Science.gov

Sample records for condensed matter applications

  1. Holographic Geometries for Condensed Matter Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, V.; Thorlacius, L.

    2015-01-01

    Holographic modeling of strongly correlated many-body systems motivates the study of novel spacetime geometries where the scaling behavior of quantum critical systems is encoded into spacetime symmetries. Einstein-Dilaton-Maxwell theory has planar black brane solutions that exhibit Lifshitz scaling and in some cases hyperscaling violation. Entanglement entropy and Wilson loops in the dual field theory are studied by inserting simple geometric probes involving minimal surfaces into the black brane geometry. Coupling to background matter fields leads to interesting low-energy behavior in holographic models, such as U(1) symmetry breaking and emergent Lifshitz scaling.

  2. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  3. Condensed Matter Applications of Quantum Monte Carlo at the Petascale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, David

    2014-03-01

    Applications of the Quantum Monte Carlo method have a number of advantages allowing them to be useful for high performance computation. The method scales well in particle number, can treat complex systems with weak or strong correlation including disordered systems, and large thermal and zero point effects of the nuclei. The methods are adaptable to a variety of computer architectures and have multiple parallelization strategies. Most errors are under control so that increases in computer resources allow a systematic increase in accuracy. We will discuss a number of recent applications of Quantum Monte Carlo including dense hydrogen and transition metal systems and suggest future directions. Support from DOE grants DE-FG52-09NA29456, SCIDAC DE-SC0008692, the Network for Ab Initio Many-Body Methods and INCITE allocation.

  4. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  5. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  6. PREFACE: 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics (ISCMP): Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2012-12-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. Like prior events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saints Constantine and Helena near Varna, going back to the refurbished facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 17 different countries delivered 31 invited lecturers and 78 posters, contributing through three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the accepted papers illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not least significant factor for the success of the 17 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. Visits to the Archaeological Museum (rich in valuable gold treasures of the ancient Thracian culture) and to the famous rock monastery Aladja were organized for the participants from the Varna Municipality. These Proceedings are published for the second time by the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for supporting this idea. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saints Constantine and Helena, 1-5 September 2014. It will be entitled: Challenges of the Nanoscale Science: Theory, Materials and Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Emilia Pecheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa Editors

  7. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  8. Recent applications of small-angle neutron scattering in strongly interacting soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wignall, G. D.; Melnichenko, Y. B.

    2005-08-01

    Before the application of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to the study of polymer structure, chain conformation studies were limited to light and small-angle x-ray scattering techniques, usually conducted in dilute solution owing to the difficulties of separating the inter- and intrachain contributions to the structure. The unique role of neutron scattering in soft condensed matter arises from the difference in the coherent scattering length between deuterium (bD = 0.67 × 10-12 cm) and hydrogen (bH = -0.37 × 10-12 cm), which results in a marked difference in scattering power (contrast) between molecules synthesized from normal (hydrogeneous) and deuterated monomer units. Thus, deuterium labelling techniques may be used to 'stain' molecules and make them 'visible' in the condensed state and other crowded environments, such as concentrated solutions of overlapping chains. For over two decades, SANS has proved to be a powerful tool for studies of structure-property relationships in polymeric systems and has made it possible to extract unique information about their size, shape, conformational changes and molecular associations. These applications are now so numerous that an exhaustive review of the field is no longer practical, so the authors propose to focus on the use of SANS for studies of strongly interacting soft matter systems. This paper will therefore discuss basic theory and practical aspects of the technique and will attempt to explain the physics of scattering with the minimum of unnecessary detail and mathematical rigour. Examples will be given to demonstrate the power of SANS and to show how it has helped to unveil universal aspects of the behaviour of macromolecules in such apparently diverse systems as polymer solutions, blends, polyelectrolytes and supercritical mixtures. The aim of the authors is to aid potential users who have a general scientific background, but no specialist knowledge of scattering, to understand the potential of the

  9. Introduction. Cosmology meets condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Kibble, T W B; Pickett, G R

    2008-08-28

    At first sight, low-temperature condensed-matter physics and early Universe cosmology seem worlds apart. Yet, in the last few years a remarkable synergy has developed between the two. It has emerged that, in terms of their mathematical description, there are surprisingly close parallels between them. This interplay has been the subject of a very successful European Science Foundation (ESF) programme entitled COSLAB ('Cosmology in the Laboratory') that ran from 2001 to 2006, itself built on an earlier ESF network called TOPDEF ('Topological Defects: Non-equilibrium Field Theory in Particle Physics, Condensed Matter and Cosmology'). The articles presented in this issue of Philosophical Transactions A are based on talks given at the Royal Society Discussion Meeting 'Cosmology meets condensed matter', held on 28 and 29 January 2008. Many of the speakers had participated earlier in the COSLAB programme, but the strength of the field is illustrated by the presence also of quite a few new participants.

  10. Shock compression of condensed matter using Eulerian multimaterial method: Applications to multidimensional shocks, deflagration, detonation, and laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, Jack J.; Kim, Ki-hong

    2008-06-01

    The reactive flow analysis of high energy material is performed using hydro shock compression of condensed matter (SCCM) tool that is being developed for handling complex multimaterial dynamics involving energetic and inert matters. Typically, the reacting flows of high energy materials such as fires and explosions give rise to strong nonlinear shock waves and high strain rate deformation of metallic confinements at unusually high pressure and temperature. In order to address difficulties associated with analyzing such complex systems, we have developed a suite of modeling capabilities for elegantly handling large gradients and high strain rates in solids as well as reactive shock waves present in gaseous phase. Mathematical formulation of explosive dynamics involving condensed matter is explained with an emphasis on validating and application of hydro-SCCM to a series of problems of high-speed multimaterial dynamics in nature. A detailed numerical description of a level-set based reactive ghost fluid approach is reported in a separate paper.

  11. Methods of Quantum Field Theory in Condensed Matter Physics ---New Perspectives, Extensions and Applications---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, H.

    Throughout the course of its development in the past four decades quantum field theory has gradually acquired a very rich structure (much richer in fact than it was originally intended) and now provides us with an effective method in the analysis of many diverse areas of physics; condensed matter physics, high energy particle physics general relativity and cosmology are among the more notable examples. Since condensed matter physics deals with those phenomena in which a system of quanta exist together with a variety of macroscopic objects at finite temperature, it may be said to manifest the fundamental properties of quantum field theory in its widest sense. Thus condensed matter physics has served as a powerful motivating force throughout the growth and development of quantum field theory. This process was indeed initiated by the celebrated Matsubara formalism of finite temperature Green's function method. This process is by no means complete since recent developments in many areas of physics demand a more sophisticated understanding with regard to the fundamental nature of quantum field theory. A brief description of this maturing process of quantum field theory in the past, present and prospects for the future will be the main content of this article.

  12. Condensed Matter Physics - Biology Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    The field of condensed matter physics had its genesis this century and it has had a remarkable evolution. A closer look at its growth reveals a hidden aim in the collective consciousness of the field - a part of the development this century is a kind of warm up exercise to understand the nature of living condensed matter, namely the field of biology, by a growing new breed of scientists in the coming century. Through some examples the vitality of this interaction will be pointed out.

  13. Piezoresistive Soft Condensed Matter Sensor for Body-Mounted Vital Function Applications

    PubMed Central

    Melnykowycz, Mark; Tschudin, Michael; Clemens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A soft condensed matter sensor (SCMS) designed to measure strains on the human body is presented. The hybrid material based on carbon black (CB) and a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) was bonded to a textile elastic band and used as a sensor on the human wrist to measure hand motion by detecting the movement of tendons in the wrist. Additionally it was able to track the blood pulse wave of a person, allowing for the determination of pulse wave peaks corresponding to the systole and diastole blood pressures in order to calculate the heart rate. Sensor characterization was done using mechanical cycle testing, and the band sensor achieved a gauge factor of 4–6.3 while displaying low signal relaxation when held at a strain levels. Near-linear signal performance was displayed when loading to successively higher strain levels up to 50% strain. PMID:26959025

  14. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-12-04

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  15. Piezoresistive Soft Condensed Matter Sensor for Body-Mounted Vital Function Applications.

    PubMed

    Melnykowycz, Mark; Tschudin, Michael; Clemens, Frank

    2016-03-04

    A soft condensed matter sensor (SCMS) designed to measure strains on the human body is presented. The hybrid material based on carbon black (CB) and a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) was bonded to a textile elastic band and used as a sensor on the human wrist to measure hand motion by detecting the movement of tendons in the wrist. Additionally it was able to track the blood pulse wave of a person, allowing for the determination of pulse wave peaks corresponding to the systole and diastole blood pressures in order to calculate the heart rate. Sensor characterization was done using mechanical cycle testing, and the band sensor achieved a gauge factor of 4-6.3 while displaying low signal relaxation when held at a strain levels. Near-linear signal performance was displayed when loading to successively higher strain levels up to 50% strain.

  16. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  17. Condensed Matter Theories - Volume 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholz, Heidi; Röpke, Gerd; de Llano, Manuel

    2007-09-01

    . Arikawa. Frustrated quantum antiferromagnets: application of high-order coupled cluster method / J. Richter ... [et al.]. Vorticity and antivorticity in submicron ferromagnetic films / H. Wang, M. Yan and C.E. Campbell -- pt. E. Conductivity. D-wave checkerboard bose condensate of mobile bipolarons / A.S. Alexandrov. Five possible reasons why high-Tc superconductivity is stalled / M. Grether and M. de Llano. Multistability and Multi 2[Pie symbol]-Kinks in the Frenkel-Kontorova model: an application to arrays of Josephson junctions / K.E. Kürten and C. Krattenthaler. Lowering of Boson-Fermion system energy with a gapped cooper resonant-pair dispersion relation / T.A. Mamedov and M. de Llano. The concept of correlated density and its application / K. Morawetz ... [et al.]. Competing local and non-local phase correlations in Fermionic systems with resonant pairing: the Boson-Fermion scenario / J. Ranninger. Superconducting order parameters in the extended Hubbard model: a simple mean-field study / J.S. Thakur and M.P. Das -- pt. F. Nuclear systems. Distribution of maxima of the antisymmetized wave function for the nucleons of a closed-shell and for the nucleons of all closed-shells in a nucleus / G.S. Anagnostatos. Pairing of strongly correlated nucleons / W.H. Dickhoff. Short range correlations in relativistic nuclear models / P.K. Panda, C. Providência and J. da Providência. Quartetting in attractive Fermi-systems and alpha particle condensation in nuclear systems / P. Schuck ... [et al.]. Alpha-alpha and Alpha-nucleus potentials: an energy-density fucntional approach / Z.F. Shehadeh ... [et al.]. -- pt. G. Density functional theory and MD simulations. Dynamics of metal clusters in rare gas clusters / M. Baer ... [et al.]. Reinhard and E. Suraud. Kohn-Sham calculations combined with an average pair-density functional theory / P. Gori-Giorgi and A. Savin. Correlations, collision frequency and optical properties in laser excited clusters / H. Reinholz, T. Raitza and G. R

  18. Condensed Matter Theories: Volume 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludeña, Eduardo V.; Bishop, Raymond F.; Iza, Peter

    2011-03-01

    pt. A. Fermi and Bose fluids, exotic systems. Reemergence of the collective mode in [symbol]He and electron layers / H. M. Bohm ... [et al.]. Dissecting and testing collective and topological scenarios for the quantum critical point / J. W. Clark, V. A. Khodel and M. V. Zverev. Helium on nanopatterned surfaces at finite temperature / E. S. Hernandez ... [et al.]. Towards DFT calculations of metal clusters in quantum fluid matrices / S. A. Chin ... [et al.]. Acoustic band gap formation in metamaterials / D. P. Elford ... [et al.]. Dissipative processes in low density strongly interacting 2D electron systems / D. Neilson. Dynamical spatially resolved response function of finite 1-D nano plasmas / T. Raitza, H. Reinholz and G. Ropke. Renormalized bosons and fermions / K. A. Gernoth and M. L. Ristig. Light clusters in nuclear matter / G. Ropke -- pt. B. Quantum magnets, quantum dynamics and phase transitions. Magnetic ordering of antiferromagnets on a spatially anisotropic triangular lattice / R. F. Bishop ... [et al.]. Thermodynamic detection of quantum phase transitions / M. K. G. Kruse ... [et al.]. The SU(2) semi quantum systems dynamics and thermodynamics / C. M. Sarris and A. N. Proto -- pt. C. Physics of nanosystems and nanotechnology. Quasi-one dimensional fluids that exhibit higher dimensional behavior / S. M. Gatica ... [et al.]. Spectral properties of molecular oligomers. A non-Markovian quantum state diffusion approach / J. Roden, W. T. Strunz and A. Eisfeld. Quantum properties in transport through nanoscopic rings: Charge-spin separation and interference effects / K. Hallberg, J. Rincon and S. Ramasesha. Cooperative localization-delocalization in the high T[symbol] cuprates / J. Ranninger. Thermodynamically stable vortex states in superconducting nanowires / W. M. Wu, M. B. Sobnack and F. V. Kusmartsev.pt. D. Quantum information. Quantum information in optical lattices / A. M. Guzman and M. A. Duenas E. -- pt. E. Theory and applications of molecular

  19. Organic Synthetic Advanced Materials for Optoelectronic and Energy Applications (at Center for Condensed Matter Sciences)

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hung-Ju

    2016-11-14

    These slides cover Hung-Ju Yen's recent work in the synthesis and structural design of functional materials, which were further used for optoelectronic and energy applications, such as lithium ion battery, solar cell, LED, electrochromic, and fuel cells. This was for a job interview at Center for Condensed Matter Sciences. The following topics are detailed: current challenges for lithium-ion batteries; graphene, graphene oxide and nanographene; nanographenes with various functional groups; fine tune d-spacing through organic synthesis: varying functional group; schematic view of LIBs; nanographenes as LIB anode; rate performance (charging-discharging); electrochromic technology; electrochromic materials; advantages of triphenylamine; requirement of electrochromic materials for practical applications; low driving voltage and long cycle life; increasing the electroactive sites by multi-step synthetic procedures; synthetic route to starburst triarylamine-based polyamide; electrochromism ranging from visible to NIR region; transmissive to black electrochromism; RGB and CMY electrochromism.

  20. Majorana fermions in condensed-matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggett, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    It is an honor and a pleasure to have been invited to give a talk in this conference celebrating the memory of the late Professor Abdus Salam. To my regret, I did not know Professor Salam personally, but I am very aware of his work and of his impact on my area of specialization, condensed matter physics, both intellectually through his ideas on spontaneously broken symmetry and more practically through his foundation of the ICTP. Since I assume that most of this audience are not specialized in condensed-matter physics, I thought I would talk about one topic which to some extent bridges this field and the particle-physics interests of Salam, namely Majorana fermions (M.F.s). However, as we shall see, the parallels which are often drawn in the current literature may be a bit too simplistic. I will devote most of this talk to a stripped-down exposition of the current orthodoxy concerning M.F.s. in condensed-matter physics and their possible applications to topological quantum computing (TQC), and then at the end briefly indicate why I believe this orthodoxy may be seriously misleading.

  1. Collision of Bose Condensate Dark Matter structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.

    2008-12-04

    The status of the scalar field or Bose condensate dark matter model is presented. Results about the solitonic behavior in collision of structures is presented as a possible explanation to the recent-possibly-solitonic behavior in the bullet cluster merger. Some estimates about the possibility to simulate the bullet cluster under the Bose Condensate dark matter model are indicated.

  2. Galilean geometry in condensed matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geracie, Michael

    In this thesis we present a systematic means to impose Galilean invariance within effective field theory. Recently a number of authors have shown that Galilean invariance has powerful consequences on condensed matter systems. However, unlike the relativistic case, torsion is often a necessary element and is subject to constraints that make it surprisingly difficult to include in a Galilean invariant way. We will review this issue, define the most general torsionful geometries consistent with Galilean invariance and then turn to applications within effective field theory and the quantum Hall effect.

  3. Physics through the 1990s: Condensed-matter physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents the current status of condensed-matter physics from developments since the 1970s to opportunities in the 1990s. Topics include electronic structure, vibrational properties, critical phenomena and phase transitions, magnetism, semiconductors, defects and diffusion, surfaces and interfaces, low-temperature physics, liquid-state physics, polymers, nonlinear dynamics, instabilities, and chaos. Appendices cover the connections between condensed-matter physics and applications of national interest, new experimental techniques and materials, laser spectroscopy, and national facilities for condensed-matter physics research. The needs of the research community regarding support for individual researchers and for national facilities are presented, as are recommendations for improved government-academic-industrial relations.

  4. Condensed-matter trio scoop Dirac prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2012-09-01

    Three condensed-matter physicists, who have advanced our understanding of a strange type of material known as a "topological insulator", have won this year's Dirac medal from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy.

  5. Condensed-matter ab initio approach for strongly correlated electrons: Application to a quantum spin liquid candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, Youhei

    2015-12-31

    Recently, condensed-matter ab initio approaches to strongly correlated electrons confined in crystalline solids have been developed and applied to transition-metal oxides and molecular conductors. In this paper, an ab initio scheme based on constrained random phase approximations and localized Wannier orbitals is applied to a spin liquid candidate Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} and is shown to reproduce experimentally observed specific heat.

  6. The NSF Condensed Matter Physics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Paul

    The Condensed Matter Physics (CMP) program in the NSF Division of Materials Research (DMR) supports experimental, as well as combined experiment and theory projects investigating the fundamental physics behind phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. CMP is the largest Individual Investigator Award program in DMR and supports a broad portfolio of research spanning both hard and soft condensed matter. Representative research areas include: 1) phenomena at the nano- to macro-scale including: transport, magnetic, and optical phenomena; classical and quantum phase transitions; localization; electronic, magnetic, and lattice structure or excitations; superconductivity; topological insulators; and nonlinear dynamics. 2) low-temperature physics: quantum fluids and solids; 1D & 2D electron systems. 3) soft condensed matter: partially ordered fluids, granular and colloid physics, liquid crystals, and 4) understanding the fundamental physics of new states of matter as well as the physical behavior of condensed matter under extreme conditions e.g., low temperatures, high pressures, and high magnetic fields. In this talk I will review the current CMP portfolio and discuss future funding trends for the program. I will also describe recent activities in the program aimed at addressing the challenges facing current and future principal investigators.

  7. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  8. Infinite statistics condensate as a model of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadi, Zahra; Mirza, Behrouz; Mohammadzadeh, Hosein E-mail: b.mirza@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2013-11-01

    In some models, dark matter is considered as a condensate bosonic system. In this paper, we prove that condensation is also possible for particles that obey infinite statistics and derive the critical condensation temperature. We argue that a condensed state of a gas of very weakly interacting particles obeying infinite statistics could be considered as a consistent model of dark matter.

  9. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a new analytical tool that provides a simple nondestructive technique for obtaining information about the electronic absorption spectrum of samples such as powders, semisolids, gels, and liquids. It can also be applied to samples which cannot be examined by conventional optical methods. Numerous applications of this technique in the field of inorganic and organic semiconductors, biology, and catalysis have been described. Among the advantages of photoacoustic spectroscopy, the signal is almost insensitive to light scattering by the sample and information can be obtained about nonradiative deactivation processes. Signal saturation, which can modify the intensity of individual absorption bands in special cases, is a drawback of the method.

  10. Condensation of galactic cold dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Visinelli, Luca

    2016-07-07

    We consider the steady-state regime describing the density profile of a dark matter halo, if dark matter is treated as a Bose-Einstein condensate. We first solve the fluid equation for “canonical” cold dark matter, obtaining a class of density profiles which includes the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, and which diverge at the halo core. We then solve numerically the equation obtained when an additional “quantum pressure” term is included in the computation of the density profile. The solution to this latter case is finite at the halo core, possibly avoiding the “cuspy halo problem” present in some cold dark matter theories. Within the model proposed, we predict the mass of the cold dark matter particle to be of the order of M{sub χ}c{sup 2}≈10{sup −24} eV, which is of the same order of magnitude as that predicted in ultra-light scalar cold dark matter models. Finally, we derive the differential equation describing perturbations in the density and the pressure of the dark matter fluid.

  11. Open problems in condensed matter physics, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1988-08-01

    The 1970's and 1980's can be considered the third stage in the explosive development of condensed matter physics. After the very intensive research of the 1930's and 1940's, which followed the formulation of quantum mechanics, and the path-breaking activity of the 1950's and 1960's, the problems being faced now are much more complex and not always susceptible to simple modelling. The (subjectively) open problems discussed here are: high temperature superconductivity, its properties and the possible new mechanisms which lead to it; the integral and fractional quantum Hall effects; new forms of order in condensed-matter systems; the physics of disorder, especially the problem of spin glasses; the physics of complex anisotropic systems; the theoretical prediction of stable and metastable states of matter; the physics of highly correlated states (heavy fermions); the physics of artificially made structures, in particular heterostructures and highly metastable states of matter; the determination of the microscopic structure of surfaces; and chaos and highly nonlinear phnomena. 82 refs.

  12. The Future of Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girvin, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Where are we? Where are we going? Where should we be going? Condensed matter systems have proven capable of existing in a marvelous variety of physical states that exhibit fundamental phenomena of interest even outside our subfield, particluarly in elementary particle physics. Will this continue or are the different subfields beginning to lose touch with each other as they mature? It is already clear that a large and unfortunate communication gulf has developed even inside our own community between the soft matter and electronic materials camps. Most members of our community have been proud to celebrate the technological relevance of our subfield. The past few decades have seen a marvelous synergy in which advances in condensed matter physics have led to technological advances. These in turn have permitted explorations of new realms and allowed new fundamental physics advances. Will this synergy continue or are we in danger of becoming technologically irrelevant? It is clear that we are entering a new era of confluence between atomic/molecular/optical physics and condensed matter physics. It is less clear but quite possible, that we are at the dawn of an age in which we will spin off a new subfield of quantum electrical engineering and quantum computation. Can we develop a useful understanding of complex materials? Whither nano-scale physics? Our colleagues in other subfields of physics seem to be better at communicating the excitement of their research to the public. What can we do on this front? I do not have answers to all these questions, but will at least attempt to make a few observations on them.

  13. Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-12-01

    The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electrical current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions. In the quark-gluon plasma, the axial anomaly induces topological charge changing transition that results in the generation of electrical current along the magnetic field. In condensed matter systems, the chiral magnetic effect was first predicted in the gapless semiconductors with tow energy bands having pointlike degeneracies. In addition, thirty years later after this prediction, the chiral magnetic effect was finally observed in the 3D Dirac/Weyl semimetals.

  14. Strange Baryonic Matter and Kaon Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    In this contribution we address the question whether kaon condensation could occur in strongly interacting self-bound strange hadronic matter. In our comprehensive dynamical relativistic mean-field (RMF) calculations of nuclear and hypernuclear systems containing several antikaons we found saturation of bar K separation energy as well as the associated nuclear and bar K density distributions upon increasing the number of bar K mesons. The saturation pattern was found to be a universal feature of these multi-strangeness configurations. Since in all cases the bar K separation energy does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that bar K mesons do not provide the physical "strangeness" degrees of freedom for self-bound strange hadronic matter.

  15. Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-12-01

    The chiral magnetic effect (CME) is the generation of electrical current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum chiral anomaly [S. L. Adler. Axial-vector vertex in spinor electrodynamics. Physical Review, 177, 2426 (1969), J. S. Bell and R. Jackiw. A PCAC puzzle: π 0 γγin the σ-model. Il Nuovo Cimento A, 60, 47-61 (1969)] in systems possessing charged chiral fermions. In quark-gluon plasma containing nearly massless quarks, the chirality imbalance is sourced by the topological transitions. In condensed matter systems, the chiral quasiparticles emerge in gapless semiconductors with two energy bands having pointlike degeneracies opening the path to the study of chiral anomaly [H. B. Nielsen and M. Ninomiya. The Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly and Weyl fermions in a crystal. Physics Letters B, 130, 389-396 (1983)]. Recently, these novel materials - so-called Dirac and Weyl semimetals have been discovered experimentally, are suitable for the investigation of the CME in condensed matter experiments. Here we report on the first experimental observation of the CME in a 3D Dirac semimetal ZrTe5 [Q. Li, D. E. Kharzeev, C. Zhang, Y. Huang, I. Pletikosić, A. V. Fedorov, R. D. Zhong, J. A. Schneeloch, G. D. Gu, and T. Valla. Chiral magnetic effect in ZrTe5. Nature Physics (2016) doi:10.1038/nphys3648].

  16. Novel Quantum Condensates in Excitonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Keeling, J. M. J.; Simons, B. D.; Eastham, P. R.; Marchetti, F. M.; Szymańska, M. H.

    2009-08-01

    These lectures interleave discussion of a novel physical problem of a new kind of condensate with teaching of the fundamental theoretical tools of quantum condensed matter field theory. Polaritons and excitons are light mass composite bosons that can be made inside solids in a number of different ways. As bosonic particles, they are liable to make a phase coherent ground state—generically called a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC)—and these lectures present some models to describe that problem, as well as general approaches to the theory. The focus is very much to explain how mean-field-like approximations that are often presented heuristically can be derived in a systematic fashion by path integral methods. Going beyond the mean field theory then produces a systematic approach to calculation of the excitation energies, and the derivation of effective low energy theories that can be generalised to more complex dynamical and spatial situations than is practicable for the full theory, as well as to study statistical properties beyond the semi-classical regime. in particular, for the polariton problem, it allows one to connect the regimes of equilibrium BEC and non-equilibrium laser. The lectures are self-sufficient, but not highly detailed. The methodological aspects are covered in standard quantum field theory texts and the presentation here is deliberately cursory: the approach will be closest to the book of Altland and Simons [1]. Since these lectures concern a particular type of condensate, reference should also be made to texts on BEC, for example by Pitaevskii and Stringari [2]. A recent theoretically focussed review of polariton systems is [3] covers many of the technical issues associated with the polariton problem in greater depth and provides many further references.

  17. Entanglement entropy and gravity/condensed matter correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-05-01

    The entanglement entropy has been very important in various subjects such as the quantum information theory, condensed matter physics and quantum gravity. Especially, for more than twenty years, this quantity has been studied by many people in order to obtain a quantum mechanical interpretation of the gravitational entropy such as the black hole entropy. We will introduce recent progresses toward this long-standing problem in quantum gravity by applying the idea of holography, especially the AdS/CFT correspondence found in string theory. We will explain the holographic formula which computes the entanglement entropy of quantum field theories in terms of the area of minimal surfaces in general relativity. We will also review the recent application of AdS/CFT correspondence to condensed matter physics from the viewpoint of entanglement entropy.

  18. Illuminating single molecules in condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Moerner, W E; Orrit, M

    1999-03-12

    Efficient collection and detection of fluorescence coupled with careful minimization of background from impurities and Raman scattering now enable routine optical microscopy and study of single molecules in complex condensed matter environments. This ultimate method for unraveling ensemble averages leads to the observation of new effects and to direct measurements of stochastic fluctuations. Experiments at cryogenic temperatures open new directions in molecular spectroscopy, quantum optics, and solid-state dynamics. Room-temperature investigations apply several techniques (polarization microscopy, single-molecule imaging, emission time dependence, energy transfer, lifetime studies, and the like) to a growing array of biophysical problems where new insight may be gained from direct observations of hidden static and dynamic inhomogeneity.

  19. Chiral magnetic effect in condensed matter systems

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Qiang; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-12-01

    The chiral magnetic effect is the generation of electrical current induced by chirality imbalance in the presence of magnetic field. It is a macroscopic manifestation of the quantum anomaly in relativistic field theory of chiral fermions. In the quark-gluon plasma, the axial anomaly induces topological charge changing transition that results in the generation of electrical current along the magnetic field. In condensed matter systems, the chiral magnetic effect was first predicted in the gapless semiconductors with tow energy bands having pointlike degeneracies. In addition, thirty years later after this prediction, the chiral magnetic effect was finally observed in the 3Dmore » Dirac/Weyl semimetals.« less

  20. Frustration in Condensed Matter and Protein Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Tanner, S.; Conroy, B.; Owens, F.; Tran, M. M.; Boekema, C.

    2014-03-01

    By means of computer modeling, we are studying frustration in condensed matter and protein folding, including the influence of temperature and Thomson-figure formation. Frustration is due to competing interactions in a disordered state. The key issue is how the particles interact to reach the lowest frustration. The relaxation for frustration is mostly a power function (randomly assigned pattern) or an exponential function (regular patterns like Thomson figures). For the atomic Thomson model, frustration is predicted to decrease with the formation of Thomson figures at zero kelvin. We attempt to apply our frustration modeling to protein folding and dynamics. We investigate the homogeneous protein frustration that would cause the speed of the protein folding to increase. Increase of protein frustration (where frustration and hydrophobicity interplay with protein folding) may lead to a protein mutation. Research is supported by WiSE@SJSU and AFC San Jose.

  1. Quantum entanglement in condensed matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflorencie, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    This review focuses on the field of quantum entanglement applied to condensed matter physics systems with strong correlations, a domain which has rapidly grown over the last decade. By tracing out part of the degrees of freedom of correlated quantum systems, useful and non-trivial information can be obtained through the study of the reduced density matrix, whose eigenvalue spectrum (the entanglement spectrum) and the associated Rényi entropies are now well recognized to contain key features. In particular, the celebrated area law for the entanglement entropy of ground-states will be discussed from the perspective of its subleading corrections which encode universal details of various quantum states of matter, e.g. symmetry breaking states or topological order. Going beyond entropies, the study of the low-lying part of the entanglement spectrum also allows to diagnose topological properties or give a direct access to the excitation spectrum of the edges, and may also raise significant questions about the underlying entanglement Hamiltonian. All these powerful tools can be further applied to shed some light on disordered quantum systems where impurity/disorder can conspire with quantum fluctuations to induce non-trivial effects. Disordered quantum spin systems, the Kondo effect, or the many-body localization problem, which have all been successfully (re)visited through the prism of quantum entanglement, will be discussed in detail. Finally, the issue of experimental access to entanglement measurement will be addressed, together with its most recent developments.

  2. Gravitational effects of condensate dark matter on compact stellar objects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: fayinwang@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We study the gravitational effect of non-self-annihilating dark matter on compact stellar objects. The self-interaction of condensate dark matter can give high accretion rate of dark matter onto stars. Phase transition to condensation state takes place when the dark matter density exceeds the critical value. A compact degenerate dark matter core is developed and alter the structure and stability of the stellar objects. Condensate dark matter admixed neutron stars is studied through the two-fluid TOV equation. The existence of condensate dark matter deforms the mass-radius relation of neutron stars and lower their maximum baryonic masses and radii. The possible effects on the Gamma-ray Burst rate in high redshift are discussed.

  3. Condensed-matter energetics from diatomic molecular spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, In H.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Jhung, Kyu S.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of molecular spectra and compression data from crystals show that a single function successfully describes the dependence on interatomic separation of both the potential energy of diatomic molecules and the cohesive binding energy of condensed matter. The empirical finding that one function describes interatomic energies for such diverse forms of matter and over a wide range of conditions can be used to extend condensed-matter equations of state but warrants further theoretical study.

  4. Observation of Weyl fermions in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong

    In 1929, a German mathematician and physicist Hermann Weyl proposed that a massless solution of the Dirac equation represents a pair of new type of particles, the so-called Weyl fermions. However, their existence in particle physics remains elusive after more than eight decades, e.g., neutrino has been regarded as a Weyl fermion in the Standard Model until it was found to have mass. Recently, significant advances in topological materials have provided an alternative way to realize Weyl fermions in condensed matter as an emergent phenomenon. Weyl semimetals are predicted as a class of topological materials that can be regarded as three-dimensional analogs of graphene breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Electrons in a Weyl semimetal behave exactly as Weyl fermions, which have many exotic properties, such as chiral anomaly, magnetic monopoles in the crystal momentum space, and open Fermi arcs on the surface. In this talk I will report our experimental discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs by observing Fermi arcs with a characteristic spin texture in the surface states and Weyl nodes in the bulk states using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  5. The NSF Condensed Matter and Materials Theory Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Daryl

    The Condensed Matter and Materials Theory (CMMT) Program in the Division of Materials Research is the home of condensed matter theory at the National Science Foundation. CMMT awards reflect a vibrant community with expanding scientific horizons and opportunities. I will present an overview of the CMMT program. Opportunities for theory and computation to open new directions and stimulate emerging frontiers will be discussed. Engaging research across disciplinary boundaries maintains the vitality of the field, leads to an agile next generation of theoretical and computational condensed matter physicists, and advances understanding of the world on the scale of life.

  6. Resource Letter HCMP-1: History of Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joseph D.

    2017-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the history of condensed matter physics, including discussions of the development of the field and strategies for approaching its complicated historical trajectory. Following the presentation of general resources, journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: conceptual development; institutional and community structure; social, cultural, and political history; and connections between condensed matter physics and technology.

  7. Gravitational collapse of Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu

    2014-04-01

    We study the mechanisms of the gravitational collapse of the Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter halos, described by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. By using a variational approach, and by choosing an appropriate trial wave function, we reformulate the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with spherical symmetry as Newton's equation of motion for a particle in an effective potential, which is determined by the zero-point kinetic energy, the gravitational energy, and the particles interaction energy, respectively. The velocity of the condensate is proportional to the radial distance, with a time-dependent proportionality function. The equation of motion of the collapsing dark matter condensate is studied by using both analytical and numerical methods. The collapse of the condensate ends with the formation of a stable configuration, corresponding to the minimum of the effective potential. The radius and the mass of the resulting dark matter object are obtained, as well as the collapse time of the condensate. The numerical values of these global astrophysical quantities, characterizing condensed dark matter systems, strongly depend on the two parameters describing the condensate, the mass of the dark matter particle, and of the scattering length, respectively. The stability of the condensate under small perturbations is also studied, and the oscillations frequency of the halo is obtained. Hence these results show that the gravitational collapse of the condensed dark matter halos can lead to the formation of stable astrophysical systems with both galactic and stellar sizes.

  8. Quantum coherence in momentum space of light-matter condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, C.; Tosi, G.; Martín, M. D.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Konstantinidis, G.; Eldridge, P. S.; Savvidis, P. G.; Tejedor, C.; Viña, L.

    2014-08-01

    We show that the use of momentum-space optical interferometry, which avoids any spatial overlap between two parts of a macroscopic quantum state, presents a unique way to study coherence phenomena in polariton condensates. In this way, we address the longstanding question in quantum mechanics: "Do two components of a condensate, which have never seen each other, possess a definitive phase?" [P. W. Anderson, Basic Notions of Condensed Matter Physics (Benjamin Cummings, Menlo Park, CA, 1984)]. A positive answer to this question is experimentally obtained here for light-matter condensates, created under precise symmetry conditions, in semiconductor microcavities, taking advantage of the direct relation between the angle of emission and the in-plane momentum of polaritons.

  9. Kaon condensation and multi-strange matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, D.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Mareš, J.

    2010-04-01

    We report on dynamical calculations of multi- K¯ hypernuclei, which were performed by adding K¯ mesons to particle-stable configurations of nucleons, Λ and Ξ hyperons. The K¯ separation energy as well as the baryonic densities saturate with the number of antikaons. We demonstrate that the saturation is a robust feature of multi- K¯ hypernuclei. Because the K¯ separation energy B does not exceed 200 MeV, we conclude that kaon condensation is unlikely to occur in finite strong-interaction self-bound {N,Λ,Ξ} strange hadronic systems.

  10. Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Condensed Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Technical, 4/1/78 - 6/30/82 Matter 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER(e) George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator...CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN CONDENSED MATTER George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator Stephen A. Sheffield* Kendal M. OgilvieT 4 C. Robert Wilson Paul...Temperture," in Sixth Symposium (International on Detonation (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, 1976), ACR-Z21, p. 36. 24. G. Gamow , "Tentative

  11. Recent Developments in Cold Fusion / Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2006-03-01

    Krivit is recognized internationally as an expert on the subject matter of cold fusion / condensed matter nuclear science. He is the editor of New Energy Times, the leading source of information for the field of cold fusion. He is the author of the 2005 book, The Rebirth of Cold Fusion and founder of New Energy Institute, an independent nonprofit public benefit corporation dedicated to accelerating the progress of new, sustainable and environmentally friendly energy sources.

  12. Soft condensed matter: Polymers, complex fluids, and biomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.

    1995-10-01

    Historians often characterize epochs through their dominant materials, clay, bronze, iron, and steel. From this perspective, the modern era is certainly the age of plastics. The progression from hard to soft materials suggests that the emerging era will be the age of {open_quotes}soft condensed matter.{close_quotes}

  13. Report on the NASA Soft and Complex Condensed Matter Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor); Chaikin, Paul; Nagel, Sidney

    2003-01-01

    During the past decade, NASA has been a leading U.S. supporter of soft and complex condensed matter research. Experiments in space shuttles, MIR, the International Space Station (ISS), as well as ground-based research have provided new insights into several areas including hard sphere colloids, crystal growth, phase ordering, and transport of complex fluids at the critical point. To help define the next generation of flight experiments needed to answer remaining important questions in the field of soft and complex condensed matter, NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Science sponsored a workshop on Soft and Complex Condensed Matter, March 6, 2003. This workshop asked leading members in the field of Soft and Complex Condensed Matter (at the APS March Meeting) to help identify exciting unanswered questions in the field, along with specific research topics for which the absence of gravity would enable significant results unobtainable by other means. The workshop was attended by 24 participants from universities across the U.S. and from five different countries (in addition to NASA GRC participants).

  14. Bose-Einstein condensates from scalar field dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2010-12-07

    We review the properties of astrophysical and cosmological relevance that may arise from the bosonic nature of scalar field dark matter models. The key property is the formation of Bose-Einstein condensates, but we also consider the presence of non-empty excited states that may be relevant for the description of scalar field galaxy halos and the properties of rotation curves.

  15. FOREWORD: International Scientific Seminars on "Fundamental and Applied Problems of Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav; Ryzhii, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    International Scientific Seminars ''Fundamental and Applied Problems of Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics'' were held in Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) in May - June 2014. The idea of the Seminars was to organize a series of meetings between young scientists and discuss actual problems and the latest results in Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics. There were eight Sessions: Modern Problems of Condensed Matter Physics; Laser Physics; Spectroscopy of Condensed Matter; Terahertz Optical Technology; Optical Signals Processing; Physics of Optical Strong Correlated Systems; Complex Dusty Plasma Physics; Biomediacal Applications of Photonics. Seminars were organized by the young group of scientists and students from Research and Educational Center ''Photonics and Infrared Technology'' at BMSTU. It brought a significant contribution to the development of youth science in the field of Physics and Photonics in Russia. More than 100 young scientists and students participated in the Seminars in spring - summer 2014. The International Scientific Seminars were supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant # 14-08-06030-g). This volume contains proceedings of the International Scientific Seminars ''Fundamental and Applied Problems of Photonics and Condensed Matter Physics''. Stanislav Yurchenko and Viktor Ryzhii Bauman Moscow State Technical University

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter axions.

    PubMed

    Sikivie, P; Yang, Q

    2009-09-11

    We show that cold dark matter axions thermalize and form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We obtain the axion state in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, and derive the equations governing small axion perturbations. Because they form a BEC, axions differ from ordinary cold dark matter in the nonlinear regime of structure formation and upon entering the horizon. Axion BEC provides a mechanism for the production of net overall rotation in dark matter halos, and for the alignment of cosmic microwave anisotropy multipoles.

  17. Particle physics and condensed matter: the saga continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Ideas from quantum field theory and topology have proved remarkably fertile in suggesting new phenomena in the quantum physics of condensed matter. Here I will supply some broad, unifying context, both conceptual and historical, for the abundance of results reported at the Nobel Symposium on ‘New Forms of Matter, Topological Insulators and Superconductors’. Since they distill some most basic ideas in their simplest forms, these concluding remarks might also serve, for non-specialists, as an introduction. Invited presentation of concluding remarks at Nobel Symposium 156 on New Forms of Matter, Topological Insulators and Superconductors, 13-15 June 2014, Högberga Gård, Stockholm.

  18. Experimental and Computational Techniques in Soft Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsen, Jeffrey

    2010-09-01

    1. Microscopy of soft materials Eric R. Weeks; 2. Computational methods to study jammed Systems Carl F. Schrek and Corey S. O'Hern; 3. Soft random solids: particulate gels, compressed emulsions and hybrid materials Anthony D. Dinsmore; 4. Langmuir monolayers Michael Dennin; 5. Computer modeling of granular rheology Leonardo E. Silbert; 6. Rheological and microrheological measurements of soft condensed matter John R. de Bruyn and Felix K. Oppong; 7. Particle-based measurement techniques for soft matter Nicholas T. Ouellette; 8. Cellular automata models of granular flow G. William Baxter; 9. Photoelastic materials Brian Utter; 10. Image acquisition and analysis in soft condensed matter Jeffrey S. Olafsen; 11. Structure and patterns in bacterial colonies Nicholas C. Darnton.

  19. Bose-Einstein condensation of relativistic Scalar Field Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2009-01-15

    Standard thermodynamical results of ideal Bose gases are used to study the possible formation of a cosmological Bose-Einstein condensate in Scalar Field Dark Matter models; the main hypothesis is that the boson particles were in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. It is then shown that the only relevant case needs the presence of both particles and anti-particles, and that it corresponds to models in which the bosonic particle is very light. Contrary to common wisdom, the condensate should be a relativistic phenomenon. Some cosmological implications are discussed in turn.

  20. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  1. A Scientific Cloud Computing Platform for Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, K.; Johnson, W.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Scientific Cloud Computing (SCC) makes possible calculations with high performance computational tools, without the need to purchase or maintain sophisticated hardware and software. We have recently developed an interface dubbed SC2IT that controls on-demand virtual Linux clusters within the Amazon EC2 cloud platform. Using this interface we have developed a more advanced, user-friendly SCC Platform configured especially for condensed matter calculations. This platform contains a GUI, based on a new Java version of SC2IT, that permits calculations of various materials properties. The cloud platform includes Virtual Machines preconfigured for parallel calculations and several precompiled and optimized materials science codes for electronic structure and x-ray and electron spectroscopy. Consequently this SCC makes state-of-the-art condensed matter calculations easy to access for general users. Proof-of-principle performance benchmarks show excellent parallelization and communication performance. Supported by NSF grant OCI-1048052

  2. Opportunities for Condensed Matter Research at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2004-03-01

    The Advanced Photon Source is the Western Hemisphere's most brilliant source of x-rays. This 3rd-generation 7-GeV synchrotron source can accomodate 34 insertion device ports, of which 30 are committed, and 24 are currently operating. In Fiscal Year 2002, we had 2767 unique users carry out at least one experiment at the source, of which 35research in materials science or condensed matter physics. Techniques commonly used by condensed matter scientists include single-crystal and powder diffraction, high-pressure studies, inelastic scattering, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, magnetic scattering and fluctuation spectroscopy. Access to the Advanced Photon Source can be either as a general user (www.aps.anl.gov) or as a partner user. Proposals from general users are encouraged, and beamtime is granted based on competitive review. Our capacity to accomodate more general users continues to increase. Typically, partner users build specialized equipment which is made available to general users. Many of our sectors have been built and operated by external Collaborative Access Teams, which support general users who enter through the APS centralized system. With the help of partnerships, the APS continues to evolve state-of-the-art beamlines of interest to condensed matter scientists, in areas such as inelastic scattering and nano-imaging. The Advanced Photon Source is closely connected with the new Center for Nanoscale Materials User Facility at Argonne. In this talk I will present notable examples of recent condensed matter physics experiments which utilized the unique capabilities of existing beamlines, and discuss future beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source.

  3. One Subject, Two Lands: My Journey in Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    This is an account of a professional life in the field that was generally known as solid-state physics when I started working in it; India and the United States of America are the countries in which this life was largely played out. My attempts to understand various things in condensed matter physics, and efforts to put together people and activities in India in this field, are mainly the story.

  4. FOREWORD: 18th International School on Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Genova, Julia; Nesheva, Diana; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2014-12-01

    We are delighted to present the Proceedings of the 18th International School on Condensed Matter Physics: Challenges of Nanoscale Science: Theory, Materials, Applications, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and chaired by Professor Alexander G Petrov. On this occasion the School was held in memory of Professor Nikolay Kirov (1943-2013), former Director of the Institute and Chairman between 1991 and 1998. The 18ISCMP was one of several events dedicated to the 145th anniversary of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 2014, and was held in the welcoming Black Sea resort of St. Constantine and Helena near Varna, at the Hotel and Congress Centre Frederic Joliot-Curie. Participants from 16 countries delivered 32 invited lectures, and 71 contributed posters were presented over three lively and well-attended evening sessions. Manuscripts submitted to the Proceedings were refereed in accordance with the guidelines of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, and we believe the papers published herein testify to the high technical quality and diversity of contributions. A satellite meeting, Transition Metal Oxide Thin Films - Functional Layers in Smart Windows and Water Splitting Devices: Technology and Optoelectronic Properties was held in parallel with the School (http://www.inera.org, 3-6 Sept 2014). This activity, which took place under the FP7-funded project INERA, offered opportunities for crossdisciplinary discussions and exchange of ideas between both sets of participants. As always, a major factor in the success of the 18ISCMP was the social programme, headed by the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and enhanced in no small measure by a variety of pleasant local restaurants, bars and beaches. We are most grateful to staff of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series for their continued support for the School, this being the third occasion on which the Proceedings have been published under its

  5. Electron ejection by heavy particles as precursor of track formation in condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann

    2004-08-01

    The detailed knowledge of the structure of ion tracks is a key issue for our understanding of radiation effects in condensed matter. Important examples are the radial energy deposition profile by electronic excitation for numerical simulations of track formation (via "Coulomb explosion" or "thermal spike") in inert matter, and calculations of the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) of heavy particles in living matter (with important applications in dosimetry and hadrontherapy). In both cases, differential electron ejection cross sections are used as input parameter. The precursor of track formation is thus electron ejection from target atoms, or from the projectile itself. These primary electrons and their subsequent secondary interactions lead to the deposition of energy along and around the ion trajectory. We first briefly discuss "primary ionization" (binary encounter and soft electron emission, multiple collision sequences: "Fermi shuttle") common to single atoms (gas targets) and condensed matter. Then, specific effects in condensed matter (electron transport, jet-like electron spikes, wake effects due to collective excitation of plasmons and emission of shock wave electrons) will be presented. Finally, we concentrate on effects connected to the high density of deposited energy and strong perturbation induced by heavy particles such as heavy ions and clusters (reduction effects due to screening, transport and "sweeping away", multiple ionization, electronic temperatures from Auger spectroscopy).

  6. Pulsed-neutron techniques for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Price, D.L.; Kamitakahara, W.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources are reviewed in a historical content as the latest generation of neutron sources in a line that started with the discovery of the neutron in 1932 and proceeded through research-reactor and accelerator-driven sources. The characteristics of the spallation sources are discussed in relation to their capabilities for structural and dynamical studies of condensed matter with slow neutrons and radiation effects research with fast neutrons. The new scientific opportunities opened up in these fields by the unique features of the sources are briefly reviewed, with some examples of completed work and experiments being planned.

  7. Scattering of High Energy Photons in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jochen R.

    Modern synchrotron radiation facilities provide bright beams at photon energies higher than 80 keV which only weakly interact with matter; most diffraction experiments can be interpreted within 1. order Born approximation. The technique is considered a new probe in condensed matter research because it combines the high penetration power of thermal neutrons with the extreme momentum space resolution obtained in state of the art X-ray diffraction experiments. Identical samples can be studied with both probes and the information content is strongly enhanced by combining their results because of the difference in the intrinsic cross section, or in cases where high resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments can be performed on the same crystal. After a short description of the experimental technique examples are presented including accurate structure factor measurements for charge density studies, defect induced diffuse scattering, structural phase transitions including critical scattering, and non-resonant bulk magnetic scattering.

