porous nature. Therefore, we used the compressive strength and dielectric constant measurements conducted on snow at a temperature of 250 K and a density range of 0.4-0.9 g/cm3 in order to investigate the relation between compressive strength and dielectric constant under cometary-relevant density range. Our results suggest that compressive strength increases linearly as function of the dielectric constant over the observed density range mentioned above. The minimum and maximum compressive strength of 0.5 and 4.5 MPa corresponded to a

  15. Strength and fracture energy of foamed concrete incorporating rice husk ash and polypropylene mega-mesh 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaini, Z. M.; Rum, R. H. M.; Boon, K. H.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the utilization of rice husk ash (RHA) as sand replacement and polypropylene mega-mesh 55 (PMM) as fiber reinforcement in foamed concrete. High pozzolanic reaction and the ability to become filler make RHA as a strategic material to enhance the strength and durability of foamed concrete. Furthermore, the presence of PMM optimizes the toughness of foamed concrete in resisting shrinkage and cracking. In this experimental study, cube and cylinder specimens were prepared for the compression and splitting-tensile tests. Meanwhile, notched beam specimens were cast for the three-point bending test. It was found that 40% RHA and 9kg/m3 PMM contribute to the highest strength and fracture energy. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths are 32MPa, 2.88MPa and 6.68MPa respectively, while the fracture energy achieves 42.19N/m. The results indicate high potential of RHA and PMM in enhancing the mechanical properties of foamed concrete.

  16. Acceptable vibrations on green concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-12-01

    Vibrations are potentially harmful to green concrete in shaft foundations, and many states, including : Mississippi, cautiously established limits in terms of compressive strength, distance boundary, and : wait time to protect early age concrete. But...

  17. Compressive strength of human openwedges: a selection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follet, H.; Gotteland, M.; Bardonnet, R.; Sfarghiu, A. M.; Peyrot, J.; Rumelhart, C.

    2004-02-01

    A series of 44 samples of bone wedges of human origin, intended for allograft openwedge osteotomy and obtained without particular precautions during hip arthroplasty were re-examined. After viral inactivity chemical treatment, lyophilisation and radio-sterilisation (intended to produce optimal health safety), the compressive strength, independent of age, sex and the height of the sample (or angle of cut), proved to be too widely dispersed [ 10{-}158 MPa] in the first study. We propose a method for selecting samples which takes into account their geometry (width, length, thicknesses, cortical surface area). Statistical methods (Principal Components Analysis PCA, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, Multilinear regression) allowed final selection of 29 samples having a mean compressive strength σ_{max} =103 MPa ± 26 and with variation [ 61{-}158 MPa] . These results are equivalent or greater than average materials currently used in openwedge osteotomy.

  18. The effects of compressive preloads on the compression-after-impact strength of carbon/epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    A preloading device was used to examine the effects of compressive prestress on the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of 16-ply, quasi-isotropic carbon epoxy test coupons. T300/934 material was evaluated at preloads from 200 to 4000 lb at impact energies from 1 to 9 joules. IM7/8551-7 material was evaluated at preloads from 4000 to 10,000 lb at impact energies from 4 to 16 joules. Advanced design of experiments methodology was used to design and evaluate the test matrices. The results showed that no statistically significant change in CAI strength could be contributed to the amount of compressive preload applied to the specimen.

  19. Compressive Strength and Indentation Damage in Ceramic Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-31

    The extent of the plastically deformed region associated with indentation in silicon carbide is determined by means of selected area electron...microfracture mechanisms responsible for the temperature-sensitive compressive strength behavior of polycrystalline Al2O3 and alpha-SiC. It is determined ...that the early stages of damage can be related to the presence or absence of microplasticity , depending upon the ceramic. Further, local plastic flow in

  20. The Strength Analysis of Differential Planetary Gears of Gearbox for Concrete Mixer Truck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, M. H.; Bae, T. Y.; Kim, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    The power train of mixer gearbox for concrete mixer truck includes differential planetary gears to get large reduction ratio for operating mixer a drum and simple structure. The planetary gears are very important part of a mixer gearbox where strength problems namely gear bending stress, gear compressive stress and scoring failure are the main concern. In the present study, calculating specifications of the differential planetary gears and analyzing the gear bending and compressive stresses as well as scoring factor of the differential planetary gears gearbox for an optimal design of the mixer gearbox in respect to cost and reliability are investigated. The analyses of actual gear bending and compressive stresses of the differential planetary gears using Lewes & Hertz equation and verifications of the calculated specifications of the differential planetary gears evaluate the results with the data of allowable bending and compressive stress from the Stress-No. of cycles curves of gears. In addition, we also analyze actual gear scoring factor as well as evaluate the possibility of scoring failure of the differential planetary gear.

  1. Parametric study on the compressive strength geopolymer paving block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman; Awaluddin, A.; Ahmad, A.; Olivia, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reported about the investigated of sodium hidroxida concentration, effect of ratio liquid to solid (L/S), temperature and time on the compressive strength of geopolymer paving block using fly ash and fine aggregate as base material and combination of sodium hidroxida and sodium silicate as alkaline activator and the ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH was 2 and fly ash to aggregate of 1: 3. The experiments were conducted with variation of the sodium hidroxida concentration of (10-16 M) liquid to solid (L/S) 0.1- 0.7 ratio, curing temperature 30-100 °C and curing time (7-28 day). The main evaluation techniques in this experimental were Compressive strength, X-ray diffraction (XRD),and Scaning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result showed that the compressive strength of Geopolymer Paving block has increased with an increasing of concentration, liquid to solid ratio, curing temperature and curing time.

  2. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.; Lee, Hung-Joo

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made either of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, or ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK. The plate length, the layup and the amount of damage were also varied. Damage was introduced in the plates either by impacting them with a solid projectile or by applying a transverse static load. Some (75 percent) or all (100 percent) of the damaged zone was then cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and repaired plates. The data at an intermediate stage of repair provide information on the effect of each repair step on the compressive strength. The results indicated that for the solid plates used in these tests, the repair methods used herein did not improve the compressive strength of already damaged plates.

  3. Review on fatigue behavior of high-strength concrete after high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongfu; Jia, Penghe; Gao, Haijing

    2017-06-01

    The fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature has begun to attract attention. But so far the researches work about the fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature have not been reported. This article based on a large number of literature. The research work about the fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature are reviewed, analysed and expected, which can provide some reference for the experimental study of fatigue damage analysis.

  4. Improving Fatigue Strength of polymer concrete using nanomaterials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-30

    Polymer concrete (PC) is that type of concrete where the cement binder is replaced with polymer. PC is often used to improve friction and protect structural substrates in reinforced concrete and orthotropic steel bridges. However, its low fatigue per...

  5. Effect of adding acid solution on setting time and compressive strength of high calcium fly ash based geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Herianto, Jason Ghorman; Anastasia, Evelin; Hardjito, Djwantoro

    2017-09-01

    Fly ash with high calcium oxide content when used as the base material in geopolymer concrete could cause flash setting or rapid hardening. However, it might increase the compressive strength of geopolymer concrete. This rapid hardening could cause problems if the geopolymer concrete is used on a large scale casting that requires a long setting time. CaO content can be indicated by pH values of the fly ash, while higher pH is correlated with the rapid setting time of fly ash-based geopolymer. This study investigates the addition of acid solution to reduce the initial pH of the fly ash and to prolong the setting time of the mixture. The acids used in this study are hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfuric acid (H2 SO4), nitric acid (HNO3) and acetic acid (CH3 COOH). It was found that the addition of acid solution in fly ash was able to decrease the initial pH of fly ash, however, the initial setting time of geopolymer was not reduced. It was even faster than that of the control mixture. The acid type causes various influence, depending on the fly ash properties. In addition, the use of acid solution in fly ash reduces the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar. It is concluded that the addition of acid solution cannot prolong the rapid hardening of high calcium fly ash geopolymer, and it causes adverse effect on the compressive strength.

  6. Durable high strength cement concrete topping for asphalt roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyrozhemskyi, Valerii; Krayushkina, Kateryna; Bidnenko, Nataliia

    2017-09-01

    Work on improving riding qualities of pavements by means of placing a thin cement layer with high roughness and strength properties on the existing asphalt pavement were conducted in Ukraine for the first time. Such pavement is called HPCM (High Performance Cementitious Material). This is a high-strength thin cement-layer pavement of 8-9 mm thickness reinforced with metal or polymer fiber of less than 5 mm length. Increased grip properties are caused by placement of stone material of 3-5 mm fraction on the concrete surface. As a result of the research, the preparation and placement technology of high-strength cement thin-layer pavement reinforced with fiber was developed to improve friction properties of existing asphalt pavements which ensures their roughness and durability. It must be emphasized that HPCM is a fundamentally new type of thin-layer pavement in which a rigid layer of 10 mm thickness is placed on a non-rigid base thereby improving riding qualities of asphalt pavement at any season of a year.

  7. Effect of rapid set binder on early strength and permeability of HES latex modified road repair pre-packed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. W.; Lee, S. K.; Yu, C.; Park, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    The early strength development characteristics and permeability resistance of high early strength (HES) pre-packed road repair concrete incorporating a rapid-set binder material were evaluated for emergency repairs to road pavement. The rapid-set binder is a mixture of rapid-set cement and silica sands whose fluidity improves with the addition of styrene butadiene latex (latex). The resulting mixture has a compressive strength of 21 MPa or higher and a flexural strength of greater than 3.5 MPa after 4 hours, the maximum curing age allowed for emergency repair materials. This study examines the strength development properties and permeability resistance of HES latex-modified pre-packed road repair concrete using a rapid- set binder as a function of the latex-to-binder mixing ratio at values of 0.40, 0.33, 0.29 and 0.25. Both early strength development properties and permeability resistance increased as the ratio of latex to rapid-set binder decreased. The mixture showed a compressive strength of 21 MPa or higher after 4 hours, which is the design standard of emergency repair concrete, only when this ratio was 0.29 or lower. A flexural strength of 3.5 MPa or greater was observed after hours only when this ratio was 0.33 or lower. The standard for permeability resistance, less than 2,000 C of chloride after 7 days of curing, was satisfied by all ratios. The ratio of latex to rapid-set binder satisfying all of the conditions for an emergency road repair material was 0.29 or less.

  8. Strength characteristics of light weight concrete blocks using mineral admixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneshwari, P.; Priyadharshini, U.; Gurucharan, S.; Mithunram, B.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study to investigate the characteristics of light weight concrete blocks. Cement was partially replaced with mineral admixtures like Fly ash (FA), limestone powder waste (LPW), Rice husk ash (RHA), sugarcane fiber waste (SCW) and Chrysopogonzizanioides (CZ). The maximum replacement level achieved was 25% by weight of cement and sand. Total of 56 cubes (150 mm x 150 mm x150 mm) and 18 cylinders (100mmφ and 50mm depth) were cast. The specimens being (FA, RHA, SCW, LPW, CZ, (FA-RHA), (FA-LPW), (FA-CZ), (LPW-CZ), (FA-SCW), (RHA-SCW)).Among the different combination, FA,FA-SCW,CZ,FA-CZ showed enhanced strength and durability, apart from achieving less density.

  9. Phase I: Evaluation of Low Flexural Strength for Northern Nevada Concrete Paving Mixtures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-07-01

    Production paving grade concrete in Northern Nevada having acceptable strength is universally acknowledged to be difficult; however understanding why this is true remains elusive. Current practice is to meet flexural strength requirements by using mi...

  10. Dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member under axial compression considering creep effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. T.; Wang, Y. D.; Dai, C. H.; Ding, M.

    2017-08-01

    The finite element model of concrete-filled steel tubular member was established by the numerical analysis software considering material nonlinearity to analyze concrete creep effect on the dynamic responses of the member under axial compression and lateral impact. In the model, the constitutive model of core concrete is the plastic damage model, that of steel is the Von Mises yield criterion and kinematic hardening model, and the creep effect at different ages is equivalent to the change of concrete elastic modulus. Then the dynamic responses of concrete-filled steel tubular member considering creep effects was simulated, and the effects of creep on contact time, impact load, deflection, stress and strain were discussed. The fruits provide a scientific basis for the design of the impact resistance of concrete filled steel tubular members.

  11. Uniaxial Compressive Constitutive Relationship of Concrete Confined by Special-Shaped Steel Tube Coupled with Multiple Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haipeng; Cao, Wanlin; Qiao, Qiyun; Dong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to predict the complete stress-strain curves of concrete subjected to triaxial stresses, which were caused by axial load and lateral force. The stress can be induced due to the confinement action inside a special-shaped steel tube having multiple cavities. The existing reinforced confined concrete formulas have been improved to determine the confinement action. The influence of cross-sectional shape, of cavity construction, of stiffening ribs and of reinforcement in cavities has been considered in the model. The parameters of the model are determined on the basis of experimental results of an axial compression test for two different kinds of special-shaped concrete filled steel tube (CFT) columns with multiple cavities. The complete load-strain curves of the special-shaped CFT columns are estimated. The predicted concrete strength and the post-peak behavior are found to show good agreement within the accepted limits, compared with the experimental results. In addition, the parameters of proposed model are taken from two kinds of totally different CFT columns, so that it can be concluded that this model is also applicable to concrete confined by other special-shaped steel tubes. PMID:28787886

  12. Uniaxial Compressive Constitutive Relationship of Concrete Confined by Special-Shaped Steel Tube Coupled with Multiple Cavities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haipeng; Cao, Wanlin; Qiao, Qiyun; Dong, Hongying

    2016-01-29

    A method is presented to predict the complete stress-strain curves of concrete subjected to triaxial stresses, which were caused by axial load and lateral force. The stress can be induced due to the confinement action inside a special-shaped steel tube having multiple cavities. The existing reinforced confined concrete formulas have been improved to determine the confinement action. The influence of cross-sectional shape, of cavity construction, of stiffening ribs and of reinforcement in cavities has been considered in the model. The parameters of the model are determined on the basis of experimental results of an axial compression test for two different kinds of special-shaped concrete filled steel tube (CFT) columns with multiple cavities. The complete load-strain curves of the special-shaped CFT columns are estimated. The predicted concrete strength and the post-peak behavior are found to show good agreement within the accepted limits, compared with the experimental results. In addition, the parameters of proposed model are taken from two kinds of totally different CFT columns, so that it can be concluded that this model is also applicable to concrete confined by other special-shaped steel tubes.

  13. Ultra-porous titanium oxide scaffold with high compressive strength

    PubMed Central

    Tiainen, Hanna; Lyngstadaas, S. Petter; Ellingsen, Jan Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Highly porous and well interconnected titanium dioxide (TiO2) scaffolds with compressive strength above 2.5 MPa were fabricated without compromising the desired pore architectural characteristics, such as high porosity, appropriate pore size, surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnectivity. Processing parameters and pore architectural characteristics were investigated in order to identify the key processing steps and morphological properties that contributed to the enhanced strength of the scaffolds. Cleaning of the TiO2 raw powder removed phosphates but introduced sodium into the powder, which was suggested to decrease the slurry stability. Strong correlation was found between compressive strength and both replication times and solid content in the ceramic slurry. Increase in the solid content resulted in more favourable sponge loading, which was achieved due to the more suitable rheological properties of the ceramic slurry. Repeated replication process induced only negligible changes in the pore architectural parameters indicating a reduced flaw size in the scaffold struts. The fabricated TiO2 scaffolds show great promise as load-bearing bone scaffolds for applications where moderate mechanical support is required. PMID:20711636

  14. The Effects of Compressive Preloads on the Compression-After-Impact Strength of Carbon/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    A fixture to apply compressive loads to composite specimens during an impact event was used to assess the effect of prestresses on the compression-after-impact (CAI) strength of 16 ply quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy test coupons. Advanced design of experiments techniques were used to evaluate a range of prestresses and impact energies on two material systems, T300/934 and IM7/8551-7. An instrumented drop tower supplied impact energies between 1 and 9 Joules for the T300/934 material and between 4 and 16 Joules for the IM7/8551-7 material. The prestress values varied between a low of 5.7 Wa and a high of 287 NDa. Results showed some change in CAI strength that could be attributed to the prestresses on the specimens.

  15. High-early-strength high-performance concrete for rapid pavement repair.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    In the construction industry, High Early-Age Strength (HES) concrete was : traditionally regarded as a concrete that achieves a loading strength in matter of days : rather than weeks. However, in the last 10-15 years, this time has been reduced down ...

  16. Improved strength and durability of concrete through metabolic activity of ureolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Maria Jose Castro; Ortiz, Carlos Eloir Lopez; Perez, Sixto Omar Garcia; Narayanasamy, Rajeswari; Fajardo San Miguel, Gerardo Del Jesús; Hernández, Héctor Herrera; Balagurusamy, Nagamani

    2017-06-07

    In recent years, biomineralization process is being employed in development of bioconcrete, which is emerging as a sustainable method to enhance the durability of concrete by way of increasing compressive strength and reducing the chloride permeability. In this study, different bacterial strains isolated from the soils of the Laguna Region of Mexico were selected for further study. ACRN5 strain demonstrated higher urease activity than other strains, and the optimum substrate concentration, pH, and temperature were 120 mM, pH 8, and 25 °C, respectively. Further, Km and Vmax of urease activity of ACRN5 were 21.38 mM and 0.212 mM min -1 , respectively. It was observed that addition of ACRN5 at 10 5  cells ml -1 to cement-water mixture significantly increased (14.94%) in compressive strength after 36 days of curing and reduced chloride penetration. Deposition of calcite in bio-mortars was observed in scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction spectrometry analyses. Results of this study demonstrated the role of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation in improving the physico-mechanical properties of bio-mortars.

  17. The influence of main bar corrosion on bond strength in selfcompacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayop, S. S.; Emhemed, A. N. K.; Jamaluddin, N.; Sadikin, A.

    2017-11-01

    The experimental study was conducted to determine the influence of main bar corrosion on bond strength in self-compacting concrete (SCC). A total 16 tension pullout tests specimens reinforced with 10 mm and 14 mm diameter bar were used for the bond strength test. The properties of SCC were determined from the slump flow, T50cm, V-funnel and L box test. Reinforcing bars in the concrete were submitted to impressed current to accelerate the corrosion of the bar. It was found that the relationship between bond strength and concrete strength in un-corroded specimens differed from that of corroded specimens set in high-strength concrete because of brittleness in the corroded specimens, which caused a sudden loss of bond strength. The results revealed that specimens of un-corroded and corroded showed a higher percentage of bond strength degradation during the pullout tests.

  18. Uniaxial Compressive Strengths of Rocks Drilled at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. H.; Carey, E. M.; Anderson, R. C.; Abbey, W. J.; Kinnett, R.; Watkins, J. A.; Schemel, M.; Lashore, M. O.; Chasek, M. D.; Green, W.; Beegle, L. W.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2018-01-01

    Measuring the physical properties of geological materials is important for understanding geologic history. Yet there has never been an instrument with the purpose of measuring mechanical properties of rocks sent to another planet. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover employs the Powder Acquisition Drill System (PADS), which provides direct mechanical interaction with Martian outcrops. While the objective of the drill system is not to make scientific measurements, the drill's performance is directly influenced by the mechanical properties of the rocks it drills into. We have developed a methodology that uses the drill to indicate the uniaxial compressive strengths of rocks through comparison with performance of an identically assembled drill system in terrestrial samples of comparable sedimentary class. During this investigation, we utilize engineering data collected on Mars to calculate the percussive energy needed to maintain a prescribed rate of penetration and correlate that to rock strength.

  19. Critical factors in displacement ductility assessment of high-strength concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Ali; Moghadam, Abdolreza S.; Tasnimi, Abass Ali

    2017-12-01

    Ductility of high-strength concrete (HSC) columns with rectangular sections was assessed in this study by reviewing experimental data from the available literature. Up to 112 normal weights concrete columns with strength in the range of 50-130 MPa were considered and presented as a database. The data included the results of column testes under axial and reversed lateral loading. Displacement ductility of HSC columns was evaluated in terms of their concrete and reinforcement strengths, bar arrangement, volumetric ratio of transverse reinforcement, and axial loading. The results indicated that the confinement requirements and displacement ductility in HSC columns are more sensitive than those in normal strength concrete columns. Moreover, ductility is descended by increasing concrete strength. However, it was possible to obtain ductile behavior in HSC columns through proper confinement. Furthermore, this study casts doubt about capability of P/ A g f c' ratio that being inversely proportional to displacement ductility of HSC columns.

  20. Experimental study on the strength parameter of Quarry Dust mixed Coconut Shell Concrete adding Coconut Fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matangulu Shrestha, Victor; Anandh, S.; Sindhu Nachiar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous mixture constitute of cement as the main ingredient with a different mix of fine and coarse aggregate. The massive use of conventional concrete has a shortfall in its key ingredients, natural sand and coarse aggregate, due to increased industrialisation and globalisation. To overcome the shortage of material, an alternate material with similar mechanical properties and composition has to be studied, as replacement of conventional concrete. Coconut shell concrete is a prime option as replacement of key ingredients of conventional concrete as coconut is produced in massive quantity in south East Asia. Coconut shell concrete is lightweight concrete and different research is still ongoing concerning about its mix design and composition in the construction industry. Concrete is weak in tension as compared to compression, hence the fibre is used to refrain the crack in the concrete. Coconut fibre is one of many fibres which can be used in concrete. The main aim of this project is to analyse the use of natural by-products in the construction industry, make light weight concrete and eco-friendly construction. This project concerns with the comparison of the mechanical properties of coconut shell concrete and conventional concrete, replacing fine aggregate with quarry dust using coconut fibre. M25 grade of concrete was adopted and testing of concrete was done at the age of 3, 7 and 28 days. In this concrete mix, sand was replaced completely in volumetric measurement by quarry dust. The result was analysed and compared with addition of coconut fibre at varying percentage of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%. From the test conducted, coconut shell concrete with quarry dust has the maximum value at 4% of coconut fibre while conventional concrete showed the maximum value at 2% of coconut fibre.

  1. Artificial Neural Network-Based Early-Age Concrete Strength Monitoring Using Dynamic Response Signals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junkyeong; Lee, Chaggil; Park, Seunghee

    2017-06-07

    Concrete is one of the most common materials used to construct a variety of civil infrastructures. However, since concrete might be susceptible to brittle fracture, it is essential to confirm the strength of concrete at the early-age stage of the curing process to prevent unexpected collapse. To address this issue, this study proposes a novel method to estimate the early-age strength of concrete, by integrating an artificial neural network algorithm with a dynamic response measurement of the concrete material. The dynamic response signals of the concrete, including both electromechanical impedances and guided ultrasonic waves, are obtained from an embedded piezoelectric sensor module. The cross-correlation coefficient of the electromechanical impedance signals and the amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave signals are selected to quantify the variation in dynamic responses according to the strength of the concrete. Furthermore, an artificial neural network algorithm is used to verify a relationship between the variation in dynamic response signals and concrete strength. The results of an experimental study confirm that the proposed approach can be effectively applied to estimate the strength of concrete material from the early-age stage of the curing process.

  2. Artificial Neural Network-Based Early-Age Concrete Strength Monitoring Using Dynamic Response Signals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junkyeong; Lee, Chaggil; Park, Seunghee

    2017-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most common materials used to construct a variety of civil infrastructures. However, since concrete might be susceptible to brittle fracture, it is essential to confirm the strength of concrete at the early-age stage of the curing process to prevent unexpected collapse. To address this issue, this study proposes a novel method to estimate the early-age strength of concrete, by integrating an artificial neural network algorithm with a dynamic response measurement of the concrete material. The dynamic response signals of the concrete, including both electromechanical impedances and guided ultrasonic waves, are obtained from an embedded piezoelectric sensor module. The cross-correlation coefficient of the electromechanical impedance signals and the amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave signals are selected to quantify the variation in dynamic responses according to the strength of the concrete. Furthermore, an artificial neural network algorithm is used to verify a relationship between the variation in dynamic response signals and concrete strength. The results of an experimental study confirm that the proposed approach can be effectively applied to estimate the strength of concrete material from the early-age stage of the curing process. PMID:28590456

  3. Polymer concrete overlay test program : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1981-12-01

    The results in this report were obtained during the test program which began in 1973. Physical properties of various polymer concretes are listed. They include compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, bond strength, the modulus of elasticity...

  4. An investigation of the compressive strength of PRD-49-3/Epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rice, J. S.; Rosen, B. W.

    1973-01-01

    The development of unidirectional fiber composite materials is discussed. The mechanical and physical properties of the materials are described. Emphasis is placed in analyzing the compressive behavior of composite materials and developing methods for increasing compressive strength. The test program for evaluating the various procedures for improving compressive strength are reported.

  5. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Ultra High Strength Concrete Incorporating Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liulei; Ouyang, Dong; Xu, Weiting

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the effect of the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the mechanical properties and durability of ultra high strength concrete (UHSC) is reported. First, the MWCNTs were dispersed by a nano sand-mill in the presence of a surfactant in water. The UHSC specimens were prepared with various amounts of MWCNTs, ranging from 0% to 0.15% by weight of cement (bwoc). Results indicated that use of an optimal percentage of MWCNTs (0.05% bwoc) caused a 4.63% increase in compressive strength and a 24.0% decrease in chloride diffusion coefficient of UHSC at 28 days curing. Moreover, the addition of MWCNTs also improved the flexural strength and deformation ability. Furthermore, a field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to observe the dispersion of MWCNTs in the cement matrix and morphology of the hardened cement paste containing MWCNTs. FE-SEM observation revealed that MWCNTs were well dispersed in the matrix and no agglomerate was found and the reinforcing effect of MWCNTs on UHSC was thought to be pulling out and microcrack bridging of MWCNTs, which transferred the load in tension. PMID:28773541

  6. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Ultra High Strength Concrete Incorporating Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liulei; Ouyang, Dong; Xu, Weiting

    2016-05-27

    In this work, the effect of the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the mechanical properties and durability of ultra high strength concrete (UHSC) is reported. First, the MWCNTs were dispersed by a nano sand-mill in the presence of a surfactant in water. The UHSC specimens were prepared with various amounts of MWCNTs, ranging from 0% to 0.15% by weight of cement (bwoc). Results indicated that use of an optimal percentage of MWCNTs (0.05% bwoc) caused a 4.63% increase in compressive strength and a 24.0% decrease in chloride diffusion coefficient of UHSC at 28 days curing. Moreover, the addition of MWCNTs also improved the flexural strength and deformation ability. Furthermore, a field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to observe the dispersion of MWCNTs in the cement matrix and morphology of the hardened cement paste containing MWCNTs. FE-SEM observation revealed that MWCNTs were well dispersed in the matrix and no agglomerate was found and the reinforcing effect of MWCNTs on UHSC was thought to be pulling out and microcrack bridging of MWCNTs, which transferred the load in tension.

  7. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Hyginus E.; Eziefula, Uchechi G.; Eziefula, Bennett I.

    2018-03-01

    This study compared the physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete. The constituent materials were batched by weight. The water-cement ratio and mix ratio selected for the experimental investigation were 0.55 and 1:2:4, respectively. The specimens were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Slump, density and compressive strength tests were carried out. The results showed that river sand concrete had greater density and compressive strength than quarry dust concrete for all curing ages. At 28 days of curing, river sand concrete exceeded the target compressive strength by 36%, whereas quarry dust concrete was less than the target compressive strength by 12%. Both river sand concrete and quarry dust concrete for the selected water/cement ratio and mix ratio are suitable for non-structural applications and lightly-loaded members where high strength is not a prerequisite.

  8. The effectiveness of stone ash and volcanic ash of mount Sinabung as a filler on the initial strength of self-compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolina, R.; Muhammad, W.; Saragih, M. D. S. M.; Mustaqa, T.

    2018-02-01

    Self Compacting Concrete is a concrete variant that has a high degree of workability and also has great initial strength, but low water cement factor. It is also self-flowable that can be molded on formwork with a very little or no compacted use of compactors. This concrete, using a variety of aggregate sizes, aggregate portions and superplasticizer admixture to achieve a special viscosity that allows it to flow on its own without the aid of a compactor. Lightweight concrete brick is a type of brick made from cement, sand, water, and developers. Lightweight concrete bricks are divided into 2 based on the developed materials used are AAC (Autoclave Aerated Concrete) using aluminum paste and CLC (Cellular Lightweight Concrete) that use Foaming Agent from BASF as a developer material. In this experiment, the lightweight bricks that will be made are CLC type which uses Foaming Agent as the developer material by mixing the Ash Stone produced by Stone Crusher machine which has the density of 2666 kg / m3 as Partial Pair Substitution. In this study the variation of Ash Stone used is 10%, 15%, and 20% of the planned amount of sand. After doing the tasting the result is obtained for 10% variation. Compressive Strength and Absorption Increase will decrease by 25.07% and 39.005% and Variation of 15% compressive strength will decrease by 65,8% and decrease of absorbtion equal to 17,441% and variation of 20% compressive strength will decreased by 67,4 and absorption increase equal to 17,956%.

  9. Long-term strength properties of HVFA concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špak, M.; Bašková, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fly ash from coal burning is used as active addition for concrete in Middle-Europe region for several decades. The intensity of its utilization increases still. In the role of supplementary cement addition it serves as binder, whereby it helps to reduce final price of concrete as well as improves both the rheological properties of fresh concrete and several characteristics of hardened concrete. Fly ash presents the co-product of energetic industry. Its production increases together with growth of energy consumption. These factors bring the opportunity and requirement of production of concretes with high volume of fly ash based addition. Thus, significant economic, environmental, technological and technical benefits can be achieved by using of high amount of fly ash for concrete production.

