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Sample records for condensins regulate meiotic

  1. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu; Makaroff, Christopher; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation.

  2. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation. PMID:27385818

  3. An SMC-like protein binds and regulates Caenorhabditis elegans condensins

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Lucy Fang-I; Singh, Meha; Thompson, James

    2017-01-01

    Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) family proteins participate in multisubunit complexes that govern chromosome structure and dynamics. SMC-containing condensin complexes create chromosome topologies essential for mitosis/meiosis, gene expression, recombination, and repair. Many eukaryotes have two condensin complexes (I and II); C. elegans has three (I, II, and the X-chromosome specialized condensin IDC) and their regulation is poorly understood. Here we identify a novel SMC-like protein, SMCL-1, that binds to C. elegans condensin SMC subunits, and modulates condensin functions. Consistent with a possible role as a negative regulator, loss of SMCL-1 partially rescued the lethal and sterile phenotypes of a hypomorphic condensin mutant, while over-expression of SMCL-1 caused lethality, chromosome mis-segregation, and disruption of condensin IDC localization on X chromosomes. Unlike canonical SMC proteins, SMCL-1 lacks hinge and coil domains, and its ATPase domain lacks conserved amino acids required for ATP hydrolysis, leading to the speculation that it may inhibit condensin ATPase activity. SMCL-1 homologs are apparent only in the subset of Caenorhabditis species in which the condensin I and II subunit SMC-4 duplicated to create the condensin IDC- specific subunit DPY-27, suggesting that SMCL-1 helps this lineage cope with the regulatory challenges imposed by evolution of a third condensin complex. Our findings uncover a new regulator of condensins and highlight how the duplication and divergence of SMC complex components in various lineages has created new proteins with diverse functions in chromosome dynamics. PMID:28301465

  4. Condensin suppresses recombination and regulates double-strand break processing at the repetitive ribosomal DNA array to ensure proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, homologues are linked by crossover, which is required for bipolar chromosome orientation before chromosome segregation at anaphase I. The repetitive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array, however, undergoes little or no meiotic recombination. Hyperrecombination can cause chromosome missegregation and rDNA copy number instability. We report here that condensin, a conserved protein complex required for chromosome organization, regulates double-strand break (DSB) formation and repair at the rDNA gene cluster during meiosis in budding yeast. Condensin is highly enriched at the rDNA region during prophase I, released at the prophase I/metaphase I transition, and reassociates with rDNA before anaphase I onset. We show that condensin plays a dual role in maintaining rDNA stability: it suppresses the formation of Spo11-mediated rDNA breaks, and it promotes DSB processing to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Condensin is unnecessary for the export of rDNA breaks outside the nucleolus but required for timely repair of meiotic DSBs. Our work reveals that condensin coordinates meiotic recombination with chromosome segregation at the repetitive rDNA sequence, thereby maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25103240

  5. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  6. The functional role for condensin in the regulation of chromosomal organization during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Yuya; Yoshida, Kiyotsugu

    2016-12-01

    In all organisms, the control of cell cycle progression is a fundamental process that is essential for cell growth, development, and survival. Through each cell cycle phase, the regulation of chromatin organization is essential for natural cell proliferation and maintaining cellular homeostasis. During mitosis, the chromatin morphology is dramatically changed to have a "thread-like" shape and the condensed chromosomes are segregated equally into two daughter cells. Disruption of the mitotic chromosome architecture physically impedes chromosomal behaviors, such as chromosome alignment and chromosome segregation; therefore, the proper mitotic chromosome structure is required to maintain chromosomal stability. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that mitotic chromosome condensation is induced by condensin complexes. Moreover, recent studies have shown that condensin also modulates interphase chromatin and regulates gene expression. This review mainly focuses on the molecular mechanisms that condensin uses to exert its functions during the cell cycle progression. Moreover, we discuss the condensin-mediated chromosomal organization in cancer cells.

  7. Involvement of condensin-directed gene associations in the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Osamu; Corcoran, Christopher J.; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes are not randomly disposed in the nucleus but instead occupy discrete sub-nuclear domains, referred to as chromosome territories. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of chromosome territories and how they are regulated during the cell cycle remain largely unknown. Here, we have developed two different chromosome-painting approaches to address how chromosome territories are organized in the fission yeast model organism. We show that condensin frequently associates RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes (tRNA and 5S rRNA) that are present on the same chromosomes, and that the disruption of these associations by condensin mutations significantly compromises the chromosome territory arrangement. We also find that condensin-dependent intra-chromosomal gene associations and chromosome territories are co-regulated during the cell cycle. For example, condensin-directed gene associations occur to the least degree during S phase, with the chromosomal overlap becoming largest. In clear contrast, condensin-directed gene associations become tighter in other cell-cycle phases, especially during mitosis, with the overlap between the different chromosomes being smaller. This study suggests that condensin-driven intra-chromosomal gene associations contribute to the organization and regulation of chromosome territories during the cell cycle. PMID:26704981

  8. Identification of a BET family Bromodomain / Casein Kinase II / TAF-containing complex as a regulator of mitotic condensin function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Rothbart, Scott B.; Silva, Andrea C.; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent; Radovani, Ernest; Kislinger, Thomas; Roguev, Assen; Ryan, Colm J.; Xu, Jiewei; Jahari, Harlizawati; Hardwick, Kevin G.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Fillingham, Jeffrey S.; Strahl, Brian D.; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Edelmann, Winfried; Keogh, Michael-Christopher

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Condensin is a central regulator of mitotic genome structure, with mutants showing poorly condensed chromosomes and profound segregation defects. Here we identify NCT complex, comprising the Nrc1 BET-family tandem bromodomain protein (SPAC631.02), Casein Kinase II (CKII) and several TAFs, as a regulator of condensin function. We show that NCT and condensin bind similar genomic regions, but only briefly co-localize during the periods of chromosome condensation and decondensation. This pattern of NCT binding at the core centromere, the region of maximal condensin enrichment, tracks the abundance of acetylated histone H4, as regulated by the Hat1-Mis16 acetyltransferase complex and recognized by the first Nrc1 bromodomain. Strikingly, mutants in NCT or Hat1-Mis16 restore the formation of segregation-competent chromosomes in cells containing defective condensin. These results are consistent with a model where NCT targets CKII to chromatin in a cell cycle-directed manner to modulate the activity of condensin during chromosome condensation and decondensation. PMID:24565511

  9. Condensins and 3D Organization of the Interphase Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Heather A.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Condensins are conserved multi-subunit protein complexes that participate in eukaryotic genome organization. Well known for their role in mitotic chromosome condensation, condensins have recently emerged as integral components of diverse interphase processes. Recent evidence shows that condensins are involved in chromatin organization, gene expression, and DNA repair and indicates similarities between the interphase and mitotic functions of condensin. Recent work has enhanced our knowledge of how chromatin architecture is dynamically regulated by condensin to impact essential cellular processes. PMID:24563825

  10. Genome-wide analysis of condensin binding in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Condensins are multi-subunit protein complexes that are essential for chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis, and play key roles in transcription regulation during interphase. Metazoans contain two condensins, I and II, which perform different functions and localize to different chromosomal regions. Caenorhabditis elegans contains a third condensin, IDC, that is targeted to and represses transcription of the X chromosome for dosage compensation. Results To understand condensin binding and function, we performed ChIP-seq analysis of C. elegans condensins in mixed developmental stage embryos, which contain predominantly interphase nuclei. Condensins bind to a subset of active promoters, tRNA genes and putative enhancers. Expression analysis in kle-2-mutant larvae suggests that the primary effect of condensin II on transcription is repression. A DNA sequence motif, GCGC, is enriched at condensin II binding sites. A sequence extension of this core motif, AGGG, creates the condensin IDC motif. In addition to differences in recruitment that result in X-enrichment of condensin IDC and condensin II binding to all chromosomes, we provide evidence for a shared recruitment mechanism, as condensin IDC recruiter SDC-2 also recruits condensin II to the condensin IDC recruitment sites on the X. In addition, we found that condensin sites overlap extensively with the cohesin loader SCC-2, and that SDC-2 also recruits SCC-2 to the condensin IDC recruitment sites. Conclusions Our results provide the first genome-wide view of metazoan condensin II binding in interphase, define putative recruitment motifs, and illustrate shared loading mechanisms for condensin IDC and condensin II. PMID:24125077

  11. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called “recombination hotspots.” Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the “DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)“ and “SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)” subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a “tethered loop-axis complex.” It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint. PMID:23572041

  12. Spatiotemporal regulation of meiotic recombination by Liaisonin.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Tomoichiro; Ito, Masaru; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    Sexual reproduction involves diversification of genetic information in successive generations. Meiotic recombination, which substantially contributes to the increase in genetic diversity, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved Spo11 protein. Spo11 requires additional partner proteins for its DNA cleavage reaction. DSBs are preferentially introduced at defined chromosomal sites called "recombination hotspots." Recent studies have revealed that meiotically established higher-order chromosome structures, such as chromosome axes and loops, are also crucial in the control of DSB formation. Most of the DSB sites are located within chromatin loop regions, while many of the proteins involved in DSB formation reside on chromosomal axes. Hence, DSB proteins and DSB sites seem to be distantly located. To resolve this paradox, we conducted comprehensive proteomics and ChIP-chip analyses on Spo11 partners in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in combination with mutant studies. We identified two distinct DSB complexes, the "DSBC (DSB Catalytic core)" and "SFT (Seven-Fifteen-Twenty four; Rec7-Rec15-Rec24)" subcomplexes. The DSBC subcomplex contains Spo11 and functions as the catalytic core for the DNA cleavage reaction. The SFT subcomplex is assumed to execute regulatory functions. To activate the DSBC subcomplex, the SFT subcomplex tethers hotspots to axes via its interaction with Mde2, which can interact with proteins in both DSBC and SFT subcomplexes. Thus, Mde2 is likely to bridge these two subcomplexes, forming a "tethered loop-axis complex." It should be noted that Mde2 expression is strictly regulated by S phase checkpoint monitoring of the completion of DNA replication. From these observations, we proposed that Mde2 is a central coupler for meiotic recombination initiation to establish a tethered loop-axis complex in liaison with the S phase checkpoint.

  13. Maintenance of Interphase Chromosome Compaction and Homolog Pairing in Drosophila Is Regulated by the Condensin Cap-H2 and Its Partner Mrg15

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen F.; Roberts, Meredith A.; Nguyen, Huy Q.; Peterson, Maureen; Hartl, Tom A.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromosome structure and organization is critical for fundamental cellular processes such as gene expression and chromosome segregation. Condensins are conserved chromosome-associated proteins that regulate a variety of chromosome dynamics, including axial shortening, lateral compaction, and homolog pairing. However, how the in vivo activities of condensins are regulated and how functional interactors target condensins to chromatin are not well understood. To better understand how Drosophila melanogaster condensin is regulated, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified the chromo-barrel domain protein Mrg15 to interact with the Cap-H2 condensin subunit. Genetic interactions demonstrate that Mrg15 function is required for Cap-H2-mediated unpairing of polytene chromosomes in ovarian nurse cells and salivary gland cells. In diploid tissues, transvection assays demonstrate that Mrg15 inhibits transvection at Ubx and cooperates with Cap-H2 to antagonize transvection at yellow. In cultured cells, we show that levels of chromatin-bound Cap-H2 protein are partially dependent on Mrg15 and that Cap-H2-mediated homolog unpairing is suppressed by RNA interference depletion of Mrg15. Thus, maintenance of interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing status requires both Mrg15 and Cap-H2. We propose a model where the Mrg15 and Cap-H2 protein–protein interaction may serve to recruit Cap-H2 to chromatin and facilitates compaction of interphase chromatin. PMID:23821596

  14. Epigenetic regulation of condensin-mediated genome organization during the cell cycle and upon DNA damage through histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Atsunari; Tanizawa, Hideki; Sriswasdi, Sira; Iwasaki, Osamu; Chatterjee, Atreyi G; Speicher, David W; Levin, Henry L; Noguchi, Eishi; Noma, Ken-Ichi

    2012-11-30

    Complex genome organizations participate in various nuclear processes including transcription, DNA replication, and repair. However, the mechanisms that generate and regulate these functional genome structures remain largely unknown. Here, we describe how the Ku heterodimer complex, which functions in nonhomologous end joining, mediates clustering of long terminal repeat retrotransposons at centromeres in fission yeast. We demonstrate that the CENP-B subunit, Abp1, functions as a recruiter of the Ku complex, which in turn loads the genome-organizing machinery condensin to retrotransposons. Intriguingly, histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) acetylation, which functions in DNA replication and repair, interferes with Ku localization at retrotransposons without disrupting Abp1 localization and, as a consequence, dissociates condensin from retrotransposons. This dissociation releases condensin-mediated genomic associations during S phase and upon DNA damage. ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) kinase mediates the DNA damage response of condensin-mediated genome organization. Our study describes a function of H3K56 acetylation that neutralizes condensin-mediated genome organization.

  15. Mechanism and Regulation of Meiotic Recombination Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Isabel; Keeney, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination involves the formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the conserved Spo11 protein. This review summarizes recent studies pertaining to the formation of meiotic DSBs, including the mechanism of DNA cleavage by Spo11, proteins required for break formation, and mechanisms that control the location, timing, and number of DSBs. Where appropriate, findings in different organisms are discussed to highlight evolutionary conservation or divergence. PMID:25324213

  16. Drosophila casein kinase I alpha regulates homolog pairing and genome organization by modulating condensin II subunit Cap-H2 levels.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Q; Nye, Jonathan; Buster, Daniel W; Klebba, Joseph E; Rogers, Gregory C; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1α) as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1α-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1α depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1α loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1α facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein.

  17. Meiotic recombination in mammals: localization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Baudat, Frédéric; Imai, Yukiko; de Massy, Bernard

    2013-11-01

    During meiosis, a programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) leads to the exchange of genetic material between homologous chromosomes. These exchanges increase genome diversity and are essential for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. Recent findings have highlighted an unexpected molecular control of the distribution of meiotic DSBs in mammals by a rapidly evolving gene, PR domain-containing 9 (PRDM9), and genome-wide analyses have facilitated the characterization of meiotic DSB sites at unprecedented resolution. In addition, the identification of new players in DSB repair processes has allowed the delineation of recombination pathways that have two major outcomes, crossovers and non-crossovers, which have distinct mechanistic roles and consequences for genome evolution.

  18. Roles of cohesin and condensin in chromosome dynamics during mammalian meiosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jibak

    2013-10-01

    Meiosis is a key step for sexual reproduction in which chromosome number is halved by two successive meiotic divisions after a single round of DNA replication. In the first meiotic division (meiosis I), homologous chromosomes pair, synapse, and recombine with their partners in prophase I. As a result, homologous chromosomes are physically connected until metaphase I and then segregated from each other at the onset of anaphase I. In the subsequent second meiotic division (meiosis II), sister chromatids are segregated. Chromosomal abnormality arising during meiosis is one of the major causes of birth defects and congenital disorders in mammals including human and domestic animals. Hence understanding of the mechanism underlying these unique chromosome behavior in meiosis is of great importance. This review focuses on the roles of cohesin and condensin, and their regulation in chromosome dynamics during mammalian meiosis.

  19. Condensin II Regulates Interphase Chromatin Organization Through the Mrg-Binding Motif of Cap-H2

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Heather A.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Kusch, Thomas; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome within the eukaryotic nucleus is a dynamic process that plays a central role in cellular processes such as gene expression, DNA replication, and chromosome segregation. Condensins are conserved multi-subunit protein complexes that contribute to chromosome organization by regulating chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that the Cap-H2 subunit of condensin II physically and genetically interacts with the Drosophila homolog of human MORF4-related gene on chromosome 15 (MRG15). Like Cap-H2, Mrg15 is required for interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. However, the mechanism by which Mrg15 and Cap-H2 cooperate to maintain interphase chromatin organization remains unclear. Here, we show that Cap-H2 localizes to interband regions on polytene chromosomes and co-localizes with Mrg15 at regions of active transcription across the genome. We show that co-localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes is partially dependent on Mrg15. We have identified a binding motif within Cap-H2 that is essential for its interaction with Mrg15, and have found that mutation of this motif results in loss of localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes and results in partial suppression of Cap-H2-mediated compaction and homolog unpairing. Our data are consistent with a model in which Mrg15 acts as a loading factor to facilitate Cap-H2 binding to chromatin and mediate changes in chromatin organization. PMID:25758823

  20. Condensin II Regulates Interphase Chromatin Organization Through the Mrg-Binding Motif of Cap-H2.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Heather A; Klebba, Joseph E; Kusch, Thomas; Rogers, Gregory C; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-03-09

    The spatial organization of the genome within the eukaryotic nucleus is a dynamic process that plays a central role in cellular processes such as gene expression, DNA replication, and chromosome segregation. Condensins are conserved multi-subunit protein complexes that contribute to chromosome organization by regulating chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that the Cap-H2 subunit of condensin II physically and genetically interacts with the Drosophila homolog of human MORF4-related gene on chromosome 15 (MRG15). Like Cap-H2, Mrg15 is required for interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. However, the mechanism by which Mrg15 and Cap-H2 cooperate to maintain interphase chromatin organization remains unclear. Here, we show that Cap-H2 localizes to interband regions on polytene chromosomes and co-localizes with Mrg15 at regions of active transcription across the genome. We show that co-localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes is partially dependent on Mrg15. We have identified a binding motif within Cap-H2 that is essential for its interaction with Mrg15, and have found that mutation of this motif results in loss of localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes and results in partial suppression of Cap-H2-mediated compaction and homolog unpairing. Our data are consistent with a model in which Mrg15 acts as a loading factor to facilitate Cap-H2 binding to chromatin and mediate changes in chromatin organization. Copyright © 2015 Wallace et al.

  1. Mutations in the Chromosomal Passenger Complex and the Condensin Complex Differentially Affect Synaptonemal Complex Disassembly and Metaphase I Configuration in Drosophila Female Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Tamar D.; Dej, Kimberley J.; Xiang, Youbin; Hawley, R. Scott; Ahn, Caroline; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2009-01-01

    Production of haploid gametes relies on the specially regulated meiotic cell cycle. Analyses of the role of essential mitotic regulators in meiosis have been hampered by a shortage of appropriate alleles in metazoans. We characterized female-sterile alleles of the condensin complex component dcap-g and used them to define roles for condensin in Drosophila female meiosis. In mitosis, the condensin complex is required for sister-chromatid resolution and contributes to chromosome condensation. In meiosis, we demonstrate a role for dcap-g in disassembly of the synaptonemal complex and for proper retention of the chromosomes in a metaphase I-arrested state. The chromosomal passenger complex also is known to have mitotic roles in chromosome condensation and is required in some systems for localization of the condensin complex. We used the QA26 allele of passenger component incenp to investigate the role of the passenger complex in oocyte meiosis. Strikingly, in incenpQA26 mutants maintenance of the synaptonemal complex is disrupted. In contrast to the dcap-g mutants, the incenp mutation leads to a failure of paired homologous chromosomes to biorient, such that bivalents frequently orient toward only one pole in prometaphase and metaphase I. We show that incenp interacts genetically with ord, suggesting an important functional relationship between them in meiotic chromosome dynamics. The dcap-g and incenp mutations cause maternal effect lethality, with embryos from mutant mothers arrested in the initial mitotic divisions. PMID:19104074

  2. Mutations in the chromosomal passenger complex and the condensin complex differentially affect synaptonemal complex disassembly and metaphase I configuration in Drosophila female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Tamar D; Dej, Kimberley J; Xiang, Youbin; Hawley, R Scott; Ahn, Caroline; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2009-03-01

    Production of haploid gametes relies on the specially regulated meiotic cell cycle. Analyses of the role of essential mitotic regulators in meiosis have been hampered by a shortage of appropriate alleles in metazoans. We characterized female-sterile alleles of the condensin complex component dcap-g and used them to define roles for condensin in Drosophila female meiosis. In mitosis, the condensin complex is required for sister-chromatid resolution and contributes to chromosome condensation. In meiosis, we demonstrate a role for dcap-g in disassembly of the synaptonemal complex and for proper retention of the chromosomes in a metaphase I-arrested state. The chromosomal passenger complex also is known to have mitotic roles in chromosome condensation and is required in some systems for localization of the condensin complex. We used the QA26 allele of passenger component incenp to investigate the role of the passenger complex in oocyte meiosis. Strikingly, in incenp(QA26) mutants maintenance of the synaptonemal complex is disrupted. In contrast to the dcap-g mutants, the incenp mutation leads to a failure of paired homologous chromosomes to biorient, such that bivalents frequently orient toward only one pole in prometaphase and metaphase I. We show that incenp interacts genetically with ord, suggesting an important functional relationship between them in meiotic chromosome dynamics. The dcap-g and incenp mutations cause maternal effect lethality, with embryos from mutant mothers arrested in the initial mitotic divisions.

  3. piRNA-directed cleavage of meiotic transcripts regulates spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wee Siong Sho; Falciatori, Ilaria; Tam, Oliver H; Burgess, Ralph; Meikar, Oliver; Kotaja, Noora; Hammell, Molly; Hannon, Gregory J

    2015-05-15

    MIWI catalytic activity is required for spermatogenesis, indicating that piRNA-guided cleavage is critical for germ cell development. To identify meiotic piRNA targets, we augmented the mouse piRNA repertoire by introducing a human meiotic piRNA cluster. This triggered a spermatogenesis defect by inappropriately targeting the piRNA machinery to mouse mRNAs essential for germ cell development. Analysis of such de novo targets revealed a signature for pachytene piRNA target recognition. This enabled identification of both transposable elements and meiotically expressed protein-coding genes as targets of native piRNAs. Cleavage of genic targets began at the pachytene stage and resulted in progressive repression through meiosis, driven at least in part via the ping-pong cycle. Our data support the idea that meiotic piRNA populations must be strongly selected to enable successful spermatogenesis, both driving the response away from essential genes and directing the pathway toward mRNA targets that are regulated by small RNAs in meiotic cells.

  4. Condensin association with histone H2A shapes mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kenji; Susumu, Hiroaki; Sakuno, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    Chromosome structure is dynamically regulated during cell division, and this regulation is dependent, in part, on condensin. The localization of condensin at chromosome arms is crucial for chromosome partitioning during anaphase. Condensin is also enriched at kinetochores but its precise role and loading machinery remain unclear. Here we show that fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) kinetochore proteins Pcs1 and Mde4--homologues of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) monopolin subunits and known to prevent merotelic kinetochore orientation--act as a condensin 'recruiter' at kinetochores, and that condensin itself may act to clamp microtubule binding sites during metaphase. In addition to the regional recruitment factors, overall condensin association with chromatin is governed by the chromosomal passenger kinase Aurora B. Aurora-B-dependent phosphorylation of condensin promotes its association with histone H2A and H2A.Z, which we identify as conserved chromatin 'receptors' of condensin. Condensin phosphorylation and its deposition onto chromosome arms reach a peak during anaphase, when Aurora B kinase relocates from centromeres to the spindle midzone, where the separating chromosome arms are positioned. Our results elucidate the molecular basis for the spatiotemporal regulation of mitotic chromosome architecture, which is crucial for chromosome partitioning.