  8. Use of ultracold neutrons for condensed-matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons have such low velocities that they are reflected by most materials at all incident angles and can be stored in material bottles for long periods of time during which their intrinsic properties can be studied in great detail. These features have been mainly used for fundamental-physics studies including the detection of a possible neutron electric dipole moment and the precise determination of neutron-decay properties. Ultracold neutrons can also play a role in condensed-matter studies with the help of high-resolution spectrometers that use gravity as a strongly dispersive medium for low-velocity neutrons. Such studies have so far been limited by the low intensity of existing ultracold-neutron sources but could be reconsidered with more intense sources, which are now envisaged. This report provides a broad survey of the properties of ultracold neutrons (including their reflectivity by different types of samples), of ultracold-neutron spectrometers that are compared with other high-resolution instruments, of results obtained in the field of condensed matter with these instruments, and of neutron microscopes. All these subjects are illustrated by numerous examples.

  9. Condensed Matter Physics in Colombia is in its forties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Physics in Colombia started to develop in the 70's as a research part of basic sciences with the acquisition, at that time, of large research equipments such as x-rays and EPR. Experimental work was soon supplemented by theoretical investigations, which led to the formation of research groups in condensed matter. In the early 80's existed such groups in five universities. In this report we present, after a short history of the main steps that guided the initial research subjects, the major areas already developed and the minor research groups that are in the stage of consolidation. Currently this type of work is done at least in 20 universities. We also show the actual numbers of researchers, publications, PhD students and laboratories discriminated in gender to complete an overview of Condensed Matter Physics in Colombia. Finally, we present a short review of the main theoretical issues that have been worked in the last decade focusing on low dimensional systems, their structural and optical properties

  10. Correlation, Decoherence, Dephasing and Relaxation in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Daniel

    2001-03-01

    The most striking differences between classical and quantum systems is that the latter are capable of being in entangled states, as recently demonstrated in atomic systems. It remains, however, a challenge to make similar observations in condensed matter, with obvious implications on practical implementation of quantum information processing. Entanglement survives only as long as the relative phase of the sates entering in the coherent superposition remains well defined. In condensed matter because of the extreme density, 10^23 cm-3, many processes occur that turn coherent excitations into incoherent occupations and qualitatively change the behavior of initially coherent systems. These processes stem from Coulomb correlation which has a dual role, it drives coherence and destroys it! Correlation induces states with macroscopic phase coherence such as the ground state of a superconductor or of a 2DEG in the quantum Hall regime, and although it is responsible for the formation of the quasi-particles, it is also responsible for the interactions between these quasi-particles that destroy their phase coherence. In this conference I give a review of both experimental and theoretical advances made in our understanding of correlation, decoherence, dephasing and relaxation in condensed matter. I shall focus on the most important physics observed in regimes where traditional assumptions fail and thus where opportunities exist for controlling correlation and dephasing. For example, the usual description of solids assumes a quasi-stationary limit in which the mean-field Random Phase Approximation is valid. However, at low density and on a time-scale short compared to the time between quasi-particle collisions, not enough events happen over the time span of a measurement for a quasi-particle to interact with a substantial fraction of its neighbors. Thus it become possible to observed deviations from mean-field theory, a regime where the scattering fluctuations induce large

  11. The Sun is Condensed Matter and has a Real Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2014-03-01

    The idea that the Sun was a gaseous in nature was born from 1858-65. At that time, a group of men, including Herbert Spencer, Father Angelo Secchi, Warren de la Rue, Balfour Stewart, and Benjamin Loewy, advanced that the Sun was a ball of gas. In 1865, Hervé Faye was the first to argue that the solar surface was merely an illusion. Dismissing all signs to the contrary, solar physics has promoted this idea to the present day, as manifested by the Standard Solar Model. In this work, overwhelming observational evidence will be presented that the Sun does indeed possess a distinct surface (see P.M. Robitaille, Forty Lines of Evidence for Condensed Matter -- The Sun on Trial: Liquid Metallic Hydrogen as a Solar Building Block, Progress in Physics, 2013, v. 4, 90-143). Our telescopes and satellites are sampling real structures on the surface of the Sun.

  12. Yang Mills condensate dark energy coupled with matter and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xia, T. Y.; Zhao, W.

    2007-07-01

    The coincidence problem is studied for the dark energy model of effective Yang Mills condensate (YMC) in a flat expanding universe during the matter-dominated stage. The YMC energy ρy(t) is taken to represent the dark energy, which is coupled either with the matter ρm(t), or with both the matter and the radiation components ρr(t). The effective YM Lagrangian is completely determined by the quantum field theory up to 1-loop order with an energy scale ~10-3 eV as a model parameter, and for each coupling, there is an extra model parameter. We have studied extensively the coupling models: the YMC decaying into the matter and the radiation; or vice versa the matter and radiation decaying into the YMC. It is found that, starting from the equality of radiation-matter ρmi = ρri, for a wide range of initial conditions of ρyi = (10-10, 10-2)ρmi, the models have a scaling solution during the early stages, and the YMC levels off and becomes dominant at late time, and the present state with Ωy sime 0.7, Ωm sime 0.3 and Ωr sime 10-5 is always achieved. If the YMC decays into a component, then this component also levels off later and approaches a constant value asymptotically, and the equation of state (EoS) of the YMC wy = ρy/py crosses over -1 and takes the value wy sime -1.1 at z = 0. If the matter and radiation decay into the YMC, then ρm(t) ~ a(t)-3 and ρr(t) ~ a(t)-4 approximately for all the time, and wy approaches -1 but does not cross over -1. We have also demonstrated that, at t → ∞, the coupled dynamics for (ρy(t), ρm(t), ρr(t)) is a stable attractor. Therefore, under generic circumstances, the existence of the scaling solution during the early stages and the subsequential exit from the scaling regime around z sime (0.3 0.5) are inevitable. Thus the coincidence problem can be naturally solved in the YMC dark energy models.

  13. Condensed Matter Lessons About the Origin of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannes, Gil

    2015-03-01

    It is widely hoped that quantum gravity will shed light on the question of the origin of time in physics. The currently dominant approaches to a candidate quantum theory of gravity have naturally evolved from general relativity, on the one hand, and from particle physics, on the other hand. A third important branch of twentieth century `fundamental' physics, condensed-matter physics, also offers an interesting perspective on quantum gravity, and thereby on the problem of time. The bottomline might sound disappointing: to understand the origin of time, much more experimental input is needed than what is available today. Moreover it is far from obvious that we will ever find out the true origin of physical time, even if we become able to directly probe physics at the Planck scale. But we might learn some interesting lessons about time and the structure of our universe in the process. A first lesson is that there are probably several characteristic scales associated with "quantum gravity" effects, rather than the single Planck scale usually considered. These can differ by several orders of magnitude, and thereby conspire to hide certain effects expected from quantum gravity, rendering them undetectable even with Planck-scale experiments. A more tentative conclusion is that the hierarchy between general relativity, special relativity and Newtonian physics, usually taken for granted, might have to be interpreted with caution.

  14. Compact heat exchangers for condensation applications: Yesterday, today and tomorrow

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.

    1993-07-01

    Compact heat exchangers are being increasingly considered for condensation applications in the process, cryogenic, aerospace, power and refrigeration industries. In this paper, different configurations available for condensation applications are analyzed and the current state-of-the-knowledge for the design of compact condensers is evaluated. The key technical issues for the design and development of compact heat exchangers for condensation applications are analyzed and major advantages are identified. The experimental data and performance prediction methods reported in the literature are analyzed to evaluate the present design capabilities for different compact heat-exchanger configurations. The design flexibility is evaluated for the development of new condensation applications, including integration with other process equipment.

  15. PREFACE: Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulek, Tadeusz; Wal, Andrzej; Lulek, Barbara

    2008-03-01

    This volume comprises the proceedings of the Ninth Summer School on Theoretical Physics under the leading title `Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter' (SSPCM 2007). The school, organised by Rzeszów University of Technology, Poland, together with AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow, Poland, in 5-12 September 2007 in Myczkowce. The meeting aimed to continue the series of biannual SSPCM schools (since 1990), and focused on the promotion of some advanced mathematical methods within the physics of condensed matter, with an emphasis on quantum information aspects. The main topics of the SSPCM07 school were the following: Quantum information and computing Finite dimensional Hilbert spaces Generating functions and exactly soluble models The Proceedings are divided into three parts accordingly. These topics can be seen as a natural continuation of the previous SSPCM05 school, aimed at studying interrelations between solid state physics and quantum informatics, as well as an extension of earlier SSPCM meetings, devoted to mathematical tools of condensed matter theory. The school gathered together more than 60 participants from 11 countries and 7 scientific centres in Poland. Some of them were there for the first time, and some had attended nearly all previous meetings. We had advanced researchers as well as their young collaborators and students. Acknowledgements The Organizing Committee wishes to express our gratitude to all participants for several their activities at the school and for creating so friendly and inspiring an atmosphere that one can talk about the term: `SSPCM society'. Special thanks are due to all lecturers, for preparing and presenting their talks, and for several valuable discussions. We also give thanks to all those who prepared manuscripts, giving us thus an opportunity to share their ideas, to all referees who improved significantly the quality of this volume, to all members of our International Advisory Committee, and

  16. Dark matter as a Bose-Einstein Condensate: the relativistic non-minimally coupled case

    SciTech Connect

    Bettoni, Dario; Colombo, Mattia; Liberati, Stefano E-mail: mattia.colombo@studenti.unitn.it

    2014-02-01

    Bose-Einstein Condensates have been recently proposed as dark matter candidates. In order to characterize the phenomenology associated to such models, we extend previous investigations by studying the general case of a relativistic BEC on a curved background including a non-minimal coupling to curvature. In particular, we discuss the possibility of a two phase cosmological evolution: a cold dark matter-like phase at the large scales/early times and a condensed phase inside dark matter halos. During the first phase dark matter is described by a minimally coupled weakly self-interacting scalar field, while in the second one dark matter condensates and, we shall argue, develops as a consequence the non-minimal coupling. Finally, we discuss how such non-minimal coupling could provide a new mechanism to address cold dark matter paradigm issues at galactic scales.

  17. Simulations of Interfacial Phenomena in Soft Condensed Matter and Nanoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Computation of interfacial free energies between coexisting phases (e.g. saturated vapor coexisting with liquid) is a fundamental problem of classical statistical mechanics: the standard approach (dating back to van der Waals, Ginzburg-Landau, Cahn-Hillard · · ·) is based on the continuation of the free energy of homogeneous states throughout the two phase coexistence region. Beyond mean field this continuation does not exist, nor does an "intrinsic profile" of the interface exist! These problems can be overcome by computer simulation: one popular method is based on sampling the order parameter distribution function in the two-phase coexistence region, which yields information on the surface tension of planar interfaces (from "slab configurations") and of curved interfaces (from states containing "droplets"), elucidating the problem of the "Tolman length". Another method (suitable also for solid-liquid interfaces) analyzes the capillary wave broadening or the capillary wave spectrum; all these methods require a careful assessment of finite size effects. Related problems occur for excess free energies due to walls, needed to describe wetting phenomena, capillary condensation, heterogenous nucleation, etc. As an example, a thermodynamic integration method (based on "mixing" systems with and without walls) will be described, and an application to understand phase separation in nanoconfinement will be mentioned.

  18. 2015 Soft Condensed Matter Physics: Self-Assembly and Active Matter GRC/GRS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-20

    applications. Topics in self-assembly include biomineralization, virus assembly and assembly of Janus and DNA colloids . Active Matter topics include swimmers...driven colloids , actin and microtubule assembly and tissues. The conference speakers include global leaders in soft matter, promising junior...to Casting of Functional Materials" 11:10 am - 11:30 am Discussion 11:30 am - 12:10 pm Peter Fratzl (Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces

  19. Adhesive interactions of biologically inspired soft condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Travers Heath

    Improving our fundamental understanding of the surface interactions between complex materials is needed to improve existing materials and products as well as develop new ones. The object of this research was to apply the measurements of fundamental surface interactions to real world problems facing chemical engineers and materials scientists. I focus on three systems of biologically inspired soft condensed matter, with an emphasis on the adhesive interactions between them. The formation of phospholipid bilayers of the neutral lipid, dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) on silica surfaces from vesicles in aqueous solutions was investigated. The process involves five stages: vesicle adhesion to the substrate surfaces, steric interactions with neighboring vesicles, rupture, spreading via hydrophobic fusion of bilayer edges, and ejection of excess lipid, trapped water and ions into the solution. The forces between DMPC bilayers and silica were measured in the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA) in phosphate buffered saline. The adhesion energy was found to be much stronger than the expected adhesion predicted by van der Waals interactions, likely due to an attractive electrostatic interaction. The effects of non-adsorbing cationic polyelectrolytes on the interactions between supported cationic surfactant bilayers were studied using the SFA. Addition of polyelectrolyte has a number of effects on the interactions including the induction of a depletion-attraction and screening of the double-layer repulsion. Calculations are made that allow for the conversion of the adhesion energy measured in the SFA to the overall interaction energy between vesicles in solution, which determines the stability behavior of vesicle dispersions. Mussels use a variety of dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (DOPA) rich proteins specifically tailored to adhering to wet surfaces. The SFA was used to study the role of DOPA on the adhesive properties of these proteins to TiO 2 and mica using both real mussel

  20. A duality web in 2 + 1 dimensions and condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiberg, Nathan; Senthil, T.; Wang, Chong; Witten, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Building on earlier work in the high energy and condensed matter communities, we present a web of dualities in 2 + 1 dimensions that generalize the known particle/vortex duality. Some of the dualities relate theories of fermions to theories of bosons. Others relate different theories of fermions. For example, the long distance behavior of the 2 + 1-dimensional analog of QED with a single Dirac fermion (a theory known as U(1)1/2) is identified with the O(2) Wilson-Fisher fixed point. The gauged version of that fixed point with a Chern-Simons coupling at level one is identified as a free Dirac fermion. The latter theory also has a dual version as a fermion interacting with some gauge fields. Assuming some of these dualities, other dualities can be derived. Our analysis resolves a number of confusing issues in the literature including how time reversal is realized in these theories. It also has many applications in condensed matter physics like the theory of topological insulators (and their gapped boundary states) and the problem of electrons in the lowest Landau level at half filling. (Our techniques also clarify some points in the fractional Hall effect and its description using flux attachment.) In addition to presenting several consistency checks, we also present plausible (but not rigorous) derivations of the dualities and relate them to 3 + 1-dimensional S-duality.

  1. Statistical Mechanics and Applications in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Castro, Carlo; Raimondi, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Preface; 1. Thermodynamics: a brief overview; 2. Kinetics; 3. From Boltzmann to Gibbs; 4. More ensembles; 5. The thermodynamic limit and its thermodynamic stability; 6. Density matrix and quantum statistical mechanics; 7. The quantum gases; 8. Mean-field theories and critical phenomena; 9. Second quantization and Hartree-Fock approximation; 10. Linear response and fluctuation-dissipation theorem in quantum systems: equilibrium and small deviations; 11. Brownian motion and transport in disordered systems; 12. Fermi liquids; 13. The Landau theory of the second order phase transitions; 14. The Landau-Wilson model for critical phenomena; 15. Superfluidity and superconductivity; 16. The scaling theory; 17. The renormalization group approach; 18. Thermal Green functions; 19. The microscopic foundations of Fermi liquids; 20. The Luttinger liquid; 21. Quantum interference effects in disordered electron systems; Appendix A. The central limit theorem; Appendix B. Some useful properties of the Euler Gamma function; Appendix C. Proof of the second theorem of Yang and Lee; Appendix D. The most probable distribution for the quantum gases; Appendix E. Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein integrals; Appendix F. The Fermi gas in a uniform magnetic field: Landau diamagnetism; Appendix G. Ising and gas-lattice models; Appendix H. Sum over discrete Matsubara frequencies; Appendix I. Hydrodynamics of the two-fluid model of superfluidity; Appendix J. The Cooper problem in the theory of superconductivity; Appendix K. Superconductive fluctuations phenomena; Appendix L. Diagrammatic aspects of the exact solution of the Tomonaga Luttinger model; Appendix M. Details on the theory of the disordered Fermi liquid; References; Author index; Index.

  2. Condensed-matter physics: Quantum mechanics in a spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balents, Leon

    2016-12-01

    Quantum spin liquids are exotic states of matter first predicted more than 40 years ago. An inorganic material has properties consistent with these predictions, revealing details about the nature of quantum matter. See Letter p.559

  3. Lars Onsager Prize: Topological Defects in Condensed Matter Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Circulation quantization in superfluid 4He and superconductors. General principles of classification of topologically stable defects in ordered media. Superfluid phases of 3He. Topology at different scales of length. Superfluids under rotation. Biaxial nematics. Nonabelian disclinations. Half-quantum vortices: 3He-A, Sr2RuO4, exciton-polariton condensates, FFLO, Super Solid.

  4. Optical nanoscopy of transient states in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Kuschewski, F.; Kehr, S.C.; Green, B.; Bauer, Ch.; Gensch, M.; Eng, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the fundamental and nanoscale understanding of complex phenomena in materials research and the life sciences, witnessed considerable progress. However, elucidating the underlying mechanisms, governed by entangled degrees of freedom such as lattice, spin, orbit, and charge for solids or conformation, electric potentials, and ligands for proteins, has remained challenging. Techniques that allow for distinguishing between different contributions to these processes are hence urgently required. In this paper we demonstrate the application of scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) as a novel type of nano-probe for tracking transient states of matter. We introduce a sideband-demodulation technique that allows for probing exclusively the stimuli-induced change of near-field optical properties. We exemplify this development by inspecting the decay of an electron-hole plasma generated in SiGe thin films through near-infrared laser pulses. Our approach can universally be applied to optically track ultrafast/-slow processes over the whole spectral range from UV to THz frequencies. PMID:26215769

  5. Fate of pion condensation in quark matter: From the chiral limit to the physical pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Abuki, H.; Anglani, R.; Pellicoro, M.; Ruggieri, M.; Gatto, R.

    2009-02-01

    We study aspects of the pion condensation in two-flavor neutral quark matter using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of QCD at finite density. We investigate the role of electric charge neutrality, and explicit symmetry breaking via quark mass, both of which control the onset of the charged pion ({pi}{sup c}) condensation. We show that the equality between the electric chemical potential and the in-medium pion mass, {mu}{sub e}=M{sub {pi}{sup -}}, as a threshold, persists even for a composite pion system in the medium, provided the transition to the pion condensed phase is of the second order. Moreover, we find that the pion condensate in neutral quark matter is extremely fragile with respect to the symmetry breaking effect via a current quark mass m, and is ruled out for m larger than the order of 10 keV.

  6. Evolution and dynamical properties of Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madarassy, Eniko J. M.; Toth, Viktor T.

    2015-02-01

    Using recently developed nonrelativistic numerical simulation code, we investigate the stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed due to the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the Universe. Because of dark matter accretion, a Bose-Einstein condensed core can also be formed inside massive astrophysical objects such as neutron stars or white dwarfs, for example. Numerically solving the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson system of coupled differential equations, we demonstrate, with longer simulation runs, that within the computational limits of the simulation the objects we investigate are stable. Physical properties of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate are examined both in nonrotating and rotating cases.

  7. Multi-Dimensional Structure of Crystalline Chiral Condensates in Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong-Gyu; Nishiyama, Kazuya; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    We explore the multi-dimensional structure of inhomogeneous chiral condensates in quark matter. For a one-dimensional structure, the system becomes unstable at finite temperature due to the Nambu-Goldstone excitations. However, inhomogeneous chiral condensates with multi-dimensional modulations may be realized as a true long-range order at any temperature, as inferred from the Landau-Peierls theorem. We here present some possible strategies for searching the multi-dimensional structure of chiral crystals.

  8. Engineering bright matter-wave solitons of dipolar condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M. J.; Bland, T.; Doran, R.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the form and interaction of dipolar bright solitons across the full parameter space afforded by dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, revealing the rich behavior introduced by the non-local nonlinearity. Working within an effective one-dimensional description, we map out the existence of the soliton solutions and show three collisional regimes: free collisions, bound state formation and soliton fusion. Finally, we examine the solitons in their full three-dimensional form through a variational approach; along with regimes of instability to collapse and runaway expansion, we identify regimes of stability which are accessible to current experiments.

  9. BES-HEP Connections: Common Problems in Condensed Matter and High Energy Physics, Round Table Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, Eduardo; Maldacena, Juan; Chatterjee, Lali; Davenport, James W

    2015-02-02

    On February 2, 2015 the Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Basic Energy Sciences (BES) convened a Round Table discussion among a group of physicists on ‘Common Problems in Condensed Matter and High Energy Physics’. This was motivated by the realization that both fields deal with quantum many body problems, share many of the same challenges, use quantum field theoretical approaches and have productively interacted in the past. The meeting brought together physicists with intersecting interests to explore recent developments and identify possible areas of collaboration.... Several topics were identified as offering great opportunity for discovery and advancement in both condensed matter physics and particle physics research. These included topological phases of matter, the use of entanglement as a tool to study nontrivial quantum systems in condensed matter and gravity, the gauge-gravity duality, non-Fermi liquids, the interplay of transport and anomalies, and strongly interacting disordered systems. Many of the condensed matter problems are realizable in laboratory experiments, where new methods beyond the usual quasi-particle approximation are needed to explain the observed exotic and anomalous results. Tools and techniques such as lattice gauge theories, numerical simulations of many-body systems, and tensor networks are seen as valuable to both communities and will likely benefit from collaborative development.

  10. Infrared applications for steam turbine condenser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanius, Mark A.

    2000-03-01

    Infrared inspection of the main steam condensers at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station has been utilized successfully in detecting condenser air in-leakage problems. Air in-leakage lowers the condenser's vacuum, thus decreasing the condenser's efficiency. This creates backpressure on the turbine which lowers its efficiency, resulting in fewer megawatts generated. Air in-leakage also creates an increase in off-gas flow which is a radiological concern for both the plant and the public. Inspections are normally performed on the condenser's manway covers and rupture disks prior to an outage during coast down and post outage. The optimum conditions are 100% power and temperature, however, a high radiation field prevents the inspection until reactor power is down to 65% or less. Anomalies are typically indicated by cooling in the effected areas of the air in-leakage. The anomalies are not limited to air in-leakage. Intermittent water out-leakage, due to a heater dump valve cycling, has been detected when visual inspections field nothing.

  11. Non-traditional Aharonov-Bohm effects in condensed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Krive, I.V. ); Rozhavsky, A.S. )

    1992-05-10

    In 1959, Aharonov and Bohm proposed an elegant experiment demonstrating observability of electromagnetic potentials (or, which is the same, the non-locality of the wave function of charged particles) in quantum mechanics. This paper discusses the Aharonov-Bohm effect, based on the fundamental principles of quantum theory, as the superposition principles, the quantum character of motion of particles and locality of the interaction of a charge with an electromagnetic potential L{sub int} = j{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}. It is thus no wonder that the Aharonov-Bohm's paper aroused much dispute which is still ongoing. Originally, the Aharonov-Bohm effect (ABE) means the dependence of the interference pattern on the magnetic fluid flux {phi} in a Gendaken experiment on a coherent electron beam in the field of an infinitely thin solenoid. Later, however, it became common to refer to the Aharonov-Bohm phenomenon wherever the characteristics of systems under study appear to depend on the flux {phi} in the absence of electric and magnetic fields. In this sense, it was highly interesting to analyze the ABE in condensed media (the many-particle Aharonov-Bohm effect), in particular to study the dependence of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics, e.g., of metal on the flux. Such a problem was first discussed by Byers and Yang who formulated the general theorems related to the ABE in conducting condensed media. The next important step was the work of Kulik who formulated a concrete model and calculated the flux-dependent contribution to the metal free energy and provided a first clear formulation of the requirements to reveal.

  12. Operational Equations of State. 2. The Generalized Courant-Friedrichs Equation of State for Condensed Matter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    The equation of state (EOS) with separable internal energy played a big role in the analysis of dynamics of condensed matter and development of the mathematical basis of the shock-wave physics (Courant, R.; Friedrichs, K. O. Supersonic Flow and Shock Waves; Interscience: New

  13. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, K; Muruganandam, P; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials.

  14. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Muruganandam, P.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials.

  15. Re-evaporation of condensed matter during the formation of the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    From the properties of matter the conclusion is derived that the mineral assemblage characteristic of most chondritic meteorites is not at all what is expected to form directly from solar matter. Rather, the major minerals of the ordinary chondrites have chemical compositions indicative of formation from a medium greatly depleted in hydrogen and somewhat deficient in oxygen relative to solar elemental abundance ratios. The re-evaporation of condensed material, after separation from a large fraction of the gaseous components of solar matter, will lead to a medium of the appropriate composition. Such re-evaporation must have occurred at a time prior to the formation of many primitive meteorites.

  16. Material science and Condensed matter Physics. 8th International Conference. Abstracts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyuk, L. L.; Paladi, Florentin; Canter, Valeriu; Nikorich, Valentina; Filippova, Irina

    2016-08-01

    The book includes the abstracts of the communications presented at the 8th International Conference on Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics (MSCMP 2016), a traditional biennial meeting organized by the Institute of Applied Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova (IAP).A total of 346 abstracts has been included in the book. The Conference programm included plenary lectures, topical keynote lectures, contributed oral and poster presentations distributed into 7 sections: * Condensed Matter Theory; * Advanced Bulk Materials; * Design and Structural Characterization of Materials; * Solid State Nanophysics and Nanotechnology; * Energy Conversion and Storage. Solid State Devices; * Surface Engineering and Applied Electrochemistry; * Digital and Optical holography: Materials and Methods. The abstracts are arranged according to the sections mentioned above. The Abstracts book includes a table of matters at the beginning of the book and an index of authors at the finish of the book.

  17. Non-autonomous bright matter wave solitons in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanna, T.; Babu Mareeswaran, R.; Sakkaravarthi, K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of bright matter wave solitons in spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates with time modulated nonlinearities. We obtain soliton solutions of an integrable autonomous three-coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (3-GP) equations using Hirota's method involving a non-standard bilinearization. The similarity transformations are developed to construct the soliton solutions of non-autonomous 3-GP system. The non-autonomous solitons admit different density profiles. An interesting phenomenon of soliton compression is identified for kink-like nonlinearity coefficient with Hermite-Gaussian-like potential strength. Our study shows that these non-autonomous solitons undergo non-trivial collisions involving condensate switching.

  18. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulski, M. Shiroka, T.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J.

    2014-09-15

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs.

  19. Shear viscosity from kaon condensation in color-flavor-locked quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Mark G.; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Braby, Matt

    2010-02-15

    We calculate the kaonic contribution to the shear viscosity of quark matter in the kaon-condensed color-flavor-locked phase (CFL-K0). This contribution comes from a light pseudo-Goldstone boson that arises from the spontaneous breaking of the flavor symmetry by the kaon condensate. The other contribution, from the exactly massless superfluid 'phonon', has been calculated previously. We specialize to a particular form of the interaction Lagrangian, parameterized by a single coupling. We find that if we make reasonable guesses for the values of the parameters of the effective theory, the kaons have a much smaller shear viscosity than the superfluid phonons but also a much shorter mean free path, so they could easily provide the dominant contribution to the shear viscosity of CFL-K0 quark matter in a neutron star in the temperature range 0.01 to 1 MeV (10{sup 8} to 10{sup 10} K).

  20. The beginnings of theoretical condensed matter physics in Rome: a personal remembrance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Castro, Carlo; Bonolis, Luisa

    2014-02-01

    This oral history interview provides a personal view on how theoretical condensed matter physics developed in Rome starting in the sixties of the last century. It then follows along the lines of research pursued by the interviewee up to the date of the interview, in March 2006. The topics considered range from the phenomenology of superfluid helium and superconductors, critical phenomena and renormalisation group approach, quantum fluids to strongly correlated electron systems and high temperature superconductors. Within these topics, fundamental problems of condensed matter physics are touched upon, such as the microscopic derivation of scaling, the metal-insulator transition and the interaction effects on disordered electron systems beyond the Anderson localisation, and the existence of heterogeneous states in cuprates. The English text presented here and revised by the authors is based on the original oral history interview recorded in Italian at Carlo Di Castro's office, Physics Department of Sapienza University, Rome, Italy, March 2006.

  1. Mass dependence of the Soret coefficient for atomic diffusion in condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Feng; Lin, Zheng-Zhe; Ning, Xi-Jing

    2013-06-01

    Particle diffusion in condensed matters driven by thermal gradient, the so-called Ludwig-Soret effect, has been investigated for about 160 years, but up to the present, seldom do theories on atomic level understand a series of puzzles in relevant experiments. In this work, we derived an expression of Soret coefficient for atomic diffusion in condensed matter from a single atom statistic model with relevant parameters expressed in terms of atomic mass and the potential profile felt by the guest atom without empirical parameters. The reality of the model was strictly tested by molecular dynamics simulations, especially the result for He atom diffusing on graphene sheet, which suggests the Soret effect may be used to separate (3)He from (4)He.

  2. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  3. Shock pressures induced in condensed matter by laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damian C; Tierney, Thomas E; Kopp, Roger A; Gammel, J Tinka

    2004-03-01

    The Trident laser was used to induce shock waves in samples of solid elements, with atomic numbers ranging from Be to Au, using pulses of 527 nm light around 1 ns long with irradiances of the order of 0.1 to 10 PW/m(2). States induced by the resulting ablation process were investigated using laser Doppler velocimetry to measure the velocity history of the opposite surface. By varying the energy in the laser pulse, relations were inferred between the irradiance and the induced pressure. For samples in vacuo, an irradiance constant in time does not produce a constant pressure. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations were used to investigate the relationship between the precise pulse shape and the pressure history. In this regime of time and irradiance, it was possible to reproduce the experimental data to within their uncertainty by including conductivity-dependent deposition of laser energy, heat conduction, gray radiation diffusion, and three temperature hydrodynamics in the treatment of the plasma, with ionizations calculated using the Thomas-Fermi equation. States induced in the solid sample were fairly insensitive to the details of modeling in the plasma, so Hugoniot points may be estimated from experiments of this type given a reasonable model of the plasma. More useful applications include the generation of dynamic loading to investigate compressive strength and phase transitions, and for sample recovery.

  4. Atomic-scale diffractive imaging of sub-cycle electron dynamics in condensed matter

    DOE PAGES

    Yakovlev, Vladislav S.; Stockman, Mark I.; Krausz, Ferenc; ...

    2015-09-28

    For interaction of light with condensed-matter systems, we show with simulations that ultrafast electron and X-ray diffraction can provide a time-dependent record of charge-density maps with sub-cycle and atomic-scale resolutions. Using graphene as an example material, we predict that diffraction can reveal localised atomic-scale origins of optical and electronic phenomena. Here, we point out nontrivial relations between microscopic electric current and density in undoped graphene.

  5. Robert Vivian Pound and the Discovery of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlish, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    This paper is based upon five interviews I conducted with Robert Vivian Pound in 2006-2007 and covers his childhood interest in radios, his time at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Radiation Laboratory during the Second World War, his work on the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance in condensed matter, his travels as a professor at Harvard University, and his social interactions with other physicists.

  6. Atomic-scale diffractive imaging of sub-cycle electron dynamics in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav S.; Stockman, Mark I.; Krausz, Ferenc; Baum, Peter

    2015-01-01

    For interaction of light with condensed-matter systems, we show with simulations that ultrafast electron and X-ray diffraction can provide a time-dependent record of charge-density maps with sub-cycle and atomic-scale resolutions. Using graphene as an example material, we predict that diffraction can reveal localised atomic-scale origins of optical and electronic phenomena. In particular, we point out nontrivial relations between microscopic electric current and density in undoped graphene. PMID:26412407

  7. Linking the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter: The slow electron and its interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1993-12-31

    The interfacing of the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter as effected by interphase and cluster studies on the behavior of key reactions involving slow electrons either as reacting initial particles or as products of the reactions themselves is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the measurement of both the cross sections and the energetics involved, although most of the available information to date is on the latter. The discussion is selectively focussed on electron scattering (especially the role of negative ion states in gases, clusters, and dense matter), ionization, electron attachment and photodetachment. The dominant role of the electric polarization of the medium is emphasized.

  8. Testing the Bose-Einstein Condensate dark matter model at galactic cluster scale

    SciTech Connect

    Harko, Tiberiu; Liang, Pengxiang; Liang, Shi-Dong; Mocanu, Gabriela E-mail: lpengx@mail2.sysu.edu.cn2 E-mail: gabriela.mocanu@ubbcluj.ro

    2015-11-01

    The possibility that dark matter may be in the form of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) has been extensively explored at galactic scale. In particular, good fits for the galactic rotations curves have been obtained, and upper limits for the dark matter particle mass and scattering length have been estimated. In the present paper we extend the investigation of the properties of the BEC dark matter to the galactic cluster scale, involving dark matter dominated astrophysical systems formed of thousands of galaxies each. By considering that one of the major components of a galactic cluster, the intra-cluster hot gas, is described by King's β-model, and that both intra-cluster gas and dark matter are in hydrostatic equilibrium, bound by the same total mass profile, we derive the mass and density profiles of the BEC dark matter. In our analysis we consider several theoretical models, corresponding to isothermal hot gas and zero temperature BEC dark matter, non-isothermal gas and zero temperature dark matter, and isothermal gas and finite temperature BEC, respectively. The properties of the finite temperature BEC dark matter cluster are investigated in detail numerically. We compare our theoretical results with the observational data of 106 galactic clusters. Using a least-squares fitting, as well as the observational results for the dark matter self-interaction cross section, we obtain some upper bounds for the mass and scattering length of the dark matter particle. Our results suggest that the mass of the dark matter particle is of the order of μ eV, while the scattering length has values in the range of 10{sup −7} fm.

  9. EDITORIAL: New criteria for Letters in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneham, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    Today, the median time from receipt to publication for regular articles in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is about four months. Letters can be reviewed, possibly revised, and on the Web in little more than a week in favourable circumstances, and the median time is six weeks. When the Journal of Physics series was started, over thirty years ago, Letters took typically three months from receipt to print, and articles took substantially longer. Now that publication times for regular papers are of a similar order to those of Letters in the past, it makes sense to review the types of submission we accept as Letters and put a higher premium on urgency. In the past, Letters have been of several different types. There have been Letters giving a first announcement of some important new result, and these have a justifiable urgency and need for priority. In addition, there have been what one might call short papers, self-contained pieces of work, but with no requirement for rapid publication. The Editorial Board of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has decided that in future all Letters published will have to satisfy criteria of significant importance and urgency. To achieve this, all manuscripts submitted as Letters will be processed as follows. First, the Letter will be looked at by a Board Member, who will decide whether or not the proposed Letter has the right level of importance, urgency, and interest to appear as a Letter. The Board Member will not usually act as referee, unless the Letter is in a field in which they normally referee. If their decision is yes, then the manuscript will go to a regular referee. Special efforts will be made to ensure rapid treatment, both by the referee and in processing at Bristol. The ideal Letter would address a significant topic in condensed matter physics. It would be recognized as important by a large number of condensed matter physicists, including those whose research area is a different one. So it is crucial that the

  10. Exploring matter-wave dynamics with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Rockson

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases provide a rich and versatile platform to study both single-particle and many-body quantum phenomena. This thesis describes several experiments using a Bose-Einstein condensate of Rb-87 as a model system to study novel matter-wave effects that traditionally arise in vastly different systems, yet are difficult to access. We study the scattering of a particle from a repulsive potential barrier in the non-asymptotic regime, for which the collision dynamics are on-going. Using a Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with a sharp repulsive potential, two distinct transient scattering effects are observed: one due to the momentary deceleration of particles atop the barrier, and one due to the abrupt discontinuity in phase written on the wavepacket in position-space, akin to quantum reflection. Both effects lead to a redistribution of momenta, resulting in a rich interference pattern that may be used to reconstruct the single-particle wavefunction. In a second experiment, we study the response of a particle in a periodic potential to an applied force. By abruptly applying an external force to a Bose-Einstein condensate in a one-dimensional optical lattice, we show that the initial response of a particle in a periodic potential is in fact characterized by the bare mass, and only over timescales long compared to that of interband dynamics is the usual effective mass an appropriate description. This breakdown of the effective mass description on fast timescales is difficult to observe in traditional solid state systems due to their large bandgaps and fast timescale of interband dynamics. Both these experiments make use of the condensate's long coherence length, and the ability to shape and modulate the external potential on timescales fast compared to the particle dynamics, allowing for observation of novel matter-wave effects.

  11. Response of Dark Matter Halos to Condensation of Baryons: Cosmological Simulations and Improved Adiabatic Contraction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2004-11-01

    The cooling of gas in the centers of dark matter halos is expected to lead to a more concentrated dark matter distribution. The response of dark matter to the condensation of baryons is usually calculated using the model of adiabatic contraction, which assumes spherical symmetry and circular orbits. In contrast, halos in the hierarchical structure formation scenarios grow via multiple violent mergers and accretion along filaments, and particle orbits in the halos are highly eccentric. We study the effects of the cooling of gas in the inner regions of halos using high-resolution cosmological simulations that include gas dynamics, radiative cooling, and star formation. We find that the dissipation of gas indeed increases the density of dark matter and steepens its radial profile in the inner regions of halos compared to the case without cooling. For the first time, we test the adiabatic contraction model in cosmological simulations and find that the standard model systematically overpredicts the increase of dark matter density in the inner 5% of the virial radius. We show that the model can be improved by a simple modification of the assumed invariant from M(r)r to M(r)r, where r and r are the current and orbit-averaged particle positions. This modification approximately accounts for orbital eccentricities of particles and reproduces simulation profiles to within 10%-20%. We present analytical fitting functions that accurately describe the transformation of the dark matter profile in the modified model and can be used for interpretation of observations.

  12. Amplification of matter rogue waves and breathers in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Kraenkel, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    We construct rogue wave and breather solutions of a quasi-two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent interatomic interaction and external trap. We show that the trapping potential and an arbitrary functional parameter that present in the similarity transformation should satisfy a constraint for the considered equation to be integrable and yield the desired solutions. We consider two different forms of functional parameters and investigate how the density of the rogue wave and breather profiles vary with respect to these functional parameters. We also construct vector localized solutions of a two coupled quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate system. We then investigate how the vector localized density profiles modify in the constant density background with respect to the functional parameters. Our results may help to manipulate matter rogue waves experimentally in the two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate systems.

  13. Low energy dynamics of non-perturbative structures in high energy and condensed matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Adam Joseph

    This dissertation presents some results on the application of low energy effective field theory vortex dynamics in condensed matter and materials systems. For the first half of the presentation we discuss the possibility of non-Abelian gapless excitations appearing on U(1) vortices in the B phase of superfluid 3He. Specifically, we focus on superfluid 3He-like systems with an enhanced SO(3) L rotational symmetry allowing for non-Abelian excitations to exist in the gapless spectrum of vortices. We consider a variety of vortices in the B-phase with different levels of symmetry breaking in the vortex core, and show conditions on the phenomenological parameters for certain vortices to be stable in the bulk. We then proceed to develope the low energy effective field theory of the various vortex types and consider the quantization of excitations. The process of quantization leads to interesting surprises due to non-lorentz symmetry that are not typically encountered in the analogous cases of U(1) x SU(N) gauge models discussed in high energy theory. The second half of this dissertation focuses on two types of vortices that appear in a particular model that is a modification of the well known Abelian-Higgs model. The specific modification includes a vector spin field in addition to the U(1) Higgs field and gauge fields of the original model. The particular form of the lagrangian results in a cholesteric vacuum structure, with interesting consequences for the vortices in the model. We observe the effects of such a modification on the well known U (1) vortex appearing in the original model due to the emergent spin field in the vortex core. We also consider a new type of vortex that is most closely related to a spin vortex. This vortex appears due to the topology introduced by the new spin field. The low energy effective field theory is also investigated for this type of vortex.

  14. PREFACE: REXS 2013 - Workshop on Resonant Elastic X-ray Scattering in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutier, G.; Mazzoli, C.; Yakhou, F.; Brown, S. D.; Bombardi, A.; Collins, S. P.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this workshop was to bring together experts in experimental and theoretical aspects of resonant elastic x-ray scattering, along with researchers who are new to the field, to discuss important recent results and the fundamentals of the technique. The meeting was a great success, with the first day dedicated to students and new researchers in the field, who received introductory lectures and tutorials. All conference delegates were invited either to make an oral presentation or to present a poster, accompanied by a short talk. The first two papers selected for the REXS13 proceedings (Grenier & Joly and Helliwell) give a basic background to the theory of REXS and applications across a wide range of scientific areas. The remainder of the papers report on some of the latest scientific results obtained by applying the REXS technique to contemporary problems in condensed matter, materials and x-ray physics. It is hoped that these proceedings provide a snapshot of the current status of a vibrant and diverse scientific technique that will be of value not just to those who attended the workshop but also to any other reader with an interest in the subject. Local Scientific Committee REXS13 International Scientific Advisory Committee M Altarelli, European XFEL, Germany F de Bergevin, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France J Garcia-Ruiz, Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain A I Goldman, Iowa State University, USA M Goldmann, Institut Nanosciences, France T Schulli, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France C R Natoli, Laboratori Nazionali de Frascati, Italy G Materlik, Diamond Light Source, UK L Paolasini, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France U Staub, Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland K Finkelstein, Cornell University, USA Y Murakami, Photon Factory, Japan REXS13 Local Scientific Committee G Beutier, CNRS Grenoble, France C Mazzoli, Politecnico di Milano, Italy F Yakhou, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France S D Brown, XMaS UK CRG

  15. Constraints on Bose-Einstein-condensed axion dark matter from the Hi nearby galaxy survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2014-05-01

    One of the leading candidates for dark matter is the axion or axionlike particle in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). In this paper, we present an analysis of 17 high-resolution galactic rotation curves from the Hi nearby galaxy survey (THINGS) data [F. Walter et al., Astron. J. 136, 2563 (2008)] in the context of the axionic Bose-Einstein condensed dark matter model. Assuming a repulsive two-body interaction, we solve the nonrelativistic Gross-Pitaevskii equation for N gravitationally trapped bosons in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We obtain the maximum possible radius R and the mass profile M(r) of a dilute axionic Bose-Einstein condensed gas cloud. A standard least- χ2 method is employed to find the best-fit values of the total mass M of the axion BEC and its radius R. The local mass density of BEC axion dark matter is ρa ≃0.02 GeV /cm3, which agrees with that presented by Beck [C. Beck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 231801 (2013)]. The axion mass ma we obtain depends not only on the best-fit value of R, but also on the s-wave scattering length a (ma∝a1/3). The transition temperature Ta of an axion BEC on galactic scales is also estimated. Comparing the calculated Ta with the ambient temperature of galaxies and galaxy clusters implies that a ˜10-3 fm. The corresponding axion mass is ma≃0.58 meV. We compare our results with others.

  16. PREFACE: 10th Summer School on Theoretical Physics 'Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulek, Tadeusz; Wal, Andrzej; Lulek, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Tenth Summer School on Theoretical Physics under the banner title 'Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter' (SSPCM 2009). The School was organized by Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland, in cooperation with AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow, Poland, and took place on 2-9 September 2009 in Myczkowce, Poland. With this meeting we have reached the round number ten of the series of biannual SSPCM schools, which started in 1990 and were focused on some advanced mathematical methods of condensed matter physics. The first five meetings were held in Zajaczkowo near Poznan, under the auspices of The Institute of Physics of Adam Mickiewicz University, and the last five in Myczkowce near Rzeszów, in the south-eastern part of Poland. Within these two decades several young workers who started at kindergarten lectures at SSPCM, have now reached their PhD degrees, professorships and authority. Proceedings of the first seven SSPCM meetings were published as separate volumes by World Scientific, and the last two as volumes 30 and 104 of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The present meeting is also the third of the last schools which put the emphasis on quantum informatics. The main topics of our jubilee SSPCM'09 are the following: Information processing, entanglement, and tensor calculus, Integrable models and unitary symmetry, Finite systems and nanophysics. The Proceedings are divided into three parts accordingly. The school gathered together 55 participants from seven countries and several scientific centers in Poland, accommodating again advanced research with young collaborators and students. Acknowledgements The Organizing Committee would like to express its gratitude to all participants for their many activities during the School and for creating a friendly and inspiring atmosphere within our SSPCM society. Special thanks are due to all lecturers for preparing and presenting their talks and

  17. Bright-matter solitons in a uniformly feeded Bose-Einstein condensate with expulsive harmonic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dikande, Alain Moiese

    2008-07-15

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which describes the dynamics of a one-dimensional uniformly feeded attractive Bose-Einstein condensate in an expulsive potential of arbitrary harmonic shape -a{sub 2}x{sup 2}+a{sub 1}x, is solved analytically following the inverse scattering transform method. Within this approach, bright-matter waves are obtained as exact envelope-soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation with a complex harmonic potential. The envelope shapes mimic double-lump pulses of unequal amplitudes symmetric with respect to the potential maximum, moving simultaneously at nonconstant accelerations with amplitudes that vary in time.

  18. A short guide to topological terms in the effective theories of condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Takayoshi, Shintaro

    2015-02-01

    This article is meant as a gentle introduction to the topological terms that often play a decisive role in effective theories describing topological quantum effects in condensed matter systems. We first take up several prominent examples, mainly from the area of quantum magnetism and superfluids/superconductors. We then briefly discuss how these ideas are now finding incarnations in the studies of symmetry-protected topological phases, which are in a sense a generalization of the concept of topological insulators to a wider range of materials, including magnets and cold atoms.

  19. A short guide to topological terms in the effective theories of condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Akihiro; Takayoshi, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    This article is meant as a gentle introduction to the topological terms that often play a decisive role in effective theories describing topological quantum effects in condensed matter systems. We first take up several prominent examples, mainly from the area of quantum magnetism and superfluids/superconductors. We then briefly discuss how these ideas are now finding incarnations in the studies of symmetry-protected topological phases, which are in a sense a generalization of the concept of topological insulators to a wider range of materials, including magnets and cold atoms. PMID:27877742

  20. Physics in the Andean Countries: A Perspective from Condensed Matter, Novel Materials and Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, P.

    2009-05-01

    We will discuss the current state of R&D in the fields of condensed matter, novel materials, and nanotechnology in the Andean nations. We will initially consider Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to then visualize individual developments, as well as those for the region as a whole in these fields of knowledge in each of the nations constituting the Andean Region (Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Venezuela, Peru, and Colombia). Based on Science & Technology watch exercises in the countries involved, along with the Iberian American and Inter-American Science & Technology Network of Indicators (Red de indicadores de Ciencia y Tecnolog'ia (RICYT) iberoamericana e interamericana)1, we will reveal statistical data that will shed light on the development in the fields mentioned. As will be noted, total R&D investment in Latin American and Caribbean countries remained constant since 1997. In spite of having reached a general increase in publications without international collaboration in LAC nations, the countries with greatest research productivity in Latin America (Argentina, Mexico, Brazil, and Chile) have strengthened their international collaboration with the United States, France, Germany, and Italy through close links associated with the formation processes of their researchers. Academic and research integration is evaluated through joint authorship of scientific articles, evidencing close collaboration in fields of research. This principle has been used in the creation of cooperation networks among participating nations. As far as networks of research on condensed matter, novel materials, and nanotechnology, the Andean nations have not consolidated a regional network allowing permanent and effective cooperation in research and technological development; as would be expected, given their idiomatic and cultural similarities, their historical background, and geographical proximity, which have been integrating factors in other research areas or socio-economic aspects. This

  1. The management of matter rogue waves in F = 1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomba, Shally

    2015-06-01

    We have reported the matter rogue wave solutions for the nonautonomous three coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation which governs the pulse propagation in spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with time modulated nonlinearities. The system under consideration has attractive mean-field interactions and ferromagnetic spin-exchange interactions. The exact solutions have been worked out by using similarity and scaling transformations. We have depicted the controllable center characteristics of rogue waves for the kink-type spin-exchange interactions. Additionally, we have also discussed the management of rogue waves for the hyperbolic form of spin-exchange interactions by invoking isospectral Hamiltonian deformation technique.