  10. Influence of pore structure on compressive strength of cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui; Zhang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure.

  11. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  12. Compressive strength evolution of thermally-stressed Saint Maximin limestone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, J.; Griffiths, L.; Baud, P.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Heap, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Saint Maximin quarry (Oise, France) opened in the early 1600s, and its limestone has been used extensively as masonry stone, particularly during the classical era of Parisian architecture from the 17th century onwards. Its widespread use has been due to a combination of its regional availability, its high workability, and its aesthetic appeal. Notable buildings completed using this material include sections of the Place de la Concorde and the Louvre in Paris. More recently, however, it has seen increasing use in the construction of large private residences throughout the United States as well as extensions to private institutions such as Stanford University. For any large building, fire hazard can be a substantial concern, especially in tectonically active areas where catastrophic fires may arise following large-magnitude earthquakes. Typically, house fires burn at temperatures of around 600 °C ( 1000 F). Given the ubiquity of this geomaterial as a building stone, it is important to ascertain the influence of heating on the strength of Saint Maximin limestone (SML), and in turn the structural stability of the buildings it is used in. We performed a series of compressive tests and permeability measurements on samples of SML to determine its strength evolution in response to heating to incrementally higher temperatures. We observe that the uniaxial compressive strength of SML decreases from >12 MPa at room temperature to <7 MPa at 600 °C. The rate of strength reduction increases at elevated temperature (>400 °C). We anticipate that this substantial weakening is in part a result of thermal microcracking, whereby changes in temperature induce thermal stresses due to a mismatch in thermal expansion between the constituent grains. This mechanism is compounded by the volumetric increase of quartz through its alpha - beta transition at 573 °C, and by the thermal decomposition of calcite. To track the formation of thermal microcracks, we monitor acoustic emissions

  13. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Arora, H.; Kelly, M.; Worley, A.; Del Linz, P.; Fergusson, A.; Hooper, P. A.; Dear, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene–acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson–Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg−1/3, 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411–413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494

  14. Concrete wear study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1968-06-01

    This report primarily investigates the wear characteristics of concrete using various cement contents and three different sources of aggregates. Compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity data was also obtained to assist in the evaluation...

  15. IMPREGNATION OF CONCRETE PIPE FOR CORROSION RESISTANCE AND STRENGTH IMPROVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The program was undertaken to field test concrete sewer pipe that had been impregnated with sulfur or hydrofluoric acid. This program was a follow-on to a previous laboratory study sponsored by EPA entitled, Impregnation of Concrete Pipe, 11024EQE 06/71. In a subsequent grant ext...

  16. Flexural and Tensile Properties of Thin, Very High-Strength, Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    Fiber - Reinforced Concrete Panels Michael J. Roth September 2008 G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc tu re s La bo ra to ry Approved for...Tensile Properties of Thin, Very High-Strength, Fiber - Reinforced Concrete Panels Michael J. Roth Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory U.S. Army...of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and noted authority in the field of 160 fiber - reinforced concrete . Implementation of Li’s work

  17. Study of strength kinetics of sand concrete system of accelerated hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharanova, A. V.; Lenkova, D. A.; Panfilova, A. D.

    2018-04-01

    Methods of calorimetric analysis are used to study the dynamics of the hydration processes of concretes with different accelerator contents. The efficiency of the isothermal calorimetry method is shown for study of strength kinetics of concrete mixtures of accelerated hardening, promising for additive technologies in civil engineering.

  18. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  19. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  20. Coated steel rebar for enhanced concrete-steel bond strength and corrosion resistance.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-10-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations on the use of enamel coating in reinforced concrete structures both for bond strength and : corrosion resistance of steel rebar. Extensive laboratory tests were conducted to characterize the pro...

  1. Feasibility evaluation of utilizing high-strength concrete in design and construction of highway bridge structures.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of using high-strength concrete in the design and construction of highway bridge structures. A literature search was conducted; a survey of five regional fabrication plants was perfo...

  2. Evaluation of a highway bridge constructed using high strength lightweight concrete bridge girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize the performance of High Strength Lightweight Concrete (HSLW) in precast, prestressed bridge girders and to evaluate their performance in a highway bridge. The mechanical properties and long-term time-d...

  3. Evaluation of in-place concrete strength by core testing.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-01

    The overall objective of the work contained in this report is to develop an ALDOT procedure to evaluate core strength results obtained under various conditions. Since there are many factors that influence the apparent strength of cores, strength corr...

  4. High-strength self-consolidating concrete (SCC) and high-volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) for infrastructure elements : implementation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-08-01

    Because of its unique nature, high-strength self-consolidating concrete (HS-SCC) has the potential to significantly reduce costs : associated with transportation-related infrastructure, benefiting both MoDOT and the residents of Missouri. HS-SCC is a...

  5. Prediction of zeolite-cement-sand unconfined compressive strength using polynomial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MolaAbasi, H.; Shooshpasha, I.

    2016-04-01

    The improvement of local soils with cement and zeolite can provide great benefits, including strengthening slopes in slope stability problems, stabilizing problematic soils and preventing soil liquefaction. Recently, dosage methodologies are being developed for improved soils based on a rational criterion as it exists in concrete technology. There are numerous earlier studies showing the possibility of relating Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and Cemented sand (CS) parameters (voids/cement ratio) as a power function fits. Taking into account the fact that the existing equations are incapable of estimating UCS for zeolite cemented sand mixture (ZCS) well, artificial intelligence methods are used for forecasting them. Polynomial-type neural network is applied to estimate the UCS from more simply determined index properties such as zeolite and cement content, porosity as well as curing time. In order to assess the merits of the proposed approach, a total number of 216 unconfined compressive tests have been done. A comparison is carried out between the experimentally measured UCS with the predictions in order to evaluate the performance of the current method. The results demonstrate that generalized polynomial-type neural network has a great ability for prediction of the UCS. At the end sensitivity analysis of the polynomial model is applied to study the influence of input parameters on model output. The sensitivity analysis reveals that cement and zeolite content have significant influence on predicting UCS.

  6. Pervious pavements - installation, operations and strength part 1 : pervious concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-08-01

    Pervious pavement systems are now being recognized as a best management practice by the Environmental Protection Agency and the state of Florida. The pervious concrete system is designed to have enhanced pore sizes in the surface layer compared to co...

  7. Creep of high-strength normal and lightweight concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-01-01

    In addition to immediate elastic deformations, concrete undergoes time-dependent deformations that must be considered in design. Creep is defined as the time-dependent deformation resulting from a sustained stress. Shrinkage deformation is the time-d...

  8. Evaluation of microsilica admixture for production of high strength concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-08-01

    This study consisted of a laboratory evaluation of the effect of microsilica on the physical properties of both plastic and hardened portland cement concrete. Microsilica (silica fume) is a by-product of the industrial manufacture of ferro silicon an...

  9. Assessment of concrete damage and strength degradation caused by reinforcement corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, Jaya; Chen, Hua-Peng

    2015-07-01

    Structural performance deterioration of reinforced concrete structures has been extensively investigated, but very limited studies have been carried out to investigate the effect of reinforcement corrosion on time-dependent reliability with consideration of the influence of mechanical characteristics of the bond interface due to corrosion. This paper deals with how corrosion in reinforcement creates different types of defects in concrete structure and how they are responsible for the structural capacity deterioration of corrosion affected reinforced concrete structures during their service life. Cracking in cover concrete due to reinforcement corrosion is investigated by using rebar-concrete model and realistic concrete properties. The flexural strength deterioration is analytically predicted on the basis of bond strength evolution due to reinforcement corrosion, which is examined by the experimental data available. The time-dependent reliability analysis is undertaken to calculate the life time structural reliability of corrosion damaged concrete structures by stochastic deterioration modelling of reinforced concrete. The results from the numerical example show that the proposed approach is capable of evaluating the damage caused by reinforcement corrosion and also predicting the structural reliability of concrete structures during their lifecycle.

  10. An Experimental Study of High Strength-High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Sustainable Construction Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kate, Gunavant K.; Thakare, Sunil B., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Concrete is the most widely used building material in the construction of infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, highways, dams, and many other facilities. This paper reports the development, the basic idea, the main properties of high strength-high volume fly ash with application in concrete associated with the development and implementation of Sustainable Properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete (HVFAC) Mixtures and Early Age Shrinkage and mechanical properties of concrete for 7,28,56 and 90days. Another alternative to make environment-friendly concrete is the development of high strength-high-volume fly ash concrete which is an synthesized from materials of geological origin or by-product materials such as fly ash which is rich in silicon and aluminum. In this paper 6 concrete mixtures were produced to evaluate the effect of key parameters on the mechanical properties of concrete and its behavior. The study key parameters are; binder material content, cement replacement ratios, and the steel fibers used to High Volume Fly Ash mixtures for increasing performance of concrete.

  11. Evaluation of the shrinkage and creep of medium strength self compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Cruz, C. J.; Ramos, G.; Hurtado, W. A.

    2017-02-01

    The difference between self compacting concrete (SCC) and conventional concrete (CC) is in fresh state, is the high fluidity at first and the need for vibration at second, but in hardened state, both concretes must comply with the resistance specified, in addition to securing the safety and functionality for which it was designed. This article describes the tests and results for shrinkage and creep at some medium strength Self Compacting Concrete with added sand (SCC-MSs) and two types of cement. The research was conducted at the Laboratorio de Tecnología de Estructuras (LTE) of the Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya (UPC), in dosages of 200 liters; with the idea of evaluating the effectiveness of implementation of these new concretes at elements designed with conventional concrete (CCs).

  12. A reassessment of the compressive strength properties of southern yellow pine bark

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2007-01-01

    Samples of southern yellow pine outer bark and wood were tested in compression to determine values for modulus of elasticity, stress at proportional limit, and maximum crushing strength. Results reported here resolve inconsistencies in the compressive strength data previously reported by others for pine bark. Testing of solvent-treated bark blocks suggests that...

  13. Study on compressive strength of self compacting mortar cubes under normal & electric oven curing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Venkatesh, G. J.; Vivek, S. S.; Dhinakaran, G.

    2017-07-01

    In the majority of civil engineering applications, the basic building blocks were the masonry units. Those masonry units were developed as a monolithic structure by plastering process with the help of binding agents namely mud, lime, cement and their combinations. In recent advancements, the mortar study plays an important role in crack repairs, structural rehabilitation, retrofitting, pointing and plastering operations. The rheology of mortar includes flowable, passing and filling properties which were analogous with the behaviour of self compacting concrete. In self compacting (SC) mortar cubes, the cement was replaced by mineral admixtures namely silica fume (SF) from 5% to 20% (with an increment of 5%), metakaolin (MK) from 10% to 30% (with an increment of 10%) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) from 25% to 75% (with an increment of 25%). The ratio between cement and fine aggregate was kept constant as 1: 2 for all normal and self compacting mortar mixes. The accelerated curing namely electric oven curing with the differential temperature of 128°C for the period of 4 hours was adopted. It was found that the compressive strength obtained from the normal and electric oven method of curing was higher for self compacting mortar cubes than normal mortar cube. The cement replacement by 15% SF, 20% MK and 25%GGBS obtained higher strength under both curing conditions.

  14. The effects of embedded internal delaminations on composite laminate compression strength; an experimental review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    Delaminations in laminated composite materials can degrade the compressive strength of these materials. Delaminations can form as a result of impact damage or processing flaws. In order to better understand the effects of these delaminations on the compressive behavior of laminated composite plates, programs have been conducted to assess the criticality of prescribed delaminations of known size, shape, and location on the compression strength of laminated composites. A review of these programs is presented along with highlights of pertinent findings from each.

  15. Autogenous accelerated curing of concrete cylinders. Part I, Strength results.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-01-01

    Forty-eight different concrete mixes were designed to investigate the influence of cement types (II, III, and V), cement contents (450, 550, and 650 lb. per cu. yd.), water-cement ratios (0.4, 0.5, and 0.6), admixtures (accelerator, retarder, and air...

  16. Design and evaluation of high strength concrete for girders : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1980-05-01

    The scope of the study was to make concrete mixes in the laboratory using a partial factorial, with three cement contents, two coarse aggregates and three fine-to-coarse aggregate ratios. The mixes showing the best properties and highest compressive ...

  17. Investigation of concrete containing condensed silica fume.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-01-01

    The properties of hydraulic cement concretes containing silica fume were investigated to assess their suitability for use in overlays with s minimum thickness of 1 1/4 in. The properties studied were compressive and flexural strengths, bond strength,...

  18. Effect of silica-palm shell carbon composite additive in enhancing the strength of the concrete in the oil-well cementing job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novriansyah, A.; Mursyidah, U.; Novrianti; Putri, S. S.; Riswati, S. S.

    2018-04-01

    This study provides an analysis of composite additive effect to concrete’s strength in the oil-well cementing job. The composite additive is originated from the nano-sized form of silica and charcoal from palm shell waste. The quality of the concrete will be determined from its porosity, compressive strength, and shear bond strength parameters. Those parameters must be reliable base on the most respectable standards in oil and gas industry, in this study we use the standard from American Petroleum Institute (API). Six concrete samples with different concentration will be tested to obtain these parameters. The result from the test shown a decrement trend of the porosity while the concentration is increased. In contrast, the highest values of compressive strength and shear bond strength are obtained from the sample with higher additive concentration. The optimum strength was obtained in sample with 0.02% The results become clearly proven through verification by scanning electron image where the additive has successfully fill the voids in the concrete’s sample, resulting in strength enhancement of the sample.

  19. Experimental and finite element study of ultimate strength of continuous composite concrete slabs with steel decking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2018-03-01

    Composite one-way concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork are commonly used in the construction industry. The steel decking supports the wet concrete of a cast in situ reinforced or post-tensioned concrete slab and, after the concrete sets, acts as external reinforcement. In this type of slab, longitudinal shear failure between the concrete and the steel decking is the most common type of failure at the ultimate load stage. Design codes require the experimental evaluation of the ultimate load capacity and longitudinal shear strength of each type of steel decking using full-scale tests on simple-span slabs. There is also no procedure in current design codes to evaluate the ultimate load capacity and longitudinal shear strength of continuous composite slabs and this is often assessed experimentally by full-scale tests. This paper presents the results of three full-scale tests up to failure on continuous composite concrete slabs cast with trapezoidal steel decking profile (KF70) that is widely used in Australia. Slab specimens were tested in four-point bending at each span with shear spans of span/4. The longitudinal shear failure of each slab is evaluated and the measured mid-span deflection, the end slip and the mid-span steel and concrete strains are also presented and discussed. Redistribution of bending moment in each slab is presented and discussed. A finite element model is proposed and verified by experimental data using interface element to model the bond properties between steel decking and concrete slab and investigate the ultimate strength of continuous composite concrete slabs.

  20. Strength and deformation behaviors of veined marble specimens after vacuum heat treatment under conventional triaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Haijian; Jing, Hongwen; Yin, Qian; Yu, Liyuan; Wang, Yingchao; Wu, Xingjie

    2017-10-01

    The mechanical behaviors of rocks affected by high temperature and stress are generally believed to be significant for the stability of certain projects involving rocks, such as nuclear waste storage and geothermal resource exploitation. In this paper, veined marble specimens were treated to high temperature treatment and then used in conventional triaxial compression tests to investigate the effect of temperature, confining pressure, and vein angle on strength and deformation behaviors. The results show that the strength and deformation parameters of the veined marble specimens changed with the temperature, presenting a critical temperature of 600 °C. The triaxial compression strength of a horizontal vein (β = 90°) is obviously larger than that of a vertical vein (β = 0°). The triaxial compression strength, elasticity modulus, and secant modulus have an approximately linear relation to the confining pressure. Finally, Mohr-Coulomb and Hoek-Brown criteria were respectively used to analyze the effect of confining pressure on triaxial compression strength.

  1. Properties and uses of concrete, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene

    1992-01-01

    Concretes that can now be formed have properties which may make them valuable for lunar or space construction. These properties include high compressive strength, good flexural strength (when reinforced), and favorable responses to temperature extremes (even increased strength at low temperatures). These and other properties of concrete are discussed.

  2. Confined compressive strength analysis can improve PDC bit selection. [Polycrystalline Diamond Compact

    SciTech Connect

    Fabain, R.T.

    1994-05-16

    A rock strength analysis program, through intensive log analysis, can quantify rock hardness in terms of confined compressive strength to identify intervals suited for drilling with polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. Additionally, knowing the confined compressive strength helps determine the optimum PDC bit for the intervals. Computing rock strength as confined compressive strength can more accurately characterize a rock's actual hardness downhole than other methods. the information can be used to improve bit selections and to help adjust drilling parameters to reduce drilling costs. Empirical data compiled from numerous field strength analyses have provided a guide to selecting PDC drillmore » bits. A computer analysis program has been developed to aid in PDC bit selection. The program more accurately defines rock hardness in terms of confined strength, which approximates the in situ rock hardness downhole. Unconfined compressive strength is rock hardness at atmospheric pressure. The program uses sonic and gamma ray logs as well as numerous input data from mud logs. Within the range of lithologies for which the program is valid, rock hardness can be determine with improved accuracy. The program's output is typically graphed in a log format displaying raw data traces from well logs, computer-interpreted lithology, the calculated values of confined compressive strength, and various optional rock mechanic outputs.« less

  3. Modification of Existing Prestressed Girder Cross-Sections for the Optimal Structural Use of Ultra-High Performance Concrete

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-10-22

    Ultra High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a class of cementitious materials that share similar characteristics including very large compressive strengths, tensile strength greater than conventional concrete and high durability. The material consists ...

  4. Feasibility analysis of ultra high performance concrete for prestressed concrete bridge applications.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-07-01

    UHPC is an emerging material technology in which concrete develops very high : compressive strengths and exhibits improved tensile strength and toughness. A : comprehensive literature and historical application review was completed to determine the :...

  5. Effect of Waterproofing Admixtures on the Flexural Strength and Corrosion Resistance of Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, A.; Perumal, P.

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals about the flexural strength and corrosion behaviour of concrete using waterproofing admixtures. The effect of waterproofing admixtures on the corrosion behaviour of RCC specimen has been studied by conducting accelerated corrosion test. To identify the effect of corrosion in pull out strength, corrosion process was induced by means of accelerated corrosion procedure. To accelerate the reinforcement corrosion, direct electric current was impressed on the rebar embedded in the specimen using a DC power supply system that has a facility to adjust voltage. The addition of waterproofing admixtures also shows the improvement in the flexural strength of concrete has been studied by conducting flexural strength tests on the concrete prism specimen of size 100 × 100 × 500 mm with and without admixtures for various dosages and various curing periods of 7 and 28 days. The results showed that the presence of waterproofing admixtures always improves the corrosion resistance and thus increases the strength of concrete due to the hydrophobic action of waterproofing admixtures.

  6. The influence of plain bar on bond strength of geopolymer concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, Evrianti Syntia; Ekaputri, Januarti Jaya

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents some results of experimental study of bond strength of plain bar embedded in geopolymer concrete. Fly ash class F was used as a raw material activated with alkali solutions. The combination of 8 Molar of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) as alkali activators was examined in the mixture with ratio of 2.5 by weight. Nine cubical specimens with a size of 150 × 150 × 150 mm were prepared to measure bond strength and slip between reinforcement and concrete. The influential factors studied for the experimental investigation were the diameter of reinforcement bar, bond area, and concrete cover to diameter (c/d) of reinforcement. The result showed that the average bond strength decreased as the diameter of plain bar and bonded length were increased from 16 mm to 19 mm. However, the 12 mm showed the different result allegedly caused by the effect of bond area and the passive confined provided by the concrete. Based on several equations used to compare the bond strength, it is clear that deformed bar of 12 mm in diameter is potential to increase the bond strength.

  7. Determine the Compressive Strength of Calcium Silicate Bricks by Combined Nondestructive Method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of combined nondestructive method for assessment of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks. In this case, it is a combination of the rebound hammer method and ultrasonic pulse method. Calibration relationships for determining compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks obtained from nondestructive parameter testing for the combined method as well as for the L-type Schmidt rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse method are quoted here. Calibration relationships are known for their close correlation and are applicable in practice. The highest correlation between parameters from nondestructive measurement and predicted compressive strength is obtained using the SonReb combined nondestructive method. Combined nondestructive SonReb method was proved applicable for determination of compressive strength of calcium silicate bricks at checking tests in a production plant and for evaluation of bricks built in existing masonry structures. PMID:25276864

  8. Properties of concrete containing foamed concrete block waste as fine aggregate replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusamy, K.; Budiea, A. M. A.; Zaidan, A. L. F.; Rasid, M. H.; Hazimmah, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Environmental degradation due to excessive sand mining dumping at certain places and disposal of foamed concrete block waste from lightweight concrete producing industry are issues that should be resolved for a better and cleaner environment of the community. Thus, the main intention of this study is to investigate the potential of foamed concrete block waste as partial sand replacement in concrete production. The foamed concrete waste (FCW) used in this research that were supplied by a local lightweight concrete producing industry. The workability and compressive strength of concrete containing various percentage of foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement has been investigated. Prior to the use, the foamed concrete waste were crushed to produce finer particles. Six concrete mixes containing various content of crushed foamed concrete waste that are 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used in this experimental work. Then the prepared specimens were placed in water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test and flexural strength tests were conducted at 7, 14 and 28 days. The result shows that integration of crushed foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement in concrete reduces the mix workability. It is interesting to note that both compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete improves when 30% crushed foamed concrete waste is added as partial sand replacement.

  9. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin, E-mail: pauzi@nm.gov.my; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containingmore » crushed granite.« less

  10. The Effect of Different Shape and Perforated rHDPE in Concrete Structures on Flexural Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhazri, MY; Hafiz, KM; Myia, YZA; Jia, CP; Sihombing, H.; Sapuan, SM; Badarulzaman, NA

    2017-10-01

    This research was carried out to develop a reinforcing structure from recycled HDPE plastic lubricant containers to be embedded in concrete structure. Different forms and shapes of recycled HDPE plastic are designed as reinforcement incorporate with cement. In this study, the reinforcing structure was prepared by washing, cutting, dimensioning and joining of the waste HDPE containers (direct technique without treatment on plastic surface). Then, the rHDPE reinforced concrete was produced by casting based on standard of procedure in civil engineering technique. Eight different shapes of rHDPE in concrete structure were used to determine the concrete’s ability in terms of flexural strength. Embedded round shape in solid and perforated of rHDPE in concrete system drastically improved flexural strength at 17.78 % and 13.79 %. The result would seem that the concrete with reinforcing rHDPE structure exhibits a more gradual or flexible properties than concrete beams without reinforcement that has the properties of fragile.

  11. Study on strength characteristics of concrete using M-Sand and coconut fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeraja, D.; Wani, Amir Iqbal; Kamili, Zainulabideen; Agarwal, Krishnakant

    2017-11-01

    In the current world, concrete has become a very important part of the construction industry and the materials which are used in making concrete have evolved due to better quality of cement and better grade of coarse aggregates. The sand is an important part of concrete. It is mainly procured from natural sources. Thus the grade of sand is not under our control. The methods of removing sand from river beds are causing various environmental issues and river sand is depleting at a faster rate than it is replaced by natural methods. Hence, various replacements for the river sand are being done, one of which is manufactured-sand. It is obtained from various granite quarries. Manufactured-sand or M-sand is slowly replacing the fine aggregate in the concrete as the sand is well graded and gives higher strength of concrete. There are various fibers used for reinforcing concrete which consist mainly of artificial or steel fibers. Some of these fibers are quite costly and sometimes difficult to obtain. So there are many natural fibers which can be used in place of these fibers, one of which is coconut fiber, extracted from the shell of a coconut. Coconut fibers are used in various industries like rope making, coir mattresses etc. Since these fibers are one of the strongest fibers among naturally occuring fibers, they can be used in the concrete mix to increase the resistance in concrete. They are also light weight and easily available and thus can be used in reinforcement of concrete. The studies up till now have tested the use of coconut fibers in normal concrete involving river sand but in this study a particular ratio of M-sand and river sand is used to get the maximum possible strength. Hence, in this project an attempt was made to use M-sand and coconut fiber in concrete. Based on the test results, it can be concluded that combination of M-sand and coconut fibers gave favorable results in strength criteria.

  12. Influence of association of "EVA-NBR" on indirect tensile strength of modified bituminous concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinoun, M.; Soudani, K.; Haddadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the improvement of the mechanical properties of bituminous concrete by modification of bituminous concrete. In this study, we present the results of the indirect tensile strength "ITS" of modified bituminous concrete by the combination of two modifiers, one is a plastomer EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) and the other is a industrial waste from the shoe soles grinding NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as crumb rubber. To modify the bitumen a wet process was used. The results show that the modification of bitumen by EVA-NBR combination increases their resistance to the indirect traction "ITS" compared to the bituminous concrete control. The mixture of 5% [50% EVA+ 50% NBR] is given the best result among the other associations.

  13. Shear transfer in concrete reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mokadem, Khaled Mounir

    2001-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The research started with preliminary tests and studies on the behavior and effect of carbon fibers in different water solutions and mortar/concrete mixes. The research work investigated the use of CF in the production of concrete pipes and prestressed concrete double-tee sections. The research then focused on studying the effect of using carbon fibers on the direct shear transfer of sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens. Findings and conclusions. In general, adding carbon fibers to concrete improved its tensile characteristics but decreased its compressive strength. The decrease in compressive strength was due to the decrease in concrete density as fibers act as three-dimensional mesh that entrapped air. The decrease in compressive strength was also due to the increase in the total surface area of non-cementitious material in the concrete. Sand-lightweight reinforced concrete push-off specimens with carbon fibers had lower shear carrying capacity than those without carbon fibers for the same cement content in the concrete. Current building codes and specifications estimate the shear strength of concrete as a ratio of the compressive strength. If applying the same principals then the ratio of shear strength to compressive strength for concrete reinforced with carbon fibers is higher than that for concrete without carbon fibers.

  14. Effect of PVA fiber content on creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zongnan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Weilun

    2018-04-01

    The effect of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber content on the creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns was investigated. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed and the creep prediction model of ACI209 was modified. Controlling the concrete strength as C80, changing the content of PVA fiber (volume fraction 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% respectively), the creep experiment of PVA fiber reinforced concrete columns was carried out, the creep coefficient of each specimen was calculated to characterize the creep property. The influence of PVA fiber content on the creep property was analyzed based on the creep coefficient and the calculation results of several frequently used creep prediction models. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed to modify the ACI209 creep prediction model.

  15. Detection of rebars in concrete using advanced ultrasonic pulse compression techniques.

    PubMed

    Laureti, S; Ricci, M; Mohamed, M N I B; Senni, L; Davis, L A J; Hutchins, D A

    2018-04-01

    A pulse compression technique has been developed for the non-destructive testing of concrete samples. Scattering of signals from aggregate has historically been a problem in such measurements. Here, it is shown that a combination of piezocomposite transducers, pulse compression and post processing can lead to good images of a reinforcement bar at a cover depth of 55 mm. This has been achieved using a combination of wide bandwidth operation over the 150-450 kHz range, and processing based on measuring the cumulative energy scattered back to the receiver. Results are presented in the form of images of a 20 mm rebar embedded within a sample containing 10 mm aggregate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of long steam curing durations on the strength of A5 concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1976-01-01

    Based on the results of this investigation in which the longest steam curing time was 72 hours, it was concluded that increasing the curing times did not adversely affect the strength of the concrete. However, at the later stages of steam curing, gai...

  17. High Strength Reinforcing Steel Bars : Concrete Shear Friction Interface : final report : Part A.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcement, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) steel reinf...

  18. High strength reinforcing steel bars : concrete shear friction interface : final report : Part A.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcement, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) steel reinf...

  19. Influence of synthetic calcium silicates on the strength properties of fine-grained concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarusova, S. B.; Gordienko, P. S.; Kozin, A. V.; Zhevtun, I. G.; Perfilev, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of additives based on acicular calcium hydrosilicates (xonotlite and tobermorite) and wollastonite, obtained from boric acid production waste in autoclave synthesis at a temperature of 220 °C, on the strength of fine-grained concrete, has been studied in this paper. It was shown that when the calcium hydrosilicates and wollastonite are introduced, an increase in the strength characteristics of concrete is observed. After heat and moisture treatment, the maximum increase in strength is observed with the addition of 4% of mass content of calcium hydrosilicates and 6% of mass content of wollastonite. After 28 days of hardening under normal conditions, the maximum increase in strength of concrete is observed with the addition of 4% of mass content of both types of additives. It was shown that the water absorption of concrete decreases with a maximum when 4% of mass content is added, as in the case of the introduction of calcium hydrosilicates, and wollastonite. With a further increase in the number of additives, the amount of water absorption increases, but these values remain below the values for the control sample without additives.

  20. Implementation of Maturity for Concrete Strength Measurement and Pay : Tech Summary

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-10-01

    Using the maturity to determine concrete strength has been done for more than four decades. The concept was originally conceived in the late 1940s and early 1950s. More and more state and municipal DOTs are implementing its use every year, with some ...