  5. Drosophila Casein Kinase I Alpha Regulates Homolog Pairing and Genome Organization by Modulating Condensin II Subunit Cap-H2 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy Q.; Nye, Jonathan; Buster, Daniel W.; Klebba, Joseph E.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The spatial organization of chromosomes within interphase nuclei is important for gene expression and epigenetic inheritance. Although the extent of physical interaction between chromosomes and their degree of compaction varies during development and between different cell-types, it is unclear how regulation of chromosome interactions and compaction relate to spatial organization of genomes. Drosophila is an excellent model system for studying chromosomal interactions including homolog pairing. Recent work has shown that condensin II governs both interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing and condensin II activity is controlled by the turnover of its regulatory subunit Cap-H2. Specifically, Cap-H2 is a target of the SCFSlimb E3 ubiquitin-ligase which down-regulates Cap-H2 in order to maintain homologous chromosome pairing, chromosome length and proper nuclear organization. Here, we identify Casein Kinase I alpha (CK1α) as an additional negative-regulator of Cap-H2. CK1α-depletion stabilizes Cap-H2 protein and results in an accumulation of Cap-H2 on chromosomes. Similar to Slimb mutation, CK1α depletion in cultured cells, larval salivary gland, and nurse cells results in several condensin II-dependent phenotypes including dispersal of centromeres, interphase chromosome compaction, and chromosome unpairing. Moreover, CK1α loss-of-function mutations dominantly suppress condensin II mutant phenotypes in vivo. Thus, CK1α facilitates Cap-H2 destruction and modulates nuclear organization by attenuating chromatin localized Cap-H2 protein. PMID:25723539

  6. Drosophila Condensin II subunit Chromosome-associated protein D3 regulates cell fate determination through non-cell-autonomous signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klebanow, Lindsey R.; Peshel, Emanuela C.; Schuster, Andrew T.; De, Kuntal; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lenoir, Jessica J.; Moore, Adrian W.; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of the Drosophila melanogaster adult wing is heavily influenced by the expression of proteins that dictate cell fate decisions between intervein and vein during development. dSRF (Blistered) expression in specific regions of the larval wing disc promotes intervein cell fate, whereas EGFR activity promotes vein cell fate. Here, we report that the chromatin-organizing protein CAP-D3 acts to dampen dSRF levels at the anterior/posterior boundary in the larval wing disc, promoting differentiation of cells into the anterior crossvein. CAP-D3 represses KNOT expression in cells immediately adjacent to the anterior/posterior boundary, thus blocking KNOT-mediated repression of EGFR activity and preventing cell death. Maintenance of EGFR activity in these cells depresses dSRF levels in the neighboring anterior crossvein progenitor cells, allowing them to differentiate into vein cells. These findings uncover a novel transcriptional regulatory network influencing Drosophila wing vein development, and are the first to identify a Condensin II subunit as an important regulator of EGFR activity and cell fate determination in vivo. PMID:27317808

  7. Drosophila Condensin II subunit Chromosome-associated protein D3 regulates cell fate determination through non-cell-autonomous signaling.

    PubMed

    Klebanow, Lindsey R; Peshel, Emanuela C; Schuster, Andrew T; De, Kuntal; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Lenoir, Jessica J; Moore, Adrian W; McDonald, Jocelyn A; Longworth, Michelle S

    2016-08-01

    The pattern of the Drosophila melanogaster adult wing is heavily influenced by the expression of proteins that dictate cell fate decisions between intervein and vein during development. dSRF (Blistered) expression in specific regions of the larval wing disc promotes intervein cell fate, whereas EGFR activity promotes vein cell fate. Here, we report that the chromatin-organizing protein CAP-D3 acts to dampen dSRF levels at the anterior/posterior boundary in the larval wing disc, promoting differentiation of cells into the anterior crossvein. CAP-D3 represses KNOT expression in cells immediately adjacent to the anterior/posterior boundary, thus blocking KNOT-mediated repression of EGFR activity and preventing cell death. Maintenance of EGFR activity in these cells depresses dSRF levels in the neighboring anterior crossvein progenitor cells, allowing them to differentiate into vein cells. These findings uncover a novel transcriptional regulatory network influencing Drosophila wing vein development, and are the first to identify a Condensin II subunit as an important regulator of EGFR activity and cell fate determination in vivo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-12-20

    Meiosis is a germ-cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction. Before the initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps, including the global erasure of DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) in CpG-rich DNA. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l and the histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be crucial for meiosis, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss-of-function approach in mice, here we show that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 has an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ-cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double-strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in primordial germ cells, but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells.

  9. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is a germ cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction1. Prior to initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps2,3, including global erasure of DNA methylation on the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) at CpG4,5. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l, histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be critical for meiosis6, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss of function approach, here we demonstrate that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 plays an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in PGCs but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells. PMID:23151479

  10. Condensins: universal organizers of chromosomes with diverse functions

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    Condensins are multisubunit protein complexes that play a fundamental role in the structural and functional organization of chromosomes in the three domains of life. Most eukaryotic species have two different types of condensin complexes, known as condensins I and II, that fulfill nonoverlapping functions and are subjected to differential regulation during mitosis and meiosis. Recent studies revealed that the two complexes contribute to a wide variety of interphase chromosome functions, such as gene regulation, recombination, and repair. Also emerging are their cell type- and tissue-specific functions and relevance to human disease. Biochemical and structural analyses of eukaryotic and bacterial condensins steadily uncover the mechanisms of action of this class of highly sophisticated molecular machines. Future studies on condensins will not only enhance our understanding of chromosome architecture and dynamics, but also help address a previously underappreciated yet profound set of questions in chromosome biology. PMID:22855829

  11. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis.

  12. The SMC-5/6 Complex and the HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase Synergistically Promote Meiotic Recombination Intermediate Processing and Chromosome Maturation during Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ye; Sonneville, Remi; Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Wang, Bin; Blow, J. Julian; Gartner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for the repair of programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) to generate crossovers (COs) during meiosis. The efficient processing of meiotic recombination intermediates not only needs various resolvases but also requires proper meiotic chromosome structure. The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) family and is closely related to cohesin and condensin. Although the Smc5/6 complex has been implicated in the processing of recombination intermediates during meiosis, it is not known how Smc5/6 controls meiotic DSB repair. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans we show that the SMC-5/6 complex acts synergistically with HIM-6, an ortholog of the human Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) during meiotic recombination. The concerted action of the SMC-5/6 complex and HIM-6 is important for processing recombination intermediates, CO regulation and bivalent maturation. Careful examination of meiotic chromosomal morphology reveals an accumulation of inter-chromosomal bridges in smc-5; him-6 double mutants, leading to compromised chromosome segregation during meiotic cell divisions. Interestingly, we found that the lethality of smc-5; him-6 can be rescued by loss of the conserved BRCA1 ortholog BRC-1. Furthermore, the combined deletion of smc-5 and him-6 leads to an irregular distribution of condensin and to chromosome decondensation defects reminiscent of condensin depletion. Lethality conferred by condensin depletion can also be rescued by BRC-1 depletion. Our results suggest that SMC-5/6 and HIM-6 can synergistically regulate recombination intermediate metabolism and suppress ectopic recombination by controlling chromosome architecture during meiosis. PMID:27010650

  13. Transcription factors mediate condensin recruitment and global chromosomal organization in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Tanizawa, Hideki; Iwasaki, Osamu; Noma, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming clear that Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) complexes, such as condensin and cohesin, are involved in the three-dimensional genome organization, yet the exact roles of these complexes in the functional organization remain unclear. This study employs the ChIA-PET approach to comprehensively identify genome-wide associations mediated by condensin and cohesin in fission yeast. We find that although cohesin and condensin often bind to the same loci, they direct different association networks and generate small and larger chromatin domains, respectively. Cohesin mediates local associations between loci positioned within 100 kb; condensin can drive longer-range associations. Moreover, condensin, but not cohesin, connects cell cycle-regulated genes bound by mitotic transcription factors. This study describes the different functions of condensin and cohesin in genome organization and how specific transcription factors function in condensin loading, cell cycle-dependent genome organization, and mitotic chromosome organization to support faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:27548313

  14. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Tim J.; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  15. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Tim J; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  16. The Meiotic Recombination Checkpoint Suppresses NHK-1 Kinase to Prevent Reorganisation of the Oocyte Nucleus in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Oscar M.; Breuer, Manuel; Cullen, C. Fiona; Ito, Takashi; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    The meiotic recombination checkpoint is a signalling pathway that blocks meiotic progression when the repair of DNA breaks formed during recombination is delayed. In comparison to the signalling pathway itself, however, the molecular targets of the checkpoint that control meiotic progression are not well understood in metazoans. In Drosophila, activation of the meiotic checkpoint is known to prevent formation of the karyosome, a meiosis-specific organisation of chromosomes, but the molecular pathway by which this occurs remains to be identified. Here we show that the conserved kinase NHK-1 (Drosophila Vrk-1) is a crucial meiotic regulator controlled by the meiotic checkpoint. An nhk-1 mutation, whilst resulting in karyosome defects, does so independent of meiotic checkpoint activation. Rather, we find unrepaired DNA breaks formed during recombination suppress NHK-1 activity (inferred from the phosphorylation level of one of its substrates) through the meiotic checkpoint. Additionally DNA breaks induced by X-rays in cultured cells also suppress NHK-1 kinase activity. Unrepaired DNA breaks in oocytes also delay other NHK-1 dependent nuclear events, such as synaptonemal complex disassembly and condensin loading onto chromosomes. Therefore we propose that NHK-1 is a crucial regulator of meiosis and that the meiotic checkpoint suppresses NHK-1 activity to prevent oocyte nuclear reorganisation until DNA breaks are repaired. PMID:21060809

  17. Condensin I and II behaviour in interphase nuclei and cells undergoing premature chromosome condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Paulson, James R; Bakhrebah, Muhammed; Kim, Ji Hun; Nowell, Cameron; Kalitsis, Paul; Hudson, Damien F

    2016-05-01

    Condensin is an integral component of the mitotic chromosome condensation machinery, which ensures orderly segregation of chromosomes during cell division. In metazoans, condensin exists as two complexes, condensin I and II. It is not yet clear what roles these complexes may play outside mitosis, and so we have examined their behaviour both in normal interphase and in premature chromosome condensation (PCC). We find that a small fraction of condensin I is retained in interphase nuclei, and our data suggests that this interphase nuclear condensin I is active in both gene regulation and chromosome condensation. Furthermore, live cell imaging demonstrates condensin II dramatically increases on G1 nuclei following completion of mitosis. Our PCC studies show condensins I and II and topoisomerase II localise to the chromosome axis in G1-PCC and G2/M-PCC, while KIF4 binding is altered. Individually, condensins I and II are dispensable for PCC. However, when both are knocked out, G1-PCC chromatids are less well structured. Our results define new roles for the condensins during interphase and provide new information about the mechanism of PCC.

  18. The chromatin remodeling complex Swi/Snf regulates splicing of meiotic transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Stephen; Galivanche, Anoop R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite its relatively streamlined genome, there are important examples of regulated RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, such as splicing of meiotic transcripts. Like other eukaryotes, S. cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic reprogramming of gene expression during meiosis, including regulated splicing of a number of crucial meiosis-specific RNAs. Splicing of a subset of these is dependent upon the splicing activator Mer1. Here we show a crucial role for the chromatin remodeler Swi/Snf in regulation of splicing of meiotic genes and find that the complex affects meiotic splicing in two ways. First, we show that Swi/Snf regulates nutrient-dependent downregulation of ribosomal protein encoding RNAs, leading to the redistribution of spliceosomes from this abundant class of intron-containing RNAs (the ribosomal protein genes) to Mer1-regulated transcripts. We also demonstrate that Mer1 expression is dependent on Snf2, its acetylation state and histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation at the MER1 locus. Hence, Snf2 exerts systems level control of meiotic gene expression through two temporally distinct mechanisms, demonstrating that it is a key regulator of meiotic splicing in S. cerevisiae. We also reveal an evolutionarily conserved mechanism whereby the cell redirects its energy from maintaining its translational capacity to the process of meiosis. PMID:28637241

  19. Selective Regulation of Oocyte Meiotic Events Enhances Progress in Fertility Preservation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Onder; Celik, Nilufer; Gungor, Sami; Haberal, Esra Tustas; Aydin, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Following early embryonic germ cell migration, oocytes are surrounded by somatic cells and remain arrested at diplotene stage until luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Strict regulation of both meiotic arrest and meiotic resumption during dormant stage are critical for future fertility. Inter-cellular signaling system between the somatic compartment and oocyte regulates these meiotic events and determines the follicle quality. As well as the collected number of eggs, their qualities are also important for in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. In spontaneous and IVF cycles, germinal vesicle (GV)–stage oocytes, premature GV breakdown, and persistence of first meiotic arrest limit the reproductive performance. Likewise, both women with premature ovarian aging and young cancer women are undergoing chemoradiotherapy under the risk of follicle loss because of unregulated meiotic events. Understanding of oocyte meiotic events is therefore critical for the prevention of functional ovarian reserve. High levels of cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP), cyclic adenosine monophophate (cAMP) and low phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A enzyme activity inside the oocyte are responsible for maintaining of meiotic arrest before the LH surge. cGMP is produced in the somatic compartment, and natriuretic peptide precursor C (Nppc) and natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (Npr2) regulate its production. cGMP diffuses into the oocyte and reduces the PDE3A activity, which inhibits the conversion of cAMP to the 5′AMP, and cAMP levels are enhanced. In addition, oocyte itself has the ability to produce cAMP. Taken together, accumulation of cAMP inside the oocyte induces protein kinase activity, which leads to the inhibition of maturation-promoting factor and meiotic arrest also continues. By stimulating the expression of epidermal growth factor, LH inhibits the Nppc/Npr2 system, blocks cGMP synthesis, and initiates meiotic resumption. Oocytes lacking the functional of this pathway may lead to persistence

  20. Dyskerin, tRNA genes, and condensin tether pericentric chromatin to the spindle axis in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Snider, Chloe E; Stephens, Andrew D; Kirkland, Jacob G; Hamdani, Omar; Kamakaka, Rohinton T; Bloom, Kerry

    2014-10-27

    Condensin is enriched in the pericentromere of budding yeast chromosomes where it is constrained to the spindle axis in metaphase. Pericentric condensin contributes to chromatin compaction, resistance to microtubule-based spindle forces, and spindle length and variance regulation. Condensin is clustered along the spindle axis in a heterogeneous fashion. We demonstrate that pericentric enrichment of condensin is mediated by interactions with transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) genes and their regulatory factors. This recruitment is important for generating axial tension on the pericentromere and coordinating movement between pericentromeres from different chromosomes. The interaction between condensin and tRNA genes in the pericentromere reveals a feature of yeast centromeres that has profound implications for the function and evolution of mitotic segregation mechanisms. © 2014 Snider et al.

  1. Dyskerin, tRNA genes, and condensin tether pericentric chromatin to the spindle axis in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Chloe E.; Stephens, Andrew D.; Kirkland, Jacob G.; Hamdani, Omar; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2014-01-01

    Condensin is enriched in the pericentromere of budding yeast chromosomes where it is constrained to the spindle axis in metaphase. Pericentric condensin contributes to chromatin compaction, resistance to microtubule-based spindle forces, and spindle length and variance regulation. Condensin is clustered along the spindle axis in a heterogeneous fashion. We demonstrate that pericentric enrichment of condensin is mediated by interactions with transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) genes and their regulatory factors. This recruitment is important for generating axial tension on the pericentromere and coordinating movement between pericentromeres from different chromosomes. The interaction between condensin and tRNA genes in the pericentromere reveals a feature of yeast centromeres that has profound implications for the function and evolution of mitotic segregation mechanisms. PMID:25332162

  2. Regulation of meiotic chromatin loop size by chromosomal position.

    PubMed Central

    Heng, H H; Chamberlain, J W; Shi, X M; Spyropoulos, B; Tsui, L C; Moens, P B

    1996-01-01

    At meiotic prophase, chromatin loops around a proteinaceous core, with the sizes of these loops varying between species. Comparison of the morphology of sequence-related inserts at different sites in transgenic mice demonstrates that loop size also varies with chromosomal geography. Similarly, chromatin loop lengths differ dramatically for interstitially and terminally located hamster telomeric sequences. Sequences, telomeric or otherwise, located at chromosome termini, closely associate with the meiotic proteinaceous core, forming shorter loops than identical interstitial sequences. Thus, we present evidence that different chromatin packaging mechanisms exist for interstitial versus terminal chromosomal regions, which act separately from those operating at the level of the DNA sequence. Chromosomal position plays the dominant role in chromatin packaging. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610120

  3. TDM1 Regulation Determines the Number of Meiotic Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Marta; Jolivet, Sylvie; Cromer, Laurence; Harashima, Hirofumi; Bulankova, Petra; Renne, Charlotte; Crismani, Wayne; Nomura, Yuko; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Keiko; Schnittger, Arp; Riha, Karel; Mercier, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle control must be modified at meiosis to allow two divisions to follow a single round of DNA replication, resulting in ploidy reduction. The mechanisms that ensure meiosis termination at the end of the second and not at the end of first division are poorly understood. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana TDM1, which has been previously shown to be essential for meiotic termination, interacts directly with the Anaphase-Promoting Complex. Further, mutations in TDM1 in a conserved putative Cyclin-Dependant Kinase (CDK) phosphorylation site (T16-P17) dominantly provoked premature meiosis termination after the first division, and the production of diploid spores and gametes. The CDKA;1-CYCA1.2/TAM complex, which is required to prevent premature meiotic exit, phosphorylated TDM1 at T16 in vitro. Finally, while CYCA1;2/TAM was previously shown to be expressed only at meiosis I, TDM1 is present throughout meiosis. These data, together with epistasis analysis, lead us to propose that TDM1 is an APC/C component whose function is to ensure meiosis termination at the end of meiosis II, and whose activity is inhibited at meiosis I by CDKA;1-TAM-mediated phosphorylation to prevent premature meiotic exit. This provides a molecular mechanism for the differential decision of performing an additional round of division, or not, at the end of meiosis I and II, respectively. PMID:26871453

  4. Post-transcriptional regulation of meiotic genes by a nuclear RNA silencing complex

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Emily D.; Braun, Craig R.; Gygi, Steven P.; Moazed, Danesh

    2014-01-01

    RNA is a central component of gene-silencing pathways that regulate diverse cellular processes. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an RNA-based mechanism represses meiotic gene expression during vegetative growth. This pathway depends on the zinc finger protein Red1, which is required to degrade meiotic mRNAs as well as to target histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation, a repressive chromatin mark, to a subset of meiotic genes. However, the mechanism of Red1 function is unknown. Here we use affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify a Red1-containing nuclear RNA silencing (NURS) complex. In addition to Red1, this complex includes the Mtl1, Red5, Ars2, Rmn1, and Iss10 proteins and associates with several other complexes that are involved in either signaling or mediating RNA silencing. By analyzing the effects of gene knockouts and inducible knockdown alleles, we show that NURS subunits regulate RNA degradation and H3K9 methylation at meiotic genes. We also identify roles for individual NURS subunits in interactions with Mmi1, an RNA-binding protein that marks meiotic RNAs for destruction, and the nuclear exosome RNA degradation complex. Finally, we show that the levels of H3K9 methylation at meiotic genes are not sufficient to restrict RNA polymerase II access or repress gene expression during vegetative growth. Our results demonstrate that Red1 partners with other proteins to silence meiotic gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Conservation of a NURS-like complex in human cells suggests that this pathway plays an ancient and fundamental role in RNA silencing. PMID:24713849

  5. SCFSlimb ubiquitin ligase suppresses condensin II–mediated nuclear reorganization by degrading Cap-H2

    PubMed Central

    Buster, Daniel W.; Daniel, Scott G.; Nguyen, Huy Q.; Windler, Sarah L.; Skwarek, Lara C.; Peterson, Maureen; Roberts, Meredith; Meserve, Joy H.; Hartl, Tom; Klebba, Joseph E.; Bilder, David; Bosco, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Condensin complexes play vital roles in chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis. Condensin II uniquely localizes to chromatin throughout the cell cycle and, in addition to its mitotic duties, modulates chromosome organization and gene expression during interphase. Mitotic condensin activity is regulated by phosphorylation, but mechanisms that regulate condensin II during interphase are unclear. Here, we report that condensin II is inactivated when its subunit Cap-H2 is targeted for degradation by the SCFSlimb ubiquitin ligase complex and that disruption of this process dramatically changed interphase chromatin organization. Inhibition of SCFSlimb function reorganized interphase chromosomes into dense, compact domains and disrupted homologue pairing in both cultured Drosophila cells and in vivo, but these effects were rescued by condensin II inactivation. Furthermore, Cap-H2 stabilization distorted nuclear envelopes and dispersed Cid/CENP-A on interphase chromosomes. Therefore, SCFSlimb-mediated down-regulation of condensin II is required to maintain proper organization and morphology of the interphase nucleus. PMID:23530065

  6. LSD1 is essential for oocyte meiotic progression by regulating CDC25B expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeesun; Singh, Anup Kumar; Takata, Yoko; Lin, Kevin; Shen, Jianjun; Lu, Yue; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Chen, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at prophase I until puberty when hormonal signals induce the resumption of meiosis I and progression to meiosis II. Meiotic progression is controlled by CDK1 activity and is accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. Although the signalling pathways regulating CDK1 activity are well defined, the functional significance of epigenetic changes remains largely unknown. Here we show that LSD1, a lysine demethylase, regulates histone H3 lysine 4 di-methylation (H3K4me2) in mouse oocytes and is essential for meiotic progression. Conditional deletion of Lsd1 in growing oocytes results in precocious resumption of meiosis and spindle and chromosomal abnormalities. Consequently, most Lsd1-null oocytes fail to complete meiosis I and undergo apoptosis. Mechanistically, upregulation of CDC25B, a phosphatase that activates CDK1, is responsible for precocious meiotic resumption and also contributes to subsequent spindle and chromosomal defects. Our findings uncover a functional link between LSD1 and the major signalling pathway governing meiotic progression. PMID:26626423

  7. LSD1 is essential for oocyte meiotic progression by regulating CDC25B expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesun; Singh, Anup Kumar; Takata, Yoko; Lin, Kevin; Shen, Jianjun; Lu, Yue; Kerenyi, Marc A; Orkin, Stuart H; Chen, Taiping

    2015-12-02

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at prophase I until puberty when hormonal signals induce the resumption of meiosis I and progression to meiosis II. Meiotic progression is controlled by CDK1 activity and is accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. Although the signalling pathways regulating CDK1 activity are well defined, the functional significance of epigenetic changes remains largely unknown. Here we show that LSD1, a lysine demethylase, regulates histone H3 lysine 4 di-methylation (H3K4me2) in mouse oocytes and is essential for meiotic progression. Conditional deletion of Lsd1 in growing oocytes results in precocious resumption of meiosis and spindle and chromosomal abnormalities. Consequently, most Lsd1-null oocytes fail to complete meiosis I and undergo apoptosis. Mechanistically, upregulation of CDC25B, a phosphatase that activates CDK1, is responsible for precocious meiotic resumption and also contributes to subsequent spindle and chromosomal defects. Our findings uncover a functional link between LSD1 and the major signalling pathway governing meiotic progression.