  2. Cosmological perturbations during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, R.C.; Gonçalves, S.V.B. E-mail: sergio.vitorino@pq.cnpq.br

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, we analyze the evolution of the scalar and tensorial perturbations and the quantities relevant for the physical description of the Universe, as the density contrast of the scalar perturbations and the gravitational waves energy density during the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. The behavior of these parameters during the Bose-Einstein phase transition of dark matter is analyzed in details. To study the cosmological dynamics and evolution of scalar and tensorial perturbations in a Universe with and without cosmological constant we use both analytical and numerical methods. The Bose-Einstein phase transition modifies the evolution of gravitational waves of cosmological origin, as well as the process of large-scale structure formation.

  3. High-performance computational condensed-matter physics in the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.; Svec, L.; Gardner, J. P.; Prange, M. P.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of high performance scientific computation in condensed-matter physics using cloud computers as an alternative to traditional computational tools. The availability of these large, virtualized pools of compute resources raises the possibility of a new compute paradigm for scientific research with many advantages. For research groups, cloud computing provides convenient access to reliable, high performance clusters and storage, without the need to purchase and maintain sophisticated hardware. For developers, virtualization allows scientific codes to be pre-installed on machine images, facilitating control over the computational environment. Detailed tests are presented for the parallelized versions of the electronic structure code SIESTA ootnotetextJ. Soler et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 14, 2745 (2002). and for the x-ray spectroscopy code FEFF ootnotetextA. Ankudinov et al., Phys. Rev. B 65, 104107 (2002). including CPU, network, and I/O performance, using the the Amazon EC2 Elastic Cloud.

  4. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  5. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-07-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  6. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  7. Creating a Community to Strengthen the Broader Impacts of Condensed Matter Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenwalla, Shireen; Bosley, Jocelyn; Voth, Gregory; Smith, Leigh

    The Broader Impacts (BI) merit criteria set out by the National Science Foundation are essential for building the public support necessary for science to flourish. Condensed matter physicists (CMP) have made transformative impacts on our society, but these are often invisible to the public. Communicating the societal benefits of our research can be challenging, because CMP consists of many independent research groups for whom effective engagement in the public arena is not necessarily a forte. Other BI activities, such as engaging K-12 students and teachers to increase scientific literacy and strengthen the STEM workforce, may be very effective, but these are often isolated and short in duration. To increase the visibility of CMP and to make the implementation of BI activities more efficient, we have created a website with two sides: a public side to communicate to a broad audience exciting scientific discoveries in CMP and the technologies they enable, and a private side for condensed matter researchers to communicate with one another about effective broader impact activities. Here we discuss the content of the new website, and the best practices we have identified for communicating the excitement of CMP research to the broadest possible audience. Nsf-DMR 1550737, 1550724 and 1550681.

  8. PHOTOEMISSION AS A PROBE OF THE COLLECTIVE EXCITATIONS IN CONDENSED MATTER SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, P.D.; VALLA, T.

    2006-08-01

    New developments in instrumentation have recently allowed photoemission measurements to be performed with very high energy and momentum resolution.[1] This has allowed detailed studies of the self-energy corrections to the lifetime and mass renormalization of excitations in the vicinity of the Fermi level. These developments come at an opportune time. Indeed the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the cuprates and related systems is presenting a range of challenges for condensed matter physics.[2] Does the mechanism of high T{sub c} superconductivity represent new physics? Do we need to go beyond Landau's concept of the Fermi liquid?[3] What, if any, is the evidence for the presence or absence of quasiparticles in the excitation spectra of these complex oxides? The energy resolution of the new instruments is comparable to or better than the energy or temperature scale of superconductivity and the energy of many collective excitations. As such, photoemission has again become recognized as an important probe of condensed matter. Studies of the high T{sub c} superconductors and related materials are aided by the observation that they are two dimensional. To understand this, we note that the photoemission process results in both an excited photoelectron and a photohole in the final state. Thus the experimentally measured photoemission peak is broadened to a width reflecting contributions from both the finite lifetime of the photohole and the momentum broadening of the outgoing photoelectron.

  9. The History of the APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter Topical Group

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-05-02

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wave/high pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  10. History of the APS Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W

    2001-10-19

    In order to provide broader scientific recognition and to advance the science of shock compressed condensed matter, a group of American Physical Society (APS) members worked within the Society to make this field an active part of the APS. Individual papers were presented at APS meetings starting in the 1940's and shock wave sessions were organized starting with the 1967 Pasadena meeting. Shock wave topical conferences began in 1979 in Pullman, WA. Signatures were obtained on a petition in 1984 from a balanced cross-section of the shock wave community to form an APS Topical Group (TG). The APS Council officially accepted the formation of the Shock Compression of Condensed Matter (SCCM) TG at its October 1984 meeting. This action firmly aligned the shock wave field with a major physical science organization. Most early topical conferences were sanctioned by the APS while those held after 1992 were official APS meetings. The topical group organizes a shock wave topical conference in odd numbered years while participating in shock wavehigh pressure sessions at APS general meetings in even numbered years.

  11. Nonautonomous matter waves in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yu-Jia; Gao, Yi-Tian; Zuo, Da-Wei; Sun, Yu-Hao; Feng, Yu-Jie; Xue, Long

    2014-06-01

    To investigate nonautonomous matter waves with time-dependent modulation in a one-dimensional trapped spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate, we hereby work on the generalized three-coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations by means of the Hirota bilinear method. By modulating the external trap potential, atom gain or loss, and coupling coefficients, we can obtain several nonautonomous matter-wave solitons and rogue waves including "bright" and "dark" shapes and arrive at the following conclusions: (i) the external trap potential and atom gain or loss can influence the propagation of matter-wave solitons and the duration and frequency of bound solitonic interaction, but they have little effect on the head-on solitonic interaction; (ii) through numerical simulation, stable evolution of the matter-wave solitons is realized with a perturbation of 5% initial random noise, and the spin-exchange interaction of atoms can be affected by the time-dependent modulation; (iii) under the influence of a periodically modulated trap potential and periodic atom gain or loss, rogue waves can emerge in the superposition of localized character and periodic oscillating properties.

  12. Nonautonomous matter waves in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Jia; Gao, Yi-Tian; Zuo, Da-Wei; Sun, Yu-Hao; Feng, Yu-Jie; Xue, Long

    2014-06-01

    To investigate nonautonomous matter waves with time-dependent modulation in a one-dimensional trapped spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate, we hereby work on the generalized three-coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations by means of the Hirota bilinear method. By modulating the external trap potential, atom gain or loss, and coupling coefficients, we can obtain several nonautonomous matter-wave solitons and rogue waves including "bright" and "dark" shapes and arrive at the following conclusions: (i) the external trap potential and atom gain or loss can influence the propagation of matter-wave solitons and the duration and frequency of bound solitonic interaction, but they have little effect on the head-on solitonic interaction; (ii) through numerical simulation, stable evolution of the matter-wave solitons is realized with a perturbation of 5% initial random noise, and the spin-exchange interaction of atoms can be affected by the time-dependent modulation; (iii) under the influence of a periodically modulated trap potential and periodic atom gain or loss, rogue waves can emerge in the superposition of localized character and periodic oscillating properties.

  13. Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Malheiro, M.; Dey, M.; Delfino, A.; Dey, J. |||

    1997-01-01

    It is known now that chiral symmetry restoration requires the meson-nucleon couplings to be density-dependent in nuclear-matter mean-field models. We further show that, quite generally, the quark and gluon condensates in medium are related to the trace of the energy-momentum tensor of nuclear matter and in these models the incompressibility K must be less than 3 times the chemical potential {mu}. In the critical density {rho}{sub c}, the gluon condensate is only reduced by 20{percent}, indicating a larger effective nucleon mass. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Investigations on the usefulness of the Massively Parallel Processor for study of electronic properties of atomic and condensed matter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, T. P.

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) for investigation of electronic structures and hyperfine properties of atomic and condensed matter systems was explored. The major effort was directed towards the preparation of algorithms for parallelization of the computational procedure being used on serial computers for electronic structure calculations in condensed matter systems. Detailed descriptions of investigations and results are reported, including MPP adaptation of self-consistent charge extended Hueckel (SCCEH) procedure, MPP adaptation of the first-principles Hartree-Fock cluster procedure for electronic structures of large molecules and solid state systems, and MPP adaptation of the many-body procedure for atomic systems.

  15. Matter wave switching in Bose-Einstein condensates via intensity redistribution soliton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, S.; Lakshmanan, M.; Muruganandam, P.

    2011-02-15

    Using time dependent nonlinear (s-wave scattering length) coupling between the components of a weakly interacting two component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), we show the possibility of matter wave switching (fraction of atoms transfer) between the components via shape changing/intensity redistribution (matter redistribution) soliton interactions. We investigate the exact bright-bright N-soliton solution of an effective one-dimensional (1D) two component BEC by suitably tailoring the trap potential, atomic scattering length, and atom gain or loss. In particular, we show that the effective 1D coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations with time dependent parameters can be transformed into the well known completely integrable Manakov model described by coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations by effecting a change of variables of the coordinates and the wave functions under certain conditions related to the time dependent parameters. We obtain the one-soliton solution and demonstrate the shape changing/matter redistribution interactions of two and three-soliton solutions for the time-independent expulsive harmonic trap potential, periodically modulated harmonic trap potential, and kinklike modulated harmonic trap potential. The standard elastic collision of solitons occur only for a specific choice of soliton parameters.

  16. Dynamics of analytical three-dimensional matter-wave solutions in Bose-Einstein condensates with multi-body interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hai-Qin; Dai, Wei; Tong, Aihong; Cai, Ze-Bin; Liang, Jian-Chu; He, Jun-Rong

    2014-03-01

    Using the F-expansion method we obtain a class of analytical matter-wave solutions to Bose-Einstein condensates with multi-body interactions through the three-dimensional quintic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of matter-wave solutions can be controlled by selecting the potential, quintic nonlinearity, and gain coefficients. The obtained matter-wave solutions may be generated by tuning the cubic nonlinearity to zero via the Feschbach resonance technique and making the quintic nonlinearity increasing rapidly enough toward the periphery. The stability analysis of the obtained matter-wave solutions is investigated analytically and numerically.

  17. Interplay of electron heating and saturable absorption in ultrafast extreme ultraviolet transmission of condensed matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cicco, Andrea; Hatada, Keisuke; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Gunnella, Roberto; Bencivenga, Filippo; Principi, Emiliano; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Filipponi, Adriano

    2014-12-01

    High intensity pulses obtained by modern extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray photon sources allows the observation of peculiar phenomena in condensed matter. Experiments performed at the Fermi@Elettra FEL-1 free-electron-laser source at 23.7, 33.5, and 37.5 eV on Al thin films, for an intermediate-fluence range up to about 20 J /cm2, show evidence for a nonmonotonic EUV transmission trend. A decreasing transmission up to about 5 -10 J /cm2 is followed by an increase at higher fluence, associated with saturable absorption effects. The present findings are interpreted within a simplified three-channel model, showing that an account of the interplay between ultrafast electron heating and saturation effects is required to explain the observed transmission trend.

  18. Matter rogue waves in an F=1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenyun; Mu, Gui

    2012-09-01

    We report new types of matter rogue waves of a spinor (three-component) model of the Bose-Einstein condensate governed by a system of three nonlinearly coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. The exact first-order rational solutions containing one free parameter are obtained by means of a Darboux transformation for the integrable system where the mean-field interaction is attractive and the spin-exchange interaction is ferromagnetic. For different choices of the parameter, there exists a variety of different shaped solutions including two peaks in bright rogue waves and four dips in dark rogue waves. Furthermore, by utilizing the relation between the three-component and the one-component versions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we can devise higher-order rational solutions, in which three components have different shapes. In addition, it is noteworthy that dark rogue wave features disappear in the third-order rational solution.

  19. Zoology of condensed matter: framids, ordinary stuff, extra-ordinary stuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolis, Alberto; Penco, Riccardo; Piazza, Federico; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    We classify condensed matter systems in terms of the spacetime symmetries they spontaneously break. In particular, we characterize condensed matter itself as any state in a Poincaré-invariant theory that spontaneously breaks Lorentz boosts while preserving at large distances some form of spatial translations, time-translations, and possibly spatial rotations. Surprisingly, the simplest, most minimal system achieving this symmetry breaking pattern — the framid — does not seem to be realized in Nature. Instead, Nature usually adopts a more cumbersome strategy: that of introducing internal translational symmetries — and possibly rotational ones — and of spontaneously breaking them along with their space-time counterparts, while preserving unbroken diagonal subgroups. This symmetry breaking pattern describes the infrared dynamics of ordinary solids, fluids, superfluids, and — if they exist — supersolids. A third, "extra-ordinary", possibility involves replacing these internal symmetries with other symmetries that do not commute with the Poincaré group, for instance the galileon symmetry, supersymmetry or gauge symmetries. Among these options, we pick the systems based on the galileon symmetry, the " galileids", for a more detailed study. Despite some similarity, all different patterns produce truly distinct physical systems with different observable properties. For instance, the low-energy 2 → 2 scattering amplitudes for the Goldstone excitations in the cases of framids, solids and galileids scale respectively as E 2, E 4, and E 6. Similarly the energy momentum tensor in the ground state is "trivial" for framids ( ρ + p = 0), normal for solids ( ρ + p > 0) and even inhomogenous for galileids.

  20. Cosmological constraints on Bose-Einstein-condensed scalar field dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bohua; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2014-04-01

    Despite the great successes of the cold dark matter (CDM) model in explaining a wide range of observations of the global evolution and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure in the Universe, the origin and microscopic nature of dark matter is still unknown. The most common form of CDM considered to date is that of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), but, so far, attempts to detect WIMPs directly or indirectly have not yet succeeded, and the allowed range of particle parameters has been significantly restricted. Some of the cosmological predictions for this kind of CDM are even in apparent conflict with observations (e.g., cuspy-cored halos and an overabundance of satellite dwarf galaxies). For these reasons, it is important to consider the consequences of different forms of CDM. We focus here on the hypothesis that the dark matter is comprised, instead, of ultralight bosons that form a Bose-Einstein condensate, described by a complex scalar field, for which particle number per unit comoving volume is conserved. We start from the Klein-Gordon and Einstein field equations to describe the evolution of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in the presence of this kind of dark matter. We find that, in addition to the radiation-, matter-, and Λ-dominated phases familiar from the standard CDM model, there is an earlier phase of scalar-field domination, which is special to this model. In addition, while WIMP CDM is nonrelativistic at all times after it decouples, the equation of state of Bose-Einstein condensed scalar field dark matter (SFDM) is found to be relativistic at early times, evolving from stiff (p ¯=ρ ¯) to radiationlike (p ¯=ρ ¯/3), before it becomes nonrelativistic and CDM-like at late times (p ¯=0). The timing of the transitions between these phases and regimes is shown to yield fundamental constraints on the SFDM model parameters, particle mass m, and self-interaction coupling strength λ. We show that SFDM is compatible with

  1. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dependence of pressure in a compressed condensed matter on parameters of high-power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, A. I.; Lebo, I. G.; Batani, D.

    2008-08-01

    Based on analysis of two-dimensional numerical calculations and experiments performed on the PALS setup, the similarity relations are obtained for determining pressure in a condensed matter irradiated by a short laser pulse of intensity 5×1013-5×1014 W cm-2.

  2. Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles: Final report, September 1, 1984-November 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Friedan, D.; Kadanoff, L.; Nambu, Y.; Shenker, S.

    1988-04-01

    Progress is reported in the field of condensed matter physics in the area of two-dimensional critical phenomena, specifically results allowing complete classification of all possible two-dimensional critical phenomena in a certain domain. In the field of high energy physics, progress is reported in string and conformal field theory, and supersymmetry.

  3. Research in the Theory of Condensed Matter and Elementary Particles: Final Report, September 1, 1984 - November 30, 1987

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedan, D.; Kadanoff, L.; Nambu, Y.; Shenker, S.

    1988-04-01

    Progress is reported in the field of condensed matter physics in the area of two-dimensional critical phenomena, specifically results allowing complete classification of all possible two-dimensional critical phenomena in a certain domain. In the field of high energy physics, progress is reported in string and conformal field theory, and supersymmetry.

  4. A novel artificial condensed matter lattice and a new platform for one-dimensional topological phases

    PubMed Central

    Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Koirala, Nikesh; Liu, Chang; Bian, Guang; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Chang, Guoqing; Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Sanchez, Daniel; Zheng, Hao; Brahlek, Matthew; Rogalev, Victor; Kim, Timur; Plumb, Nicholas C.; Chen, Chaoyu; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Taleb-Ibrahimi, Amina; Asensio, Maria-Carmen; Shi, Ming; Lin, Hsin; Hoesch, Moritz; Oh, Seongshik; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Engineered lattices in condensed matter physics, such as cold-atom optical lattices or photonic crystals, can have properties that are fundamentally different from those of naturally occurring electronic crystals. We report a novel type of artificial quantum matter lattice. Our lattice is a multilayer heterostructure built from alternating thin films of topological and trivial insulators. Each interface within the heterostructure hosts a set of topologically protected interface states, and by making the layers sufficiently thin, we demonstrate for the first time a hybridization of interface states across layers. In this way, our heterostructure forms an emergent atomic chain, where the interfaces act as lattice sites and the interface states act as atomic orbitals, as seen from our measurements by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By changing the composition of the heterostructure, we can directly control hopping between lattice sites. We realize a topological and a trivial phase in our superlattice band structure. We argue that the superlattice may be characterized in a significant way by a one-dimensional topological invariant, closely related to the invariant of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. Our topological insulator heterostructure demonstrates a novel experimental platform where we can engineer band structures by directly controlling how electrons hop between lattice sites. PMID:28378013

  5. Ferroelectric hybrid fibers to develop flexible sensors for shape sensing of smart textiles and soft condensed matter bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Tutu; Lusiola, Tony; Clemens, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Piezoelectric fibers are widely used in composites for actuator and sensor applications due to its ability to convert electrical pulses into mechanical vibrations and transform the returned mechanical vibrations back into electrical signal. They are beneficial for the fabrication of composites especially 1–3 composites, active fiber composites (unidirectional axially aligned PZT fibers sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes and embedded in a polymer matrix) etc, with potential applications in medical imaging, structural health monitoring, energy harvesting, vibration and noise control. However, due to the brittle nature of PZT fibers, maximum strain is limited to 0.2% and cannot be integrated into flexible sensor applications. In this contribution, a new approach to develop flexible ferroelectric hybrid fibers for soft body shape sensing is investigated. Piezoelectric particles incorporated in a polymer matrix and extruded as fiber, 0–3 composite in fibrous form is studied. Commercially obtained calcined PZT and calcined BaTiO3 powders were used in the unsintered form to obtain flexible soft condensed matter ferroelectric hybrid fibers. The extruded fibers were subjected to investigation for their electromechanical behavior as a function of electric field. The hybrid fibers reached 10% of the maximum polarization of their sintered counterpart.

  6. Light in condensed matter in the upper atmosphere as the origin of homochirality: circularly polarized light from Rydberg matter.

    PubMed

    Holmlid, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Clouds of the condensed excited Rydberg matter (RM) exist in the atmospheres of comets and planetary bodies (most easily observed at Mercury and the Moon), where they surround the entire bodies. Vast such clouds are recently proposed to exist in the upper atmosphere of Earth (giving rise to the enormous features called noctilucent clouds, polar mesospheric clouds, and polar mesospheric summer radar echoes). It has been shown in experiments with RM that linearly polarized visible light scattered from an RM layer is transformed to circularly polarized light with a probability of approximately 50%. The circular Rydberg electrons in the magnetic field in the RM may be chiral scatterers. The magnetic and anisotropic RM medium acts as a circular polarizer probably by delaying one of the perpendicular components of the light wave. The delay process involved is called Rabi-flopping and gives delays of the order of femtoseconds. This strong effect thus gives intense circularly polarized visible and UV light within RM clouds. Amino acids and other chiral molecules will experience a strong interaction with this light field in the upper atmospheres of planets. The interaction will vary with the stereogenic conformation of the molecules and in all probability promote the survival of one enantiomer. Here, this strong effect is proposed to be the origin of homochirality. The formation of amino acids in the RM clouds is probably facilitated by the catalytic effect of RM.

  7. Interference pattern in the collision of structures in the Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter model: Comparison with fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J. A; Guzman, F. S.

    2011-05-15

    In order to explore nonlinear effects on the distribution of matter during collisions within the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) dark matter model driven by the Schroedinger-Poisson system of equations, we study the head-on collision of structures and focus on the interference pattern formation in the density of matter during the collision process. We explore the possibility that the collision of two structures of fluid matter modeled with an ideal gas equation of state also forms interference patterns and found a negative result. Given that a fluid is the most common flavor of dark matter models, we conclude that one fingerprint of the BEC dark matter model is the pattern formation in the density during a collision of structures.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Many-Body Quantum Theory in Condensed Matter Physics—An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, D. E.

    2005-02-01

    This is undoubtedly an ambitious book. It aims to provide a wide ranging, yet self-contained and pedagogical introduction to techniques of quantum many-body theory in condensed matter physics, without losing mathematical `rigor' (which I hope means rigour), and with an eye on physical insight, motivation and application. The authors certainly bring plenty of experience to the task, the book having grown out of their graduate lectures at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen over a five year period, with the feedback and refinement this presumably brings. The book is also of course ambitious in another sense, for it competes in the tight market of general graduate/advanced undergraduate texts on many-particle physics. Prospective punters will thus want reasons to prefer it to, or at least give it space beside, well established texts in the field. Subject-wise, the book is a good mix of the ancient and modern, the standard and less so. Obligatory chapters deal with the formal cornerstones of many-body theory, from second quantization, time-dependence in quantum mechanics and linear response theory, to Green's function and Feynman diagrams. Traditional topics are well covered, including two chapters on the electron gas, chapters on phonons and electron phonon coupling, and a concise account of superconductivity (confined, no doubt judiciously, to the conventional BCS case). Less mandatory, albeit conceptually vital, subjects are also aired. These include a chapter on Fermi liquid theory, from both semi-classical and microscopic perspectives, and a freestanding account of one-dimensional electron gases and Luttinger liquids which, given the enormity of the topic, is about as concise as it could be without sacrificing clarity. Quite naturally, the authors' own interests also influence the choice of material covered. A persistent theme, which brings a healthy topicality to the book, is the area of transport in mesoscopic systems or nanostructures. Two chapters, some

  9. Equation of state in the pion condensation phase in asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Hiroki; Harada, Masayasu

    2014-12-01

    We study the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model by introducing a baryonic charge in the infrared boundary. We first show that, in the normal hadron phase, the predicted values of the symmetry energy and its slope parameter are comparable with the empirical values. We find that the phase transition from the normal phase to the pion condensation phase is delayed compared with the pure mesonic matter: the critical chemical potential is larger than the pion mass which is obtained for the pure mesonic matter. We also show that, in the pion condensation phase, the pion contribution to the isospin number density increases with the chemical potential, while the baryonic contribution is almost constant. Furthermore, the value of chiral condensation implies that the enhancement of the chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the asymmetric nuclear matter as in the pure mesonic matter. We also give a discussion on how to understand the delay in terms of the four-dimensional chiral Lagrangian including the rho and omega mesons based on the hidden local symmetry.

  10. Localized nonlinear matter waves in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with time- and space-modulated nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dengshan; Hu Xinghua; Liu, W. M.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the localized nonlinear matter waves in the two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with time- and space-modulated nonlinearities analytically and numerically. The similarity transformations are developed to solve the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations and two families of explicitly exact solutions are derived. Our results show that not only the attractive spatiotemporal inhomogeneous interactions but the repulsive ones support novel localized nonlinear matter waves in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. The dynamics of these matter waves, including the breathing solitons, quasibreathing solitons, resonant solitons, and moving solitons, is discussed. We confirm the stability of the exact solutions by adding various initial stochastic noise and study the general cases of the interaction parameters numerically. We also provide the experimental parameters to produce these phenomena in future experiments.

  11. Opportunities for Condensed Matter Research at the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (http://www.nnin.org)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2004-03-01

    A major challenge in science and engineering research at the nano-scale, and particularly for condensed matter, is the availability of infrastructure that can allow easy and quick implementation of structures, devices, or more complex systems necessary for making rigorous measurements or for other exploratory directions of interest. The experiments connect across length scales - nanometer and up, employ a variety of materials and techniques of assembly and patterning, and require a complex knowledge-mix derived from other research areas and tools that require skill and are hard to access. The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN; www.nnin.org) is an NSF-funded infrastructure of open shared facilities across the country that enables the national community to pursue research and technology development that can benefit from nanotechnology. The NNIN provides easy hands-on access to external users, remote usage, staff support, low cost usage, knowledge infrastructure, and brings together an extensive coordinated array of instruments for fabrication, synthesis, and characterization together with other infrastructure. Particularly relevant to condensed matter physics (e.g., in experiments involving single-electron transistor or its use in ultra-sensitive measurements, or measurements across a single nano-scale structure such as a molecule or a nanocrystal, development of new apparatus that allows X-ray measurements of soft materials, etc.) is the ability to integrate the small length scale through synthesis and electron-beam lithography, growth and deposition of a variety materials with controlled properties, patterning of complex shapes in the three-dimensions, connecting such structures, characterization, and the ability to achieve this quickly and at low cost. NNIN tool resources that span focused-ion beam, electron microscopy, spectroscopic techniques, etc. for characterization; synthesis, growth, deposition, etc. for assembling; lithography, etching

  12. EDITORIAL: Richard Palmer: celebrating 37 years with Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter Richard Palmer: celebrating 37 years with Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, David

    2009-01-01

    It is with a great deal of both happiness and sadness that I have to announce that we are losing one of the real strengths of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter (JPCM). Dr Richard Palmer, our Senior Publisher, announced his retirement, and this issue marks the first without his involvement. Of course, we are happy that he will get to enjoy his retirement, but we are sad to lose such a valuable member of our team. Richard first started work at IOP Publishing in March 1971 as an Editorial Assistant with Journal of Physics B: Atomic and Molecular Physics. After a few months, he transferred to Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics. During his first year, he was sent on a residential publishing training course and asked to sign an undertaking to stay at IOP Publishing for at least two years. Although Richard refused to sign, as he did not want to commit himself, he has remained with the journal since then. The following year, the Assistant Editor of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Malcolm Haines, walked out without notice in order to work on his family vineyard in France, and Richard stepped into the breach. In those days, external editors had a much more hands-on role in IOP Publishing and he had to travel to Harwell to be interviewed by Alan Lidiard, the Honorary Editor of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, before being given the job of Assistant Editor permanently. I am told that in those days the job consisted mainly of editing and proofreading and peer review. There was no journal development work. At some point in the early 1980s, production and peer review were split into separate departments and Richard then headed a group of journals consisting of Journal of Physics C: Solid State Physics, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics and Journal of Physics F: Metal Physics, Semiconductor Science and Technology, Superconductor Science and Technology, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, and later Nanotechnology and Modelling and Simulation

  13. Supermassive black holes from collapsing dark matter Bose–Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Patrick; Thareja, Eklavya

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of active galactic nuclei at redshifts ≳ 6 suggests that supermassive black holes (SMBHs) formed early on. Growth of the remnants of population III stars by accretion of matter, both baryonic as well as collisionless dark matter (DM), leading up to formation of SMBHs is a very slow process. Therefore, such models encounter difficulties in explaining quasars detected at z≳ 6 . Furthermore, massive particles making up collisionless DM have not only so far eluded experimental detection but they also do not satisfactorily explain gravitational structures on small scales. In recent years, there has been a surge in research activities concerning cosmological structure formation that involve coherent, ultra-light bosons in a dark fluid-like or fuzzy cold DM state. In this paper, we study collapse of such ultra-light bosonic halo DM that is in a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) phase to give rise to SMBHs on dynamical time scales. Time evolution of such self-gravitating BECs is examined using the Gross–Pitaevskii equation in the framework of time-dependent variational method. Comprised of identical dark bosons of mass m, BECs can collapse to form black holes of mass M eff on time scales  ∼108 yrs provided m~{{M}\\text{eff}}≳ 0.64~mPl2 . In particular, ultra-light dark bosons of mass ∼ {{10}-20}~\\text{eV} can lead to SMBHs with mass ≳ {{10}10}~{{M}ȯ} at z≈ 6 . Recently observed radio-galaxies in the ELAIS-N1 deep field with aligned jets can also possibly be explained if vortices of a rotating cluster size BEC collapse to form spinning SMBHs with angular momentum J≲ 3.6~{{n}W}\\frac{G{{M}2}}{c} , where n W and M are the winding number and mass of a vortex, respectively.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: A novel Dy3+-doped GdPO4 white-light phosphors under vacuum ultraviolet excitation for Hg-free lamps application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guo-Cai; Wang, Yu-Hua; Wu, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Jia-Chi

    2009-10-01

    Novel Dy3+-doped GdPO4 white light phosphors with monoclinic system were successfully synthesised by hydrothermal method at 240 °C. This paper investigates the luminescence properties of white-light Gd1-xPO4:xDy3+ under vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation. The strong absorption at around 147 nm in excitation spectrum energy can be transferred to the energy levels of Dy3+ ion from the host absorption. Additionally, this white light phosphors are activated by a single Dy3+ ion and with a lower preparation temperature, which tend to decrease the consumption of rare earth resource and energy. Therefore, the luminescence of Gd1-xPO4:xDy3+ under VUV excitation is effective, and proves to be promising in application to mercury-free lamp.

  15. Condensed-matter equation of states covering a wide region of pressure studied experimentally

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The relationships among the pressure P, volume V, and temperature T of solid-state materials are described by their equations of state (EOSs), which are often derived from the consideration of the finite-strain energy or the interatomic potential. These EOSs consist of typically three parameters to determine from experimental P-V-T data by fitting analyses. In the empirical approach to EOSs, one either refines such fitting parameters or improves the mathematical functions to better simulate the experimental data. Despite over seven decades of studies on EOSs, none has been found to be accurate for all types of solids over the whole temperature and pressure ranges studied experimentally. Here we show that the simple empirical EOS, P = α1(PV) + α2(PV)2 + α3(PV)3, in which the pressure P is indirectly related to the volume V through a cubic polynomial of the energy term PV with three fitting parameters α1–α3, provides accurate descriptions for the P-vs-V data of condensed matter in a wide region of pressure studied experimentally even in the presence of phase transitions. PMID:27976712

  16. Generation of directional, coherent matter beams through dynamical instabilities in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Graham R.; Johnsson, Mattias T.

    2010-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of a coupled, two-state Bose-Einstein condensate with nonequal scattering lengths and show that dynamical instabilities can be excited. We demonstrate that these instabilities are exponentially amplified, resulting in highly directional, oppositely propagating, coherent matter beams at specific momenta. To accomplish this we prove that the mean field of our system is periodic and extend the standard Bogoliubov approach to consider a time-dependent, but cyclic, background. This allows us to use Floquet’s theorem to gain analytic insight into such systems, rather than employing the usual Bogoliubov-de Gennes approach, which is usually limited to numerical solutions. We apply our theory to the metastable helium atom laser experiment by Dall [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.79.011601 79, 011601(R) (2009)] and show that it explains the anomalous beam profiles they observed. Finally, we demonstrate that the paired particle beams will be Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entangled on formation.

  17. High-Sensitivity Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Giga-Pascal Pressures: A New Tool for Probing Electronic and Chemical Properties of Condensed Matter under Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  18. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-10-10

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe.

  19. New constraints for low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter: fundamental consequences from classical and quantum dielectric theory.

    PubMed

    Chantler, C T; Bourke, J D

    2015-11-18

    We present new constraints for the transportation behaviour of low-momentum electronic excitations in condensed matter systems, and demonstrate that these have both a fundamental physical interpretation and a significant impact on the description of low-energy inelastic electron scattering. The dispersion behaviour and characteristic lifetime properties of plasmon and single-electron excitations are investigated using popular classical, semi-classical and quantum dielectric models. We find that, irrespective of constrained agreement to the well known high-momentum and high-energy Bethe ridge limit, standard descriptions of low-momentum electron excitations are inconsistent and unphysical. These observations have direct impact on calculations of transport properties such as inelastic mean free paths, stopping powers and escape depths of charged particles in condensed matter systems.

  20. State waste discharge permit application for cooling water and condensate discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, R.D.

    1996-08-12

    The following presents the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) Application for the Cooling Water and Condensate Discharges on the Hanford Site. This application is intended to cover existing cooling water and condensate discharges as well as similar future discharges meeting the criteria set forth in this document.

  1. Influence of the possible production of the globs of condensed matter on propagation of cosmic rays in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Grochalska, B.; Wdowczyk, J.

    Detailed analysis of cosmic ray data shows that there exist several phenomena which resist any interpretation based on direct extrapolation of the high-energy interaction picture. It is pointed out that most of them can be understood, if in high energy collisions there are properties similar to those of the globs of condensed matter suggested by Bjorken and McLerran (1979) as the explanation for the Centauro events.

  2. Shock waves in condensed matter - 1983; Proceedings of the Topical Conference, Santa Fe, NM, July 18-21, 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay, J. R.; Graham, R. A.; Straub, G. K.

    1984-09-01

    The responses of condensed matter to dynamic high pressure and temperature are examined in reviews and reports of theoretical and experimental investigations and numerical simulations. Topics addressed include the equation of state, constitutive modeling, simulation techniques, experimental methods, optical properties, laser-driven shocks, shock-induced modification and defects, shock-compression technology, geological and geophysical materials, energetic materials, and modeling of energetic materials. Graphs, photographs, drawings, and diagrams are provided.

  3. Affleck-Dine baryogenesis, condensate fragmentation and gravitino dark matter in gauge-mediation with a large messenger mass

    SciTech Connect

    Doddato, Francesca; McDonald, John E-mail: j.mcdonald@lancaster.ac.uk

    2011-06-01

    We study the conditions for successful Affleck-Dine baryogenesis and the origin of gravitino dark matter in GMSB models. AD baryogenesis in GMSB models is ruled out by neutron star stability unless Q-balls are unstable and decay before nucleosynthesis. Unstable Q-balls can form if the messenger mass scale is larger than the flat-direction field Φ when the condensate fragments. We provide an example based on AD baryogenesis along a d = 6 flat direction for the case where m{sub 3/2} ≈ 2GeV, as predicted by gravitino dark matter from Q-ball decay. Using a phenomenological GMSB potential which models the Φ dependence of the SUSY breaking terms, we numerically solve for the evolution of Φ and show that the messenger mass can be sufficiently close to the flat-direction field when the condensate fragments. We compute the corresponding reheating temperature and the baryonic charge of the condensate fragments and show that the charge is large enough to produce late-decaying Q-balls which can be the origin of gravitino dark matter.

  4. Invited article: High-pressure techniques for condensed matter physics at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yejun; Jaramillo, R; Wang, Jiyang; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, T F

    2010-04-01

    Condensed matter experiments at high pressure accentuate the need for accurate pressure scales over a broad range of temperatures, as well as placing a premium on a homogeneous pressure environment. However, challenges remain in diamond anvil cell technology, including both the quality of various pressure transmitting media and the accuracy of secondary pressure scales at low temperature. We directly calibrate the ruby fluorescence R1 line shift with pressure at T=4.5 K using high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction measurements of the silver lattice constant and its known equation of state up to P=16 GPa. Our results reveal a ruby pressure scale at low temperatures that differs by 6% from the best available ruby scale at room T. We also use ruby fluorescence to characterize the pressure inhomogeneity and anisotropy in two representative and commonly used pressure media, helium and methanol:ethanol 4:1, under the same preparation conditions for pressures up to 20 GPa at T=5 K. Contrary to the accepted wisdom, both media show equal levels of pressure inhomogeneity measured over the same area, with a consistent DeltaP/P per unit area of +/-1.8 %/(10(4) microm(2)) from 0 to 20 GPa. The helium medium shows an essentially constant deviatoric stress of 0.021+/-0.011 GPa up to 16 GPa, while the methanol:ethanol mixture shows a similar level of anisotropy up to 10 GPa, above which the anisotropy increases. The quality of both pressure media is further examined under the more stringent requirements of single crystal x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperature. For such experiments we conclude that the ratio of sample-to-pressure chamber volume is a critical parameter in maintaining sample quality at high pressure, and may affect the choice of pressure medium.

  5. Invited article : High pressure standards for condensed matter physics at low temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Jaramillo, R.; Wang, J.; Ren, Y.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-04-01

    Condensed matter experiments at high pressure accentuate the need for accurate pressure scales over a broad range of temperatures, as well as placing a premium on a homogeneous pressure environment. However, challenges remain in diamond anvil cell technology, including both the quality of various pressure transmitting media and the accuracy of secondary pressure scales at low temperature. We directly calibrate the ruby fluorescence R1 line shift with pressure at T = 4.5 K using high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction measurements of the silver lattice constant and its known equation of state up to P = 16 GPa. Our results reveal a ruby pressure scale at low temperatures that differs by 6% from the best available ruby scale at room T. We also use ruby fluorescence to characterize the pressure inhomogeneity and anisotropy in two representative and commonly used pressure media, helium and methanol:ethanol 4:1, under the same preparation conditions for pressures up to 20 GPa at T = 5 K. Contrary to the accepted wisdom, both media show equal levels of pressure inhomogeneity measured over the same area, with a consistent {Delta}P/P per unit area of {+-}1.8?%/(10{sup 4}{mu}m{sup 2}) from 0 to 20 GPa. The helium medium shows an essentially constant deviatoric stress of 0.021{+-}/{+-}0.011 GPa up to 16 GPa, while the methanol:ethanol mixture shows a similar level of anisotropy up to 10 GPa, above which the anisotropy increases. The quality of both pressure media is further examined under the more stringent requirements of single crystal x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperature. For such experiments we conclude that the ratio of sample-to-pressure chamber volume is a critical parameter in maintaining sample quality at high pressure, and may affect the choice of pressure medium.

  6. Invited Article: High-pressure techniques for condensed matter physics at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yejun; Jaramillo, R.; Wang, Jiyang; Ren, Yang; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2010-04-01

    Condensed matter experiments at high pressure accentuate the need for accurate pressure scales over a broad range of temperatures, as well as placing a premium on a homogeneous pressure environment. However, challenges remain in diamond anvil cell technology, including both the quality of various pressure transmitting media and the accuracy of secondary pressure scales at low temperature. We directly calibrate the ruby fluorescence R1 line shift with pressure at T=4.5 K using high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction measurements of the silver lattice constant and its known equation of state up to P=16 GPa. Our results reveal a ruby pressure scale at low temperatures that differs by 6% from the best available ruby scale at room T. We also use ruby fluorescence to characterize the pressure inhomogeneity and anisotropy in two representative and commonly used pressure media, helium and methanol:ethanol 4:1, under the same preparation conditions for pressures up to 20 GPa at T=5 K. Contrary to the accepted wisdom, both media show equal levels of pressure inhomogeneity measured over the same area, with a consistent ΔP /P per unit area of ±1.8%/(104 μm2) from 0 to 20 GPa. The helium medium shows an essentially constant deviatoric stress of 0.021±0.011 GPa up to 16 GPa, while the methanol:ethanol mixture shows a similar level of anisotropy up to 10 GPa, above which the anisotropy increases. The quality of both pressure media is further examined under the more stringent requirements of single crystal x-ray diffraction at cryogenic temperature. For such experiments we conclude that the ratio of sample-to-pressure chamber volume is a critical parameter in maintaining sample quality at high pressure, and may affect the choice of pressure medium.

  7. 40 CFR 405.90 - Applicability; description of the condensed milk subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the condensed milk subcategory. 405.90 Section 405.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Condensed...

  8. Scalar quanta in Fermi liquids: Zero sounds, instabilities, Bose condensation, and a metastable state in dilute nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    The spectrum of bosonic scalar-mode excitations in a normal Fermi liquid with local scalar interaction is investigated for various values and momentum dependence of the scalar Landau parameter f0 in the particle-hole channel. For f0 > 0 the conditions are found when the phase velocity on the spectrum of zero sound acquires a minimum at non-zero momentum. For -1 < f0 < 0 there are only damped excitations, and for f0 < -1 the spectrum becomes unstable against the growth of scalar-mode excitations. An effective Lagrangian for the scalar excitation modes is derived after performing a bosonization procedure. We demonstrate that the instability may be tamed by the formation of a static Bose condensate of the scalar modes. The condensation may occur in a homogeneous or inhomogeneous state relying on the momentum dependence of the scalar Landau parameter. We show that in the isospin-symmetric nuclear matter there may appear a metastable state at subsaturation nuclear density owing to the condensate. Then we consider a possibility of the condensation of the zero-sound-like excitations in a state with a non-zero momentum in Fermi liquids moving with overcritical velocities, provided an appropriate momentum dependence of the Landau parameter f0(k) > 0. We also argue that in peripheral heavy-ion collisions the Pomeranchuk instability may occur already for f0 > -1.

  9. Supersymmetric transformation approach to pseudopotentials in condensed matter physics and bosonic superconductivity in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei

    This thesis is divided into two parts. The first part, "Supersymmetric Transformation Approach to Pseudopotentials in Condensed Matter Physics", provides a new method to obtain pseudopotentials, The conventional methods of constructing pseudopotentials based on the spirit of Orthogonalized Plane Wave and Augmented Plane Wave, etc. as well as the modern version of the norm-conserving pseudopotentials through density functional theory are first reviewed. Our new supersymmetric approach is aimed at eliminating some of the disadvantages while retaining in full the advantages such as phase equivalence or norm-conserving properties of the pseudopotentials. Vast amounts of numerical computation can be eliminated as compared to the old methods. Details and examples are given. Part two, "Bosonic Superconductivity in Two Dimensions", describes a theory for high Tc superconductivity aimed at the current cuprates superconductors. The current status of the cuprates is first reviewed. A one-band Hubbard model is used to formulate the interaction among the holes doped into the layered compounds. Tightly bound pairs of size ˜ a few lattice spacings are obtained based on the Antiferromagnetic Background Approximation. They are shown to have the dsb{xsp2-ysp2} symmetry. Such boson-like pairs form the basis of charged boson models. After reviewing the properties of an ideal charged bose gas including a perfect Meissner effect for 3D, and a nearly perfect Meissner effect for 2D, we develop a theory for high Tc superconductivity without interlayer coupling as adapted, on the one hand, from Friedberg-Lee's mixed Boson-Fermion model to 2D and, on the other hand, from May's work on two-dimensional ideal charged bosons. In addition to the critical temperature Tsb{May} for transition to a phase exhibiting a near-perfect Meissner effect, a new transition temperature Tsb{c} depending on the finite area of the system and the temperature-dependent coherence length is introduced. The appearance

  10. Role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. I - Generation of gases and condensates under dry condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1985-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments conducted at 200 and 300 C on kerogen and bitumen from the Monterey formation and on the Green River Formation kerogen with montmorillonite, illite, and calcite added are described. The pyrolysis products are identified and gas and condensate analyses are performed. A catalytic effect is detected in the pyrolysis of kerogen with montmorillonite; however, illite and calcite display no catalytic activity. The increased production of C1-C6 hydrocarbons and the dominance of branched hydrocarbons in the C4-C6 range reveals a catalytic influence. It is observed that the catalysis of montmorillonite is greater during bitumen pyrolysis than for kerogen, and catalysis with minerals affects the production of CO2. It is concluded that a mineral matrix is important in determining the type and amount of gases and condensates forming from organic matter under thermal stress.

  11. Trapping of water vapor from an atmosphere by condensed silicate matter formed by high-temperature pulse vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Dikov, Yu. P.; Yakovlev, O. I.; Wlotzka, F.

    1993-01-01

    The origin of planetary atmospheres is thought to be the result of bombardment of a growing planet by massive planetesimals. According to some models, the accumulation of released water vapor and/or carbon dioxide can result in the formation of a dense and hot primordial atmosphere. Among source and sink processes of atmospheric water vapor the formation of hydroxides was considered mainly as rehydration of dehydrated minerals (foresterite and enstatite). From our point of view, the formation of hydroxides is not limited to rehydration. Condensation of small silicate particles in a spreading vapor cloud and their interaction with a wet atmosphere can also result in the origin of hydrated phases which have no genetic connections with initial water bearing minerals. We present results of two experiments of a simulated interaction of condensed silicate matter which originated during vaporization of dry clinopyroxene in a wet helium atmosphere.

  12. Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter - Proceedings of the 4th International School on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulek, T.; Florek, W.; Lulek, B.

    1997-07-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Committees and Sponsors * Eugene Wigner and Translational Symmetries * PART A. GROUP ACTION ON SETS AND HIDDEN SYMMETRIES; BETHE ANSATZ * Physical Implications of Crystal Symmetry and Time Reversal * Bethe's Ansatz and the Marshall Rule * Symmetry Properties of Small Amounts of Matter: Clusters and Surface Reconstructions * Analyticity of Bloch and Wannier Functions -- Properties of Berry Phases * τ-Numeration, τ-Wavelets and Diffraction Formulas for the Fibonacci Chain * Dynamical Symmetry * Lorentz Group in Condensed Matter Physics * Geometric Properties of Potentials of Electric Charges * Quadratic Algebra as Dynamic Symmetry * Energy Eigenstates of High Symmetry Electron Systems by Means of Subspace Density Functionals * Optical Tensors in Spatially Modulated Magnetic Systems * Thermodynamic Properties of Spin Systems by Means of the Method of Hierarchy of Algebras * Isoenergetic Surfaces and the Density of States in Low-Symmetrical Crystals * Critical Comments on the Infinite Volume Limit * Orbit Spaces of Compact Linear Groups * The Orbit Space Approach to the Theory of Phase Transitions: The Non-Coregular Case * PART B. MOLECULAR PHYSICS, SYMMETRIC AND UNITARY GROUPS * Combinatorial Aspects of Representations of the Unitary Group * Plethysm in Physics and Chemistry Applications * Group Theory and the Meaning of Life? * Finite States and the Constructive Theory of Discrete Structures * Affine Kac-Moody Algebras and Their Representations * Quantum Systems with Finite Hilbert Space * Casimir Operators of the Unitary Group and Spectral Density Distribution Moments * Quasi-Exact Solvability of a System of Coupled Equations: The Canonical Form of the Rabi and E ⊗ ɛ Jahn-Teller Hamiltonians * Affine Kac-Moody Algebras and the D-Dimensional Hydrogen Atom * Symmetry Classification of Magnetic Excitations in Thulium Iron Garnet * Spectral Density of a Periodic J-Matrix * PART C. STATISTICS OF PARTICLES

  13. Measure Guideline. Condensing Boilers - Control Strategies for Optimizing Performance and Comfort in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.

    2013-05-01

    This guide is intended for designers and installers of hydronic heating systems interested in maximizing the overall system efficiency of condensing boilers when coupled with baseboard convectors. It is applicable to new and retrofit projects.