  1. Morse Brothers, Inc. Harrisburg plant : high-strength concrete : research study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-07-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of research studies designed to determine the difference in strength of concrete cylinders cast in steel molds vs. cylinders cast in plastic molds. Prior to this report, six other research studies on the differe...

  2. Evolution of the fracture process zone in high-strength concrete under different loading rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, R. C.; Zhang, X.; Ruiz, G.; Tarifa, M.; Cámara, M.

    2010-06-01

    For cementitious materials, the inelastic zone around a crack tip is termed as fracture process zone (FPZ) and dominated by complicated mechanism, such as microcracking, crack deflection, bridging, crack face friction, crack tip blunting by voids, crack branching, and so on. Due to the length of the FPZ is related with the characteristic length of the cementitious materials, the size, extent and location of the FPZ has been the object of countless research efforts for several decades. For instance, Cedolin et al. [1] have used an optical method based on the moiré interferometry to determine FPZ in concrete. Castro-Montero et al. [2] have applied the method of holographic interferometry to mortar to study the extension of the FPZ. The advantage of the interferometry method is that the complete FPZ can be directly observed on the surface of the sample. Swartz et al. [3] has adopted the dye penetration technique to illustrate the changing patterns observed as the crack progress from the tensile side to the compression side of the beam. Moreover, acoustic emission (AE) is also an experimental technique well suited for monitoring fracture process. Haidar et al. [4] and Maji et al. [5] have studied the relation between acoustic emission characteristics and the properties of the FPZ. Compared with the extensive research on properties of the FPZ under quasi-static loading conditions, much less information is available on its dynamic characterization, especially for high-strength concrete (HSC). This paper presents the very recent results of an experimental program aimed at disclosing the loading rate effect on the size and velocity of the (FPZ) in HSC. Eighteen three-point bending specimens were conducted under a wide range of loading rates from from 10-4 mm/s to 103 mm/s using either a servo-hydraulic machine or a self-designed drop-weight impact device. The beam dimensions were 100 mm 100 mm in cross section, and 420 mm in length. The initial notch-depth ratio was

  3. Comparison of postbuckling model and finite element model with compression strength of corrugated boxes

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Urbanik; Edmond P. Saliklis

    2002-01-01

    Conventional compression strength formulas for corrugated fiberboard boxes are limited to geometry and material that produce an elastic postbuckling failure. Inelastic postbuckling can occur in squatty boxes and trays, but a mechanistic rationale for unifying observed strength data is lacking. This study employs a finite element model, instead of actual experiments, to...

  4. Enhancing the compressive strength of landfill soil using cement and bagasse ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azim, M. A. M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Tarmizi, A. K. A.; Shahidan, S.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The stabilisation of contaminated soil with cement and agricultural waste is a widely applied method which contributes to the sustainability of the environment. Soil may be stabilised to increase strength and durability or to prevent erosion and other geotechnical failure. This study was carried out to evaluate the compressive strength of ex-landfill soil when cement and bagasse ash (BA) are added to it. Different proportions of cement (5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) was added to sample weights without BA. On the other hand, the cement in a different batch of sample weights was replaced by 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% of BA. All samples were allowed to harden and were cured at room temperature for 7, 14 and 28 days respectively. The strength of the contaminated soil was assessed using an unconfined compressive strength test (UCS). The laboratory tests also included the index properties of soil, cement and bagasse ash in raw form. The results indicated that the samples with cement achieved the highest compressive strength measuring 4.39 MPa. However, this study revealed that the use of bagasse ash produced low quality products with a reduction in strength. For example, when 5% of cement was replaced with 5% ash, the compressive strength decreased by about 54% from 0.72 MPa to 0.33 MPa. Similarly, the compressive strength of each sample after a curing period of 28 days was higher compared to samples cured for 7 and 14 days respectively. This is proved that a longer curing period is needed to increase the compressive strength of the samples.

  5. The Axial Compressive Strength of High Performance Polymer Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    consists of axially oriented graphitic microfibrils that have the strong and stiff graphite crystal basal plane oriented parallel to the long axis of the... microfibrils [3,4]. The synthetic rigid polymer fibers are represented by only one commercial material: the PPTA fibers produced by E.I. DuPont de...and/or microfibrils is presented. A potential energy balance analysis is used to calculate critical stresses for the onset of compressive buckling

  6. The relationship between vickers microhardness and compressive strength of functional surface geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subaer, Ekaputri, Januari Jaya; Fansuri, Hamzah; Abdullah, Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study to investigate the relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength of geopolymers made from metakaolin has been conducted. Samples were prepared by using metakaolin activated with a sodium silicate solution at a different ratio of Si to Al and Na to Al and cured at 70oC for one hour. The resulting geopolymers were stored in an open air for 28 days before conducting any measurement. Bulk density and apparent porosity of the samples were measured by using Archimedes's method. Vickers microhardness measurements were performed on a polished surface of geopolymers with a load ranging from 0.3 - 1.0 kg. The topographic of indented samples were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compressive strength of the resulting geopolymers was measured on the cylindrical samples with a ratio of height to the diameter was 2:1. The results showed that the molar ratios of geopolymers compositions play important roles in the magnitude of bulk density, porosity, Vickers's microhardness as well as the compressive strength. The porosity reduced exponentially the magnitude of the strength of geopolymers. It was found that the relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength was linear. At the request of all authors and with the approval of the proceedings editor, article 020188 titled, "The relationship between vickers microhardness and compressive strength of functional surface geopolymers," is being retracted from the public record due to the fact that it is a duplication of article 020170 published in the same volume.

  7. An effective simplified model of composite compression struts for partially-restrained steel frame with reinforced concrete infill walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guohua; Chuang-Sheng, Walter Yang; Gu, Qiang; DesRoches, Reginald

    2018-04-01

    To resolve the issue regarding inaccurate prediction of the hysteretic behavior by micro-based numerical analysis for partially-restrained (PR) steel frames with solid reinforced concrete (RC) infill walls, an innovative simplified model of composite compression struts is proposed on the basis of experimental observation on the cracking distribution, load transferring mechanism, and failure modes of RC infill walls filled in PR steel frame. The proposed composite compression struts model for the solid RC infill walls is composed of α inclined struts and main diagonal struts. The α inclined struts are used to reflect the part of the lateral force resisted by shear connectors along the frame-wall interface, while the main diagonal struts are introduced to take into account the rest of the lateral force transferred along the diagonal direction due to the complicated interaction between the steel frame and RC infill walls. This study derives appropriate formulas for the effective widths of the α inclined strut and main diagonal strut, respectively. An example of PR steel frame with RC infill walls simulating simulated by the composite inclined compression struts model is illustrated. The maximum lateral strength and the hysteresis curve shape obtained from the proposed composite strut model are in good agreement with those from the test results, and the backbone curve of a PR steel frame with RC infill walls can be predicted precisely when the inter-story drift is within 1%. This simplified model can also predict the structural stiffness and the equivalent viscous damping ratio well when the inter-story drift ratio exceeds 0.5%.

  8. Application of natural seaweed modified mortar for sustainable concrete production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, M. N. I.; Zularisam, A. W.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of seaweed such as Eucheuma Cottonii (gel) and Gracilaria Sp. modified mortar on the properties of sustainable concrete was investigated. Pre-experiment and main-experiment was conducted to carry out this study. Pre-experiment was conducted to study the compressive strength of the sustainable concrete. The main-experiment studied the compressive and splitting strength. Results showed that seaweed modified mortar yielded satisfactory compressive and splitting strength of 30 MPa and 5 MPa at 28 days.

  9. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH2PO4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH2PO4. However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH2PO4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. © 2013.

  10. Strength Calculation of Inclined Sections of Reinforced Concrete Elements under Transverse Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, V. B.

    2017-11-01

    The authors propose a design model to determine the strength of inclined sections of bent reinforced concrete elements without shear reinforcement for the action of transverse force taking into account the aggregate interlock forces in the inclined crack. The calculated dependences to find out the components of forces acting in an inclined section are presented. The calculated dependences are obtained from the consideration of equilibrium conditions of the block over the inclined crack. A comparative analysis of the experimental values of the failure loads of the inclined section and the theoretical values obtained for the proposed dependencies and normative calculation methods is performed. It is shown that the proposed design model makes it possible to take into account the effect the longitudinal reinforcement percentage has on the inclined section strength, the element cross section height without the introduction of empirical coefficients which contributes to an increase in the structural safety of design solutions including the safety of high-strength concrete elements.

  11. Influence of seawater mixing and curing on strength characteristics and porosity of ground granulated blast-furnace slag concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiwijaya; Hamada, H.; Sagawa, Y.; Yamamoto, D.

    2017-11-01

    Generally, in the concrete industry, several billion tons of fresh water are annually used for mixing water, curing water and cleaning water. Nevertheless, the utilization of seawater in the concrete industry is prohibited, because it increases the risk of corrosion of steel bars in concrete. This study presents strength characteristics and porosity of seawater mixed concrete and tap water mixed concrete incorporating Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS) with water-binder ratio (W/B) of 40%, 50% and 60%. The influence of seawater mixing, GGBS and curing conditions such as tap water curing (TC), seawater curing (SC) and air curing (AC) on the strength and porosity of concrete were evaluated. Based on investigation result, it was shown that there is no significant influence of seawater mixing in improving strength of GGBS concrete up to 365 days in TC and SC. Effectiveness of seawater-mixing on strength enhancement of GGBS concrete is larger in air curing than in water curing. Porosity of seawater-mixed concrete is decreased compared to tap water-mixed concrete in all curing conditions.

  12. Study on Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Dongqing; Wu, Min; Jie, Pengyu

    2017-12-01

    Several common high elastic modulus fibers (steel fibers, basalt fibers, polyvinyl alcohol fibers) and low elastic modulus fibers (polypropylene fiber) are incorporated into the concrete, and its cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength are studied. The test result and analysis demonstrate that single fiber and hybrid fiber will improve the integrity of the concrete at failure. The mechanical properties of hybrid steel fiber-polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete are excellent, and the cube compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and flexural strength respectively increase than plain concrete by 6.4%, 3.7%, 11.4%. Doped single basalt fiber or polypropylene fiber and basalt fibers hybrid has little effect on the mechanical properties of concrete. Polyvinyl alcohol fiber and polypropylene fiber hybrid exhibit ‘negative confounding effect’ on concrete, its splitting tensile and flexural strength respectively are reduced by 17.8% and 12.9% than the single-doped polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete.

  13. Preliminary Study of Radioactive Waste Package Made of High-Strength and Ultra Low-Permeability Concrete for Geological Disposal of TRU Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Sakamoto, H.

    2003-02-27

    We have been developing a radioactive waste package made of high-strength and ultra low-permeability concrete (HSULPC) for geological disposal of TRU wastes, which is expected to be much more impervious to water than conventional concrete. In this study, basic data for the HSULPC regarding its the impervious character and the thermodynamics during cement hydration were obtained through water permeability measurements using cold isostatic pressing (CIP) and adiabatic concrete hydration experiments, respectively. Then, a prediction tool to find concrete package construction conditions to avoid thermal cracking was developed, which could deal with coupled calculations of cement hydration, heat transfer, stress, andmore » cracking. The developed tool was applied to HSULPC hydration on a small-scale cylindrical model to examine whether there was any effect on cracking which depended on the ratio of concrete cylinder thickness to its inner diameter. The results were compared to experiments. For concrete with a compressive strength of 200MPa, the water permeability coefficient was 4 x 10{sup 19} m/s. Dependences of activation energy and frequency factor on degree of cement hydration had a sharp peaking due to the nucleation rate-determining step, and a gradual increase region due to the diffusion rate-determining step. From analyses of the small-scale cylindrical model, dependences of the maximum principal stress on the radius were obtained. When the ratio of the concrete thickness to the heater diameter was around 1, the risk of cracking was predicted to be minimized. These numerical predictions from the developed tool were verified by experiments.« less

  14. Experimental study on infrared radiation temperature field of concrete under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Quan; He, Xueqiu

    2018-05-01

    Infrared thermography, as a nondestructive, non-contact and real-time monitoring method, has great significance in assessing the stability of concrete structure and monitoring its failure. It is necessary to conduct in depth study on the mechanism and application of infrared radiation (IR) of concrete failure under loading. In this paper, the concrete specimens with size of 100 × 100 × 100 mm were adopted to carry out the uniaxial compressions for the IR tests. The distribution of IR temperatures (IRTs), surface topography of IRT field and the reconstructed IR images were studied. The results show that the IRT distribution follows the Gaussian distribution, and the R2 of Gaussian fitting changes along with the loading time. The abnormities of R2 and AE counts display the opposite variation trends. The surface topography of IRT field is similar to the hyperbolic paraboloid, which is related to the stress distribution in the sample. The R2 of hyperbolic paraboloid fitting presents an upward trend prior to the fracture which enables to change the IRT field significantly. This R2 has a sharp drop in response to this large destruction. The normalization images of IRT field, including the row and column normalization images, were proposed as auxiliary means to analyze the IRT field. The row and column normalization images respectively show the transverse and longitudinal distribution of the IRT field, and they have clear responses to the destruction occurring on the sample surface. In this paper, the new methods and quantitative index were proposed for the analysis of IRT field, which have some theoretical and instructive significance for the analysis of the characteristics of IRT field, as well as the monitoring of instability and failure for concrete structure.

  15. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Knox, Lerry

    1997-01-01

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  16. Compressive Strength of Notched Poly(Phenylene Sulfide) Aerospace Composite: Influence of Fatigue and Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niitsu, G. T.; Lopes, C. M. A.

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the influences of fatigue and environmental conditions (-55 °C, 23 °C, and 82 °C/Wet) on the ultimate compression strength of notched carbon-fiber-reinforced poly(phenylene sulfide) composites by performing open-hole compression (OHC) tests. Analysis of the fatigue effect showed that at temperatures of -55 and 23 °C, the ultimate OHC strengths were higher for fatigued than for not-fatigued specimens; this could be attributed to fiber splitting and delamination during fatigue cycling, which reduces the stress concentration at the hole edge, thus increasing the composite strength. This effect of increasing strength for fatigued specimens was not observed under the 82 °C/Wet conditions, since the test temperature near the matrix glass transition temperature ( T g) together with moisture content resulted in matrix softening, suggesting a reduction in fiber splitting during cycling; similar OHC strengths were verified for fatigued and not-fatigued specimens tested at 82 °C/Wet. Analysis of the temperature effect showed that the ultimate OHC strengths decreased with increasing temperature. A high temperature together with moisture content (82 °C/Wet condition) reduced the composite compressive strengths, since a temperature close to the matrix T g resulted in matrix softening, which reduced the lateral support provided by the resin to the 0° fibers, leading to fiber instability failure at reduced applied loads. On the other hand, a low temperature (-55 °C) improved the compressive strength because of possible fiber-matrix interfacial strengthening, increasing the fiber contribution to compressive strength.

  17. Hydraulic efficiency compromises compression strength perpendicular to the grain in Norway spruce trunkwood

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bending stiffness and compression strength perpendicular to the grain of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trunkwood with different anatomical and hydraulic properties. Hydraulically less safe mature sapwood had bigger hydraulic lumen diameters and higher specific hydraulic conductivities than hydraulically safer juvenile wood. Bending stiffness (MOE) was higher, whereas radial compression strength lower in mature than in juvenile wood. A density-based tradeoff between MOE and hydraulic efficiency was apparent in mature wood only. Across cambial age, bending stiffness did not compromise hydraulic efficiency due to variation in latewood percent and because of the structural demands of the tree top (e.g. high flexibility). Radial compression strength compromised, however, hydraulic efficiency because it was extremely dependent on the characteristics of the “weakest” wood part, the highly conductive earlywood. An increase in conduit wall reinforcement of earlywood tracheids would be too costly for the tree. Increasing radial compression strength by modification of microfibril angles or ray cell number could result in a decrease of MOE, which would negatively affect the trunk’s capability to support the crown. We propose that radial compression strength could be an easily assessable and highly predictive parameter for the resistance against implosion or vulnerability to cavitation across conifer species, which should be topic of further studies. PMID:22058609

  18. Effect of angle-ply orientation on compression strength of composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Hoppel, C P

    1999-03-01

    An experimental program was initiated to investigate the effect of angle-ply orientations on the compressive strength (X{sub 1C}) of 0{degree} plies in fiber reinforced composite laminates. Graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy test coupons with the generic architecture [0{sub 2}/{+-}{theta}] (where {theta} varied between 0{degree} and 90{degree}) and for the quasi-isotropic architecture were evaluated. The effective compressive strength of the 0{degree} plies varied considerably. The results were related to the Poisson's ratios of the laminates with high Poisson's ratios leading to high transverse tensile strains in the test coupons and lower than expected strengths. Specimens with the [O{sub 2}/{+-}30] architecture had both themore » highest Poisson's ratio and the lowest calculated ply-level compression strength for the 0{degree} plies. This work has implications in the selection of composite failure criterion for compression performance, design of test coupons for acceptance testing, and the selection of laminate architectures for optimum combinations of compressive and shear behavior. Two commonly used composite failure criteria, the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu, predict significantly different laminate strengths depending on the Poisson's ratio of the laminate. This implies that the biaxial stress state in the laminate needs to be carefully considered before backing out unidirectional properties.« less

  19. Test method research on weakening interface strength of steel - concrete under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-wei; Zhang, Fang-hua; Su, Guang-quan

    2018-02-01

    The mechanical properties of steel - concrete interface under cyclic loading are the key factors affecting the rule of horizontal load transfer, the calculation of bearing capacity and cumulative horizontal deformation. Cyclic shear test is an effective method to study the strength reduction of steel - concrete interface. A test system composed of large repeated direct shear test instrument, hydraulic servo system, data acquisition system, test control software system and so on is independently designed, and a set of test method, including the specimen preparation, the instrument preparation, the loading method and so on, is put forward. By listing a set of test results, the validity of the test method is verified. The test system and the test method based on it provide a reference for the experimental study on mechanical properties of steel - concrete interface.

  20. Effect of pH on compressive strength of some modification of mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad A.; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Asatourian, Armen; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Khezri-Boukani, Kaveh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, it was shown that NanoMTA improved the setting time and promoted a better hydration process which prevents washout and the dislodgment of this novel biomaterial in comparison with WTMA. This study analyzed the compressive strength of ProRoot WMTA (Dentsply), a NanoWMTA (Kamal Asgar Research Center), and Bioaggregate (Innovative Bioceramix) after its exposure to a range of environmental pH conditions during hydration. Study Design: After mixing the cements under aseptic condition and based on the manufacturers` recommendations, the cements were condensed with moderate force using plugger into 9 × 6 mm split molds. Each type of cement was then randomly divided into three groups (n=10). Specimens were exposed to environments with pH values of 4.4, 7.4, or 10.4 for 3 days. Cement pellets were compressed by using an Instron testing machine. Values were recorded and compared. Data were analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey’s test. Results: After 3 days, the samples were solid when probed with an explorer before removing them from the molds. The greatest mean compressive strength 133.19±11.14 MPa was observed after exposure to a pH value of 10.4 for NanoWMTA. The values decreased to 111.41±8.26 MPa after exposure to a pH value of 4.4. Increasing of pH had a significant effect on the compressive strength of the groups (p<0.001). The mean compressive strength for the NanoWMTA was statistically higher than for ProRoot WMTA and Bioaggregate (p<0.001). Moreover, increasing of pH values had a significant effect on compressive strength of the experimental groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: The compressive strength of NanoWMTA was significantly higher than WMTA and Bioaggregate; the more acidic the environmental pH, the lower was the compressive strength. Key words:Compressive strength, mineral trioxide aggregate, Nano. PMID:23722137

  1. Compressive and flexural strength of expanded perlite aggregate mortar subjected to high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifeli, Muhamad Faqrul Hisham bin Mohd; Saman@Hj Mohamed, Hamidah binti Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Work on thermal resistant of outer structures of buildings is one of the solution to reduce death, damages and properties loss in fire cases. Structures protected with thermal resistant materials can delay or avoid failure and collapse during fire. Hence, establishment of skin cladding with advance materials to protect the structure of buildings is a necessary action. Expanded perlite is a good insulation material which can be used as aggregate replacement in mortar. This study is to study on mortar mechanical properties of flexural and compressive strength subjected to elevated temperatures using expanded perlite aggregate (EPA). This study involved experimental work which was developing mortar with sand replacement by volume of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of EPA and cured for 56 days. The mortars then exposed to 200°C, 400 °C, 700 °C and 1000 °C. Flexural and compressive strength of the mortar were tested. The tests showed that there were increased of flexural and compressive strength at 200°C, and constantly decreased when subjected to 400°C, 700°C and 1000 °C. There were also variation of strengths at different percentages of EPA replacement. Highest compressive strength and flexural strength recorded were both at 200 °C with 65.52 MPa and 21.34 MPa respectively. The study conclude that by using EPA as aggregate replacement was ineffective below elevated temperatures but increased the performance of the mortar at elevated temperatures.

  2. An investigation of the compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rosen, B. W.; Rice, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the effect of a wide range of variables including matrix properties, interface properties, fiber prestressing, secondary reinforcement, and others on the ultimate compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites. Scanning electron microscopy is used to assess the resulting failure surfaces. In addition, a theoretical study is conducted to determine the influence of fiber anisotropy and lack of perfect bond between fiber and matrix on the shear mode microbuckling. The experimental evaluation of the effect of various constituent and process characteristics on the behavior of these unidirectional composites in compression did not reveal any substantial increase in strength. However, theoretical evaluations indicate that the high degree of fiber anisotropy results in a significant drop in the predicted stress level for internal instability. Scanning electron microscope data analysis suggests that internal fiber failure and smooth surface debonding could be responsible for the measured low compressive strengths.

  3. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi, E-mail: paryanto-ds@yahoo.com; Sugiman,; Saputra, Yudhi

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing themore » core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.« less

  4. Strength and deformability of concrete beams reinforced by non-metallic fiber and composite rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, K. L.; Plevkov, V. S.; Nevskii, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Production of durable and high-strength concrete structures with unique properties has always been crucial. Therefore special attention has been paid to non-metallic composite and fiber reinforcement. This article describes the experimental research of strength and deformability of concrete beams with dispersed and core fiber-based reinforcement. As composite reinforcement fiberglass reinforced plastic rods with diameters 6 mm and 10 mm are used. Carbon and basalt fibers are used as dispersed reinforcement. The developed experimental program includes designing and production of flexural structures with different parameters of dispersed fiber and composite rebar reinforcement. The preliminary testing of mechanical properties of these materials has shown their effectiveness. Structures underwent bending testing on a special bench by applying flexural static load up to complete destruction. During the tests vertical displacements were recorded, as well as value of actual load, slippage of rebars in concrete, crack formation. As a result of research were obtained structural failure and crack formation graphs, value of fracture load and maximum displacements of the beams at midspan. Analysis of experimental data showed the effectiveness of using dispersed reinforcement of concrete and the need for prestressing of fiberglass composite rebar.

  5. State of practice for concrete cylinder match curing and effect of test cylinder size.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-01-01

    The prestressed concrete element industry is interested in exploring the application of different types of matchcuring : technologies and in using 4 x 8-in. (100 x 200-mm) cylinders to measure concrete compressive strength : instead of the standard 6...

  6. Development of Non-Proprietary Ultra-High Performance Concrete : Final Report

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-12-01

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) has mechanical and durability properties that far exceed those of conventional concrete. Particularly, UHPC has compressive and post-cracking tensile strengths of around 20 ksi and 0.72 ksi, respectively. Thus, ...

  7. Development of Non-Proprietary Ultra High Performance Concrete : Final Presentation : November, 2017

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-11-01

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) has mechanical and durability properties that far exceed those of conventional concrete. Particularly, UHPC has compressive and post-cracking tensile strengths of around 20 ksi and 0.72 ksi, respectively. Thus, ...

  8. Roller Compacted Concrete over Soil Cement under Accelerated Loading : Research Project Capsule

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-09-01

    Roller compacted concrete (RCC) is a stiff , zero-slump concrete mixture placed with modifi ed : asphalt paving equipment and compacted by vibratory rollers. Properly designed RCC mixes : can achieve outstanding compressive strengths similar to those...

  9. I-SonReb: an improved NDT method to evaluate the in situ strength of carbonated concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breccolotti, Marco; Bonfigli, Massimo F.

    2015-10-01

    Concrete strength evaluated in situ by means of the conventional SonReb method can be highly overestimated in presence of carbonation. This latter, in fact, is responsible for the physical and chemical alteration of the outer layer of concrete. As most of the existing concrete structures are subjected to carbonation, it is of high importance to overcome this problem. In this paper, an Improved SonReb method (I-SonReb) for carbonated concretes is proposed. It relies on the definition of a correction coefficient of the measured Rebound index as a function of the carbonated concrete cover thickness, an additional parameter to be measured during in situ testing campaigns. The usefulness of the method has been validated showing the improvement in the accuracy of concrete strength estimation from two sets of NDT experimental data collected from investigations on real structures.

  10. A compressibility based model for predicting the tensile strength of directly compressed pharmaceutical powder mixtures.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Gavin K; Campbell, Jacqueline I; Roberts, Ron J

    2017-10-05

    A new model to predict the compressibility and compactability of mixtures of pharmaceutical powders has been developed. The key aspect of the model is consideration of the volumetric occupancy of each powder under an applied compaction pressure and the respective contribution it then makes to the mixture properties. The compressibility and compactability of three pharmaceutical powders: microcrystalline cellulose, mannitol and anhydrous dicalcium phosphate have been characterised. Binary and ternary mixtures of these excipients have been tested and used to demonstrate the predictive capability of the model. Furthermore, the model is shown to be uniquely able to capture a broad range of mixture behaviours, including neutral, negative and positive deviations, illustrating its utility for formulation design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Creep and Strength Behavior of Frozen Silt in Uniaxial Compression,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    Limiting long-term strengths predicted by various investigators .............. 32 39. Plot of log(tn/T) vs lI /T...oz - 2C equation: ic68 , li 1ill I ,IIi hl lIi lili’C( o),(9 1 10 100 (000 I / (19) 0/, Stress Factor (0,- kg/cm2) where c, is the mimimum creep rate...I.20-t3 0 U, o B- 0 -0 L 108-1.10 ,o ’I , , ,jI I I ,1 1 1 1 1 1 1, 11 1 , ,l 1 11111, 1 1 1, , ,,,h I0 - r’ to - s 50 - 4 I0 " r, 10 " 1 10-1 li

  12. The relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength of functional surface geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subaer, Ekaputri, Januari Jaya; Fansuri, Hamzah; Abdullah, Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study to investigate the relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength of geopolymers made from metakaolin has been conducted. Samples were prepared by using metakaolin activated with a sodium silicate solution at a different ratio of Si to Al and Na to Al and cured at 70°C for one hour. The resulting geopolymers were stored in an open air for 28 days before conducting any measurement. Bulk density and apparent porosity of the samples were measured by using Archimedes's method. Vickers microhardness measurements were performed on a polished surface of geopolymers with a load ranging from 0.3 - 1.0 kg. The topographic of indented samples were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compressive strength of the resulting geopolymers was measured on the cylindrical samples with a ratio of height to the diameter was 2:1. The results showed that the molar ratios of geopolymers compositions play important roles in the magnitude of bulk density, porosity, Vickers's microhardness as well as the compressive strength. The porosity reduced exponentially the magnitude of the strength of geopolymers. It was found that the relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength was linear.

  13. Oxidation Behavior of Matrix Graphite and Its Effect on Compressive Strength

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiangwen; Contescu, Cristian I.; Zhao, Xi; ...

    2017-01-01

    Mmore » atrix graphite (G) with incompletely graphitized binder used in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) is commonly suspected to exhibit lower oxidation resistance in air. In order to reveal the oxidation performance, the oxidation behavior of newly developed A3-3 G at the temperature range from 500 to 950°C in air was studied and the effect of oxidation on the compressive strength of oxidized G specimens was characterized. Results show that temperature has a significant influence on the oxidation behavior of G. The transition temperature between Regimes I and II is ~700°C and the activation energy ( E a ) in Regime I is around 185 kJ/mol, a little lower than that of nuclear graphite, which indicates G is more vulnerable to oxidation. Oxidation at 550°C causes more damage to compressive strength of G than oxidation at 900°C. Comparing with the strength of pristine G specimens, the rate of compressive strength loss is 77.3% after oxidation at 550°C and only 12.5% for oxidation at 900°C. icrostructure images of SE and porosity measurement by ercury Porosimetry indicate that the significant compressive strength loss of G oxidized at 550°C may be attributed to both the uniform pore formation throughout the bulk and the preferential oxidation of the binder.« less

  14. Innovative concrete bridging systems for pedestrian bridges : implementation and monitoring.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-08-01

    Two precast, prestressed pedestrian bridges were designed for rapid construction in Rolla, MO, utilizing high-strength concrete (HSC) : and high-strength self-consolidating concrete (HS-SCC) with a target 28 day compressive strength of 68.9 MPa (10,0...