  8. ATR acts stage specifically to regulate multiple aspects of mammalian meiotic silencing.

    PubMed

    Royo, Hélène; Prosser, Haydn; Ruzankina, Yaroslava; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Baumann, Marek; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Höög, Christer; Tóth, Attila; de Rooij, Dirk G; Bradley, Allan; Brown, Eric J; Turner, James M A

    2013-07-01

    In mammals, homologs that fail to synapse during meiosis are transcriptionally inactivated. This process, meiotic silencing, drives inactivation of the heterologous XY bivalent in male germ cells (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation [MSCI]) and is thought to act as a meiotic surveillance mechanism. The checkpoint protein ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) localizes to unsynapsed chromosomes, but its role in the initiation and maintenance of meiotic silencing is unknown. Here we show that ATR has multiple roles in silencing. ATR first regulates HORMA (Hop1, Rev7, and Mad2) domain protein HORMAD1/2 phosphorylation and localization of breast cancer I (BRCA1) and ATR cofactors ATR-interacting peptide (ATRIP)/topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) at unsynapsed axes. Later, it acts as an adaptor, transducing signaling at unsynapsed axes into surrounding chromatin in a manner that requires interdependence with mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and H2AFX. Finally, ATR catalyzes histone H2AFX phosphorylation, the epigenetic event leading to gene inactivation. Using a novel genetic strategy in which MSCI is used to silence a chosen gene in pachytene, we show that ATR depletion does not disrupt the maintenance of silencing and that silencing comprises two phases: The first is dynamic and reversible, and the second is stable and irreversible. Our work identifies a role for ATR in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and presents a new technique for ablating gene function in the germline.

  9. Calcium Signaling During Meiotic Cell Cycle Regulation and Apoptosis in Mammalian Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2017-05-01

    Calcium (Ca(++) ) is one of the major signal molecules that regulate various aspects of cell functions including cell cycle progression, arrest, and apoptosis in wide variety of cells. This review summarizes current knowledge on the differential roles of Ca(++) in meiotic cell cycle resumption, arrest, and apoptosis in mammalian oocytes. Release of Ca(++) from internal stores and/or Ca(++) influx from extracellular medium causes moderate increase of intracellular Ca(++) ([Ca(++) ]i) level and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increase of Ca(++) as well as ROS levels under physiological range trigger maturation promoting factor (MPF) destabilization, thereby meiotic resumption from diplotene as well as metaphase-II (M-II) arrest in oocytes. A sustained increase of [Ca(++) ]i level beyond physiological range induces generation of ROS sufficient enough to cause oxidative stress (OS) in aging oocytes. The increased [Ca(++) ]i triggers Fas ligand-mediated oocyte apoptosis. Further, OS triggers mitochondria-mediated oocyte apoptosis in several mammalian species. Thus, Ca(++) exerts differential roles on oocyte physiology depending upon its intracellular concentration. A moderate increase of [Ca(++) ]i as well as ROS mediate spontaneous resumption of meiosis from diplotene as well as M-II arrest, while their high levels cause meiotic cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by operating both mitochondria- as well as Fas ligand-mediated apoptotic pathways. Indeed, Ca(++) regulates cellular physiology by modulating meiotic cell cycle and apoptosis in mammalian oocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 976-981, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Condensin-Driven Remodeling of X-Chromosome Topology during Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure1,2. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, FISH, and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive 3D maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X-chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half3–7. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes5,6. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian Topologically Associating Domains (TADs)8,9. TADs on X have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using CRISPR/Cas9 greatly diminished the boundary. Thus, the DCC imposes a distinct

  11. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R; Wheeler, Bayly S; Ralston, Edward J; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J

    2015-07-09

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (∼1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  12. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  13. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  14. The fission yeast meiotic checkpoint kinase Mek1 regulates nuclear localization of Cdc25 by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio; San-Segundo, Pedro A

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, fidelity in transmission of genetic information during cell division is ensured by the action of cell cycle checkpoints. Checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that arrest or delay cell cycle progression when critical cellular processes are defective or when the genome is damaged. During meiosis, the so-called meiotic recombination checkpoint blocks entry into meiosis I until recombination has been completed, thus avoiding aberrant chromosome segregation and the formation of aneuploid gametes. One of the key components of the meiotic recombination checkpoint is the meiosis-specific Mek1 kinase, which belongs to the family of Rad53/Cds1/Chk2 checkpoint kinases containing forkhead-associated domains. In fission yeast, several lines of evidence suggest that Mek1 targets the critical cell cycle regulator Cdc25 to delay meiotic cell cycle progression. Here, we investigate in more detail the molecular mechanism of action of the fission yeast Mek1 protein. We demonstrate that Mek1 acts independently of Cds1 to phosphorylate Cdc25, and this phosphorylation is required to trigger cell cycle arrest. Using ectopic overexpression of mek1(+) as a tool to induce in vivo activation of Mek1, we find that Mek1 promotes cytoplasmic accumulation of Cdc25 and results in prolonged phosphorylation of Cdc2 at tyrosine 15. We propose that at least one of the mechanisms contributing to the cell cycle delay when the meiotic recombination checkpoint is activated in fission yeast is the nuclear exclusion of the Cdc25 phosphatase by Mek1-dependent phosphorylation.

  15. Negative regulation of meiotic gene expression by the nuclear poly(a)-binding protein in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    St-André, Olivier; Lemieux, Caroline; Perreault, Audrey; Lackner, Daniel H; Bähler, Jürg; Bachand, François

    2010-09-03

    Meiosis is a cellular differentiation process in which hundreds of genes are temporally induced. Because the expression of meiotic genes during mitosis is detrimental to proliferation, meiotic genes must be negatively regulated in the mitotic cell cycle. Yet, little is known about mechanisms used by mitotic cells to repress meiosis-specific genes. Here we show that the poly(A)-binding protein Pab2, the fission yeast homolog of mammalian PABPN1, controls the expression of several meiotic transcripts during mitotic division. Our results from chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter-swapping experiments indicate that Pab2 controls meiotic genes post-transcriptionally. Consistently, we show that the nuclear exosome complex cooperates with Pab2 in the negative regulation of meiotic genes. We also found that Pab2 plays a role in the RNA decay pathway orchestrated by Mmi1, a previously described factor that functions in the post-transcriptional elimination of meiotic transcripts. Our results support a model in which Mmi1 selectively targets meiotic transcripts for degradation via Pab2 and the exosome. Our findings have therefore uncovered a mode of gene regulation whereby a poly(A)-binding protein promotes RNA degradation in the nucleus to prevent untimely expression.

  16. Mek1/Mre4 is a master regulator of meiotic recombination in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2016-01-01

    Sexually reproducing organisms create gametes with half the somatic cell chromosome number so that fusion of gametes at fertilization does not change the ploidy of the cell. This reduction in chromosome number occurs by the specialized cell division of meiosis in which two rounds of chromosome segregation follow a single round of chromosome duplication. Meiotic crossovers formed between the non-sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes, combined with sister chromatid cohesion, physically connect homologs, thereby allowing proper segregation at the first meiotic division. Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) whose repair is highly regulated such that (1) there is a bias for recombination with homologs rather than sister chromatids, (2) crossovers are distributed throughout the genome by a process called interference, (3) crossover homeostasis regulates the balance between crossover and non-crossover repair to maintain a critical number of crossovers and (4) each pair of homologs receives at least one crossover. It was previously known that the imposition of interhomolog bias in budding yeast requires meiosis-specific modifications to the DNA damage response and the local activation of the meiosis-specific Mek1/Mre4 (hereafter Mek1) kinase at DSBs. However, because inactivation of Mek1 results in intersister, rather than interhomolog DSB repair, whether Mek1 had a role in interhomolog pathway choice was unknown. A recent study by Chen et al. (2015) reveals that Mek1 indirectly regulates the crossover/non-crossover decision between homologs as well as genetic interference. It does this by enabling phosphorylation of Zip1, the meiosis-specific transverse filament protein of the synaptonemal complex (SC), by the conserved cell cycle kinase, Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK). These results suggest that Mek1 is a “master regulator” of meiotic recombination in budding yeast.

  17. A developmentally regulated translational control pathway establishes the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern

    PubMed Central

    Berchowitz, Luke E.; Gajadhar, Aaron S.; van Werven, Folkert J.; De Rosa, Alexandra A.; Samoylova, Mariya L.; Brar, Gloria A.; Xu, Yifeng; Xiao, Che; Futcher, Bruce; Weissman, Jonathan S.; White, Forest M.; Amon, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Production of haploid gametes from diploid progenitor cells is mediated by a specialized cell division, meiosis, where two divisions, meiosis I and II, follow a single S phase. Errors in progression from meiosis I to meiosis II lead to aneuploid and polyploid gametes, but the regulatory mechanisms controlling this transition are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the conserved kinase Ime2 regulates the timing and order of the meiotic divisions by controlling translation. Ime2 coordinates translational activation of a cluster of genes at the meiosis I–meiosis II transition, including the critical determinant of the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern CLB3. We further show that Ime2 mediates translational control through the meiosis-specific RNA-binding protein Rim4. Rim4 inhibits translation of CLB3 during meiosis I by interacting with the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of CLB3. At the onset of meiosis II, Ime2 kinase activity rises and triggers a decrease in Rim4 protein levels, thereby alleviating translational repression. Our results elucidate a novel developmentally regulated translational control pathway that establishes the meiotic chromosome segregation pattern. PMID:24115771

  18. Spindle assembly checkpoint proteins regulate and monitor meiotic synapsis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Tisha; Nelson, Christian R.; Klee, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Homologue synapsis is required for meiotic chromosome segregation, but how synapsis is initiated between chromosomes is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, synapsis and a checkpoint that monitors synapsis depend on pairing centers (PCs), cis-acting loci that interact with nuclear envelope proteins, such as SUN-1, to access cytoplasmic microtubules. Here, we report that spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) components MAD-1, MAD-2, and BUB-3 are required to negatively regulate synapsis and promote the synapsis checkpoint response. Both of these roles are independent of a conserved component of the anaphase-promoting complex, indicating a unique role for these proteins in meiotic prophase. MAD-1 and MAD-2 localize to the periphery of meiotic nuclei and interact with SUN-1, suggesting a role at PCs. Consistent with this idea, MAD-1 and BUB-3 require full PC function to inhibit synapsis. We propose that SAC proteins monitor the stability of pairing, or tension, between homologues to regulate synapsis and elicit a checkpoint response. PMID:26483555

  19. Contrasting roles of condensin I and condensin II in mitotic chromosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lydia C.; Kalitsis, Paul; Chang, Tsz M.; Cipetic, Miri; Kim, Ji Hun; Marshall, Owen; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Vagnarelli, Paola; Samejima, Kumiko; Earnshaw, William C.; Choo, K. H. Andy; Hudson, Damien F.

    2012-01-01

    In vertebrates, two condensin complexes exist, condensin I and condensin II, which have differing but unresolved roles in organizing mitotic chromosomes. To dissect accurately the role of each complex in mitosis, we have made and studied the first vertebrate conditional knockouts of the genes encoding condensin I subunit CAP-H and condensin II subunit CAP-D3 in chicken DT40 cells. Live-cell imaging reveals highly distinct segregation defects. CAP-D3 (condensin II) knockout results in masses of chromatin-containing anaphase bridges. CAP-H (condensin I)-knockout anaphases have a more subtle defect, with chromatids showing fine chromatin fibres that are associated with failure of cytokinesis and cell death. Super-resolution microscopy reveals that condensin-I-depleted mitotic chromosomes are wider and shorter, with a diffuse chromosome scaffold, whereas condensin-II-depleted chromosomes retain a more defined scaffold, with chromosomes more stretched and seemingly lacking in axial rigidity. We conclude that condensin II is required primarily to provide rigidity by establishing an initial chromosome axis around which condensin I can arrange loops of chromatin. PMID:22344259

  20. Stag3 regulates microtubule stability to maintain euploidy during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mianqun; Dai, Xiaoxin; Sun, Yalu; Lu, Yajuan; Zhou, Changyin; Miao, Yilong; Wang, Ying; Xiong, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Stag3, a meiosis-specific subunit of cohesin complex, has been demonstrated to function in both male and female reproductive systems in mammals. However, its roles during oocyte meiotic maturation have not been fully defined. In the present study, we report that Stag3 uniquely accumulates on the spindle apparatus and colocalizes with microtubule fibers during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Depletion of Stag3 by gene-targeting morpholino disrupts normal spindle assembly and chromosome alignment in oocytes. We also find that depletion of Stag3 reduces the acetylated level of tubulin and microtubule resistance to microtubule depolymerizing drug, suggesting that Stag3 is required for microtubule stability. Consistent with these observations, kinetochore-microtubule attachment, an important mechanism controlling chromosome alignment, is severely impaired in Stag3-depleted oocytes, resultantly causing the significantly increased incidence of aneuploid eggs. Collectively, our data reveal that Stag3 is a novel regulator of microtubule dynamics to ensure euploidy during moue oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27906670

  1. Kif2a regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zi-Yun; Ma, Xue-Shan; Liang, Qiu-Xia; Zhang, Teng; Xu, Zhao-Yang; Meng, Tie-Gang; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Quan, Song

    2016-01-01

    Kif2a is a member of the Kinesin-13 microtubule depolymerases. Here, we report the expression, subcellular localization and functions of Kif2a during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Immunoblotting analysis showed that Kif2a was gradually increased form GV to the M I stages, and then decreased slightly at the M II stage. Confocal microscopy identified that Kif2a localized to the meiotic spindle, especially concentrated at the spindle poles and inner centromeres in metaphase and translocated to the midbody at telophase. Kif2a depletion by siRNA microinjection generated severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, reduced microtubule depolymerization, which led to significant pro-M I/M Iarrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Kif2a-depleted oocytes were also defective in spindle pole localization of γ-tubulin and showed spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protein Bub3 at the kinetochores even after 10 hr extended culture. These results demonstrate that Kif2a may act as a microtubule depolymerase, regulating microtubule dynamics, spindle assembly and chromosome congression, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27991495

  2. H2B ubiquitination regulates meiotic recombination by promoting chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiliang; Song, Zhenhua; Li, Guoping; Tu, Huayu; Liu, Weixiao; Liu, Yujiao; Wang, Pan; Wang, Yuanting; Cui, Xiuhong; Liu, Chao; Shang, Yongliang; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Gao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is essential for fertility in most sexually reproducing species, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood in mammals. Here, we show that RNF20-mediated H2B ubiquitination is required for meiotic recombination. A germ cell-specific knockout of the H2B ubiquitination E3 ligase RNF20 results in complete male infertility. The Stra8-Rnf20−/− spermatocytes arrest at the pachytene stage because of impaired programmed double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further investigations reveal that the depletion of RNF20 in the germ cells affects chromatin relaxation, thus preventing programmed DSB repair factors from being recruited to proper positions on the chromatin. The gametogenetic defects of the H2B ubiquitination deficient cells could be partially rescued by forced chromatin relaxation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RNF20/Bre1p-mediated H2B ubiquitination regulates meiotic recombination by promoting chromatin relaxation, and suggest an old drug may provide a new way to treat some oligo- or azoospermia patients with chromatin relaxation disorders. PMID:27431324

  3. Monopolin recruits condensin to organize centromere DNA and repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Laura S.; Applen Clancey, Shelly E.; Chacón, Jeremy M.; Gardner, Melissa K.; Berman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of higher-order structure at centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. The monopolin complex is thought to cross-link multiple kinetochore complexes to prevent merotelic attachments that result in chromosome missegregation. This model is based on structural analysis and the requirement that monopolin execute mitotic and meiotic chromosome segregation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has more than one kinetochore–microtubule attachment/centromere, and co-orient sister chromatids in meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent data from S. pombe suggest an alternative possibility: that the recruitment of condensin is the primary function of monopolin. Here we test these models using the yeast Candida albicans. C. albicans cells lacking monopolin exhibit defects in chromosome segregation, increased distance between centromeres, and decreased stability of several types of repeat DNA. Of note, changing kinetochore–microtubule copy number from one to more than one kinetochore–microtubule/centromere does not alter the requirement for monopolin. Furthermore, monopolin recruits condensin to C. albicans centromeres, and overexpression of condensin suppresses chromosome segregation defects in strains lacking monopolin. We propose that the key function of monopolin is to recruit condensin in order to promote the assembly of higher-order structure at centromere and repetitive DNA. PMID:23885115

  4. Signaling-Mediated Regulation of Meiotic Prophase I and Transition During Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Generation of healthy oocytes requires coordinated regulation of multiple cellular events and signaling pathways. Oocytes undergo a unique developmental growth and differentiation pattern interspersed with long periods of arrest. Oocytes from almost all species arrest in prophase I of oogenesis that allows for long period of growth and differentiation essential for normal oocyte development. Depending on species, oocytes that transit from prophase I to meiosis I also arrest at meiosis I for fairly long periods of time and then undergo a second arrest at meiosis II that is completed upon fertilization. While there are species-specific differences in C. elegans, D. melanogaster, and mammalian oocytes in stages of prophase I, meiosis I, or meiosis II arrest, in all cases cell signaling pathways coordinate the developmental events controlling oocyte growth and differentiation to regulate these crucial phases of transition. In particular, the ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway, cyclic AMP second messengers, and the cell cycle regulators CDK1/cyclin B are key signaling pathways that seem evolutionarily conserved in their control of oocyte growth and meiotic maturation across species. Here, I identify the common themes and differences in the regulation of key meiotic events during oocyte growth and maturation. PMID:28247047

  5. New paradigms for conserved, multifactorial, cis-acting regulation of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wahls, Wayne P.; Davidson, Mari K.

    2012-01-01

    How do cells position the Spo11 (Rec12)-dependent initiation of meiotic recombination at hotspots? The mechanisms are poorly understood and a prevailing view is that they differ substantially between phylogenetic groups. However, recent work discovered that individual species have multiple different DNA sequence-specific, protein–DNA complexes that regulate (and are essential for the activation of) recombination hotspots. The cis-acting elements function combinatorially with documented examples of synergism, antagonism and redundancy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that all currently well-defined modules of this multifactorial, cis-acting regulation are conserved functionally between taxa whose latest common ancestor occurred more than 1 billion years ago. Functionally conserved components include the ATF/CREB-family heterodimer Atf1-Pcr1 and its CRE-like DNA site M26, the CCAAT-box-binding complex Php2-Php3-Php5 and the CCAAT-box, and the zinc-finger protein Rst2 and its Oligo-C motif. The newfound multiplicity, functional redundancy and conservation of cis-acting controls constitute a paradigm shift with broad implications. They provide compelling evidence that most meiotic recombination is, like transcription, regulated by sequence-specific protein–DNA complexes. And the new findings provide important mechanistic insight, such as a solution to the conundrum that Prdm9 is a ‘master regulator’ of—yet is dispensable for—hotspot activity in mammals. PMID:22904082

  6. Distinct regulators for Plk1 activation in starfish meiotic and early embryonic cycles

    PubMed Central

    Okano-Uchida, Takayuki; Okumura, Eiichi; Iwashita, Motoko; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Tachibana, Kazunori; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2003-01-01

    The Polo-like kinase, Plk, has multiple roles in regulating mitosis. In particular, Plk1 has been postulated to function as a trigger kinase that phosphorylates and activates Cdc25C prior to the activation of cyclin B–Cdc2 and thereby initiates its activation. However, the upstream regulation of Plk1 activation remains unclear. Here we have studied the interplay between Plk1 and Cdc2 through meiotic and early embryonic cycles in starfish. Distinct kinases, cyclin B–Cdc2, MAPK along with cyclin B– and/or cyclin A–Cdc2 and cyclin A–Cdc2, were unique upstream regulators for Plk1 activation at meiosis I, meiosis II and embryonic M-phase, respectively, indicating that Plk1 is not the trigger kinase at meiotic reinitiation. When Plk1 was required for cyclin B–Cdc2 activation, the action of Plk1 was mediated primarily through suppression of Myt1 rather than through activation of Cdc25. We propose that Plk1 can be activated by either cyclin A– or cyclin B–Cdc2, and its primary target is Myt1. PMID:14532135

  7. Condensin Smc2-Smc4 Dimers Are Flexible and Dynamic.

    PubMed

    Eeftens, Jorine M; Katan, Allard J; Kschonsak, Marc; Hassler, Markus; de Wilde, Liza; Dief, Essam M; Haering, Christian H; Dekker, Cees

    2016-03-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, including cohesin and condensin, play key roles in the regulation of higher-order chromosome organization. Even though SMC proteins are thought to mechanistically determine the function of the complexes, their native conformations and dynamics have remained unclear. Here, we probe the topology of Smc2-Smc4 dimers of the S. cerevisiae condensin complex with high-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid. We show that the Smc2-Smc4 coiled coils are highly flexible polymers with a persistence length of only ∼ 4 nm. Moreover, we demonstrate that the SMC dimers can adopt various architectures that interconvert dynamically over time, and we find that the SMC head domains engage not only with each other, but also with the hinge domain situated at the other end of the ∼ 45-nm-long coiled coil. Our findings reveal structural properties that provide insights into the molecular mechanics of condensin complexes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids.

    PubMed

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2012-12-15

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation.

  9. RNF8 regulates active epigenetic modifications and escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Ho-Su; Barski, Artem; Zhang, Fan; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Chen, Junjie; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.