  14. Anitproton-matter interactions in antiproton applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, David L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    By virtue of the highly energetic particles released when they annihilate in matter, antiprotons have a variety of potentially important applications. Among others, these include remote 3-D density and composition imaging of the human body and also of thick, dense materials, cancer therapy, and spacecraft propulsion. Except for spacecraft propulsion, the required numbers of low energy antiprotons can be produced, stored, and transported through reliance on current or near term technology. Paramount to these applications and to fundamental research involving antiprotons is knowledge of how antiprotons interact with matter. The basic annihilation process is fairly well understood, but the antiproton annihilation and energy loss rates in matter depend in complex ways on a number of atomic processes. The rates, and the corresponding cross sections, were measured or are accurately predictable only for limited combinations of antiproton kinetic energy and material species.

  15. Numerical solution of the gross-pitaevskii equation using an explicit finite-difference scheme: An application to trapped bose-einstein condensates

    PubMed

    Cerimele; Chiofalo; Pistella; Succi; Tosi

    2000-07-01

    We present the application of a fast, explicit time-marching scheme for the solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in cylindrical geometry. The scheme is validated on simple analytical tests and demonstrated for two situations of physical interest in experiments on the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of trapped alkali-metal vapors. It is tested by reproducing known results on the free expansion of a BEC after removing a cylindrical trap, and it is then used to address the formation of matter-wave pulses that result from gravity-induced transport of a condensate in an optical potential.

  16. Block Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with Condensed Matter Cluster Type Targets for p-B11 Powered Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, George H.; Hora, H.; Badziak, J.; Wolowski, J.; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Osman, F.; Zhang Weiyan; Tuhe Xia

    2009-03-16

    The use of laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) for space propulsion has been the subject of several earlier conceptual design studies, (see: Orth, 1998; and other references therein). However, these studies were based on older ICF technology using either 'direct' or 'in-direct x-ray driven' type target irradiation. Important new directions have opened for laser ICF in recent years following the development of 'chirped' lasers capable of ultra short pulses with powers of TW up to few PW which leads to the concept of 'fast ignition (FI)' to achieve higher energy gains from target implosions. In a recent publication the authors showed that use of a modified type of FI, termed 'block ignition' (Miley et al., 2008), could meet many of the requirements anticipated (but not then available) by the designs of the Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Applications (VISTA) ICF fusion propulsion ship (Orth, 2008) for deep space missions. Subsequently the first author devised and presented concepts for imbedding high density condensed matter 'clusters' of deuterium into the target to obtain ultra high local fusion reaction rates (Miley, 2008). Such rates are possible due to the high density of the clusters (over an order of magnitude above cryogenic deuterium). Once compressed by the implosion, the yet higher density gives an ultra high reaction rate over the cluster volume since the fusion rate is proportional to the square of the fuel density. Most recently, a new discovery discussed here indicates that the target matrix could be composed of B{sup 11} with proton clusters imbedded. This then makes p-B{sup 11} fusion practical, assuming all of the physics issues such as stability of the clusters during compression are resolved. Indeed, p-B{sup 11} power is ideal for fusion propulsion since it has a minimum of unwanted side products while giving most of the reaction energy to energetic alpha particles which can be directed into an exhaust (propulsion) nozzle

  17. Mixing light and matter waves: Principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuping

    The work of this dissertation is committed to theoretically explore rich physics involving quantum-mechanical mixing of light and matter waves, while specifically seeking applications in the fields of quantum interferometry, quantum information processing, and testing fundamental quantum mechanics. Towards this goal, the present research is guided by two lines. The first line is to study and manipulate collective behaviors of multi-atom systems at quantum-degenerate temperature, where the wave nature of atoms is maximized. Specifically, a variety of phase-coherent mixing processes of two macroscopic matter-waves, in the form of gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), are investigated and engineered via (i) tuning atomic collisional interaction and/or inter-wave tunneling rate; (ii) mixing with optical waves of phase-locked lasers. By these means, a series of novel applications are proposed for generating highly nonclassical states, Heisenberg-uncertainty phase measurements and ultra-fast quantum state mapping between light and matter waves. The second line is to coherently mix single atoms with light beams in free space. It is well known that the free-space atom-photon interactions are weak, usually dominated by incoherent dissipation via spontaneous emission. Usable couplings between atoms and photons are routinely realized by confining them in high-finesse optical cavities in the strong coupling regime. The goal of the present work is to use ultrahigh-sensitivity quantum interferometry and the quantum Zeno effect to overcome the weak free-space atom-photon coupling, thus leading to implementations of quantum information processing in free space. Along the first line of this dissertation, chapter II describes a dynamical approach to create many-particle Schrodinger cat states, created in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a double-well potential, via the technique of Feshbach resonance. A detection scheme for cat states is proposed via revivial of the initial

  18. Localized spatially nonlinear matter waves in atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates with space-modulated nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Li, Ji; Han, Wei; Wang, Deng-Shan; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nonlinearity is the most remarkable characteristic of the Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) systems. Many studies have been done on atomic BECs with time- and space- modulated nonlinearities, while there is few work considering the atomic-molecular BECs with space-modulated nonlinearities. Here, we obtain two kinds of Jacobi elliptic solutions and a family of rational solutions of the atomic-molecular BECs with trapping potential and space-modulated nonlinearity and consider the effect of three-body interaction on the localized matter wave solutions. The topological properties of the localized nonlinear matter wave for no coupling are analysed: the parity of nonlinear matter wave functions depends only on the principal quantum number n, and the numbers of the density packets for each quantum state depend on both the principal quantum number n and the secondary quantum number l. When the coupling is not zero, the localized nonlinear matter waves given by the rational function, their topological properties are independent of the principal quantum number n, only depend on the secondary quantum number l. The Raman detuning and the chemical potential can change the number and the shape of the density packets. The stability of the Jacobi elliptic solutions depends on the principal quantum number n, while the stability of the rational solutions depends on the chemical potential and Raman detuning. PMID:27403634

  19. STRUCTURE AND TRANSFORMATION: Large Molecular Clusters as Models of Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartell, Lawrence S.

    1998-10-01

    This paper reviews investigations of homogeneous nucleation in phase transitions in large molecular clusters. The principal techniques brought to bear are electron diffraction analyses of transformations in clusters formed by condensation of vapor in supersonic expansions and computer simulations of spontaneous phase changes in clusters. Results obtained to date are contrasted with those of larger systems and interpreted in terms of nucleation theory. The review also refers to some unresolved aspects of nucleation theory.

  20. Sculpting quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate to generate calibrated matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akram, Javed; Pelster, Axel

    2016-02-01

    We explore theoretically how to tune the dynamics of a quasi-one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) due to an additional red- and blue-detuned Hermite-Gaussian dimple trap (HGdT). To this end we study a BEC in a highly nonequilibrium state, which is not possible in a traditional harmonically confined trap. Our system is modeled by a time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which is numerically solved by the Crank-Nicolson method in both imaginary and real time. For equilibrium, we obtain a condensate with two bumps or dips which are induced by the chosen TEM01 mode for the red- or blue-detuned HGdT, respectively. Afterward, in time-of-flight dynamics, we examine the adherence or decay of the two bumps or dips in the condensate, which are induced by the still present red- or blue-detuned HGdT, respectively. On the other hand, once the red or blue HGdT potential is switched off, shock waves or bi-trains of gray or dark pair-solitons are created. During this process it is found that the generation of gray or dark pair-soliton bi-trains are generic phenomena of collisions of moderately or fully fragmented BEC. Additionally, it turns out that the special shape of generated solitons in the harmonically trapped BEC firmly depends upon the geometry of the HGdT.

  1. [Infrared spectroscopy application in soil organic matter].

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Xi, S; Jiang, Y

    1998-02-01

    As an important method to study the constitution and properties of macromolecular organic compounds, the infrared spectroscopy has been more and more widely taken in the researches of soil organic matters (SOM). Especially,the application of FTIR and the combined uses of FTIR with chromatogram etc. have made the researches of SOM get a great progress in many aspects. In this paper, the infrared spectroscopy applications were reviewed in SOM. It includes the following contents: the methods to study SOM by IR, studies on the constitution of soil humic substances (SHS), extraction of SOM and classification of SHS, decomposition, transformation and humification of organic matters, the differences of SOM in different situations, the interactions of SHS with metais, clay minerals and other organics in soil.

  2. Plasmon enhanced photoelectron spectroscopy and the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses for use with condensed matter targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Phillip Michael

    Surface plasmon resonances (SPRs), collective oscillations of quasi-free electrons in metals, can produce strong electric field enhancements at the surface of nanoparticles. These oscillations typically occur at optical frequencies (thus having a period on the order of one to a few femtoseconds) and only remain coherent for a few to tens of femtoseconds. Because of their increasing importance in various applications, it is important to understand SPRs at a fundamental level. The ultrafast nature of the processes involved with SPRs make time-resolved spectroscopy an important tool for probing their dynamics. Recently developed light sources capable of producing isolated attosecond (10^-18 s) pulses of light can provide snapshots of electron dynamics on asub-femtosecond timescale. Fewer than a dozen laboratories in the world currently have the ability to produce such light pulses. In this dissertation I discuss the development and construction of an experimental apparatus capable of producing and utilizing isolated attosecond pulses to study condensed matter, including surface plasmon dynamics. The ultimate goal of the experiments presented here is to laser-excite plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures and to detect the field enhancement at the surface of the nanostructures by measuring photoelectron spectra. In the first experiment presented, electron photoemission from lithographically prepared gold nanopillars using nominally few-cycle, 800 nm laser pulses is described. Electron kinetic energies are observed that are higher by up to tens of eV compared to photoemission from a flat gold surface at the same laser intensities. A classical electron acceleration model consisting of multiphoton ionization followed by field acceleration qualitatively reproduces the electron kinetic energy data and suggests average enhanced electric fields due to the nanopillars that are between 25 and 39 times greater than the experimentally used laser fields. In the second

  3. 7 CFR 1412.50 - Matters of general applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Matters of general applicability. 1412.50 Section... and Peanuts 2008 through 2012 § 1412.50 Matters of general applicability. These regulations and CCC's... matters of general applicability and are not individually appealable in administrative appeals...

  4. 7 CFR 1412.50 - Matters of general applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Matters of general applicability. 1412.50 Section... and Peanuts 2008 Through 2012 § 1412.50 Matters of general applicability. These regulations and CCC's... matters of general applicability and are not individually appealable in administrative appeals...

  5. 7 CFR 1412.50 - Matters of general applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Matters of general applicability. 1412.50 Section... and Peanuts 2008 through 2012 § 1412.50 Matters of general applicability. These regulations and CCC's... matters of general applicability and are not individually appealable in administrative appeals...

  6. 7 CFR 1412.50 - Matters of general applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Matters of general applicability. 1412.50 Section... and Peanuts 2008 Through 2012 § 1412.50 Matters of general applicability. These regulations and CCC's... matters of general applicability and are not individually appealable in administrative appeals...

  7. 7 CFR 1412.50 - Matters of general applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Matters of general applicability. 1412.50 Section... and Peanuts 2008 through 2012 § 1412.50 Matters of general applicability. These regulations and CCC's... matters of general applicability and are not individually appealable in administrative appeals...

  8. Variational calculation of ground-state energy of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields. [at neutron star surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, E. G.; Ruderman, M. A.; Lee, J.-F.; Sutherland, P. G.; Hillebrandt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1977-01-01

    Variational calculations of the binding energies of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields (greater than 10 to the 12th gauss). These calculations include the electron exchange energy. The cohesive energy of the condensed matter, which is the difference between these two binding energies, is of interest in pulsar theories and in the description of the surfaces of neutron stars. It is found that the cohesive energy ranges from 2.6 keV to 8.0 keV.

  9. Kaon condensation in CFL quark matter, the Goldstone theorem, and the 2PI Hartree approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Leganger, Lars E.

    2011-05-23

    At very high densities, QCD is in the color-flavor-locked phase, which is a color-superconducting phase. The diquark condensates break chiral symmetry in the same way as it is broken in vacuum QCD and gives rise to an octet of pseudo-Goldstone bosons and a superfluid mode. The lightest of these are the charged and neutral kaons. For energies below the superconducting gap, the kaons are described by an O(2)xO(2)-symmetric effective scalar field theory with chemical potentials. We use this effective theory to study Bose-condensation of kaons and their properties as functions of the temperature and the chemical potentials. We use the 2-particle irreducible effective action formalism in the Hartree approximation. The renormalization of the gap equations and the effective potential is studied in detail and we show that the counterterms are independent of temperature and chemical potentials. We determine the phase diagram and the medium-dependent quasiparticle masses. It is shown that the Goldstone theorem is satisfied to a very good approximation.

  10. Matter-waves in Bose-Einstein condensates with spin-orbit and Rabi couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiquillo, Emerson

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) reduction of a quantum field theory starting from the three-dimensional (3D) many-body Hamiltonian of interacting bosons with spin-orbit (SO) and Rabi couplings. We obtain the effective time-dependent 1D and 2D nonpolynomial Heisenberg equations for both the repulsive and attractive signs of the inter-atomic interaction. Our findings show that in the case in which the many-body state coincides with the Glauber coherent state, the 1D and 2D Heisenberg equations become 1D and 2D nonpolynomial Schrödinger equations (NPSEs). These models were derived in a mean-field approximation from 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), describing a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with SO and Rabi couplings. In the present work self-repulsive and self-attractive localized solutions of the 1D NPSE and the 1D GPE are obtained in a numerical form. The combined action of SO and Rabi couplings produces conspicuous sidelobes on the density profile, for both signs of the interaction. In the case of the attractive nonlinearity, an essential result is the possibility of getting an unstable condensate by the increasing of SO coupling.

  11. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. II ---Numerical Results---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-10-01

    Results obtained by applying a formulation based on the reaction matrix theory developed in I are given. Calculations by making use of a modified realistic potential, the Reid soft-core potential with the OPEP-part enhanced due to the isobar (Δ)-mixing, show that the transition to the [ALS] phase of quasi-neutrons corresponding to a typical π0 condensation occurs in the region of (2 ˜ 3) times the nuclear density. The most important ingredients responsible for this transition are the growth of the attractive 3P2 + 3F2 contribution mainly from the spin-parallel pairs in the same leyers and the reduction of the repulsive 3P1 contribution mainly from the spin-antiparallel pairs in the nearest layers; these mainfest themselves as the [ALS]-type localization develops. Properties of the matter under the new phase thus obtained such as the shape of the Fermi surface and the effective mass are discussed.

  12. Potential condensed-matter realization of space-fractional quantum mechanics: the one-dimensional Lévy crystal.

    PubMed

    Stickler, B A

    2013-07-01

    We introduce and discuss the one-dimensional Lévy crystal as a probable candidate for an experimentally accessible realization of space-fractional quantum mechanics (SFQM) in a condensed-matter environment. The discretization of the space-fractional Schrödinger equation with the help of shifted Grünwald-Letnikov derivatives delivers a straightforward route to define the Lévy crystal of order αε(1,2]. As key ingredients for its experimental identification we study the dispersion relation as well as the density of states for arbitrary αε(1,2]. It is demonstrated that in the limit of small wave numbers all interesting properties of continuous-space SFQM are recovered, while for α→2 the well-established nearest-neighbor one-dimensional tight-binding chain arises.

  13. Vibronic spectra in condensed matter: A comparison of exact quantum mechanical and various semiclassical treatments for harmonic baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, S. A.; Rabani, Eran; Berne, B. J.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the problem of calculating the vibronic absorption spectrum of a diatomic molecule coupled to a condensed phase environment, where all nuclear degrees of freedom are taken in the quadratic approximation, and where the two electronic states couple differently to the solvent. This simple model is used to examine several commonly used semiclassical approximations. The method of Kubo-Toyozawa is adapted to enable exact calculation of the real-time dipole autocorrelation function for the quantum mechanical treatment. Alternatively, we derive an expression for this correlation function in terms of a path-integral influence functional, which is not limited to a finite number of bath modes and could be applied to treat anharmonic solutes in condensed matter. We then obtain an analytical solution for the classical treatment of nuclear dynamics, and develop a mixed quantum-classical approach, where the dynamics of the diatomic vibrational mode is treated quantum mechanically and the bath is treated classically. It is shown that the mixed quantum-classical treatment provides better agreement with the exact quantum treatment than the other approximations for a wide range of parameters. Exact analytical results similar to the pure dephasing theory of Skinner and Hsu are obtained for the asymptotic long time behavior of the dipole autocorrelation functions.

  14. Phase-space methods for the spin dynamics in condensed matter systems.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jérôme; Hervieux, Paul-Antoine; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2017-04-28

    Using the phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics, we derive a four-component Wigner equation for a system composed of spin-[Formula: see text] fermions (typically, electrons) including the Zeeman effect and the spin-orbit coupling. This Wigner equation is coupled to the appropriate Maxwell equations to form a self-consistent mean-field model. A set of semiclassical Vlasov equations with spin effects is obtained by expanding the full quantum model to first order in the Planck constant. The corresponding hydrodynamic equations are derived by taking velocity moments of the phase-space distribution function. A simple closure relation is proposed to obtain a closed set of hydrodynamic equations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  15. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. I ---Formulation---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-09-01

    Based on the viewpoint that a typical π0 condensation is realized with the [ALS] (Alternating-Layer-Spin) structure of nucleon system, a framework to calculate the energy of neutron matter under such a new phase is presented in the reaction matrix theory. This enables us to treat both effects on equal footing; the long-range effect dominated by the OPEP tensor component with the enhancement due to the mixing of Δ(1236MeV) and the sort-range effect much influenced by repulsive core and spin-orbit force. Starting with the [ALS] model wave function constructed on the Bloch basis which assures to take the limit of no localization, we have the expressions for energy quantities expressed by the partial-wave contributions. This scheme provides a way to understand the mechanism of energy gain in the new phase, by making use of the notions of the ordinary unclear matter theory such as the potential picture and the partial waves. Some numerical examples are shown.

  16. Brockhouse and others: Neutron Scattering and Condensed Matter Physics at Chalk River Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Eric

    2004-03-01

    research. One of its most notable achievements was the first convincing experimental demonstration (in 1982) that there was a substantial Bose-Einstein Condensate in superfluid helium, with the condensate fraction estimated to be approximately 13% at a temperature of 1 K.

  17. Measure Guideline: Condensing Boilers - Control Strategies for Optimizing Performance and Comfort in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.

    2013-05-01

    The combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater has become a common option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. While there are many condensing boilers available on the market with rated efficiencies in the low to mid 90% efficient range, it is imperative to understand that if the control systems are not properly configured, these heaters will perform no better than their non-condensing counterparts. Based on previous research efforts, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency (Arena 2010). It was found that there is a significant lack of information for contractors on how to configure the control systems to optimize overall efficiency. For example, there is little advice on selecting the best settings for the boiler reset curve or how to measure and set flow rates in the system to ensure that the return temperatures are low enough to promote condensing. It has also been observed that recovery from setback can be extremely slow and, at times, not achieved. Recovery can be affected by the outdoor reset control, the differential setting on the boiler and over-sizing of the boiler itself. This guide is intended for designers and installers of hydronic heating systems interested in maximizing the overall system efficiency of condensing boilers when coupled with baseboard convectors. It is applicable to new and retrofit applications.

  18. Massive parallel simulation of phenomena in condensed matter at high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    This talk deals with computational hydrodynamics, advanced material properties and phenomena at high energy density. New results of massive parallel 3D simulation done with method of individual particles in cells have been obtained. The gas dynamic code includes advanced physical models of matter such as multi-phase equations of state, elastic-plastic, spallation, optic properties and ion-beams stopping. Investigated are the influence on hypervelocity impact processes effects of equation of state, elastic-plastic and spallation. We also report results of numerical modeling of the action of intense heavy ion beams on metallic targets in comparison with new experimental data.

  19. 40 CFR 405.110 - Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory. 405.110 Section 405.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE...

  20. Towards a Realization of the Condensed-Matter-Gravity Correspondence in String Theory via Consistent Abelian Truncation of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Asadig; Murugan, Jeff; Nastase, Horatiu

    2012-11-01

    We present an embedding of the three-dimensional relativistic Landau-Ginzburg model for condensed matter systems in an N=6, U(N)×U(N) Chern-Simons-matter theory [the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model] by consistently truncating the latter to an Abelian effective field theory encoding the collective dynamics of O(N) of the O(N2) modes. In fact, depending on the vacuum expectation value on one of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena scalars, a mass deformation parameter μ and the Chern-Simons level number k, our Abelianization prescription allows us to interpolate between the Abelian Higgs model with its usual multivortex solutions and a ϕ4 theory. We sketch a simple condensed matter model that reproduces all the salient features of the Abelianization. In this context, the Abelianization can be interpreted as giving a dimensional reduction from four dimensions.

  1. Towards a realization of the condensed-matter-gravity correspondence in string theory via consistent Abelian truncation of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Asadig; Murugan, Jeff; Nastase, Horatiu

    2012-11-02

    We present an embedding of the three-dimensional relativistic Landau-Ginzburg model for condensed matter systems in an N = 6, U(N) × U(N) Chern-Simons-matter theory [the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena model] by consistently truncating the latter to an Abelian effective field theory encoding the collective dynamics of O(N) of the O(N(2)) modes. In fact, depending on the vacuum expectation value on one of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena scalars, a mass deformation parameter μ and the Chern-Simons level number k, our Abelianization prescription allows us to interpolate between the Abelian Higgs model with its usual multivortex solutions and a Ø(4) theory. We sketch a simple condensed matter model that reproduces all the salient features of the Abelianization. In this context, the Abelianization can be interpreted as giving a dimensional reduction from four dimensions.

  2. 40 CFR 405.90 - Applicability; description of the condensed milk subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... skim milk, sweetened condensed milk and condensed buttermilk. ... condensed milk subcategory. 405.90 Section 405.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Condensed...

  3. (Super)symmetries of semiclassical models in theoretical and condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngome, J.-P.

    2011-03-01

    Van Holten's covariant algorithm for deriving conserved quantities is presented, with particular attention paid to Runge-Lenz-type vectors. The classical dynamics of isospin-carrying particles is reviewed. Physical applications including non-Abelian monopole-type systems in diatoms, introduced by Moody, Shapere and Wilczek, are considered. Applied to curved space, the formalism of van Holten allows us to describe the dynamical symmetries of generalized Kaluza-Klein monopoles. The framework is extended to supersymmetry and applied to the SUSY of the monopoles. Yet another application concerns the three-dimensional non-commutative oscillator.

  4. PREFACE: 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics & 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-09-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38) and the 1st International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics: Condensed Matter, Soft Matter and Materials Physics (IWTCP-1). Both the conference and the workshop were held from 29 July to 1 August 2013 in Pullman hotel, Da Nang, Vietnam. The IWTCP-1 was a new activity of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society (VTPS) organized in association with the 38th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-38), the most well-known annual scientific forum dedicated to the dissemination of the latest development in the field of theoretical physics within the country. The IWTCP-1 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). The overriding goal of the IWTCP is to provide an international forum for scientists and engineers from academia to share ideas, problems and solution relating to the recent advances in theoretical physics as well as in computational physics. The main IWTCP motivation is to foster scientific exchanges between the Vietnamese theoretical and computational physics community and world-wide scientists as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. About 110 participants coming from 10 countries participated in the conference and the workshop. 4 invited talks, 18 oral contributions and 46 posters were presented at the conference. In the workshop we had one keynote lecture and 9 invited talks presented by international experts in the fields of theoretical and computational physics, together with 14 oral and 33 poster contributions. The proceedings were edited by Nguyen Tri Lan, Trinh Xuan Hoang, and Nguyen Ai Viet. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the conference and the workshop successful. Nguyen Ai Viet Chair of NCTP-38 and IWTCP-1

  5. Many-body quantum electrodynamics networks: Non-equilibrium condensed matter physics with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hur, Karyn; Henriet, Loïc; Petrescu, Alexandru; Plekhanov, Kirill; Roux, Guillaume; Schiró, Marco

    2016-10-01

    We review recent developments regarding the quantum dynamics and many-body physics with light, in superconducting circuits and Josephson analogues, by analogy with atomic physics. We start with quantum impurity models addressing dissipative and driven systems. Both theorists and experimentalists are making efforts towards the characterization of these non-equilibrium quantum systems. We show how Josephson junction systems can implement the equivalent of the Kondo effect with microwave photons. The Kondo effect can be characterized by a renormalized light frequency and a peak in the Rayleigh elastic transmission of a photon. We also address the physics of hybrid systems comprising mesoscopic quantum dot devices coupled with an electromagnetic resonator. Then, we discuss extensions to Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) Networks allowing one to engineer the Jaynes-Cummings lattice and Rabi lattice models through the presence of superconducting qubits in the cavities. This opens the door to novel many-body physics with light out of equilibrium, in relation with the Mott-superfluid transition observed with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices. Then, we summarize recent theoretical predictions for realizing topological phases with light. Synthetic gauge fields and spin-orbit couplings have been successfully implemented in quantum materials and with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices - using time-dependent Floquet perturbations periodic in time, for example - as well as in photonic lattice systems. Finally, we discuss the Josephson effect related to Bose-Hubbard models in ladder and two-dimensional geometries, producing phase coherence and Meissner currents. The Bose-Hubbard model is related to the Jaynes-Cummings lattice model in the large detuning limit between light and matter (the superconducting qubits). In the presence of synthetic gauge fields, we show that Meissner currents subsist in an insulating Mott phase.

  6. Dynamics of matter-wave solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length and complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, Emmanuel; Shehou, Abdourahman; Lakhssassi, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of matter-wave solitons in the one-dimensional (1-D) Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation describing Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with time-dependent scattering length in varying trapping potentials with feeding/loss term. By performing a modified lens-type transformation, we reduce the GP equation into a classical nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with distributed coefficients and find its integrable condition. Under the integrable condition, we apply the generalized Jacobian elliptic function method (GJEFM) and present exact analytical solutions which describe the propagation of a bright and dark solitons in BECs. Their stability is examined using analytic method. The obtained exact solutions show that the amplitude of bright and dark solitons depends on the scattering length, while their motion and the total number of BEC atoms depend on the external trapping potential. Our results also shown that the loss of atoms can dominate the aggregation of atoms by the attractive interaction, and thus the peak density can decrease in time despite that the strength of the attractive interaction is increased.

  7. Research in the theory of condensed matter and elementary particles. (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The proposed research is concerned with problems occupying the common ground between quantum field theory and statistical mechanics. The topics under investigation include: superconformal field theory in two dimensions, its relationship to two dimensional critical phenomena and its applications in string theory; the covariant formulation of the superstring theory; formation of large-scale structures and spatial chaos in dynamical systems; fermion-boson mass relations in BCS type theories; and properties of quantum field theories defined over galois fields. 37 refs.

  8. nanocrystallites condensed in vapor-phase for photocatalyst applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takehito; Yagi, Nobuyasu; Nakagou, Riki; Sugimura, Akira; Umezu, Ikurou

    2014-10-01

    We have synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocrystallites by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in oxygen (O2) background gas for photocatalyst applications. Varying O2 background gas pressure or substrate target distance ( D TS), it was possible to change weight fraction of anatase phase in the anatase/rutile mixture from 0.2 to 1.0. Porosity of the deposited TiO2 films increased with increasing and D TS. Relation between the process parameters and the formed crystal phases was explained from the point of cooling process in vapor-phase. Furthermore, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) was performed as post-annealing, suppressing sintering of the nanocrystallites. Photocatalytic activities of the TiO2 nanocrystallites depended on the RTA temperature and following crystallinity restoring as well as the crystal phase: anatase or rutile.

  9. Consequences of Non-Trivial Band Topology in Condensed Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan Ramakrishna

    The commonly adopted classification of the electronic phases of matter as metals, insulators, semimetals, semiconductors and superconductors can be refined by studying the topological properties of the band structure in these phases. This unveils a rich and diverse substructure, and helps to conclude the existence of topological phases—phases whose properties are robust against perturbations, possibly with the requirement that the perturbations preserve certain symmetries. In this dissertation, several topological phases are studied, and predictions are made for some unusual physical phenomena involving these phases. Some of these phenomena may be observable using current experimental techniques. Topological phases often carry unconventional surface states; experimental signatures for the surface states of a strong topological insulator are presented as well. We begin by systematically discussing the gapped phases, including some topological insulators and topological superconductors, proximate to a three-dimensional Dirac node. Studying topological defects in these phases reveals interesting duality relations between them, which provide potential routes for unconventional or non-Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson continuous phase transitions between them. Topological textures, on the other hand, can lead to very different physics, and we show that a bulk superconductor vortex in a topological insulator—a texture with a non-trivial Hopf index—acts like a fermion. As a corollary, we show that if the vortex string is terminated by a surface, the resulting dangling end traps a Majorana zero mode. The Majorana mode is found to be stable against doping the topological insulator, provided the doping is below a critical value set by Berry phase properties of the Fermi surface of the doped insulator. Importantly, several existing superconductors such as Cu-doped Bi2Se 3 and TlBiTe2 are predicted to host surface Majorana modes. In the absence of

  10. A smartphone application for earthquakes that matter!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossu, Rémy; Etivant, Caroline; Roussel, Fréderic; Mazet-Roux, Gilles; Steed, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Smartphone applications have swiftly become one of the most popular tools for rapid reception of earthquake information for the public, some of them having been downloaded more than 1 million times! The advantages are obvious: wherever someone's own location is, they can be automatically informed when an earthquake has struck. Just by setting a magnitude threshold and an area of interest, there is no longer the need to browse the internet as the information reaches you automatically and instantaneously! One question remains: are the provided earthquake notifications always relevant for the public? What are the earthquakes that really matters to laypeople? One clue may be derived from some newspaper reports that show that a while after damaging earthquakes many eyewitnesses scrap the application they installed just after the mainshock. Why? Because either the magnitude threshold is set too high and many felt earthquakes are missed, or it is set too low and the majority of the notifications are related to unfelt earthquakes thereby only increasing anxiety among the population at each new update. Felt and damaging earthquakes are the ones that matter the most for the public (and authorities). They are the ones of societal importance even when of small magnitude. A smartphone application developed by EMSC (Euro-Med Seismological Centre) with the financial support of the Fondation MAIF aims at providing suitable notifications for earthquakes by collating different information threads covering tsunamigenic, potentially damaging and felt earthquakes. Tsunamigenic earthquakes are considered here to be those ones that are the subject of alert or information messages from the PTWC (Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre). While potentially damaging earthquakes are identified through an automated system called EQIA (Earthquake Qualitative Impact Assessment) developed and operated at EMSC. This rapidly assesses earthquake impact by comparing the population exposed to each expected

  11. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Analogies between a Meniscus and a Cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Lin

    2009-11-01

    Systematic and quantitative analyses of exact analogies between a meniscus and an elastica are performed. It is shown that the two governing equations take the same style after coordinate translation and scale transformation. The morphologies of the liquid bridge and the cantilever are calculated in terms of elliptic integrations, which can be reduced to the same shape after converting the boundary conditions. The present analyses can make us grasp the nature of this physical phenomenon deeply and show some inspiration for designing the analogy experiments. Moreover, the calculated results are helpful to engineering applications, such as design and fabrication of MEMS, and micro-manipulations in micro/nano-technology.

  12. Duality methods in networks, computer science models, and disordered condensed matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Joseph Dan

    In this thesis, I explore lattice independent duality and systems to which it can be applied. I first demonstrate classical duality on models in an external field, including the Ising, Potts, and x -- y models, showing in particular how this modifies duality to be lattice independent and applicable to networks. I then present a novel application of duality on the boolean satsifiability problem, one of the most important problems in computational complexity, through mapping to a low temperature Ising model. This establishes the equivalence between boolean satisfiability and a problem of enumerating the positive solutions to a Diophantine system of equations. I continue by combining duality with a prominent tool for models on networks, belief propagation, deriving a new message passing procedure, dual belief propagation. In the final part of my thesis, I shift to propose and examine a semiclassical model, the two-component Coulomb glass model, which can explain the giant magnetoresistance peak present in disordered films near a superconductor-insulator transition as the effect of competition between single particle and localized pair transport. I numerically analyze the density of states and transport properties of this model.

  13. An overview of Experimental Condensed Matter Physics in Argentina by 2014, and Oxides for Non Volatile Memory Devices: The MeMOSat Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Pablo

    2015-03-01

    In the first part of my talk, I will describe the status of the experimental research in Condensed Matter Physics in Argentina, biased towards developments related to micro and nanotechnology. In the second part, I will describe the MeMOSat Project, a consortium aimed at producing non-volatile memory devices to work in aggressive environments, like those found in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Our devices rely on the Resistive Switching mechanism, which produces a permanent but reversible change in the electrical resistance across a metal-insulator-metal structure by means of a pulsed protocol of electrical stimuli. Our project is devoted to the study of Memory Mechanisms in Oxides (MeMO) in order to establish a technological platform that tests the Resistive RAM (ReRAM) technology for aerospace applications. A review of MeMOSat's activities is presented, covering the initial Proof of Concept in ceramic millimeter sized samples; the study of different oxide-metal couples including (LaPr)2/3Ca1/3MnO, La2/3Ca1/3MnO3, YBa2Cu3O7, TiO2, HfO2, MgO and CuO; and recent miniaturized arrays of micrometer sized devices controlled by in-house designed electronics, which were launched with the BugSat01 satellite in June2014 by the argentinian company Satellogic.

  14. Full symmetry implementation in condensed matter and molecular physics-Modified group projector technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damnjanović, Milan; Milošević, Ivanka

    2015-06-01

    Symmetry is well established as one of the fundamental concepts in physics, accurately extracting relevant characteristics of the studied object, giving deep and transparent insight to its properties. In the solid state and molecular physics the most abundant application is reduction of the dimension of the eigenproblem of the Hamiltonian, with the resulting eigenvectors labeled by good quantum numbers, forming the so called symmetry adapted basis. Such a basis is the starting point for subsequent analysis of the physical properties of the system, performed usually by applying adequate perturbation technique. Standard procedure for finding a symmetry adapted basis involves Wigner operators, which are sums of the operators acting in the quantum state space (Hilbert space, most usually) over all elements of the symmetry group of the systems. However, both the dimension of the state space and the number of the symmetry transformations are infinite even in the simplest approximate models in crystal physics making obstacles for direct application of the standard Wigner projector technique, and its numerical implementation. On the other hand, there is a minimal part of the system, the full symmetry elementary cell (symcell), from which the whole system can be built by action of the full symmetry group elements on it. A clear heuristic idea, that symcell and full symmetry group, determine the properties of the entire system, is fully realized within modified group projector technique. Namely, when applying this technique, the full symmetry of the system is used to provide reduction of calculations to the symcell only, singling out its state space (of a finite dimension!) as the effective state space to be worked in. Physical observables, expressed through their irreducible tensor components, obtain their counterparts in this finite-dimensional space of a symcell. It remains to consider only the symmetry transformations which leave the symcell invariant. This is absolutely

  15. Condensed Matter and Material Sciences: Electrochemistry of Immobilized Particles and Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Fritz; Schröder, Uwe; Gulaboski, Rubin

    Immobilizing particles or droplets on electrodes is a novel and most powerful technique for studying the electrochemical reactions of three-phase systems. It gives access to a wealth of information, ranging from quantitative and phase analysis to thermodynamic and kinetic data of electrode processes. Three-phase electrodes with immobilized droplets provide information on the electrochemistry of redox liquids and of compounds dissolved in inert organic liquids. Such measurements allow the determination of the Gibbs energies of the transfer of cations and anions between immiscible solvents, and thus make it possible to assess the hydrophobicity of ions -- a property that is of great importance for pharmaceutical applications, biological studies, and for many fields of chemistry.

  16. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.49 Section 1240.49 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... to April 1, 1997) § 1240.49 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an...

  17. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.49 Section 1240.49 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... to April 1, 1997) § 1240.49 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an...

  18. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.11 Section 1240.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Proceedings § 1240.11 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an alien...

  19. 8 CFR 1240.49 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.49 Section 1240.49 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... to April 1, 1997) § 1240.49 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an...

  20. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.11 Section 1240.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Proceedings § 1240.11 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an alien...

  1. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.11 Section 1240.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Proceedings § 1240.11 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an alien...

  2. 8 CFR 1240.11 - Ancillary matters, applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ancillary matters, applications. 1240.11 Section 1240.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Proceedings § 1240.11 Ancillary matters, applications. (a) Creation of the status of an alien...

  3. 7th International Conference on Excitonic Processes in Condensed Matter (EXCON'06) Winston-Salem, NC, USA, 26-30 June 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelenz, P.; Schreiber, M.

    2006-10-01

    This conference report is meant to offer an authoritative view on a recently held scientific meeting rather than a comprehensive list of the conference presentations. We tried to describe what we feel were the most interesting contributions.The full Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Excitonic Processes in Condensed Matter (EXCON'06) shall be published in phys. stat. sol. (b) and phys. stat. sol. (c) in November 2006.

  4. Discussion on the energy content of the galactic dark matter Bose-Einstein condensate halo in the Thomas-Fermi approximation

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, J.C.C.; Pires, M.O.C. E-mail: marcelo.pires@ufabc.edu.br

    2014-03-01

    We show that the galactic dark matter halo, considered composed of an axionlike particles Bose-Einstein condensate [6] trapped by a self-graviting potential [5], may be stable in the Thomas-Fermi approximation since appropriate choices for the dark matter particle mass and scattering length are made. The demonstration is performed by means of the calculation of the potential, kinetic and self-interaction energy terms of a galactic halo described by a Boehmer-Harko density profile. We discuss the validity of the Thomas-Fermi approximation for the halo system, and show that the kinetic energy contribution is indeed negligible.

  5. Spin-orbit-induced photoelectron spin polarization in angle-resolved photoemission from both atomic and condensed matter targets.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Ulrich; Dil, J Hugo

    2012-05-02

    The existence of highly spin polarized photoelectrons emitted from non-magnetic solids as well as from unpolarized atoms and molecules has been found to be very common in many studies over the past 40 years. This so-called Fano effect is based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the photoionization or the photoemission process. In a non-angle-resolved photoemission experiment, circularly polarized radiation has to be used to create spin polarized photoelectrons, while in angle-resolved photoemission even unpolarized or linearly polarized radiation is sufficient to get a high spin polarization. In past years the Rashba effect has become very important in the angle-resolved photoemission of solid surfaces, also with an observed high photoelectron spin polarization. It is the purpose of the present topical review to cross-compare the spin polarization experimentally found in angle-resolved photoelectron emission spectroscopy of condensed matter with that of free atoms, to compare it with the Rashba effect and topological insulators to describe the influence and the importance of the spin-orbit interaction and to show and disentangle the matrix element and phase shift effects therein.The relationship between the energy dispersion of these phase shifts and the emission delay of photoelectron emission in attosecond-resolved photoemission is also discussed. Furthermore the influence of chiral structures of the photo-effect target on the spin polarization, the interferences of different spin components in coherent superpositions in photoemission and a cross-comparison of spin polarization in photoemission from non-magnetic solids with XMCD on magnetic materials are presented; these are all based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in angle-resolved photoemission.

  6. Testing of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe with Multiple Evaporators and Multiple Condensers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, Hosei; Ku, Jentung

    2006-01-01

    Thermal performance of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with two evaporators and two condensers is described. A comprehensive test program, including start-up, high power, low power, power cycle, and sink temperature cycle tests, has been executed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for potential space applications. Experimental data showed that the loop could start with heat loads as low as 2W. The loop operated stably with even and uneven evaporator heat loads, and even and uneven condenser sink temperatures. Heat load sharing between the two evaporators was also successfully demonstrated. The loop had a heat transport capability of l00W to 120W, and could recover from a dry-out by reducing the heat load to evaporators. Low power test results showed the loop could work stably for heat loads as low as 1 W to each evaporator. Excellent adaptability of the MLHP to rapid changes of evaporator power and sink temperature were also demonstrated.

  7. Molecular view modeling of atmospheric organic particulate matter: Incorporating molecular structure and co-condensation of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankow, James F.; Marks, Marguerite C.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Asher, William E.; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2015-12-01

    Most urban and regional models used to predict levels of organic particulate matter (OPM) are based on fundamental equations for gas/particle partitioning, but make the highly simplifying, anonymized-view (AV) assumptions that OPM levels are not affected by either: a) the molecular characteristics of the condensing organic compounds (other than simple volatility); or b) co-condensation of water as driven by non-zero relative humidity (RH) values. The simplifying assumptions have allowed parameterized chamber results for formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (e.g., "two-product" (2p) coefficients) to be incorporated in chemical transport models. However, a return towards a less simplistic (and more computationally demanding) molecular view (MV) is needed that acknowledges that atmospheric OPM is a mixture of organic compounds with differing polarities, water, and in some cases dissolved salts. The higher computational cost of MV modeling results from a need for iterative calculations of the composition-dependent gas/particle partition coefficient values. MV modeling of OPM that considered water uptake (but not dissolved salts) was carried out for the southeast United States for the period August 29 through September 7, 2006. Three model variants were used at three universities: CMAQ-RH-2p (at PSU), UCD/CIT-RH-2p (at UCD), and CMAQ-RH-MCM (at TAMU). With the first two, MV structural characteristics (carbon number and numbers of functional groups) were assigned to each of the 2p products used in CMAQv.4.7.1 such that resulting predicted Kp,i values matched those in CMAQv.4.7.1. When water uptake was allowed, most runs assumed that uptake occurred only into the SOA portion, and imposed immiscibility of SOA with primary organic aerosol (POA). (POA is often viewed as rather non-polar, while SOA is commonly viewed as moderately-to-rather polar. Some runs with UCD/CIT-RH-2p were used to investigate the effects of POA/SOA miscibility.) CMAQ-RH-MCM used MCM to

  8. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  9. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B. K.; Althof, J. A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations.

  10. Application of the string method to the study of critical nuclei in capillary condensation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunyin; Qian, Tiezheng; Ren, Weiqing

    2008-10-21

    We adopt a continuum description for liquid-vapor phase transition in the framework of mean-field theory and use the string method to numerically investigate the critical nuclei for capillary condensation in a slit pore. This numerical approach allows us to determine the critical nuclei corresponding to saddle points of the grand potential function in which the chemical potential is given in the beginning. The string method locates the minimal energy path (MEP), which is the most probable transition pathway connecting two metastable/stable states in configuration space. From the MEP, the saddle point is determined and the corresponding energy barrier also obtained (for grand potential). Moreover, the MEP shows how the new phase (liquid) grows out of the old phase (vapor) along the most probable transition pathway, from the birth of a critical nucleus to its consequent expansion. Our calculations run from partial wetting to complete wetting with a variable strength of attractive wall potential. In the latter case, the string method presents a unified way for computing the critical nuclei, from film formation at solid surface to bulk condensation via liquid bridge. The present application of the string method to the numerical study of capillary condensation shows the great power of this method in evaluating the critical nuclei in various liquid-vapor phase transitions.

  11. Three-component Gross-Pitaevskii equations in the spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate: Spin-rotation symmetry, matter-wave solutions, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zichao; Yan, Zhenya

    2017-03-01

    We report new matter-wave solutions of the one-dimensional spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate system by combining global spin-rotation states and similarity transformation. Dynamical behaviors of non-stationary global spin-rotation states derived from the SU(2) spin-rotation symmetry are discussed, which exhibit temporal periodicity. We derive generalized bright-dark mixed solitons and new rogue wave solutions and reveal the relations between Euler angles in spin-rotation symmetry and parameters in ferromagnetic and polar solitons. In the modulated spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate system, new solutions are derived and graphically illustrated for different types of modulations. Moreover, numerical simulations are performed to investigate the stability of some obtained solutions for chosen parameters.

  12. Condensed matter astrophysics: A prescription for determining the species-specific composition and quantity of interstellar dust using x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Julia C.; Xiang, Jingen; Ravel, Bruce; Kortright, Jeffrey B; Flanagan, Kathryn

    2009-01-05

    We present a newtechnique for determining the quantity and composition of dust in astrophysical environments using<6 keV X-rays.We argue that high-resolution X-ray spectra as enabled by the Chandra and XMM-Newton gratings should be considered a powerful and viable new resource for delving into a relatively unexplored regime for directlydetermining dust properties: composition, quantity, and distribution.We present initial cross section measurements of astrophysically likely iron-based dust candidates taken at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source synchrotron beamline, as an illustrative tool for the formulation of our technique for determining the quantity and composition of interstellar dust with X-rays. (Cross sections for the materials presented here will be made available for astrophysical modeling in the near future.) Focused at the 700 eV Fe LIII and LII photoelectric edges, we discuss a technique for modeling dust properties in the soft X-rays using L-edge data to complement K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis techniques discussed by Lee& Ravel. The paper is intended to be a techniques paper of interest and useful to both condensed matter experimentalists andastrophysicists. For the experimentalists, we offer a new prescription for normalizing relatively low signal-to-noise ratio L-edge cross section measurements. For astrophysics interests, we discuss the use of X-ray absorption spectra for determining dust composition in cold and ionized astrophysical environments and a new method for determining species-specific gas and dust ratios. Possible astrophysical applications of interest, including relevance to Sagittarius A*, are offered. Prospects for improving on this work in future X-ray missions with higher throughput and spectral resolution are also presented in the context of spectral resolution goals for gratings and calorimeters, for proposed and planned missions such as Astro-H and the International X

  13. Plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter: an Argonne National Laboratory report prepared in response to the Report of the Review Panel on Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-27

    The Review Panel on Neutron Scattering has recommended an expanded budget to allow systematic development of the field. An alternative plan for the future of neutron research on condensed matter is presented here, in case it is not possible to fund the expanded budget. This plan leads, in a rational and logical way, to a world-class neutron source that will ensure the vitality of the field and exploit the many benefits that state-of-the-art neutron facilities can bring to programs in the materials and biological sciences. 2 tables. (RWR)

  14. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Self-Organization of Weighted Networks in Connection with the Misanthrope Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Kuan; Zhu, Jian-Yang

    2009-08-01

    From an undirected random graph, by the weight redistribution of the edges, we obtain a weighted network. The weight redistribution of the edges can be connected to the well-known Misanthrope process, in which distinguishable particles hop among different urns. Under specific conditions, the condensation phenomena can be observed, i.e., nearly all the edges connect to one vertex in the network. When there is no condensation, by adjusting the parameters, the strength distribution can be scale-free or exponentially decreasing. The numerical results fit well with the analytical ones.

  16. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to an Aharonov-Bohm effect for the vacuum expectation values induced by the gauge field. The fermionic condensate and the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with period equal to the flux quantum. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditions along the compact dimensions, and on the gauge potential, too. Applications of the general formulas to cylindrical carbon nanotubes are considered, within the framework of a Dirac-like theory for the electronic states in graphene. In the absence of a magnetic flux, the energy density for semiconducting nanotubes is always negative. For metallic nanotubes the energy density is positive for long tubes and negative for short ones. The resulting Casimir forces acting on the edges of the nanotube are attractive for short tubes with independence of the tube chirality. The sign of the force for long nanotubes can be controlled by tuning the magnetic flux

  17. Assessing the applicability of FISH-based prematurely condensed dicentric chromosome assay in triage biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko; Gotoh, Takaya; Noda, Takashi; Akiyama, Miho; Owaki, Makiko; Darroudi, Firouz; Hirai, Momoki

    2015-03-01

    The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) has been regarded as the gold standard of radiation biodosimetry. The assay, however, requires a 2-d peripheral blood lymphocyte culture before starting metaphase chromosome analyses to estimate biological doses. Other biological assays also have drawbacks with respect to the time needed to obtain dose estimates for rapid decision on the correct line of medical treatment. Therefore, alternative technologies that suit requirements for triage biodosimetry are needed. Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in G0 lymphocytes can be detected as interphase chromosome aberrations by the cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation (PCC) method. The method, in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques, has been proposed in early studies as a powerful tool for obtaining biological dose estimates without 2-d lymphocyte culture procedures. The present work assesses the applicability of FISH-based PCC techniques using pan-centromeric and telomeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in triage mode biodosimetry and demonstrates that an improved rapid procedure of the prematurely condensed dicentric chromosome (PCDC) assay has the potential for evaluating exposed radiation doses in as short as 6 h after the collection of peripheral blood specimens.