  15. Failure strengths of denture teeth fabricated on injection molded or compression molded denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Robison, Nathan E; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Cagna, David R

    2016-08-01

    Denture tooth fracture or debonding remains a common problem in removable prosthodontics. The purpose of this in vitro study was to explore factors determining failure strengths for combinations of different denture tooth designs (shape, materials) and injection or compression molded denture base resins. Three central incisor denture tooth designs were tested: nanohybrid composite (NHC; Ivoclar Phonares II), interpenetrating network (IPN; Dentsply Portrait), and microfiller reinforced polyacrylic (MRP; VITA Physiodens). Denture teeth of each type were processed on an injection molded resin (IvoBase HI; Ivoclar Vivadent AG) or a compression molded resin (Lucitone 199; Dentsply Intl) (n=11 or 12). The denture teeth were loaded at 45 degrees on the incisal edge. The failure load was recorded and analyzed with 2-way ANOVA (α=.05), and the fracture mode was categorized from observed fracture surfaces as cohesive, adhesive, or mixed failure. The following failure loads (mean ±SD) were recorded: NHC/injection molded 280 ±52 N; IPN/injection molded 331 ±41 N; MRP/injection molded 247 ±23 N; NHC/compression molded 204 ±31 N; IPN/compression molded 184 ±17 N; MRP/compression molded 201 ±16 N. Injection molded resin yielded significantly higher failure strength for all denture teeth (P<.001), among which IPN had the highest strength. Failure was predominantly cohesive in the teeth, with the exception of mixed mode for the IPN/compression group. When good bonding was achieved, the strength of the structure (denture tooth/base resin combination) was determined by the strength of the denture teeth, which may be affected by the processing technique. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Elasticity Modulus and Flexural Strength Assessment of Foam Concrete Layer of Poroflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, Matej; Decky, Martin; Drusa, Marian; Orininová, Lucia; Scherfel, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, it is necessary to develop new building materials, which are in accordance to the principles of the following provisions of the Roads Act: The design of road is a subject that follows national technical standards, technical regulations and objectively established results of research and development for road infrastructure. Foam concrete, as a type of lightweight concrete, offers advantages such as low bulk density, thermal insulation and disadvantages that will be reduced by future development. The contribution focuses on identifying the major material characteristics of foam concrete named Poroflow 17-5, in order to replace cement-bound granular mixtures. The experimental measurements performed on test specimens were the subject of diploma thesis in 2015 and continuously of the dissertation thesis and grant research project. At the beginning of the contribution, an overview of the current use of foam concrete abroad is elaborated. Moreover, it aims to determine the flexural strength of test specimens Poroflow 17-5 in combination with various basis weights of the underlying geotextile. Another part of the article is devoted to back-calculation of indicative design modulus of Poroflow based layers based on the results of static plate load tests provided at in situ experimental stand of Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Žilina (FCE Uniza). Testing stand has been created in order to solve problems related to research of road and railway structures. Concern to building construction presents a physical homomorphic model that is identical with the corresponding theory in all structural features. Based on the achieved material characteristics, the tensile strength in bending of previously used road construction materials was compared with innovative alternative of foam concrete and the suitability for the base layers of pavement roads was determined.

  17. The significance of nanoparticles on bond strength of polymer concrete to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Douba, A.; Genedy, M.; Matteo, E. N.

    Here, polymer concrete (PC) is a commonly used material in construction due to its improved durability and good bond strength to steel substrate. PC has been suggested as a repair and seal material to restore the bond between the cement annulus and the steel casing in wells that penetrate formations under consideration for CO 2 sequestration. Nanoparticles including Multi-Walled Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNTs), Aluminum Nanoparticles (ANPs) and Silica Nano particles (SNPs) were added to an epoxy-based PC to examine how the nanoparticles affect the bond strength of PC to a steel substrate. Slant shear tests were used to determine themore » bond strength of PC incorporating nanomaterials to steel; results reveal that PC incorporating nanomaterials has an improved bond strength to steel substrate compared with neat PC. In particular, ANPs improve the bond strength by 51% over neat PC. Local shear stresses, extracted from Finite Element (FE) analysis of the slant shear test, were found to be as much as twice the apparent/average shear/bond strength. These results suggest that the impact of nanomaterials is higher than that shown by the apparent strength. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements of epoxy with and without nanomaterials showed ANPs to influence curing of epoxy, which might explain the improved bond strength of PC incorporating ANPs.« less

  18. The significance of nanoparticles on bond strength of polymer concrete to steel

    DOE PAGES

    Douba, A.; Genedy, M.; Matteo, E. N.; ...

    2017-01-03

    Here, polymer concrete (PC) is a commonly used material in construction due to its improved durability and good bond strength to steel substrate. PC has been suggested as a repair and seal material to restore the bond between the cement annulus and the steel casing in wells that penetrate formations under consideration for CO 2 sequestration. Nanoparticles including Multi-Walled Carbon Nano Tubes (MWCNTs), Aluminum Nanoparticles (ANPs) and Silica Nano particles (SNPs) were added to an epoxy-based PC to examine how the nanoparticles affect the bond strength of PC to a steel substrate. Slant shear tests were used to determine themore » bond strength of PC incorporating nanomaterials to steel; results reveal that PC incorporating nanomaterials has an improved bond strength to steel substrate compared with neat PC. In particular, ANPs improve the bond strength by 51% over neat PC. Local shear stresses, extracted from Finite Element (FE) analysis of the slant shear test, were found to be as much as twice the apparent/average shear/bond strength. These results suggest that the impact of nanomaterials is higher than that shown by the apparent strength. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements of epoxy with and without nanomaterials showed ANPs to influence curing of epoxy, which might explain the improved bond strength of PC incorporating ANPs.« less

  19. Non-destructive testing of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-11-01

    This research project was initiated to evaluate the performance of an ultrasonic testing device device in predicting compressive strengths from tests performed on samples of fresh concrete. : The initial phase of this study involved laboratory perora...

  20. Feasibility evaluation of utilizing high strength concrete in design and construction of highway bridge structures : interim report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of using high-strength concrete in the design and construction of highway bridge structures. A literature search was conducted; a survey of five regional fabrication plants was perfo...

  1. An extrapolation method for compressive strength prediction of hydraulic cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Siqueira Tango, C.E. de

    1998-07-01

    The basis for the AMEBA Method is presented. A strength-time function is used to extrapolate the predicted cementitious material strength for a late (ALTA) age, based on two earlier age strengths--medium (MEDIA) and low (BAIXA) ages. The experimental basis for the method is data from the IPT-Brazil laboratory and the field, including a long-term study on concrete, research on limestone, slag, and fly-ash additions, and quality control data from a cement factory, a shotcrete tunnel lining, and a grout for structural repair. The method applicability was also verified for high-performance concrete with silica fume. The formula for predicting late agemore » (e.g., 28 days) strength, for a given set of involved ages (e.g., 28,7, and 2 days) is normally a function only of the two earlier ages` (e.g., 7 and 2 days) strengths. This equation has been shown to be independent on materials variations, including cement brand, and is easy to use also graphically. Using the AMEBA method, and only needing to know the type of cement used, it has been possible to predict strengths satisfactorily, even without the preliminary tests which are required in other methods.« less

  2. Optimization of calcium carbonate content on synthesis of aluminum foam and its compressive strength characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno, Nugraha, Bagja; Kusharjanto

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important characteristic of aluminum foam is compressive strength, which is reflected by its impact energy and Young's modulus. In the present research, optimization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) content in the synthesized aluminum foam in order to obtain the highest compressive strength was carried out. The results of this study will be used to determine the CaCO3 content synthesis process parameter in pilot plant scale production of an aluminum foam. The experiment was performed by varying the concentration of calcium carbonate content, which was used as foaming agent, at constant alumina concentration (1.5 wt%), which was added as stabilizer, and temperature (725°C). It was found that 4 wt% CaCO3 gave the lowest relative density, which was 0.15, and the highest porosity, which was 85.29%, and compressive strength of as high as 0.26 Mpa. The pore morphology of the obtained aluminum foam at such condition was as follow: the average pore diameter was 4.42 mm, the wall thickness minimum of the pore was 83.24 µm, roundness of the pore was 0.91. Based on the fractal porosity, the compressive strength was inversely proportional to the porosity and huddled on a power law value of 2.91.

  3. Chemical treatments for improving compressive strength of linerboard at high moisture conditions

    Treesearch

    D. J. Fahey

    1964-01-01

    Various chemical treatments have been investigated at the Forest Products Laboratory for improving the compressive strength of linerboard exposed at high humidities and after water-soaking. Phenolic resins have been among the more promising chemicals studied, but they vary in performance. The low-condensed water-soluble phenolic resins have given some of the highest...

  4. New rapid method for determining edgewise compressive strength of corrugated fiberboard

    Treesearch

    John W. Koning

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if corrugated fiberboard specimens that had been necked down with a common router would yield acceptable edgewise compressive strength values. Tests were conducted on specimens prepared using a circular saw and router, and the results were compared with those obtained on specimens prepared according to TAPPI Test Method T...

  5. Effect of Impact Damage and Open Hole on Compressive Strength of Hybrid Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement; Brinson, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Impact damage tolerance is a frequently listed design requirement for composites hardware. The effect of impact damage and open hole size on laminate compressive strength was studied on sandwich beam specimens which combine CFRP-GFRP hybrid skins and a syntactic foam core. Three test specimen configurations have been investigated for this study. The first two were sandwich beams which were loaded in pure bending (by four point flexure). One series had a skin damaged by impact, and the second series had a circular hole machined through one of the skins. The reduction of compressive strength with increasing damage (hole) size was compared. Additionally a third series of uniaxially loaded open hole compression coupons were tested to generate baseline data for comparison with both series of sandwich beams.

  6. The influence of lay-up and thickness on composite impact damage and compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. G.; Obrien, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of composite stacking sequence, thickness, and percentage of zero-degree plies on the size, shape, and distribution of delamination through the laminate thickness and on residual compression strength following impact were studied. Graphite/epoxy laminates were impacted with an 0.5 inch diameter aluminum sphere at a specific low or high velocity. Impact damage was measured nondestructively by ultrasonic C-scans and X-radiography and destructively by the deply technique, and compression strength tests were performed. It was found that differences in compression failure strain due to stacking sequence were small, while laminates with very low percentages of zero-degree plies had similar failure loads but higher failure strains than laminates with higher percentages of zero-degree plies. Failure strain did not correlate with planar impact damage area, and delaminations in impact regions were associated with matrix cracking.

  7. Damage Characteristics and Residual Strength of Composite Sandwich Panels Impacted with and Without Compression Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the impact damage characteristics and residual strength of composite sandwich panels impacted with and without a compression loading are presented. Results of impact damage screening tests conducted to identify the impact-energy levels at which damage initiates and at which barely visible impact damage occurs in the impacted facesheet are discussed. Parametric effects studied in these tests include the impactor diameter, dropped-weight versus airgun-launched impactors, and the effect of the location of the impact site with respect to the panel boundaries. Residual strength results of panels tested in compression after impact are presented and compared with results of panels that are subjected to a compressive preload prior to being impacted.

  8. A unified bond theory, probabilistic meso-scale modeling, and experimental validation of deformed steel rebar in normal strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenglin

    Bond between deformed rebar and concrete is affected by rebar deformation pattern, concrete properties, concrete confinement, and rebar-concrete interfacial properties. Two distinct groups of bond models were traditionally developed based on the dominant effects of concrete splitting and near-interface shear-off failures. Their accuracy highly depended upon the test data sets selected in analysis and calibration. In this study, a unified bond model is proposed and developed based on an analogy to the indentation problem around the rib front of deformed rebar. This mechanics-based model can take into account the combined effect of concrete splitting and interface shear-off failures, resulting in average bond strengths for all practical scenarios. To understand the fracture process associated with bond failure, a probabilistic meso-scale model of concrete is proposed and its sensitivity to interface and confinement strengths are investigated. Both the mechanical and finite element models are validated with the available test data sets and are superior to existing models in prediction of average bond strength (< 6% error) and crack spacing (< 6% error). The validated bond model is applied to derive various interrelations among concrete crushing, concrete splitting, interfacial behavior, and the rib spacing-to-height ratio of deformed rebar. It can accurately predict the transition of failure modes from concrete splitting to rebar pullout and predict the effect of rebar surface characteristics as the rib spacing-to-height ratio increases. Based on the unified theory, a global bond model is proposed and developed by introducing bond-slip laws, and validated with testing of concrete beams with spliced reinforcement, achieving a load capacity prediction error of less than 26%. The optimal rebar parameters and concrete cover in structural designs can be derived from this study.

  9. Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) and Eggshell Powder (ESP) as Partial Replacement for Cement in Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezdiani Mohamad, Mazizah; Mahmood, Ali A.; Min, Alicia Yik Yee; Nur Nadhira A., R.

    2018-03-01

    This study is an attempt to partially replace Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in concrete with palm oil fuel ash (POFA) and eggshell powder (ESP). The mix proportions of POFA and ESP were varied at 10% of cement replacement and compared with OPC concrete as control specimen. The fineness of POFA is characterized by passing through 300 μm sieve and ESP by passing through 75 μm sieve. Compressive strength testing was conducted on concrete specimens to determine the optimum mix proportion of POFA and ESP. Generally the compressive strength of OPC concrete is higher compared to POFA-ESP concrete. Based on the results of POFA-ESP concrete overall, it shows that the optimum mix proportion of concrete is 6%POFA:4% ESP achieved compressive strength of 38.60 N/mm2 at 28 days. The compressive strength of OPC concrete for the same period was 42.37 N/mm2. Higher water demand in concrete is needed due to low fineness of POFA that contributing to low compressive strength of POFA-ESP concrete. However, the compressive strength and workability of the POFA-ESP concrete were within the ranges typically encountered in regular concrete mixtures indicating the viability of this replacement procedure for structural and non-structural applications.

  10. Comparison of the compressive strength of 3 different implant design systems.

    PubMed

    Pedroza, Jose E; Torrealba, Ysidora; Elias, Augusto; Psoter, Walter

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: to compare the static compressive strength at the implant-abutment interface of 3 design systems and to describe the implant abutment connection failure mode. A stainless steel holding device was designed to align the implants at 30 degrees with respect to the y-axis. Sixty-nine specimens were used, 23 for each system. A computer-controlled universal testing machine (MTS 810) applied static compression loading by a unidirectional vertical piston until failure. Specimens were evaluated macroscopically for longitudinal displacement, abutment looseness, and screw and implant fracture. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The mean compressive strength for the Unipost system was 392.5 psi (SD +/-40.9), for the Spline system 342.8 psi (SD+/-25.8), and for the Screw-Vent system 269.1 psi (SD+/-30.7). The Unipost implant-abutment connection demonstrated a statistically significant superior mechanical stability (P < or = .009) compared with the Spline implant system. The Spline implant system showed a statistically significant higher compressive strength than the Screw-Vent implant system (P < or =.009). Regarding failure mode, the Unipost system consistently broke at the same site, while the other systems failed at different points of the connection. The Unipost system demonstrated excellent fracture resistance to compressive forces; this resistance may be attributed primarily to the diameter of the abutment screw and the 2.5 mm counter bore, representing the same and a unique piece of the implant. The Unipost implant system demonstrated a statistically significant superior compressive strength value compared with the Spline and Screw-Vent systems, at a 30 degrees angulation.

  11. Laterally Loaded Partially Prestressed Concrete Piles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    of an extensive test program onl laterali y ioadeu. partially pr- estressed concrete fender piles. The study Included service load range as well ats...12,000-psi design strength). Configura- tion G utilized 14 r:- estress strand, in an unsymmetric pattern. To provide a uniform concrete prestress of 540...sudden loss in load carrying capacity directly related to the loss of concrete area. The compression concrete fractured longitudinally and along the

  12. Dynamics of layered reinforced concrete beam on visco-elastic foundation with different resistances of concrete and reinforcement to tension and compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovsky, Y. V.; Tikhonov, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Originally, fundamentals of the theory of limit equilibrium and dynamic deformation of building metal and reinforced concrete structures were created by A. A. Gvozdev [1] and developed by his followers [4, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12]. Forming the basis for the calculation, the model of an ideal rigid-plastic material has enabled to determine in many cases the ultimate load bearing capacity and upper (kinematically possible) or lower (statically valid) values for a wide class of different structures with quite simple methods. At the same time, applied to concrete structures the most important property of concrete to significantly differently resist tension and compression was not taken into account [10]. This circumstance was considered in [3] for reinforced concrete beams under conditions of quasistatic loading. The deformation is often accompanied by resistance of the environment in construction practice [8, 9]. In [2], the dynamics of multi-layered concrete beams on visco-elastic foundation under the loadings of explosive type is considered. In this work we consider the case which is often encountered in practical applications when the loadings weakly change in time.

  13. Investigation on Flexure Test of Composite Beam of Repair Materials and Substrate Concrete for Durable Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnaik, Rashmi R.; Rangaraju, Prasada Rao

    2014-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted on composite beam of repair materials and substrate concrete to investigate the failures of concrete repair due to differences in strength of repair materials and substrate concrete. In this investigation the flexural strength, load-deflection curves and failure patterns of the composite beam specimens are studied for the durability of the concrete repair. Flexure test was conducted to simulate tensile stress in the concrete repair material. Compressive strength and split tensile strength of the repair materials and substrate concrete are investigated to aid in the analysis of the concrete repair. It was observed that the repair materials of higher compressive strength than the substrate concrete are causing an incompatible failure in the concrete repair.

  14. Nondestructive Concrete Characterization System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    Army, locate steel reinforcing bars, and identify the presence of steel fiber reinforcement . The thickness of all sides of each concrete block was...concrete compressive strength within the accuracy required by the U.S. Army, locate steel reinforcing bars, and identify the presence of steel fiber ...tolerance of ±3 ksi. 3. Detect the presence of fiber reinforcement . 4. Locate and detect the presence and density (e.g. spacing) of metallic objects

  15. Research on Foam Concrete Features by Replacing Cement with Industrial Waste Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynbaatar; Qiqige; Ma, Gangping; Fu, Jianhua; Wang, Jinghua

    The influence on the performance of foam concrete made by replacing cement with some industrial waste residues was researched in this paper. The result shows that the 7d and 28d compressive strength of foam concrete increases firstly and then decreases with the increasing amount of industrial waste residue. The proper added range is 10%-20% for steel slag, blast furnace slag and coal ash, but, 8% for desulfurized fly ash. With the proper adding ratio, the compressive strength of foam concrete always increased comparing with the pure cement foam concrete. When adding 48% of the compound industrial waste residues, the 28d compressive strength of the foam concrete reached the 2.9MPa which could match the pure cement foam concrete. The results indicates that there is a synergistic effect among the compound industrial waste residue, and this effect is benefit to improving the compressive strength of foam concrete.

  16. A review on the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Anting Guntor, Nickholas; Syazani Leman, Alif

    2017-11-01

    Road authorities manage a large population of ageing bridges, a substantial number of which fail to meet the current requirements either due to deterioration and other structural deficiencies or as a result of the escalating demands imposed by increased traffic. This problem is related to the dynamic load from vehicles. This problem can be solved by producing a type of concrete that can reduce the amplitude of oscillation or vibration such as rubberized concrete. Green construction has been a very important aspect in concrete production field in the last decade. One of the most problematic waste materials is scrap tires. The use of scrap tires in civil engineering is increasing by producing rubberized concrete. Rubberized concrete is a type of concrete that is mixed with rubber. The purpose of this review is to justify the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Several parameters named physical, chemical and mechanical properties were measured to ensure the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Rubberized concrete has similar workability to normal concrete. The rubber reduced the density and compressive strength of the concrete while increased the flexural strength, water absorption and damping ratio. The used of rubber in concrete beyond 20% is not recommended due to decreasing in compressive strength. Rubberized concrete recommended to be used in circumstances where vibration damping was required such as in bridge construction as shock-wave absorber.

  17. A low cost method of testing compression-after-impact strength of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1991-01-01

    A method was devised to test the compression strength of composite laminate specimens that are much thinner and wider than other tests require. The specimen can be up to 7.62 cm (3 in) wide and as thin as 1.02 mm (.04 in). The best features of the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) fixture are combined with an antibuckling jig developed and used at the University of Dayton Research Institute to obtain a method of compression testing thin, wide test coupons on any 20 kip (or larger) loading frame. Up to 83 pct. less composite material is needed for the test coupons compared to the most commonly used compression-after-impact (CAI) tests, which calls for 48 ply thick (approx. 6.12 mm) test coupons. Another advantage of the new method is that composite coupons of the exact lay-up and thickness of production parts can be tested for CAI strength, thus yielding more meaningful results. This new method was used to compression test 8 and 16 ply laminates of T300/934 carbon/epoxy. These results were compared to those obtained using ASTM standard D 3410-87 (Celanese compression test). CAI testing was performed on IM6/3501-6, IM7/SP500 and IM7/F3900. The new test method and associated fixture work well and is a valuable asset to MSFC's damage tolerance program.

  18. GROUT-CONCRETE INTERFACE BOND PERFORMANCE: EFFECT OF INTERFACE MOISTURE ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH AND GROUT MICROSTRUCTURE.

    PubMed

    De la Varga, I; Muñoz, J F; Bentz, D P; Spragg, R P; Stutzman, P E; Graybeal, B A

    2018-05-01

    Bond between two cementitious materials is crucial in applications such as repairs, overlays, and connections of prefabricated bridge elements (PBEs), to name just a few. It is the latter that has special interest to the authors of this paper. After performing a dimensional stability study on grout-like materials commonly used as connections between PBEs, it was observed that the so-called 'non-shrink' cementitious grouts showed a considerable amount of early-age shrinkage. This might have negative effects on the integrity of the structure, due not only to the grout material's early degradation, but also to a possible loss of bond between the grout and the prefabricated concrete element. Many factors affect the bond strength between two cementitious materials (e.g., grout-concrete), the presence of moisture at the existing concrete substrate surface being one of them. In this regard, pre-moistening the concrete substrate surface prior to the application of the grout material is sometimes recommended for bond enhancement. This topic has been the focus of numerous research studies in the past; however, there is still controversy among practitioners on the real benefits that this practice might provide. This paper evaluates the tensile bond performance of two non-shrink cementitious grouts applied to the exposed aggregate surface of a concrete substrate, and how the supply of moisture at the grout-concrete interface affects the bond strength. "Pull-off" bond results show increased tensile bond strength when the concrete surface is pre-moistened. Reasons to explain the observed increased bond strength are given after a careful microstructural analysis of the grout-concrete interface. Interfaces where sufficient moisture is provided to the concrete substrate such that moisture movement from the grout is prevented show reduced porosity and increased hydration on the grout side of the interface, which is thought to directly contribute to the increased tensile bond

  19. Modeling of high-strength concrete-filled FRP tube columns under cyclic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Kee-Yen; Ma, Chau-Khun; Apandi, Nazirah Mohd; Awang, Abdullah Zawawi; Omar, Wahid

    2018-05-01

    The behavior of high-strength concrete (HSC) - filled fiber-reinforced-polymer (FRP) tubes (HSCFFTs) column subjected to cyclic lateral loading is presented in this paper. As the experimental study is costly and time consuming, a finite element analysis (FEA) is chosen for the study. Most of the previous studies have focused on examining the axial load behavior of HSCFFT column instead of seismic behavior. The seismic behavior of HSCFFT columns has been the main interest in the industry. The key objective of this research is to develop a reliable numerical non-linear FEA model to represent the seismic behavior of such column. A FEA model was developed using the Concrete Damaged Plasticity Model (CDPM) available in the finite element software package (ABAQUS). Comparisons between experimental results from previous research and the predicted results were made based on load versus displacement relationships and ultimate strength of the column. The results showed that the column increased in ductility and able to deform to a greater extent with the increase of the FRP confinement ratio. With the increase of confinement ratio, HSCFFT column achieved a higher moment resistance, thus indicated a higher failure strength in the column under cyclic lateral load. It was found that the proposed FEA model can regenerate the experimental results with adequate accuracy.

  20. Solidification/stabilization of ASR fly ash using Thiomer material: Optimization of compressive strength and heavy metals leaching.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin Woong; Choi, Angelo Earvin Sy; Park, Hung Suck

    2017-12-01

    Optimization studies of a novel and eco-friendly construction material, Thiomer, was investigated in the solidification/stabilization of automobile shredded residue (ASR) fly ash. A D-optimal mixture design was used to evaluate and optimize maximum compressive strength and heavy metals leaching by varying Thiomer (20-40wt%), ASR fly ash (30-50wt%) and sand (20-40wt%). The analysis of variance was utilized to determine the level of significance of each process parameters and interactions. The microstructure of the solidified materials was taken from a field emission-scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy that confirmed successful Thiomer solidified ASR fly ash due to reduced pores and gaps in comparison with an untreated ASR fly ash. The X-ray diffraction detected the enclosed materials on the ASR fly ash primarily contained sulfur associated crystalline complexes. Results indicated the optimal conditions of 30wt% Thiomer, 30wt% ASR fly ash and 40wt% sand reached a compressive strength of 54.9MPa. For the optimum results in heavy metals leaching, 0.0078mg/LPb, 0.0260mg/L Cr, 0.0007mg/LCd, 0.0020mg/L Cu, 0.1027mg/L Fe, 0.0046mg/L Ni and 0.0920mg/L Zn were leached out, being environmentally safe due to being substantially lower than the Korean standard leaching requirements. The results also showed that Thiomer has superiority over the commonly used Portland cement asa binding material which confirmed its potential usage as an innovative approach to simultaneously synthesize durable concrete and satisfactorily pass strict environmental regulations by heavy metals leaching. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanical behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete using soft - drink can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilya, J.; Cheow Chea, C.

    2017-11-01

    This research was carried out to study the behaviour of concrete, specifically compressive and flexural strength, by incorporating recycled soft drink aluminium can as fibre reinforcement in the concrete. Another aim of the research is to determine the maximum proportion of fibres to be added in the concrete. By following standard mix design, Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) concrete was made to have a target mean strength of 30 N/mm2 with not more than 30 mm of slump. Having the same workability, OPC concrete with 0%, 1% and 2% of soft drink can aluminium fibre was prepared based on weight of cement. The specimens were tested for compressive strength and flexural strength. Laboratory test results based on short term investigation reveals that the compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete containing fibre are higher than of normal OPC concrete. Among two volume fractions, concrete with 1% of soft drink can fibre have performed better result in compressive strength and flexural strength compared with 2% amount of soft drink can fibre. The optimum proportion of aluminium fibre to be added in the concrete as fibre reinforcement is 1% fibre content by weight of cement which gave all the positive response from all the tests conducted.

  2. Effect of shallow angles on compressive strength of biaxial and triaxial laminates.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongli; Yang, Hyun-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Biaxial (BX) and triaxial (TX) composite laminates with ±45° angled plies have been widely used in wind turbine blades. As the scale of blades increases, BX and TX laminates with shallow-angled plies (i.e. off-axis ply angle <45°) might be utilized for reducing mass and/or improving performance. The compressive properties of shallow-angled BX and TX laminates are critical considering their locations in a wind turbine blade, and therefore in this study, the uniaxial static compression tests were conducted using BX and TX laminates with angled-plies of ±45°, ±35°, and ±25°, for the purpose of evaluation. On the other hand, Mori-Tanaka mean field homogenization method was employed to predict elastic constants of plies in BX and TX laminates involved in tests; linear regression analyses of experimentally measured ply strengths collected from various sources were then performed to estimate strengths of plies in BX and TX laminates; finally, Tsai-Wu, Hashin, and Puck failure criteria were chosen to predict compressive strengths of BX and TX laminates. Comparison between theoretical predictions and test results were carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of each criterion. The compressive strength of BX laminate decreases as ply angle increases, and the trend was successfully predicted by all three failure criteria. For TX laminates, ±35° angled plies rather than ±45° angled plies led to the lowest laminate compressive strength. Hashin and Puck criteria gave good predictions at certain ply angles for TX laminates, but Tsai-Wu criterion was able to capture the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle. It was concluded that the transverse tensile stress in 0° plies of TX laminates, which attains its maximum when the off-axis ply angle is 35°, is the dominant factor in failure determination if using Tsai-Wu criterion. This explains the unexpected strength variation of TX laminates with ply angle, and also indicates that proper

  3. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  4. Development of Lateral Prestress in High-Strength Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, T.; Ozbakkaloglu, T.

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports on an experimental investigation into the axial and lateral strain development of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) confined high-strength concrete (HSC) with prestressed FRP shells. A total of 24 aramid FRP (AFRP)-confined concrete specimens were manufactured as concrete-filled FRP tubes (CFFTs) with instrumentation to measure the strain variations during application of prestress, removal of end constraints and progressive prestress losses. Prestressed CFFT specimens were prepared with three different dose rates of expansive mineral admixture to create a range of lateral prestress applied to AFRP tubes manufactured with sheet thicknesses of 0.2 or 0.3 mm/ply and referred to as lightly- or well-confined, respectively. In addition to these three levels of prestress, non-prestressed companion specimens were manufactured and tested to determine baseline performance. The experimental results from this study indicate that lateral prestressing of CFFTs manufactured with HSC can be achieved by varying the expansive mineral admixture dose rate with a lateral prestress of up to 7.3 MPa recorded in this study. Significant strain variations were measured during removal of the end constraints with up to 700 microstrain recorded in the axial direction. Finally, the measurement of prestress losses for the month following prestress application revealed minimal progressive losses, with only 250 and 100 με recorded for the axial and hoop strains, respectively.