    2012-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are uniquely subject to chromosome-wide silencing during male meiosis, and silencing persists into post-meiotic spermatids. Against this background, a select set of sex chromosome-linked genes escapes silencing and is activated in post-meiotic spermatids. Here, we identify a novel mechanism that regulates escape gene activation in an environment of chromosome-wide silencing in murine germ cells. We show that RNF8-dependent ubiquitination of histone H2A during meiosis establishes active epigenetic modifications, including dimethylation of H3K4 on the sex chromosomes. RNF8-dependent active epigenetic memory, defined by dimethylation of H3K4, persists throughout meiotic division. Various active epigenetic modifications are subsequently established on the sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. These RNF8-dependent modifications include trimethylation of H3K4, histone lysine crotonylation (Kcr), and incorporation of the histone variant H2AFZ. RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming regulates escape gene activation from inactive sex chromosomes in post-meiotic spermatids. Kcr accumulates at transcriptional start sites of sex-linked genes activated in an RNF8-dependent manner, and a chromatin conformational change is associated with RNF8-dependent epigenetic programming. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this RNF8-dependent pathway is distinct from that which recognizes DNA double-strand breaks. Our results establish a novel connection between a DNA damage response factor (RNF8) and epigenetic programming, specifically in establishing active epigenetic modifications and gene activation. PMID:23249736

  10. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity. PMID:27494704

  11. Cdc7-Dbf4 is a gene-specific regulator of meiotic transcription in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Kunz, Ryan C; Chen, Xiangyu; Marullo, Allison; Gygi, Steven P; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis divides the chromosome number of the cell in half by having two rounds of chromosome segregation follow a single round of chromosome duplication. The first meiotic division is unique in that homologous pairs of sister chromatids segregate to opposite poles. Recent work in budding and fission yeast has shown that the cell cycle kinase, Cdc7-Dbf4, is required for many meiosis-specific chromosomal functions necessary for proper disjunction at meiosis I. This work reveals another role for Cdc7 in meiosis as a gene-specific regulator of the global transcription factor, Ndt80, which is required for exit from pachytene and entry into the meiotic divisions in budding yeast. Cdc7-Dbf4 promotes NDT80 transcription by relieving repression mediated by a complex of Sum1, Rfm1, and a histone deacetylase, Hst1. Sum1 exhibits meiosis-specific Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation, and mass spectrometry analysis reveals a dynamic and complex pattern of phosphorylation events, including four constitutive cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1) sites and 11 meiosis-specific Cdc7-Dbf4-dependent sites. Analysis of various phosphorylation site mutants suggests that Cdc7 functions with both Cdk1 and the meiosis-specific kinase Ime2 to control this critical transition point during meiosis.

  12. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity.

  13. The synaptonemal complex has liquid crystalline properties and spatially regulates meiotic recombination factors

    PubMed Central

    Rog, Ofer; Köhler, Simone; Dernburg, Abby F

    2017-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a polymer that spans ~100 nm between paired homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Its striated, periodic appearance in electron micrographs led to the idea that transverse filaments within this structure ‘crosslink’ the axes of homologous chromosomes, stabilizing their pairing. SC proteins can also form polycomplexes, three-dimensional lattices that recapitulate the periodic structure of SCs but do not associate with chromosomes. Here we provide evidence that SCs and polycomplexes contain mobile subunits and that their assembly is promoted by weak hydrophobic interactions, indicative of a liquid crystalline phase. We further show that in the absence of recombination intermediates, polycomplexes recapitulate the dynamic localization of pro-crossover factors during meiotic progression, revealing how the SC might act as a conduit to regulate chromosome-wide crossover distribution. Properties unique to liquid crystals likely enable long-range signal transduction along meiotic chromosomes and underlie the rapid evolution of SC proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21455.001 PMID:28045371

  14. Functional Dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin Subunit Cap-G Reveals Its Exclusive Association with Condensin I

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Sabine; Nagarkar Jaiswal, Sonal; Urban, Evelin; Riemer, Anna; Fischer, Sina; Heidmann, Stefan K.

    2013-01-01

    The heteropentameric condensin complexes have been shown to participate in mitotic chromosome condensation and to be required for unperturbed chromatid segregation in nuclear divisions. Vertebrates have two condensin complexes, condensin I and condensin II, which contain the same structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits SMC2 and SMC4, but differ in their composition of non–SMC subunits. While a clear biochemical and functional distinction between condensin I and condensin II has been established in vertebrates, the situation in Drosophila melanogaster is less defined. Since Drosophila lacks a clear homolog for the condensin II–specific subunit Cap-G2, the condensin I subunit Cap-G has been hypothesized to be part of both complexes. In vivo microscopy revealed that a functional Cap-G-EGFP variant shows a distinct nuclear enrichment during interphase, which is reminiscent of condensin II localization in vertebrates and contrasts with the cytoplasmic enrichment observed for the other EGFP-fused condensin I subunits. However, we show that this nuclear localization is dispensable for Cap-G chromatin association, for its assembly into the condensin I complex and, importantly, for development into a viable and fertile adult animal. Immunoprecipitation analyses and complex formation studies provide evidence that Cap-G does not associate with condensin II–specific subunits, while it can be readily detected in complexes with condensin I–specific proteins in vitro and in vivo. Mass-spectrometric analyses of proteins associated with the condensin II–specific subunit Cap-H2 not only fail to identify Cap-G but also the other known condensin II–specific homolog Cap-D3. As condensin II–specific subunits are also not found associated with SMC2, our results question the existence of a soluble condensin II complex in Drosophila. PMID:23637630

  15. Targeted induction of meiotic double-strand breaks reveals chromosomal domain-dependent regulation of Spo11 and interactions among potential sites of meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Kugou, Kazuto; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2008-02-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation mediated by Spo11. DSBs occur with frequency in chromosomal regions called hot domains but are seldom seen in cold domains. To obtain insights into the determinants of the distribution of meiotic DSBs, we examined the effects of inducing targeted DSBs during yeast meiosis using a UAS-directed form of Spo11 (Gal4BD-Spo11) and a meiosis-specific endonuclease, VDE (PI-SceI). Gal4BD-Spo11 cleaved its target sequence (UAS) integrated in hot domains but rarely in cold domains. However, Gal4BD-Spo11 did bind to UAS and VDE efficiently cleaved its recognition sequence in either context, suggesting that a cold domain is not a region of inaccessible or uncleavable chromosome structure. Importantly, self-association of Spo11 occurred at UAS in a hot domain but not in a cold domain, raising the possibility that Spo11 remains in an inactive intermediate state in cold domains. Integration of UAS adjacent to known DSB hotspots allowed us to detect competitive interactions among hotspots for activation. Moreover, the presence of VDE-introduced DSB repressed proximal hotspot activity, implicating DSBs themselves in interactions among hotspots. Thus, potential sites for Spo11-mediated DSB are subject to domain-specific and local competitive regulations during and after DSB formation.

  16. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Amy M; Brockway, Heather M; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S; Jones, Steven J M; Colaiácovo, Monica P; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-04-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure.

  17. Coordination of Recombination with Meiotic Progression in the Caenorhabditis elegans Germline by KIN-18, a TAO Kinase That Regulates the Timing of MPK-1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yizhi; Donlevy, Sean; Smolikove, Sarit

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a tightly regulated process requiring coordination of diverse events. A conserved ERK/MAPK-signaling cascade plays an essential role in the regulation of meiotic progression. The Thousand And One kinase (TAO) kinase is a MAPK kinase kinase, the meiotic role of which is unknown. We have analyzed the meiotic functions of KIN-18, the homolog of mammalian TAO kinases, in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that KIN-18 is essential for normal meiotic progression; mutants exhibit accelerated meiotic recombination as detected both by analysis of recombination intermediates and by crossover outcome. In addition, ectopic germ-cell differentiation and enhanced levels of apoptosis were observed in kin-18 mutants. These defects correlate with ectopic activation of MPK-1 that includes premature, missing, and reoccurring MPK-1 activation. Late progression defects in kin-18 mutants are suppressed by inhibiting an upstream activator of MPK-1 signaling, KSR-2. However, the acceleration of recombination events observed in kin-18 mutants is largely MPK-1-independent. Our data suggest that KIN-18 coordinates meiotic progression by modulating the timing of MPK-1 activation and the progression of recombination events. The regulation of the timing of MPK-1 activation ensures the proper timing of apoptosis and is required for the formation of functional oocytes. Meiosis is a conserved process; thus, revealing that KIN-18 is a novel regulator of meiotic progression in C. elegans would help to elucidate TAO kinase’s role in germline development in higher eukaryotes. PMID:26510792

  18. Coordination of Recombination with Meiotic Progression in the Caenorhabditis elegans Germline by KIN-18, a TAO Kinase That Regulates the Timing of MPK-1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yizhi; Donlevy, Sean; Smolikove, Sarit

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a tightly regulated process requiring coordination of diverse events. A conserved ERK/MAPK-signaling cascade plays an essential role in the regulation of meiotic progression. The Thousand And One kinase (TAO) kinase is a MAPK kinase kinase, the meiotic role of which is unknown. We have analyzed the meiotic functions of KIN-18, the homolog of mammalian TAO kinases, in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that KIN-18 is essential for normal meiotic progression; mutants exhibit accelerated meiotic recombination as detected both by analysis of recombination intermediates and by crossover outcome. In addition, ectopic germ-cell differentiation and enhanced levels of apoptosis were observed in kin-18 mutants. These defects correlate with ectopic activation of MPK-1 that includes premature, missing, and reoccurring MPK-1 activation. Late progression defects in kin-18 mutants are suppressed by inhibiting an upstream activator of MPK-1 signaling, KSR-2. However, the acceleration of recombination events observed in kin-18 mutants is largely MPK-1-independent. Our data suggest that KIN-18 coordinates meiotic progression by modulating the timing of MPK-1 activation and the progression of recombination events. The regulation of the timing of MPK-1 activation ensures the proper timing of apoptosis and is required for the formation of functional oocytes. Meiosis is a conserved process; thus, revealing that KIN-18 is a novel regulator of meiotic progression in C. elegans would help to elucidate TAO kinase's role in germline development in higher eukaryotes. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Diverse Mitotic and Interphase Functions of Condensins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cobbe, Neville; Savvidou, Ellada; Heck, Margarete M. S.

    2006-01-01

    The condensin complex has been implicated in the higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes in a host of model eukaryotes from yeasts to flies and vertebrates. Although chromosomes paradoxically appear to condense in condensin mutants, chromatids are not properly resolved, resulting in chromosome segregation defects during anaphase. We have examined the role of different condensin complex components in interphase chromatin function by examining the effects of various condensin mutations on position-effect variegation in Drosophila melanogaster. Surprisingly, most mutations affecting condensin proteins were often found to result in strong enhancement of variegation in contrast to what might be expected for proteins believed to compact the genome. This suggests either that the role of condensin proteins in interphase differs from their expected role in mitosis or that the way we envision condensin's activity needs to be modified to accommodate alternative possibilities. PMID:16272408

  20. PHS1 regulates meiotic recombination and homologous chromosome pairing by controlling the transport of RAD50 to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ronceret, Arnaud; Doutriaux, Marie-Pascale; Golubovskaya, Inna N; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2009-11-24

    Recombination and pairing of homologous chromosomes are critical for bivalent formation in meiotic prophase. In many organisms, including yeast, mammals, and plants, pairing and recombination are intimately interconnected. The POOR HOMOLOGOUS SYNAPSIS1 (PHS1) gene acts in coordination of chromosome pairing and early recombination steps in plants, ensuring pairing fidelity and proper repair of meiotic DNA double-strand-breaks. In phs1 mutants, chromosomes exhibit early recombination defects and frequently associate with non-homologous partners, instead of pairing with their proper homologs. Here, we show that the product of the PHS1 gene is a cytoplasmic protein that functions by controlling transport of RAD50 from cytoplasm to the nucleus. RAD50 is a component of the MRN protein complex that processes meiotic double-strand-breaks to produce single-stranded DNA ends, which act in the homology search and recombination. We demonstrate that PHS1 plays the same role in homologous pairing in both Arabidopsis and maize, whose genomes differ dramatically in size and repetitive element content. This suggests that PHS1 affects pairing of the gene-rich fraction of the genome rather than preventing pairing between repetitive DNA elements. We propose that PHS1 is part of a system that regulates the progression of meiotic prophase by controlling entry of meiotic proteins into the nucleus. We also document that in phs1 mutants in Arabidopsis, centromeres interact before pairing commences along chromosome arms. Centromere coupling was previously observed in yeast and polyploid wheat while our data suggest that it may be a more common feature of meiosis.

  1. Meiotic association between Spo11 regulated by Rec102, Rec104 and Rec114.

    PubMed

    Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Hajime; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Shibata, Takehiko; Nicolas, Alain; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-stranded break (DSB) formation catalyzed by Spo11, a type-II topoisomerase-like transesterificase, presumably via a dimerization-mediated mechanism. We demonstrate the existence of in vivo interactions between Spo11 proteins carrying distinct tags, and the chromatin-binding and DSB activity of tagged Spo11 at innate and targeted DSB sites upon fusion to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain. First we identified the interaction between Spo11-3FLAG and Gal4BD-Spo11 proteins, and established that this interaction specifically occurs at the time of DSB formation. We then observed that presence of the Gal4BD-spo11Y135F (nuclease-deficient) protein allows Spo11-3FLAG recruitment at the GAL2 locus, indicative of the formation of a hetero-complex near the GAL2 UAS sites, but no formation of double- or single-strand breaks. Spo11 self-interaction around the GAL2 DSB site depends on other proteins for DSB formation, in particular Rec102, Rec104 and Rec114. Together, these results suggest that in vivo self-association of Spo11 during meiosis is genetically regulated. The results are discussed in relation to possible roles of Spo11 self-interaction in the control of the cleavage activity.

  2. Smc5/6 Coordinates Formation and Resolution of Joint Molecules with Chromosome Morphology to Ensure Meiotic Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Blitzblau, Hannah G.; Newcombe, Sonya; Chan, Andrew Chi-ho; Newnham, Louise; Li, Zhaobo; Gray, Stephen; Herbert, Alex D.; Arumugam, Prakash; Hochwagen, Andreas; Hunter, Neil; Hoffmann, Eva

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) complexes underpin two fundamental features of meiosis: homologous recombination and chromosome segregation. While meiotic functions of the cohesin and condensin complexes have been delineated, the role of the third SMC complex, Smc5/6, remains enigmatic. Here we identify specific, essential meiotic functions for the Smc5/6 complex in homologous recombination and the regulation of cohesin. We show that Smc5/6 is enriched at centromeres and cohesin-association sites where it regulates sister-chromatid cohesion and the timely removal of cohesin from chromosomal arms, respectively. Smc5/6 also localizes to recombination hotspots, where it promotes normal formation and resolution of a subset of joint-molecule intermediates. In this regard, Smc5/6 functions independently of the major crossover pathway defined by the MutLγ complex. Furthermore, we show that Smc5/6 is required for stable chromosomal localization of the XPF-family endonuclease, Mus81-Mms4Eme1. Our data suggest that the Smc5/6 complex is required for specific recombination and chromosomal processes throughout meiosis and that in its absence, attempts at cell division with unresolved joint molecules and residual cohesin lead to severe recombination-induced meiotic catastrophe. PMID:24385939

  3. Cohesin, condensin, and the intramolecular centromere loop together generate the mitotic chromatin spring.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Andrew D; Haase, Julian; Vicci, Leandra; Taylor, Russell M; Bloom, Kerry

    2011-06-27

    Sister chromatid cohesion provides the mechanistic basis, together with spindle microtubules, for generating tension between bioriented chromosomes in metaphase. Pericentric chromatin forms an intramolecular loop that protrudes bidirectionally from the sister chromatid axis. The centromere lies on the surface of the chromosome at the apex of each loop. The cohesin and condensin structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes are concentrated within the pericentric chromatin, but whether they contribute to tension-generating mechanisms is not known. To understand how pericentric chromatin is packaged and resists tension, we map the position of cohesin (SMC3), condensin (SMC4), and pericentric LacO arrays within the spindle. Condensin lies proximal to the spindle axis and is responsible for axial compaction of pericentric chromatin. Cohesin is radially displaced from the spindle axis and confines pericentric chromatin. Pericentric cohesin and condensin contribute to spindle length regulation and dynamics in metaphase. Together with the intramolecular centromere loop, these SMC complexes constitute a molecular spring that balances spindle microtubule force in metaphase.

  4. Mutations in the Drosophila Condensin Subunit dCAP-G

    PubMed Central

    Dej, Kimberley J.; Ahn, Caroline; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2004-01-01

    Chromosomes are dynamic structures that are reorganized during the cell cycle to optimize them for distinct functions. SMC and non-SMC condensin proteins associate into complexes that have been implicated in the process of chromosome condensation. The roles of the individual non-SMC subunits of the complex are poorly understood, and mutations in the CAP-G subunit have not been described in metazoans. Here we elucidate a role for dCAP-G in chromosome condensation and cohesion in Drosophila. We illustrate the requirement of dCAP-G for condensation during prophase and prometaphase; however, we find that alternate mechanisms ensure that replicated chromosomes are condensed prior to metaphase. In contrast, dCAP-G is essential for chromosome condensation in metaphase of single, unreplicated sister chromatids, suggesting that there is an interplay between replicated chromatids and the condensin complex. In the dcap-g mutants, defects in sister-chromatid separation are also observed. Chromatid arms fail to resolve in prophase and are unable to separate at anaphase, whereas sister centromeres show aberrant separation in metaphase and successfully move to spindle poles at anaphase. We also identified a role for dCAP-G during interphase in regulating heterochromatic gene expression. PMID:15514062

  5. Concerted action of the MutLβ heterodimer and Mer3 helicase regulates the global extent of meiotic gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Duroc, Yann; Kumar, Rajeev; Ranjha, Lepakshi; Adam, Céline; Guérois, Raphaël; Md Muntaz, Khan; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Dingli, Florent; Laureau, Raphaëlle; Loew, Damarys; Llorente, Bertrand; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Cejka, Petr; Borde, Valérie

    2017-01-04

    Gene conversions resulting from meiotic recombination are critical in shaping genome diversification and evolution. How the extent of gene conversions is regulated is unknown. Here we show that the budding yeast mismatch repair related MutLβ complex, Mlh1-Mlh2, specifically interacts with the conserved meiotic Mer3 helicase, which recruits it to recombination hotspots, independently of mismatch recognition. This recruitment is essential to limit gene conversion tract lengths genome-wide, without affecting crossover formation. Contrary to expectations, Mer3 helicase activity, proposed to extend the displacement loop (D-loop) recombination intermediate, does not influence the length of gene conversion events, revealing non-catalytical roles of Mer3. In addition, both purified Mer3 and MutLβ preferentially recognize D-loops, providing a mechanism for limiting gene conversion in vivo. These findings show that MutLβ is an integral part of a new regulatory step of meiotic recombination, which has implications to prevent rapid allele fixation and hotspot erosion in populations.

  6. Concerted action of the MutLβ heterodimer and Mer3 helicase regulates the global extent of meiotic gene conversion

    PubMed Central

    Duroc, Yann; Kumar, Rajeev; Ranjha, Lepakshi; Adam, Céline; Guérois, Raphaël; Md Muntaz, Khan; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Dingli, Florent; Laureau, Raphaëlle; Loew, Damarys; Llorente, Bertrand; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Cejka, Petr; Borde, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Gene conversions resulting from meiotic recombination are critical in shaping genome diversification and evolution. How the extent of gene conversions is regulated is unknown. Here we show that the budding yeast mismatch repair related MutLβ complex, Mlh1-Mlh2, specifically interacts with the conserved meiotic Mer3 helicase, which recruits it to recombination hotspots, independently of mismatch recognition. This recruitment is essential to limit gene conversion tract lengths genome-wide, without affecting crossover formation. Contrary to expectations, Mer3 helicase activity, proposed to extend the displacement loop (D-loop) recombination intermediate, does not influence the length of gene conversion events, revealing non-catalytical roles of Mer3. In addition, both purified Mer3 and MutLβ preferentially recognize D-loops, providing a mechanism for limiting gene conversion in vivo. These findings show that MutLβ is an integral part of a new regulatory step of meiotic recombination, which has implications to prevent rapid allele fixation and hotspot erosion in populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21900.001 PMID:28051769

  7. Trans-regulation of mouse meiotic recombination hotspots by Rcr1.

    PubMed

    Parvanov, Emil D; Ng, Siemon H S; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2009-02-17

    Meiotic recombination is required for the orderly segregation of chromosomes during meiosis and for providing genetic diversity among offspring. Among mammals, as well as yeast and higher plants, recombination preferentially occurs at highly delimited chromosomal sites 1-2 kb long known as hotspots. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the roles various proteins play in carrying out the molecular events of the recombination process, relatively little is understood about the factors controlling the location and relative activity of mammalian recombination hotspots. To search for trans-acting factors controlling the positioning of recombination events, we compared the locations of crossovers arising in an 8-Mb segment of a 100-Mb region of mouse Chromosome 1 (Chr 1) when the longer region was heterozygous C57BL/6J (B6) x CAST/EiJ (CAST) and the remainder of the genome was either similarly heterozygous or entirely homozygous B6. The lack of CAST alleles in the remainder of the genome resulted in profound changes in hotspot activity in both females and males. Recombination activity was lost at several hotspots; new, previously undetected hotspots appeared; and still other hotspots remained unaffected, indicating the presence of distant trans-acting gene(s) whose CAST allele(s) activate or suppress the activity of specific hotspots. Testing the activity of three activated hotspots in sperm samples from individual male progeny of two genetic crosses, we identified a single trans-acting regulator of hotspot activity, designated Rcr1, that is located in a 5.30-Mb interval (11.74-17.04 Mb) on Chr 17. Using an Escherichia coli cloning assay to characterize the molecular products of recombination at two of these hotspots, we found that Rcr1 controls the appearance of both crossover and noncrossover gene conversion events, indicating that it likely controls the sites of the double-strand DNA breaks that initiate the recombination process.

  8. Reversible phosphorylation and regulation of mammalian oocyte meiotic chromatin remodeling and segregation.

    PubMed

    Swain, J E; Smith, G D

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian oocyte is notorious for high rates of chromosomal abnormalities. This results in subsequent embryonic aneuploidy, resulting in infertility and congenital defects. Therefore, understanding regulatory mechanisms involved in chromatin remodeling and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation is imperative to fully understand the complex process and establish potential therapies. This review will focus on major events occurring during oocyte meiosis, critical to ensure proper cellular ploidy. Mechanistic and cellular events such as chromosome condensation, meiotic spindle formation, as well as cohesion of homologues and sister chromatids will be discussed, focusing on the role of reversible phosphorylation in control of these processes.

  9. Condensin-Based Chromosome Organization from Bacteria to Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tatsuya

    2016-02-25

    Condensins are large protein complexes that play a central role in chromosome organization and segregation in the three domains of life. They display highly characteristic, rod-shaped structures with SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) ATPases as their core subunits and organize large-scale chromosome structure through active mechanisms. Most eukaryotic species have two distinct condensin complexes whose balanced usage is adapted flexibly to different organisms and cell types. Studies of bacterial condensins provide deep insights into the fundamental mechanisms of chromosome segregation. This Review surveys both conserved features and rich variations of condensin-based chromosome organization and discusses their evolutionary implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nup132 modulates meiotic spindle attachment in fission yeast by regulating kinetochore assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, the kinetochore undergoes substantial reorganization to establish monopolar spindle attachment. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the KNL1–Spc7-Mis12-Nuf2 (KMN) complex, which constitutes the outer kinetochore, is disassembled during meiotic prophase and is reassembled before meiosis I. Here, we show that the nucleoporin Nup132 is required for timely assembly of the KMN proteins: In the absence of Nup132, Mis12 and Spc7 are precociously assembled at the centromeres during meiotic prophase. In contrast, Nuf2 shows timely dissociation and reappearance at the meiotic centromeres. We further demonstrate that depletion of Nup132 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint in meiosis I, possibly because of the increased incidence of erroneous spindle attachment at sister chromatids. These results suggest that precocious assembly of the kinetochores leads to the meiosis I defects observed in the nup132-disrupted mutant. Thus, we propose that Nup132 plays an important role in establishing monopolar spindle attachment at meiosis I through outer kinetochore reorganization at meiotic prophase. PMID:26483559

  11. Glucose induction pathway regulates meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in part by controlling turnover of Ime2p meiotic kinase.