  18. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  19. Molecular recognition of genomic DNA in a condensate with a model surfactant for potential gene-delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Chandra, Goutam Kumar; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The functionality of a gene carrying nucleic acid in an artificial gene-delivery system is important for the overall efficiency of the vehicle in vivo. Here, we have studied a well-known artificial gene-delivery system, which is a condensate of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with a model cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to investigate the molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. While dynamic light scattering (DLS) and circular dichroism (CD) reveal structural aspects of the condensate and the constituting DNA respectively, picosecond resolved polarization gated spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) reveal molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate. We have considered ethidium bromide (EB) and crystal violet (CV), which are well known DNA-binding agents through intercalative (specific) and electrostatic (non-specific) interactions, respectively, as model ligands for the molecular recognition studies. A fluorescent cationic surfactant, Nonyl Acridine Orange (NAO) is considered to be a mimic of CTAB in the condensate. The polarization gated fluorescence of NAO at various temperatures has been used to investigate the local microviscosity of the condensate. The excellent spectral overlap of NAO emission and the absorption spectra of both EB and CV allow us to investigate FRET-distances of the ligands with respect to NAO in the condensate at various temperatures and thermal stability of ligand-binding of the genomic DNA. The thermodynamic properties of the molecular recognition have also been explored using Van't Hoff equation. We have also extended our studies to molecular recognition of the genomic DNA in the condensate as dried thin films. This has important implications for its application in bioelectronics.

  20. Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N.

    1992-04-01

    Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant. This document also includes appendices A through I which provide: System descriptions; ISLOCA event trees; human reliability analysis; thermal hydraulic analysis; core uncovery timing calculations; calculation of system rupture probability; ISLOCA consequences analysis; uncertainty analysis; and component failure analysis.

  1. Environmental and biological applications and implications of soft and condensed nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengyu

    Recent innovations and growth of nanotechnology have spurred exciting technological and commercial developments of nanomaterails. Their appealing physical and physicochemical properties offer great opportunities in biological and environmental applications, while in the meantime may compromise human health and environmental sustainability through either unintentional exposure or intentional discharge. Accordingly, this dissertation exploits the physicochemical behavior of soft dendritic polymers for environmental remediation and condensed nano ZnO tetrapods for biological sensing (Chapter two-four), and further delineate the environmental implications of such nanomaterials using algae- the major constituent of the aquatic food chain-as a model system (Chapter five). This dissertation is presented as follows. Chapter one presents a general review of the characteristic properties, applications, forces dictating nanomaterials, and their biological and environmental implications of the most produced and studied soft and condensed nanomaterials. In addition, dendritic polymers and ZnO nanomaterials are thoroughly reviewed separately. Chapter two investigates the physicochemical properties of poly(amidoamine)-tris(hydroxymethyl)amidomethane- dendrimer for its potential applications in water purification. The binding mechanisms and capacities of this dendrimer in hosting major environmental pollutants including cationic copper, anionic nitrate, and polyaromatic phenanthrene are discussed. Chapter three exploits a promising use of dendrimers for removal of potentially harmful discharged nanoparticles (NPs). Specifically, fullerenols are used as a model nanomaterial, and their interactions with two different generations of dendrimers are studied using spectrophotometry and thermodynamics methods. Chapter four elucidates two novel optical schemes for sensing environmental pollutants and biological compounds using dendrimer-gold nanowire complex and gold-coated ZnO tetrapods

  2. Controlling a class of chaotic quantum system under disturbances and noisy measurements: Application to 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-López, Ricardo; López-Pérez, Pablo A.; Lara-Cisneros, Gerardo; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a robust nonlinear feedback control scheme with adaptive gain is proposed to control the chaotic behavior in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The control goal concerns the track or regulation purposes. The BEC system is represented as stochastic ordinary differential equations with measured output perturbed by Gaussian noise, which represents the nature of the quantum systems. The convergence of the BEC control law is analyzed under the frame of the Lyapunov stability theory. Numerical experiments show an adequate performance of the proposed methodology under the required conditions. The results are applicable when the shape of the condensate is sufficiently simple.

  3. A method for the combined measurement of volatile and condensable organic AMC in semiconductor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles M.; Zaloga, Emily C.; Lobert, Jürgen M.

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring airborne molecular contamination (AMC) at the parts per trillion (ppt) level in cleanroom environments, scanner applications and compressed gas lines is essential for processes, equipment and yield-control. For the operation of EUV tools, in particular, volatile organic contamination is known to have as much impact as condensable organic compounds, which requires a suitable sampling and measurement methodology. Some of the current industry standards use sample traps comprised of porous 2,6-diphenylene-oxide polymer resin, such as Tenax®, for measuring volatile organic (<6 C-atoms, approximately IPA/acetone to toluene) and condensable organic (>6 C atoms, about toluene and higher) AMC. Inherent problems associated with these traps are a number of artifacts and chemical reactions that reduce accuracy of reported organic AMC concentrations. The break-down of the polymeric material forms false positive artifacts when used in the presence of reactive gases, such as nitrous acid and ozone, which attack and degrade the polymer to form detectable AMC. Most importantly, these traps have poor capture efficiency for volatile organic compounds (VOC). To address the disadvantages of polymer-based sample traps, we developed a method based on carbonaceous, multi-layered adsorbent traps to replace the 2,6-diphenylene-oxide polymer resin sample trap type. Along with the new trap's ability to retain volatile organics, the trap was found to provide artifact-free results. With industry trends towards detecting more contaminants while continuously reducing required reporting limits for those compounds, artifact-free and accurate detection of AMC is needed at the parts per quadrillion (ppq) level. The proposed, multi-layered trap substantially increases laboratory productivity and reduces cost by eliminating the need to analyze condensable and volatile organic compounds in two separate methods. In our studies, even some organic compounds with six C-atoms, that are part of

  4. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Prediction Error from Application of Kohler Theory: Importance for the Aerosol Indirect Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P.; Nenes, Athanasios; Adams, Peter J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2007-01-01

    In situ observations of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the GISS GCM Model II' with an online aerosol simulation and explicit aerosol-cloud interactions are used to quantify the uncertainty in radiative forcing and autoconversion rate from application of Kohler theory. Simulations suggest that application of Koehler theory introduces a 10-20% uncertainty in global average indirect forcing and 2-11% uncertainty in autoconversion. Regionally, the uncertainty in indirect forcing ranges between 10-20%, and 5-50% for autoconversion. These results are insensitive to the range of updraft velocity and water vapor uptake coefficient considered. This study suggests that Koehler theory (as implemented in climate models) is not a significant source of uncertainty for aerosol indirect forcing but can be substantial for assessments of aerosol effects on the hydrological cycle in climatically sensitive regions of the globe. This implies that improvements in the representation of GCM subgrid processes and aerosol size distribution will mostly benefit indirect forcing assessments. Predictions of autoconversion, by nature, will be subject to considerable uncertainty; its reduction may require explicit representation of size-resolved aerosol composition and mixing state.

  5. International Workshop on Condensed Matter Theories (13th) Held in Campos do Jordao, Brazil on August 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    hadronic system. The properties of collective modes, typified by the zero-sound dispersion relation, may be extracted from fI(q, co), while the nature...by other documentation. 12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13...for Model Nuclear Matter; by Eirene Mavromatis and )- J John W. Clark. 4. Generalized Momentum Distributions of Quantum Fluids,; by John W. Clark and

  6. Dynamics of matter-wave condensates with time-dependent two- and three-body interactions trapped by a linear potential in the presence of atom gain or loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belobo Belobo, D.; Ben-Bolie, G. H.; Kofane, T. C.

    2014-04-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates with time varying two- and three-body interatomic interactions, confined in a linear potential and exchanging atoms with the thermal cloud are investigated. Using the extended tanh-function method with an auxiliary equation, i.e., the Lenard equation, many exact solutions describing the dynamics of matter-wave condensates are derived. An important issue is the time management of the cubic and the quintic nonlinearities by tuning the rate of exchange of atoms between the condensate and the thermal background. In addition, adjusting the strength of the linear potential, the rate of exchange of atoms, and many other free parameters allow one to control many features of the condensate such as its height, width, position, velocity, acceleration, and its direction, respectively. Full numerical solutions corroborate the analytical predictions.

  7. Many-particle theory of nuclear systems with application to neutron star matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakkalakal, D. A.; Yang, C.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning energy-density relation for the normal state of neutron star matter, and the effects of superfluidity and polarization on neutron star matter. Considering constraints on variation, and the theory of quantum fluids, three methods for calculating the energy-density range are presented. The effects of polarization on neutron star structure, and polarization effects on condensation and superfluid-state energy are discussed.

  8. 48 CFR 52.227-10 - Filing of Patent Applications-Classified Subject Matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... application. (b) Before filing a patent application in the United States disclosing any subject matter of this... United States statutes or regulations. (c) Where the subject matter of this contract is classified for... Applications-Classified Subject Matter. 52.227-10 Section 52.227-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Electronic, thermodynamic and elastic properties of pyrite RuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ze-Jin; Guo, Yun-Dong; Wang, Guang-Chang; Li, Jin; Dai, Wei; Liu, Jin-Chao; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Yang, Xiang-Dong

    2009-11-01

    This paper calculates the elastic, thermodynamic and electronic properties of pyrite (Pabar 3) RuO2 by the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory (DFT) method. The lattice parameters, normalized elastic constants, Cauchy pressure, brittle-ductile relations, heat capacity and Debye temperature are successfully obtained. The Murnaghan equation of state shows that pyrite RuO2 is a potential superhard material. Internal coordinate parameter increases with pressure, which disagrees with experimental data. An analysis based on electronic structure and the pseudogap reveals that the bonding nature in RuO2 is a combination of covalent, ionic and metallic bonding. A study of the elastic properties indicates that the pyrite phase is isotropic under usual conditions. The relationship between brittleness and ductility shows that pyrite RuO2 behaves in a ductile matter at zero pressure and the degree of ductility increases with pressure.

  10. Round Table Workshop on the Frontiers of Condensed Matter Physics Held in Broomcroft Hall, Manchester on 24-25 September 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    microscopic description, of which the lowest order approximant is Gross - Pitaevskii theory. 3. Emerging Trends We note a number of possible future areas...A system of three coupled equations for the electric field, atomic polarisation and atomic inversion results. These are similar but not exactly...being made and practical applications may yet emerge. The semiclassical theory of coupled radiation-matter fields can be reduced to the famous Lorenz

  11. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  12. 39 CFR 3020.112 - Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter... Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.112 Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter. The Postal Service shall notify the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations for competitive...

  13. 39 CFR 3020.112 - Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter... Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.112 Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter. The Postal Service shall notify the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations for competitive...

  14. 39 CFR 3020.112 - Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter... Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.112 Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter. The Postal Service shall notify the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations for competitive...

  15. 39 CFR 3020.112 - Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter... Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.112 Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter. The Postal Service shall notify the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations for competitive...

  16. 39 CFR 3020.112 - Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter... Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.112 Limitations applicable to competitive mail matter. The Postal Service shall notify the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations for competitive...

  17. Occurrence of inorganic elements in condensed volatile matter emitted from coal pyrolysis and their contributions to the formation of ultrafine particulates during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Zhang; Yoshihiko Ninomiya; Toru Yamashita

    2006-08-15

    Coal pyrolysis is the first step during coal combustion, when the injected coal particles swell to release the volatile matter (VM) at a very short residence time. Simultaneously, the organically bound fraction of inherent metals is likely emitted out too. To prove the presence of organically bound metals in coals, five bituminous coals and one anthracite coal from China were pyrolyzed in N{sub 2} in a lab-scale drop tube furnace. The gas temperature in furnace was about 900-1400 K so that almost all the inorganic elements except those containing Na hardly vaporized. The emitted VM was collected by a low-pressure impactor. The results indicate that the condensed VM (CVM) smaller than 1.0 {mu}m has an amorphous carbon structure, which contains the inorganic elements too. Sulfur is the most prevalent, followed by sodium, silicon, chlorine, calcium, and others in the decreasing order. Apart from a portion of sodium in form of NaCl, all the inorganic elements are organically bound with CVM as determined by both TEM-EDS and XPS. These elements disperse highly in CVM; their oxidation and coagulation during VM combustion likely contribute to the majority of ultrafine particulates (PM0.1 smaller than 0.1 m) formed during coal combustion at a relatively low temperature, 1473 K. 30 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivanco, R.; Ghiglino, A.; de Vicente, J. P.; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M.; Perlado, J. M.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final keff value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  19. Application of a single-fluid model for the steam condensing flow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smołka, K.; Dykas, S.; Majkut, M.; Strozik, M.

    2016-10-01

    One of the results of many years of research conducted in the Institute of Power Engineering and Turbomachinery of the Silesian University of Technology are computational algorithms for modelling steam flows with a non-equilibrium condensation process. In parallel with theoretical and numerical research, works were also started on experimental testing of the steam condensing flow. This paper presents a comparison of calculations of a flow field modelled by means of a single-fluid model using both an in-house CFD code and the commercial Ansys CFX v16.2 software package. The calculation results are compared to inhouse experimental testing.

  20. Aquatic Organic Matter Fluorescence - from phenomenon to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Darren

    2014-05-01

    The use of fluorescence to quantify and characterise aquatic organic matter in river, ocean, ground water and drinking and waste waters has come along way since its discovery as a phenomenon in the early 20th century. For example, there are over 100 papers published each year in international peer reviewed journals, an order of magnitude increase since a decade ago (see Figure taken from ISI database from 1989 to 2007 for publications in the fields of river water and waste water). Since then it has been extensively used as a research tool since the 1990's by scientists and is currently used for a wide variety of applications within a number of sectors. Universities, organisations and companies that research into aquatic organic matter have either recently readily use appropriate fluorescence based techniques and instrumentation. In industry and government, the technology is being taken up by environmental regulators and water and wastewater companies. This keynote presentation will give an overview of aquatic organic matter fluorescence from its conception as a phenomenon through to its current use in a variety of emerging applications within the sectors concerned with understanding, managing and monitoring the aquatic environment. About the Speaker Darren Reynolds pioneered the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for the analysis of wastewaters in the 1990's. He currently leads a research group within the Centre for Research in Biosciences and sits on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology at the University of the West of England, Bristol. He is a multidisciplinary scientist concerned with the development of technology platforms for applications in the fields of environment/agri-food and health. His current research interests include the development of optical technologies and techniques for environmental and biological sensing and bio-prospecting applications. He is currently involved in the development and use of synthetic biology

  1. Experimental and analytical investigation of 0 G condensation in a mechanical refrigeration system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    Basic equations of momentum and energy are presented and discussed with respect to heat transfer and pressure drop for forced flow condensation in horizontal tubes under 1-g and 0-g conditions. Some experimental results are presented for condensing refrigerant-12 in a system of three parallel-connected quartz tubes (3-mm inside diameter, G = 1.037 to 3.456 x 105 lbm/hr-sq. ft). From high speed photographs, measurements were obtained of film thickness, phase velocities, disturbance wavelengths, and flow regimes and their transitions. Based upon these measurements various dimensionless force ratios (flow and instability parameters) were calculated. Under 0-g conditions a uniformly thick redistribution of liquid condensate about the tube walls was found to result in a lowered heat transfer coefficient as compared with 1-g conditions, based upon fundamental heat transfer theory. A model is proposed that takes into account the difference in heat transfer due to condensate distribution under 1-g and 0-g conditions.

  2. Application of CATHARE code to the isolation condenser experiment in PIPER-ONE loop

    SciTech Connect

    D`Auria, F.; Mazzini, M.; Kalli, H.; Sorjonen, J.

    1996-07-01

    CATHARE code has been applied to Isolation Condenser experiment conducted in PIPER-ONE facility. PIPER-ONE simulates a General Electric BWR-6 with volume and height scaling ratios 1/2200 and 1/1, respectively. The integral test facility was properly modified to reproduce typical IC thermal-hydraulic conditions for the test PO-IC-02. The facility was equipped with an once-through heat exchanger immersed in a pool of ambient temperature water, installed roughly 10 m above the core, in aim to reproduce qualitatively the phenomenologies expected for Isolation Condenser in the Simplified BWR (SBWR). The facility is installed in Dipartimento di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari of Pisa University (I). CATHARE is a thermal-hydraulic computer code developed at the Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (CENG) for the prediction of nuclear power plant behavior in case of transients. CATHARE2 V1.3E was applied during the activity. Experiment PO-IC-02 included two subsequent power levels with initial pressure of 5.1 MPa. The Isolation Condenser was active during the whole experiment except between the two different power levels. The aim of the calculation was to reproduce the experiment. This was not achieved. CATHARE2 V1.3E calculates too low heat transfer coefficients for condensation of steam.

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Frequency selective surface structure optimized by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun; Wang, Jian-Bo; Sun, Guan-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Frequency selective surface (FSS) is a two-dimensional periodic structure which has prominent characteristics of bandpass or bandblock when interacting with electromagnetic waves. In this paper, the thickness, the dielectric constant, the element graph and the arrangement periodicity of an FSS medium are investigated by Genetic Algorithm (GA) when an electromagnetic wave is incident on the FSS at a wide angle, and an optimized FSS structure and transmission characteristics are obtained. The results show that the optimized structure has better stability in relation to incident angle of electromagnetic wave and preserves the stability of centre frequency even at an incident angle as large as 80°, thereby laying the foundation for the application of FSS to curved surfaces at wide angles.

  4. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-16

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  5. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation. Final technical report, December 1, 1989--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: SiC based Si/SiC heterojunction and its rectifying characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Chen, Zhi-Ming; Li, Lian-Bi; Zhao, Shun-Feng; Lin, Tao

    2009-11-01

    The Si on SiC heterojunction is still poorly understood, although it has a number of potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices, for example, light-activated SiC power switches where Si may play the role of an light absorbing layer. This paper reports on Si films heteroepitaxially grown on the Si face of (0001) n-type 6H-SiC substrates and the use of B2H6 as a dopant for p-Si grown at temperatures in a range of 700-950 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests have demonstrated that the samples prepared at the temperatures ranged from 850 °C to 900 °C are characterized as monocrystalline silicon. The rocking XRD curves show a well symmetry with FWHM of 0.4339° Omega. Twin crystals and stacking faults observed in the epitaxial layers might be responsible for widening of the rocking curves. Dependence of the crystal structure and surface topography on growth temperature is discussed based on the experimental results. The energy band structure and rectifying characteristics of the Si/SiC heterojunctions are also preliminarily tested.

  7. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  8. Many-particle theory of nuclear system with application to neutron-star matter and other systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    General problems in nuclear-many-body theory were considered. Superfluid states of neutron star matter and other strongly interacting many-fermion systems were analyzed by using the soft-core potential of Reid. The pion condensation in neutron star matter was also treated.

  9. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  10. Evolution of a dark soliton in a parabolic potential: Application to Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brazhnyi, V.A.; Konotop, V.V.

    2003-10-01

    Evolution of a dark soliton in a one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate trapped by a harmonic potential is studied analytically and numerically. In the case of a deep soliton, main characteristics of its motion such as frequency and amplitude of oscillations are calculated by means of the perturbation theory which in the leading order results in a Newtonian dynamics, corrections to which are computed as well.

  11. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  12. Applications of modern chiral interactions in nuclear matter and nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammarruca, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Experimental investigations are in progress, and more are planned for the near future, to set reliable constraints on the isospin asymmetric part of the nuclear equation of state. The latter plays a fundamental role in a broad spectrum of systems and phenomena, including the skins of neutron-rich nuclei and the location of the neutron drip lines. From the theoretical standpoint, microscopic calculations with statistically meaningful uncertainties are essential to guide experiments. We will discuss recent calculations of the nuclear and neutron matter equations of state at different orders of the chiral expansion. We will present applications and discuss the significance of those predictions as a foundation for future studies of convergence of the chiral perturbation series. Anticipating future experiments which may provide reliable information on the weak charge density in nuclei, we discuss the possibility of constraining the size of three-neutron forces in neutron matter. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-03ER41270.

  13. Sidestream condensate polishing for PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, S.W.W.; Yim, S.L.; Rios, J.; Liu, J.

    1986-06-01

    Condensate polishers are used in power plant condensate system to remove both particulate matter and ionized corrodents. Their conventional location is just downstream of the hotwell pumps (condensate pumps). Most polisher installations have enough flow capacity to polish 100% of the condensate. This inline configuration has some disadvantage, including a flow that varies with unit load and tends to disturb the polisher beds and reduce their effectiveness, and a potential for interrupting flow to the feedwater pumps. An alternate arrangement where water is extracted from either the condenser or the condensate system, polished and returned to the system, has been used in a few plants. Three different ways of doing this have been used: divide the condenser hotwell into two parts, one of which receives condensate from the tube bundles and the other of which is sheltered. Take unpolished condensate from the first part, purify it and return it to the other part from which the condensate pumps take suction; take unpolished condensate from one end of a divided header on the suction side of the hotwell pumps and after polishing it return it to the other end; and take unpolished condensate from a header on the discharge side of the condensate pumps, purify it and return it to the condensate system a short distance downstream. The three variants are analyzed in this report. It is concluded that the variant where the connections are on the discharge side of the condensate pumps is the most desirable for retrofitting, in all cases being far easier to retrofit than an inline polisher. In many cases it will be most desirable for new construction.

  14. Fundamentals of Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2016-05-01

    Part I. Basic Concepts: Electrons and Phonons: 1. Concept of a solid: qualitative introduction and overview; 2. Electrons in crystals; 3. Electronic energy bands; 4. Lattice vibrations and phonons; Part II. Electron Intercations, Dynamics and Responses: 5. Electron dynamics in crystals; 6. Many-electron interactions: the interacting electron gas and beyond; 7. Density functional theory; 8. The dielectric function for solids; Part III. Optical and Transport Phenomena: 9. Electronic transitions and optical properties of solids; 10. Electron-phonon interactions; 11. Dynamics of crystal electrons in a magnetic field; 12. Fundamentals of transport phenomena in solids; Part IV. Superconductivity, Magnetism, and Lower Dimensional Systems: 13. Using many-body techniques; 14. Superconductivity; 15. Magnetism; 16. Reduced-dimensional systems and nanostructures; Index.

  15. Symmetry and Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batanouny, M.; Wooten, F.

    2008-03-01

    Preface; 1. Symmetry and physics; 2. Symmetry and group theory; 3. Group representations: concepts; 4. Group representations: formalism and methodology; 5. Dixon's method for computing group characters; 6. Group action and symmetry projection operators; 7. Construction of the irreducible representations; 8. Product groups and product representations; 9. Induced representations; 10. Crystallographic symmetry and space-groups; 11. Space groups: Irreps; 12. Time-reversal symmetry: color groups and the Onsager relations; 13. Tensors and tensor fields; 14. Electronic properties of solids; 15. Dynamical properties of molecules, solids and surfaces; 16. Experimental measurements and selection rules; 17. Landau's theory of phase transitions; 18. Incommensurate systems and quasi-crystals; References; Bibliography; Index.

  16. Condensed matter physics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    The proposed Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) upgrade is ideally suited for science-based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) because LANSCE is a highly-intensity pulsed neutron source located at a nuclear weapons design laboratory. The attributes of a high-intensity pulsed source are essential for performing experiments on Pu and other materials important for SBSS. Neutrons can accurately probe thick bulk specimens, probe thin layers both freestanding and embedded in thicker specimens, and provide time-resolution for some phenomena. Both ordered structures and disorder in solids, liquids, and amorphous materials can be characterized, as well as phase transition. Because LANSCE is at a nuclear design laboratory, specimens important for SBSS issues are available. Los Alamos National Laboratory is an appropriate place to develop the requisite hardware to accommodate SBSS specimens, such as Pu.

  17. Investigation of condensed matter fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M.; Anderson, A.N.; McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N.; Goff, F.E.

    1990-12-01

    Work on muon-catalyzed fusion led to research on a possible new type of fusion occurring in hydrogen isotopes embedded in metal lattices. While the nuclear-product yields observed to date are so small as to require careful further checking, rates observed over short times appear sufficiently large to suggest that significant neutrons and triton yields could be realized -- if the process could be understood and controlled. During 1990, we have developed two charged-particle detection systems and three new neutron detectors. A segmented, high-efficiency neutron counter was taken into 600 m underground in a mine in Colorado for studies out of the cosmic-ray background. Significant neutron emissions were observed in this environment in both deuterium-gas-loaded metals and in electrolytic cells, confirming our earlier observations.

  18. Condensation of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of current experimental results concerned with the kinetic constraints on chondrule formation showed that the major physical properties of chondrules could have been produced by direct condensation of metastable liquid silicates droplets from a hot gas in the primordial nebula. It is argued that such a condensation process would have to be followed by crystallization, accretion, and partial comminution of the droplets. The chemical mechanisms driving this process are described, including: nucleation constraints on comminution and crystallization; slow transformations and chemical reactions in chain silicates; and the slow diffusion of ions. It is shown that the physical mechanisms for chondrule condensation are applicable to a broad spectrum of chondrule sources.

  19. Experimental characterization of the COndensation PArticle counting System for high altitude aircraft-borne application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Hermann, M.; Curtius, J.; Voigt, C.; Walter, S.; Böttger, T.; Lepukhov, B.; Belyaev, G.; Borrmann, S.

    2009-06-01

    A characterization of the ultra-fine aerosol particle counter COPAS (COndensation PArticle counting System) for operation on board the Russian high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysika is presented. The COPAS instrument consists of an aerosol inlet and two dual-channel continuous flow Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs) operated with the chlorofluorocarbon FC-43. It operates at pressures between 400 and 50 hPa for aerosol detection in the particle diameter (dp) range from 6 nm up to 1 μm. The aerosol inlet, designed for the M-55, is characterized with respect to aspiration, transmission, and transport losses. The experimental characterization of counting efficiencies of three CPCs yields dp50 (50% detection particle diameter) of 6 nm, 11 nm, and 15 nm at temperature differences (ΔT) between saturator and condenser of 17°C, 30°C, and 33°C, respectively. Non-volatile particles are quantified with a fourth CPC, with dp50=11 nm. It includes an aerosol heating line (250°C) to evaporate H2SO4-H2O particles of 11 nm

  20. Reverse engineering liver buds through self-driven condensation and organization towards medical application.

    PubMed

    Shinozawa, Tadahiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Takebe, Takanori

    2016-12-15

    The self-organizing tissue-based approach coupled with induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology is evolving as a promising field for designing organoids in culture and is expected to achieve valuable practical outcomes in regenerative medicine and drug development. Organoids show properties of functional organs and represent an alternative to cell models in conventional two-dimensional differentiation platforms; moreover, organoids can be used to investigate mechanisms of development and disease, drug discovery and toxicity assessment. Towards a more complex and advanced organoid model, it is essential to incorporate multiple cell lineages including developing vessels. Using a self-condensation method, we recently demonstrated self-organizing "organ buds" of diverse systems together with human mesenchymal and endothelial progenitors, proposing a new reverse engineering method to generate a more complex organoid structure. In this section, we review characters of organ bud technology based on two important principles: self-condensation and self-organization focusing on liver bud as an example, and discuss their practicality in regenerative medicine and potential as research tools for developmental biology and drug discovery.

  1. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... market dominant mail matter by filing notice with the Commission 45 days prior to the effective date...

  2. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... market dominant mail matter by filing notice with the Commission 45 days prior to the effective date...

  3. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... market dominant mail matter by filing notice with the Commission 45 days prior to the effective date...

  4. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... Size and Weight Limitations for Mail Matter § 3020.111 Limitations applicable to market dominant mail... market dominant mail matter by filing notice with the Commission 45 days prior to the effective date...

  5. The application of the transfer matrix and matrix condensation methods with finite elements to duct acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craggs, A.

    1989-08-01

    When making an acoustic finite element model of a duct system, the resulting matrices can be very large due to the length of ductwork, the complex changes in geometry and the numerous junctions, and a full model may require several thousand nodes. In this paper two techniques are given for reducing the size of the matrices; the transfer matrix method and the condensed stiffness matrix approach—both of which lead to equations expressed in terms of the input and output nodes only. The methods are demonstrated with examples on a straight section of duct and a branched duct network. The substantial reductions in computer memory shown imply that duct acoustic problems can be studied using a desktop work station.

  6. Amorphous Solid Water (ASW): Macroscale Environmentally-Neutral Application for Remediation of Hazardous Pollutants using Condensed-Phase Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Strulle, Ronald; Rheinhart, Maximilian

    2012-03-01

    We report macroscale environmentally-neutral use of cryogenic fluids to induce phase transitions from crystalline water-ices to amorphous solid water (ASW). New IP and uses in remediation of oil-spills and hazardous immiscibles from aquatic environments. We display high-resolution images of the transitions from hexagonal to cubic crystalline water-ice, then to hydrophobic ASW. Accretion and encapsulation of viscous pollutants within crystalline water-ice, and sequestration of condensed volatiles (PAH, methane) and low viscosity fluids within the interstitial cavities of ASW are shown and differentiated for: crude oils, diesel (heating) and blended oils, petroleum byproducts, vegetable and mineral oils, lipids, and light immiscible fluids. The effects of PdV work and thermal energy transfers during phase changes are shown, along with the sequestration efficiencies for hexagonal and cubic ice lattices vs. non-crystalline ASW, for a range of pollutant substances. The viability of ASW as a medium for study of quantum criticality phases is also proposed. The process is environmentally-neutral in that only substantially condensed-phase air liquefaction products, e.g. nitrogen in >90% liquid phase are employed as an active agent. The applications are also presented in terms of the scale-up of experiments performed at the nanoscale.

  7. Mineral surface-organic matter interactions: basics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdrè, G.; Moro, D.; Ulian, G.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to control the binding of biological and organic molecules to a crystal surface is central in several fields; for example, in biotechnology, catalysis, molecular microarrays, biosensors preparation and environmental sciences. The nano-morphology and nanostructure at the surface may have physico-chemical properties that are very different from those of the underlying mineral substrate. Recent developments in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have widened the spectrum of possible investigations that can be performed at the nanometric level on the surface of minerals. They range from the study of physical properties such as surface potential, electric field topological determination, Brønsted-Lowry site distributions, to chemical and spectroscopic analysis in air, in liquid or in gaseous environments. After an introduction to SPM modes of operation and new SPM-based technological developments, we will present recent examples of applications in the study of interactions between organic matter and mineral surface and report on the advances in knowledge that have been made by the use of scanning probe microscopy.

  8. Advances in shell side condensation for refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube condensers used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The geometry of interest involves condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for condensation on the shell side. The heat transfer is removed by water on the tube side, which typically have tube side enhancement. Single tube and row effect condensation data are presented. Thermal design methods for sizing of the condenser are outlined.

  9. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  10. Nonautonomous matter waves in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhenya; Zhang Xiaofei; Liu, W. M.

    2011-08-15

    We present a physical model that describes the transport of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms from a reservoir to a waveguide. By using the similarity and Moebius transformations, we study nonautonomous matter waves in Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of an inhomogeneous source. Then, we find its various types of exact nonautonomous matter-wave solutions, including the W-shaped bright solitary waves, W-shaped and U-shaped dark solitary waves, periodic wave solutions, and rational solitary waves. The results show that these different types of matter-wave structures can be generated and effectively controlled by modulating the amplitude of the source. Our results may raise the possibility of some experiments and potential applications related to Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of an inhomogeneous source.

  11. Size Does Matter: Application-driven Approaches for Soil Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Kakirde, Kavita S.; Parsley, Larissa C.; Liles, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Metagenomic analyses can provide extensive information on the structure, composition, and predicted gene functions of diverse environmental microbial assemblages. Each environment presents its own unique challenges to metagenomic investigation and requires a specifically designed approach to accommodate physicochemical and biotic factors unique to each environment that can pose technical hurdles and/or bias the metagenomic analyses. In particular, soils harbor an exceptional diversity of prokaryotes that are largely undescribed beyond the level of ribotype and are a potentially vast resource for natural product discovery. The successful application of a soil metagenomic approach depends on selecting the appropriate DNA extraction, purification, and if necessary, cloning methods for the intended downstream analyses. The most important technical considerations in a metagenomic study include obtaining a sufficient yield of high-purity DNA representing the targeted microorganisms within an environmental sample or enrichment and (if required) constructing a metagenomic library in a suitable vector and host. Size does matter in the context of the average insert size within a clone library or the sequence read length for a high-throughput sequencing approach. It is also imperative to select the appropriate metagenomic screening strategy to address the specific question(s) of interest, which should drive the selection of methods used in the earlier stages of a metagenomic project (e.g., DNA size, to clone or not to clone). Here, we present both the promising and problematic nature of soil metagenomics and discuss the factors that should be considered when selecting soil sampling, DNA extraction, purification, and cloning methods to implement based on the ultimate study objectives. PMID:21076656

  12. Warm Dense Matter: Another Application for Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    developing, and validating extended, or new, computational models that describe material equation -of- state , constitutive properties, and the behavior of...the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state , viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter...M.W.C. Dharma-wardana, J. Benage, “Possibility of an unequivocal test of different models of the equation of state of aluminum in the coupling regime

  13. Weak, strong, and coherent regimes of Fröhlich condensation and their applications to terahertz medicine and quantum consciousness.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Mark, Alan E; Hush, Noel S

    2009-03-17

    In 1968, Fröhlich showed that a driven set of oscillators can condense with nearly all of the supplied energy activating the vibrational mode of lowest frequency. This is a remarkable property usually compared with Bose-Einstein condensation, superconductivity, lasing, and other unique phenomena involving macroscopic quantum coherence. However, despite intense research, no unambiguous example has been documented. We determine the most likely experimental signatures of Fröhlich condensation and show that they are significant features remote from the extraordinary properties normally envisaged. Fröhlich condensates are classified into 3 types: weak condensates in which profound effects on chemical kinetics are possible, strong condensates in which an extremely large amount of energy is channeled into 1 vibrational mode, and coherent condensates in which this energy is placed in a single quantum state. Coherent condensates are shown to involve extremely large energies, to not be produced by the Wu-Austin dynamical Hamiltonian that provides the simplest depiction of Fröhlich condensates formed using mechanically supplied energy, and to be extremely fragile. They are inaccessible in a biological environment. Hence the Penrose-Hameroff orchestrated objective-reduction model and related theories for cognitive function that embody coherent Fröhlich condensation as an essential element are untenable. Weak condensates, however, may have profound effects on chemical and enzyme kinetics, and may be produced from biochemical energy or from radio frequency, microwave, or terahertz radiation. Pokorný's observed 8.085-MHz microtubulin resonance is identified as a possible candidate, with microwave reactors (green chemistry) and terahertz medicine appearing as other feasible sources.

  14. Weak, strong, and coherent regimes of Fröhlich condensation and their applications to terahertz medicine and quantum consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; McKemmish, Laura K.; McKenzie, Ross H.; Mark, Alan E.; Hush, Noel S.

    2009-01-01

    In 1968, Fröhlich showed that a driven set of oscillators can condense with nearly all of the supplied energy activating the vibrational mode of lowest frequency. This is a remarkable property usually compared with Bose–Einstein condensation, superconductivity, lasing, and other unique phenomena involving macroscopic quantum coherence. However, despite intense research, no unambiguous example has been documented. We determine the most likely experimental signatures of Fröhlich condensation and show that they are significant features remote from the extraordinary properties normally envisaged. Fröhlich condensates are classified into 3 types: weak condensates in which profound effects on chemical kinetics are possible, strong condensates in which an extremely large amount of energy is channeled into 1 vibrational mode, and coherent condensates in which this energy is placed in a single quantum state. Coherent condensates are shown to involve extremely large energies, to not be produced by the Wu–Austin dynamical Hamiltonian that provides the simplest depiction of Fröhlich condensates formed using mechanically supplied energy, and to be extremely fragile. They are inaccessible in a biological environment. Hence the Penrose–Hameroff orchestrated objective-reduction model and related theories for cognitive function that embody coherent Fröhlich condensation as an essential element are untenable. Weak condensates, however, may have profound effects on chemical and enzyme kinetics, and may be produced from biochemical energy or from radio frequency, microwave, or terahertz radiation. Pokorný's observed 8.085-MHz microtubulin resonance is identified as a possible candidate, with microwave reactors (green chemistry) and terahertz medicine appearing as other feasible sources. PMID:19251667

  15. Nonlinear evolution of dark matter subhalos and applications to warm dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Benson, Andrew J.

    2014-09-01

    We describe the methodology to include nonlinear evolution, including tidal effects, in the computation of subhalo distribution properties in both cold (CDM) and warm (WDM) dark matter universes. Using semi-analytic modeling, we include effects from dynamical friction, tidal stripping, and tidal heating, allowing us to dynamically evolve the subhalo distribution. We calibrate our nonlinear evolution scheme to the CDM subhalo mass function in the Aquarius N-body simulation, producing a subhalo mass function within the range of simulations. We find tidal effects to be the dominant mechanism of nonlinear evolution in the subhalo population. Finally, we compute the subhalo mass function for m {sub χ} = 1.5 keV WDM including the effects of nonlinear evolution, and compare radial number densities and mass density profiles of subhalos in CDM and WDM models. We show that all three signatures differ between the two dark matter models, suggesting that probes of substructure may be able to differentiate between them.

  16. Synthesis, properties and applications of pure and covalently doped DLC films prepared by energetic condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.

    2001-12-04

    Hyper-thermal species have been used to produce carbon-based films with mechanical and tribological properties that have greatly expanded the applications of amorphous carbon coatings. Tetragonally bonded amorphous carbon films have properties that approach that of diamond in several ways. The major drawback, namely intrinsic stresses, preventing the production of thick ta-C films has been overcome by heat treating these films, and presently several micrometer-thick films of ta-C are regularly produced. Yet another area where superhard coatings are of great interest is for wear applications at elevated temperatures, namely around 500 degrees C and above. Such temperatures may be environment temperatures, or localized (flash) temperatures resulting for instance from wear. For this applications, doping the ta-C with elements that are covalently bonded to C (such as Si and B) offers a promising alternative. In this article, I will discuss some treatments that have allowed expanding the applications of pure ta-C, and the incorporation of Si and B on ta-C films. Film properties are presented and discussed.

  17. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  18. Organic Matter Application Can Reduce Copper Toxicity in Tomato Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Copper fungicides and bactericides are often used in tomato cultivation and can cause toxic Cu levels in soils. In order to combat this, organic matter can be applied to induce chelation reactions and form a soluble complex by which much of the Cu can leach out of the soil profile or be taken up safely by plants. Organic acids such as citric,…

  19. Diquark Bose-Einstein condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, K.; Nakano, E.; Yabu, H.

    2006-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of composite diquarks in quark matter (the color superconductor phase) is discussed using the quasichemical equilibrium theory at a relatively low-density region near the deconfinement phase transition, where dynamical quark-pair fluctuations are assumed to be described as bosonic degrees of freedom (diquarks). A general formulation is given for the diquark formation and particle-antiparticle pair-creation processes in the relativistic framework, and some interesting properties are shown, which are characteristic for the relativistic many-body system. Behaviors of transition temperature and phase diagram of the quark-diquark matter are generally presented in model parameter space, and their asymptotic behaviors are also discussed. As an application to the color superconductivity, the transition temperatures and the quark and diquark density profiles are calculated in case with constituent/current quarks, where the diquark is in the bound/resonant state. We obtained T{sub C}{approx}60-80 MeV for constituent quarks and T{sub C}{approx}130 MeV for current quarks at a moderate density ({rho}{sub b}{approx}3{rho}{sub 0}). The method is also developed to include interdiquark interactions into the quasichemical equilibrium theory within a mean-field approximation, and it is found that a possible repulsive diquark-diquark interaction lowers the transition temperature by {approx}50%.

  20. Finite temperature application of the corrected propagator method to reactive dynamics in a condensed-phase environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    The recently proposed mixed quantum-classical method is extended to applications at finite temperatures. The method is designed to treat complex systems consisting of a low-dimensional quantum part (the primary system) coupled to a dissipative bath described classically. The method is based on a formalism showing how to systematically correct the approximate zeroth-order evolution rule. The corrections are defined in terms of the total quantum Hamiltonian and are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The evolution of the primary system is governed by the corrected propagator yielding the exact quantum dynamics. The method has been tested on a standard model system describing proton transfer in a condensed-phase environment: a symmetric double-well potential bilinearly coupled to a bath of harmonic oscillators. Flux correlation functions and thermal rate constants have been calculated at two different temperatures for a range of coupling strengths. The results have been compared to the fully quantum simulations of Topaler and Makri [J. Chem. Phys. 101, 7500 (1994)] with the real path integral method.

  1. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  2. Numerical study of the coupled time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation: application to Bose-Einstein condensation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, S K

    2001-05-01

    We present a numerical study of the coupled time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which describes the Bose-Einstein condensate of several types of trapped bosons at ultralow temperature with both attractive and repulsive interatomic interactions. The same approach is used to study both stationary and time-evolution problems. We consider up to four types of atoms in the study of stationary problems. We consider the time-evolution problems where the frequencies of the traps or the atomic scattering lengths are suddenly changed in a stable preformed condensate. We also study the effect of periodically varying these frequencies or scattering lengths on a preformed condensate. These changes introduce oscillations in the condensate, which are studied in detail. Good convergence is obtained in all cases studied.

  3. Investigation of matter-antimatter interaction for possible propulsion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, D. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation is discussed as a means of rocket propulsion. The feasibility of different means of antimatter storage is shown to depend on how annihilation rates are affected by various circumstances. The annihilation processes are described, with emphasis on important features of atom-antiatom interatomic potential energies. A model is developed that allows approximate calculation of upper and lower bounds to the interatomic potential energy for any atom-antiatom pair. Formulae for the upper and lower bounds for atom-antiatom annihilation cross-sections are obtained and applied to the annihilation rates for each means of antimatter storage under consideration. Recommendations for further studies are presented.

  4. Application of the Premature Chromosome Condensation Assay in Simulated Partial-Body Radiation Exposures: Evaluation of the Use of an Automated Metaphase-Finder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    DECLASSIFY ON: SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 4 .ARMED FORCES RADIOSIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCIENTIFIC REPORT SR95-17 Application of the Premature ...Radiation Biophysics Department, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; bLoats Associates, Westminster, Maryland, USA Key Words. Premature chromosome condensation...assay • Lymphocytes • x-ray • Chromosome damage • Biodosimetry • Partial-body exposure • Metaphase-finder Abstract. The premature chromosome condensa

  5. International journal of quantum chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 27: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowdin, Per-Olov; Ohrn, N. Y.; Sabin, John R.; Zerner, Michael C.

    1993-03-01

    The topics covered at the 33rd annual Sanibel Symposium, organized by the faculty and staff of the Quantum Theory Project of the University of Florida, and held March 13 - 20, 1993, include advanced scientific computing, interaction of photons and matter, quantum molecular dynamics, electronic structure methods, polymeric systems, and quantum chemical methods for extended systems.

  6. Coupling a single electron to a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    PubMed

    Balewski, Jonathan B; Krupp, Alexander T; Gaj, Anita; Peter, David; Büchler, Hans Peter; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman

    2013-10-31

    The coupling of electrons to matter lies at the heart of our understanding of material properties such as electrical conductivity. Electron-phonon coupling can lead to the formation of a Cooper pair out of two repelling electrons, which forms the basis for Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductivity. Here we study the interaction of a single localized electron with a Bose-Einstein condensate and show that the electron can excite phonons and eventually trigger a collective oscillation of the whole condensate. We find that the coupling is surprisingly strong compared to that of ionic impurities, owing to the more favourable mass ratio. The electron is held in place by a single charged ionic core, forming a Rydberg bound state. This Rydberg electron is described by a wavefunction extending to a size of up to eight micrometres, comparable to the dimensions of the condensate. In such a state, corresponding to a principal quantum number of n = 202, the Rydberg electron is interacting with several tens of thousands of condensed atoms contained within its orbit. We observe surprisingly long lifetimes and finite size effects caused by the electron exploring the outer regions of the condensate. We anticipate future experiments on electron orbital imaging, the investigation of phonon-mediated coupling of single electrons, and applications in quantum optics.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensate strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the possible existence of gravitationally bound general relativistic strings consisting of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) matter which is described, in the Newtonian limit, by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. In the Madelung representation of the wave function, the quantum dynamics of the condensate can be formulated in terms of the classical continuity equation and the hydrodynamic Euler equations. In the case of a condensate with quartic nonlinearity, the condensates can be described as a gas with two pressure terms, the interaction pressure, which is proportional to the square of the matter density, and the quantum pressure, which is without any classical analogue, though, when the number of particles in the system is high enough, the latter may be neglected. Assuming cylindrical symmetry, we analyze the physical properties of the BEC strings in both the interaction pressure and quantum pressure dominated limits, by numerically integrating the gravitational field equations. In this way we obtain a large class of stable stringlike astrophysical objects, whose basic parameters (mass density and radius) depend sensitively on the mass and scattering length of the condensate particle, as well as on the quantum pressure of the Bose-Einstein gas.

  8. A Novel Antimatter Detector with Application to Dark Matter Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Madden, N; Ziock, K; Hailey, C; Aramaki, T; Gabhauer, F; Koglin, J; Mori, K; Yu, H

    2006-02-13

    We report on recent accelerator testing of a prototype general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS). GAPS uses a novel approach for indirect dark matter searches that exploits the antideuterons produced in neutralino-neutralino annihilations. GAPS captures these antideuterons into a target with the subsequent formation of exotic atoms. These exotic atoms decay with the emission of x-rays of precisely defined energy and a correlated pion signature from nuclear annihilation. This signature uniquely characterizes the antideuterons. Preliminary analysis of data from a prototype GAPS in an antiproton beam at the KEK accelerator in Japan has confirmed the multiple x-ray/pion star topology and indicated x-ray yields consistent with prior expectations. Moreover, our success in utilizing solid rather than gas targets represents a significant simplification over our original approach and offers potential gains in sensitivity through reduced dead mass in the target area.

  9. A high-throughput method for the quantification of proanthocyanidins in forage crops and its application in assessing variation in condensed tannin content in breeding programmes for Lotus corniculatus and Lotus uliginosus.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Athole; Bryant, David; Latypova, Galina; Hauck, Barbara; Olyott, Phil; Morris, Phillip; Robbins, Mark

    2008-02-13

    Lotus corniculatus and Lotus uliginosus are agronomically important forage crops used in ruminant livestock production. The condensed tannin (CT) content, dry matter (DM) production, and persistence of these species are key characteristics of interest for future exploitation of these crops. Here we present field data on 19 varieties of L. corniculatus, 2 varieties of L. uliginosus and, additionally, a glasshouse experiment using 6 varieties of L. corniculatus and 2 varieties of L. uliginosus. Current methods for the quantification of condensed tannins in crop species are slow and labor intensive and are generally based upon polymer hydrolysis following the extraction of chlorophyll in a liquid phase. Presented here is a high-throughput protocol for condensed tannin quantification suitable for microtiter plates based upon the precipitation of condensed tannin polymers in complex with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with subsequent hydrolysis of precipates using butan 1-ol/ hydrochloric acid.

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Growth of High Quality Strained-Si on Ultra-Thin SiGe-on-Insulator Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu-Yan; Liu, Wei-Li; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Chao; Song, Zhi-Tang; Lin, Cheng-Lu

    2009-11-01

    Ultra-thin and near-fully relaxed SiGe substrate is fabricated using a modified Ge condensation technique, and then a 25-nm-thick biaxially tensile strained-Si with a low rms roughness is epitaxially deposited on a SiGeon-Insulator (SGOI) substrate by ultra high vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD). High-Resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (HR-XTEM) observations reveal that the strained-Si/SiGe layer is dislocation-free and the atoms at the interface are well aligned. Furthermore, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) results show a sharp interface between layers and a uniform distribution of Ge in the SiGe layer. One percent in-plane tensile strain in the strained-Si layer is confirmed by ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectra, and the stress maintained even after a 30-s rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process at 1000°C According to those results, devices based on strained-Si are expected to have a better performance than the conventional ones.