  5. Mechanical performance of porous concrete pavement containing nano black rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. Y. Mohd; Ramadhansyah, P. J.; Rosli, H. Mohd; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental research on the performance of nano black rice husk ash on the porous concrete pavement properties. The performance of the porous concrete pavement mixtures was investigated based on their compressive strength, flexural strength, and splitting tensile strength. The results indicated that using nano material from black rice husk ash improved the mechanical properties of porous concrete pavement. In addition, the result of compressive, flexural, and splitting tensile strength was increased with increasing in curing age. Finally, porous concrete pavement with 10% replacement levels exhibited an excellent performance with good strength compared to others.

  6. Empirical Approach for Determining Axial Strength of Circular Concrete Filled Steel Tubular Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalekshmi, S.; Jegadesh, J. S. Sankar; Goel, Abhishek

    2018-06-01

    The concrete filled steel tubular (CFST) columns are highly regarded in recent years as an interesting option in the construction field by designers and structural engineers, due to their exquisite structural performance, with enhanced load bearing capacity and energy absorption capacity. This study presents a new approach to simulate the capacity of circular CFST columns under axial loading condition, using a large database of experimental results by applying artificial neural network (ANN). A well trained network is established and is used to simulate the axial capacity of CFST columns. The validation and testing of the ANN is carried out. The current study is focused on proposing a simplified equation that can predict the ultimate strength of the axially loaded columns with high level of accuracy. The predicted results are compared with five existing analytical models which estimate the strength of the CFST column. The ANN-based equation has good prediction with experimental data, when compared with the analytical models.

  7. Empirical Approach for Determining Axial Strength of Circular Concrete Filled Steel Tubular Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalekshmi, S.; Jegadesh, J. S. Sankar; Goel, Abhishek

    2018-03-01

    The concrete filled steel tubular (CFST) columns are highly regarded in recent years as an interesting option in the construction field by designers and structural engineers, due to their exquisite structural performance, with enhanced load bearing capacity and energy absorption capacity. This study presents a new approach to simulate the capacity of circular CFST columns under axial loading condition, using a large database of experimental results by applying artificial neural network (ANN). A well trained network is established and is used to simulate the axial capacity of CFST columns. The validation and testing of the ANN is carried out. The current study is focused on proposing a simplified equation that can predict the ultimate strength of the axially loaded columns with high level of accuracy. The predicted results are compared with five existing analytical models which estimate the strength of the CFST column. The ANN-based equation has good prediction with experimental data, when compared with the analytical models.

  8. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compressive strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compressive loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  9. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compression Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compression strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compression loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  10. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-06-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio ( w/ c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/ c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  11. Strength properties and structure of a submicrocrystalline Al-Mg-Mn alloy under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, A. N.; Brodova, I. G.; Razorenov, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    The results of studying the strength of a submicrocrystalline aluminum A5083 alloy (chemical composition was 4.4Mg-0.6Mn-0.11Si-0.23Fe-0.03Cr-0.02Cu-0.06Ti wt % and Al base) under shockwave compression are presented. The submicrocrystalline structure of the alloy was produced in the process of dynamic channel-angular pressing at a strain rate of 104 s-1. The average size of crystallites in the alloy was 180-460 nm. Hugoniot elastic limit σHEL, dynamic yield stress σy, and the spall strength σSP of the submicrocrystalline alloy were determined based on the free-surface velocity profiles of samples during shock compression. It has been established that upon shock compression, the σHEL and σy of the submicrocrystalline alloy are higher than those of the coarse-grained alloy and σsp does not depend on the grain size. The maximum value of σHEL reached for the submicrocrystalline alloy is 0.66 GPa, which is greater than that in the coarse-crystalline alloy by 78%. The dynamic yield stress is σy = 0.31 GPa, which is higher than that of the coarse-crystalline alloy by 63%. The spall strength is σsp = 1.49 GPa. The evolution of the submicrocrystalline structure of the alloy during shock compression was studied. It has been established that a mixed nonequilibrium grain-subgrain structure with a fragment size of about 400 nm is retained after shock compression, and the dislocation density and the hardness of the alloy are increased.

  12. Structure and compressive strength of silicon open-cell foam obtained by a centrifugal separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ju-Young; Kim, Ki-Young

    2013-03-01

    The present study describes a new way to make an open-cell silicon foam from an Al-Si alloy melt by centrifugation during its solidification. The effects of the silicon content and the chute diameter of the crucible on the morphology, the density and the compressive strength of the silicon foams were investigated. A vertical-type centrifugal separator was designed to push the unfrozen Al-Si melt outside, leaving only the silicon foam inside the crucible during rotation. Alloys in the Al-Si system with silicon contents of 40 and 50 wt% were prepared by an electrical resistance furnace, and the revolution of the centrifugal separator was controlled to fabricate the foam. Open-cell silicon foams could be obtained successfully. The apparent density and the compressive strength were in the ranges of 620-820 kg/m3 and 7.5-14.5 MPa, respectively.

  13. Research on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yubo; Han, Peiwei; Ye, Shufeng; Wei, Lianqi; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Guoyan; Yu, Bo

    2018-02-01

    The solidification of cyanide slag by using basic magnesium salts could reduce pollution and protect the environment. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of age, mixing amount of cyanide slag, water cement ratio and molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body in the present paper. It was found that compressive strength of solidified body increased with the increase of age, and decreased with the increase of mixing amount of cyanide slag and water cement ratio. The molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 should be controlled in the range from 9 to 11 when the mixing amount of cyanide slag was larger than 80 mass%.

  14. Measurement of concrete strength using the emission intensity ratio between Ca(II) 396.8 nm and Ca(I) 422.6 nm in a Nd:YAG laser-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Miura, Satoru; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2006-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the potential of a laser-induced plasma method for determining concrete compressive strength was conducted by focusing a Nd:YAG laser on concrete samples with different degrees of compressive strength. This technique was developed in light of the role of the shock wave in the generation of a laser-induced plasma. It was found that the speed of the shock front depends on the hardness of the sample. It was also found that a positive relationship exists between the speed of the shock front and the ionization rate of the ablated atoms. Hence, the ratio of the intensity between the Ca(II) 396.8 nm and Ca(I) 422.6 nm emission lines detected from the laser-induced plasma can be used to examine the hardness of the material. In fact, it was observed that the ratio changes with respect to the change in the concrete compressive strength. The findings also show that the ratio increases with time after the cement is mixed with water.

  15. Effect of Alkali-Silica Reaction on Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Structural Members

    SciTech Connect

    Hariri-Ardebili, Mohammad; Saouma, Victor; Le Pape, Yann

    Alkali-silica reaction (ASR) was discovered in the early 40s by Stanton (1940) of the California Division of Highways. Since, it has been recognized as a major degradation mechanism for concrete dams and transportation infrastructures. Sometimes described as the ’cancer of concrete’, this internal swelling mechanism causes expansion, cracking and loss of mechanical properties. There are no known economically viable solutions applicable to massive concrete to prevent the reaction once initiated. The e ciency of the mitigation strategies for ASR subjected structures is limited. Several cases of ASR in nuclear generating stations have been disclosed in Japan (Takatura et al. 2005),more » Canada at Gentilly 2 NPP (Tcherner and Aziz 2009) 1, and more recently, in the United States for which the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Information Notice (IN) 2011-20, ’Concrete Degradation by Alkali Silica Reaction,’ on November 18, 2011, to provide the industry with information related to the ASR identified at Seabrook. Considering that US commercial reactors in operation enter the age when ASR degradation can be visually detected and that numerous non nuclear infrastructures (transportation, energy production) have already experienced ASR in a large majority of the States (e.g., Department of Transportation survey reported by Touma (Touma 2000)), the susceptibility and significance of ASR for nuclear concrete structures must be addressed in the perspective of license renewal and long-term operation beyond 60 years. The aim of this report is to perform an extensive parametric series of 3D nonlinear finite element analyses of three di erent “beam-like” geometries, including two di erent depths, three di erent types of boundary conditions, and four other parameters: namely, the ASR volumetric expansion, the reinforcement ratio, the loss of elastic modulus induced by ASR and the loss of tensile strength caused by ASR.« less

  16. Effects of fiber, matrix, and interphase on carbon fiber composite compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.; Harper, Sheila I.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1994-01-01

    The major goal of this project was to obtain basic information on compression failure properties of carbon fiber composites. To do this, we investigated fiber effects, matrix effects, and fiber/matrix interface effects. Using each of nine fiber types, we prepared embedded single-fiber specimens, single-ply specimens, and full laminates. From the single-fiber specimens, in addition to the standard fragmentation test analysis, we were able to use the low crack density data to provide information about the distribution of fiber flaws. The single-ply specimens provided evidence of a correlation between the size of kink band zones and the quality of the interface. Results of the laminate compression experiments mostly agreed with the results from single-ply experiments, although the ultimate compression strengths of laminates were higher. Generally, these experiments showed a strong effect of interfacial properties. Matrix effects were examined using laminates subjected to precracking under mixed-mode loading conditions. A large effect of precracking conditions on the mode 1 toughness of the laminates was found. In order to control the properties of the fiber/matrix interface, we prepared composites of carbon fiber and polycarbonate and subjected these to annealing. The changes in interfacial properties directly correlated with changes in compression strength.

  17. Contributions on the Study of the Compressive Strength of the Light-Cured Composite Resins

    PubMed Central

    Manolea, H.; Degeratu, Sonia; Deva, V.; Coles, Evantia; Draghici, Emma

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the light-cured composite resins are related to the material composition, but also vary according to the light-source characteristics used for polymerization. In this study we followed the compressive strength variation for a light-cured composite resin according to the time of exposure to the curing light. With that end in view,18 test pieces were made from a light-cured hybrid composite material (Filtek Z250). The test pieces where then submitted to a compressive force by a mechanical properties universal testing machine. Our results didn’t show an increase of the compressive strength according to the light-curing time increasing, than only in the light-curing time limit indicated by the manufacturer. A longer light-curing time may induce a shrinkage polymerization growth with the formation of internal tensions inside the material. The composite materials light-curing in short layers as long as there is indicated by the manufacturer seems to be a safer method to make the best from a resin qualities, then an exaggerated increase of the light-curing time. The light-curing is indicated to be done in the direction of the compressive forces. To confirm this supposition other mechanical tests are also necessary PMID:24778814

  18. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  19. Quasi-static and dynamic experimental studies on the tensile strength and failure pattern of concrete and mortar discs.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaochao; Hou, Cheng; Fan, Xueling; Lu, Chunsheng; Yang, Huawei; Shu, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhihua

    2017-11-10

    As concrete and mortar materials widely used in structural engineering may suffer dynamic loadings, studies on their mechanical properties under different strain rates are of great importance. In this paper, based on splitting tests of Brazilian discs, the tensile strength and failure pattern of concrete and mortar were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic loadings with a strain rate of 1-200 s -1 . It is shown that the quasi-static tensile strength of mortar is higher than that of concrete since coarse aggregates weaken the interface bonding strength of the latter. Numerical results confirmed that the plane stress hypothesis lead to a lower value tensile strength for the cylindrical specimens. With the increase of strain rates, dynamic tensile strengths of concrete and mortar significantly increase, and their failure patterns change form a single crack to multiple cracks and even fragment. Furthermore, a relationship between the dynamic increase factor and strain rate was established by using a linear fitting algorithm, which can be conveniently used to calculate the dynamic increase factor of concrete-like materials in engineering applications.

  20. Influence of Random Inclusion of Coconut Fibres on the Short term Strength of Highly Compressible Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani Sujatha, Evangelin; SaiSree, S.; Prabalini, C.; Aysha Farsana, Z.

    2017-07-01

    The choice of natural fibres for soil stabilization provides an economic, safe and eco-friendly alternative to improve the properties of soil. They are an important step forward toward sustainable development. An attempt was made to study the influence of the random addition of untreated coconut fibres on the short term strength of soil, its stress-strain behavior, compaction characteristics and index properties. The soil selected for the study is a highly compressible clay sample with a liquid limit of 52.5 % and plasticity index of 38 %. The soil has no organic content. The study reveals that the compaction curves tend to shift to the right side, indicating more plastic behavior with the addition of fibres. The addition of fibres also reorient the soil structure to a more dispersed fashion. A significant increase in the unconfined compressive strength is also observed. An increase of nearly 51 % in the unconfined compressive strength is observed at 0.75 % coir inclusion. The stress-strain behavior of the soil shows a shift toward more plastic behavior. The mode of failure of the soil specimen is by cracking and with fibre inclusion, length of the failure cracks is restrained as the fibre tends to hold the cracks together, resulting in shorter cracks, with significant bulging of the specimen at failure.

  1. Experimental study of tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets: effect of the diluent nature and compression pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juban, Audrey; Briançon, Stéphanie; Puel, François; Hoc, Thierry; Nouguier-Lehon, Cécile

    2017-06-01

    In the pharmaceutical field, tablets are the most common dosage form for oral administration in the world. Among different manufacturing processes, direct compression is widely used because of its economics interest and it is a process which avoids the steps of wet granulation and drying processes. Tablets are composed of at least two ingredients: an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) which is mixed with a diluent. The nature of the powders and the processing conditions are crucial for the properties of the blend and, consequently, strongly influence the mechanical characteristics of tablets. Moreover, tablets have to present a suitable mechanical strength to avoid crumbling or breaking when handling, while ensuring an appropriate disintegration after administration. Accordingly, this mechanical property is an essential parameter to consider. Experimental results showed that proportion of the diluent, fragmentary (DCPA) or plastic (MCC), had a large influence on the tensile strength evolution with API content as well as the compression load applied during tableting process. From these results a model was developed in order to predict the tensile strength of binary tablets by knowing the compression pressure. The validity of this model was demonstrated for the two studied systems and a comparison was made with two existing models.

  2. Compressive strength and magnetic properties of calcium silicate-zirconia-iron (III) oxide composite cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridzwan, Hendrie Johann Muhamad; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Ismail, Hamisah; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Awang, Rozidawati Binti

    2018-04-01

    In this study, ZrO2 microparticles and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles have been added into calcium silicate based cements. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the compressive strength and magnetic properties of the prepared composite cement. Calcium silicate (CAS) powder was prepared by hydrothermal method. SiO2 and CaO obtained from rice husk ash and limestone respectively were autoclaved at 135 °C for 8 h and sintered at 950°C to obtain CAS powder. SiO2:CaO ratio was set at 45:55. CAS/ZrO2 sample were prepared with varying ZrO2 microparticles concentrations by 0-40 wt. %. Compressive strength value of CAS/ZrO2 cements range from 1.44 to 2.44 MPa. CAS/ZrO2/γ-Fe2O3 sample with 40 wt. % ZrO2 were prepared with varying γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles concentrations (1-5 wt. %). The additions of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed up to twofold increase in the compressive strength of the cement. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the formation of mixed phases in the produced composite cements. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the ferromagnetic behaviour has been observed in CAS/ZrO2/γ-Fe2O3 composite cements.

  3. The Effect on the Flexural Strength, Flexural Modulus and Compressive Strength of Fibre Reinforced Acrylic with That of Plain Unfilled Acrylic Resin – An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 – carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 – polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results: The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. Conclusion: The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged. PMID:25954696

  4. The effect on the flexural strength, flexural modulus and compressive strength of fibre reinforced acrylic with that of plain unfilled acrylic resin - an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tony C; K, Aswini Kumar; Mohamed, Shamaz; Krishnan, Vinod; Mathew, Anil; V, Manju

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the flexural strength, the flexural modulus and compressive strength of the acrylic polymer reinforced with glass, carbon, polyethylene and Kevlar fibres with that of plain unfilled resin. A total of 50 specimens were prepared and divided into 10 specimens each under 5 groups namely group 1- control group without any fibres, group 2 - carbon fibres, group 3- glass fibres, group 4 - polyethylene, group 5- Kevlar. Universal testing machine (Tinius olsen, USA) was used for the testing of these specimens. Out of each group, 5 specimens were randomly selected and testing was done for flexural strength using a three point deflection test and three point bending test for compressive strength and the modulus was plotted using a graphical method. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. The respective mean values for samples in regard to their flexural strength for PMMA plain, PMMA+ glass fibre, PMMA+ carbon, PMMA+ polyethylene and PMMA+ Kevlar were 90.64, 100.79, 102.58, 94.13 and 96.43 respectively. Scheffes post hoc test clearly indicated that only mean flexural strength values of PMMA + Carbon, has the highest mean value. One-way ANOVA revealed a non-significant difference among the groups in regard to their compressive strength. The study concludes that carbon fibre reinforced samples has the greatest flexural strength and greatest flexural modulus, however the compressive strength remains unchanged.

  5. High performance concrete in a bridge in Richlands, Virginia

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-09-01

    The Virginia Department of Transportation built a high-performance concrete (HPC) bridge with high-strength and low-permeability concrete in Richlands. The beams had a minimum compressive strength of 69 MPa (10,000 psi) at 28 days and large, 15 mm (0...

  6. Effect of overglazed and polished surface finishes on the compressive fracture strength of machinable ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Asai, Tetsuya; Kazama, Ryunosuke; Fukushima, Masayoshi; Okiji, Takashi

    2010-11-01

    Controversy prevails over the effect of overglazing on the fracture strength of ceramic materials. Therefore, the effects of different surface finishes on the compressive fracture strength of machinable ceramic materials were investigated in this study. Plates prepared from four commercial brands of ceramic materials were either surface-polished or overglazed (n=10 per ceramic material for each surface finish), and bonded to flat surfaces of human dentin using a resin cement. Loads at failure were determined and statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni test. Although no statistical differences in load value were detected between polished and overglazed groups (p>0.05), the fracture load of Vita Mark II was significantly lower than those of ProCAD and IPS Empress CAD, whereas that of IPS e.max CAD was significantly higher than the latter two ceramic materials (p<0.05). It was concluded that overglazed and polished surfaces produced similar compressive fracture strengths irrespective of the machinable ceramic material tested, and that fracture strength was material-dependent.

  7. Using Cementitious Materials Such as Fly Ash to Replace a Part of Cement in Producing High Strength Concrete in Hot Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuallo, Gidion; Mallisa, Harun

    2018-03-01

    The use of waste materials in concrete gave many advantages to prove the properties of concrete such as its workability, strength and durability; as well to support sustaianable development programs. Fly ash was a waste material produced from coal combustion. This research was conducted to find out the effect of fly ash as a part replacement of cement to produce high strength concrete. The fly ash, which was used in this research, was taken from PLTU Mpanau Palu, Central Sulawesi. The water-binder ratio used in this research was 0.3 selected from trial mixes done before. The results of this research showed that the strength of fly ash concretes were higher than concrete with PCC only. The replacement of cement with fly ash concrete could be up to 20% to produce high strength concrete.

  8. Physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete containing superplasticizer and metakaolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahidan, Shahiron; Tayeh, Bassam A.; Jamaludin, A. A.; Bahari, N. A. A. S.; Mohd, S. S.; Zuki Ali, N.; Khalid, F. S.

    2017-11-01

    The development of concrete technology shows a variety of admixtures in concrete to produce special concrete. This includes the production of self-compacting concrete which is able to fill up all spaces, take formwork shapes and pass through congested reinforcement bars without vibrating or needing any external energy. In this study, the main objective is to compare the physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete containing metakaolin with normal concrete. Four types of samples were produced to study the effect of metakaolin towards the physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete where 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of metakaolin were used as cement replacement. The physical properties were investigated using slump test for normal concrete and slump flow test for self-compacting concrete. The mechanical properties were tested for compressive strength and tensile strength. The findings of this study show that the inclusion of metakaolin as cement replacement can increase both compressive and tensile strength compared to normal concrete. The highest compressive strength was found in self-compacting concrete with 15% metakaolin replacement at 53.3 MPa while self-compacting concrete with 10% metakaolin replacement showed the highest tensile strength at 3.6 MPa. On top of that, the finishing or concrete surface of both cube and cylinder samples made of self-compacting concrete produced a smooth surface with the appearance of less honeycombs compared to normal concrete.

  9. Mechanical and Physical Properties of Polyester Polymer Concrete Using Recycled Aggregates from Concrete Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior. PMID:25243213

  10. Mechanical and physical properties of polyester polymer concrete using recycled aggregates from concrete sleepers.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Francisco; Montalbán, Laura; Real, Julia I; Real, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Currently, reuse of solid waste from disused infrastructures is an important environmental issue to study. In this research, polymer concrete was developed by mixing orthophthalic unsaturated polyester resin, artificial microfillers (calcium carbonate), and waste aggregates (basalt and limestone) coming from the recycling process of concrete sleepers. The variation of the mechanical and physical properties of the polymer concrete (compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, density, and water absorption) was analyzed based on the modification of different variables: nature of the recycled aggregates, resin contents (11 wt%, 12 wt%, and 13 wt%), and particle-size distributions of microfillers used. The results show the influence of these variables on mechanical performance of polymer concrete. Compressive and flexural strength of recycled polymer concrete were improved by increasing amount of polyester resin and by optimizing the particle-size distribution of the microfillers. Besides, the results show the feasibility of developing a polymer concrete with excellent mechanical behavior.

  11. Compressive, diametral tensile and biaxial flexural strength of cutting-edge calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Ajaxon, Ingrid; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are widely used in bone repair. Currently there are two main types of CPCs, brushite and apatite. The aim of this project was to evaluate the mechanical properties of particularly promising experimental brushite and apatite formulations in comparison to commercially available brushite- and apatite-based cements (chronOS(™) Inject and Norian(®) SRS(®), respectively), and in particular evaluate the diametral tensile strength and biaxial flexural strength of these cements in both wet and dry conditions for the first time. The cements׳ porosity and their compressive, diametral tensile and biaxial flexural strength were tested in wet (or moist) and dry conditions. The surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Phase composition was assessed with X-ray diffraction. It was found that the novel experimental cements showed better mechanical properties than the commercially available cements, in all loading scenarios. The highest compressive strength (57.2±6.5MPa before drying and 69.5±6.0MPa after drying) was found for the experimental brushite cement. This cement also showed the highest wet diametral tensile strength (10.0±0.8MPa) and wet biaxial flexural strength (30.7±1.8MPa). It was also the cement that presented the lowest porosity (approx. 12%). The influence of water content was found to depend on cement type, with some cements showing higher mechanical properties after drying and some no difference after drying. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of the compressive strengths for stitched and toughened composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The compression strength of a stitched and a toughened matrix graphite/epoxy composite was determined and compared to a baseline unstitched untoughened composite. Two different layups with a variety of test lengths were tested under both ambient and hot/wet conditions. No significant difference in strength was seen for the different materials when the gage lengths of the specimens were long enough to lead to a buckling failure. For shorter specimens, a 30 percent reduction in strength from the baseline was seen due to stitching for both a 48-ply quasi-isotropic and a (0/45/0/-45/90/-45/0/45/0)s laminate. Analysis of the results suggested that the decrease in strength was due to increased fiber misalignment due to the stitches. An observed increasing strength with decreasing gage length, which was seen for all materials, was explained with a size effect model. The model assumed a random distribution of flaws (misaligned fibers). The toughened materials showed a small increase in strength over the baseline material for both laminates presumably due to the compensating effects of a more compliant matrix and straighter fibers in the toughened material. The hot/wet strength of the stitched and baseline material fell 30 percent below their ambient strengths for shorter, nonbuckling specimen, while the strength of the toughened matrix material only fell 20 percent. Video images of the failing specimen were recorded and showed local failures prior to global collapse of the specimen. These images support the theory of a random distribution of flaws controlling composite failure. Failed specimen appearance, however, seems to be a misleading indication of the cause of failure.

  13. General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2015-04-30

    We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In situ observation of fracture processes in high-strength concretes and limestone using high-speed X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Guo, Zherui; Hudspeth, Matthew

    The mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of geomaterials and construction materials such as concrete are reported to be dependent on the loading rates. However, the in situ cracking inside such specimens cannot be visualized using traditional optical imaging methods since the materials are opaque. In this study, the in situ sub-surface failure/damage mechanisms in Cor-Tuf (a reactive powder concrete), a high-strength concrete (HSC) and Indiana limestone under dynamic loading were investigated using high-speed synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast imaging. Dynamic compressive loading was applied using a modified Kolsky bar and fracture images were recorded using a synchronized high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging set-up.more » Three-dimensional synchrotron X-ray tomography was also performed to record the microstructure of the specimens before dynamic loading. In the Cor-Tuf and HSC specimens, two different modes of cracking were observed: straight cracking or angular cracking with respect to the direction of loading. In limestone, cracks followed the grain boundaries and voids, ultimately fracturing the specimen. Cracks in HSC were more tortuous than the cracks in Cor-Tuf specimens. The effects of the microstructure on the observed cracking behaviour are discussed. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates’.« less

  15. The Effect of Temperature on Compressive and Tensile Strengths of Commonly Used Luting Cements: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, MC Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. Materials and Methods: In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. Results: All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. Conclusion: An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures. PMID:25859100

  16. The effect of temperature on compressive and tensile strengths of commonly used luting cements: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Suneel G; Sajjan, Mc Suresh; Patil, Rekha

    2015-02-01

    The luting cements must withstand masticatory and parafunctional stresses in the warm and wet oral environment. Mouth temperature and the temperature of the ingested foods may induce thermal variation and plastic deformation within the cements and might affect the strength properties. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of temperature on the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of two polycarboxylate, a conventional glass ionomer and a resin modified glass ionomer luting cements and, to compare the compressive strength and the diametral tensile strength of the selected luting cements at varying temperatures. In this study, standardized specimens were prepared. The temperature of the specimens was regulated prior to testing them using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Six specimens each were tested at 23°C, 37°C and 50°C for both the compressive and diametral tensile strengths, for all the luting cements. All the luting cements showed a marginal reduction in their compressive and diametral tensile strengths at raised temperatures. Fuji Plus was strongest in compression, followed by Fuji I > Poly F > Liv Carbo. Fuji Plus had the highest diametral tensile strength values, followed by Poly F = Fuji I = Liv Carbo, at all temperatures. An increase in the temperature caused no significant reduction in the compressive and diametral tensile strengths of the cements evaluated. The compressive strength of the luting cements differed significantly from one another at all temperatures. The diametral tensile strength of resin modified glass ionomers differed considerably from the other cements, whereas there was no significant difference between the other cements, at all the temperatures.

  17. The Effect of Alkaline Activator Ratio on the Compressive Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymer Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lăzărescu, A. V.; Szilagyi, H.; Baeră, C.; Ioani, A.

    2017-06-01

    Alkaline activation of fly ash is a particular procedure in which ash resulting from a power plant combined with a specific alkaline activator creates a solid material when dried at a certain temperature. In order to obtain desirable compressive strengths, the mix design of fly ash based geopolymer pastes should be explored comprehensively. To determine the preliminary compressive strength for fly ash based geopolymer paste using Romanian material source, various ratios of Na2SiO3 solution/ NaOH solution were produced, keeping the fly ash/alkaline activator ratio constant. All the mixes were then cured at 70 °C for 24 hours and tested at 2 and 7 days, respectively. The aim of this paper is to present the preliminary compressive strength results for producing fly ash based geopolymer paste using Romanian material sources, the effect of alkaline activators ratio on the compressive strength and studying the directions for future research.

  18. Evaluation of shear-compressive strength properties for laminated GFRP composites in electromagnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun Hee; Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Sam Yeon

    2014-07-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composites can be applied to an insulating structure of a nuclear fusion device. It is necessary to investigate the interlaminar fracture characteristics of the laminated composites for the assurance of design and structural integrity. The three methods used to prepare the glass fiber reinforced plastic composites tested in this study were vacuum pressure impregnation, high pressure laminate (HPL), and prepreg laminate. We discuss the design criteria for safe application of composites and the shear-compressive test methods for evaluating mechanical properties of the material. Shear-compressive tests could be performed successfully using series-type test jigs that were inclined 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° to the normal axis. Shear strength depends strongly on the applied compressive stress. The design range of allowable shear stress was extended by use of the appropriate composite fabrication method. HPL had the largest design range, and the allowable interlaminar shear stress was 0.254 times the compressive stress.

  19. Bond characteristics of reinforcing steel embedded in geopolymer concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirvel, Parthiban; Thangavelu, Manju; Gopalan, Rashmi; Raja Mohan Kaliyaperumal, Saravana

    2017-07-01

    The force transferring between reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete in reinforced concrete is influenced by several factors. Whereas, the study on bond behaviour of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is lagging. In this paper, an experimental attempt has been made to evaluate the geopolymer concrete bond with reinforcing steel of different diameter and embedded length using standard pull out test. The geopolymer concrete is made of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) as geopolymer source material (GSM). The tests were conducted to evaluate the development of bond between steel and concrete of grade M40 and M50 with 12 and 16 mm diameter reinforcing steel for geopolymer and cement concrete mixes and to develop a relation between bond strength and compressive strength. From the experimental results, it has been observed that the bond strength of the geopolymer concrete mixes was more compared to the cement concrete mixes and increases with the reduction in the diameter of the bar.

  20. Fatigue Behavior of Steel Fiber Reinforced High-Strength Concrete under Different Stress Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chong; Gao, Danying; Gu, Zhiqiang

    2017-12-01

    The investigation was conducted to study the fatigue behavior of steel fiber reinforced high-strength concrete (SFRHSC) beams. A series of 5 SFRHSC beams was conducted flexural fatigue tests at different stress level S of 0.5, 0.55, 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8 respectively. Static test was conducted to determine the ultimate static capacity prior to fatigue tests. Fatigue modes and S-N curves were analyzed. Besides, two fatige life prediction model were analyzed and compared. It was found that stress level S significantly influenced the fatigue life of SFRHSC beams and the fatigue behavior of SFRHSC beams was mainly determined by the tensile reinforcement.