    PubMed

    Gray, Misa; Piccirillo, Sarah; Purnapatre, Kedar; Schneider, Brandt L; Honigberg, Saul M

    2008-08-01

    Several components of the glucose induction pathway, namely the Snf3p glucose sensor and the Rgt1p and Mth1p transcription factors, were shown to be involved in inhibition of sporulation by glucose. The glucose sensors had only a minor role in regulating transcript levels of the two key regulators of meiotic initiation, the Ime1p transcription factor and the Ime2p kinase, but a major role in regulating Ime2p stability. Interestingly, Rgt1p was involved in glucose inhibition of spore formation but not inhibition of Ime2p stability. Thus, the glucose induction pathway may regulate meiosis through both RGT1-dependent and RGT1-independent pathways.

  12. Condensin II Promotes the Formation of Chromosome Territories by Inducing Axial Compaction of Polyploid Interphase Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christopher R.; Hartl, Tom A.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic nucleus is both spatially and functionally partitioned. This organization contributes to the maintenance, expression, and transmission of genetic information. Though our ability to probe the physical structure of the genome within the nucleus has improved substantially in recent years, relatively little is known about the factors that regulate its organization or the mechanisms through which specific organizational states are achieved. Here, we show that Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II induces axial compaction of interphase chromosomes, globally disrupts interchromosomal interactions, and promotes the dispersal of peri-centric heterochromatin. These Condensin II activities compartmentalize the nucleus into discrete chromosome territories and indicate commonalities in the mechanisms that regulate the spatial structure of the genome during mitosis and interphase. PMID:22956908

  13. A Maternal Screen for Genes Regulating Drosophila Oocyte Polarity Uncovers New Steps in Meiotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vitor; Kimm, Naomi; Lehmann, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic checkpoints monitor chromosome status to ensure correct homologous recombination, genomic integrity, and chromosome segregation. In Drosophila, the persistent presence of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) activates the ATR/Mei-41 checkpoint, delays progression through meiosis, and causes defects in DNA condensation of the oocyte nucleus, the karyosome. Checkpoint activation has also been linked to decreased levels of the TGFα-like molecule Gurken, which controls normal eggshell patterning. We used this easy-to-score eggshell phenotype in a germ-line mosaic screen in Drosophila to identify new genes affecting meiotic progression, DNA condensation, and Gurken signaling. One hundred eighteen new ventralizing mutants on the second chromosome fell into 17 complementation groups. Here we describe the analysis of 8 complementation groups, including Kinesin heavy chain, the SR protein kinase cuaba, the cohesin-related gene dPds5/cohiba, and the Tudor-domain gene montecristo. Our findings challenge the hypothesis that checkpoint activation upon persistent DSBs is exclusively mediated by ATR/Mei-41 kinase and instead reveal a more complex network of interactions that link DSB formation, checkpoint activation, meiotic delay, DNA condensation, and Gurken protein synthesis. PMID:17507684

  14. The Meiotic Nuclear Lamina Regulates Chromosome Dynamics and Promotes Efficient Homologous Recombination in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Johannes; Göb, Eva; Baar, Johannes; Ortega, Sagrario; Benavente, Ricardo; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is the structural scaffold of the nuclear envelope and is well known for its central role in nuclear organization and maintaining nuclear stability and shape. In the past, a number of severe human disorders have been identified to be associated with mutations in lamins. Extensive research on this topic has provided novel important clues about nuclear lamina function. These studies have contributed to the knowledge that the lamina constitutes a complex multifunctional platform combining both structural and regulatory functions. Here, we report that, in addition to the previously demonstrated significance for somatic cell differentiation and maintenance, the nuclear lamina is also an essential determinant for germ cell development. Both male and female mice lacking the short meiosis-specific A-type lamin C2 have a severely defective meiosis, which at least in the male results in infertility. Detailed analysis revealed that lamin C2 is required for telomere-driven dynamic repositioning of meiotic chromosomes. Loss of lamin C2 affects precise synapsis of the homologs and interferes with meiotic double-strand break repair. Taken together, our data explain how the nuclear lamina contributes to meiotic chromosome behaviour and accurate genome haploidization on a mechanistic level. PMID:23382700

  15. Meiotic Crossover Control by Concerted Action of Rad51-Dmc1 in Homolog Template Bias and Robust Homeostatic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chu-Chun; Grubb, Jennifer; Thacker, Drew; Lee, Chih-Ying; Dresser, Michael E.; Hunter, Neil; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by recombination promotes pairing of homologous chromosomes and their connection by crossovers. Two DNA strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, are required for meiotic recombination in many organisms. Studies in budding yeast imply that Rad51 acts to regulate Dmc1's strand exchange activity, while its own exchange activity is inhibited. However, in a dmc1 mutant, elimination of inhibitory factor, Hed1, activates Rad51's strand exchange activity and results in high levels of recombination without participation of Dmc1. Here we show that Rad51-mediated meiotic recombination is not subject to regulatory processes associated with high-fidelity chromosome segregation. These include homolog bias, a process that directs strand exchange between homologs rather than sister chromatids. Furthermore, activation of Rad51 does not effectively substitute for Dmc1's chromosome pairing activity, nor does it ensure formation of the obligate crossovers required for accurate homolog segregation. We further show that Dmc1's dominance in promoting strand exchange between homologs involves repression of Rad51's strand-exchange activity. This function of Dmc1 is independent of Hed1, but requires the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Hed1 makes a relatively minor contribution to homolog bias, but nonetheless this is important for normal morphogenesis of synaptonemal complexes and efficient crossing-over especially when DSB numbers are decreased. Super-resolution microscopy shows that Dmc1 also acts to organize discrete complexes of a Mek1 partner protein, Red1, into clusters along lateral elements of synaptonemal complexes; this activity may also contribute to homolog bias. Finally, we show that when interhomolog bias is defective, recombination is buffered by two feedback processes, one that increases the fraction of events that yields crossovers, and a second that we propose involves additional DSB formation in response to

  16. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, Colin D; Landeen, Emily L; Cook, Jodi M; Kingan, Sarah B; Presgraves, Daven C

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females) has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI)--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female) germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  17. Casein kinase 1 alpha regulates chromosome congression and separation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Lu, Angeleem; Zhou, Hong-Xia; Sun, Ran; Zhao, Jie; Zhou, Cheng-Jie; Shen, Jiang-Peng; Wu, Sha-Na; Liang, Cheng-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase I alpha (CK1α) is a member of serine/threonine protein kinase, generally present in all eukaryotes. In mammals, CK1α regulates the transition from interphase to metaphase in mitosis. However, little is known about its role in meiosis. Here we examined Ck1α mRNA and protein expression, as well as its subcellular localization in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle to the late 1-cell stage. Our results showed that the expression level of CK1α was increased in metaphase. Immunostaining results showed that CK1α colocalized with condensed chromosomes during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development. We used the loss-of-function approach by employing CK1α specific morpholino injection to block the function of CK1α. This functional blocking leads to failure of polar body 1 (PB1) extrusion, chromosome misalignment and MII plate incrassation. We further found that D4476, a specific and efficient CK1 inhibitor, decreased the rate of PB1 extrusion. Moreover, D4476 resulted in giant polar body extrusion, oocyte pro-MI arrest, chromosome congression failure and impairment of embryo developmental potential. In addition, we employed pyrvinium pamoate (PP), an allosteric activator of CK1α, to enhance CK1α activity in oocytes. Supplementation of PP induced oocyte meiotic maturation failure, severe congression abnormalities and misalignment of chromosomes. Taken together, our study for the first time demonstrates that CK1α is required for chromosome alignment and segregation during oocyte meiotic maturation and early embryo development.

  18. The CSN/COP9 Signalosome Regulates Synaptonemal Complex Assembly during Meiotic Prophase I of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Brockway, Heather; Balukoff, Nathan; Dean, Martha; Alleva, Benjamin; Smolikove, Sarit

    2014-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein structure that holds homologous chromosome pairs together throughout much of meiotic prophase I. It is essential for the formation of crossovers, which are required for the proper segregation of chromosomes into gametes. The assembly of the SC is likely to be regulated by post-translational modifications. The CSN/COP9 signalosome has been shown to act in many pathways, mainly via the ubiquitin degradation/proteasome pathway. Here we examine the role of the CSN/COP9 signalosome in SC assembly in the model organism C. elegans. Our work shows that mutants in three subunits of the CSN/COP9 signalosome fail to properly assemble the SC. In these mutants, SC proteins aggregate, leading to a decrease in proper pairing between homologous chromosomes. The reduction in homolog pairing also results in an accumulation of recombination intermediates and defects in repair of meiotic DSBs to form the designated crossovers. The effect of the CSN/COP9 signalosome mutants on synapsis and crossover formation is due to increased neddylation, as reducing neddylation in these mutants can partially suppress their phenotypes. We also find a marked increase in apoptosis in csn mutants that specifically eliminates nuclei with aggregated SC proteins. csn mutants exhibit defects in germline proliferation, and an almost complete pachytene arrest due to an inability to activate the MAPK pathway. The work described here supports a previously unknown role for the CSN/COP9 signalosome in chromosome behavior during meiotic prophase I. PMID:25375142

  19. Positive regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation by activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Mec1(ATR).

    PubMed

    Gray, Stephen; Allison, Rachal M; Garcia, Valerie; Goldman, Alastair S H; Neale, Matthew J

    2013-07-31

    During meiosis, formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) create genetic exchange between homologous chromosomes-a process that is critical for reductional meiotic chromosome segregation and the production of genetically diverse sexually reproducing populations. Meiotic DSB formation is a complex process, requiring numerous proteins, of which Spo11 is the evolutionarily conserved catalytic subunit. Precisely how Spo11 and its accessory proteins function or are regulated is unclear. Here, we use Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reveal that meiotic DSB formation is modulated by the Mec1(ATR) branch of the DNA damage signalling cascade, promoting DSB formation when Spo11-mediated catalysis is compromised. Activation of the positive feedback pathway correlates with the formation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombination intermediates and activation of the downstream kinase, Mek1. We show that the requirement for checkpoint activation can be rescued by prolonging meiotic prophase by deleting the NDT80 transcription factor, and that even transient prophase arrest caused by Ndt80 depletion is sufficient to restore meiotic spore viability in checkpoint mutants. Our observations are unexpected given recent reports that the complementary kinase pathway Tel1(ATM) acts to inhibit DSB formation. We propose that such antagonistic regulation of DSB formation by Mec1 and Tel1 creates a regulatory mechanism, where the absolute frequency of DSBs is maintained at a level optimal for genetic exchange and efficient chromosome segregation.

  20. FANCM limits meiotic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Crismani, Wayne; Girard, Chloé; Froger, Nicole; Pradillo, Mónica; Santos, Juan Luis; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Horlow, Christine; Mercier, Raphaël

    2012-06-22

    The number of meiotic crossovers (COs) is tightly regulated within a narrow range, despite a large excess of molecular precursors. The factors that limit COs remain largely unknown. Here, using a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the highly conserved FANCM helicase, which is required for genome stability in humans and yeasts, as a major factor limiting meiotic CO formation. The fancm mutant has a threefold-increased CO frequency as compared to the wild type. These extra COs arise not from the pathway that accounts for most of the COs in wild type, but from an alternate, normally minor pathway. Thus, FANCM is a key factor imposing an upper limit on the number of meiotic COs, and its manipulation holds much promise for plant breeding.

  1. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A

    2007-05-01

    X chromosome inactivation is most commonly studied in the context of female mammalian development, where it performs an essential role in dosage compensation. However, another form of X-inactivation takes place in the male, during spermatogenesis, as germ cells enter meiosis. This second form of X-inactivation, called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has emerged as a novel paradigm for studying the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. New studies have revealed that MSCI is a special example of a more general mechanism called meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), which silences chromosomes that fail to pair with their homologous partners and, in doing so, may protect against aneuploidy in subsequent generations. Furthermore, failure in MSCI is emerging as an important etiological factor in meiotic sterility.

  2. Condensin II mutation causes T-cell lymphoma through tissue-specific genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Jessica; Taylor, Gillian C.; Soares, Dinesh C.; Boyle, Shelagh; Sie, Daoud; Read, David; Chathoth, Keerthi; Vukovic, Milica; Tarrats, Nuria; Jamieson, David; Campbell, Kirsteen J.; Blyth, Karen; Acosta, Juan Carlos; Ylstra, Bauke; Arends, Mark J.; Kranc, Kamil R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of cancer, but mitotic regulators are rarely mutated in tumors. Mutations in the condensin complexes, which restructure chromosomes to facilitate segregation during mitosis, are significantly enriched in cancer genomes, but experimental evidence implicating condensin dysfunction in tumorigenesis is lacking. We report that mice inheriting missense mutations in a condensin II subunit (Caph2nes) develop T-cell lymphoma. Before tumors develop, we found that the same Caph2 mutation impairs ploidy maintenance to a different extent in different hematopoietic cell types, with ploidy most severely perturbed at the CD4+CD8+ T-cell stage from which tumors initiate. Premalignant CD4+CD8+ T cells show persistent catenations during chromosome segregation, triggering DNA damage in diploid daughter cells and elevated ploidy. Genome sequencing revealed that Caph2 single-mutant tumors are near diploid but carry deletions spanning tumor suppressor genes, whereas P53 inactivation allowed Caph2 mutant cells with whole-chromosome gains and structural rearrangements to form highly aggressive disease. Together, our data challenge the view that mitotic chromosome formation is an invariant process during development and provide evidence that defective mitotic chromosome structure can promote tumorigenesis. PMID:27737961

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of meiotic recombination hotspots regulator PRDM9 in bovids.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Sonika; De, Sachinandan; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; Kataria, R S; Datta, T K; Singh, R K

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid sterility or reproductive isolation in mammals has been attributed to allelic incompatibilities in a DNA-binding protein PRDM9. Not only is PRDM9 exceptional in being the only known 'speciation gene' in vertebrates, but it is also considered to be the fastest evolving gene in the genome. The terminal zinc finger (ZF) domain of PRDM9 specifies genome-wide meiotic recombination hotspot locations in mammals. Intriguingly, PRDM9 ZF domain is highly variable between as well as within species, possibly activating different recombination hotspots. The present study characterized the full-length coding sequence of PRDM9 in cattle and buffalo and explored the diversity of the ZF array in 514 samples from different bovids (cattle, yak, mithun, and buffalo). Substantial numerical and sequence variability were observed in the ZFs, with the number of repeats ranging from 6 to 9 in different bovines. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 37 different ZFs in cattle, 3 in mithun, 4 in yak, and 13 in buffaloes producing 41 unique PRDM9 alleles in these species. The posterior mean of dN/dS or omega values calculated using Codeml tool of PAMLX identified sites -5, -1, +2, +3, +4, +5, and +6 in the ZF domain to be evolving positively in the studied species. Concerted evolution which typifies the evolution of this gene was consistently evident in all bovines. Our results demonstrate the extraordinary diversity of PRDM9 ZF array across bovines, reinforcing similar observations in other metazoans. The high variability is suggestive of unique repertoire of meiotic recombination hotspots in each species.

  4. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Regulation of transcription of meiotic cell cycle and terminal differentiation genes by the testis-specific Zn-finger protein matotopetli.

    PubMed

    Perezgasga, Lucia; Jiang, JianQiao; Bolival, Benjamin; Hiller, Mark; Benson, Elizabeth; Fuller, Margaret T; White-Cooper, Helen

    2004-04-01

    A robust developmentally regulated and cell type specific transcriptional programme is activated in primary spermatocytes in preparation for differentiation of the male gametes during spermatogenesis. Work in Drosophila is beginning to reveal the genetic networks that regulate this gene expression. The Drosophila aly-class meiotic arrest loci are essential for activation of transcription of many differentiation-specific genes, as well as several genes important for meiotic cell cycle progression, thus linking meiotic cell cycle progression to cellular differentiation during spermatogenesis. The three previously described aly-class proteins (aly, comr and achi/vis) form a complex and are associated with chromatin in primary spermatocytes. We identify, clone and characterize a new aly-class meiotic arrest gene, matotopetli (topi), which encodes a testis-specific Zn-finger protein that physically interacts with Comr. The topi mutant phenotype is most like achi/vis in that topi function is not required for the nuclear localization of Aly or Comr, but is required for their accumulation on chromatin. Most target genes in the transcriptional programme depend on both topi and achi/vis; however, a small subset of target genes are differentially sensitive to loss of topi or achi/vis, suggesting that these aly-class predicted DNA binding proteins can act independently in some contexts.

  6. A casein kinase 1 prevents expulsion of the oocyte meiotic spindle into a polar body by regulating cortical contractility.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jonathan R; McNally, Francis J

    2017-09-01

    During female meiosis, haploid eggs are generated from diploid oocytes. This reduction in chromosome number occurs through two highly asymmetric cell divisions, resulting in one large egg and two small polar bodies. Unlike mitosis, where an actomyosin contractile ring forms between the sets of segregating chromosomes, the meiotic contractile ring forms on the cortex adjacent to one spindle pole, then ingresses down the length of the spindle to position itself at the exact midpoint between the two sets of segregating chromosomes. Depletion of casein kinase 1 gamma (CSNK-1) in Caenorhabditis elegans led to the formation of large polar bodies that contain all maternal DNA, because the contractile ring ingressed past the spindle midpoint. Depletion of CSNK-1 also resulted in the formation of deep membrane invaginations during meiosis, suggesting an effect on cortical myosin. Both myosin and anillin assemble into dynamic rho-dependent cortical patches that rapidly disassemble in wild-type embryos. CSNK-1 was required for disassembly of both myosin patches and anillin patches. Disassembly of anillin patches was myosin independent, suggesting that CSNK-1 prevents expulsion of the entire meiotic spindle into a polar body by negatively regulating the rho pathway rather than through direct inhibition of myosin. © 2017 Flynn and McNally. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. MEI4 – a central player in the regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Ghyselinck, Norbert; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kouznetsova, Anna; Höög, Christer; Strong, Edward; Schimenti, John; Daniel, Katrin; Toth, Attila; de Massy, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    The formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the beginning of meiotic prophase marks the initiation of meiotic recombination. Meiotic DSB formation is catalyzed by SPO11 and their repair takes place on meiotic chromosome axes. The evolutionarily conserved MEI4 protein is required for meiotic DSB formation and is localized on chromosome axes. Here, we show that HORMAD1, one of the meiotic chromosome axis components, is required for MEI4 localization. Importantly, the quantitative correlation between the level of axis-associated MEI4 and DSB formation suggests that axis-associated MEI4 could be a limiting factor for DSB formation. We also show that MEI1, REC8 and RAD21L are important for proper MEI4 localization. These findings on MEI4 dynamics during meiotic prophase suggest that the association of MEI4 to chromosome axes is required for DSB formation, and that the loss of this association upon DSB repair could contribute to turning off meiotic DSB formation.

  8. Antagonistic roles of ubiquitin ligase HEI10 and SUMO ligase RNF212 regulate meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Huanyu; Prasada Rao, H B D; Yang, Ye; Fong, Jared H; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Deacon, Dekker C; Nagel, Kathryn E; Swartz, Rebecca K; Strong, Edward; Holloway, J Kim; Cohen, Paula E; Schimenti, John; Ward, Jeremy; Hunter, Neil

    2014-02-01

    Crossover recombination facilitates the accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. In mammals, poorly characterized regulatory processes ensure that every pair of chromosomes obtains at least one crossover, even though most recombination sites yield non-crossovers. Designation of crossovers involves selective localization of the SUMO ligase RNF212 to a minority of recombination sites, where it stabilizes pertinent factors such as MutSγ (ref. 4). Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase HEI10 (also called CCNB1IP1) is essential for this crossover/non-crossover differentiation process. In HEI10-deficient mice, RNF212 localizes to most recombination sites, and dissociation of both RNF212 and MutSγ from chromosomes is blocked. Consequently, recombination is impeded, and crossing over fails. In wild-type mice, HEI10 accumulates at designated crossover sites, suggesting that it also has a late role in implementing crossing over. As with RNF212, dosage sensitivity for HEI10 indicates that it is a limiting factor for crossing over. We suggest that SUMO and ubiquitin have antagonistic roles during meiotic recombination that are balanced to effect differential stabilization of recombination factors at crossover and non-crossover sites.

  9. Condensin I associates with structural and gene regulatory regions in vertebrate chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hun; Zhang, Tao; Wong, Nicholas C; Davidson, Nadia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Oshlack, Alicia; Earnshaw, William C; Kalitsis, Paul; Hudson, Damien F

    2014-01-01

    The condensin complex is essential for correct packaging and segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis in all eukaryotes. To date, the genome wide location and the nature of condensin binding sites has remained elusive in vertebrates. Here we report the genome wide map of condensin I in chicken DT40 cells. Unexpectedly, we find condensin I binds predominately to promoter sequences in mitotic cells. We also find a striking enrichment at both centromeres and telomeres, highlighting the importance of the complex in chromosome segregation. Taken together, the results show condensin I is largely absent from heterochromatic regions. This map of the condensin I binding sites on the chicken genome reveals that patterns of condensin distribution on chromosomes are conserved from prokaryotes, through yeasts to vertebrates. Thus in three kingdoms of life, condensin is enriched on promoters of actively transcribed genes and at loci important for chromosome segregation. PMID:24088984

  10. Transcriptional Regulation of the SMK1 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene during Meiotic Development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Michael; Wagner, Marisa; Xie, Jianxin; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Six, John; Vershon, Andrew K.; Winter, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Meiotic development (sporulation) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is characterized by an ordered pattern of gene expression, with sporulation-specific genes classified as early, middle, mid-late, or late depending on when they are expressed. SMK1 encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase required for spore morphogenesis that is expressed as a middle sporulation-specific gene. Here, we identify the cis-acting DNA elements that regulate SMK1 transcription and characterize the phenotypes of mutants with altered expression patterns. The SMK1 promoter contains an upstream activating sequence (UASS) that specifically interacts with the transcriptional activator Abf1p. The Abf1p-binding sites from the early HOP1 and the middle SMK1 promoters are functionally interchangeable, demonstrating that these elements do not play a direct role in their differential transcriptional timing. Timing of SMK1 expression is determined by another cis-acting DNA sequence termed MSE (for middle sporulation element). The MSE is required not only for activation of SMK1 transcription during middle sporulation but also for its repression during vegetative growth and early meiosis. In addition, the SMK1 MSE can repress vegetative expression in the context of the HOP1 promoter and convert HOP1 from an early to a middle gene. SMK1 function is not contingent on its tight transcriptional regulation as a middle sporulation-specific gene. However, promoter mutants with different quantitative defects in SMK1 transcript levels during middle sporulation show distinct sporulation phenotypes. PMID:9742114

  11. A requirement for protein phosphorylation in regulating the meiotic and mitotic cell cycles in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Néant, I; Charbonneau, M; Guerrier, P

    1989-04-01

    Populations of hormone-stimulated starfish oocytes and fertilized sea urchin eggs undergo synchronous meiotic and mitotic divisions. We have studied the requirement for protein phosphorylation during these events by testing the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) upon the incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate. It was found that 6-DMAP blocked meiosis reinitiation and early cleavage and simultaneously inhibited protein phosphorylation, without changing the rate of [35S]methionine incorporation or pattern of protein synthesis. The protein, cyclin (54 kDa in starfish and 57 kDa in sea urchin), continues to be synthesized in the presence of 6-DMAP. This protein is destroyed at first and second cell cycles when 6-DMAP is added 30 min following fertilization but not when this drug is present before fertilization. Thus, cyclin breakdown does not depend on the completion of the nuclear events of M-phase, and its time of breakdown is set at an early step between fertilization and first cleavage. Using tubulin immunostaining, we found that 6-DMAP did not affect the cortical microtubules and resting female centrioles of prophase-arrested starfish oocytes, whereas it induced a precocious disappearance of spindle fibers when applied to hormone-stimulated oocytes. While an early addition of 6-DMAP precluded nuclear breakdown and spindle formation in both systems, a late treatment always allowed chromosome separation and centriole separation. Under these conditions pericentriolar tubulin persisted and could organize new spindles after the inhibitor was removed. It is suggested that (1) the assembly of cortical and centriolar-associated microtubules is not controlled by the same factors as spindle-associated tubulin; (2) specific proteins which are required for the cell to enter the following M-phase can become operative only via a process depending upon protein phosphorylation; (3) microtubule-associated kinases may play an important role in MPF function and spindle dynamics.