  11. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES Klein Paradox and Disorder-Induced Delocalization of Dirac Quasiparticles in One-Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jian-Hui; Cheng, Ze; Yin, Miao; Zeng, Qi-Jun; Zhang, Jun-Pei

    2010-12-01

    Dirac particle penetration is studied theoretically with Dirac equation in one-dimensional systems. We investigate a one-dimensional system with N barriers where both barrier height and well width are constants randomly distributed in certain range. The one-parameter scaling theory for nonrelativistic particles is still valid for massive Dirac particles. In the same disorder sample, we find that the localization length of relativistic particles is always larger than that of nonrelativistic particles and the transmission coefficient related to incident particle in both cases fits the form T ~ exp(- αL). More interesting, massless relativistic particles are entirely delocalized no matter how big the energy of incident particles is.

  12. Two-phase nanofluid condensation and heat transfer modeling using least square method (LSM) for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, M.; Mosayebidorcheh, S.; Jing, D.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, two-phase Nanofluid condensation and heat transfer analysis over a vertical plate under gravity and between two parallel plates under magnetic force are investigated respectively using Least Square Method (LSM) and numerical method. After presenting the governing equations and solving them by LSM, the accuracy of results is examined by fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical method. Modeling results show that the condensate film thickness after condensation is reduced and therefore, the rate of heat transfer is enhanced by the addition of nanoparticles to the regular fluid. Effect of different nanoparticles and constant numbers on the temperature/velocity/concentration profiles as well as Nusselt number and boundary layer thickness, are also investigated. For instance, it was found that TiO2 and Ag have maximum boundary layer thicknesses and Nusselt number, respectively. By considering the magnetic field effect, it is also found that nanoparticles concentration can be controlled by changing the Hartmann number which, in turn, leads to different condensation and heat transfer properties.

  13. Variational methods with coupled Gaussian functions for Bose-Einstein condensates with long-range interactions. II. Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Stefan; Main, Joerg; Cartarius, Holger; Koeberle, Patrick; Wunner, Guenter

    2010-08-15

    Bose-Einstein condensates with an attractive 1/r interaction and with dipole-dipole interaction are investigated in the framework of the Gaussian variational ansatz introduced by S. Rau, J. Main, and G. Wunner [Phys. Rev. A 82, 023610 (2010)]. We demonstrate that the method of coupled Gaussian wave packets is a full-fledged alternative to direct numerical solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, or even superior in that coupled Gaussians are capable of producing both stable and unstable states of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and thus of giving access to yet unexplored regions of the space of solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. As an alternative to numerical solutions of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, the stability of the stationary condensate wave functions is investigated by analyzing the stability properties of the dynamical equations of motion for the Gaussian variational parameters in the local vicinity of the stationary fixed points. For blood-cell-shaped dipolar condensates it is shown that on the route to collapse the condensate passes through a pitchfork bifurcation, where the ground state itself turns unstable, before it finally vanishes in a tangent bifurcation.

  14. A few-parameter equation of state of the condensed matter and its application to the impact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, V.; Kraus, E.; Shabalin, I.

    A simple caloric model of the equation of state is proposed to describe thermodynamic properties of solid materials with the phase transitions being ignored and with the minimum possible number of parameters as the initial data. Thermal oscillations of the crystal lattice are described by the Debye approximation. The values of the parameters on the zero isotherm are calculated analytically from the generalized form of the Gruneisen function. Thermodynamic characteristics are calculated in wide ranges of densities and pressures. Extensive comparisons of theoretical results with experimental data available for high energy densities are performed for the materials considered. Two-dimensional problems of a high-velocity impact of a reactor of a nuclear powerplant with the Earth's surface propulsion system are solved on the basis of Willkins' method with allowance for the equation of state being derived.

  15. Condensed Astatine: Monatomic and Metallic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2013-09-01

    The condensed matter properties of the nominal terminating element of the halogen group with atomic number 85, astatine, are as yet unknown. In the intervening more than 70 years since its discovery significant advances have been made in substrate cooling and the other techniques necessary for the production of the element to the point where we might now enquire about the key properties astatine might have if it attained a condensed phase. This subject is addressed here using density functional theory and structural selection methods, with an accounting for relativistic physics that is essential. Condensed astatine is predicted to be quite different in fascinating ways from iodine, being already at 1 atm a metal, and monatomic at that, and possibly a superconductor (as is dense iodine).

  16. Condensed astatine: monatomic and metallic.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2013-09-13

    The condensed matter properties of the nominal terminating element of the halogen group with atomic number 85, astatine, are as yet unknown. In the intervening more than 70 years since its discovery significant advances have been made in substrate cooling and the other techniques necessary for the production of the element to the point where we might now enquire about the key properties astatine might have if it attained a condensed phase. This subject is addressed here using density functional theory and structural selection methods, with an accounting for relativistic physics that is essential. Condensed astatine is predicted to be quite different in fascinating ways from iodine, being already at 1 atm a metal, and monatomic at that, and possibly a superconductor (as is dense iodine).

  17. The need for expanded exploration of matter-antimatter annihilation for propulsion application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    The use of matter-antimatter annihilation as a propulsion application for interstellar travel is discussed. The physical basis for the superior energy release in such a system is summarized, and the problems associated with antimatter production, collection and storage are assessed. Advances in devising a workable propulsion system are reported, and the parameters of an antimatter propulsion system are described.

  18. 39 CFR 3020.111 - Limitations applicable to market dominant mail matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... matter. (a) The Postal Service shall inform the Commission of updates to size and weight limitations for... the proposed update. The notice shall include a copy of the applicable sections of the Mail Classification Schedule and the proposed updates therein in legislative format. (b) The Commission shall...

  19. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  20. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization.

  1. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  2. [On-line method for measurement of the carbon isotope ratio of atmospheric methane and its application to atmosphere of Yakela condensed gas field].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun-Hong; Bao, Zheng-Yu; Xiang, Wu; Qiao, Sheng-Ying; Li, Bing

    2006-01-01

    An on-line method for measurement of the 13C/12C ratio of methane by a gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/ isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/MS) technique was developed. This method is less laborious, more rapid (45 min), of high precision (+/- 0.4 x 10(-3)) and by using a small amount of sample (about 200 mL of atmosphere). Its application to isotopic characterization, and hence methane source identification, was demonstrated by examination of atmosphere sample collected in Yakela condensed gas field, China. The average 13C/12C ratio of atmospheric methane in Yakela field was -45.0 x 10(-3) heavier by 1.2 x 10(-3) -2.0 x 10(-3) than the global average. This is caused by seepage and diffusing of methane from Yakela condensed gas reservoir. The concentrations of atmospheric methane in daytimes are found to be lower than those in nighttimes, and the corresponding 13C/12C ratios in daytimes are lighter compared to those in nighttimes, a phenomena probably caused by the fact that a small part of methane from Yakela condensate reservoir is consumed in soil's surface under sunlight.

  3. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions.

  4. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    PubMed Central

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions. PMID:28176827

  5. Microscopic theory of equilibrium polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Fei; Wu, Fengcheng; Xie, Ming; Su, Jung-Jung; MacDonald, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the equilibrium polariton condensate state of a semiconductor quantum well in a planar optical cavity. The theory accounts for the adjustment of matter excitations to the presence of a coherent photon field, predicts effective polariton-polariton interaction strengths that are weaker and condensate exciton fractions that are smaller than in the commonly employed exciton-photon model, and yields effective Rabi coupling strengths that depend on the detuning of the cavity-photon energy relative to the bare exciton energy. The dressed quasiparticle bands that appear naturally in the theory provide a mechanism for electrical manipulation of polariton condensates.

  6. Collapse of Solutions of the Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation with a Time-Dependent Nonlinearity: Application to Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Konotop, V.V.; Pacciani, P.

    2005-06-24

    It is proven that periodically varying and sign definite nonlinearity in a general case does not prevent collapse in two-dimensional and three-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equations: at any oscillation frequency of the nonlinearity blowing up solutions exist. Contrary to the results known for a sign-alternating nonlinearity, an increase of the frequency of oscillations accelerates collapse. The effect is discussed from the viewpoint of scaling arguments. For the three-dimensional case a sufficient condition for the existence of collapse is rigorously established. The results are discussed in the context of the mean field theory of Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent scattering length.

  7. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Spin-Polarized Transport through a Quantum Dot Coupled to Ferromagnetic Leads and a Mesoscopic Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Wu, Shao-Quan

    2010-02-01

    Using an equation of motion technique, we investigate the spin-polarized transport through a quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic leads and a mesoscopic ring by the Anderson Hamiltonian. We analyze the transmission probability of this system in both the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases, and our results reveal that the transport properties show some noticeable characteristics depending upon the spin-polarized strength p, the magnetic flux Φ and the number of lattice sites NR in the mesoscopic ring. These effects might have some potential applications in spintronics.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Fabrication of 11-nm-Wide Silica-Like Lines Using X-Ray Diffraction Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-Li; Xie, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Man-Hong; Liu, Ming; Chen, Bao-Qin; Pan, Feng

    2009-08-01

    Fine silica-like lines with 11 nm width are successfully fabricated using x-ray Fresnel diffraction exposure. X-rays pass a mask of 175-nm-wide lines and 125-nm-wide spaces and form sharp peaks on a wafer coated with a layer of hydrogen silsesquioxane resist (HSQ). By precisely controlling the mask-wafer gap at 10 μm using the laser interferogram method, the fine structures are defined on HSQ. Experimental images are reproduced by a simulation using the one-dimensional beam propagation method. This lithographic technique presents a novel and convenient way to fabricate fine silica-like structures and devices in nano-optical and nanoelectronic applications.

  10. The Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma: Two Lectures.

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2007-08-29

    These two lectures concern the Color Glass Condensate and the Glasma. These are forms of matter which might be studied in high energy hadronic collisions. The Color Glass Condensate is high energy density gluonic matter. It constitutes the part of a hadron wave function important for high energy processes. The Glasma is matter produced from the Color Glass Condensate in the first instants after a collision of two high energy hadrons. Both types of matter are associated with coherent fields. The Color Glass Condensate is static and related to a hadron wavefunction, where the Glasma is transient and evolves quickly after a collision. I present the properties of such matter, and some aspects of what is known of their properties.

  11. DISH CODE A deeply simplified hydrodynamic code for applications to warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    More, Richard

    2007-08-22

    DISH is a 1-dimensional (planar) Lagrangian hydrodynamic code intended for application to experiments on warm dense matter. The code is a simplified version of the DPC code written in the Data and Planning Center of the National Institute for Fusion Science in Toki, Japan. DPC was originally intended as a testbed for exploring equation of state and opacity models, but turned out to have a variety of applications. The Dish code is a "deeply simplified hydrodynamic" code, deliberately made as simple as possible. It is intended to be easy to understand, easy to use and easy to change.

  12. Application of norm-conserving pseudopotentials to intense laser-matter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiao-Min; Wachter, Georg; Sato, Shunsuke A.; Lemell, Christoph; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the applicability of norm-conserving pseudopotentials to intense laser-matter interactions by performing time-dependent density functional theory simulations with an all-electron potential and with norm-conserving pseudopotentials. We find pseudopotentials to be reliable for the simulation of above-threshold ionization over a broad range of laser intensities both for the total ionization probability and the photoelectron energy spectrum. For the simulation of high-order-harmonic generation, pseudopotentials are shown to be applicable for lower-order harmonics in the spectral range in which the one-photon recombination dipole-matrix element can be recovered by the pseudopotential calculation.

  13. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Artificial Modulation of Ferroelectric Thin Films into Antiferroelectric through H+ Implantation for High-Density Charge Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Fei, Jin-Wen; Tang, Ting-Ao; Jiang, An-Quan

    2008-05-01

    Hydrogen ions are implanted into Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3 thin films at the energy of 40 keV with a flux of 5 × 1014 ions/cm2. Pseudo-antiferroelectric behaviour in the implanted thin films is observed, as confirmed by the measurements of polarization versus electric hysteresis loops and capacitance versus voltage curves. X-ray diffraction patterns show the film structures before and after H+ implantation both to be perovskite of a tetragonal symmetry. These findings indicate that hydrogen ions exist as stable dopants within the films. It is believed that the dopants change domain-switching behaviour via the boundary charge compensation. Meanwhile, time dependence of leakage current density after time longer than 10s indicates the enhancement of the leakage current nearly in one order for the implanted film, but the current at time shorter than 1 s is mostly the same as that of the original film without the ionic implantation. The artificial tailoring of the antiferroelectric behaviour through H+ implantation in ferroelectric thin films is finally proven to be achievable for the device application of high-density charge storage.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Enhanced nonlinear optical absorption of Au/SiO2 nano-composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cui-Hua; Zhang, Bo-Ping; Shang, Peng-Peng

    2009-12-01

    Nano metal-particle dispersed glasses are the attractive candidates for nonlinear optical material applications. Au/SiO2 nano-composite thin films with 3 vol% to 65 vol% Au are prepared by inductively coupled plasma sputtering. Au particles as perfect spheres with diameters between 10 nm and 30 nm are uniformly dispersed in the SiO2 matrix. Optical absorption peaks due to the surface plasmon resonance of Au particles are observed. The absorption property is enhanced with the increase of Au content, showing a maximum value in the films with 37 vol% Au. The absorption curves of the Au/SiO2 thin films with 3 vol% to 37 vol% Au accord well with the theoretical optical absorption spectra obtained from Mie resonance theory. Increasing Au content over 37 vol% results in the partial connection of Au particles, whereby the intensity of the absorption peak is weakened and ultimately replaced by the optical absorption of the bulk. The band gap decreases with Au content increasing from 3 vol% to 37 vol% but increases as Au content further increases.

  15. Synthesis of fluorinated nano-silica and its application in wettability alteration near-wellbore region in gas condensate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, M. A.; Hassanajili, Sh.; Rahimpour, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    Fluorinated silica nanoparticles were prepared to alter rock wettability near-wellbore region in gas condensate reservoirs. Hence fluorinated silica nanoparticles with average diameter of about 80 nm were prepared and used to alter limestone core wettability from highly liquid-wet to intermediate gas-wet state. Water and n-decane contact angles for rock were measured before and after treatment. The contact angle measured 147° for water and 61° for n-decane on the core surface. The rock surface could not support the formation of any water or n-decane droplets before treatment. The functionalized fluorinated silica nanoparticles have been confirmed by the Csbnd F bond along with Sisbnd Osbnd Si bond as analyzed by FT-IR. The elemental composition of treated limestone core surface was determined using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses. The final evaluation of the fluorinated nanosilica treatment in terms of its effectiveness was measured by core flood experimental tests.

  16. DNA adduct formation in mice following dermal application of smoke condensates from cigarettes that burn or heat tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Brown, B.G.; Reed, E.A.; Mosberg, A.T.; Doolittle, D.J.; Hayes, A.W. ); Hejtmancik, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A prototype cigarette that heats tobacco (test cigarette), developed by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, has yielded consistently negative results in several in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology tests. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) from the test cigarette to induce DNA adducts in mouse tissues and compare the results with those obtained with CSC from a reference tobacco-burning cigarette (1R4F). CD-1 mice were skin-painted with CSF from reference and test cigarettes three times a week for 4 weeks. The highest mass of CSC applied was 180 mg tar per week per animal for both reference and test cigarette. DNA adducts were analyzed in skin and lung tissues using the [sup 32]P-postlabeling method with the P[sub 1] nuclease modification. Distinct diagonal radioactive zones (DRZ) were observed in the DNA from both skin and lung tissues of animals dosed with reference CSC, whereas no corresponding DRZ were observed from the DNA of animals dosed with either test CSC or acetone (solvent control). The relative adduct labeling (RAL) values of skin and lung DNA from reference CSC-treated animals were significantly greater than those of the test CSC-treated animals. The RAL values of the test CSC-treated animals were no greater than those of solvent controls. The negative results in DNA adduct assays with test CSC are consistent with all previous results of in vivo and in vitro genetic toxicology testing on this cigarette and provide additional evidence that smoke condensate from the test cigarette is not genotoxic. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Bose-Einstein condensation in microgravity.

    PubMed

    van Zoest, T; Gaaloul, N; Singh, Y; Ahlers, H; Herr, W; Seidel, S T; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Eckart, M; Kajari, E; Arnold, S; Nandi, G; Schleich, W P; Walser, R; Vogel, A; Sengstock, K; Bongs, K; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Schiemangk, M; Schuldt, T; Peters, A; Könemann, T; Müntinga, H; Lämmerzahl, C; Dittus, H; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J

    2010-06-18

    Albert Einstein's insight that it is impossible to distinguish a local experiment in a "freely falling elevator" from one in free space led to the development of the theory of general relativity. The wave nature of matter manifests itself in a striking way in Bose-Einstein condensates, where millions of atoms lose their identity and can be described by a single macroscopic wave function. We combine these two topics and report the preparation and observation of a Bose-Einstein condensate during free fall in a 146-meter-tall evacuated drop tower. During the expansion over 1 second, the atoms form a giant coherent matter wave that is delocalized on a millimeter scale, which represents a promising source for matter-wave interferometry to test the universality of free fall with quantum matter.

  18. Applications of Fluorescence Spectroscopy for dissolved organic matter characterization in wastewater treatment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffin, Angélique; Guérin, Sabrina; Rocher, Vincent; Varrault, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences wastewater treatment plants efficiency (WTTP): variations in its quality and quantity can induce a foaming phenomenon and a fouling event inside biofiltration processes. Moreover, in order to manage denitrification step (control and optimization of the nitrate recirculation), it is important to be able to estimate biodegradable organic matter quantity before biological treatment. But the current methods used to characterize organic matter quality, like biological oxygen demand are laborious, time consuming and sometimes not applicable to directly monitor organic matter in situ. In the context of MOCOPEE research program (www.mocopee.com), this study aims to assess the use of optical techniques, such as UV-Visible absorbance and more specifically fluorescence spectroscopy in order to monitor and to optimize process efficiency in WWTP. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy was employed to prospect the possibility of using this technology online and in real time to characterize dissolved organic matter in different effluents of the WWTP Seine Centre (240,000 m3/day) in Paris, France. 35 sewage water influent samples were collected on 10 days at different hours. Data treatment were performed by two methods: peak picking and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). An evolution of DOM quality (position of excitation - emission peaks) and quantity (intensity of fluorescence) was observed between the different treatment steps (influent, primary treatment, biological treatment, effluent). Correlations were found between fluorescence indicators and different water quality key parameters in the sewage influents. We developed different multivariate linear regression models in order to predict a variety of water quality parameters by fluorescence intensity at specific excitation-emission wavelengths. For example dissolved biological oxygen demand (r2=0,900; p<0,0001) and ammonium concentration (r2=0,898; p<0

  19. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.

  20. Spatiotemporal binary interaction and designer quasi-particle condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Radha; Pattu Sakthi, Vinayagam; Hyun Jong, Shin; Kuppuswamy, Porsezian

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a new integrable model to investigate the dynamics of two component quasi-particle condensates with spatiotemporal interaction strengths. We derive the associated Lax pair of the coupled Gross—Pitaevskii (GP) equation and construct matter wave solitons. We show that the spatiotemporal binary interaction strengths not only facilitate the stabilization of the condensates, but also enables one to fabricate condensates with desirable densities, geometries, and properties, leading to the so-called “designer quasi-particle condensates”.

  1. Preparation and characterization of Mg-Zr mixed oxide aerogels and their application as aldol condensation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sádaba, Irantzu; Ojeda, Manuel; Mariscal, Rafael; Richards, Ryan; López Granados, Manuel

    2012-10-08

    A series of Mg-Zr mixed oxides with different nominal Mg/(Mg+Zr) atomic ratios, namely 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.85, and 1, is prepared by alcogel methodology and fundamental insights into the phases obtained and resulting active sites are studied. Characterization is performed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms, and thermal and chemical analysis. Cubic Mg(x)Zr(1-x)O(2-x) solid solution, which results from the dissolution of Mg(2+) cations within the cubic ZrO(2) structure, is the main phase detected for the solids with theoretical Mg/(Mg+Zr) atomic ratio ≤0.4. In contrast, the cubic periclase (c-MgO) phase derived from hydroxynitrates or hydroxy precursors predominates in the solid with Mg/(Mg+Zr)=0.85. c-MgO is also incipiently detected in samples with Mg/(Mg+Zr)=0.2 and 0.4, but in these solids the c-MgO phase mostly arises from the segregation of Mg atoms out of the alcogel-derived c-Mg(x)Zr(1-x)O(2-x) phase during the calcination process, and therefore the species c-MgO and c-Mg(x)Zr(1-x)O(2-x) are in close contact. Regarding the intrinsic activity in furfural-acetone aldol condensation in the aqueous phase, these Mg-O-Zr sites located at the interface between c-Mg(x)Zr(1-x)O(2-x) and segregated c-MgO display a much larger intrinsic activity than the other noninterface sites that are present in these catalysts: Mg-O-Mg sites on c-MgO and Mg-O-Zr sites on c-Mg(x)Zr(1-x)O(2-x). The very active Mg-O-Zr sites rapidly deactivate in the furfural-acetone condensation due to the leaching of active phases, deposition of heavy hydrocarbonaceous compounds, and hydration of the c-MgO phase. Nonetheless, these Mg-Zr materials with very high specific surface areas would be suitable solid catalysts for other relevant reactions catalyzed by strong basic sites in nonaqueous environments.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation in large time-averaged optical ring potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Thomas A.; Glidden, Jake A. P.; Humbert, Leif; Bromley, Michael W. J.; Haine, Simon A.; Davis, Matthew J.; Neely, Tyler W.; Baker, Mark A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Interferometric measurements with matter waves are established techniques for sensitive gravimetry, rotation sensing, and measurement of surface interactions, but compact interferometers will require techniques based on trapped geometries. In a step towards the realisation of matter wave interferometers in toroidal geometries, we produce a large, smooth ring trap for Bose-Einstein condensates using rapidly scanned time-averaged dipole potentials. The trap potential is smoothed by using the atom distribution as input to an optical intensity correction algorithm. Smooth rings with a diameter up to 300 μm are demonstrated. We experimentally observe and simulate the dispersion of condensed atoms in the resulting potential, with good agreement serving as an indication of trap smoothness. Under time of flight expansion we observe low energy excitations in the ring, which serves to constrain the lower frequency limit of the scanned potential technique. The resulting ring potential will have applications as a waveguide for atom interferometry and studies of superfluidity.

  3. XX International Workshop on Condensed Matter Theories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Rojo5, M.A. Solis6 and A.A. Valladares4 1 Institute de Fisica Teorica -UNESP, 01405 Säo Paulo, BRAZIL and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade...an elegant functional integral approach which in lowest-order gives a Ginzburg- Landau theory. Following Ref. [30] a generalized coherence length (or...representing Landau damping due to the wave particle interactions [16]. For a nonequilibrium plasma with a two peaked distribution function f0(u) (e.g

  4. Computer simulation radiation damages in condensed matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.; Gyngazov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    As part of the cascade-probability method were calculated the energy spectra of primary knocked-out atoms and the concentration of radiation-induced defects in a number of metals irradiated by electrons. As follows from the formulas, the number of Frenkel pairs at a given depth depends on three variables having certain physical meaning: firstly, Cd (Ea h) is proportional to the average energy of the considered depth of the PKA (if it is higher, than the greater number of atoms it will displace); secondly is inversely proportional to the path length λ2 for the formation of the PKA (if λ1 is higher than is the smaller the probability of interaction) and thirdly is inversely proportional to Ed. In this case calculations are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data (for example, copper and aluminum).

  5. Quantum Field Theory in Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvelik, Alexei M.

    2007-01-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introduction to Methods: 1. QFT: language and goals; 2. Connection between quantum and classical: path integrals; 3. Definitions of correlation functions: Wick's theorem; 4. Free bosonic field in an external field; 5. Perturbation theory: Feynman diagrams; 6. Calculation methods for diagram series: divergences and their elimination; 7. Renormalization group procedures; 8. O(N)-symmetric vector model below the transition point; 9. Nonlinear sigma models in two dimensions: renormalization group and 1/N-expansion; 10. O(3) nonlinear sigma model in the strong coupling limit; Part II. Fermions: 11. Path integral and Wick's theorem for fermions; 12. Interaction electrons: the Fermi liquid; 13. Electrodynamics in metals; 14. Relativistic fermions: aspects of quantum electrodynamics; 15. Aharonov-Bohm effect and transmutation of statistics; Part III. Strongly Fluctuating Spin Systems: Introduction; 16. Schwinger-Wigner quantization procedure: nonlinear sigma models; 17. O(3) nonlinear sigma model in (2+1) dimensions: the phase diagram; 18. Order from disorder; 19. Jordan-Wigner transformations for spin S=1/2 models in D=1, 2, 3; 20. Majorana representation for spin S=1/2 magnets: relationship to Z2 lattice gauge theories; 21. Path integral representations for a doped antiferromagnet; Part IV. Physics in the World of One Spatial Dimension: Introduction; 22. Model of the free bosonic massless scalar field; 23. Relevant and irrelevant fields; 24. Kosterlitz-Thouless transition; 25. Conformal symmetry; 26. Virasoro algebra; 27. Differential equations for the correlation functions; 28. Ising model; 29. One-dimensional spinless fermions: Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid; 30. One-dimensional fermions with spin: spin-charge separation; 31. Kac-Moody algebras: Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten model; 32. Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten model in the Lagrangian form: non-Abelian bosonization; 33. Semiclassical approach to Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten models; 34. Integrable models: dynamical mass generation; 35. A comparative study of dynamical mass generation in one and three dimensions; 36. One-dimensional spin liquids: spin ladder and spin S=1 Heisenberg chain; 37. Kondo chain; 38. Gauge fixing in non-Abelian theories: (1+1)-dimensional quantum chromodynamics; Select bibliography; Index.

  6. Measuring Entanglement in Condensed Matter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, M.; Wunderlich, H.; Plenio, M. B.

    2011-01-14

    We show how entanglement may be quantified in spin and cold atom many-body systems using standard experimental techniques only. The scheme requires no assumptions on the state in the laboratory, and a lower bound to the entanglement can be read off directly from the scattering cross section of neutrons deflected from solid state samples or the time-of-flight distribution of cold atoms in optical lattices, respectively. This removes a major obstacle which so far has prevented the direct and quantitative experimental study of genuine quantum correlations in many-body systems: The need for a full characterization of the state to quantify the entanglement contained in it. Instead, the scheme presented here relies solely on global measurements that are routinely performed and is versatile enough to accommodate systems and measurements different from the ones we exemplify in this work.

  7. Nuclear techniques in studies of condensed matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have played an important role in the studies of materials over the past several decades. For example, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, neutron activation, and particle- or photon-induced X-ray emission techniques have been used extensively for the elucidation of structural and compositional details of materials. Several new techniques have been developed recently. Four such techniques are briefly reviewed which have great potential in the study and development of new materials. Of these four, Mossbauer spectroscopy, muon spin rotation, and positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques exploit their great sensitivity to the local atomic environments in the test materials. Interest in synchrotron radiation, on the other hand, stems from its special properties, such as high intensity, high degree of polarization, and high monochromaticity. It is hoped that this brief review will stimulate interest in the exploitation of these newer techniques for the development of improved materials.

  8. Many body topics in condensed matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anduaga, Inaki Pablo

    Two different problems involving many-body systems are presented. A hydrodynamic version of the Calogero system of one-dimensional particles interacting on the line is derived using a classical field formalism, and the results are contrasted to a derivation starting from first quantum mechanical principles. This new classical approach is shown to help in understanding subtleties occurring in the latter, such as the conditions for chiral motion, the decomposition of the Hamiltonian in terms of chiral currents and the nature of the physical velocity and density operators. Explicit collective solitonic excitations in the linear and non-linear limits are also presented. Additionally, we overview the possibility of expanding this formalism to the study of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. The second problem involves a simple two-dimensional model of a px + ipy superfluid in which the mass flow that gives rise to the intrinsic angular momentum is easily calculated by numerical diagonalization of the Bogoliubovde Gennes operator. The results confirm theoretical predictions such as the Thomas-Fermi approximation and the Ishikawa formula, in which the mass flow at zero-temperature and for a constant director l follows jmass = ½curl(rhohl/2).

  9. Stable and unstable vector dark solitons of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations: Application to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brazhnyi, V.A.; Konotop, V.V.

    2005-08-01

    The dynamics of vector dark solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates is studied within the framework of coupled one-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equations. We consider the small-amplitude limit in which the coupled NLS equations are reduced to coupled Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations. For a specific choice of the parameters the obtained coupled KdV equations are exactly integrable. We find that there exist two branches of (slow and fast) dark solitons corresponding to the two branches of the sound waves. Slow solitons, corresponding to the lower branch of the acoustic wave, appear to be unstable and transform during the evolution into stable fast solitons (corresponding to the upper branch of the dispersion law). Vector dark solitons of arbitrary depths are studied numerically. It is shown that effectively different parabolic traps, to which the two components are subjected, cause an instability of the solitons, leading to a splitting of their components and subsequent decay. A simple phenomenological theory, describing the oscillations of vector dark solitons in a magnetic trap, is proposed.

  10. Retarded hydrolysis-condensing reactivity of tetrabutyl titanate by acetylacetone and the application in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Conghua Ouyang, Jun; Yang, Bingchu

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Effect of acetone acetyl on coarsening rate of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites was studied. • Hydrolysis reactivity of alkoxide was retarded with addition of acetone acetyl. • Coarsening rate of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites is retarded with addition of acetone acetyl. • The synthesized TiO{sub 2} sols were utilized in dye sensitized solar cells. • Small particles formed by Ti-complexes were beneficial for device performance. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites have been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction using tetrabutyl titanate as source material. Acetylacetone was utilized to modify hydrolysis-condensation behavior of the alkoxide and thus coarsening dynamics of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites in the reaction. With assistance of Fourier transformation infrared spectrum, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction, interaction between acetylacetone and tetrabutyltitanate was explored, crystallographic and morphological properties of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites were monitored. Less hydrolysable complex was formed by “method of chelating” as tetrabutyltitanate was mixed with acetylacetone, leading to retarded coarsening rate of nanocrystallites. The obtained TiO{sub 2} nanocrystallites were applied to fabricate nanoporous photoanode of dye sensitized solar cells. Improvement of 18% has been achieved for photo-to-electric energy conversion efficiency of the devices due to both upgraded open circuit voltage and photocurrent density.

  11. Condensational Droplet Growth in Rarefied Quiescent Vapor and Forced Convective Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sushant

    Multiphase Heat transfer is ubiquitous in diverse fields of application such as cooling systems, micro and mini power systems and many chemical processes. By now, single phase dynamics are mostly understood in their applications in vast fields, however multiphase systems especially involving phase changes are still a challenge. Present study aims to enhance understanding in this domain especially in the field of condensation heat transfer. Of special relevance to present studies is study of condensation phenomenon for detection of airborne nanoparticles using heterogeneous nucleation. Detection of particulate matter in the environment via heterogeneous condensation is based on the droplet growth phenomenon where seeding particles in presence of supersaturated vapor undergo condensation on their surface and amplify in size to micrometric ranges, thereby making them optically visible. Previous investigations show that condensation is a molecular exchange process affected by mean free path of vapor molecules (lambda) in conjunction with size of condensing droplet (d), which is measured in terms of Knudsen number (Kn=lambda/ d). In an event involving heterogeneous nucleation with favorable thermodynamic conditions for condensation to take place, the droplet growth process begins with accretion of vapor molecules on a surface through random molecular collision (Kn>1) until diffusive forces start dominating the mass transport process (Kn<<1). Knowledge of droplet growth thus requires understanding of mass transport in both of these regimes. Present study aims to understand the dynamics of the Microthermofluidic sensor which has been developed, based on above mentioned fundamentals. Using continuum approach, numerical modeling was carried to understand the effect of various system parameters for improving the device performance to produce conditions which can lead to conditions abetting condensational growth. The study reveals that the minimum size of nanoparticle which

  12. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  13. Applications of infrared free electron lasers in picosecond and nonlinear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, W. S.; Benson, S. V.; Madey, J. M. J.; Etemad, S.; Baker, G. L.; Rothberg, L.; Roberson, M.; Austin, R. H.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper we describe two different types of spectroscopic experiments that exploit the characteristics of the infrared FEL, Mark III, for studies of condensed matter: - the spectrum of χ(3)(-3ω; ω, ω, ω) in polyacetylene: an application of the free electron laser in nonlinear optical spectroscopy, and - a dynamical test of Davydov-like solitons in acetanilide using a picosecond free electron laser. These two studies highlight the unique contributions FELs can make to condensed-matter spectroscopy.

  14. Temporal condensation and dynamic λ-transition within the complex network: an application to real-life market evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiliński, Mateusz; Szewczak, Bartłomiej; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-02-01

    We fill a void in merging empirical and phenomenological characterisation of the dynamical phase transitions in complex networks by identifying and thoroughly characterising a triple sequence of such transitions on a real-life financial market. We extract and interpret the empirical, numerical, and analytical evidences for the existence of these dynamical phase transitions, by considering the medium size Frankfurt stock exchange (FSE), as a typical example of a financial market. By using the canonical object for the graph theory, i.e. the minimal spanning tree (MST) network, we observe: (i) the (initial) dynamical phase transition from equilibrium to non-equilibrium nucleation phase of the MST network, occurring at some critical time. Coalescence of edges on the FSE's transient leader (defined by its largest degree) is observed within the nucleation phase; (ii) subsequent acceleration of the process of nucleation and the emergence of the condensation phase (the second dynamical phase transition), forming a logarithmically diverging temporal λ-peak of the leader's degree at the second critical time; (iii) the third dynamical fragmentation phase transition (after passing the second critical time), where the λ-peak logarithmically relaxes over three quarters of the year, resulting in a few loosely connected sub-graphs. This λ-peak (comparable to that of the specific heat vs. temperature forming during the equilibrium continuous phase transition from the normal fluid I 4He to the superfluid II 4He) is considered as a prominent result of a non-equilibrium superstar-like superhub or a dragon-king's abrupt evolution over about two and a half year of market evolution. We capture and meticulously characterise a remarkable phenomenon in which a peripheral company becomes progressively promoted to become the dragon-king strongly dominating the complex network over an exceptionally long period of time containing the crash. Detailed analysis of the complete trio of the

  15. Demonstration of Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, RIchard; Tang, Linh; Wambolt, Spencer; Golliher, Eric; Agui, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a proof of concept effort for development of a Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser (NCCC or NC3) used for microgravity compatible water recovery from moist air with integral passive phase separation. Removal of liquid condensate from the air stream exiting a condenser is readily performed here on Earth. In order to perform this function in space however, without gravity or mechanical action, other tactics including utilization of inertial, drag and capillary forces are required. Within the NC3, liquid water forms via condensation on cold condenser surfaces as humid air passes along multiple spiral channels, each in its own plane, all together forming a stacked plate assembly. Non-mechanical inertial forces are employed to transfer condensate, as it forms, via centripetal action to the outer perimeter of each channel. A V-shaped groove, constructed on this outer edge of the spiral channel, increases local capillary forces thereby retaining the liquid. Air drag then pulls the liquid along to a collection region near the center of the device. Dry air produced by each parallel spiral channel is combined in a common orthogonal, out-of-plane conduit passing down the axial center of the stacked device. Similarly, the parallel condensate streams are combined and removed from the condenser/separator through yet another out-of-plane axial conduit. NC3 is an integration of conventional finned condenser operation, combined with static phase separation and capillary transport phenomena. A Mars' transit mission would be a logical application for this technology where gravity is absent and the use of vibrating, energy-intensive, motor-driven centrifugal separators is undesired. Here a vapor stream from either the Heat Melt Compactor or the Carbon dioxide Reduction Assembly, for example, would be dried to a dew point of 10 deg using a passive NC3 condenser/separator with the precious water condensate recycled to the water bus.

  16. Dynamic Condensation of Mass and Stiffness Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.

    1995-12-01

    Details are given of a procedure for condensing the mass and stiffness matrices of a structure for dynamic analysis. The condensed model is based on choosing ncnatural frequencies and the corresponding modes of original model. The model is constructed so that (1) it has ncnatural frequencies equal to those of the original model, (2) the modes φ ifcless than i,j = 1, 2, . . . , ncare the same as those for the master co-ordinates in the corresponding modes of the original and (3) the responses of the condensed system at the co-ordinates Xcdue to forces at these co-ordinates, at one particular chosen frequency, are the same as those of the original system. The natural frequencies, the corresponding modes and the dynamic responses used for the condensation can be obtained from finite element analysis of the original structure. The method has been applied to the modelling of two common structures to examine its applicability. Comparisons between the performance of the condensed models obtained by means of the dynamic condensation method and that of the models obtained by the Guyan method have been conducted. The results of the example show that the condensed models determined by the dynamic condensation method retain the natural frequencies and modal shapes and perform better in describing the dynamic responses of the structures than do the corresponding models obtained by the Guyan method.

  17. Enhancement of Condensation on a Vertical Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Rencai; Hatanaka, Tsutomu; Nishio, Shigefumi

    In previous study, the characteristic of the condensation heat transfer on the dispersed vertical surface were investigated experimentally for the application of the finned surface to the thermoelectric generator utilizing boiling and condensation as the electrodes of the thermoelectric module. A prediction model for this diapered finned surface was proposed, based on Adamek-Webb model of the condensation on a finned tube. In this study, a condensation heat transfer experiment on a vertical dispersed finned surfaces using FC5312 was carried out, in order to enhance the condensation heat transfer coefficient by optimizing the fin size on a dispersed heat transfer surface. Experimental parameters were the fin width, thickness, height and the dispersed fin length. As the results, it was found from the experiment there was a dispersed fin length corresponding to the condensation at the maximum and its value was 1.75 mm. As the characteristic, the condensation changed from slowly increasing to rapidly increasing and then decreasing at a steep grade, with decreasing the dispersed fin length. In addition, the fin height did not affect this optimum dispersed fin length and the dispersed fin length affects the dependence of the condensation on different fin thickness. Further, the prediction values have a good agreement with the experimental data except the case of short dispersed fin length.

  18. EPRI condensate polisher guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, B.A.; Webb, L.C.; Sawochka, S.G.; Crits, G.J.; Pocock, F.J.; Wirth, L.

    1995-01-01

    Cycle chemistry is one of the most important contributors to the loss of availability of generating units. Condensate polishing can significantly improve cycle chemistry by improving cycle water quality and minimizing the transport of contaminants in the power cycle. The EPRI-funded project described in this paper developed comprehensive guidelines for condensate polishing based upon information gathered from utility surveys, equipment vendors, and resin suppliers. Existing literature was also surveyed for pertinent input. Comprehensive guidelines which outline guidance for design, operation, maintenance, surveillance, management, and retrofitting of condensate polishing systems were developed. Economics of condensate polishing were evaluated and a roadmap for economic evaluation for utilities to follow was produced.

  19. Semiclassical stochastic mechanics for the Coulomb potential with applications to modelling dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neate, Andrew; Truman, Aubrey

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about dark matter particles save that their most important interactions with ordinary matter are gravitational and that, if they exist, they are stable, slow moving and relatively massive. Based on these assumptions, a semiclassical approximation to the Schrödinger equation under the action of a Coulomb potential should be relevant for modelling their behaviour. We investigate the semiclassical limit of the Schrödinger equation for a particle of mass M under a Coulomb potential in the context of Nelson's stochastic mechanics. This is done using a Freidlin-Wentzell asymptotic series expansion in the parameter ɛ = √{ ħ / M } for the Nelson diffusion. It is shown that for wave functions ψ ˜ exp((R + iS)/ɛ2) where R and S are real valued, the ɛ = 0 behaviour is governed by a constrained Hamiltonian system with Hamiltonian Hr and constraint Hi = 0 where the superscripts r and i denote the real and imaginary parts of the Bohr correspondence limit of the quantum mechanical Hamiltonian, independent of Nelson's ideas. Nelson's stochastic mechanics is restored in dealing with the nodal surface singularities and by computing (correct to first order in ɛ) the relevant diffusion process in terms of Jacobi fields thereby revealing Kepler's laws in a new light. The key here is that the constrained Hamiltonian system has just two solutions corresponding to the forward and backward drifts in Nelson's stochastic mechanics. We discuss the application of this theory to modelling dark matter particles under the influence of a large gravitating point mass.

  20. Colored condensates deep inside neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, David

    2014-09-01

    It is demonstrated how in the absence of solutions for QCD under conditions deep inside compact stars an equation of state can be obtained within a model that is built on the basic symmetries of the QCD Lagrangian, in particular chiral symmetry and color symmetry. While in the vacuum the chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken, it gets restored at high densities. Color symmetry, however, gets broken simultaneously by the formation of colorful diquark condensates. It is shown that a strong diquark condensate in cold dense quark matter is essential for supporting the possibility that such states could exist in the recently observed pulsars with masses of 2 Mʘ.

  1. Atomic Phase Conjugation From a Bose Condensate

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Elena V.; Plättner, Katja; Meystre, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of observing atomic phase conjugation from Bose condensates, and using it as a diagnostic tool to access the spatial coherence properties and to measure the lifetime of the condensate. We argue that since phase conjugation results from the scattering of a partial matter wave off the spatial grating produced by two other waves, it offers a natural way to directly measure such properties, and as such provides an attractive alternative to the optical methods proposed in the past. PMID:27805111

  2. Particulate matter emissions from combustion of wood in district heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafghazi, S.; Sowlati, T.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bi, X.T.; Melin, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of wood biomass to generate district heat and power in communities that have access to this energy source is increasing. In this paper the effect of wood fuel properties, combustion condition, and flue gas cleaning system on variation in the amount and formation of particles in the flue gas of typical district heating wood boilers are discussed based on the literature survey. Direct measurements of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood boilers with district heating applications are reviewed and presented. Finally, recommendations are given regarding the selection of wood fuel, combustion system condition, and flue gas cleaning system in district heating systems in order to meet stringent air quality standards. It is concluded that utilization of high quality wood fuel, such as wood pellets produced from natural, uncontaminated stem wood, would generate the least PM emissions compared to other wood fuel types. Particulate matter emissions from grate burners equipped with electrostatic precipitators when using wood pellets can be well below stringent regulatory emission limit such as particulate emission limit of Metro Vancouver, Canada.

  3. The contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fractions with different boiling ranges to the carcinogenic impact of emission condensate from coal fired residential furnaces as evaluated by topical application to the skin of mice.

    PubMed

    Grimmer, G; Brune, H; Deutsch-Wenzel, R; Dettbarn, G; Misfeld, J; Abel, U; Timm, J

    1985-09-15

    Flue gas condensate from briquet-fired residential furnaces was separated into a polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC)-free and a PAC-containing part, followed by a subfractionation of the PAC-containing fraction into 3 parts: PAC consisting predominantly of (a) 2 and 3 rings, (b) 4 and 5 rings and (c) 6 and more rings. To evaluate the carcinogenic potency of the condensate and its fractions, local application onto skin of mice in 2 or 3 doses was used. Since it was known from an earlier investigation that both the PAC-free fraction and the fraction containing PAC with 2 and 3 rings were almost ineffective, only PAC-fractions containing more than 3 rings were tested. The probit and Weibull analysis of the results showed that the condensate and the fractions containing PAC with 4 and 5 rings as well as 6 and more rings provoke local tumors after repeated application to the dorsal skin of mice. The tumor incidence exhibited a clear cut dose-response relationship. Fractions (b) and (c) were almost equally active, each contributing by about 50% to the total carcinogenicity. The content of benzo[a]pyrene (0.72 mg/g condensate) contributed by 10-11% to the total carcinogenicity of the emission.

  4. Theory and applications of light-matter interactions in quantum dot nanowire photonic crystal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelatos, Gerasimos

    Photonic crystal slabs coupled with quantum dipole emitters allow one to control quantum light-matter interactions and are a promising platform for quantum information science technologies; however their development has been hindered by inherent fabrication issues. Inspired by recent nanowire growth techniques and opportunities in fundamental quantum nanophotonics, in this thesis we theoretically investigate light-matter interactions in nanowire photonic crystal structures with embedded quantum dots, a novel engineered quantum system, for applications in quantum optics. We develop designs for currently fabricable structures, including finite-size effects and radiative loss, and investigate their fundamental properties using photonic band structure calculations, finite-difference time-domain computations, and a rigorous photonic Green function technique. We study and engineer realistic nanowire photonic crystal waveguides for single photon applications whose performance can exceed that of state-of-the-art slab photonic crystals, and design a directed single photon source. We then develop a powerful quantum optical formalism using master equation techniques and the photonic Green function to understand the quantum dynamics of these exotic structures in open and lossy photonic environments. This is used to explore the coupling of a pair of quantum dots in a nanowire photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating long-lived entangled states and a system with a completely controllable Hamiltonian capable of simulating a wide variety of quantum systems and entering a unique regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics characterized by strong exchange-splitting. Lastly, we propose and study a "metamaterial" polariton waveguide comprised of a nanowire photonic crystal waveguide with an embedded quantum dot in each unit cell, and explain the properties of both infinite and finite-sized structures using a Green function approach. We show that an external quantum dot can be strongly

  5. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  6. Interactions of light with matter: Applications to single molecule spectroscopy and quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Frank Leon Halet

    Two different applications of the interaction between light and matter are discussed. First, we consider the single molecule spectra (SMS) of chromophores embedded in low temperature glasses. We demonstrate that it is possible to rationalize recent experimental results within the framework of the standard tunneling model (STM) for glassy dynamics as proposed by Anderson, Halperin and Varma and Phillips. Our analysis enables insight to be gained as to what features of the model are most important in describing experiment. Implicit in our treatment is the assumption that the two level systems, central to the STM, do not interact. The validity of this assumption is critically examined by extending the model to allow for such interactions. This complication of the theoretical model, beyond the lowest order implications of the STM, is found to influence individual spectra, but not the averaged quantities which are typically reported in the experimental literature. Our second application is a brief foray into the field of quantum control. Within the limit of weak applied fields and quadratic potentials for the control target, we describe a general method capable of determining the best possible field for affecting a desired configuration of the nuclear positions in the target. Several simple models are discussed within this framework to prove the validity of the formulation and its ease of implementation. Possibilities for extension to more complicated applications will be discussed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307, Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253- 1690.)

  7. Sub-micronic capsules based on gelatin and poly(maleic anhydride-alt-vinyl acetate) obtained by interfacial condensation with potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Iurea, Delia Mihaela; Peptu, Cătălina Anişoara; Chailan, Jean-François; Carriere, Pascal; Popa, Marcel

    2013-06-01

    New sub-micronic capsules based on a copolymer of maleic anhydride-alt-vinyl acetate and a natural polymer (gelatin) using an interfacial condensation method were obtained. Sub-micronic capsules were characterized by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) method, zeta-potential, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thermal properties were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). According to some parameters of the synthesis reaction (polymer weight ratio, acetone/water ratio, surfactant concentration), the mean diameter of the sub-micronic capsules can be tuned from 200 to 760 nm. The sub-micronic capsules show a higher agglomeration tendency as the amount of gelatin in their composition increases. The swelling capacity in aqueous solutions is dependent on the composition and size of the sub-micronic capsules, decreasing with their diameter and gelatin composition. The drug loading and release capacity was studied using Penicillin G (sodium salt) (PG), and it has been proved that it is influenced by the sub-micronic capsules morphology induced by preparation parameters. Encapsulation and controlled release of small molecule were successfully carried out, demonstrating the potential biomedical applications of these new easily obtained sub-micronic capsules.