  1. A Study of the Efficiency of High-strength, Steel, Cellular-core Sandwich Plates in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Aldie E , Jr; Semonian, Joseph W

    1956-01-01

    Structural efficiency curves are presented for high-strength, stainless-steel, cellular-core sandwich plates of various proportions subjected to compressive end loads for temperatures of 80 F and 600 F. Optimum proportions of sandwich plates for any value of the compressive loading intensity can be determined from the curves. The efficiency of steel sandwich plates of optimum proportions is compared with the efficiency of solid plates of high-strength steel and aluminum and titanium alloys at the two temperatures.

  2. Effect Of Coir Fibres On The Compaction And Unconfined Compressive Strength Of Bentonite-Lime-Gypsum Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilak B., Vidya; Dutta, Rakesh Kumar; Mohanty, Bijayananda

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the effect of coir fibres on the compaction and unconfined compressive strength of a bentonite-lime-gypsum mixture. The coir fiber content varied from 0.5 to 2 %. The results indicated that the dry unit weight and the optimum moisture content of a bentonite - lime mix increased with the addition of gypsum. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the increase in the lime content up to 8 %. Beyond 8 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The dry unit weight of the reference mix decreased, and the optimum moisture content increased with the addition of coir fibre. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime mix increased up to 4 % with the gypsum. Beyond 4 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix increased with the addition of coir fibre up to a fibre content of 1.5 %. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix-coir fibre composite was less in comparison to the reference mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the addition of lime and gypsum and with the increase in the curing period. The improvement in the post-peak region was better for the reference mix with reinforced coir fibres as compared to the unreinforced reference mix. The improved post-peak behaviour of the bentonite-lime-gypsum-coir fibre mixture could boost the construction of temporary roads on such problematic soils. Further, its use will also provide an environmental motivation for providing a means of consuming large quantities of coir fibres.

  3. Analysis of compressive strength in flatwise and edgewise direction to characterize Al-7000 aluminium foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno, Soepriyanto, Syoni; Korda, Akhmad A.; Dirgantara, Tatacipta

    2015-09-01

    The physical mechanical properties of Al-7000 aluminium foam product and processing has been evaluated in this study. The characterization through the compressive testing refers to flatwise direction provided more confident result than edgewise direction. This experiment may correlate with formation of side products of calcia alumina and alumina silica that involved in metal mixture of aluminium foam. These compounds are formed from additional calcium carbonate and silica in the mixture. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) roles as a blowing agent source of carbon dioxide (CO2). The formation of calcia alumina (CaO.Al2O3) may role to strengthen of cell wall of aluminium foam and to improve the viscosity of melting metal. The Al-7000 aluminium foam indicated a decrease of compressive strength probably due to existence of alumina silica (3Al2O3.SiO2) in the metal mixture.

  4. Damage assessment and residual compression strength of thick composite plates with through-the-thickness reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Barry T.

    1990-01-01

    Damage in composite materials was studied with through-the-thickness reinforcements. As a first step it was necessary to develop new ultrasonic imaging technology to better assess internal damage of the composite. A useful ultrasonic imaging technique was successfully developed to assess the internal damage of composite panels. The ultrasonic technique accurately determines the size of the internal damage. It was found that the ultrasonic imaging technique was better able to assess the damage in a composite panel with through-the-thickness reinforcements than by destructively sectioning the specimen and visual inspection under a microscope. Five composite compression-after-impact panels were tested. The compression-after-impact strength of the panels with the through-the-thickness reinforcements was almost twice that of the comparable panel without through-the-thickness reinforcement.

  5. Development of maturity protocol for construction of NJDOT concrete structures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-12-01

    In-place tests can be used to estimate concrete strength during construction so that : construction operations can be performed safely or curing procedures can be terminated. : Compression tests pertaining to field cylinders do not represent the stre...

  6. A novel dentin bond strength measurement technique using a composite disk in diametral compression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Lin, Lian-Shan; Rudney, Joel; Jones, Rob; Aparicio, Conrado; Lin, Chun-Pin; Fok, Alex

    2012-04-01

    New methods are needed that can predict the clinical failure of dental restorations that primarily rely on dentin bonding. Existing methods have shortcomings, e.g. severe deviation in the actual stress distribution from theory and a large standard deviation in the measured bond strength. We introduce here a novel test specimen by examining an endodontic model for dentin bonding. Specifically, we evaluated the feasibility of using the modified Brazilian disk test to measure the post-dentin interfacial bond strength. Four groups of resin composite disks which contained a slice of dentin with or without an intracanal post in the center were tested under diametral compression until fracture. Advanced nondestructive examination and imaging techniques in the form of acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used innovatively to capture the fracture process in real time. DIC showed strain concentration first appearing at one of the lateral sides of the post-dentin interface. The appearance of the interfacial strain concentration also coincided with the first AE signal detected. Utilizing both the experimental data and finite-element analysis, the bond/tensile strengths were calculated to be: 11.2 MPa (fiber posts), 12.9 MPa (metal posts), 8.9 MPa (direct resin fillings) and 82.6 MPa for dentin. We have thus established the feasibility of using the composite disk in diametral compression to measure the bond strength between intracanal posts and dentin. The new method has the advantages of simpler specimen preparation, no premature failure, more consistent failure mode and smaller variations in the calculated bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on Energy Absorption Capacity of Steel-Polyester Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete Under Uni-axial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chella Gifta, C.; Prabavathy, S.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents the energy absorption capacity of hybrid fiber reinforced concrete made with hooked end steel fibers (0.5 and 0.75%) and straight polyester fibers (0.5, 0.8, 1.0 and 2.0%). Compressive toughness (energy absorption capacity) under uni-axial compression was evaluated on 100 × 200 mm size cylindrical specimens with varying steel and polyester fiber content. Efficiency of the hybrid fiber reinforcement is studied with respect to fiber type, size and volume fractions in this investigation. The vertical displacement under uni-axial compression was measured under the applied loads and the load-deformation curves were plotted. From these curves the toughness values were calculated and the results were compared with steel and polyester as individual fibers. The hybridization of 0.5% steel + 0.5% polyester performed well in post peak region due to the addition of polyester fibers with steel fibers and the energy absorption value was 23% greater than 0.5% steel FRC. Peak stress values were also higher in hybrid series than single fiber and based on the results it is concluded that hybrid fiber reinforcement improves the toughness characteristics of concrete without affecting workability.

  8. Effect of hydrated lime on compressive strength mortar of fly ash laterite soil geopolymer mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangsa, F. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Djamaluddin, A. R.; Muhiddin, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    This paper explored the suitability of fly ash, hydrated lime, and laterite soil with several activator (sodium hydroxide and sodium tiosulfate) to produce geopolymer mortar. Furthermore, the heat that released by hydrated lime was used instead of oven curing. In order to produce geopolymer mortar without oven curing, three variations of curing condition has been applied. Based on the result, all the curing condition showed that the hardener mortar can be produced and exhibited the increasing of compressive strength of geopolymer mortar from 3 days to 7 days without oven curing.

  9. Influence of polypropylene fibres on the tensile strength and thermal properties of various densities of foamed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhatial, Ashfaque Ahmed; Inn, Goh Wan; Mohamad, Noridah; Johnson Alengaram, U.; Mo, Kim Hung; Abdullah, Redzuan

    2017-11-01

    As almost half of the world’s population now lives in the urban areas, the raise in temperature in these areas has necessitated the development of thermal insulating material. Conventional concrete absorbs solar radiation during the daytime while releasing it at night causing raise in temperature in urban areas. The thermal conductivity of 2200 kg/m3 density conventional concrete is 1.6 W/mK. Higher the thermal conductivity value, greater the heat flow through the material. To reduce this heat transfer, the construction industry has turned to lightweight foamed concrete. Foamed concrete, due to its air voids, gives excellent thermal properties and sound absorption apart from fire-resistance and self-leveling properties. But due to limited studies on different densities of foamed concrete, the thermal properties are not understood properly thus limiting its use as thermal insulating material. In this study, thermal conductivity is determined for 1400, 1600 and 1800 kg/m3 densities of foamed concrete. 0.8% of Polypropylene fibres (PP) is used to reinforce the foamed concrete and improve the mechanical properties. Based upon the results, it was found that addition of PP fibres enhances the tensile strength and slightly reduced the thermal conductivity for lower densities, while the reverse affect was noticed in 1800 kg/m3 density.

  10. Polymer concrete reinforced with recycled-tire fibers: Mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Cruz, E.; Martínez-Barrera, G.; Martínez-López, M.

    2013-06-01

    Polymer Concrete was reinforced with recycled-tire fibers in order to improve the compressive and flexural strength. Polymer concrete specimens were prepared with 70% of silicious sand, 30% of polyester resin and various fiber concentrations (0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 vol%). The results show increment of 50% in average of the compressive and flexural strength as well as on the deformation when adding 1.2 vol% of recycled-fibers.

  11. Optimizing the use of natural gravel Brantas river as normal concrete mixed with quality fc = 19.3 Mpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limantara, A. D.; Widodo, A.; Winarto, S.; Krisnawati, L. D.; Mudjanarko, S. W.

    2018-04-01

    The use of natural gravel (rivers) as concrete mixtures is rarely encountered after days of demands for a higher strength of concrete. Moreover, today people have found High-Performance Concrete which, when viewed from the rough aggregate consisted mostly of broken stone, although the fine grain material still used natural sand. Is it possible that a mixture of concrete using natural gravel as a coarse aggregate is capable of producing concrete with compressive strength equivalent to a concrete mixture using crushed stone? To obtain information on this, a series of tests on concrete mixes with crude aggregates of Kalitelu Crusher, Gondang, Tulungagung and natural stone (river gravel) from the Brantas River, Ngujang, Tulungagung in the Materials Testing Laboratory Tugu Dam Construction Project, Kab. Trenggalek. From concrete strength test results using coarse material obtained value 19.47 Mpa, while the compressive strength of concrete with a mixture of crushed stone obtained the value of 21.12 Mpa.

  12. Comparative evaluation of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and shear bond strength of GIC type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated GIC and triclosan-incorporated GIC: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Jaidka, Shipra; Somani, Rani; Singh, Deepti J; Shafat, Shazia

    2016-04-01

    To comparatively evaluate the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX, chlorhexidine-incorporated glass ionomer cement, and triclosan-incorporated glass ionomer cement. In this study, glass ionomer cement type IX was used as a control. Chlorhexidine diacetate, and triclosan were added to glass ionomer cement type IX powder, respectively, in order to obtain 0.5, 1.25, and 2.5% concentrations of the respective experimental groups. Compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength were evaluated after 24 h using Instron Universal Testing Machine. The results obtained were statistically analyzed using the independent t-test, Dunnett test, and Tukey test. There was no statistical difference in the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement type IX (control), 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement, and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement. The present study suggests that the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and shear bond strength of 0.5% triclosan-glass ionomer cement and 0.5% chlorhexidine-glass ionomer cement were similar to those of the glass ionomer cement type IX, discernibly signifying that these can be considered as viable options for use in pediatric dentistry with the additional value of antimicrobial property along with physical properties within the higher acceptable range.

  13. Ultrasonic Monitoring of Setting and Strength Development of Ultra-High-Performance Concrete.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Doo-Yeol; Shin, Hyun-Oh; Yoon, Young-Soo

    2016-04-19

    In this study, the setting and tensile strength development of ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) at a very early age was investigated by performing the penetration resistance test (ASTM C403), as well as the direct tensile test using the newly developed test apparatus, and taking ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) measurements. In order to determine the optimum surface treatment method for preventing rapid surface drying of UHPC, four different methods were examined: plastic sheet, curing cover, membrane-forming compound, and paraffin oil. Based on the test results, the use of paraffin oil was found to be the best choice for measuring the penetration resistance and the UPV, and attaching the plastic sheet to the exposed surface was considered to be a simple method for preventing the rapid surface drying of UHPC elements. An S-shaped tensile strength development at a very early age (before 24 h) was experimentally obtained, and it was predicted by a power function of UPV. Lastly, the addition of shrinkage-reducing and expansive admixtures resulted in more rapid development of penetration resistance and UPV of UHPC.

  14. Damage Behaviors and Compressive Strength of Toughened CFRP Laminates with Thin Plies Subjected to Transverse Impact Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Aoki, Yuichiro; Ogasawara, Toshio

    It has been recognized that damage resistance and strength properties of CFRP laminates can be improved by using thin-ply prepregs. This study investigates the damage behaviors and compressive strength of CFRP laminates using thin-ply and standard prepregs subjected to out-of-plane impact loadings. CFRP laminates used for the evaluation are prepared using the standard prepregs, thin-ply prepregs, and combinations of the both. Weight-drop impact test and post-impact compression test of quasi-isotropic laminates are performed. It is shown that the damage behaviors are different between the thin-ply and the standard laminates, and the compression-after-impact strength is improved by using thin-ply prepregs. Effects of the use of thin-ply prepregs and the layout of thin-ply layers on the damage behaviors and compression-after-impact properties are discussed based on the experimental results.

  15. Long-Term Isothermal Aging Effects on Carbon Fabric-Reinforced PMR-15 Composites: Compression Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kamvouris, John E.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of long-term isothermal thermo-oxidative aging on the compressive properties of T-650-35 fabric reinforced PMR-15 composites. The temperatures that were studied were 204, 260, 288, 316, and 343 C. Specimens of different geometries were evaluated. Cut edge-to-surface ratios of 0.03 to 0.89 were fabricated and aged. Aging times extended to a period in excess of 15,000 hours for the lower temperature runs. The unaged and aged specimens were tested in compression in accordance with ASTM D-695. Both thin and thick (plasma) specimens were tested. Three specimens were tested at each time/temperature/geometry condition. The failure modes appeared to be initiated by fiber kinking with longitudinal, interlaminar splitting. In general, it appears that the thermo-oxidative degradation of the compression strength of the composite material may occur by both thermal (time-dependent) and oxidative (weight-loss) mechanisms. Both mechanisms appear to be specimen-thickness dependent.

  16. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete with demolished waste concrete aggregate and clay brick aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chaocan; Lou, Cong; Du, Geng; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Zhiwu; Li, Liqin

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the effect of the replacement of natural coarse aggregate (NCA) with either recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) or recycled clay brick aggregate (RBA) on the compressive strengths of the hardened concrete. Two grades (C25 and C50) of concrete were investigated, which were achieved by using different water-to-cement ratios. In each grade concrete five different replacement rates, 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% were considered. In order to improve the performance of the recycled aggregates in the concrete mixes, the RCA and RBA were carefully sieved by using the optimal degradation. In this way the largest reduction in the 28-day compressive strength was found to be only 7.2% and 9.6% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RCA, and 11% and 13% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RBA. In general, the concrete with RCA has better performance than the concrete with RBA. The comparison of the present experimental results with those reported in literature for hardened concrete with either RCA or RBA demonstrates the effectiveness in improving the compressive strength by using the optimal gradation of recycled aggregates.

  17. Blasted copper slag as fine aggregate in Portland cement concrete.

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos, M A G; Sales, A T C; Andrade, N

    2017-07-01

    The present work focuses on assessing the viability of applying blasted copper slag, produced during abrasive blasting, as fine aggregate for Portland cement concrete manufacturing, resulting in an alternative and safe disposal method. Leaching assays showed no toxicity for this material. Concrete mixtures were produced, with high aggregate replacement ratios, varying from 0% to 100%. Axial compressive strength, diametrical compressive strength, elastic modulus, physical indexes and durability were evaluated. Assays showed a significant improvement in workability, with the increase in substitution of fine aggregate. With 80% of replacement, the concrete presented lower levels of water absorption capacity. Axial compressive strength and diametrical compressive strength decreased, with the increase of residue replacement content. The greatest reductions of compressive strength were found when the replacement was over 40%. For tensile strength by diametrical compression, the greatest reduction occurred for the concrete with 80% of replacement. After the accelerated aging, results of mechanic properties showed a small reduction of the concrete with blasted copper slag performance, when compared with the reference mixture. Results indicated that the blasted copper slag is a technically viable material for application as fine aggregate for concrete mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of alkaliphilic biofilm-forming bacteria to improve compressive strength of cement-sand mortar.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-03-01

    The application of microorganisms in the field of construction material is rapidly increasing worldwide; however, almost all studies that were investigated were bacterial sources with mineral-producing activity and not with organic substances. The difference in the efficiency of using bacteria as an organic agent is that it could improve the durability of cement material. This study aimed to assess the use of biofilm-forming microorganisms as binding agents to increase the compressive strength of cement-sand material. We isolated 13 alkaliphilic biofilmforming bacteria (ABB) from a cement tetrapod block in the West Sea, Korea. Using 16S RNA sequence analysis, the ABB were partially identified as Bacillus algicola KNUC501 and Exiguobacterium marinum KNUC513. KNUC513 was selected for further study following analysis of pH and biofilm formation. Cement-sand mortar cubes containing KNUC513 exhibited greater compressive strength than mineral-forming bacteria (Sporosarcina pasteurii and Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403). To determine the biofilm effect, Dnase I was used to suppress the biofilm formation of KNUC513. Field emission scanning electron microscopy image revealed the direct involvement of organic-inorganic substance in cement-sand mortar.

  19. Laboratory investigation of nanomaterials to improve the permeability and strength of concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-02-01

    Concretes containing various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) such as silica fume, fly ash, and slag have improved properties. Nanomaterials (a nanometer, nm, is 10-9 m), new SCMs with possible applications in concrete, have the smallest p...

  20. Improving resistance of high strength concrete (HSC) bridge beams to frost and defrosting salt attack by application of hydrophobic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolisko, Jiri; Balík, Lukáš; Kostelecka, Michaela; Pokorný, Petr

    2017-09-01

    HSC (High Strength Concrete) is increasingly used for bearing bridge structures nowadays. Bridge structures in the Czech Republic are exposed to severe conditions in winter time and durability of the concrete is therefore a crucial requirement. The high strength and low water absorption of HSC suggests that the material will have high durability. However, the situation may not be so straightforward. We carried out a study of the very poor durability of HSC concrete C70/85 used to produce prestresed beams 37.1 m in length to build a 6-span highway bridge. After the beams were cast, a production control test indicated some problems with the durability of the concrete. There was a danger that 42 of the beams would not be suitable for use. All participants in the bridge project finally decided, after extensive discussions, to attempt to improve the durability of the concrete by applying a hydrophobic agent. Paper will present the results of comparative tests of four hydrophobic agents in order to choose one for real application and describes this application on construction site.

  1. Study on Mechanical Properties of Concrete Using Plastic Waste as an Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaivignesh, B.; Sofi, A.

    2017-07-01

    Disposal of large quantity of plastic causes land, water and air pollution etc.., so a study is conducted to recycle the plastic in concrete. This work investigates about the replacement of natural aggregate with non-biodegradable plastic aggregate made up of mixed plastic waste in concrete. Several tests are conducted such as compressive strength of cube, split tensile strength of cylinder, flexural strength test of prism to identify the properties and behavior of concrete using plastic aggregate. Replacement of fine aggregate weight by 10%, 15%, 20% with Plastic fine (PF) aggregate and for each replacement of fine aggregate 15%, 20%, 25% of coarse aggregate replacement also conducted with Plastic Coarse(PC) aggregate. In literatures reported that the addition of plastic aggregate in concrete causes the reduction of strength in concrete due to poor bonding between concrete and plastic aggregate, so addition of 0.3% of steel fiber by weight of cement in concrete is done to improve the concrete strength. Totally 60 cubes, 60 cylinders and 40 prisms are casted to identify the compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength respectively. Casted specimens are tested at 7 and 28 days. The identified results from concrete using plastic aggregate are compared with conventional concrete. Result shows that reduction in mechanical properties of plastic aggregate added concrete. This reduction in strength is mainly due to poor bond strength between cement and plastic aggregate.

  2. Determination of Uniaxial Compressive Strength of Ankara Agglomerate Considering Fractal Geometry of Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coskun, Aycan; Sonmez, Harun; Ercin Kasapoglu, K.; Ozge Dinc, S.; Celal Tunusluoglu, M.

    2010-05-01

    The uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) of rock material is a crucial parameter to be used for design stages of slopes, tunnels and foundations to be constructed in/on geological medium. However, preparation of high quality cores from geological mixtures or fragmented rocks such as melanges, fault rocks, coarse pyroclastic rocks, breccias and sheared serpentinites is often extremely difficult. According to the studies performed in literature, this type of geological materials may be grouped as welded and unwelded birmocks. Success of preparation of core samples from welded bimrocks is slightly better than unwelded ones. Therefore, some studies performed on the welded bimrocks to understand the mechanical behavior of geological mixture materials composed of stronger and weaker components (Gokceoglu, 2002; Sonmez et al., 2004; Sonmez et al., 2006; Kahraman, et al., 2008). The overall strength of bimrocks are generally depends on strength contrast between blocks and matrix; types and strength of matrix; type, size, strength, shape and orientation of blocks and volumetric block proportion. In previously proposed prediction models, while UCS of unwelded bimrocks may be determined by decreasing the UCS of matrix considering the volumetric block proportion, the welded ones can be predicted by considering both UCS of matrix and blocks together (Lindquist, 1994; Lindquist and Goodman, 1994; Sonmez et al., 2006 and Sonmez et al., 2009). However, there is a few attempts were performed about the effect of blocks shape and orientation on the strength of bimrock (Linqduist, 1994 and Kahraman, et al., 2008). In this study, Ankara agglomerate, which is composed of andesite blocks and surrounded weak tuff matrix, was selected as study material. Image analyses were performed on bottom, top and side faces of cores to identify volumetric block portions. In addition to the image analyses, andesite blocks on bottom, top and side faces were digitized for determination of fractal

  3. Strength of Perceptual Experience Predicts Word Processing Performance Better than Concreteness or Imageability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Louise; Lynott, Dermot

    2012-01-01

    Abstract concepts are traditionally thought to differ from concrete concepts by their lack of perceptual information, which causes them to be processed more slowly and less accurately than perceptually-based concrete concepts. In two studies, we examined this assumption by comparing concreteness and imageability ratings to a set of perceptual…

  4. Compressive Strength Evaluation in Brazed ZrO2/Ti6Al4V Joints Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Kee, Se Ho; Jung, Flora; Heo, Yongku; Jung, Jae Pil

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to synthesize and evaluate the compressive strength of the ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint brazed using an active metal filler Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti, and its application to dental implants assuring its reliability to resist the compressive failure in the actual oral environment. The brazing was performed at a temperature of 750 °C for 30 min in a vacuum furnace under 5 × 10-6 Torr atmosphere. The microstructure of the brazed joint showed the presence of an Ag-rich matrix and a Cu-rich phase, and Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds were observed along the Ti-6Al-4V bonded interface. The compressive strength of the brazed ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joint was measured by EN ISO 14801 standard test method. The measured compressive strength of the joint was ~1477 MPa—a value almost five times that of existing dental cements. Finite element analysis also confirmed the high von Mises stress values. The compressive strains in the samples were found concentrated near the Ti-6Al-4V position, matching with the position of the real fractured sample. These results suggest extremely significant compressive strength in ZrO2/Ti-6Al-4V joints using the Ag-Cu-Sn-Ti filler. It is believed that a highly reliable dental implant can be processed and designed using the results of this study.

  5. Comparison of compressive strength of paving block with a mixture of Sinabung ash and paving block with a mixture of lime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastuty, I. P.; Sembiringand Nursyamsi, I. S.

    2018-02-01

    Paving block is one of the material used as the top layer of road structure besides asphalt and concrete paving block is usually made of mixed material such as Portland cement or other adhesive material, water, and aggregate. People nowadays prefer paving block compared to other pavement such as concrete or asphalt. Their interest toward the use of paving block increase because paving block is an eco-friendly construction which is very useful in helping soil water conservation, can be done faster, has easier installation and maintenance, has a variety of shades that increase the aesthetic value, also costs cheaper than the other. Preparation of the specimens with a mixture of Sinabung ash and a mixture of Sinabung ash and lime are implemented with a mixture ratio of cement : sand : stone ash is 1: 2 : 3. The mixture is used as a substitute material by reducing the percentage amount of the weight of the cement with the composition ratio variation based on the comparative volume category of the paving block aggregate, i.e. 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. The result of this research shows that the maximum compressive strength value is 42.27 Mpa, it was obtained from a mixture of 10% lime with curing time 28 days. The maximum compressive strength value which is obtained from the mixture of sinabung ash is 41.60 Mpa, it was obtained from a mixture of 15% sinabung ash. From the use of these two materials, paving blocks produced are classified as paving blocks quality A and B (350 - 400 Mpa) in accordance to specification from SNI 03-0691-1996.

  6. Effect of luting cements on the compressive strength of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic copings.

    PubMed

    Al-Makramani, Bandar M A; Razak, Abdul A A; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different luting agents on the fracture strength of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic copings. Standardized metal dies were duplicated from a prepared maxillary first premolar tooth using non-precious metal alloy (Wiron 99). Thirty Turkom-Cera copings of 0.6 mm thickness were then fabricated. Three types of luting agents were used: zinc phosphate cement (Elite), glass-ionomer cement (Fuji I), and a dual-cured composite resin cement (Panavia F). Ten copings were cemented with each type. All copings were cemented to their respective dies according to manufacturer's instructions and received a static load of 5 kg for ten minutes. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the copings were vertically loaded until fracture using an Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The mode of fracture was then determined. Statistical analysis carried out using analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant differences in the compressive strength between the three groups (P<0.001). The mean fracture strength (in Newtons) of Turkom-Cera copings cemented with Elite, Fuji I, and Panavia F were 1537.4 N, 1294.4 N, and 2183.6 N, respectively. Luting agents have an influence on the fracture resistance of Turkom-Cera copings.

  7. β-tricalcium phosphate composite ceramics with high compressive strength, enhanced osteogenesis and inhibited osteoclastic activities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Lu, Teliang; He, Fupo; Xu, Yubin; Shi, Haishan; Shi, Xuetao; Zuo, Fei; Wu, Shanghua; Ye, Jiandong

    2018-04-13

    β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is well known as a resorbable bone repair material due to its inherent excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, β-TCP is encountered with osteostimulation-deficiency and poor mechanical strength because of poor sinterability. Herein, we prepared novel β-TCP composite ceramics (TCP/SPGs) by introducing strontium-containing phosphate-based glass (SPG; 45P 2 O 5 -32SrO-23Na 2 O) as sintering additive. The SPG helped to achieve efficient liquid-phase sintering of β-TCP at 1100 °C. The compressive strength of TCP/SPGs with 15 wt.% SPG (TCP/SPG15) was 2.65 times as high as that of plain β-TCP ceramic. The SPG reacted with β-TCP, and the Sr 2+ and Na 2+ from SPG replaced Ca 2+ in the lattice structure of β-TCP, enabling the sustained release of strontium from TCP/SPGs. In vitro cytological test indicated that TCP/SPGs with certain amount of SPG were highly biocompatible, and noticeably promoted osteogenesis, and inhibited osteoclastic activities. Our results suggested that the TCP/SPG15 might be potential high-strength bone grafts used for bone defect repair, especially in the osteoporotic condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Compression Strength Measurements Conducted According to ASTM E9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luecke, William E.; Ma, Li; Graham, Stephen M.; Adler, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Ten commercial laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to establish the repeatability and reproducibility of compression strength tests conducted according to ASTM International Standard Test Method E9. The test employed a cylindrical aluminum AA2024-T351 test specimen. Participants measured elastic modulus and 0.2 % offset yield strength, YS(0.2 % offset), using an extensometer attached to the specimen. The repeatability and reproducibility of the yield strength measurement, expressed as coefficient of variations were cv(sub r)= 0.011 and cv(sub R)= 0.020 The reproducibility of the test across the laboratories was among the best that has been reported for uniaxial tests. The reported data indicated that using diametrically opposed extensometers, instead of a single extensometer doubled the precision of the test method. Laboratories that did not lubricate the ends of the specimen measured yield stresses and elastic moduli that were smaller than those measured in laboratories that lubricated the specimen ends. A finite element analysis of the test specimen deformation for frictionless and perfect friction could not explain the discrepancy, however. The modulus measured from stress-strain data were reanalyzed using a technique that finds the optimal fit range, and applies several quality checks to the data. The error in modulus measurements from stress-strain curves generally increased as the fit range decreased to less than 40 % of the stress range.

  9. Numerical simulations of SHPB experiments for the dynamic compressive strength and failure of ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Charles E., Jr.; O'Donoghue, Padraic E.; Lankford, James; Walker, James D.

    1992-06-01

    Complementary to a study of the compressive strength of ceramic as a function of strain rate and confinement, numerical simulations of the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments have been performed using the two-dimensional wave propagation computer program HEMP. The numerical effort had two main thrusts. Firstly, the interpretation of the experimental data relies on several assumptions. The numerical simulations were used to investigate the validity of these assumptions. The second part of the effort focused on computing the idealized constitutive response of a ceramic within the SHPB experiment. These numerical results were then compared against experimental data. Idealized models examined included a perfectly elastic material, an elastic-perfectly plastic material, and an elastic material with failure. Post-failure material was modeled as having either no strength, or a strength proportional to the mean stress. The effects of confinement were also studied. Conclusions concerning the dynamic behavior of a ceramic up to and after failure are drawn from the numerical study.