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of condensins I and II: evolutionary insights from the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kan; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Condensins are multisubunit complexes that play central roles in chromosome organization and segregation in eukaryotes. Many eukaryotic species have two different condensin complexes (condensins I and II), although some species, such as fungi, have condensin I only. Here we use the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae as a model organism because it represents the smallest and simplest organism that is predicted to possess both condensins I and II. We demonstrate that, despite the great evolutionary distance, spatiotemporal dynamics of condensins in C. merolae is strikingly similar to that observed in mammalian cells: condensin II is nuclear throughout the cell cycle, whereas condensin I appears on chromosomes only after the nuclear envelope partially dissolves at prometaphase. Unlike in mammalian cells, however, condensin II is confined to centromeres in metaphase, whereas condensin I distributes more broadly along arms. We firmly establish a targeted gene disruption technique in this organism and find, to our surprise, that condensin II is not essential for mitosis under laboratory growth conditions, although it plays a crucial role in facilitating sister centromere resolution in the presence of a microtubule drug. The results provide fundamental insights into the evolution of condensin-based chromosome architecture and dynamics. PMID:23783031

  13. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  14. Condensin II Subunit dCAP-D3 Restricts Retrotransposon Mobilization in Drosophila Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Andrew T.; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Murphy, Eain A.; Longworth, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Retrotransposon sequences are positioned throughout the genome of almost every eukaryote that has been sequenced. As mobilization of these elements can have detrimental effects on the transcriptional regulation and stability of an organism's genome, most organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress their movement. Here, we identify a novel role for the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II subunit, dCAP-D3 in preventing the mobilization of retrotransposons located in somatic cell euchromatin. dCAP-D3 regulates transcription of euchromatic gene clusters which contain or are proximal to retrotransposon sequence. ChIP experiments demonstrate that dCAP-D3 binds to these loci and is important for maintaining a repressed chromatin structure within the boundaries of the retrotransposon and for repressing retrotransposon transcription. We show that dCAP-D3 prevents accumulation of double stranded DNA breaks within retrotransposon sequence, and decreased dCAP-D3 levels leads to a precise loss of retrotransposon sequence at some dCAP-D3 regulated gene clusters and a gain of sequence elsewhere in the genome. Homologous chromosomes exhibit high levels of pairing in Drosophila somatic cells, and our FISH analyses demonstrate that retrotransposon-containing euchromatic loci are regions which are actually less paired than euchromatic regions devoid of retrotransposon sequences. Decreased dCAP-D3 expression increases pairing of homologous retrotransposon-containing loci in tissue culture cells. We propose that the combined effects of dCAP-D3 deficiency on double strand break levels, chromatin structure, transcription and pairing at retrotransposon-containing loci may lead to 1) higher levels of homologous recombination between repeats flanking retrotransposons in dCAP-D3 deficient cells and 2) increased retrotransposition. These findings identify a novel role for the anti-pairing activities of dCAP-D3/Condensin II and uncover a new way in which dCAP-D3/Condensin II influences local

  15. Condensin II subunit dCAP-D3 restricts retrotransposon mobilization in Drosophila somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Andrew T; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Murphy, Eain A; Longworth, Michelle S

    2013-10-01

    Retrotransposon sequences are positioned throughout the genome of almost every eukaryote that has been sequenced. As mobilization of these elements can have detrimental effects on the transcriptional regulation and stability of an organism's genome, most organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress their movement. Here, we identify a novel role for the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II subunit, dCAP-D3 in preventing the mobilization of retrotransposons located in somatic cell euchromatin. dCAP-D3 regulates transcription of euchromatic gene clusters which contain or are proximal to retrotransposon sequence. ChIP experiments demonstrate that dCAP-D3 binds to these loci and is important for maintaining a repressed chromatin structure within the boundaries of the retrotransposon and for repressing retrotransposon transcription. We show that dCAP-D3 prevents accumulation of double stranded DNA breaks within retrotransposon sequence, and decreased dCAP-D3 levels leads to a precise loss of retrotransposon sequence at some dCAP-D3 regulated gene clusters and a gain of sequence elsewhere in the genome. Homologous chromosomes exhibit high levels of pairing in Drosophila somatic cells, and our FISH analyses demonstrate that retrotransposon-containing euchromatic loci are regions which are actually less paired than euchromatic regions devoid of retrotransposon sequences. Decreased dCAP-D3 expression increases pairing of homologous retrotransposon-containing loci in tissue culture cells. We propose that the combined effects of dCAP-D3 deficiency on double strand break levels, chromatin structure, transcription and pairing at retrotransposon-containing loci may lead to 1) higher levels of homologous recombination between repeats flanking retrotransposons in dCAP-D3 deficient cells and 2) increased retrotransposition. These findings identify a novel role for the anti-pairing activities of dCAP-D3/Condensin II and uncover a new way in which dCAP-D3/Condensin II influences local

  16. A Pair of Maternal Chromosomes Derived from Meiotic Nondisjunction in Trisomy 21 Affects Nuclear Architecture and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Omori, Sayaka; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Banno, Kimihiko; Tsuji, Ayumi; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Hirata, Katsuya; Kawatani, Keiji; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Arahori, Hitomi; Wada, Kazuko; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ozono, Keiichi

    2017-04-10

    Eukaryotic genomes are organised into complex higher-order structures within the nucleus, and the three-dimensional arrangement of chromosomes is functionally important for global gene regulation. The existence of supernumerary chromosome 21 in Down syndrome may perturb the nuclear architecture at different levels, which is normally optimised to maintain the physiological balance of gene expression. However, it has not been clearly elucidated whether and how aberrant configuration of chromosomes affects gene activities. To investigate the effects of trisomy 21 on nuclear organisation and gene expression, we performed three-dimensional fluorescent imaging analysis of chromosome-edited human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which enabled identification of the parental origin of the three copies of chromosome 21. We found that two copies of maternal chromosomes resulting from meiotic nondisjunction had a higher tendency to form an adjacent pair and were located relatively distant from the nuclear membrane, suggesting the conserved interaction between these homologous chromosomes. Transcriptional profiling of parental-origin-specific corrected disomy 21 iPSC lines indicated upregulated expression of the maternal alleles for a group of genes, which was accompanied by a fluctuating expression pattern. These results suggest the unique effects of a pair of maternal chromosomes in trisomy 21, which may contribute to the pathological phenotype.

  17. Variants of the protein PRDM9 differentially regulate a set of human meiotic recombination hotspots highly active in African populations.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; Butler, Nicola J; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2011-07-26

    PRDM9 is a major specifier of human meiotic recombination hotspots, probably via binding of its zinc-finger repeat array to a DNA sequence motif associated with hotspots. However, our view of PRDM9 regulation, in terms of motifs defined and hotspots studied, has a strong bias toward the PRDM9 A variant particularly common in Europeans. We show that population diversity can reveal a second class of hotspots specifically activated by PRDM9 variants common in Africans but rare in Europeans. These African-enhanced hotspots nevertheless share very similar properties with their counterparts activated by the A variant. The specificity of hotspot activation is such that individuals with differing PRDM9 genotypes, even within the same population, can use substantially if not completely different sets of hotspots. Each African-enhanced hotspot is activated by a distinct spectrum of PRDM9 variants, despite the fact that all are predicted to bind the same sequence motif. This differential activation points to complex interactions between the zinc-finger array and hotspots and identifies features of the array that might be important in controlling hotspot activity.

  18. Budding yeast ATM/ATR control meiotic double-strand break (DSB) levels by down-regulating Rec114, an essential component of the DSB-machinery.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Jesús A; Panizza, Silvia; Serrentino, Maria Elisabetta; Johnson, Anthony L; Geymonat, Marco; Borde, Valérie; Klein, Franz; Cha, Rita S

    2013-06-01

    An essential feature of meiosis is Spo11 catalysis of programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Evidence suggests that the number of DSBs generated per meiosis is genetically determined and that this ability to maintain a pre-determined DSB level, or "DSB homeostasis", might be a property of the meiotic program. Here, we present direct evidence that Rec114, an evolutionarily conserved essential component of the meiotic DSB-machinery, interacts with DSB hotspot DNA, and that Tel1 and Mec1, the budding yeast ATM and ATR, respectively, down-regulate Rec114 upon meiotic DSB formation through phosphorylation. Mimicking constitutive phosphorylation reduces the interaction between Rec114 and DSB hotspot DNA, resulting in a reduction and/or delay in DSB formation. Conversely, a non-phosphorylatable rec114 allele confers a genome-wide increase in both DSB levels and in the interaction between Rec114 and the DSB hotspot DNA. These observations strongly suggest that Tel1 and/or Mec1 phosphorylation of Rec114 following Spo11 catalysis down-regulates DSB formation by limiting the interaction between Rec114 and DSB hotspots. We also present evidence that Ndt80, a meiosis specific transcription factor, contributes to Rec114 degradation, consistent with its requirement for complete cessation of DSB formation. Loss of Rec114 foci from chromatin is associated with homolog synapsis but independent of Ndt80 or Tel1/Mec1 phosphorylation. Taken together, we present evidence for three independent ways of regulating Rec114 activity, which likely contribute to meiotic DSBs-homeostasis in maintaining genetically determined levels of breaks.

  19. Initiation of meiotic recombination in chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-08-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is markedly activated during meiotic prophase to play central roles in faithful chromosome segregation and conferring genetic diversity to gametes. It is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the conserved protein Spo11, and preferentially occurs at discrete sites called hotspots. Since the functions of Spo11 are influenced by both of local chromatin at hotspots and higher-order chromosome structures, formation of meiotic DSBs is under regulation of chromatin structure. Therefore, investigating features and roles of meiotic chromatin is crucial to elucidate the in vivo mechanism of meiotic recombination initiation. Recent progress in genome-wide chromatin analyses tremendously improved our understanding on this point, but many critical questions are left unaddressed. In this review, we summarize current knowledge in the field, and also discuss the future problems that must be solved to understand the role of chromatin structure in meiotic recombination.

  20. Mutations in the Drosophila condensin subunit dCAP-G: defining the role of condensin for chromosome condensation in mitosis and gene expression in interphase.

    PubMed

    Dej, Kimberley J; Ahn, Caroline; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2004-10-01

    Chromosomes are dynamic structures that are reorganized during the cell cycle to optimize them for distinct functions. SMC and non-SMC condensin proteins associate into complexes that have been implicated in the process of chromosome condensation. The roles of the individual non-SMC subunits of the complex are poorly understood, and mutations in the CAP-G subunit have not been described in metazoans. Here we elucidate a role for dCAP-G in chromosome condensation and cohesion in Drosophila. We illustrate the requirement of dCAP-G for condensation during prophase and prometaphase; however, we find that alternate mechanisms ensure that replicated chromosomes are condensed prior to metaphase. In contrast, dCAP-G is essential for chromosome condensation in metaphase of single, unreplicated sister chromatids, suggesting that there is an interplay between replicated chromatids and the condensin complex. In the dcap-g mutants, defects in sister-chromatid separation are also observed. Chromatid arms fail to resolve in prophase and are unable to separate at anaphase, whereas sister centromeres show aberrant separation in metaphase and successfully move to spindle poles at anaphase. We also identified a role for dCAP-G during interphase in regulating heterochromatic gene expression.

  1. Meiotic prophase abnormalities and metaphase cell death in MLH1-deficient mouse spermatocytes: insights into regulation of spermatogenic progress.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Shannon; Cobb, John; Pyle, April; Handel, Mary Ann

    2002-09-01

    The MLH1 protein is required for normal meiosis in mice and its absence leads to failure in maintenance of pairing between bivalent chromosomes, abnormal meiotic division, and ensuing sterility in both sexes. In this study, we investigated whether failure to develop foci of MLH1 protein on chromosomes in prophase would lead to elimination of prophase spermatocytes, and, if not, whether univalent chromosomes could align normally on the meiotic spindle and whether metaphase spermatocytes would be delayed and/or eliminated. In spite of the absence of MLH1 foci, no apoptosis of spermatocytes in prophase was detected. In fact, chromosomes of pachytene spermatocytes from Mlh1(-/-) mice were competent to condense metaphase chromosomes, both in vivo and in vitro. Most condensed chromosomes were univalents with spatially distinct FISH signals. Typical metaphase events, such as synaptonemal complex breakdown and the phosphorylation of Ser10 on histone H3, occurred in Mlh1(-/-) spermatocytes, suggesting that there is no inhibition of onset of meiotic metaphase in the face of massive chromosomal abnormalities. However, the condensed univalent chromosomes did not align correctly onto the spindle apparatus in the majority of Mlh1(-/-) spermatocytes. Most meiotic metaphase spermatocytes were characterized with bipolar spindles, but chromosomes radiated away from the microtubule-organizing centers in a prometaphase-like pattern rather than achieving a bipolar orientation. Apoptosis was not observed until after the onset of meiotic metaphase. Thus, spermatocytes are not eliminated in direct response to the initial meiotic defect, but are eliminated later. Taken together, these observations suggest that a spindle assembly checkpoint, rather than a recombination or chiasmata checkpoint, may be activated in response to meiotic errors, thereby ensuring elimination of chromosomally abnormal gamete precursors.

  2. Function of cyclins in regulating the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    The specialized cell cycles that characterize various aspects of the differentiation of germ cells provide a unique opportunity to understand heretofore elusive aspects of the in vivo function of cell cycle regulators. Key components of the cell cycle machinery are the regulatory sub-units, the cyclins, and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases. Some of the cyclins exhibit unique patterns of expression in germ cells that suggest possible concomitant distinct functions, predictions that are being explored by targeted mutagenesis in mouse models. A novel, meiosis-specific function has been shown for one of the A-type cyclins, cyclin A1. Embryonic lethality has obviated understanding of the germline functions of cyclin A2 and cyclin B1, while yet other cyclins, although expressed at specific stages of germ cell development, may have less essential function in the male germline. PMID:19001847

  3. Structural Basis for Dimer Formation of Human Condensin Structural Maintenance of Chromosome Proteins and Its Implications for Single-stranded DNA Recognition*

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Susumu; Kawahara, Kazuki; Hosokawa, Yuki; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Oki, Hiroya; Nakamura, Shota; Kojima, Yukiko; Noda, Masanori; Takino, Rie; Miyahara, Yuya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic structural maintenance of chromosome proteins (SMC) are major components of cohesin and condensins that regulate chromosome structure and dynamics during cell cycle. We here determine the crystal structure of human condensin SMC hinge heterodimer with ∼30 residues of coiled coils. The structure, in conjunction with the hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry analyses, revealed the structural basis for the specific heterodimer formation of eukaryotic SMC and that the coiled coils from two different hinges protrude in the same direction, providing a unique binding surface conducive for binding to single-stranded DNA. The characteristic hydrogen exchange profiles of peptides constituted regions especially across the hinge-hinge dimerization interface, further suggesting the structural alterations upon single-stranded DNA binding and the presence of a half-opened state of hinge heterodimer. This structural change potentially relates to the DNA loading mechanism of SMC, in which the hinge domain functions as an entrance gate as previously proposed for cohesin. Our results, however, indicated that this is not the case for condensins based on the fact that the coiled coils are still interacting with each other, even when DNA binding induces structural changes in the hinge region, suggesting the functional differences of SMC hinge domain between condensins and cohesin in DNA recognition. PMID:26491021

  4. Analysis of meiosis regulators in human gonads: a sexually dimorphic spatio-temporal expression pattern suggests involvement of DMRT1 in meiotic entry.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E; Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Græm, Niels; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2012-11-01

    The mitosis-meiosis switch is a key event in the differentiation of germ cells. In humans, meiosis is initiated in fetal ovaries, whereas in testes meiotic entry is inhibited until puberty. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression pattern of meiosis regulators in human gonads and to investigate a possible role of DMRT1 in the regulation of meiotic entry. The expression pattern of DMRT1, STRA8, SCP3, DMC1, NANOS3, CYP26B1 and NANOS2 was investigated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in a series of human testis samples from fetal life to adulthood, and in fetal ovaries. DMRT1 was expressed in testes throughout development but with marked spatio-temporal changes. At the early fetal period of 8-20 gestational weeks (GW) and at infantile mini-puberty, DMRT1 was predominantly expressed in Sertoli cells, whereas at later stages of gestation (22-40 GW), during childhood and in post-pubertal testes, DMRT1 was most abundant in spermatogonia, except in the A-dark type. In fetal ovaries, DMRT1 was detected in oogonia and oocytes until 20 GW, but was completely down-regulated following meiotic entry. STRA8, SCP3 and DMC1 were expressed mainly in oocytes and spermatogonia in accordance with their role in initiation and progression of meiosis. The putative meiosis inhibitors, CYP26B1 and NANOS2, were primarily expressed in Leydig cells and spermatocytes, respectively. In conclusion, the expression pattern of the investigated meiotic regulators is largely conserved in the human gonads compared with rodents, but with some minor differences, such as a stable expression of CYP26B1 in human fetal ovaries. The sexually dimorphic expression pattern of DMRT1 indicates a similar role in the mitosis-meiosis switch in human gonads as previously demonstrated in mice. The biological importance of the changes in expression of DMRT1 in Sertoli cells remains to be established, but it is consistent with DMRT1 reinforcing the inhibition of meiosis in the testis.

  5. Meiotic Recombination: The Essence of Heredity.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Neil

    2015-10-28

    The study of homologous recombination has its historical roots in meiosis. In this context, recombination occurs as a programmed event that culminates in the formation of crossovers, which are essential for accurate chromosome segregation and create new combinations of parental alleles. Thus, meiotic recombination underlies both the independent assortment of parental chromosomes and genetic linkage. This review highlights the features of meiotic recombination that distinguish it from recombinational repair in somatic cells, and how the molecular processes of meiotic recombination are embedded and interdependent with the chromosome structures that characterize meiotic prophase. A more in-depth review presents our understanding of how crossover and noncrossover pathways of meiotic recombination are differentiated and regulated. The final section of this review summarizes the studies that have defined defective recombination as a leading cause of pregnancy loss and congenital disease in humans.

  6. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/G)AAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  7. Musashi 1 regulates the timing and extent of meiotic mRNA translational activation by promoting the use of specific CPEs.

    PubMed

    Weill, Laure; Belloc, Eulàlia; Castellazzi, Chiara Lara; Méndez, Raúl

    2017-08-01

    The translational reactivation of maternal mRNAs encoding meiotic drivers in vertebrates is accomplished mainly by cytoplasmic polyadenylation. The cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) present in the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) of these transcripts, together with their cognate CPE-binding proteins (CPEBs), define a combinatorial code that determines the timing and extent of translational activation upon meiosis resumption. In addition, the RNA-binding protein Musashi1 (Msi1) regulates polyadenylation of CPE-containing mRNAs by a yet undefined CPEB-dependent or CPEB-independent mechanism. Here we show that Msi1 alone does not support cytoplasmic polyadenylation, but its binding triggers the remodeling of RNA structure, thereby exposing adjacent CPEs and stimulating polyadenylation. In this way, Msi1 directs the preferential use of specific CPEs, which in turn affects the timing and extent of polyadenylation during meiotic progression. Genome-wide analysis of CPEB1- and Msi1-associated mRNAs identified 491 common targets, thus revealing a new layer of CPE-mediated translational control.

  8. Meiotic functions of RAD18.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Ooms, Marja; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Seibler, Jost; Vogt, Thomas F; Shin, Myung K; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2011-08-15

    RAD18 is an ubiquitin ligase that is involved in replication damage bypass and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair processes in mitotic cells. Here, we investigated the testicular phenotype of Rad18-knockdown mice to determine the function of RAD18 in meiosis, and in particular, in the repair of meiotic DSBs induced by the meiosis-specific topoisomerase-like enzyme SPO11. We found that RAD18 is recruited to a specific subfraction of persistent meiotic DSBs. In addition, RAD18 is recruited to the chromatin of the XY chromosome pair, which forms the transcriptionally silent XY body. At the XY body, RAD18 mediates the chromatin association of its interaction partners, the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes HR6A and HR6B. Moreover, RAD18 was found to regulate the level of dimethylation of histone H3 at Lys4 and maintain meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, in a manner similar to that previously observed for HR6B. Finally, we show that RAD18 and HR6B have a role in the efficient repair of a small subset of meiotic DSBs.