  8. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  9. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics.

  10. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged ρ -mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that ρ -meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the ρ -meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and ρ -mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  11. Antikaon condensation and deconfinement phase transition in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jianfa; Guo Hua; Xu Furong; Li Xiguo; Liu Yuxin

    2006-05-15

    Antikaon condensation and deconfinement phase transition in neutron stars are investigated in a chiral hadronic model (also referred as to the FST model) for the hadronic phase and in the MIT bag model for the deconfined quark matter phase. It is shown that the existence of quark matter phase makes antikaon condensation impossible in neutron stars. The properties of neutron stars are sensitive to the bag constant. For the small values of the bag constant, the pure quark matter core appears and hyperons are strongly suppressed in neutron stars, whereas for the large bag constant, the hadron-quark mixed phase exists in the center of neutron stars. The maximum masses of neutron stars with the quark matter phase are lower than those without the quark matter phase; meanwhile, the maximum masses of neutron stars with the quark matter phase increase with the bag constant.

  12. Electric field enhanced dropwise condensation on hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratian, Davood; Hoek, Harmen; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Physics of Complex Fluids Team

    2016-11-01

    Dropwise condensation occurs when vapor condenses on a low surface energy surface, and the substrate is just partially wetted by the condensate. Dropwise condensation has attracted significant attention due to its reported superior heat transfer performance compared to filmwise condensation. Extensive research efforts are focused on how to promote, and enhance dropwise condensation by considering both physical and chemical factors. We have studied electrowetting-actuated condensation on hydrophobic surfaces, aiming for enhancement of heat transfer in dropwise condensation. The idea is to use suitably structured patterns of micro-electrodes that generate a heterogeneous electric field at the interface and thereby promote both the condensation itself and the shedding of condensed drops. Comforting the shedding of droplets on electrowetting-functionalized surfaces allows more condensing surface area for re-nucleation of small droplets, leading to higher condensation rates. Possible applications of this innovative concept include heat pipes for (micro) coolers in electronics as well as in more efficient heat exchangers. We acknowledge financial support by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is part of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), within the VICI program.

  13. Quantum hydrodynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The peculiar dynamics of superfluids are a fascinating research topic. Since the first generation of a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in 1995, quantum degenerate atomic gases have taken the investigation of quantum hydrodynamics to a new level. The atomic physics toolbox has grown tremendously and now provides unique and powerful ways to explore nonlinear quantum systems. As an example, pioneering results have recently revealed that the counterflow between two superfluids can be used as a well controlled tool to access the rich dynamics of vector systems. New structures, such as beating dark-dark solitons which only exist in multicomponent systems and have never been observed before, can now be realized in the lab for the first time. Furthermore, the field of nonlinear quantum hydrodynamics is entering new regimes by exploiting Raman dressing as a tool to directly modify the dispersion relation. This leads to the generation of spin-orbit coupled BECs, artificial gauge fields, etc. that are currently receiving tremendous interest due to their parallels to complex condensed-matter systems. Studies of quantum hydrodynamics help to develop a profound understanding of nonlinear quantum dynamics, which is not only of fundamental interest but also of eminent importance for future technological applications, e.g. in telecommunication applications using optical solitons in fibers. This talk will showcase some ``classic'' hallmark results and highlight recent advances from the forefront of the field.

  14. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2010-06-01

    The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in the green organic reactions in water are directly applicable to astrobiology. Another green chemistry approach is to abolish use of toxic solvents. This can be accomplished by carrying out the reactions without a solvent in the solventless or solid-state reactions. The advances in these green reactions are directly applicable to the chemistry on asteroids during the periods when water was not available. Many reactions on asteroids may have been done in the solid mixtures. These reactions may be responsible for a myriad of organic compounds that have been isolated from the meteorites.

  15. 76 FR 11522 - In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application, Levy County Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application, Levy County Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2); Notice of Appointment of Adjudicatory Employee Commissioners: Gregory...

  16. 75 FR 51295 - In the Matter of the Application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for Registration as a National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of the Application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for Registration as a National... October 20, 2009, BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. (``BATS Y Exchange'' or ``Exchange'') submitted to the Securities... January 28, 2010.\\2\\ The Commission received no comments regarding the BATS Y Exchange Form 1. On July...

  17. Sedimentary condensation and authigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föllmi, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Most marine authigenic minerals form in sediments, which are subjected to condensation. Condensation processes lead to the formation of well individualized, extremely thin (< 1m) beds, which were accumulated during extremely long time periods (> 100ky), and which experienced authigenesis and the precipitation of glaucony, verdine, phosphate, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides, iron sulfide, carbonate and/or silica. They usually show complex internal stratigraphies, which result from an interplay of sediment accumulation, halts in sedimentation, sediment winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass. They may include amalgamated faunas of different origin and age. Hardgrounds may be part of condensed beds and may embody strongly condensed beds by themselves. Sedimentary condensation is the result of a hydrodynamically active depositional regime, in which sediment accumulation, winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass are processes, which alternate as a function of changes in the location and intensity of currents, and/or as the result of episodic high-energy events engendered by storms and gravity flow. Sedimentary condensation has been and still is a widespread phenomenon in past and present-day oceans. The present-day distribution of glaucony and verdine-rich sediments on shelves and upper slopes, phosphate-rich sediments and phosphorite on outer shelves and upper slopes, ferromanganese crusts on slopes, seamounts and submarine plateaus, and ferromanganese nodules on abyssal seafloors is a good indication of the importance of condensation processes today. In the past, we may add the occurrence of oolitic ironstone, carbonate hardgrounds, and eventually also silica layers in banded iron formations as indicators of the importance of condensation processes. Besides their economic value, condensed sediments are useful both as a carrier of geochemical proxies of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change, as well as the product of episodes of paleoceanographic and

  18. Analytical applications of condensed phosphoric acid-III Iodometric determination of sulphur after reduction of sulphate with sodium hypophosphite and either tin metal or potassium iodide in condensed phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, T; Iwahori, H; Ishii, H

    1980-06-01

    Novel methods for the reduction of sulphate to hydrogen sulphide with hypophosphite-tin metal or hypophosphite-iodide in condensed phosphoric acid (CPA) are proposed. The reduction of sulphate with hypophosphite alone does not proceed quantitatively. Sulphate, however, is quantitatively decomposed with hypophosphite when tin metal or potassium iodide is used together with it. The determination of sulphur by the hypophosphite-tin metal-CPA and tin(II)-CPA methods is interfered with by copper on account of the stabilization of copper(I) sulphide, but this interference can be eliminated by adding iodide, e.g. potassium and lead salts. Alum and barytes are quantitatively decomposed within 15 min at 140 and 280 degrees , respectively. The hydrogen sulphide evolved is absorbed in zinc acetate solution at pH 4.5 and then determined by iodometry.

  19. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  20. Dropwise condensation dynamics in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo Chacon, Julian Eduardo

    Dropwise condensation of atmospheric water vapor is important in multiple practical engineering applications. The roles of environmental factors and surface morphology/chemistry on the condensation dynamics need to be better understood to enable efficient water-harvesting, dehumidication, and other psychrometric processes. Systems and surfaces that promote faster condensation rates and self-shedding of condensate droplets could lead to improved mass transfer rates and higher water yields in harvesting applications. The thesis presents the design and construction of an experimental facility that allows visualization of the condensation process as a function of relative humidity. Dropwise condensation experiments are performed on a vertically oriented, hydrophobic surface at a controlled relative humidity and surface subcooling temperature. The distribution and growth of water droplets are monitored across the surface at different relative humidities (45%, 50%, 55%, and 70%) at a constant surface subcooling temperature of 15 °C below the ambient temperature. The droplet growth dynamics exhibits a strong dependency on relative humidity in the early stages during which there is a large population of small droplets on the surface and single droplet growth dominates over coalescence effects. At later stages, the dynamics of droplet growth is insensitive to relative humidity due to the dominance of coalescence effects. The overall volumetric rate of condensation on the surface is also assessed as a function of time and ambient relative humidity. Low relative humidity conditions not only slow the absolute rate of condensation, but also prolong an initial transient regime over which the condensation rate remains significantly below the steady-state value. The current state-of-the-art in dropwise condensation research indicates the need for systematic experimental investigations as a function of relative humidity. The improved understanding of the relative humidity

  1. THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    IANCU,E.; LEONIDOV,A.; MCLERRAN,L.

    2001-08-06

    In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory.

  2. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications. A review

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-23

    It is important to note that Soil organic matter (SOM) is a great natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In our SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystem function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. Finally, we conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4)SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5)SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.

  3. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications. A review

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-23

    It is important to note that Soil organic matter (SOM) is a great natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In our SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystemmore » function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. Finally, we conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4)SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5)SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.« less

  4. Current developments in soil organic matter modeling and the expansion of model applications: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Eleanor E.; Paustian, Keith

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is an important natural resource. It is fundamental to soil and ecosystem functions across a wide range of scales, from site-specific soil fertility and water holding capacity to global biogeochemical cycling. It is also a highly complex material that is sensitive to direct and indirect human impacts. In SOM research, simulation models play an important role by providing a mathematical framework to integrate, examine, and test the understanding of SOM dynamics. Simulation models of SOM are also increasingly used in more ‘applied’ settings to evaluate human impacts on ecosystem function, and to manage SOM for greenhouse gas mitigation, improved soil health, and sustainable use as a natural resource. Within this context, there is a need to maintain a robust connection between scientific developments in SOM modeling approaches and SOM model applications. This need forms the basis of this review. In this review we first provide an overview of SOM modeling, focusing on SOM theory, data-model integration, and model development as evidenced by a quantitative review of SOM literature. Second, we present the landscape of SOM model applications, focusing on examples in climate change policy. We conclude by discussing five areas of recent developments in SOM modeling including: (1) microbial roles in SOM stabilization; (2) modeling SOM saturation kinetics; (3) temperature controls on decomposition; (4) SOM dynamics in deep soil layers; and (5) SOM representation in earth system models. Our aim is to comprehensively connect SOM model development to its applications, revealing knowledge gaps in need of focused interdisciplinary attention and exposing pitfalls that, if avoided, can lead to best use of SOM models to support policy initiatives and sustainable land management solutions.

  5. Passive control of unsteady condensation shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Shigeru; Shimamoto, Katsumi; Yasugi, Shinichi; Yu, Shen

    2000-12-01

    A rapid expansion of moist air or steam in a supersonic nozzle gives rise to nonequilibrium condensation phenomena. Thereby, if the heat released by condensation of water vapour exceeds a certain quantity, the flow will become unstable and periodic flow oscillations of the unsteady condensation shock wave will occur. For the passive control of shock-boundary layer interaction using the porous wall with a plenum underneath, many papers have been presented on the application of the technique to transonic airfoil flows. In this paper, the passive technique is applied to three types of oscillations of the unsteady condensation shock wave generated in a supersonic nozzle in order to suppress the unsteady behavior. As a result, the effects of number of slits and length of cavity on the aspect of flow field have been clarified numerically using a 3rd-order MUSCL type TVD finite-difference scheme with a second-order fractional-step for time integration.

  6. Key condenser failure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2009-04-15

    Eight practical lessons highlight many of the factors that can influence condenser tube corrosion at coal-fired utilities and the effects contaminant in-leakage can have on steam generating units. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  7. Scalable graphene coatings for enhanced condensation heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Preston, Daniel J; Mafra, Daniela L; Miljkovic, Nenad; Kong, Jing; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-05-13

    Water vapor condensation is commonly observed in nature and routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat with dropwise condensation on nonwetting surfaces exhibiting heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation on wetting surfaces. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings that either have challenges with chemical stability or are so thick that any potential heat transfer improvement is negated due to the added thermal resistance of the coating. In this work, we show the effectiveness of ultrathin scalable chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene coatings to promote dropwise condensation while offering robust chemical stability and maintaining low thermal resistance. Heat transfer enhancements of 4× were demonstrated compared to filmwise condensation, and the robustness of these CVD coatings was superior to typical hydrophobic monolayer coatings. Our results indicate that graphene is a promising surface coating to promote dropwise condensation of water in industrial conditions with the potential for scalable application via CVD.

  8. Applicability of approximations used in calculations of the spectrum of dark matter particles produced in particle decays

    DOE PAGES

    Bezrukov, Fedor; Gorbunov, Dmitry

    2016-03-03

    For the warm dark matter (WDM) candidates the momentum distribution of particles becomes important, since it can be probed with observations of Lyman-α forest structures and confronted with coarse grained phase space density in galaxy clusters. We recall the calculation of the spectrum in the case of dark matter nonthermal production in decays of heavy particles emphasizing the inherent applicability conditions, which are rather restrictive and sometimes ignored in literature. Finally, the cold part of the spectrum requires special care when WDM is considered.

  9. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  10. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  11. Condensation and Evaporation of Solar System Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M.; Richter, F. M.

    2003-12-01

    condensable matter (see Chapter 1.08; Grossman, 1973; Wänke et al., 1974; Grossman and Ganapathy, 1976; Grossman et al., 1977), where CI chondrites are taken to represent total condensable matter.Elemental abundance patterns ordered by volatility certainly could have been produced by partial condensation, but they could also have been caused by partial evaporation. The relative importance of these opposite processes is still subject to debate and uncertainty. It should be remembered that condensation calculations typically assume chemical equilibrium in a closed system, in which case the system has no memory of the path by which it arrived at a given state, and thus the chemical and isotopic composition of the condensed phase cannot be used to distinguish between partial condensation and partial evaporation. Humayun and Clayton (1995) have taken a somewhat different view by arguing that condensation and evaporation are distinguishable, in that evaporation, but not condensation, will produce isotopically fractionated residues. With this idea in mind, they carefully measured the potassium isotopic compositions of a broad range of solar system materials with different degrees of potassium depletion and found them to be indistinguishable. This they took as evidence that evaporation could not have been a significant process in determining the diverse elemental abundance patterns of the various solar system materials they measured, because had evaporation been important in fractionating potassium it would have also fractionated the potassium isotopes. We will qualify this line of reasoning by arguing that evaporation and condensation can under certain conditions produce isotopically fractionated condensed phases (i.e., that partial evaporation can produce isotopically heavy residues and that partial condensation can produce isotopically light condensates) but that under other conditions both can produce elemental fractionations without significant isotopic fractionation. The

  12. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  13. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  14. Revealing the dark side of a bright exciton–polariton condensate

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, J. -M.; Poellmann, C.; Porer, M.; Leierseder, U.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Amo, A.; Bloch, J.; Huber, R.

    2014-01-01

    Condensation of bosons causes spectacular phenomena such as superfluidity or superconductivity. Understanding the nature of the condensed particles is crucial for active control of such quantum phases. Fascinating possibilities emerge from condensates of light–matter-coupled excitations, such as exciton–polaritons, photons hybridized with hydrogen-like bound electron–hole pairs. So far, only the photon component has been resolved, while even the mere existence of excitons in the condensed regime has been challenged. Here we trace the matter component of polariton condensates by monitoring intra-excitonic terahertz transitions. We study how a reservoir of optically dark excitons forms and feeds the degenerate state. Unlike atomic gases, the atom-like transition in excitons is dramatically renormalized on macroscopic ground state population. Our results establish fundamental differences between polariton condensation and photon lasing and open possibilities for coherent control of condensates. PMID:25115964

  15. Ghost dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Mukohyama, Shinji E-mail: shu@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: naoshi@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We revisit ghost dark matter, the possibility that ghost condensation may serve as an alternative to dark matter. In particular, we investigate the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background evolution and the large-scale structure (LSS) in the ΛGDM universe, i.e. a late-time universe dominated by a cosmological constant and ghost dark matter. The FRW background of the ΛGDM universe is indistinguishable from that of the standard ΛCDM universe if M∼>1eV, where M is the scale of spontaneous Lorentz breaking. From the LSS we find a stronger bound: M∼>10eV. For smaller M, ghost dark matter would have non-negligible sound speed after the matter-radiation equality, and thus the matter power spectrum would significantly differ from observation. These bounds are compatible with the phenomenological upper bound M∼<100GeV known in the literature.

  16. A Bubble Chamber Revival: Superheated Liquid Detectors for Dark Matter Searches and Other Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Bubble chambers were recently deemed to be obsolete, of interest only to historians, but a few new applications have unexpectedly emerged in nuclear and particle astrophysics. These include the search for WIMP dark matter and the measurement of a few otherwise intractable nuclear cross sections. The new bubble chambers exploit features of the bubble nucleation process that were unappreciated or irrelevant in the 1950s-1970s when the technology was known for its capability to provide fine-grained tracking of high energy particles in a dense target medium. By carefully tuning the temperature and pressure, a liquid can be made selectively sensitive to particles on the basis of their specific rate of energy loss, enabling a high degree of background rejection power when searching for rare heavily-ionizing tracks. Surprisingly, additional information on the microstructure of particle tracks can be extracted from the acoustic noise produce by bubble nucleation. Other novel features of the new bubble chambers include the use of digital photography, self-triggering, and the achievement of nearly continuous sensitivity by the avoidance of bubble nucleation on internal wetted surfaces.

  17. Modeling of local steam condensation on walls in presence of non-condensable gases. Application to a loca calculation in reactor containment using the multidimensional geyser/tonus code

    SciTech Connect

    Benet, L.V.; Caroli, C.; Cornet, P.

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports part of a study of possible severe pressurized water reactor (PWR) accidents. The need for containment modeling, and in particular for a hydrogen risk study, was reinforced in France after 1990, with the requirement that severe accidents must be taken into account in the design of future plants. This new need of assessing the transient local hydrogen concentration led to the development, in the Mechanical Engineering and Technology Department of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA/DMT), of the multidimensional code GEYSER/TONUS for containment analysis. A detailed example of the use of this code is presented. The mixture consisted of noncondensable gases (air or air plus hydrogen) and water vapor and liquid water. This is described by a compressible homogeneous two-phase flow model and wall condensation is based on the Chilton-Colburn formula and the analogy between heat and mass transfer. Results are given for a transient two-dimensional axially-symmetric computation for the first hour of a simplified accident sequence. In this there was an initial injection of a large amount of water vapor followed by a smaller amount and by hydrogen injection.

  18. Magnetic monopole condensation transition out of quantum spin ice: application to Pr2 Ir2 O7 and Yb2 Ti2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang

    We study the proximate magnetic orders and the related quantum phase transition out of quantum spin ice (QSI). We apply the electromagnetic duality of the compact quantum electrodynamics to analyze the condensation of the magnetic monopoles for QSI. The monopole condensation transition represents a unconventional quantum criticality with unusual scaling laws. The magnetic monopole condensation leads to the magnetic states that belong to the ``2-in 2-out'' spin ice manifold and generically have an enlarged magnetic unit cell. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic state with the ordering wavevector Q = 2p(001) is proximate to QSI while the ferromagnetic state with the ordering wavevector Q = (000) is not proximate to QSI. This implies that if there exists a direct transition from QSI to the ferromagnetic state, the transition must be strongly first order. We apply the theory to the puzzling experiments on two pyrochlore systems Pr2Ir2O7 and Yb2Ti2O7. chggst@gmail.com.

  19. Synthesis of novel dendritic 2,2'-bipyridine ligands and their application to Lewis acid-catalyzed diels-alder and three-component condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takahito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kujime, Masato

    2007-10-12

    A series of dendritic ligands with a 2,2'-bipyridine core was synthesized through the coupling of 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine with poly(aryl ether) dendrons. The corresponding dendritic Cu(OTf)2 catalysts were used for Diels-Alder and three-component condensation reactions. The dendritic Cu(OTf)2-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction proceeded smoothly, and these dendritic catalysts could be recycled without deactivation by reprecipitation. Three-component condensation reactions such as Mannich-type reactions also proceeded not only in dichloromethane but also in water. Furthermore, a positive dendritic effect on chemical yields was observed in both Diels-Alder reactions and aqueous-media three-component condensation reactions.

  20. Covariant theory of Bose-Einstein condensates in curved spacetimes with electromagnetic interactions: The hydrodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri; Matos, Tonatiuh

    2017-01-01

    We develop a hydrodynamic representation of the Klein-Gordon-Maxwell-Einstein equations. These equations combine quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, and general relativity. We consider the case of an arbitrary curved spacetime, the case of weak gravitational fields in a static or expanding background, and the nonrelativistic (Newtonian) limit. The Klein-Gordon-Maxwell-Einstein equations govern the evolution of a complex scalar field, possibly describing self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates, coupled to an electromagnetic field. They may find applications in the context of dark matter, boson stars, and neutron stars with a superfluid core.

  1. Direct condensation by humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, S.; Schiebelsberger, B.

    1980-12-01

    The practicability of direct condensation with humid air (DKFL) for waste heat removal from thermal power plants was investigated with regard to technical, economical and environmental aspects. The adjustment of a uniform trickling-water film was examined. A vertical test tube was erected to study the phenomenon of a trickling-water film. A pilot plant with a vertical tube-bundle was installed to evaluate the main process parameters. The applicability of the cooling system is judged. A theoretical model was derived for the design of a DKFL apparatus. A vertical geometry for the test tube has essential operational and economical advantages in comparison with a horizontal one.

  2. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Organic Matter - Module 17, Objectives, and Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    This module sketches out the impact of sewage organic matter on soils. For convenience, that organic matter is separated into the readily decomposable compounds and the more resistant material (volatile suspended solids, refractory organics, and sludges). The fates of those organics are reviewed along with loading rates and recommended soil…

  3. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  4. Enhancement of Condensation on a Vertical Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Rencai; Hatanaka, Tsutomu; Nishio, Shigefumi

    In previous study, the characteristic of the condensation heat transfer on the dispersed vertical surface were investigated experimentally for the application of the finned surface to the thermoelectric generator utilizing boiling and condensation as the electrodes of the thermoelectric module. A prediction model for this diapered finned surface was proposed, based on Adamek-Webb model of the condensation on a finned tube. In this study, a condensation heat transfer experiment on a vertical dispersed finned surfaces using FC5312 was carried out, in order to enhance the condensation heat transfer coefficient by optimizing the fin size on a dispersed heat transfer surface. The object of the experiment was limited to the rectangular fin with the height of 3 mm. Experimental parameters were the temperature difference, the fin groove width, the fin thickness and the dispersing size on the vertical direction. As the results, it was found from the experiment that the dependence of the condensation heat transfer coefficient on the dispersed size is controlled by the fin groove width. That is, the condensation heat transfer coefficient will increase for a smaller fin groove width and will decrease for a larger fin groove width, with decreasing of the dispersing size. Moreover, there is an optimum fin thickness at which the condensation heat transfer coefficient becomes the maximum in the case of constant fin groove width for both size of the fin groove width. This effect of the fin thickness is more significant for the smaller fin groove width. Further, the prediction values exhibit a good agreement with the experimental data in the present experiment.

  5. Characterization of simultaneous heat and mass transfer phenomena for water vapour condensation on a solid surface in an abiotic environment--application to bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Akhilesh; Kondjoyan, Alain; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of heat and mass transfer by condensation of water vapour from humid air involves several key concepts in aerobic bioreactors. The high performance of bioreactors results from optimised interactions between biological processes and multiphase heat and mass transfer. Indeed in various processes such as submerged fermenters and solid-state fermenters, gas/liquid transfer need to be well controlled, as it is involved at the microorganism interface and for the control of the global process. For the theoretical prediction of such phenomena, mathematical models require heat and mass transfer coefficients. To date, very few data have been validated concerning mass transfer coefficients from humid air inflows relevant to those bioprocesses. Our study focussed on the condensation process of water vapour and developed an experimental set-up and protocol to study the velocity profiles and the mass flux on a small size horizontal flat plate in controlled environmental conditions. A closed circuit wind tunnel facility was used to control the temperature, hygrometry and hydrodynamics of the flow. The temperature of the active surface was controlled and kept isothermal below the dew point to induce condensation, by the use of thermoelectricity. The experiments were performed at ambient temperature for a relative humidity between 35-65% and for a velocity of 1.0 ms⁻¹. The obtained data are analysed and compared to available theoretical calculations on condensation mass flux.

  6. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-03

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach--based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants--that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  7. Condensation on slippery asymmetric bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Grinthal, Alison; He, Neil; Fox, David; Weaver, James C.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation is fundamental to water-harvesting systems, desalination, thermal power generation, air conditioning, distillation towers, and numerous other applications. For any of these, it is essential to design surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and to be shed as quickly as possible. However, approaches based on microscale, nanoscale or molecular-scale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach—based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants—that synergistically combines these aspects of condensation and substantially outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle’s bumpy surface geometry in promoting condensation, and using theoretical modelling, we show how to maximize vapour diffusion fluxat the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing the radius of curvature and cross-sectional shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope, analogous to cactus spines, directly couples facilitated droplet growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free-energy profile that drives the droplet down the slope before its growth rate can decrease. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher-plant-inspired nanocoating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion on the way down. Bumps that are rationally designed to integrate these mechanisms are able to grow and transport large droplets even against gravity and overcome the effect of an unfavourable temperature gradient. We further observe an unprecedented sixfold-higher exponent of growth rate, faster onset, higher steady-state turnover rate, and a greater volume of water collected compared to other surfaces. We envision that this fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be

  8. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  9. Application of hybrid coagulation microfiltration with air backflushing to direct sewage concentration for organic matter recovery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhengyu; Gong, Hui; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-01-01

    The idea of sewage concentration is gradually being accepted as a promising and sustainable way of wastewater resource recovery. In this study, Hybrid coagulation microfiltration (HCM) with air backflushing (AB) was investigated to effectively concentrate organic matter. Compared to direct sewage microfiltration, the addition of coagulation process improved the filtration performance with less fouling trends and better concentration efficiency. The use of AB exhibited even better performance within the same 7-h preliminary concentration period by reducing to one tenth of the resistance and collecting around four times as much organic matter into the product concentrate as in direct sewage microfiltration. During 93-h lab-scale continuous concentration by HCM with AB, a product concentrate with the COD concentration over 15,000 mg/L was achieved and around 70% of total influent organic matter could be recovered. Compared to Direct Membrane Filtration (DMF) with Chemically Enhanced Backwash (CEB), HCM with AB achieved better concentration efficiency with higher concentration extent and concentration velocity along with less organic matter mineralization and the more concentrated product despite with lower organic matter retention. HCM with AB could be a promising effective sewage organic matter concentration for resource recovery under optimization.

  10. Simple simulations of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M J

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored coulombic structure is a charge-ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomenon and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong. PMID:11159388

  11. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  12. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  13. Application of surface analytical methods for hazardous situation in the Adriatic Sea: monitoring of organic matter dynamics and oil pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletikapić, Galja; Ivošević DeNardis, Nadica

    2017-01-01

    Surface analytical methods are applied to examine the environmental status of seawaters. The present overview emphasizes advantages of combining surface analytical methods, applied to a hazardous situation in the Adriatic Sea, such as monitoring of the first aggregation phases of dissolved organic matter in order to potentially predict the massive mucilage formation and testing of oil spill cleanup. Such an approach, based on fast and direct characterization of organic matter and its high-resolution visualization, sets a continuous-scale description of organic matter from micro- to nanometre scales. Electrochemical method of chronoamperometry at the dropping mercury electrode meets the requirements for monitoring purposes due to the simple and fast analysis of a large number of natural seawater samples enabling simultaneous differentiation of organic constituents. In contrast, atomic force microscopy allows direct visualization of biotic and abiotic particles and provides an insight into structural organization of marine organic matter at micro- and nanometre scales. In the future, merging data at different spatial scales, taking into account experimental input on micrometre scale, observations on metre scale and modelling on kilometre scale, will be important for developing sophisticated technological platforms for knowledge transfer, reports and maps applicable for the marine environmental protection and management of the coastal area, especially for tourism, fishery and cruiser trafficking.

  14. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  15. Disequilibrium condensation environments in space - A frontier in thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal-disequilibrium aspect of the problem of dust-particle formation from a gas phase in an open space environment is discussed in an effort to draw attention to the space condensation environment as an interesting arena for application and extension of the ideas and formalisms of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. It is shown that quasi-steady states with a disequilibrium between the gas-phase kinetic temperature and the condensed-phase internal temperature appear to be the norm of condensation environments in space. Consideration of the case of condensation onto a bulk condensed phase indicates that these quasi-steady states may constitute Prigogine dissipative structures. It is suggested that a proper study of the process of condensation in a space environment should include any effects arising from thermal disequilibrium.

  16. Flow condensation on copper-based nanotextured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Torresin, Daniele; Tiwari, Manish K; Del Col, Davide; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have shown excellent ability to promote dropwise condensation with high droplet mobility, leading to enhanced surface thermal transport. To date, however, it is unclear how superhydrophobic surfaces would perform under the stringent flow condensation conditions of saturated vapor at high temperature, which can affect superhydrophobicity. Here, we investigate this issue employing "all-copper" superhydrophobic surfaces with controlled nanostructuring for minimal thermal resistance. Flow condensation tests performed with saturated vapor at a high temperature (110 °C) showed the condensing drops penetrate the surface texture (i.e., attain the Wenzel state with lower droplet mobility). At the same time, the vapor shear helped ameliorate the mobility and enhanced the thermal transport. At the high end of the examined vapor velocity range, a heat flux of ~600 kW m(-2) was measured at 10 K subcooling and 18 m s(-1) vapor velocity. This clearly highlights the excellent potential of a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface in flow condensation applications. The surfaces sustained dropwise condensation and vapor shear for five days, following which mechanical degradation caused a transition to filmwise condensation. Overall, our results underscore the need to investigate superhydrophobic surfaces under stringent and realistic flow condensation conditions before drawing conclusions regarding their performance in practically relevant condensation applications.

  17. Characterization of condensed tannins and carbohydrates in hot water bark extracts of European softwood species.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Sauro; Kroslakova, Ivana; Janzon, Ron; Mayer, Ingo; Saake, Bodo; Pichelin, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    Condensed tannins extracted from European softwood bark are recognized as alternatives to synthetic phenolics. The extraction is generally performed in hot water, leading to simultaneous extraction of other bark constituents such as carbohydrates, phenolic monomers and salts. Characterization of the extract's composition and identification of the extracted tannins' molecular structure are needed to better identify potential applications. Bark from Silver fir (Abies alba [Mill.]), European larch (Larix decidua [Mill.]), Norway spruce (Picea abies [Karst.]), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.]) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) were extracted in water at 60°C. The amounts of phenolic monomers, condensed tannins, carbohydrates, and inorganic compounds in the extract were determined. The molecular structures of condensed tannins and carbohydrates were also investigated (HPLC-UV combined with thiolysis, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, anion exchange chromatography). Distinct extract compositions and tannin structures were found in each of the analysed species. Procyanidins were the most ubiquitous tannins. The presence of phenolic glucosides in the tannin oligomers was suggested. Polysaccharides such as arabinans, arabinogalactans and glucans represented an important fraction of all extracts. Compared to traditionally used species (Mimosa and Quebracho) higher viscosities as well as faster chemical reactivities are expected in the analysed species. The most promising species for a bark tannin extraction was found to be larch, while the least encouraging results were detected in pine. A better knowledge of the interaction between the various extracted compounds is deemed an important matter for investigation in the context of industrial applications of such extracts.

  18. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 2. Transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Yang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohua; Pang, Qingping

    2016-10-01

    The transport coefficients, namely thermal conductivity, viscosity and electrical conductivity, of CO2-CH4 mixture in and out of LTE are calculated in this paper. The calculation was based on local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption. The 2-temperature composition results obtained with consideration of condensed phase in the previous paper (Part I) of this series were used in this calculation. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman-Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The results are presented for different temperatures (300-30 000 K), pressures (0.1-10 atm), non-equilibrium degrees (1-5), and CH4 molar proportions (0-100%). The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the composition and thermodynamic properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  19. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 1. Composition and thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Cressault, Yann; Yang, Fei; Niu, Chunping; Sun, Hao

    2016-10-01

    As the first part of this series of papers, a new calculation method for composition and thermodynamic properties of 2-temperature plasma considering condensed species under local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption is presented. The 2-T mass action law and chemical potential are used to determine the composition of multiphase system. The thermo-physical properties of CO2-CH4 mixture, which may be a possible substitution for SF6, are calculated by this method as an example. The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the thermo-physical properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  20. Analysis of matters associated with the transferring of object-oriented applications to platform .Net using C# programming language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsimbayeva, S. M.; Kospanova, K. K.

    2015-11-01

    The article provides the discussion of matters associated with the problems of transferring of object-oriented Windows applications from C++ programming language to .Net platform using C# programming language. C++ has always been considered to be the best language for the software development, but the implicit mistakes that come along with the tool may lead to infinite memory leaks and other errors. The platform .Net and the C#, made by Microsoft, are the solutions to the issues mentioned above. The world economy and production are highly demanding applications developed by C++, but the new language with its stability and transferability to .Net will bring many advantages. An example can be presented using the applications that imitate the work of queuing systems. Authors solved the problem of transferring of an application, imitating seaport works, from C++ to the platform .Net using C# in the scope of Visual Studio.

  1. Noble gas trapping by laboratory carbon condensates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, S.; Marti, K.

    1982-01-01

    Trapping of noble gases by carbon-rich matter was investigated by synthesizing carbon condensates in a noble gas atmosphere. Laser evaporation of a solid carbon target yielded submicron grains which proved to be efficient noble gas trappers (Xe distribution coefficients up to 13 cu cm STP/g-atm). The carbon condensates are better noble gas trappers than previously reported synthetic samples, except one, but coefficients inferred for meteoritic acid-residues are still orders of magnitude higher. The trapped noble gases are loosely bound and elementally strongly fractionated, but isotopic fractionations were not detected. Although this experiment does not simulate nebular conditions, the results support the evidence that carbon-rich phases in meteorites may be carriers of noble gases from early solar system reservoirs. The trapped elemental noble gas fractionations are remarkably similar to both those inferred for meteorites and those of planetary atmospheres for earth, Mars and Venus.

  2. Density-Dependent Relations among Properties of Hadronic Matter and Applications to Hadron-Quark Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Hiroshi; Uechi, Schun T.

    2011-05-06

    Density-dependent relations among the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter and hyperonic matter, and properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars are shown by applying the conserving nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} hadronic mean-field theory. Nonlinear interactions are renormalized self-consistently as effective coupling constants, effective masses, and sources of equations of motion by maintaining thermodynamic consistency to the mean-field approximation. Effective masses and coupling constants at the saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter simultaneously determine the binding energy and saturation properties of hyperonic matter. The coupling constants expected from the hadronic mean-field model and SU(6) quark model for the vector coupling constants are compared by calculating masses of hadron-quark neutron stars. The nonlinear {sigma}-{omega}-{rho} mean-field approximation with vacuum fluctuation corrections and strange quark matter defined by the MIT-bag model were employed to examine properties of hadron-(strange) quark stars. We found that hadron-(strange) quark stars become more stable at high densities compared to pure hadronic and strange quark stars.

  3. The visual white matter: The application of diffusion MRI and fiber tractography to vision science

    PubMed Central

    Rokem, Ariel; Takemura, Hiromasa; Bock, Andrew S.; Scherf, K. Suzanne; Behrmann, Marlene; Wandell, Brian A.; Fine, Ione; Bridge, Holly; Pestilli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Visual neuroscience has traditionally focused much of its attention on understanding the response properties of single neurons or neuronal ensembles. The visual white matter and the long-range neuronal connections it supports are fundamental in establishing such neuronal response properties and visual function. This review article provides an introduction to measurements and methods to study the human visual white matter using diffusion MRI. These methods allow us to measure the microstructural and macrostructural properties of the white matter in living human individuals; they allow us to trace long-range connections between neurons in different parts of the visual system and to measure the biophysical properties of these connections. We also review a range of findings from recent studies on connections between different visual field maps, the effects of visual impairment on the white matter, and the properties underlying networks that process visual information supporting visual face recognition. Finally, we discuss a few promising directions for future studies. These include new methods for analysis of MRI data, open datasets that are becoming available to study brain connectivity and white matter properties, and open source software for the analysis of these data. PMID:28196374

  4. Analysis of atmospheric paniculate matter; application of optical and selected geochemical techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Glikson, M.; Simpson, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    An increase in participate matter in the atmosphere has been shown to be linked to increased mortality but this relationship is poorly understood. Light microscopy, electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and micro-FTIR techniques have been applied to study atmospheric particulates in Brisbane, Australia as a part of a study on asthma. The particulate matter samples were collected daily from April to August 1992, and the sampling covered the autumn period which is typically a time of high asthma incidence in Brisbane. Volumetrically, most atmospheric particulate matter is less than 2 ??m in size. The microscopic analysis reveals that this material is composed mainly of combusted and incompletely burned hydrocarbons from motor vehicle exhaust emissions, quiescent spores of Mucorales, soil bacteria, and inorganic matter in the form of quartz and other silicates. Elemental and functional group analyses confirm microscope identification, documenting carbon-rich, aromatic exhaust material, more aliphatic pollen and spore material and inorganic matter. Fungal spores dominate bioaerosol and are very abundant from the end of April through May to mid-June. The cytoplasmic content of pollens or fungal spores is commonly regarded as allergenic. Particulates from the exhaust emissions and crustal material in a sub-micrometer size range may act as carriers or dispersive mechanisms for cytoplasmic material from fungal spores and pollens, perhaps causing periods of the highest exhaust emission to be the most allergenic. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Derivative of Electron Density in Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Technique and Its Application to Boost Performance of Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ze; Chen, Zhi-Dong; Zhang, Jin-Yu; He, Yu; Zhang, Ming; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2009-11-01

    The non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) technique provides a solid foundation for the development of quantum mechanical simulators. However, the convergence is always of great concern. We present a general analytical formalism to acquire the accurate derivative of electron density with respect to electrical potential in the framework of NEGF. This formalism not only provides physical insight on non-local quantum phenomena in device simulation, but also can be used to set up a new scheme in solving the Poisson equation to boost the performance of convergence when the NEGF and Poisson equations are solved self-consistently. This method is illustrated by a simple one-dimensional example of an N++ N+ N++ resistor. The total simulation time and iteration number are largely reduced.

  6. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Growth and Characterization of a Kind of Nitrogen-Rich Niobium Nitride for Bolometer Applications at Terahertz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xue-Hui; Kang, Lin; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Jian; Ji, Zheng-Ming; Cao, Chun-Hai; Jin, Biao-Bing; Xu, Wei-Wei; Wu, Pei-Heng; Wang, Xiao-Shu

    2008-11-01

    Niobium is sputtered onto a single crystalline silicon substrate in N2:Ar = 4:l gas mixture at the total pressure of 2Pa. The temperature coefficient of resistance of the sample is about 0.5% at 300K, and up to 7% at 77K, indicating the possibility of using it to make room-temperature bolometers with performances better than those based on Pt, Bi, or Nb. For a 60-nm-thick sample, the rms surface roughness is 0.45 nm over an area of 2μm × 2 μm. Analyses based on x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy indicate that the samples are Nb5N6 thin films in which there is a combination of Nb3+ and Nb5+, or Nb4+.

  7. Gravitational dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Girelli, F.; Liberati, S.; Sindoni, L.

    2008-10-15

    Analogue models for gravity intend to provide a framework where matter and gravity, as well as their intertwined dynamics, emerge from degrees of freedom that have a priori nothing to do with what we call gravity or matter. Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) are a natural example of an analogue model since one can identify matter propagating on a (pseudo-Riemannian) metric with collective excitations above the condensate of atoms. However, until now, a description of the 'analogue gravitational dynamics' for such model was missing. We show here that in a BEC system with massive quasiparticles, the gravitational dynamics can be encoded in a modified (semiclassical) Poisson equation. In particular, gravity is of extreme short range (characterized by the healing length) and the cosmological constant appears from the noncondensed fraction of atoms in the quasiparticle vacuum. While some of these features make the analogue gravitational dynamics of our BEC system quite different from standard Newtonian gravity, we nonetheless show that it can be used to draw some interesting lessons about 'emergent gravity' scenarios.

  8. Quantum Langevin model for nonequilibrium condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiocchetta, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2014-08-01

    We develop a quantum model for nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation of photons and polaritons in planar microcavity devices. The model builds on laser theory and includes the spatial dynamics of the cavity field, a saturation mechanism, and some frequency dependence of the gain: quantum Langevin equations are written for a cavity field coupled to a continuous distribution of externally pumped two-level emitters with a well-defined frequency. As an example of application, the method is used to study the linearized quantum fluctuations around a steady-state condensed state. In the good-cavity regime, an effective equation for the cavity field only is proposed in terms of a stochastic Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Perspectives in view of a full quantum simulation of the nonequilibrium condensation process are finally sketched.

  9. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-07

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition. At high baryon density and low temperature, large N{sub c} arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  10. Homogeneous cosmologies as group field theory condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Steffen; Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    We give a general procedure, in the group field theory (GFT) formalism for quantum gravity, for constructing states that describe macroscopic, spatially homogeneous universes. These states are close to coherent (condensate) states used in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The condition on such states to be (approximate) solutions to the quantum equations of motion of GFT is used to extract an effective dynamics for homogeneous cosmologies directly from the underlying quantum theory. The resulting description in general gives nonlinear and nonlocal equations for the `condensate wavefunction' which are analogous to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates. We show the general form of the effective equations for current quantum gravity models, as well as some concrete examples. We identify conditions under which the dynamics becomes linear, admitting an interpretation as a quantum-cosmological Wheeler-DeWitt equation, and give its semiclassical (WKB) approximation in the case of a kinetic term that includes a Laplace-Beltrami operator. For isotropic states, this approximation reproduces the classical Friedmann equation in vacuum with positive spatial curvature. We show how the formalism can be consistently extended from Riemannian signature to Lorentzian signature models, and discuss the addition of matter fields, obtaining the correct coupling of a massless scalar in the Friedmann equation from the most natural extension of the GFT action. We also outline the procedure for extending our condensate states to include cosmological perturbations. Our results form the basis of a general programme for extracting effective cosmological dynamics directly from a microscopic non-perturbative theory of quantum gravity.

  11. Recovery of condensate water quality in power generator's surface condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Lilik Adib

    2017-03-01

    In PT Badak NGL Plant, steam turbines are used to drive major power generators, compressors, and pumps. Steam exiting the turbines is condensed in surface condensers to be returned to boilers. Therefore, surface condenser performance and quality of condensate water are very important. One of the recent problem was caused by the leak of a surface condenser of Steam Turbine Power Generator. Thesteam turbine was overhauled, leaving the surface condenser idle and exposed to air for more than 1.5 years. Sea water ingress due to tube leaks worsens the corrosionof the condenser shell. The combination of mineral scale and corrosion product resulting high conductivity condensate at outlet condenser when we restarted up, beyond the acceptable limit. After assessing several options, chemical cleaning was the best way to overcome the problem according to condenser configuration. An 8 hour circulation of 5%wt citric acid had succeed reducing water conductivity from 50 μmhos/cm to below 5 μmhos/cm. The condensate water, then meets the required quality, i.e. pH 8.3 - 9.0; conductivity ≤ 5 μmhos/cm, therefore the power generator can be operated normally without any concern until now.

  12. Feshbach-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, V. G.; Denteneer, P. J. H.

    2009-01-09

    We investigate the phase diagram of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model describing atoms and molecules on a lattice, interacting via a Feshbach resonance. We identify a region where the system exhibits an exotic super-Mott phase and regions with phases characterized by atomic and/or molecular condensates. Our approach is based on a recently developed exact quantum Monte Carlo algorithm: the stochastic Green function algorithm with tunable directionality. We confirm some of the results predicted by mean-field studies, but we also find disagreement with these studies. In particular, we find a phase with an atomic but no molecular condensate, which is missing in all mean-field phase diagrams.

  13. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2004-01-01

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose–Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate pv = -ρv and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness ℓ of fluid with equation of state p = +ρ, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order kBℓMc/, instead of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula, SBH = 4πkBGM2/c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  14. Exciton-photon correlations in bosonic condensates of exciton-polaritons.

    PubMed

    Kavokin, Alexey V; Sheremet, Alexandra S; Shelykh, Ivan A; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G; Rubo, Yuri G

    2015-07-08

    Exciton-polaritons are mixed light-matter quasiparticles. We have developed a statistical model describing stochastic exciton-photon transitions within a condensate of exciton polaritons. We show that the exciton-photon correlator depends on the rate of incoherent exciton-photon transformations in the condensate. We discuss implications of this effect for the quantum statistics of photons emitted by polariton lasers.

  15. Manure ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from beef cattle fed condensed tannins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of three levels of condensed tannins fed to 27 beef feed yard steers on ammonia and GHG emissions from manure. Condensed tannins were fed at rates of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 percent on a dry matter basis. Manure and urine were collected from two periods over 6 d...

  16. Measuring Dark Matter Profiles Non-Parametrically in Dwarf Spheroidals: An Application to Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardel, John R.; Gebhardt, Karl; Fabricius, Maximilian H.; Drory, Niv; Williams, Michael J.

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel implementation of orbit-based (or Schwarzschild) modeling that allows dark matter density profiles to be calculated non-parametrically in nearby galaxies. Our models require no assumptions to be made about velocity anisotropy or the dark matter profile. The technique can be applied to any dispersion-supported stellar system, and we demonstrate its use by studying the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Draco. We use existing kinematic data at larger radii and also present 12 new radial velocities within the central 13 pc obtained with the VIRUS-W integral field spectrograph on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Our non-parametric Schwarzschild models find strong evidence that the dark matter profile in Draco is cuspy for 20 <= r <= 700 pc. The profile for r >= 20 pc is well fit by a power law with slope α = -1.0 ± 0.2, consistent with predictions from cold dark matter simulations. Our models confirm that, despite its low baryon content relative to other dSphs, Draco lives in a massive halo.

  17. HEAVY DUTY DIESEL FINE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS: DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF ON-ROAD MEASUREMENT CAPABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses EPA's On-Road Diesel Emissions Characterization Facility, which has been collecting real-world gaseous emissions data for the past 6 years. It has recently undergone extensive modifications to enhance its particulate matter (PM) measurement capabilities, with...

  18. HIERARCHIAL BAYESIAN CALIBRATION: AN APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In studies of the relationship between airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and health, researchers frequently use monitoring data with the most extensive temporal coverage. Such data may come from a monitor that is not a federal reference monitor (FRM), a monitor that is d...

  19. Hyperbolic spin vortices and textures in exciton-polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manni, F.; Léger, Y.; Rubo, Y. G.; André, R.; Deveaud, B.

    2013-10-01

    From cosmology to the microscopic scales of the quantum world, the study of topological excitations is essential for the understanding of phase conformation and phase transitions. Quantum fluids are convenient systems to investigate topological entities because well-established techniques are available for their preparation, control and measurement. Across a phase transition, a system dramatically changes its properties because of the spontaneous breaking of certain continuous symmetries, leading to generation of topological defects. In particular, attention is given to entities that involve both spin and phase topologies. Exciton-polariton condensates are quantum fluids combining coherence and spin properties that, thanks to their light-matter nature, bring the advantage of direct optical access to the condensate order parameter. Here we report on the spontaneous occurrence of hyperbolic spin vortices in polariton condensates, by directly imaging both their phase and spin structure, and observe the associated spatial polarization patterns, spin textures that arise in the condensate.