  10. The Effect of Coloring and Compacting Pressure Paving Block by Adding 5 Wt.% Fly Ash in The Compressive Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurzal; Nursyuhada, Aries

    2017-12-01

    This research aims based on SNI 03-0691-1996 to investigate the effect of coloring and compacting pressure with the addition of 5 wt.% fly ash (Fa) on compressive strength. Fa derived from waste material coal-fired Sijantang Sawahlunto thermal power plant. The growing production of Fa caused negative environmental impact. So, one of the solutions to overcome that effects is to use the Fa as a raw material for paving block mixture that can reduce the cost of raw material and increase its strength. Paving blocks are gray and red with 0 wt.%, 5 wt.% Fa + Pb composition. Compaction pressure variations 55, 65, 75, 85 and 95 Kg/cm2. The drying time for 35 days. Specimens were produced in the form of rectangular bar (length, L = 20 cm, width, B = 10 cm, thickness, W = 6 cm). The test results showed that the addition of 5 wt% FA has a compressive strength value higher than 0 wt%. The red color has a compressive strength lower than the gray color paving block caused the red color (Iron Oxide) is less binding at the time of mixing the material. Gray and red Paving blocks both increase in each additional compaction pressure, because the higher the compaction pressure will increase the bond between the particles so porosity is reduced increased compressive strength. The overall data, the gray paving block with the composition of 5 wt% FA at compaction pressure 95 kg/cm2 with the optimal compressive strength value of 36.1 MPa and the lowest value is found in the red color paving block at 0 wt% FA at a pressure of 55 kg/cm2 with a value of 6.5 MPa. Gray and red Color paving blocks has a compressive strength quality based on SNI 03-0691-1996.

  11. Evaluation of post-fire strength of concrete flexural members reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Devon S.

    Owing to their corrosion resistance and superior strength to weight ratio, there has been, over the past two decades, increased interest in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structural members. The mechanical behavior of FRP reinforcement differs from that of steel reinforcement. For example, FRP reinforcement exhibit a linear stress-strain behavior until the bar ruptures and the strength, stiffness and bond properties of FRP reinforcement are affected more adversely by elevated temperatures. All structures are subject to the risk of damage by fire and fires continue to be a significant cause of damage to structures. Many structures do not collapse after being exposed to fire. The safety of the structure for any future use is dependent on the ability to accurately estimate the post-fire load capacity of the structure. Assuming that the changes, due to fire exposure, in the mechanical behavior of the GFRP reinforcing bar and concrete, and the bond between the reinforcing bar and the concrete are understood, an analytical procedure for estimating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete flexural elements can be developed. This thesis investigates the changes in: a) tensile properties and bond of GFRP bars; and b) the flexural behavior of GFRP reinforced concrete beams flexural after being exposed to elevated temperatures up to 400°C and cooled to ambient temperature. To this end, twelve tensile tests, twelve pullout bond tests and ten four-point beam tests were performed. The data from the tests were used to formulate analytical procedures for evaluating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete beams. The procedure produced conservative results when compared with the experimental data. In general, the residual tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of GFRP bars decrease as the exposure temperature increases. The loss in properties is however, smaller than that observed by other researchers when

  12. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  13. Effect of amorphous silica ash used as a partial replacement for cement on the compressive and flexural strengths cement mortar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Aliyu; Ibrahim, Muhammad B.; Bala, Nura

    2018-04-01

    This research is aimed at investigating the effect of using amorphous silica ash (ASA) obtained from rice husk as a partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) on the compressive and flexural strength of mortar. ASA was used in partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement in the following percentages 2.5 percent, 5 percent, 7.5 percent and 10 percent. These partial replacements were used to produce Cement-ASA mortar. ASA was found to contain all major chemical compounds found in cement with the exception of alumina, which are SiO2 (91.5%), CaO (2.84%), Fe2O3 (1.96%), and loss on ignition (LOI) was found to be 9.18%. It also contains other minor oxides found in cement. The test on hardened mortar were destructive in nature which include flexural strength test on prismatic beam (40mm x 40mm x 160mm) and compressive strength test on the cube size (40mm x 40mm, by using the auxiliary steel plates) at 2,7,14 and 28 days curing. The Cement-ASA mortar flexural and compressive strengths were found to be increasing with curing time and decreases with cement replacement by ASA. It was observed that 5 percent replacement of cement with ASA attained the highest strength for all the curing ages and all the percentage replacements attained the targeted compressive strength of 6N/mm2 for 28 days for the cement mortar

  14. The influences of calcia silica contents to the compressive strength of the Al-7000 aluminium foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno; Soepriyanto, S.; Korda, A. A.; Dirgantara, T.

    2016-08-01

    This experiment evaluated the effect of calcia alumina and alumina silica that formed as side products involved in metal mixture of aluminium foam. These compounds are formed from additional calcium carbonate and silica in the mixture. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) roles as a blowing agent source of carbon dioxide (CO2). The formation of calcia alumina (CaO.Al2O3) is desired to improve the viscosity and to strengthen of cell wall of aluminium foam. However, Al-7000 aluminium foam showed a decrease tendency of compressive strength probably due to existence of alumina silica (3Al2O3.SiO2) in the metal mixture. In this case, the silica that thermally combines with alumina compound may degrade the metal mixture of aluminium foam structure.

  15. Enhancing Ultimate Compressive Strength of Notch Embedded Steel Cylinders Using Overwrap CFRP Patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Nazari, Alireza

    2012-06-01

    In this study, the application of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) patch for strengthening of the damaged area in thin walled steel cylinders under compression loading was investigated. In this direction, some experimental tests were carried out on the selected notch induced specimens with unique diameter-to-thickness ratio (D/t). The obtained results were compared to the intact cylinder in order to find out the reduction effect of notch on the buckling load of cylinders. Following that, the notched specimens were treated using externally FRP by wrapping around the notched area and the stability strength of the retrofitted specimens was measured experimentally. The investigation was also carried out in numerical analysis using FEM in order to develop the proposed technique for determination of optimum FRP configurations and also better understanding of the experimental observations considering the nonlinear behavior and failure modes for composite member.

  16. Hot/Wet Open Hole Compression Strength of Carbon/Epoxy Laminates for Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum examines the effects of heat and absorbed moisture on the open hole compression strength of carbon/epoxy laminates with the material and layup intended for the Ares I composite interstage. The knockdown due to temperature, amount of moisture absorbed, and the interaction between these two are examined. Results show that temperature is much more critical than the amount of moisture absorbed. The environmental knockdown factor was found to be low for this material and layup and thus obtaining a statistically significant number for this value needs to be weighed against a program s cost and schedule since basis values, damage tolerance, and safety factors all contribute much more to the overall knockdown factor.

  17. Effects of different crumb rubber sizes on the flowability and compressive strength of hybrid fibre reinforced ECC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khed, Veerendrakumar C.; Mohammed, Bashar S.; Fadhil Nuruddin, Muhd

    2018-04-01

    The different sizes of crumb rubber have been used to investigate the effects on flowability and the compressive strength of the hybrid fibre reinforced engineered cementitious composite. Two sizes of crumb rubber 30 mesh and 1 to 3mm were used in partial replacement with the fine aggregate up to 60%. The experimental study was carried out through mathematical and statistical analysis by response surface methodology (RSM) using the Design Expert software. The response models have been developed and the results were validated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). It was found that finer sized crumb rubber inclusion had produced better workability and higher compressive strength when compared to the larger size and it was concluded that crumb rubber has negative effect on compressive strength and positive effect on workability. The optimization results are found to an approximately good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Dynamic shear strength of S2 glass fiber reinforced polymer composites under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fuping; Tsai, Liren; Prakash, Vikas; Dandekar, Dattatraya P.; Rajendran, A. M.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper, a series of plate impact shock-reshock and shock-release experiments were conducted to study the critical shear strength of a S2 glass fiber reinforced polymer (GRP) composite under shock compression levels ranging from 0.8 to 1.8 GPa. The GRP was fabricated at ARL, Aberdeen, using S2 glass woven roving in a Cycom 4102 polyester resin matrix. The experiments were conducted by using an 82.5 mm bore single-stage gas gun at Case Western Reserve University. In order to conduct shock-reshock and shock-release experiments a dual flyer plate assembly was utilized. The shock-reshock experiments were conducted by using a projectile faced with GRP and backed with a relatively high shock impedance Al 6061-T6 plate; while for the shock-release experiments the GRP was backed by a relatively lower impedance polymethyl methacrylate backup flyer plate. A multibeam velocity interferometer was used to measure the particle velocity profile at the rear surface of the target plate. By using self-consistent technique procedure described by Asay and Chabbildas [Shock Waves and High-Strain-Rate Phenomena, in Metals, edited by M. M. Myers and L. E. Murr (Plenum, New York, 1981), pp. 417-431], the critical shear strength of the GRP (2τc) was determined for impact stresses in the range of 0.8 to 1.8 GPa. The results show that the critical shear strength of the GRP is increased from 0.108 GPa to 0.682 GPa when the impact stress is increased from 0.8 to 1.8 GPa. The increase in critical shear strength may be attributed to rate-dependence and/or pressure dependent yield behavior of the GRP.

  19. Enhanced densification, strength and molecular mechanisms in shock compressed porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-06-01

    In most porous materials, void collapse during shock compression couples mechanical energy to thermal energy. Increased temperature drives up pressures and lowers densities in the final Hugoniot states as compared to full-density samples. Some materials, however, exhibit an anomalous enhanced densification in their Hugoniot states when porosity is introduced. We have recently shown that silicon is such a material, and demonstrated a molecular mechanism for the effect using molecular simulation. We will review results from large-scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and Hugoniotstat simulations of shock compressed porous silicon, highlighting the mechanism by which porosity produces local shear which nucleate partial phase transition and localized melting at shock pressures below typical thresholds in these materials. Further, we will characterize the stress states and strength of the material as a function of porosity from 5 to 50 percent and with various porosity microstructures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. A practical method for estimating maximum shear modulus of cemented sands using unconfined compressive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Hyunwook; Nam, Hongyeop; Lee, Woojin

    2017-12-01

    The composition of naturally cemented deposits is very complicated; thus, estimating the maximum shear modulus (Gmax, or shear modulus at very small strains) of cemented sands using the previous empirical formulas is very difficult. The purpose of this experimental investigation is to evaluate the effects of particle size and cement type on the Gmax and unconfined compressive strength (qucs) of cemented sands, with the ultimate goal of estimating Gmax of cemented sands using qucs. Two sands were artificially cemented using Portland cement or gypsum under varying cement contents (2%-9%) and relative densities (30%-80%). Unconfined compression tests and bender element tests were performed, and the results from previous studies of two cemented sands were incorporated in this study. The results of this study demonstrate that the effect of particle size on the qucs and Gmax of four cemented sands is insignificant, and the variation of qucs and Gmax can be captured by the ratio between volume of void and volume of cement. qucs and Gmax of sand cemented with Portland cement are greater than those of sand cemented with gypsum. However, the relationship between qucs and Gmax of the cemented sand is not affected by the void ratio, cement type and cement content, revealing that Gmax of the complex naturally cemented soils with unknown in-situ void ratio, cement type and cement content can be estimated using qucs.

  1. A Numerical Study on the Edgewise Compression Strength of Sandwich Structures with Facesheet-Core Disbonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Damage tolerant design approaches require determination of critical damage modes and flaw sizes in order to establish nondestructive evaluation detection requirements. A finite element model is developed to assess the effect of circular facesheet-core disbonds on the strength of sandwich specimens subjected to edgewise compressive loads for the purpose of predicting the critical flaw size for a variety of design parameters. Postbuckling analyses are conducted in which an initial imperfection is seeded using results from a linear buckling analysis. Both the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) and cohesive elements are considered for modeling disbond growth. Predictions from analyses using the VCCT and analyses using cohesive elements are in good correlation. A series of parametric analyses are conducted to investigate the effect of core thickness and material, facesheet layup, facesheet-core interface properties, and curvature on the criticality of facesheet-core disbonds of various sizes. The results from these analyses provide a basis for determining the critical flaw size for facesheet-core disbonds subjected to edgewise compression loads and, therefore, nondestructive evaluation flaw detection requirements for this configuration.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced all Lightweight Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. M.; Li, J. Y.; Zhen, Y.; Nie, Y. N.; Dong, W. L.

    2018-05-01

    In order to study the basic mechanical properties and failure characteristics of all lightweight aggregate concrete with different volume of steel fiber (0%, 1%, 2%), shale ceramsite is used as light coarse aggregate. The shale sand is made of light fine aggregate and mixed with different volume of steel fiber, and the mix proportion design of all lightweight aggregate concrete is carried out. The cubic compressive strength, axial compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting strength and modulus of elasticity of steel fiber all lightweight aggregate concrete were studied. Test results show that the incorporation of steel fiber can restrict the cracking of concrete, improve crack resistance; at the same time, it shows good plastic deformation ability and failure morphology. It lays a theoretical foundation for further research on the application of all lightweight aggregate concrete in structural systems.

  3. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  4. Comparison of low-strength compression stockings with bandages for the treatment of recalcitrant venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Brizzio, Eugenio; Amsler, Felix; Lun, Bertrand; Blättler, Werner

    2010-02-01

    To compare the proportion and rate of healing, pain, and quality of life of low-strength medical compression stockings (MCS) with traditional bandages applied for the treatment of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers. A single-center, randomized, open-label study was performed with consecutive patients. Sigvaris prototype MCS providing 15 mm Hg-25 mm Hg at the ankle were compared with multi-layer short-stretch bandages. In both groups, pads were placed above incompetent perforating veins in the ulcer area. The initial static pressure between the dressing-covered ulcer and the pad was 29 mm Hg and 49 mm Hg with MCS and bandages, respectively. Dynamic pressure measurements showed no difference. Compression was maintained day and night and changed every week. The primary endpoint was healing within 90 days. Secondary endpoints were healing within 180 days, time to healing, pain (weekly Likert scales), and monthly quality of life (ChronIc Venous Insufficiency Quality of Life [CIVIQ] questionnaire). Of 74 patients screened, 60 fulfilled the selection criteria and 55 completed the study; 28 in the MCS and 27 in the bandage group. Ulcers were recurrent (48%), long lasting (mean, 27 months), and large (mean, 13 cm2). All but one patient had deep venous reflux and/or incompetent perforating veins in addition to trunk varices. Characteristics of patients and ulcers were evenly distributed (exception: more edema in the MCS group; P = .019). Healing within 90 days was observed in 36% with MCS and in 48% with bandages (P = .350). Healing within 180 days was documented in 50% with MCS and in 67% with bandages (P = .210). Time to healing was identical. Pain scored 44 and 46 initially (on a scale in which 100 referred to maximum and 0 to no pain) and decreased within the first week to 20 and 28 in the MCS and bandage groups, respectively (P < .001 vs .010). Quality of life showed no difference between the treatment groups. In both groups, pain at 90 days had decreased by half

  5. Micro Environmental Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  6. Effect of Industrial By-Products on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Solidified Organic Marine Clayey Soils

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan-Gi; Yun, Sung-Wook; Baveye, Phillippe C.; Yu, Chan

    2015-01-01

    The use of industrial by-products as admixture to ASTM Type I cement (ordinary Portland cement (OPC)) was investigated with the objective of improving the solidification of organic marine clayey soils. The industrial by-products considered in this paper were oyster-shell powder (OSP), steelmaking slag dust (SMS) and fuel-gas-desulfurized (FGD) gypsum. The industrial by-products were added to OPC at a ratio of 5% based on dry weight to produce a mixture used to solidify organic marine clayey soils. The dosage ratios of mixtures to organic marine clayey soils were 5, 10 and 15% on a dry weight basis. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS) test after 28 days revealed that the highest strength was obtained with the OPC + SMS 15% mixing ratio. The UCS of specimens treated with this mixture was >500 kPa, compared with 300 kPa for specimens treated with a 15% OPC + OSP mixture and 200 kPa when 15% of OPC was used alone. These results were attributed to the more active hydration and pozzolanic reaction of the OPC + SMS mixture. This hypothesis was verified through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses, and was confirmed by variations in the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) content of the materials during curing. PMID:28793493

  7. Effect of microwave disinfection on compressive and tensile strengths of dental stones.

    PubMed

    Robati Anaraki, Mahmood; Moslehifard, Elnaz; Aminifar, Soran; Ghanati, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    Although microwave irradiation has been used for disinfection of dental stone casts, there are concerns regarding mechanical damage to casts during the process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave irradiation on the compressive strength (CS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) of stone casts. In this in vitro study, 80 cylindrical type III and IV stone models (20 × 40 mm) were prepared and divided into 8 groups of 10. The DTS and CS of the specimens were measured by a mechanical testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/min after 7 times of frequent wetting, irradiating at an energy level of 600 W for 3 minutes and cooling. Data were analyzed by Student's t-test. Microwave irradiation significantly increased DTS of type III and IV to 5.23 ± 0.64 and 8.17 ± 0.94, respectively (P < 0.01). According to the results, microwave disinfection increases DTS of type III and IV stone casts without any effects on their CS.

  8. Strength and Permeability Evolution of Compressed Bentonite in Response to Salinity and Temperature Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnard, B. R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Browning, J.; Cuss, R. J.; Norris, S.; Meredith, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Deep geological repositories are the preferred solution to dispose of radioactive waste; design concepts for these disposal facilities include compacted, saturated bentonite as a buffer between waste canister and host rock. Bentonite is favoured for its high swelling capacity, low permeability, and radionuclide retention properties. However, its thermo-hydro-mechanical tolerances must be thoroughly tested to ensure adequate long term performance. Climate variations are likely to induce periods of permafrost, and consequently, changes in groundwater salinity at depth. We performed laboratory experiments investigating effects of temperature and salinity change on uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), and permeability of compacted MX-80 bentonite cylinders. These specimens (moisture content = 22.9±0.1%, dry density = 1.66±0.02 g.cm-3) were compacted with deionised water, and a range of wt% NaCl, CaCl2, or KCl, to compare the effects of compaction fluid. Samples of compressed bentonite were cooled to -20 °C, and heated to 90 ºC, a possible temperature forecast for a repository dependent on factors such as geographical location, waste type, and facility design. Tests were all performed at room temperature, however in situ temperature tests are planned. The UCS of samples that experienced freeze thaw, and 40 ºC treatment failed at 6.5 MPa, with 4% strain, maintaining the same values as untreated bentonite compacted with deionised water. Samples compacted with saline solutions also yielded similar strengths, of 7 MPa, and failed at 4%. However, the 90 ºC, regardless of compaction fluid, failed at 15-18 MPa, at just 2% strain. In all experiments, the spread of strain accommodated varied inconsistently, however, peak stress was uniform. Further experiments into heterogeneity are needed to understand the responsible mechanisms. To obtain permeability, we utilised the pore pressure oscillation (PPO) technique with argon as the pore fluid. We also tested water as the pore

  9. A New Test Method for Determining the Strength and Fracture Toughness of Cement Mortar and Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Ken C; Naus, Dan J

    2010-01-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45 a pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One importantmore » characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m^(1/2).« less

  10. Developing a Material Strength Design Value Based on Compression after Impact Damage for the Ares I Composite Interstage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Jackson, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    The derivation of design values for compression after impact strength for two types of honeycomb sandwich structures are presented. The sandwich structures in this study had an aluminum core and composite laminate facesheets of either 16-ply quasi or 18-ply directional lay-ups. The results show that a simple power law curve fit to the data can be used to create A- and B-basis residual strength curves.

  11. Compressive Membrane Capability Estimates in Laterally Edge Restrained Reinforced Concrete One-Way Slabs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    by THE UNITED STATES ARMY, I DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERINGI UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY and DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ...SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING I MONITORING AG-ENCY REPORT NUMBER Department of Civil and Environmental ...LATERALLY EDGE RESTRAINED REINFORCED CONCRETE ONE-WAY SLABS Ronald Wayne Welch, Ph.D. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of

  12. Experimental evaluation and design of unfilled and concrete-filled FRP composite piles, task 6 - FRP composite pile axial compression testing.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    The overall goal of this project is the experimental evaluation and design of unfilled and concrete-filled FRP : composite piles for load-bearing in bridges. This report covers Task 6, FRP Composite Pile Axial Compression : Testing. : Hollow and conc...

  13. Variations of electric resistance and H2 and Rn emissions of concrete blocks under increasing uniaxial compression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.; Luo, G.

    1990-01-01

    Electric resistance and emissions of hydrogen and radon isotopes of concrete (which is somewhat similar to fault-zone materials) under increasing uniaxial compression were continuously monitored to check whether they show any pre- and post-failure changes that may correspond to similar changes reported for earthquakes. The results show that all these parameters generally begin to increase when the applied stresses reach 20% to 90% of the corresponding failure stresses, probably due to the occurrence and growth of dilatant microcracks in the specimens. The prefailure changes have different patterns for different specimens, probably because of differences in spatial and temporal distributions of the microcracks. The resistance shows large co-failure increases, and the gas emissions show large post-failure increases. The post-failure increase of radon persists longer and stays at a higher level than that of hydrogen, suggesting a difference in the emission mechanisms for these two kinds of gases. The H2 increase may be mainly due to chemical reaction at the crack surfaces while they are fresh, whereas the Rn increases may be mainly the result of the increased emanation area of such surfaces. The results suggest that monitoring of resistivity and gas emissions may be useful for predicting earthquakes and failures of concrete structures. ?? 1990 Birkha??user Verlag.

  14. Age- and sex-related regional compressive strength characteristics of human lumbar vertebrae in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurutz, Márta; Donáth, Judit; Gálos, Miklós; Varga, Péter; Fornet, Béla

    2008-01-01

    Objective To obtain the compressive load bearing and energy absorption capacity of lumbar vertebrae of osteoporotic elderly for the everyday medical praxis in terms of the simple diagnostic data, like computed tomography (CT), densitometry, age, and sex. Methods Compressive test of 54 osteoporotic cadaver vertebrae L1 and L2, 16 males and 38 females (age range 43–93, mean age 71.6 ± 13.3 years, mean bone mineral density (BMD) 0.377 ± 0.089 g/cm2, mean T-score −5.57 ± 0.79, Z-score −4.05 ± 0.77) was investigated. Based on the load-displacement diagrams and the measured geometrical parameters of vertebral bodies, proportional, ultimate and yield stresses and strains, Young’s modulus, ductility and energy absorption capacity were determined. Three vertebral regions were distinguished: superior, central and inferior regions, but certain parameters were calculated for the upper/ lower intermediate layers, as well. Cross-sectional areas, and certain bone tissue parameters were determined by image analysis of CT pictures of vertebrae. Sex- and age-related decline functions and trends of strength characteristics were determined. Results Size-corrected failure load was 15%–25% smaller in women, proportional and ultimate stresses were about 30%–35% smaller for women in any region, and 20%–25% higher in central regions for both sexes. Young’s moduli were about 30% smaller in women in any region, and 20%–25% smaller in the central region for both sexes. Small strains were higher in males, large strains were higher in females, namely, proportional strains were about 25% larger in men, yield and ultimate strains were quasi equal for sexes, break strains were 10% higher in women. Ultimate energy absorption capacity was 10%–20% higher in men; the final ductile energy absorption capacity was quasi equal for sexes in all levels. Age-dependence was stronger for men, mainly in central regions (ultimate load, male: r = −0.66, p < 0.01, female: r = −0.52, p

  15. An Investigation of Tendon Corrosion-Inhibitor Leakage into Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1999-07-05

    During inspections performed at US nuclear power plants several years ago, some of the prestressed concrete containment had experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler. A study was conducted to indicate the extent of the leakage into the concrete and its potential effects on concrete properties. Concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant. Examination and testing of the core samples indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the surface was due to leakage of the filler from the conduits and its subsequent migration to the concrete surface through cracks that were present. Migration of themore » tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks with no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength tests indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased relative to the strength at 28 days age.« less

  16. Use of high performance, high strength concrete (HPC) bulb-tee girders saves millions on I-10 twin span bridge in New Orleans district.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-01-01

    History: LADOTD has been gradually introducing high performance, high strength concrete into its bridge construction program. At the same time, LTRC has been sponsoring research work to address design and construction issues related to the utilizatio...

  17. Improvement of the compressive strength of a cuttlefish bone-derived porous hydroxyapatite scaffold via polycaprolactone coating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kang, Hyo Jin; Lee, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Cuttlefish bones (CBs) have emerged as attractive biomaterials because of their porous structure and components that can be converted into hydroxyapatite (HAp) via a hydrothermal reaction. However, their brittleness and low strength restrict their application in bone tissue engineering. Therefore, to improve the compressive strength of the scaffold following hydrothermal conversion to a HAp form of CB (CB-HAp), the scaffold was coated using a polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer at various concentrations. In this study, raw CB was successfully converted into HAp via a hydrothermal reaction. We then evaluated their surface properties and composition by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The CB-HAp coated with PCL showed improved compressive performance and retained a microporous structure. The compressive strength was significantly increased upon coating with 5 and 10% PCL, by 2.09- and 3.30-fold, respectively, as compared with uncoated CB-HAp. However, coating with 10% PCL resulted in a reduction in porosity. Furthermore, an in vitro biological evaluation demonstrated that MG-63 cells adhered well, proliferated and were able to be differentiated on the PCL-coated CB-HAp scaffold, which was noncytotoxic. These results suggest that a simple coating method is useful to improve the compressive strength of CB-HAp for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Benefits of aggregates surface modification in concrete production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junak, J.; Sicakova, A.

    2017-10-01

    In our study, recycled concrete aggregates (RCA), which surfaces had been modified by geopolymer material based on coal fly ash, were used to produce the concrete samples. In these samples, fraction 4/8 mm was replaced by recycled concrete aggregate with a range of 100%. To modify the surface of RCA was “Solo” and “Triple stage” modification used. On these samples real density, total water absorption and compressive strength were examined after 28, 90, 180 and 365 days of hardening. The highest compressive strength 56.8 MPa, after 365 days hardening, reached sample which had improved RCA surface by “Triple stage mixing”.

  19. Wear resistance and compression strength of ceramics tested in fluoride environments.

    PubMed

    Theodoro, Guilherme Teixeira; Fiorin, Lívia; Moris, Izabela Cristina Maurício; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria

    2017-01-01

    Dental ceramics have been widely used because of aesthetic, but wear is still questioned. There are relates that ceramic surface is prone to degradation by acidulated fluoride, that can increase wear rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of neutral and acidulated fluoride gel, used as preventive agents for professional use, at wear and compression strength of dental ceramics IPS e.max ZirPress (ZIR), IPS Empress Esthetic (EMP) e IPS Inline POM (POM). For this, 30 crowns and 30 disks were obtained by heat-pressing. Crowns and disks were submitted to two-body wear test at machine of mechanical loading, simulating occlusion, lateral movement and disocclusion. It was performed 300,000 cycles at 1Hz frequency under 20N load, to simulate 1 year of mastication. Samples were totally immersed during the test and were divided into three groups according to the gel used for immersion (n=10): control, neutral (sodium fluoride 2%) and acidulated (acidulated phosphate fluoride 1.23%). Samples (crowns and disks) were analyzed for vertical height loss after the test using, respectively, profile projector and stereomicroscope. Roughness of worn surface of crowns and disks was evaluated by laser confocal microscopy. Data of height loss and roughness were evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's test. A crown/disk of each group was analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy. After wear resistance tests, crowns were cemented to their abutments and submitted to compressive load at 30° angulation and 1mm/min speed. Type of failures was compared by qui-square test. Ceramic EMP worn less while ZIR worn more. Control gel worn more at crowns while acidulated gel worn more at disks. Surface roughness of samples tested at acidulated gel was significantly lower. Type of failures found at compression resistance tests was affected by ceramic type, but not by gel used. The results suggest that ceramic and fluoride gel affect wear and roughness of worn surface while type of

  20. Self-compacting geopolymer concrete-a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukesh Praveen, P.; Srinivasan, K.

    2017-11-01

    In this construction world, Geopolymer concrete is a special concrete which doesn’t requires the Ordinary Portland Cement and also reduces the emission of carbon-dioxide. The Geopolymer Concrete is made up of industrial by-products (which contains more Silica and Alumina) and activated with the help of Alkaline solution (combination of sodium hydroxide & sodium silicate or potassium hydroxide & potassium silicate). The high viscosity nature of Geopolymer Concrete had the ability to fail due to lack of compaction. In improvising the issue, Self Compacting Geopolymer Concrete has been introduced. The SCGC doesn’t require any additional compaction it will flow and compacted by its own weight. This concrete is made up of industrial by-products like Fly ash, GGBFS and Silica Fume and activated with alkaline solution. The earlier research was mostly on Fly ash based SCGC. In few research works Fly ash was partially replaced with GGBS and Silica Fume. They evaluated the compressive strength of concrete with varying molarities of NaOH; curing time and curing temperature. The flexural behaviour of the concrete also examined. The Fly ash based SCGC was got high compressive strength in heat curing as well as low compressive strength in ambient curing. The presence of GGBS improves the strength in ambient curing. For aiming the high strength in ambient curing Fly ash will be completely replace and examine with different mineral admixtures.

  1. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2015-01-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m3 of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m3 of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96–100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m3 of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water. PMID:26862577

  2. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2016-03-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m(3) of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m(3) of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96-100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m(3) of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water.