  9. Mitotic chromosomes are compacted laterally by KIF4 and condensin and axially by topoisomerase IIα

    PubMed Central

    Vagnarelli, Paola; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Kelly, David A.; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Kerr, Alastair; Green, Lydia C.; Hudson, Damien F.; Ohta, Shinya; Cooke, Carol A.; Farr, Christine J.; Rappsilber, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome formation involves a relatively minor condensation of the chromatin volume coupled with a dramatic reorganization into the characteristic “X” shape. Here we report results of a detailed morphological analysis, which revealed that chromokinesin KIF4 cooperated in a parallel pathway with condensin complexes to promote the lateral compaction of chromatid arms. In this analysis, KIF4 and condensin were mutually dependent for their dynamic localization on the chromatid axes. Depletion of either caused sister chromatids to expand and compromised the “intrinsic structure” of the chromosomes (defined in an in vitro assay), with loss of condensin showing stronger effects. Simultaneous depletion of KIF4 and condensin caused complete loss of chromosome morphology. In these experiments, topoisomerase IIα contributed to shaping mitotic chromosomes by promoting the shortening of the chromatid axes and apparently acting in opposition to the actions of KIF4 and condensins. These three proteins are major determinants in shaping the characteristic mitotic chromosome morphology. PMID:23166350

  10. Guanine Nucleotides in the Meiotic Maturation of Starfish Oocytes: Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton and of Ca2+ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kyozuka, Keiichiro; Chun, Jong T.; Puppo, Agostina; Gragnaniello, Gianni; Garante, Ezio; Santella, Luigia

    2009-01-01

    Background Starfish oocytes are arrested at the first prophase of meiosis until they are stimulated by 1-methyladenine (1-MA). The two most immediate responses to the maturation-inducing hormone are the quick release of intracellular Ca2+ and the accelerated changes of the actin cytoskeleton in the cortex. Compared with the later events of oocyte maturation such as germinal vesicle breakdown, the molecular mechanisms underlying the early events involving Ca2+ signaling and actin changes are poorly understood. Herein, we have studied the roles of G-proteins in the early stage of meiotic maturation. Methodology/Principal Findings By microinjecting starfish oocytes with nonhydrolyzable nucleotides that stabilize either active (GTPγS) or inactive (GDPβS) forms of G-proteins, we have demonstrated that: i) GTPγS induces Ca2+ release that mimics the effect of 1-MA; ii) GDPβS completely blocks 1-MA-induced Ca2+; iii) GDPβS has little effect on the amplitude of the Ca2+ peak, but significantly expedites the initial Ca2+ waves induced by InsP3 photoactivation, iv) GDPβS induces unexpectedly striking modification of the cortical actin networks, suggesting a link between the cytoskeletal change and the modulation of the Ca2+ release kinetics; v) alteration of cortical actin networks with jasplakinolide, GDPβS, or actinase E, all led to significant changes of 1-MA-induced Ca2+ signaling. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate that G-proteins are implicated in the early events of meiotic maturation and support our previous proposal that the dynamic change of the actin cytoskeleton may play a regulatory role in modulating intracellular Ca2+ release. PMID:19617909

  11. Reduced dosage of the chromosome axis factor Red1 selectively disrupts the meiotic recombination checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Tovah E; Suarez, Daniel; Blitzblau, Hannah G; Patel, Neem J; Markhard, Andrew L; MacQueen, Amy J; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Meiotic chromosomes assemble characteristic "axial element" structures that are essential for fertility and provide the chromosomal context for meiotic recombination, synapsis and checkpoint signaling. Whether these meiotic processes are equally dependent on axial element integrity has remained unclear. Here, we investigated this question in S. cerevisiae using the putative condensin allele ycs4S. We show that the severe axial element assembly defects of this allele are explained by a linked mutation in the promoter of the major axial element gene RED1 that reduces Red1 protein levels to 20-25% of wild type. Intriguingly, the Red1 levels of ycs4S mutants support meiotic processes linked to axis integrity, including DNA double-strand break formation and deposition of the synapsis protein Zip1, at levels that permit 70% gamete survival. By contrast, the ability to elicit a meiotic checkpoint arrest is completely eliminated. This selective loss of checkpoint function is supported by a RED1 dosage series and is associated with the loss of most of the cytologically detectable Red1 from the axial element. Our results indicate separable roles for Red1 in building the structural axis of meiotic chromosomes and mounting a sustained recombination checkpoint response.

  12. pRb and condensin--local control of global chromosome structure.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Brigitte D

    2008-04-15

    Rb mutants exhibit aneuploidy and aberrant chromosome structure during mitosis. In this issue of Genes & Development, a new paper from Longworth and colleagues (1011-1024) describes both physical and functional interactions between Drosophila Rbf1 and the dCAP-D3 subunit of condensin II. This work directly implicates the Rb family proteins in mitotic chromosome condensation and suggests that a failure in targeting condensin II to chromatin underlies the aneuploidy in rbf1 mutants.

  13. Condensin promotes the juxtaposition of DNA flanking its loading site in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xindan; Le, Tung B.K.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Dekker, Job; Laub, Michael T.; Rudner, David Z.

    2015-01-01

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in compacting and resolving replicated chromosomes in virtually all organisms, yet how they accomplish this remains elusive. In Bacillus subtilis, condensin is loaded at centromeric parS sites, where it encircles DNA and individualizes newly replicated origins. Using chromosome conformation capture and cytological assays, we show that condensin recruitment to origin-proximal parS sites is required for the juxtaposition of the two chromosome arms. Recruitment to ectopic parS sites promotes alignment of large tracks of DNA flanking these sites. Importantly, insertion of parS sites on opposing arms indicates that these “zip-up” interactions only occur between adjacent DNA segments. Collectively, our data suggest that condensin resolves replicated origins by promoting the juxtaposition of DNA flanking parS sites, drawing sister origins in on themselves and away from each other. These results are consistent with a model in which condensin encircles the DNA flanking its loading site and then slides down, tethering the two arms together. Lengthwise condensation via loop extrusion could provide a generalizable mechanism by which condensin complexes act dynamically to individualize origins in B. subtilis and, when loaded along eukaryotic chromosomes, resolve them during mitosis. PMID:26253537

  14. The Rho-GTPase effector ROCK regulates meiotic maturation of the bovine oocyte via myosin light chain phosphorylation and cofilin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Rim; Xu, Yong-Nan; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Oocyte meiosis involves a unique asymmetric division involving spindle movement from the central cytoplasm to the cortex, followed by polar body extrusion. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector involved in various cellular functions in somatic cells as well as oocyte meiosis. ROCK was previously shown to promote actin organization by phosphorylating several downstream targets, including LIM domain kinase (LIMK), phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin), and myosin light chain (MLC). In this study, we investigated the roles of ROCK and MLC during bovine oocyte meiosis. We found that ROCK was localized around the nucleus at the oocyte's germinal-vesicle (GV) stage, but spreads to the rest of the cytoplasm in later developmental stages. On the other hand, phosphorylated MLC (p-MLC) localized at the cortex, and its abundance decreased by the metaphase-II stage. Disrupting ROCK activity, via RNAi or the chemical inhibitor Y-27632, blocked both cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion. ROCK inhibition also resulted in decreased cortical actin, p-cofilin, and p-MLC levels. Similar to the phenotype associated with inhibition of ROCK activity, inhibition of MLC kinase by the chemical inhibitor ML-7 caused defects in polar body extrusion. Collectively, our results suggest that the ROCK/MLC/actomyosin as well as ROCK/LIMK/cofilin pathways regulate meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during bovine oocyte maturation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Initiation of Meiotic Recombination in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; de Massy, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the induction of programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). DSB repair promotes homologous interactions and pairing and leads to the formation of crossovers (COs), which are required for the proper reductional segregation at the first meiotic division. In mammals, several hundred DSBs are generated at the beginning of meiotic prophase by the catalytic activity of SPO11. Currently it is not well understood how the frequency and timing of DSB formation and their localization are regulated. Several approaches in humans and mice have provided an extensive description of the localization of initiation events based on CO mapping, leading to the identification and characterization of preferred sites (hotspots) of initiation. This review presents the current knowledge about the proteins known to be involved in this process, the sites where initiation takes place, and the factors that control hotspot localization. PMID:24710101

  16. Condensin and the spindle midzone prevent cytokinesis failure induced by chromatin bridges in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Bembenek, Joshua N; Verbrugghe, Koen J C; Khanikar, Jayshree; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Chan, Raymond C

    2013-06-03

    During cell division, chromosomes must clear the path of the cleavage furrow before the onset of cytokinesis. The abscission checkpoint in mammalian cells stabilizes the cleavage furrow in the presence of a chromatin obstruction. This provides time to resolve the obstruction before the cleavage furrow regresses or breaks the chromosomes, preventing aneuploidy or DNA damage. Two unanswered questions in the proposed mechanistic pathway of the abscission checkpoint concern factors involved in (1) resolving the obstructions and (2) coordinating obstruction resolution with the delay in cytokinesis. We found that the one-cell and two-cell C. elegans embryos suppress furrow regression following depletion of essential chromosome-segregation factors: topoisomerase II(TOP-2), CENP-A(HCP-3), cohesin, and to a lesser degree, condensin. Chromatin obstructions activated Aurora B(AIR-2) at the spindle midzone, which is needed for the abscission checkpoint in other systems. Condensin I, but not condensin II, localizes to the spindle midzone in anaphase and to the midbody during normal cytokinesis. Interestingly, condensin I is enriched on chromatin bridges and near the midzone/midbody in an AIR-2-dependent manner. Disruption of AIR-2, the spindle midzone, or condensin leads to cytokinesis failure in a chromatin-obstruction-dependent manner. Examination of the condensin-deficient embryos uncovered defects in both the resolution of the chromatin obstructions and the maintenance of the stable cleavage furrow. We postulate that condensin I is recruited by Aurora B(AIR-2) to aid in the resolution of chromatin obstructions and also helps generate a signal to maintain the delay in cytokinesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Condensin and the spindle midzone prevent cytokinesis failure induced by chromatin bridges in C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Joshua N.; Verbrugghe, Koen J.C.; Khanikar, Jayshree; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Chan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background During cell division, chromosomes must clear the path of the cleavage furrow before the onset of cytokinesis. The abscission checkpoint in mammalian cells stabilizes the cleavage furrow in the presence of a chromatin obstruction. This provides time to resolve the obstruction before the cleavage furrow regresses or breaks the chromosomes, preventing aneuploidy or DNA damage. Two unanswered questions in the proposed mechanistic pathway of the abscission checkpoint concern factors involved in 1) resolving the obstructions, and 2) coordinating obstruction resolution with the delay in cytokinesis. Results We found that the 1-cell and 2-cell C. elegans embryos suppress furrow regression following depletion of essential chromosome segregation factors: topoisomerase IITOP-2, CENP-AHCP-3, cohesin, and to a lesser degree, condensin. Chromatin obstructions activated Aurora BAIR-2 at the spindle midzone, which is needed for the abscission checkpoint in other systems. Condensin I, but not condensin II, localizes to the spindle midzone in anaphase and to the midbody during normal cytokinesis. Interestingly, condensin I is enriched on chromatin bridges and near the midzone/midbody in an AIR-2 dependent manner. Disruption of AIR-2, the spindle midzone or condensin leads to cytokinesis failure in a chromatin-obstruction-dependent manner. Examination of the condensin-deficient embryos uncovered defects in both the resolution of the chromatin obstructions and the maintenance of the stable cleavage furrow. Conclusions We postulate that condensin I is recruited by Aurora BAIR-2 to aid in the resolution of chromatin obstructions and also helps generate a signal to maintain the delay in cytokinesis. PMID:23684975

  18. Two p90 ribosomal S6 kinase isoforms are involved in the regulation of mitotic and meiotic arrest in Artemia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ru-Bing; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dian-Fu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2014-06-06

    There are multiple isoforms of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), which regulate diverse cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, maturation, and motility. However, the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms remains undetermined. Artemia is a useful model in which to study cell cycle arrest because these animals undergo prolonged diapauses, a state of obligate dormancy. A novel RSK isoform was identified in Artemia, which was termed Ar-Rsk2. This isoform was compared with an RSK isoform that we previously identified in Artemia, termed Ar-Rsk1. Ar-Rsk2 has an ERK-docking motif, whereas Ar-Rsk1 does not. Western blot analysis revealed that Ar-Rsk1 was activated by phosphorylation, which blocked meiosis in oocytes. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk1 reduced the level of phosphorylated cdc2 and thereby suppressed cytostatic factor activity. This indicates that Ar-Rsk1 regulates the cytostatic factor in meiosis. Expression of Ar-Rsk2 was down-regulated in Artemia cysts in which mitosis was arrested. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk2 resulted in decreased levels of cyclin D3 and phosphorylated histone H3, and the production of pseudo-diapause cysts. This indicates that Ar-Rsk2 regulates mitotic arrest. PLK and ERK RNAi showed that Ar-Rsk2, but not Ar-Rsk1, could be activated by PLK-ERK in Artemia. This is the first study to report that RSK isoforms with and without an ERK-docking motif regulate mitosis and meiosis, respectively. This study provides insight into the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Two p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase Isoforms Are Involved in the Regulation of Mitotic and Meiotic Arrest in Artemia*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ru-Bing; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dian-Fu; Yang, Fan; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2014-01-01

    There are multiple isoforms of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), which regulate diverse cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, maturation, and motility. However, the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms remains undetermined. Artemia is a useful model in which to study cell cycle arrest because these animals undergo prolonged diapauses, a state of obligate dormancy. A novel RSK isoform was identified in Artemia, which was termed Ar-Rsk2. This isoform was compared with an RSK isoform that we previously identified in Artemia, termed Ar-Rsk1. Ar-Rsk2 has an ERK-docking motif, whereas Ar-Rsk1 does not. Western blot analysis revealed that Ar-Rsk1 was activated by phosphorylation, which blocked meiosis in oocytes. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk1 reduced the level of phosphorylated cdc2 and thereby suppressed cytostatic factor activity. This indicates that Ar-Rsk1 regulates the cytostatic factor in meiosis. Expression of Ar-Rsk2 was down-regulated in Artemia cysts in which mitosis was arrested. Knockdown of Ar-Rsk2 resulted in decreased levels of cyclin D3 and phosphorylated histone H3, and the production of pseudo-diapause cysts. This indicates that Ar-Rsk2 regulates mitotic arrest. PLK and ERK RNAi showed that Ar-Rsk2, but not Ar-Rsk1, could be activated by PLK-ERK in Artemia. This is the first study to report that RSK isoforms with and without an ERK-docking motif regulate mitosis and meiosis, respectively. This study provides insight into the relationship between the structures and functions of RSK isoforms. PMID:24755224

  20. Combinatorial regulation of meiotic holliday junction resolution in C. elegans by HIM-6 (BLM) helicase, SLX-4, and the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Ana; Meier, Bettina; Sonneville, Remi; Jagut, Marlène; Woglar, Alexander; Blow, Julian; Jantsch, Verena; Gartner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are cruciform DNA structures that are created during recombination events. It is a matter of considerable importance to determine the resolvase(s) that promote resolution of these structures. We previously reported that C. elegans GEN-1 is a symmetrically cleaving HJ resolving enzyme required for recombinational repair, but we could not find an overt role in meiotic recombination. Here we identify C. elegans proteins involved in resolving meiotic HJs. We found no evidence for a redundant meiotic function of GEN-1. In contrast, we discovered two redundant HJ resolution pathways likely coordinated by the SLX-4 scaffold protein and also involving the HIM-6/BLM helicase. SLX-4 associates with the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases and has been implicated in meiotic recombination in C. elegans. We found that C. elegans [mus-81; xpf-1], [slx-1; xpf-1], [mus-81; him-6] and [slx-1; him-6] double mutants showed a similar reduction in survival rates as slx-4. Analysis of meiotic diakinesis chromosomes revealed a distinct phenotype in these double mutants. Instead of wild-type bivalent chromosomes, pairs of "univalents" linked by chromatin bridges occur. These linkages depend on the conserved meiosis-specific transesterase SPO-11 and can be restored by ionizing radiation, suggesting that they represent unresolved meiotic HJs. This suggests the existence of two major resolvase activities, one provided by XPF-1 and HIM-6, the other by SLX-1 and MUS-81. In all double mutants crossover (CO) recombination is reduced but not abolished, indicative of further redundancy in meiotic HJ resolution. Real time imaging revealed extensive chromatin bridges during the first meiotic division that appear to be eventually resolved in meiosis II, suggesting back-up resolution activities acting at or after anaphase I. We also show that in HJ resolution mutants, the restructuring of chromosome arms distal and proximal to the CO still occurs, suggesting that CO initiation

  1. Combinatorial Regulation of Meiotic Holliday Junction Resolution in C. elegans by HIM-6 (BLM) Helicase, SLX-4, and the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Sonneville, Remi; Jagut, Marlène; Woglar, Alexander; Blow, Julian; Jantsch, Verena; Gartner, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are cruciform DNA structures that are created during recombination events. It is a matter of considerable importance to determine the resolvase(s) that promote resolution of these structures. We previously reported that C. elegans GEN-1 is a symmetrically cleaving HJ resolving enzyme required for recombinational repair, but we could not find an overt role in meiotic recombination. Here we identify C. elegans proteins involved in resolving meiotic HJs. We found no evidence for a redundant meiotic function of GEN-1. In contrast, we discovered two redundant HJ resolution pathways likely coordinated by the SLX-4 scaffold protein and also involving the HIM-6/BLM helicase. SLX-4 associates with the SLX-1, MUS-81 and XPF-1 nucleases and has been implicated in meiotic recombination in C. elegans. We found that C. elegans [mus-81; xpf-1], [slx-1; xpf-1], [mus-81; him-6] and [slx-1; him-6] double mutants showed a similar reduction in survival rates as slx-4. Analysis of meiotic diakinesis chromosomes revealed a distinct phenotype in these double mutants. Instead of wild-type bivalent chromosomes, pairs of “univalents” linked by chromatin bridges occur. These linkages depend on the conserved meiosis-specific transesterase SPO-11 and can be restored by ionizing radiation, suggesting that they represent unresolved meiotic HJs. This suggests the existence of two major resolvase activities, one provided by XPF-1 and HIM-6, the other by SLX-1 and MUS-81. In all double mutants crossover (CO) recombination is reduced but not abolished, indicative of further redundancy in meiotic HJ resolution. Real time imaging revealed extensive chromatin bridges during the first meiotic division that appear to be eventually resolved in meiosis II, suggesting back-up resolution activities acting at or after anaphase I. We also show that in HJ resolution mutants, the restructuring of chromosome arms distal and proximal to the CO still occurs, suggesting that CO

  2. HJURP interaction with the condensin II complex during G1 promotes CENP-A deposition

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart-Dailey, Meghan C.; Trivedi, Prasad; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Foltz, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    Centromeric chromatin is required for kinetochore assembly during mitosis and accurate chromosome segregation. A unique nucleosome containing the histone H3–specific variant CENP-A is the defining feature of centromeric chromatin. In humans, CENP-A nucleosome deposition occurs in early G1 just after mitotic exit at the time when the CENP-A deposition machinery localizes to centromeres. The mechanism by which CENP-A is deposited onto an existing, condensed chromatin template is not understood. Here we identify the selective association of the CENP-A chaperone HJURP with the condensin II complex and not condensin I. We show CAPH2 is present at centromeres during early G1 at the time when CENP-A deposition is occurring. CAPH2 localization to early G1 centromeres is dependent on HJURP. The CENP-A chaperone and assembly factor HJURP induces decondensation of a noncentromeric LacO array, and this decondensation is modulated by the condensin II complex. We show that condensin II function at the centromere is required for new CENP-A deposition in human cells. These data demonstrate that HJURP selectively recruits the condensin II chromatin-remodeling complex to facilitate CENP-A deposition in human cells. PMID:27807043

  3. Metaphase chromosome structure is dynamically maintained by condensin I-directed DNA (de)catenation

    PubMed Central

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Tavares, Alexandra; Oliveira, Raquel A

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic chromosome assembly remains a big mystery in biology. Condensin complexes are pivotal for chromosome architecture yet how they shape mitotic chromatin remains unknown. Using acute inactivation approaches and live-cell imaging in Drosophila embryos, we dissect the role of condensin I in the maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure with unprecedented temporal resolution. Removal of condensin I from pre-established chromosomes results in rapid disassembly of centromeric regions while most chromatin mass undergoes hyper-compaction. This is accompanied by drastic changes in the degree of sister chromatid intertwines. While wild-type metaphase chromosomes display residual levels of catenations, upon timely removal of condensin I, chromosomes present high levels of de novo Topoisomerase II (TopoII)-dependent re-entanglements, and complete failure in chromosome segregation. TopoII is thus capable of re-intertwining previously separated DNA molecules and condensin I continuously required to counteract this erroneous activity. We propose that maintenance of chromosome resolution is a highly dynamic bidirectional process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26120.001 PMID:28477406

  4. Defective histone supply causes condensin-dependent chromatin alterations, SAC activation and chromosome decatenation impairment

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Pineda, Marina; Cabello-Lobato, María J.; Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Monje-Casas, Fernando; Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The structural organization of chromosomes is essential for their correct function and dynamics during the cell cycle. The assembly of DNA into chromatin provides the substrate for topoisomerases and condensins, which introduce the different levels of superhelical torsion required for DNA metabolism. In particular, Top2 and condensin are directly involved in both the resolution of precatenanes that form during replication and the formation of the intramolecular loop that detects tension at the centromeric chromatin during chromosome biorientation. Here we show that histone depletion activates the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and impairs sister chromatid decatenation, leading to chromosome mis-segregation and lethality in the absence of the SAC. We demonstrate that histone depletion impairs chromosome biorientation and activates the Aurora-dependent pathway, which detects tension problems at the kinetochore. Interestingly, SAC activation is suppressed by the absence of Top2 and Smc2, an essential component of condensin. Indeed, smc2-8 suppresses catenanes accumulation, mitotic arrest and growth defects induced by histone depletion at semi-permissive temperature. Remarkably, SAC activation by histone depletion is associated with condensin-mediated alterations of the centromeric chromatin. Therefore, our results reveal the importance of a precise interplay between histone supply and condensin/Top2 for pericentric chromatin structure, precatenanes resolution and centromere biorientation. PMID:25300489

  5. The Condensin Complex Governs Chromosome Condensation and Mitotic Transmission of Rdna

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Lita; Aragon-Alcaide, Luis; Strunnikov, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    We have characterized five genes encoding condensin components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All genes are essential for cell viability and encode proteins that form a complex in vivo. We characterized new mutant alleles of the genes encoding the core subunits of this complex, smc2-8 and smc4-1. Both SMC2 and SMC4 are essential for chromosome transmission in anaphase. Mutations in these genes cause defects in establishing condensation of unique (chromosome VIII arm) and repetitive (rDNA) regions of the genome but do not impair sister chromatid cohesion. In vivo localization of Smc4p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that, unexpectedly, in S. cerevisiae the condensin complex concentrates in the rDNA region at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. rDNA segregation in mitosis is delayed and/or stalled in smc2 and smc4 mutants, compared with separation of pericentromeric and distal arm regions. Mitotic transmission of chromosome III carrying the rDNA translocation is impaired in smc2 and smc4 mutants. Thus, the condensin complex in S. cerevisiae has a specialized function in mitotic segregation of the rDNA locus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that condensin is physically associated with rDNA in vivo. Thus, the rDNA array is the first identified set of DNA sequences specifically bound by condensin in vivo. The biological role of higher-order chromosome structure in S. cerevisiae is discussed. PMID:10811823

  6. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) alters mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway regulation and microRNA expression in mouse meiotic spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Koli, S; Reddy, K V R