  20. Loss of superhydrophobicity of hydrophobic micro/nano structures during condensation.

    PubMed

    Jo, HangJin; Hwang, Kyung Won; Kim, DongHyun; Kiyofumi, Moriyama; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan; Ahn, Ho Seon

    2015-04-23

    Condensed liquid behavior on hydrophobic micro/nano-structured surfaces is a subject with multiple practical applications, but remains poorly understood. In particular, the loss of superhydrophobicity of hydrophobic micro/nanostructures during condensation, even when the same surface shows water-repellant characteristics when exposed to air, requires intensive investigation to improve and apply our understanding of the fundamental physics of condensation. Here, we postulate the criterion required for condensation to form from inside the surface structures by examining the grand potentials of a condensation system, including the properties of the condensed liquid and the conditions required for condensation. The results imply that the same hydrophobic micro/nano-structured surface could exhibit different liquid droplet behavior depending on the conditions. Our findings are supported by the observed phenomena: the initiation of a condensed droplet from inside a hydrophobic cavity, the apparent wetted state changes, and the presence of sticky condensed droplets on the hydrophobic micro/nano-structured surface.

  1. Chiral symmetry in quarkyonic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, T.

    2012-05-15

    The 1/N{sub c} expansion classifies nuclear matter, deconfined quark matter, and Quarkyonic matter in low temperature region. We investigate the realization of chiral symmetry in Quarkyonic matter by taking into account condensations of chiral particle-hole pairs. It is argued that chiral symmetry and parity are locally violated by the formation of chiral spirals, <{psi}-bar exp (2i{mu}{sub q} z{gamma}{sup 0} {gamma}{sup z}){psi}> . An extension to multiple chiral spirals is also briefly discussed.

  2. On the late-time cosmology of a condensed scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalee, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We study the late-time cosmology of a scalar field with a kinetic term non-minimally coupled to gravity. It is demonstrated that the scalar field dominate the radiation matter and the cold dark matter (CDM). Moreover, we show that eventually the scalar field will be condensed and results in an accelerated expansion. The metric perturbations around the condensed phase of the scalar field are investigated and it has been shown that the ghost instability and gradient instability do not exist.

  3. Tunguska dark matter ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    It is suggested that the Tunguska event in June 1908 was due to a cm-large ball of a condensate of bound states of 6 top and 6 antitop quarks containing highly compressed ordinary matter. Such balls are supposed to make up the dark matter as we earlier proposed. The expected rate of impact of this kind of dark matter ball with the earth seems to crudely match a time scale of 200 years between the impacts. The main explosion of the Tunguska event is explained in our picture as material coming out from deep within the earth, where it has been heated and compressed by the ball penetrating to a depth of several thousand km. Thus the effect has some similarity with volcanic activity as suggested by Kundt. We discuss the possible identification of kimberlite pipes with earlier Tunguska-like events. A discussion of how the dark matter balls may have formed in the early universe is also given.

  4. Applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy in materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.

    1988-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) has emerged as a powerful technique for research in condensed matter. It has been used extensively in the study of metals, ionic crystals, glasses and polymers. The present review concentrates on applications of positron lifetime measurements for elucidation of the physicochemical structure of polymers.

  5. Tunable Vapor-Condensed Nanolenses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured optical components, such as nanolenses, direct light at subwavelength scales to enable, among others, high-resolution lithography, miniaturization of photonic circuits, and nanoscopic imaging of biostructures. A major challenge in fabricating nanolenses is the appropriate positioning of the lens with respect to the sample while simultaneously ensuring it adopts the optimal size and shape for the intended use. One application of particular interest is the enhancement of contrast and signal-to-noise ratio in the imaging of nanoscale objects, especially over wide fields-of-view (FOVs), which typically come with limited resolution and sensitivity for imaging nano-objects. Here we present a self-assembly method for fabricating time- and temperature-tunable nanolenses based on the condensation of a polymeric liquid around a nanoparticle, which we apply to the high-throughput on-chip detection of spheroids smaller than 40 nm, rod-shaped particles with diameter smaller than 20 nm, and biofunctionalized nanoparticles, all across an ultralarge FOV of >20 mm2. Previous nanoparticle imaging efforts across similar FOVs have detected spheroids no smaller than 100 nm, and therefore our results demonstrate the detection of particles >15-fold smaller in volume, which in free space have >240 times weaker Rayleigh scattering compared to the particle sizes detected in earlier wide-field imaging work. This entire platform, with its tunable nanolens condensation and wide-field imaging functions, is also miniaturized into a cost-effective and portable device, which might be especially important for field use, mobile sensing, and diagnostics applications, including, for example, the measurement of viral load in bodily fluids. PMID:24979060

  6. Applications of a simulation model to description of anaerobic conversion of complex organic matter into methane

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilin, V.A.; Rytow, S.V.; Lokshina, L.Ya.

    1996-12-31

    Three years passed since the generalized model of anaerobic degradation of complex organic matter has been developed. Now the new modifications were created. Anaerobic degradation was described as a multistep process of series and parallel reactions in which several groups of bacteria take part. Hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis were considered in the model with the various kinetic functions. A two-phase equation describing a particulate substrate degradation as a heterogeneous reaction has been developed. Acetic, butyric, and propionic groups of acidogenic bacteria producing the particular products were considered. The additional group of homoacetogenic bacteria producing acetate from hydrogen and carbon dioxide was involved into new version of the model. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide inhibition were described previously. In that paper, it was shown by simulation of several case-studies that unionized volatile fatty acids (VFA) are the inhibitors of key stages of anaerobic conversion of complex organic matter: hydrolysis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis.

  7. Weighted fourier series representation and its application to quantifying the amount of gray matter.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Dalton, Kim M; Shen, Li; Evans, Alan C; Davidson, Richard J

    2007-04-01

    We present a novel weighted Fourier series (WFS) representation for cortical surfaces. The WFS representation is a data smoothing technique that provides the explicit smooth functional estimation of unknown cortical boundary as a linear combination of basis functions. The basic properties of the representation are investigated in connection with a self-adjoint partial differential equation and the traditional spherical harmonic (SPHARM) representation. To reduce steep computational requirements, a new iterative residual fitting (IRF) algorithm is developed. Its computational and numerical implementation issues are discussed in detail. The computer codes are also available at http://www.stat.wisc.edu/-mchung/softwares/weighted.SPHARM/weighted-SPHARM.html. As an illustration, the WFS is applied i n quantifying the amount ofgray matter in a group of high functioning autistic subjects. Within the WFS framework, cortical thickness and gray matter density are computed and compared.

  8. Skin formation in drying a film of soft matter solutions: Application of solute based Lagrangian scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Luo; Fanlong, Meng; Junying, Zhang; Masao, Doi

    2016-07-01

    When a film of soft matter solutions is being dried, a skin layer often forms at its surface, which is a gel-like elastic phase made of concentrated soft matter solutions. We study the dynamics of this process by using the solute based Lagrangian scheme which was proposed by us recently. In this scheme, the process of the gelation (i.e., the change from sol to gel) can be naturally incorporated in the diffusion equation. Effects of the elasticity of the skin phase, the evaporation rate of the solvents, and the initial concentration of the solutions are discussed. Moreover, the condition for the skin formation is provided. Project supported by the National Natural Science of China (Grant Nos. 21434001, 51561145002, and 11421110001).

  9. Dark matter and cosmological nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, D. N.

    1986-01-01

    Existing dark matter problems, i.e., dynamics, galaxy formation and inflation, are considered, along with a model which proposes dark baryons as the bulk of missing matter in a fractal universe. It is shown that no combination of dark, nonbaryonic matter can either provide a cosmological density parameter value near unity or, as in the case of high energy neutrinos, allow formation of condensed matter at epochs when quasars already existed. The possibility that correlations among galactic clusters are scale-free is discussed. Such a distribution of matter would yield a fractal of 1.2, close to a one-dimensional universe. Biasing, cosmic superstrings, and percolated explosions and hot dark matter are theoretical approaches that would satisfy the D = 1.2 fractal model of the large-scale structure of the universe and which would also allow sufficient dark matter in halos to close the universe.

  10. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  11. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  12. Supermode-density-wave-polariton condensation with a Bose-Einstein condensate in a multimode cavity.

    PubMed

    Kollár, Alicia J; Papageorge, Alexander T; Vaidya, Varun D; Guo, Yudan; Keeling, Jonathan; Lev, Benjamin L

    2017-02-17

    Phase transitions, where observable properties of a many-body system change discontinuously, can occur in both open and closed systems. By placing cold atoms in optical cavities and inducing strong coupling between light and excitations of the atoms, one can experimentally study phase transitions of open quantum systems. Here we observe and study a non-equilibrium phase transition, the condensation of supermode-density-wave polaritons. These polaritons are formed from a superposition of cavity photon eigenmodes (a supermode), coupled to atomic density waves of a quantum gas. As the cavity supports multiple photon spatial modes and because the light-matter coupling can be comparable to the energy splitting of these modes, the composition of the supermode polariton is changed by the light-matter coupling on condensation. By demonstrating the ability to observe and understand density-wave-polariton condensation in the few-mode-degenerate cavity regime, our results show the potential to study similar questions in fully multimode cavities.

  13. Supermode-density-wave-polariton condensation with a Bose-Einstein condensate in a multimode cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Alicia J.; Papageorge, Alexander T.; Vaidya, Varun D.; Guo, Yudan; Keeling, Jonathan; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-02-01

    Phase transitions, where observable properties of a many-body system change discontinuously, can occur in both open and closed systems. By placing cold atoms in optical cavities and inducing strong coupling between light and excitations of the atoms, one can experimentally study phase transitions of open quantum systems. Here we observe and study a non-equilibrium phase transition, the condensation of supermode-density-wave polaritons. These polaritons are formed from a superposition of cavity photon eigenmodes (a supermode), coupled to atomic density waves of a quantum gas. As the cavity supports multiple photon spatial modes and because the light-matter coupling can be comparable to the energy splitting of these modes, the composition of the supermode polariton is changed by the light-matter coupling on condensation. By demonstrating the ability to observe and understand density-wave-polariton condensation in the few-mode-degenerate cavity regime, our results show the potential to study similar questions in fully multimode cavities.

  14. Supermode-density-wave-polariton condensation with a Bose–Einstein condensate in a multimode cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kollár, Alicia J.; Papageorge, Alexander T.; Vaidya, Varun D.; Guo, Yudan; Keeling, Jonathan; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2017-01-01

    Phase transitions, where observable properties of a many-body system change discontinuously, can occur in both open and closed systems. By placing cold atoms in optical cavities and inducing strong coupling between light and excitations of the atoms, one can experimentally study phase transitions of open quantum systems. Here we observe and study a non-equilibrium phase transition, the condensation of supermode-density-wave polaritons. These polaritons are formed from a superposition of cavity photon eigenmodes (a supermode), coupled to atomic density waves of a quantum gas. As the cavity supports multiple photon spatial modes and because the light–matter coupling can be comparable to the energy splitting of these modes, the composition of the supermode polariton is changed by the light–matter coupling on condensation. By demonstrating the ability to observe and understand density-wave-polariton condensation in the few-mode-degenerate cavity regime, our results show the potential to study similar questions in fully multimode cavities. PMID:28211455

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Numerical study on the thermo-stress of ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings by high-intensity pulsed ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Liu, Chen; Zhu Xiao, Peng; Lei, Kai Ming

    2009-11-01

    This paper studies numerically the thermo-mechanical effects of ZrO2 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) irradiated by a high-intensity pulsed ion beam in consideration of the surface structure. Taking the deposited energy of ion beams in TBCs as the source term in the thermal conduction equation, the distribution of temperature in TBCs was simulated. Then, based on the distribution, the evolution of thermal stress was calculated by the finite element method. The results show that tensile radial stress formed at the valley of TBC surfaces after irradiation by HIPIB. Therefore, if cracks happen, they must be at valleys instead of peaks. As for the stress waves, no matter whether through peak or valley position, tensile and compressive stresses are present alternately inside TBCs along the depth direction, and the strength of stress decreases with time.

  16. A History of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Hooper, Dan

    2016-05-16

    Although dark matter is a central element of modern cosmology, the history of how it became accepted as part of the dominant paradigm is often ignored or condensed into a brief anecdotical account focused around the work of a few pioneering scientists. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a broader historical perspective on the observational discoveries and the theoretical arguments that led the scientific community to adopt dark matter as an essential part of the standard cosmological model.

  17. Fifteen years of cold matter on the atom chip: promise, realizations, and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Mark; Amit, Omer; Zhou, Shuyu; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Here we review the field of atom chips in the context of Bose–Einstein Condensates (BEC) as well as cold matter in general. Twenty years after the first realization of the BEC and 15 years after the realization of the atom chip, the latter has been found to enable extraordinary feats: from producing BECs at a rate of several per second, through the realization of matter-wave interferometry, and all the way to novel probing of surfaces and new forces. In addition, technological applications are also being intensively pursued. This review will describe these developments and more, including new ideas which have not yet been realized. PMID:27499585

  18. On the condensating species in terrestrial extrasolar planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzer, A. B. C.; von Paris, P.; Kitzmann, D.; Rauer, H.; Grenfell, J. L.

    2008-09-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of liquid droplets and/or solid particles has a significant impact on the thermal, dynamic, and chemical structure of the planetary environments, in which they are formed. For example, the character and distribution of the atmospheric condensates determine the appearance of such objects. It is therefore important to know, which chemical species might condense under the atmospheric conditions of extrasolar planets and how the condensate, solid or maybe liquid, nucleate in detail to finally form cloudy structures in such planetary atmospheres. In this contribution the presence of particles of likely condensates under atmospheric conditions of extrasolar terrestrial planets is discussed. Consequences regarding the condensation of major gaseous constituents of the planetary atmospheres are considered in particular. Selected applications, especially in view of the recently discovered low mass planets - so called Super-Earths -, are presented and compared. Acknowledgement: This work has been partly supported by the Forschungsallianz Planetary Evolution and Life of the Helmholtz Gemeinschaft (HGF).

  19. Comment on 'Stable and unstable vector dark solitons of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equation: Application to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates'

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jukui

    2006-02-15

    In a recent paper, V. A. Brazhnyi and V. V. Konoto [Phys. Rev. E 72, 026616 (2005)] investigated the dynamics of vector dark solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. In the small amplitude limit, they deduced a coupled Korteweg-de Vries equation from the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. They found that two branches of (slow and fast) dark solitons corresponding to the two branches of the sound waves exist. The slow solitons, corresponding to the lower branch of the acoustic wave, appear to be unstable and transform during the evolution into the stable fast solitons (corresponding to the upper branch of the dispersion law). However, our discussion shows that these results are incorrect.

  20. Comment on "stable and unstable vector dark solitons of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation: application to two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ju-Kui

    2006-02-01

    In a recent paper, V. A. Brazhnyi and V. V. Konoto [Phys. Rev. E 72, 026616 (2005)] investigated the dynamics of vector dark solitons in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. In the small amplitude limit, they deduced a coupled Korteweg-de Vries equation from the coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. They found that two branches of (slow and fast) dark solitons corresponding to the two branches of the sound waves exist. The slow solitons, corresponding to the lower branch of the acoustic wave, appear to be unstable and transform during the evolution into the stable fast solitons (corresponding to the upper branch of the dispersion law). However, our discussion shows that these results are incorrect.

  1. Bose-Einstein Condensation: Where Many Become One and So There is Plenty of Room at the Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.

    gaseous state down to nanokelvins and localized in a trap. There are reasons why we ought to be mindful of the BEC — if only because here even the interaction between the particles is tunable at will — the sign as well as the strength of it. BEC has now become an ideal laboratory for basic and condensed matter experiments, and for high resolution applications. Properly viewed, it is indeed a new state of matter. This article is about the saga of BEC that really began with Einstein in 1925.

  2. An Application of Functional Renormalization Group Method for Superdense Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaföldi, G. G.; Jakovác, A.; Pósfay, P.

    2017-01-01

    We proposed a method, using the expansion of the effective potential in a base of harmonic functions, to study the Functional Renormalization Group (FRG) method at finite chemical potential. Within this theoretical framework we determined the equation of state and the phase diagram of a simple model of massless fermions coupled to scalars through Yukawa-couling at the zero-temperature limit. Here, we use our FRG-based equation of state to describe the superdense nuclear matter inside compact astrophysical objects. We calculated the mass-radius relation for a compact star using the TOV equation, which was compared to other results.

  3. Nuclear recoil energy scale in liquid xenon with application to the direct detection of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, P; Dahl, C E

    2011-02-14

    We show for the first time that the quenching of electronic excitation from nuclear recoils in liquid xenon is well-described by Lindhard theory, if the nuclear recoil energy is reconstructed using the combined (scintillation and ionization) energy scale proposed by Shutt et al.. We argue for the adoption of this perspective in favor of the existing preference for reconstructing nuclear recoil energy solely from primary scintillation. We show that signal partitioning into scintillation and ionization is well-described by the Thomas-Imel box model. We discuss the implications for liquid xenon detectors aimed at the direct detection of dark matter.

  4. Kinetic boundary layers in gas mixtures: Systems described by nonlinearly coupled kinetic and hydrodynamic equations and applications to droplet condensation and evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Widder, M.E.; Titulaer, U.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors consider a mixture of heavy vapor molecules and a light carrier gas surrounding a liquid droplet. The vapor is described by a variant of the Klein-Kramers equation; the gas is described by the Navier-Stokes equations; the droplet acts as a heat source due to the released heat of condensation. The exchange of momentum and energy between the constituents of the mixture is taken into account by force terms in the kinetic equation and source terms in the Navier-Stokes equations. These are chosen to obtain maximal agreement with the irreversible thermodynamics of a gas mixture. The structure of the kinetic boundary layer around the sphere is determined from the self-consistent solution of this set of coupled equations with appropriate boundary conditions at the surface of the sphere. The kinetic equation is rewritten as a set of coupled moment equations. A complete set of solutions of these moment equations is constructed by numerical integration inward from the region far away from the droplet, where the background inhomogeneities are small. A technique developed earlier is used to deal with the numerical instability of the moment equations. The solutions obtained for given temperature and pressure profiles in the gas are then combined linearly such that they obey the boundary conditions at the droplet surface; from this solution source terms for the Navier-Stokes equation of the gas are constructed and used to determine improved temperature and pressure profiles for the background gas. For not too large temperature differneces between the droplet and the gas at infinity, self-consistency is reached after a few iterations. The method is applied to the condensation of droplets from a supersaturated vapor as well as to strong evaporation of droplets under the influence of an external heat source, where corrections of up to 40% are obtained.

  5. Cosmic curvature and condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the universe may consist of a patchwork of domains with different Riemann curvature constants k = 0, +/-1. Features of a phase transition in which flat space breaks up in a transition 2k0 - k(-) + k(+) with initial scale factors R(-) = R(+) are postulated and explored. It is shown that such a transition is energetically permitted, has the equivalent of a Curie temperature, and can lead in a natural way to the formation of voids and galaxies. It is predicted that, if the ambient universe on average is well fitted by a purely k(-) space, with only occasional domains of k(+) containing galaxies, a density parameter of (A(z sub c + 1)) super -1 should be expected, where z sub c represents the redshift of the earliest objects to have condensed, and A takes on values ranging from about 5 to 3. Present observations of quasars would suggest a density of about 0.03 or 0.05, respectively, but it could be lower if earlier condensation took place.

  6. Pion condensation in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Dylan; Erlich, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We study pion condensation at zero temperature in a hard-wall holographic model of hadrons with isospin chemical potential. We find that the transition from the hadronic phase to the pion condensate phase is first order except in a certain limit of model parameters. Our analysis suggests that immediately across the phase boundary the condensate acts as a stiff medium approaching the Zel'dovich limit of equal energy density and pressure.

  7. An average atom code for warm matter: application to aluminum and uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pénicaud, Michel

    2009-03-01

    In astrophysics and in other sciences there is sometimes a need for information about the properties of matter, particularly equations of state, in extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. Global equation of state models, which represent solid, fluid and plasma states, typically consist of three parts: the cold curve, the ion-thermal contribution and the electron-thermal contribution. For the calculation of the latest part we present here an average atom embedded in a jellium code. We employ Liberman's relativistic and quantum model of matter which is a significant advance in complexity beyond the commonly used Thomas-Fermi model. We have applied specific algorithms to deal with the highly oscillatory nature of the free wavefunctions at high temperatures and to capture resonances which form in the continuum when bound states are destroyed by pressure ionization. Also we use massive parallel computing to treat the huge number of free wavefunctions at high temperatures (up to 109 K). Densities of states of resonant states are shown for uranium. With our code, which we have called Paradisio, we obtain tables of electron-thermal entropies from which free energies and pressures are derived. Our results are compared with those calculated in the Thomas-Fermi approximation and with available experiments. In aluminum, with our quantum code, a shell structure appears on the Hugoniot and a first-order metallic-nonmetallic transition is created at low densities and temperatures.

  8. Comparison of discriminant analysis methods: Application to occupational exposure to particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. Rosário; Carolino, E.; Viegas, Carla; Viegas, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Health effects associated with occupational exposure to particulate matter have been studied by several authors. In this study were selected six industries of five different areas: Cork company 1, Cork company 2, poultry, slaughterhouse for cattle, riding arena and production of animal feed. The measurements tool was a portable device for direct reading. This tool provides information on the particle number concentration for six different diameters, namely 0.3 µm, 0.5 µm, 1 µm, 2.5 µm, 5 µm and 10 µm. The focus on these features is because they might be more closely related with adverse health effects. The aim is to identify the particles that better discriminate the industries, with the ultimate goal of classifying industries regarding potential negative effects on workers' health. Several methods of discriminant analysis were applied to data of occupational exposure to particulate matter and compared with respect to classification accuracy. The selected methods were linear discriminant analyses (LDA); linear quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), robust linear discriminant analysis with selected estimators (MLE (Maximum Likelihood Estimators), MVE (Minimum Volume Elipsoid), "t", MCD (Minimum Covariance Determinant), MCD-A, MCD-B), multinomial logistic regression and artificial neural networks (ANN). The predictive accuracy of the methods was accessed through a simulation study. ANN yielded the highest rate of classification accuracy in the data set under study. Results indicate that the particle number concentration of diameter size 0.5 µm is the parameter that better discriminates industries.

  9. High energy neutrino analysis at KamLAND and application to dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Michinari

    There are currently two active detector technologies for neutrino detection, namely Cherenkov and scintillator detectors. In the past, scintillator detectors have traditionally been used much like calorimeters to analyze neutrinos at lower energies of ˜MeV, whereas neutrino directionality and flavor discrimination at higher energy scales have been greatly pursued by Cherenkov detectors. In this work, we will introduce a novel analysis technique to resolve the directionality of ˜GeV scale neutrinos in scintillator with data taken at the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND), the world's largest scintillator neutrino detector located in Kamioka, Japan. Studies suggest that the directional resolution using this new method may be better than that of the Cherenkov method by ˜10° in this energy regime. We will also explore track reconstruction and flavor discrimination techniques that were initially developed for R&D in the Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA) detector, and apply these techniques for the first time using real data. Finally we will employ the methods introduced to conduct an indirect dark matter search by looking for neutrino signals originating from dark matter annihilation in the Sun and Earth.

  10. Bioremediation of polluted soil through the combined application of plants, earthworms and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Macci, Cristina; Doni, Serena; Peruzzi, Eleonora; Ceccanti, Brunello; Masciandaro, Grazia

    2012-10-26

    Two plant species (Paulownia tomentosa and Cytisus scoparius), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), and organic matter (horse manure) were used as an ecological approach to bioremediate a soil historically contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The experiment was carried out for six months at a mesoscale level using pots containing 90 kg of polluted soil. Three different treatments were performed for each plant: (i) untreated planted soil as a control (C); (ii) planted soil + horse manure (20:1 w/w) (M); (iii) planted soil + horse manure + 15 earthworms (ME). Both the plant species were able to grow in the polluted soil and to improve the soil's bio-chemical conditions, especially when organic matter and earthworms were applied. By comparing the two plant species, few significant differences were observed in the soil characteristics; Cytisus scoparius improved soil nutrient content more than Paulownia tomentosa, which instead stimulated more soil microbial metabolism. Regarding the pollutants, Paulownia tomentosa was more efficient in reducing the heavy metal (Pb, Cr, Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni) content, while earthworms were particularly able to stimulate the processes involved in the decontamination of organic pollutants (hydrocarbons). This ecological approach, validated at a mesoscale level, has recently been transferred to a real scale situation to carry out the bioremediation of polluted soil in San Giuliano Terme Municipality (Pisa, Italy).

  11. Development and Optimization of Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques with Applications in Soft Matter Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Babak

    The overall goals of this project are (i) to improve the current dynamic modes of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the focus of multifrequency AFM measurements on soft matters in ambient air and liquid environments and (ii) to develop a new methodology for mechanically characterizing the subsurface of soft samples, allowing users to gradually, controllably and reversibly reveal features that are buried under the surface. This dissertation includes a wide range of studies on multifrequency atomic force microscopy. Firstly, the imaging parameters (drive amplitude and frequency) of each eigenmode is studied, optimized based on the observables. Secondly, a new mutltifrequency AFM technique with capability of imaging subsurface features has been developed and verified through experiments. Based on the first goal of the project, an experimental protocol to select excitation frequency in air for single tapping mode and bimodal AFM are provided. Additionally, a rigorous guideline for the selection of drive frequency in ambient air, liquid environment based on the energy quantities and slope of the cantilever's phase response is established. Finally, an advantage of using higher and stiffer eigenmodes for imaging soft matters has been proposed and verified experimentally. By this technique, subsurface imaging capabilities of AFM are expanded.

  12. Automatic clustering of white matter fibers in brain diffusion MRI with an application to genetics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yan; Shi, Yonggang; Zhan, Liang; Gutman, Boris; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Wright, Margaret J.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    To understand factors that affect brain connectivity and integrity, it is beneficial to automatically cluster white matter (WM) fibers into anatomically recognizable tracts. Whole brain tractography, based on diffusion-weighted MRI, generates vast sets of fibers throughout the brain; clustering them into consistent and recognizable bundles can be difficult as there are wide individual variations in the trajectory and shape of WM pathways. Here we introduce a novel automated tract clustering algorithm based on label fusion – a concept from traditional intensity-based segmentation. Streamline tractography generates many incorrect fibers, so our top-down approach extracts tracts consistent with known anatomy, by mapping multiple hand-labeled atlases into a new dataset. We fuse clustering results from different atlases, using a mean distance fusion scheme. We reliably extracted the major tracts from 105-gradient high angular resolution diffusion images (HARDI) of 198 young normal twins. To compute population statistics, we use a point-wise correspondence method to match, compare, and average WM tracts across subjects. We illustrate our method in a genetic study of white matter tract heritability in twins. PMID:24821529

  13. Condensation heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, L. C.; Parish, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the condensation heat transfer process in a microgravity environment, two mechanisms for condensate removal are analyzed in light of two problems: (1) film condensation on a flat, porous plate, with condensate being removed by wall suction; and (2) the analytical prediction of the heat transfer coefficient of condensing annular flows, where the condensate film is driven by vapor shear. Both suction and vapor shear can effectively drain the condensate, ensuring continuous operation in microgravity.

  14. Dark matter and weak signals of quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doplicher, Sergio; Fredenhagen, Klaus; Morsella, Gerardo; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2017-03-01

    In physically motivated models of quantum spacetime, a U (1 ) gauge theory turns into a U (∞ ) gauge theory; hence, free classical electrodynamics is no longer free and neutral fields may have electromagnetic interactions. We discuss the last point for scalar fields, as a way to possibly describe dark matter; we have in mind the gravitational collapse of binary systems or future applications to self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensates as possible sources of evidence of quantum gravitational phenomena. The effects considered so far, however, seem too faint to be detectable at present.

  15. Dark matter and halo bispectrum in redshift space: theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will; Wagner, Christian; Noreña, Jorge; Verde, Licia E-mail: cwagner@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: liciaverde@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-01

    We present a phenomenological modification of the standard perturbation theory prediction for the bispectrum in redshift space that allows us to extend the model to mildly non-linear scales over a wide range of redshifts, z≤1.5. Our model require 18 free parameters that are fitted to N-body simulations using the shapes k{sub 2}/k{sub 1}=1, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5. We find that we can describe the bispectrum of dark matter particles with ∼5% accuracy for k{sub i}∼<0.10 h/Mpc at z=0, for k{sub i}∼<0.15 h/Mpc at z=0.5, for k{sub i}∼<0.17 h/Mpc at z=1.0 and for k{sub i}∼<0.20 h/Mpc at z=1.5. For very squeezed triangles with k{sub 1}=k{sub 2}∼>0.1 hMpc{sup -1} and k{sub 3}≤0.02 hMpc{sup -1}, however, neither SPT nor the proposed fitting formula are able to describe the measured dark matter bispectrum with this accuracy. We show that the fitting formula is sufficiently general that can be applied to other intermediate shapes such as k{sub 2}/k{sub 1}=1.25, 1.75, and 2.25. We also test that the fitting formula is able to describe with similar accuracy the bispectrum of cosmologies with different Ω{sub m}, in the range 0.2∼< Ω{sub m} ∼< 0.4, and consequently with different values of the logarithmic grow rate f at z=0, 0.4∼< f(z=0) ∼< 0.6. We apply this new formula to recover the bias parameters, f and σ{sub 8}, by combining the redshift space power spectrum monopole and quadrupole with the bispectrum monopole for both dark matter particles and haloes. We find that the combination of these three statistics can break the degeneracy between b{sub 1}, f and σ{sub 8}. For dark matter particles the new model can be used to recover f and σ{sub 8} with ∼1% accuracy. For dark matter haloes we find that f and σ{sub 8} present larger systematic shifts, ∼10%. The systematic offsets arise because of limitations in the modelling of the interplay between bias and redshift space distortions, and represent a limitation as the statistical errors of

  16. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B. ); Hughes, E.D. )

    1991-01-01

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases.

  17. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1991-12-31

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases.

  18. Excitation spectrum of Bose-Einstein Condensates with modified dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossman, Maren; Khamehchi, M. A.; Engels, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Bose-Einstein Condensates provide a flexible platform to model a wide variety of condensed matter phenomena. To this goal, Raman dressing schemes and dynamical lattices have emerged as a premier tool, allowing for a modification of the dispersion relation leading to spin-orbit coupling and artificial gauge fields. Using Bragg spectroscopy, we investigate the collective excitation spectrum of BECs with engineered dispersion relations and study consequences of a roton-like minimum that can be softened by changing Raman dressing parameters. We report on the current status and future directions of our experiments. This work is supported by NSF.

  19. Ghost Condensation and Modification of Gravity at Long distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luty, Markus

    2004-05-01

    This talk will describe the physics of a "ghost condensate", a new kind of cosmological fluid that can fill the universe and give rise to novel gravitational effects. The fluid has a preferred rest frame, but is nonetheless compatible with maximally symmetric spacetimes such as flat space or de Sitter. In the presence of a ghost condensate, gravity is modified in a nontrivial way at large distances and late times. New phenomena include new contributions to dark energy and dark matter, antigravity, new spin-dependent forces, and oscillatory potentials. All of this new physics can be described by a completely explicit and consistent effective field theory.

  20. Condensates in quantum chromodynamics and the cosmological constant

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Shrock, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Casher and Susskind [Casher A, Susskind L (1974) Phys Rev 9:436–460] have noted that in the light-front description, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is a property of hadronic wavefunctions and not of the vacuum. Here we show from several physical perspectives that, because of color confinement, quark and gluon condensates in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are associated with the internal dynamics of hadrons. We discuss condensates using condensed matter analogues, the Anti de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence, and the Bethe–Salpeter–Dyson–Schwinger approach for bound states. Our analysis is in agreement with the Casher and Susskind model and the explicit demonstration of “in-hadron” condensates by Roberts and coworkers [Maris P, Roberts CD, Tandy PC (1998) Phys Lett B 420:267–273], using the Bethe–Salpeter–Dyson–Schwinger formalism for QCD-bound states. These results imply that QCD condensates give zero contribution to the cosmological constant, because all of the gravitational effects of the in-hadron condensates are already included in the normal contribution from hadron masses.

  1. What Matters Most: Factors Influencing the University Application Choice Decisions of Korean International Students and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parslow, Breanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine factors influencing Korean parents' and students' university application choice decisions in three international schools in the Republic of Korea (South). Institutional and individual factors that influenced Korean students' university application choice decisions and their parents' university application…

  2. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  3. Condenser for photolithography system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2004-03-02

    A condenser for a photolithography system, in which a mask image from a mask is projected onto a wafer through a camera having an entrance pupil, includes a source of propagating radiation, a first mirror illuminated by the radiation, a mirror array illuminated by the radiation reflected from said first mirror, and a second mirror illuminated by the radiation reflected from the array. The mirror array includes a plurality of micromirrors. Each of the micromirrors is selectively actuatable independently of each other. The first mirror and the second mirror are disposed such that the source is imaged onto a plane of the mask and the mirror array is imaged into the entrance pupil of the camera.

  4. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  5. Applications of an 88Y/Be photoneutron calibration source to dark matter and neutrino experiments.

    PubMed

    Collar, J I

    2013-05-24

    The low-energy monochromatic neutron emission from an (88)Y/Be source can be exploited to mimic the few keV(nr) nuclear recoils expected from low-mass weakly interacting massive particles and coherent scattering of neutrinos off nuclei. Using this source, a matter experiment, resulting in a marked increase of its tension with other searches, under the standard set of phenomenological assumptions. The method is illustrated for other target materials (superheated and noble liquids).

  6. Development And Application of Functional Assays For Freshwater Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thacker, S.; Tipping, E.; Gondar, D.; Baker, A.

    2006-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters participates in many important ecological and geochemical reactions, including acid-base buffering, light absorption, proton binding, binding of heavy metals, organic contaminants, aluminium and radionuclides, adsorption at surfaces, aggregation and photochemical reactivity. We are studying DOM in order to understand and quantify these functional properties, so we can use the knowledge to predict the influence of DOM on the natural freshwater environment. As DOM has no readily identifiable structure, our approach is to measure what it does, rather than what it is. Thus, we have developed a series of 12 standardised, reproducible assays of physico-chemical functions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwaters. The assays provide quantitative information on light absorption, fluorescence, photochemical fading, pH buffering, copper binding, benzo(a)pyrene binding, hydrophilicity and adsorption to alumina. We have collected twenty DOM samples in total, ten samples from a eutrophic lake (Esthwaite Water) and ten samples from three stream waters. A mild isolation method was then used to concentrate the DOM samples for the assay work. When assaying the concentrates, parallel assays were also preformed with Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA), as a quality control standard. Our results showed that; (i) for eleven of the assays, the variability among the twenty DOM samples was significantly (p<0.001) greater than can be explained by analytical error, i.e. by comparison with results from the SRFA quality control; (ii) the functional properties of the DOM from Esthwaite Water are strongly influenced by the seasonally-dependent input of autochthonous DOM, derived from phytoplankton. The autochthonous DOM is less fluorescent, light absorbing, hydrophobic and has a lower acid group content and capacity to be adsorbed onto alumina than terrestrially derived allochthonous DOM; (iii) significant correlations were found between

  7. Study of the Warm Dense Matter with XANES spectroscopy - Applications to planetary interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoeud, Adrien

    With the recent discovery of many exoplanets, modelling the interior of these celestial bodies is becoming a fascinating scientific challenge. In this context, it is crucial to accurately know the equations of state and the macroscopic and microscopic physical properties of their constituent materials in the Warm Dense Matter regime (WDM). Moreover, planetary models rely almost exclusively on physical properties obtained using first principles simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) predictions. It is thus of paramount importance to validate the basic underlying mechanisms occurring for key planetary constituents (metallization, dissociation, structural modifications, phase transitions, etc....) as pressure and temperature both increase. In this work, we were interested in two materials that can be mainly found in the Earth-like planets: silica, or SiO2, as a model compound of the silicates that constitute the major part of their mantles, and iron, which is found in abundance in their cores. These two materials were compressed and brought to the WDM regime by using strong shock created by laser pulses during various experiments performed on the LULI2000 (Palaiseau, France) and the JLF (Livermore, US) laser facilities and on the LCLS XFEL (Stanford, US). In order to penetrate this dense matter and to have access to its both ionic and electronic structures, we have probed silica and iron with time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). In parallel with these experiments, we performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations based on DFT at conditions representative of the region investigated experimentally so as to extract the interesting physical processes and comprehend the limits of the implemented models. In particular, these works allowed us to highlight the metallization processes of silica in temperature and the structural changes of its liquid in density, as well as to more constrain the melting curve of iron at very high pressures.

  8. Dynamics of Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates in a Random Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardonov, Sh.; Modugno, M.; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2015-10-01

    Disorder plays a crucial role in spin dynamics in solids and condensed matter systems. We demonstrate that for a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a random potential two mechanisms of spin evolution that can be characterized as "precessional" and "anomalous" are at work simultaneously. The precessional mechanism, typical for solids, is due to the condensate displacement. The unconventional anomalous mechanism is due to the spin-dependent velocity producing the distribution of the condensate spin polarization. The condensate expansion is accompanied by a random displacement and fragmentation, where it becomes sparse, as clearly revealed in the spin dynamics. Thus, different stages of the evolution can be characterized by looking at the condensate spin.

  9. Capillary Condensation in Polymer Blends: an Analysis of Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina C.; Jira, Nicholas C.; Evans, Ian R.; Cohen, Matthew; D'Rozario, Julia R.; Romano, Marie T.; Sabirianov, Ildar

    We explore herein the capillary condensation for various geometries. Capillary condensation is studied in the presence of van der Waals forces. We derive the grand free energy, and we analyze the phase transitions, the absorption isotherms and the triple point. Phase transitions between full, empty and two films are investigated and the shape of the liquid is calculated. We also analyze an important application of wetting phenomena and capillary condensation in binary polymer blends and investigate the type of wetting transitions presented and the phase diagram. SUNY Oswego SCAC Grant, NSF Noyce Grant.

  10. Amine catalyzed condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    The catalysis of the condensation of hydrolyzed metal alkoxides by amines has been mentioned in the literature, but there has been no systematic study of their influence on the rate of the condensation reaction of the alkoxide and the microstructure of the resultant gel.

  11. Exact solutions for generalized variable-coefficients Ginzburg-Landau equation: Application to Bose-Einstein condensates with multi-body interatomic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengne, E.; Lakhssassi, A.; Vaillancourt, R.; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2012-12-01

    We present a double-mapping method (D-MM), a natural combination of a similarity with F-expansion methods, for obtaining general solvable nonlinear evolution equations. We focus on variable-coefficients complex Ginzburg-Landau equations (VCCGLE) with multi-body interactions. We show that it is easy by this method to find a large class of exact solutions of Gross-Pitaevskii and Gross-Pitaevskii-Ginzburg equations. We apply the D-MM to investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation with two- and three-body interactions. As a surprising result, we obtained that it is very easy to use the built D-MM to obtain a large class of exact solutions of VCCGLE with two-body interactions via a generalized VCCGLE with two- and three-body interactions containing cubic-derivative terms. The results show that the proposed method is direct, concise, elementary, and effective, and can be a very effective and powerful mathematical tool for solving many other nonlinear evolution equations in physics.

  12. Applications of UT results to confirm defects findings by utilization of relevant metallurgical investigations techniques on gas/condensate pipeline working in wet sour gas environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Azhari, O. A.; Gajam, S. Y.

    2015-03-01

    The gas/condensate pipe line under investigation is a 12 inch diameter, 48 km ASTM, A106 steel pipeline, carrying hydrocarbons containing wet CO2 and H2S.The pipe line had exploded in a region 100m distance from its terminal; after 24 years of service. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sour gas corrosion were expected due to the presence of wet H2S in the gas analysis. In other areas of pipe line ultrasonic testing was performed to determine whether the pipeline can be re-operated. The results have shown presence of internal planner defects, this was attributed to the existence of either laminations, type II inclusions or some service defects such as HIC and step wise cracking (SWC).Metallurgical investigations were conducted on fractured samples as per NACE standard (TM-0284-84). The obtained results had shown macroscopic cracks in the form of SWC, microstructure of steel had MnS inclusions. Crack sensitivity analyses were calculated and the microhardness testing was conducted. These results had confirmed that the line material was suffering from sour gas deteriorations. This paper correlates the field UT inspection findings with those methods investigated in the laboratory. Based on the results obtained a new HIC resistance material pipeline needs to be selected.

  13. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  14. Chromatin condensation during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian terminal erythropoiesis involves gradual but dramatic chromatin condensation steps that are essential for cell differentiation. Chromatin and nuclear condensation is followed by a unique enucleation process, which is believed to liberate more spaces for hemoglobin enrichment and enable the generation of a physically flexible mature red blood cell. Although these processes have been known for decades, the mechanisms are still unclear. Our recent study reveals an unexpected nuclear opening formation during mouse terminal erythropoiesis that requires caspase-3 activity. Major histones, except H2AZ, are partially released from the opening, which is important for chromatin condensation. Block of the nuclear opening through caspase inhibitor or knockdown of caspase-3 inhibits chromatin condensation and enucleation. We also demonstrate that nuclear opening and histone release are cell cycle regulated. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for chromatin condensation in mammalia terminal erythropoiesis.

  15. Application of TAM III to study sensitivity of soil organic matter degradation to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikegard, Peter; Barros, Nieves; Piñeiro, Verónica

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, studies of soil biodegradation are based on CO2 dissipation rates. CO2 is a product of aerobic degradation of labile organic substrates like carbohydrates. That limits the biodegradation concept to just one of the soil organic matter fractions. This feature is responsible for some problems to settle the concept of soil organic matter (SOM) recalcitrance and for controversial results defining sensitivity of SOM to temperature. SOM consists of highly complex macromolecules constituted by fractions with different chemical nature and redox state affecting the chemical nature of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of fractions more reduced than carbohydrates take place through metabolic pathways that dissipate less CO2 than carbohydrate respiration, that may not dissipate CO2, or that even may uptake CO2. These compounds can be considered more recalcitrant and with lower turnover times than labile SOM just because they are degraded at lower CO2 rates that may be just a consequence of the metabolic path. Nevertheless, decomposition of every kind of organic substrate always releases heat. For this reason, the measurement of the heat rate by calorimetry yields a more realistic measurement of the biodegradation of the SOM continuum. TAM III is one of the most recent calorimeters designed for directly measuring in real time the heat rate associated with any degradation process. It is designed as a multichannel system allowing the concomitant measurement of to up 24 samples at isothermal conditions or through a temperature scanning mode from 18 to 100ºC, allowing the continous measure of any sample at controlled non-isothermal conditions. The temperature scanning mode was tested in several soil samples collected at different depths to study their sensitivity to temperature changes from 18 to 35 ºC calculating the Q10 and the activation energy (EA) by the Arrhenius equation. It was attempted to associate the obtained EA values with the soil thermal

  16. Shape matters: synthesis and biomedical applications of high aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratila, Raluca M.; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; de La Fuente, Jesús M.

    2015-04-01

    High aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials possess anisotropic properties that make them attractive for biological applications. Their elongated shape enables multivalent interactions with receptors through the introduction of multiple targeting units on their surface, thus enhancing cell internalization. Moreover, due to their magnetic anisotropy, high aspect ratio nanomaterials can outperform their spherical analogues as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. In this review, we first describe the two main synthetic routes for the preparation of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: (i) direct synthesis (in which the anisotropic growth is directed by tuning the reaction conditions or by using templates) and (ii) assembly methods (in which the high aspect ratio is achieved by assembly from individual building blocks). We then provide an overview of the biomedical applications of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: magnetic separation and detection, targeted delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Shape matters: synthesis and biomedical applications of high aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Fratila, Raluca M; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; de la Fuente, Jesús M

    2015-05-14

    High aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials possess anisotropic properties that make them attractive for biological applications. Their elongated shape enables multivalent interactions with receptors through the introduction of multiple targeting units on their surface, thus enhancing cell internalization. Moreover, due to their magnetic anisotropy, high aspect ratio nanomaterials can outperform their spherical analogues as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. In this review, we first describe the two main synthetic routes for the preparation of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: (i) direct synthesis (in which the anisotropic growth is directed by tuning the reaction conditions or by using templates) and (ii) assembly methods (in which the high aspect ratio is achieved by assembly from individual building blocks). We then provide an overview of the biomedical applications of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: magnetic separation and detection, targeted delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

  18. Quantitative T2 mapping of white matter: applications for ageing and cognitive decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Michael J.; McCann, Bryony; Tsivos, Demitra; Dillon, Serena; Coulthard, Elizabeth; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2016-08-01

    In MRI, the coherence lifetime T2 is sensitive to the magnetic environment imposed by tissue microstructure and biochemistry in vivo. Here we explore the possibility that the use of T2 relaxometry may provide information complementary to that provided by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in ageing of healthy controls (HC), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). T2 and diffusion MRI metrics were quantified in HC and patients with MCI and mild AD using multi-echo MRI and DTI. We used tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to evaluate quantitative MRI parameters in white matter (WM). A prolonged T2 in WM was associated with AD, and able to distinguish AD from MCI, and AD from HC. Shorter WM T2 was associated with better cognition and younger age in general. In no case was a reduction in T2 associated with poorer cognition. We also applied principal component analysis, showing that WM volume changes independently of  T2, MRI diffusion indices and cognitive performance indices. Our data add to the evidence that age-related and AD-related decline in cognition is in part attributable to WM tissue state, and much less to WM quantity. These observations suggest that WM is involved in AD pathology, and that T2 relaxometry is a potential imaging modality for detecting and characterising WM in cognitive decline and dementia.

  19. Organic matter characterization of sediments in two river beaches from northern Portugal for forensic application.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Áurea; Ribeiro, Helena; Mayes, Robert; Guedes, Alexandra; Abreu, Ilda; Noronha, Fernando; Dawson, Lorna

    2013-12-10

    In a forensic investigation, the analysis of earth materials such as sediments and soils have been used as evidence at a court of law, relying on the study of properties such as color, particle size distribution and mineral identification, among others. In addition, the analysis of the organic composition of sediments and soils is of particular value, since these can be used as complementary independent evidence to the inorganic component. To investigate the usefulness of organic indicators in sediment characterization and discrimination, seventy-seven samples were collected during a period of one year in two river beaches located at the southern bank of the Douro River estuary in the North of Portugal. Isotopes of total carbon, pollen and plant wax-marker analyses were performed. In both beaches, an increase of the organic matter concentrations was noticeable, moving landward, related with the higher cover of associated plant material. The results obtained showed that the combination of all the techniques adopted showed a clear discrimination between samples from the two beaches, and also showed a differentiation of samples in relation to distance from the river in both beaches. The results also show that seasonality in these beaches was not a determining factor for discrimination, at the times considered. In addition, the effects of time was not marked.

  20. Ultrasonic application to boost hydroxyl radical formation during Fenton oxidation and release organic matter from sludge.

    PubMed

    Gong, Changxiu; Jiang, Jianguo; Li, De'an; Tian, Sicong

    2015-06-12

    We examined the effects of ultrasound and Fenton reagent on ultrasonic coupling Fenton oxidation (U+F) pre-treatment processes for the disintegration of wastewater treatment plant sludge. The results demonstrated that U+F treatment could significantly increase soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), total organic carbon (TOC), and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentrations in sludge supernatant. This method was more effective than ultrasonic (U) or Fenton oxidation (F) treatment alone. U+F treatment increased the release of SCOD by 2.1- and 1.4-fold compared with U and F alone, respectively. U+F treatment increased the release of EPS by 1.2-fold compared with U alone. After U+F treatment, sludge showed a considerably finer particle size and looser microstructure based on fluorescence microscopy, and the concentration of hydroxyl radicals (OH•) increased from 0.26 mM by F treatment to 0.43 mM by U+F treatment based on fluorescence spectrophotometer. This demonstrated that U+F treatment improves the release of organic matter from sludge.