  3. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Khrystyna; Markiv, Taras; Hunyak, Oleksii

    2017-12-01

    Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  4. Shear strength of a PCBT-53 girder fabricated with lightweight self-consolidating concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight self-consolidating concrete (LWSCC) is advantageous in the bridge industry because members fabricated with this material have a significantly lower self weight and in its fresh state, LWSCC has a low viscosity that eliminates the need for...

  5. Investigation of transfer length, development length, flexural strength, and prestress losses in lightweight prestressed concrete girders.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-01-01

    Encouraged by the performance of high performance normal weight composite girders, the Virginia Department of Transportation has sought to exploit the use of high performance lightweight composite concrete (HPLWC) girders to achieve economies brought...

  6. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strainsmore » due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.« less

  7. Utilisation of Waste Marble Dust as Fine Aggregate in Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshpandian, G. V.; Aparna Shruthi, E.; Venkatasubramanian, C.; Muthu, D.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete is the important construction material and it is used in the construction industry due to its high compressive strength and its durability. Now a day’s various studies have been conducted to make concrete with waste material with the intention of reducing cost and unavailability of conventional materials. This paper investigates the strength properties of concrete specimens cast using waste marble dust as replacement of fine aggregate. The marble pieces are finely crushed to powdered and the gradation is compared with conventional fine aggregate. Concrete specimen were cast using wmd in the laboratory with different proportion (25%, 50% and 100%) by weight of cement and from the studies it reveals that addition of waste marble dust as a replacement of fine aggregate marginally improves compressive, tensile and flexural strength in concrete.

  8. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Moćko, Wojciech; Fenu, Luigi; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1) and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  9. Correlation between structure and compressive strength in a reticulated glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite foam.

    PubMed

    Callcut, S; Knowles, J C

    2002-05-01

    Glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite (HA) foams were produced using reticulated foam technology using a polyurethane template with two different pore size distributions. The mechanical properties were evaluated and the structure analyzed through density measurements, image analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the mechanical properties, the use of a glass significantly improved the ultimate compressive strength (UCS) as did the use of a second coating. All the samples tested showed the classic three regions characteristic of an elastic brittle foam. From the density measurements, after application of a correction to compensate for the closed porosity, the bulk and apparent density showed a 1 : 1 correlation. When relative bulk density was plotted against UCS, a non-linear relationship was found characteristic of an isotropic open celled material. It was found by image analysis that the pore size distribution did not change and there was no degradation of the macrostructure when replicating the ceramic from the initial polyurethane template during processing. However, the pore size distributions did shift to a lower size by about 0.5 mm due to the firing process. The ceramic foams were found to exhibit mechanical properties typical of isotropic open cellular foams.

  10. Roughness and compressive strength of FDM 3D printed specimens affected by acetone vapour treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniak, Juraj; Križan, Peter; Šooš, Ľubomír; Matúš, Miloš

    2018-01-01

    Rapid Prototyping technologies are the fastest growing technologies in the manufacturing of components and parts. There are many techniques which can be used with different materials and different purposes of produced part. Gradually, Rapid Prototyping systems have grown into Additive Manufacturing, because technology expansion brings faster production, improved manufactured components, and expanded palette of used materials. So now this techniques are also used for regular production of special parts, where is usual change of part design, where is necessary to produce variety of different designs and shapes. The following article deals with Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) technology, the core of which is the manufacture models and components from thermoplastic polymers by deposition single fibres of semi-molten plastic material layer by layer. The article focuses on the results of research for testing of manufactured specimens by FDM technology. Components are modified by acetone vapour for surface smoothing. The purpose is to point out how the additional specimen treatment influence the strength properties. Presented paper shows realized experiments and measurements of compressive force on specimens and surface roughness which are influenced by acetone vapour treatment.

  11. Strength of mortar containing rubber tire particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusoh, M. A.; Abdullah, S. R.; Adnan, S. H.

    2018-04-01

    The main focus in this investigation is to determine the strength consist compressive and tensile strength of mortar containing rubber tire particle. In fact, from the previous study, the strength of mortar containing waste rubber tire in mortar has a slightly decreases compare to normal mortar. In this study, rubber tire particle was replacing on volume of fine aggregate with 6%. 9% and 12%. The sample were indicated M0 (0%), M6 (6%), M9 (9%) and M12 (12%). In this study, two different size of sample used with cube 100mm x 100mm x 100mm for compressive strength and 40mm x 40mm x 160mm for flexural strength. Morphology test was conducted by using Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) were done after testing compressive strength test. The concrete sample were cured for day 3, 7 and 28 before testing. Results compressive strength and flexural strength of rubber mortar shown improved compare to normal mortar.

  12. Equipment and Protocols for Quasi-Static and Dynamic Tests of Very-High-Strength Concrete (VHSC) and High-Strength High-Ductility Concrete (HSHDC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    quasi -static mechanical properties, deformation behavior, and damage mechanisms in HSHDC and compare the behavior with VHSC. 2. Develop experimental ...using the experimental setup described in Chapter 6. The quasi -static strain rate was approximately 10-4/s. All panels tested have nominal dimensions...ER D C TR -1 6- 13 Force Protection Basing; TeCD 1a Equipment and Protocols for Quasi -Static and Dynamic Tests of Very-High-Strength

  13. The effect of shredding and test apparatus size on compressibility and strength parameters of degraded municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M S; Gabr, M A; Asce, F

    2009-09-01

    In many situations, MSW components are processed and shredded before use in laboratory experiments using conventional soil testing apparatus. However, shredding MSW material may affect the target property to be measured. The objective of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the effect of shredding of MSW on the measured compressibility and strength properties. It is hypothesized that measured properties can be correlated to an R-value, the ratio of waste particle size to apparatus size. Results from oedometer tests, conducted on 63.5 mm, 100 mm, 200 mm diameter apparatus, indicated the dependency of the compressibility parameters on R-value. The compressibility parameters are similar for the same R-value even though the apparatus size varies. The results using same apparatus size with variable R-values indicated that shredding of MSW mainly affects initial compression. Creep and biological strain rate of the tested MSW are not significantly affected by R-value. The shear strength is affected by shredding as the light-weight reinforcing materials are shredded into smaller pieces during specimen preparation. For example, the measured friction angles are 32 degrees and 27 degrees for maximum particle sizes of 50 mm and 25 mm, respectively. The larger MSW components in the specimen provide better reinforcing contribution. This conclusion is however dependent on comparing specimen at the same level of degradation since shear strength is also a function of extent of degradation.

  14. Durability of coconut shell powder (CSP) concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leman, A. S.; Shahidan, S.; Senin, M. S.; Shamsuddin, S. M.; Anak Guntor, N. A.; Zuki, S. S. Mohd; Khalid, F. S.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Razak, N. H. S.

    2017-11-01

    The rising cost of construction in developing countries like Malaysia has led concrete experts to explore alternative materials such as coconut shells which are renewable and possess high potential to be used as construction material. Coconut shell powder in varying percentages of1%, 3% and 5% was used as filler material in concrete grade 30 and evaluated after a curing period of 7 days and 28days respectively. Compressive strength, water absorption and carbonation tests were conducted to evaluate the strength and durability of CSP concrete in comparison with normal concrete. The test results revealed that 1%, 3% and 5% of CSP concrete achieved a compressive strength of 47.65 MPa, 45.6 MPa and 40.55% respectively. The rate of water absorption of CSP concrete was recorded as 3.21%, 2.47%, and 2.73% for 1%, 3% and 5% of CSP concrete respectively. Although CSP contained a carbon composition of 47%, the carbonation test showed that CSP no signs of carbon were detected inside the concrete. To conclude, CSP offers great prospects as it demonstrated relatively high durability as a construction material.

  15. Non-Destructive Assessment of Residual Strength of Thermally Damaged Concrete Made with Different Aggregate Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mróz, Katarzyna; Hager, Izabela

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results obtained for four concretes made with four different aggregate types: basalt, granite, dolomite and riverbed gravel. In this study, the cement paste and mortar compositions and their volumes remained the same for all the four concretes that allow clear comparisons and conclusions of aggregate type effect. Moreover, the aggregate particle size distribution is chosen to be quasi identical for all concretes so that this factor does not affect the concrete behaviour. The residual material properties (after heating and cooling down) are determined with the use of destructive and non-destructive testing methods for each concrete type being not thermally damaged and after thermal exposure at temperature of 200 °C. 400 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C and 1000 °C. Residual mechanical properties are compared with diagnostic parameters obtained with NDT methods. The aim of this study is to provide and compare the regression curves between selected non-destructive diagnostic parameters and the residual values of mechanical properties. The NDT methods used in this experiment are: surface hardness and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity.

  16. Strength resistance of reinforced concrete elements of high-rise buildings under dynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlinov, Mikhail

    2018-03-01

    A new method for calculating reinforced concrete constructions of high-rise buildings under dynamic loads from wind, seismic, transport and equipment based on the initial assumptions of the modern phenomenological theory of a nonlinearly deformable elastic-creeping body is proposed. In the article examined the influence of reinforcement on the work of concrete in the conditions of triaxial stress-strain state, based on the compatibility of the deformation of concrete and reinforcement. Mathematical phenomenological equations have been obtained that make it possible to calculate the reinforced concrete elements working without and with cracks. A method for linearizing of these equations based on integral estimates is proposed, which provides the fixation of the vibro-creep processes in the considered period of time. Application of such a technique using the finite-difference method, step method and successive approximations will allow to find a numerical solution of the problem. Such an approach in the design of reinforced concrete constructions will allow not only more fully to take into account the real conditions of their work, revealing additional reserves of load capacity, but also to open additional opportunities for analysis and forecasting their functioning at various stages of operation.

  17. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    PubMed

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-06-11

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding.

  19. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding.

  20. The effects of boric acid and phosphoric acid on the compressive strength of glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Leon H; Tyas, Martin J; Burrow, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Both boric acid (H3BO3) and phosphoric acid (H3PO4) are components of dental cements, commonly incorporated into glass (as ingredients in the melt) and occasionally added to the powder or liquid components. This study investigated the effect of boric acid addition to an experimental glass-ionomer powder and the effect of phosphoric acid addition to a glass-ionomer liquid on the 24-h compressive strength. Boric acid powder was added in various concentrations to an experimental glass-ionomer powder and, separately, phosphoric acid was added to an experimental glass-ionomer liquid. Powders and liquids were dosed into capsules at various powder:liquid ratios and cements thus formed were assessed for 24-h compressive strength. Incorporation of boric acid in glass-ionomer powder resulted in a pronounced decrease (p < 0.05 at 1% boric acid) in compressive strength. Addition of phosphoric acid produced initially stronger cements (up to 13% increase at 1% phosphoric acid) before also declining. The incorporation of less than 2% w/w phosphoric acid in glass-ionomer liquids may improve cement strengths without compromising clinical usefulness. The incorporation of boric acid in glass-ionomer cements is contraindicated.

  1. In-Situ Welding Carbon Nanotubes into a Porous Solid with Super-High Compressive Strength and Fatigue Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; Gui, Xuchun; Gan, Qiming; Chen, Wenjun; Cheng, Xiaoping; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yang, Yanbing; Cao, Anyuan; Tang, Zikang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) and graphene-based sponges and aerogels have an isotropic porous structure and their mechanical strength and stability are relatively lower. Here, we present a junction-welding approach to fabricate porous CNT solids in which all CNTs are coated and welded in situ by an amorphous carbon layer, forming an integral three-dimensional scaffold with fixed joints. The resulting CNT solids are robust, yet still highly porous and compressible, with compressive strengths up to 72 MPa, flexural strengths up to 33 MPa, and fatigue resistance (recovery after 100,000 large-strain compression cycles at high frequency). Significant enhancement of mechanical properties is attributed to the welding-induced interconnection and reinforcement of structural units, and synergistic effects stemming from the core-shell microstructures consisting of a flexible CNT framework and a rigid amorphous carbon shell. Our results provide a simple and effective method to manufacture high-strength porous materials by nanoscale welding. PMID:26067176

  2. Analysis of acoustic emission cumulative signal strength of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Hakeem, Z.; Noorsuhada, M. N.; Azmi, I.; Noor Syafeekha, M. S.; Soffian Noor, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated using acoustic emission (AE) technique. Three beams with dimension of 150 mm width, 200 mm depth and 1500 mm length were fabricated. The results generated from AE parameters were analysed as well as signal strength and cumulative signal strength. Three relationships were produced namely load versus deflection, signal strength versus time and cumulative signal strength with respect to time. Each relationship indicates significant physical behaviour as the crack propagated in the beams. It is found that an addition of steel fibre in the concrete mix and strengthening of CFRP increase the ultimate load of the beam and the activity of signal strength. Moreover, the highest signal strength generated can be identified. From the study, the occurrence of crack in the beam can be predicted using AE signal strength.

  3. Strength and durability studies on concrete with partial replacement over burnt brick bat waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchidurai, S.; Bharani, G.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the partial and complete replacement of over burnt brick bat (OBB) 20-30mm as coarse aggregate in the concrete. OBB are formed at extreme heating to a temperature not less than 1600 degree Celsius. The burnt bricks change from red to blue-black ceramics color. The series of tests are conducted to study the effect of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% replacement of coarse aggregate with over burnt bricks. Totally 36numbers of 150mm concrete cube with 5 different percentage replacement mix are cast and tested and three numbers of the flexural beam. In durability aspects, water absorption and sorptivity were tested. Experimental results found 25-50% of overburnt brick bat wastes can be replaced with the normal and mass concrete without quality compromisation.

  4. An Experimental Investigation on the Effect of Addition of Ternary Blend on the Mix Design Characteristics of High Strength Concrete using Steel Fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Deepa A., Dr; Verma, A. K., Dr

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the results of M60 grade of concrete. M60 grade of concrete is achieved by maximum density technique. Concrete is brittle and weak in tension and develops cracks during curing and due to thermal expansion / contraction over a period ot time. Thus the effect of addition of 1% steel fibre is studied. For ages, concrete has been one of the widely used materials for construction. When cement is manufactured, every one ton of cement produces around one ton of carbon dioxide leading to global warming and also as natural resources are finishing, so use of supplementary cementitious material like alccofine and flyash is used as partial replacement of cement is considered. The effect of binary and ternary blend on the strength characteristics is studied. The results indicate that the concrete made with alccofine and flyash generally show excellent fresh and hardened properties. The ternary system that is Portland cement-fly ash-Alccofine concrete was found to increase the strength of concrete when compared to concrete made with Portland cement or even from Portland cement and fly ash.

  5. In situ micropillar compression reveals superior strength and ductility but an absence of damage in lamellar bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Raghavan, Rejin; Bürki, Alexander; Lenader, Victor; Wolfram, Uwe; Michler, Johann; Zysset, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Ageing societies suffer from an increasing incidence of bone fractures. Bone strength depends on the amount of mineral measured by clinical densitometry, but also on the micromechanical properties of the hierarchical organization of bone. Here, we investigate the mechanical response under monotonic and cyclic compression of both single osteonal lamellae and macroscopic samples containing numerous osteons. Micropillar compression tests in a scanning electron microscope, microindentation and macroscopic compression tests were performed on dry ovine bone to identify the elastic modulus, yield stress, plastic deformation, damage accumulation and failure mechanisms. We found that isolated lamellae exhibit a plastic behaviour, with higher yield stress and ductility but no damage. In agreement with a proposed rheological model, these experiments illustrate a transition from a ductile mechanical behaviour of bone at the microscale to a quasi-brittle response driven by the growth of cracks along interfaces or in the vicinity of pores at the macroscale.

  6. A Unified Model for Predicting the Open Hole Tensile and Compressive Strengths of Composite Laminates for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Paul; Pineda, Evan J.; Heinrich, Christian; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The open hole tensile and compressive strengths are important design parameters in qualifying fiber reinforced laminates for a wide variety of structural applications in the aerospace industry. In this paper, we present a unified model that can be used for predicting both these strengths (tensile and compressive) using the same set of coupon level, material property data. As a prelude to the unified computational model that follows, simplified approaches, referred to as "zeroth order", "first order", etc. with increasing levels of fidelity are first presented. The results and methods presented are practical and validated against experimental data. They serve as an introductory step in establishing a virtual building block, bottom-up approach to designing future airframe structures with composite materials. The results are useful for aerospace design engineers, particularly those that deal with airframe design.

  7. Mechanical Performance Test of Rubber-Powder Modified Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan Cong; Gao, Ling Ling

    2018-06-01

    A number of rubber cement concrete specimens that rubber powder dosage different were obtained using same cement, water and fine aggregates, by adjusting the dosage of rubber powder. Then it was used to research the influence of rubber powder dosage on performance of cement concrete by measuring its liquidity, strength and toughness. The results show that: when water-cement ratio was equal and rubber powder replacing the same volume sand, the fluidity of cement concrete almost linear increased with rubber powder dosage increasing. With dosage of rubber powder increasing, compressive strength and flexural strength reduced, but toughness linear growth trend when dosage of rubber powder less 30%.

  8. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  9. Study of the strength of molybdenum under high pressure using electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jow; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James

    2015-06-01

    MAPS (Magnetically Applied Pressure Shear) is a new technique that has the potential to study material strength under mega-bar pressures. By applying a mixed-mode pressure-shear loading and measuring the resultant material responses, the technique provides explicit and direct information on material strength under high pressure. In order to apply sufficient shear traction to the test sample, the driver must have substantial strength. Molybdenum was selected for this reason along with its good electrical conductivity. In this work, the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under MAPS loading was studied. To understand the experimental data, a viscoplasticity model with tension-compression asymmetry was also developed. Through a combination of experimental characterization, model development, and numerical simulation, many unique insights were gained on the inelastic behavior of molybdenum such as the effects of strength on the interplay between longitudinal and shear stresses, potential interaction between the magnetic field and molybdenum strength, and the possible tension-compression asymmetry of the inelastic material response. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Haemodynamic Performance of Low Strength Below Knee Graduated Elastic Compression Stockings in Health, Venous Disease, and Lymphoedema.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, C R; Kalodiki, E; Azzam, M; Geroulakos, G

    2016-07-01

    To test the in vivo haemodynamic performance of graduated elastic compression (GEC) stockings using air-plethysmography (APG) in healthy volunteers (controls) and patients with varicose veins (VVs), post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), or lymphoedema. Responsiveness data were used to determine which group benefited the most from GEC. There were 12 patients per group compared using no compression, knee-length Class 1 (18-21 mmHg) compression, and Class 2 (23-32 mmHg) compression. Stocking/leg interface pressures (mmHg) were measured supine in two places using an air-sensor transducer. Stocking performance parameters, investigated before and after GEC, included the standard APG tests (working venous volume [wVV], venous filling index [VFI], venous drainage index [VDI], ejection fraction [EF]) and the occlusion plethysmography tests (incremental pressure causing the maximal increase in calf volume [IPMIV], outflow fraction [OF]). Results were expressed as median and interquartile range. Significant graduated compression was achieved in all four groups with higher interface pressures at the ankle. Only the VVs patients had a significant reduction in their wVV (without: 133 [109-146] vs. class1: 93 [74-113] mL) and the VFI (without: 4.6 [3-7.1] vs. class1: 3.1 [1.9-5] mL/s), both at p <.05. The IPMIV improved significantly in all groups except in the PTS group (p <.05). The OF improved only in the controls (without: 43 [38-51] vs. class1: 50 [48-53] %) and the VVs patients (without: 47 [39-58] vs. class1: 56 [50-64] %), both at p <.05. There were no significant differences in the VDI or the EF with GEC. Compression dose-response relationships were not observed. Patients with varicose veins improved the most, whereas those with PTS improved the least. Performance seemed to depend more on disease pathophysiology than compression strength. However, the lack of responsiveness to compression strength may be related to the low external pressures used. Stocking performance tests

  11. An in vitro study to compare the transverse strength of thermopressed and conventional compression-molded polymethylmethacrylate polymers.

    PubMed

    Raut, Anjana; Rao, Polsani Laxman; Vikas, B V J; Ravindranath, T; Paradkar, Archana; Malakondaiah, G

    2013-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been in the center stage of Prosthodontics for more than half a century. The flexural fatigue failure of denture base materials is the primary mode of clinical failure. Hence there is a need for superior physical and mechanical properties. This in vitro study compared the transverse strength of specimens of thermopressed injection-molded and conventional compression-molded polymethylmethacrylate polymers and examined the morphology and microstructure of fractured acrylic specimens. The following denture base resins were examined: Brecrystal (Thermopressed injection-molded, modified polymethylmethacrylate) and Pyrax (compression molded, control group). Specimens of each material were tested according to the American Society for Testing and Materials standard D790-03 for flexural strength testing of reinforced plastics and subsequently examined under SEM. The data was analyzed with Student unpaired t test. Flexural strength of Brecrystal (82.08 ± 1.27 MPa) was significantly higher than Pyrax (72.76 ± 0.97 MPa). The tested denture base materials fulfilled the requirements regarding flexural strength (>65 MPa). The scanning electron microscopy image of Brecrystal revealed a ductile fracture with crazing. The fracture pattern of control group specimens exhibited poorly defined crystallographic planes with a high degree of disorganization. Flexural strength of Brecrystal was significantly higher than the control group. Brecrystal showed a higher mean transverse strength value of 82.08 ± 1.27 MPa and a more homogenous pattern at microscopic level. Based on flexural strength properties and handling characteristics, Brecrystal may prove to be an useful alternative to conventional denture base resins.

  12. Effects of Texture and Grain Size on the Yield Strength of ZK61 Alloy Rods Processed by Cyclic Extrusion and Compression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Wencong; Cao, Biao; Chen, Wenzhen; Duan, Junpeng; Cui, Guorong

    2017-01-01

    The ZK61 alloy rods with different grain sizes and crystallographic texture were successfully fabricated by cyclic extrusion and compression (CEC). Their room-temperature tension & compression yield strength displayed a significant dependence on grain size and texture, essentially attributed to {10-12} twinning. The texture variations were characterized by the angle θ between the c-axis of the grain and the extrusion direction (ED) during the process. The contour map of room-temperature yield strength as a function of grain size and the angle θ was obtained. It showed that both the tension yield strength and the compression yield strength of ZK61 alloy were fully consistent with the Hall-Patch relationship at a certain texture, but the change trends of the tension yield strength and the compression yield strength were completely opposite at the same grain size while texture altered. The friction stresses of different deformation modes calculated based on the texture confirmed the tension yield strength of the CECed ZK61 alloy rods, which was determined by both the basal slip and the tension twinning slip during the tension deformation at room temperature, while the compression yield strength was mainly determined by the basal slip during the compression deformation. PMID:29072616

  13. Experimental study on the performance of pervious concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haojie; Liu, Rentai; Yang, Honglu; Ma, Chenyang; Zhou, Heng

    2018-02-01

    With the construction of sponge city, the pervious concrete material has been developed rapidly. A high-performance pervious concrete is developed by using cement, silica fume (SF) and superplasticizer (SP). The effects of SF, SP, aggregate size, water-cement ration and aggregate-cement ratio on the permeability coefficient, compressive strength and flexural strength are studied by controlling variables, and exploring the corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance of pervious concrete. The results show that using 0.5% SP, 5% SF and small aggregate can greatly improve the strength. There is an optimum value for water-cement ratio to make the strength and permeability coefficient maximum. Compared to ordinary pervious concrete, the corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance of this pervious concrete are very good.

  14. Performance of Kaolin Clay on the Concrete Pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. E.; Jaya, R. P.; Shahafuddin, M. N. A.; Yaacob, H.; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan; Nazri, F. M.; Ramli, N. I.; Mohammed, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the performance of concrete pavement containing kaolin clay with their engineering properties and to determine the optimum kaolin clay content. The concrete used throughout the study was designed as grade 30 MPa strength with constant water to cement ratio of 0.49. The compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption test was conducted in this research. The concrete mix designed with kaolin clay as cement replacement comprises at 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% by the total weight of cement. The results indicate that the strength of pavement concrete decreases as the percentage of kaolin clay increases. It also shows that the water absorption increases with the percentage of cement replacement. However, 5% kaolin clay is found to be the optimum level to replace cement in a pavement concrete.

  15. High performance concrete bridges

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-08-01

    This compilation of FHWA reports focuses on high performance concrete bridges. High performance concrete is described as concrete with enhanced durability and strength characteristics. Under the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP), more than 40...

  16. Effects of Medium Temperature and Industrial By-Products on the Key Hardened Properties of High Performance Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Safiuddin, Md.; Raman, Sudharshan N.; Zain, Muhammad Fauzi Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work reported in this article was to investigate the effects of medium temperature and industrial by-products on the key hardened properties of high performance concrete. Four concrete mixes were prepared based on a water-to-binder ratio of 0.35. Two industrial by-products, silica fume and Class F fly ash, were used separately and together with normal portland cement to produce three concrete mixes in addition to the control mix. The properties of both fresh and hardened concretes were examined in the laboratory. The freshly mixed concrete mixes were tested for slump, slump flow, and V-funnel flow. The hardened concretes were tested for compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity after exposing to 20, 35 and 50 °C. In addition, the initial surface absorption and the rate of moisture movement into the concretes were determined at 20 °C. The performance of the concretes in the fresh state was excellent due to their superior deformability and good segregation resistance. In their hardened state, the highest levels of compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity were produced by silica fume concrete. In addition, silica fume concrete showed the lowest level of initial surface absorption and the lowest rate of moisture movement into the interior of concrete. In comparison, the compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, initial surface absorption, and moisture movement rate of silica fume-fly ash concrete were close to those of silica fume concrete. Moreover, all concretes provided relatively low compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity when they were exposed to 50 °C. However, the effect of increased temperature was less detrimental for silica fume and silica fume-fly ash concretes in comparison with the control concrete. PMID:28793732

  17. Effects of Medium Temperature and Industrial By-Products on the Key Hardened Properties of High Performance Concrete.

    PubMed

    Safiuddin, Md; Raman, Sudharshan N; Zain, Muhammad Fauzi Mohd

    2015-12-10

    The aim of the work reported in this article was to investigate the effects of medium temperature and industrial by-products on the key hardened properties of high performance concrete. Four concrete mixes were prepared based on a water-to-binder ratio of 0.35. Two industrial by-products, silica fume and Class F fly ash, were used separately and together with normal portland cement to produce three concrete mixes in addition to the control mix. The properties of both fresh and hardened concretes were examined in the laboratory. The freshly mixed concrete mixes were tested for slump, slump flow, and V-funnel flow. The hardened concretes were tested for compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity after exposing to 20, 35 and 50 °C. In addition, the initial surface absorption and the rate of moisture movement into the concretes were determined at 20 °C. The performance of the concretes in the fresh state was excellent due to their superior deformability and good segregation resistance. In their hardened state, the highest levels of compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity were produced by silica fume concrete. In addition, silica fume concrete showed the lowest level of initial surface absorption and the lowest rate of moisture movement into the interior of concrete. In comparison, the compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, initial surface absorption, and moisture movement rate of silica fume-fly ash concrete were close to those of silica fume concrete. Moreover, all concretes provided relatively low compressive strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity when they were exposed to 50 °C. However, the effect of increased temperature was less detrimental for silica fume and silica fume-fly ash concretes in comparison with the control concrete.

  18. Mechanical properties and durability of crumb rubber concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chylík, Roman; Trtík, Tomáš; Fládr, Josef; Bílý, Petr

    2017-09-01

    This paper is focused on concrete with admixture of rubber powder, generally called crumb rubber concrete (CRC). The inspiration was found in Arizona, where one of the first CRCs has been created. However, Arizona has completely different climates than Central Europe. Could we use the crumb rubber concrete on construction applications in the Central European climate too? The paper evaluates the influence of the rubber powder on material characteristics and durability of CRC. CRCs with various contents of fine and coarse crumb powder were compared. The tested parameters were slump, air content, permeability, resistance of concrete to water with deicing chemicals, compressive and splitting tensile strength. The tests showed that workability, compressive strength and permeability decreased as the amount of rubber increased, but the air content increased as the rubber content increased. Photos of air voids in cement matrix from electron microscope were captured. The results of laboratory tests showed that admixture of rubber powder in concrete could have a positive impact on durability of concrete and concurrently contribute to sustainable development. Considering the lower compressive strength, CRC is recommended for use in applications where the high strength of concrete is not required.

  19. Thermal stress control using waste steel fibers in massive concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabi, Sahar; Bakhshi, Hossein; Sarkardeh, Hamed; Nikoo, Hamed Safaye

    2017-11-01

    One of the important subjects in massive concrete structures is the control of the generated heat of hydration and consequently the potential of cracking due to the thermal stress expansion. In the present study, using the waste turnery steel fibers in the massive concretes, the amount of used cement was reduced without changing the compressive strength. By substituting a part of the cement with waste steel fibers, the costs and the generated hydration heat were reduced and the tensile strength was increased. The results showed that by using 0.5% turnery waste steel fibers and consequently, reducing to 32% the cement content, the hydration heat reduced to 23.4% without changing the compressive strength. Moreover, the maximum heat gradient reduced from 18.5% in the plain concrete sample to 12% in the fiber-reinforced concrete sample.

  20. Design of high-performance concrete mixtures and test beams for a bridge in Virginia.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop concretes with a compressive strength of 69 to 83 MPa (10,000 to 12,000 psi) at 28 days and a high early release strength (within 20 hr) exceeding 70% of the 28-day strength. The properties of the high-...