    2015-09-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a signal transduction pathway that modulates translation initiation in several animals including mammals. Rapamaycin, an allosteric inhibitor of mTOR pathway, is often used as an immunosuppressive drug following kidney transplantation and causes gonadal dysfunction and defects in spermatogenesis. The molecular mechanism behind rapamycin-mediated testicular dysfunction is not known. We have therefore explored the contribution of rapamycin in mTOR regulation and microRNA (miRNA) expression in mouse spermatocytes, the intermediate stage of spermatogenesis, where meiosis takes place. In the present study, we optimized the isolation of highly pure and viable spermatocytes by flow sorting, treated them with rapamycin, and investigated the expression of mTOR and downstream effector molecules. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis confirm that rapamycin treatment suppresses mTOR and phopsphorylated P70S6 kinase activities in spermatocytes, but not that of phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1. Also, rapamycin treatment modulates the expression of several spermatocyte-specific miRNAs. To complement these finding an in vivo study was also performed. In silico prediction of target genes of these miRNAs and their functional pathway analysis revealed that, several of them are involved in crucial biological process, cellular process and catalytic activities. miRNA-transcription factor (TF) network analysis enlisted different TFs propelling the transcription machineries of these miRNAs. In silico prediction followed by quatitative real-time PCR revealed two of these TFs namely, PU.1 and CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) are down and upregulated, respectively, which may be the reason of the altered expression of miRNAs following rapamycin treatment. In conclusion, for the first time, the present study provides insight into how rapamycin regulates mTOR pathway and spermatocyte-specific miRNA expression which in turn, regulate expression of

  7. Autophosphorylation of the Smk1 MAPK is spatially and temporally regulated by Ssp2 during meiotic development in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tio, Chong Wai; Omerza, Gregory; Sunder, Sham; Winter, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Smk1 is a meiosis-specific MAPK that controls spore wall morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although Smk1 is activated by phosphorylation of the threonine (T) and tyrosine (Y) in its activation loop, it is not phosphorylated by a dual-specificity MAPK kinase. Instead, the T is phosphorylated by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)–activating kinase, Cak1. The Y is autophosphorylated in an intramolecular reaction that requires a meiosis-specific protein named Ssp2. The meiosis-specific CDK-like kinase, Ime2, was previously shown to positively regulate Smk1. Here we show that Ime2 activity is required to induce the translation of SSP2 mRNA at anaphase II. Ssp2 protein is then localized to the prospore membrane, the structure where spore wall assembly takes place. Next the carboxy-terminal portion of Ssp2 forms a complex with Smk1 and stimulates the autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y residue. These findings link Ime2 to Smk1 activation through Ssp2 and define a developmentally regulated mechanism for activating MAPK at specific locations in the cell. PMID:26246597

  8. Dynamic changes of connexin-43, gap junctional protein, in outer layers of cumulus cells are regulated by PKC and PI 3-kinase during meiotic resumption in porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Maeda, T; Terada, T

    2001-04-01

    Mammalian oocytes are surrounded by numerous layers of cumulus cells, and the loss of gap junctional communication in the outer layers of cumulus cells induces meiotic resumption in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in the gap junctional protein connexin-43 in cumulus cells during the meiotic resumption of porcine oocytes. The amount of connexin-43 in all layers of cumulus cells recovered from cumulus-oocyte complexes was increased after 4-h cultivation. However, at 12-h cultivation, the positive signal for connexin-43 immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the outer layers of cumulus cells. When these reductions of connexin-43 were blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) or phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor, networks of filamentous bivalents (i.e., advanced chromosomal status) were undetectable in the germinal vesicle of the oocyte. After 28-h cultivation, when the majority of oocytes were reaching the metaphase I (MI) stage, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells was phosphorylated, regardless of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. These results suggest that the initiation of meiotic resumption, namely, the formation of networks of filamentous bivalents in germinal vesicle, is associated with the reduction of gap junctional protein connexin-43 in the outer layers of cumulus cells via the PKC and/or PI 3-kinase pathway. Moreover, the connexin-43 in the inner layers of cumulus cells is phosphorylated during meiotic progression beyond the MI stage, regardless of MAP kinase activation in cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte.

  9. Meiotic nuclear movements in fission yeast are regulated by the transcription factor Mei4 downstream of a Cds1-dependent replication checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Kun; Yamamoto, Takaharu G; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Chikashige, Yuji; Masukata, Hisao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-03-01

    In meiosis, the fission yeast nucleus displays an elongated morphology, moving back and forth within the cell; these nuclear movements continue for approximately 2 h before meiotic nuclear divisions. Meiotic DNA replication occurs in an early phase of the nuclear movements and is followed by meiotic prophase. Here we report that in mutants deficient in meiotic DNA replication, the duration of nuclear movements is strikingly prolonged to four to 5 h. We found that this prolongation was caused by the Cds1-dependent replication checkpoint, which represses expression of the mei4(+) gene encoding a meiosis-specific transcription factor. In the absence of Mei4, nuclear movements persisted for more than 8 h. In contrast, overproduction of Mei4 accelerated termination of nuclear movements to approximately 30 min. These results show that Mei4 is involved in the termination of nuclear movements and that Mei4-mediated regulatory pathways link a DNA replication checkpoint to the termination of nuclear movements.

  10. Complex elaboration: making sense of meiotic cohesin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    In mitotically dividing cells, the cohesin complex tethers sister chromatids, the products of DNA replication, together from the time they are generated during S phase until anaphase. Cohesion between sister chromatids ensures accurate chromosome segregation, and promotes normal gene regulation and certain kinds of DNA repair. In somatic cells, the core cohesin complex is composed of four subunits: Smc1, Smc3, Rad21 and an SA subunit. During meiotic cell divisions meiosis-specific isoforms of several of the cohesin subunits are also expressed and incorporated into distinct meiotic cohesin complexes. The relative contributions of these meiosis-specific forms of cohesin to chromosome dynamics during meiotic progression have not been fully worked out. However, the localization of these proteins during chromosome pairing and synapsis, and their unique loss-of-function phenotypes, suggest non-overlapping roles in controlling meiotic chromosome behavior. Many of the proteins that regulate cohesin function during mitosis also appear to regulate cohesin during meiosis. Here we review how cohesin contributes to meiotic chromosome dynamics, and explore similarities and differences between cohesin regulation during the mitotic cell cycle and meiotic progression. A deeper understanding of the regulation and function of cohesin in meiosis will provide important new insights into how the cohesin complex is able to promote distinct kinds of chromosome interactions under diverse conditions. PMID:25895170

  11. ATPase-dependent auto-phosphorylation of the open condensin hinge diminishes DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Akai, Yuko; Kanai, Ryuta; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Ebe, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Condensin, which contains two structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) subunits and three regulatory non-SMC subunits, is essential for many chromosomal functions, including mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation. The ATPase domain of the SMC subunit comprises two termini connected by a long helical domain that is interrupted by a central hinge. The role of the ATPase domain has remained elusive. Here we report that the condensin SMC subunit of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is phosphorylated in a manner that requires the presence of the intact SMC ATPase Walker motif. Principal phosphorylation sites reside in the conserved, glycine-rich stretch at the hinge interface surrounded by the highly basic DNA-binding patch. Phosphorylation reduces affinity for DNA. Consistently, phosphomimetic mutants produce severe mitotic phenotypes. Structural evidence suggests that prior opening (though slight) of the hinge is necessary for phosphorylation, which is implicated in condensin's dissociation from and its progression along DNA. PMID:25520186

  12. Balancing acts of two HEAT subunits of condensin I support dynamic assembly of chromosome axes.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2015-04-06

    Condensin I is a five-subunit protein complex that plays a central role in mitotic chromosome assembly and segregation in eukaryotes. To dissect its mechanism of action, we reconstituted wild-type and mutant complexes from recombinant subunits and tested their abilities to assemble chromosomes in Xenopus egg cell-free extracts depleted of endogenous condensins. We find that ATP binding and hydrolysis by SMC subunits have distinct contributions to the action of condensin I and that continuous ATP hydrolysis is required for structural maintenance of chromosomes. Mutant complexes lacking either one of two HEAT subunits produce abnormal chromosomes with highly characteristic defects and have contrasting structural effects on chromosome axes preassembled with the wild-type complex. We propose that balancing acts of the two HEAT subunits support dynamic assembly of chromosome axes under the control of the SMC ATPase cycle, thereby governing construction of rod-shaped chromosomes in eukaryotic cells.

  13. A new light on the meiotic DSB catalytic complex.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Mézard, Christine; de Massy, Bernard; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). More than 15 years ago, Spo11 was identified as the protein responsible for meiotic DSB formation, notably because of its striking similarities with the A subunit of topoisomerase VI (TopoVI). TopoVI are enzymes that modify DNA topology by generating transient DSBs and are active as heterotetramers, composed of two A and two B subunits. A2 dimers catalyse the DNA cleavage reaction, whereas the B subunits regulate A2 conformation, DNA capture, cleavage and re-ligation. The recent identification in plants and mammals of a B-like TopoVI subunit that interacts with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation makes us to reconsider our understanding of the meiotic DSB catalytic complex. We provide here an overview of the knowledge on TopoVI structure and mode of action and we compare them with their meiotic counterparts. This allows us to discuss the nature, structure and functions of the meiotic TopoVI-like complex during meiotic DSB formation.

  14. The conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the DNA binding regulator Ume6 repress BOI1's meiotic transcript isoform during vegetative growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuchen; Stuparevic, Igor; Xie, Bingning; Becker, Emmanuelle; Law, Michael J; Primig, Michael

    2015-05-01

    BOI1 and BOI2 are paralogs important for the actin cytoskeleton and polar growth. BOI1 encodes a meiotic transcript isoform with an extended 5'-untranslated region predicted to impair protein translation. It is, however, unknown how the isoform is repressed during mitosis, and if Boi1 is present during sporulation. By interpreting microarray data from MATa cells, MATa/α cells, a starving MATα/α control, and a meiosis-impaired rrp6 mutant, we classified BOI1's extended isoform as early meiosis-specific. These results were confirmed by RNA-Sequencing, and extended by a 5'-RACE assay and Northern blotting, showing that meiotic cells induce the long isoform while the mitotic isoform remains detectable during meiosis. We provide evidence via motif predictions, an in vivo binding assay and genetic experiments that the Rpd3/Sin3/Ume6 histone deacetylase complex, which represses meiotic genes during mitosis, also prevents the induction of BOI1's 5'-extended isoform in mitosis by direct binding of Ume6 to its URS1 target. Finally, we find that Boi1 protein levels decline when cells switch from fermentation to respiration and sporulation. The histone deacetylase Rpd3 is conserved, and eukaryotic genes frequently encode transcripts with variable 5'-UTRs. Our findings are therefore relevant for regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of transcript isoforms in multi-cellular organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characterization of aurora-a in porcine oocytes and early embryos implies its functional roles in the regulation of meiotic maturation, fertilization and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li-Juan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2005-02-01

    Aurora-A is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays important regulatory roles during mitotic cell cycle progression. In this study, Aurora-A expression, subcellular localization, and possible functions during porcine oocyte meiotic maturation, fertilization and early embryonic cleavage were studied by using Western blot, confocal microscopy and drug treatments. The quantity of Aurora-A protein remained stable during porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. Confocal microscopy revealed that Aurora-A distributed abundantly in the nucleus at the germinal vesicle stage. After germinal vesicle breakdown, Aurora-A concentrated around the condensed chromosomes and the metaphase I spindle, and finally, Aurora-A was associated with spindle poles during the formation of the metaphase II spindle. Aurora-A concentrated in the pronuclei in fertilized eggs. Aurora-A was not found in the spindle region when colchicine or staurosporine was used to inhibit microtubule organization, while it accumulated as several dots in the cytoplasm after taxol treatment. In conclusion, Aurora-A may be a multifunctional kinase that plays pivotal regulatory roles in microtubule assembly during porcine oocyte meiotic maturation, fertilization and early embryonic mitosis.

  16. The role of chromatin modifications in progression through mouse meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Crichton, James H; Playfoot, Christopher J; Adams, Ian R

    2014-03-20

    Meiosis is a key event in gametogenesis that generates new combinations of genetic information and is required to reduce the chromosome content of the gametes. Meiotic chromosomes undergo a number of specialised events during prophase to allow meiotic recombination, homologous chromosome synapsis and reductional chromosome segregation to occur. In mammalian cells, DNA physically associates with histones to form chromatin, which can be modified by methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and acetylation to help regulate higher order chromatin structure, gene expression, and chromosome organisation. Recent studies have identified some of the enzymes responsible for generating chromatin modifications in meiotic mammalian cells, and shown that these chromatin modifying enzymes are required for key meiosis-specific events that occur during meiotic prophase. This review will discuss the role of chromatin modifications in meiotic recombination, homologous chromosome synapsis and regulation of meiotic gene expression in mammals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Implementation of meiosis prophase I programme requires a conserved retinoid-independent stabilizer of meiotic transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Emilie; Tourpin, Sophie; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Daniel, Katrin; Messiaen, Sébastien; Moison, Delphine; Guerquin, Justine; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Armengaud, Jean; Langa, Francina; Toth, Attila; Martini, Emmanuelle; Livera, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is crucially dependent on meiosis, a conserved, specialized cell division programme that is essential for the production of haploid gametes. Here we demonstrate that fertility and the implementation of the meiotic programme require a previously uncharacterized meiosis-specific protein, MEIOC. Meioc invalidation in mice induces early and pleiotropic meiotic defects in males and females. MEIOC prevents meiotic transcript degradation and interacts with an RNA helicase that binds numerous meiotic mRNAs. Our results indicate that proper engagement into meiosis necessitates the specific stabilization of meiotic transcripts, a previously little-appreciated feature in mammals. Remarkably, the upregulation of MEIOC at the onset of meiosis does not require retinoic acid and STRA8 signalling. Thus, we propose that the complete induction of the meiotic programme requires both retinoic acid-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The latter process involving post-transcriptional regulation likely represents an ancestral mechanism, given that MEIOC homologues are conserved throughout multicellular animals. PMID:26742488

  18. Control of Oocyte Growth and Meiotic Maturation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongseop; Spike, Caroline; Greenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    In sexually reproducing animals, oocytes arrest at diplotene or diakinesis and resume meiosis (meiotic maturation) in response to hormones. Chromosome segregation errors in female meiosis I are the leading cause of human birth defects, and age-related changes in the hormonal environment of the ovary are a suggested cause. C. elegans is emerging as a genetic paradigm for studying hormonal control of meiotic maturation. The meiotic maturation processes in C. elegans and mammals share a number of biological and molecular similarities. Major sperm protein (MSP) and luteinizing hormone (LH), though unrelated in sequence, both trigger meiotic resumption using somatic Gαs-adenylate cyclase pathways and soma-germline gap-junctional communication. At a molecular level, the oocyte responses apparently involve the control of conserved protein kinase pathways and post-transcriptional gene regulation in the oocyte. At a cellular level, the responses include cortical cytoskeletal rearrangement, nuclear envelope breakdown, assembly of the acentriolar meiotic spindle, chromosome segregation, and likely changes important for fertilization and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. This chapter focuses on signaling mechanisms required for oocyte growth and meiotic maturation in C. elegans and discusses how these mechanisms coordinate the completion of meiosis and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. PMID:22872481

  19. Disruption of a conserved CAP-D3 threonine alters condensin loading on mitotic chromosomes leading to chromosome hypercondensation.

    PubMed

    Bakhrebah, Muhammed; Zhang, Tao; Mann, Jeff R; Kalitsis, Paul; Hudson, Damien F

    2015-03-06

    The condensin complex plays a key role in organizing mitotic chromosomes. In vertebrates, there are two condensin complexes that have independent and cooperative roles in folding mitotic chromosomes. In this study, we dissect the role of a putative Cdk1 site on the condensin II subunit CAP-D3 in chicken DT40 cells. This conserved site has been shown to activate condensin II during prophase in human cells, and facilitate further phosphorylation by polo-like kinase I. We examined the functional significance of this phosphorylation mark by mutating the orthologous site of CAP-D3 (CAP-D3(T1403A)) in chicken DT40 cells. We show that this mutation is a gain of function mutant in chicken cells; it disrupts prophase, results in a dramatic shortening of the mitotic chromosome axis, and leads to abnormal INCENP localization. Our results imply phosphorylation of CAP-D3 acts to limit condensin II binding onto mitotic chromosomes. We present the first in vivo example that alters the ratio of condensin I:II on mitotic chromosomes. Our results demonstrate this ratio is a critical determinant in shaping mitotic chromosomes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Disruption of a Conserved CAP-D3 Threonine Alters Condensin Loading on Mitotic Chromosomes Leading to Chromosome Hypercondensation*

    PubMed Central

    Bakhrebah, Muhammed; Zhang, Tao; Mann, Jeff R.; Kalitsis, Paul; Hudson, Damien F.

    2015-01-01

    The condensin complex plays a key role in organizing mitotic chromosomes. In vertebrates, there are two condensin complexes that have independent and cooperative roles in folding mitotic chromosomes. In this study, we dissect the role of a putative Cdk1 site on the condensin II subunit CAP-D3 in chicken DT40 cells. This conserved site has been shown to activate condensin II during prophase in human cells, and facilitate further phosphorylation by polo-like kinase I. We examined the functional significance of this phosphorylation mark by mutating the orthologous site of CAP-D3 (CAP-D3T1403A) in chicken DT40 cells. We show that this mutation is a gain of function mutant in chicken cells; it disrupts prophase, results in a dramatic shortening of the mitotic chromosome axis, and leads to abnormal INCENP localization. Our results imply phosphorylation of CAP-D3 acts to limit condensin II binding onto mitotic chromosomes. We present the first in vivo example that alters the ratio of condensin I:II on mitotic chromosomes. Our results demonstrate this ratio is a critical determinant in shaping mitotic chromosomes. PMID:25605712

  1. Co-culture of spermatogonial stem cells with sertoli cells in the presence of testosterone and FSH improved differentiation via up-regulation of post meiotic genes.

    PubMed

    Minaee Zanganeh, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Ragerdi Kashani, Iraj; Amidi, Fardin; Abolhasani, Farid; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) maintain spermatogenesis throughout life in the male. Maintenance of SSCs and induction of spermiogenesis in vitro may provide a therapeutic strategy to treat male infertility. This study investigated in vitro differentiation of mouse SSCs in presence or absence of Sertoli cells, hormones and vitamins. Spermatogonial populations were enriched from testes of 4-6 week old males by magnetic activated cell sorting and anti-Thy-1 antibody. Sertoli cells isolated from 6-8 week old testes were enriched using lectin-DSA-coated plates. Isolated SSCs were cultured in the presence of Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) for 7 days in gelatin-coated dishes, then dissociated and cultured for 7 days in media lacking LIF in the presence or absence of Sertoli cells, with or without FSH, testosterone and vitamins. After one week, the effects of Sertoli cells ± supplementary media on SSC differentiation was evaluated by microscopy and expression of meiotic and postmeiotic transcripts using RT-PCR. SSC colonies had limited development after LIF removal alone, exhibiting low expression of meiotic (Scp3, Th2b) but not postmeiotic transcript, and loss of Stra8 and Dazl expression. SSCs co-cultured with Sertoli cells, hormones and vitamins developed spermatid-like cells expressing postmeiotic markers (TP1, TP2, Prm1) at levels over 2-fold higher than Sertoli cells or hormone/vitamins alone. Our present SSC-Sertoli co-culture provides conditions that may allow efficient in vitro differentiation of SSCs for the treatment of male infertility. © 2013 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.

  2. Condensin- and Replication-Mediated Bacterial Chromosome Folding and Origin Condensation Revealed by Hi-C and Super-resolution Imaging.

    PubMed

    Marbouty, Martial; Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I; Cournac, Axel; Koh, Alan; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Mozziconacci, Julien; Murray, Heath; Koszul, Romain; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2015-08-20

    Chromosomes of a broad range of species, from bacteria to mammals, are structured by large topological domains whose precise functional roles and regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we combine super-resolution microscopies and chromosome-capture technologies to unravel the higher-order organization of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and its dynamic rearrangements during the cell cycle. We decipher the fine 3D architecture of the origin domain, revealing folding motifs regulated by condensin-like complexes. This organization, along with global folding throughout the genome, is present before replication, disrupted by active DNA replication, and re-established thereafter. Single-cell analysis revealed a strict correspondence between sub-cellular localization of origin domains and their condensation state. Our results suggest that the precise 3D folding pattern of the origin domain plays a role in the regulation of replication initiation, chromosome organization, and DNA segregation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Shugoshin biases chromosomes for biorientation through condensin recruitment to the pericentromere

    PubMed Central

    Verzijlbergen, Kitty F; Nerusheva, Olga O; Kelly, David; Kerr, Alastair; Clift, Dean; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Marston, Adele L

    2014-01-01

    To protect against aneuploidy, chromosomes must attach to microtubules from opposite poles (‘biorientation’) prior to their segregation during mitosis. Biorientation relies on the correction of erroneous attachments by the aurora B kinase, which destabilizes kinetochore-microtubule attachments that lack tension. Incorrect attachments are also avoided because sister kinetochores are intrinsically biased towards capture by microtubules from opposite poles. Here, we show that shugoshin acts as a pericentromeric adaptor that plays dual roles in biorientation in budding yeast. Shugoshin maintains the aurora B kinase at kinetochores that lack tension, thereby engaging the error correction machinery. Shugoshin also recruits the chromosome-organizing complex, condensin, to the pericentromere. Pericentromeric condensin biases sister kinetochores towards capture by microtubules from opposite poles. Our findings uncover the molecular basis of the bias to sister kinetochore capture and expose shugoshin as a pericentromeric hub controlling chromosome biorientation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01374.001 PMID:24497542

  4. Mutations in genes encoding condensin complex proteins cause microcephaly through decatenation failure at mitosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Murray, Jennie E; Carroll, Paula; Leitch, Andrea; Mackenzie, Karen J; Halachev, Mihail; Fetit, Ahmed E; Keith, Charlotte; Bicknell, Louise S; Fluteau, Adeline; Gautier, Philippe; Hall, Emma A; Joss, Shelagh; Soares, Gabriela; Silva, João; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Wise, Carol A; Quigley, Alan J; Phadke, Shubha R; Wood, Andrew J; Vagnarelli, Paola; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-10-01

    Compaction of chromosomes is essential for accurate segregation of the genome during mitosis. In vertebrates, two condensin complexes ensure timely chromosome condensation, sister chromatid disentanglement, and maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure. Here, we report that biallelic mutations in NCAPD2, NCAPH, or NCAPD3, encoding subunits of these complexes, cause microcephaly. In addition, hypomorphic Ncaph2 mice have significantly reduced brain size, with frequent anaphase chromatin bridge formation observed in apical neural progenitors during neurogenesis. Such DNA bridges also arise in condensin-deficient patient cells, where they are the consequence of failed sister chromatid disentanglement during chromosome compaction. This results in chromosome segregation errors, leading to micronucleus formation and increased aneuploidy in daughter cells. These findings establish "condensinopathies" as microcephalic disorders, with decatenation failure as an additional disease mechanism for microcephaly, implicating mitotic chromosome condensation as a key process ensuring mammalian cerebral cortex size. © 2016 Martin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Mutations in genes encoding condensin complex proteins cause microcephaly through decatenation failure at mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carol-Anne; Murray, Jennie E.; Carroll, Paula; Leitch, Andrea; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Halachev, Mihail; Fetit, Ahmed E.; Keith, Charlotte; Bicknell, Louise S.; Fluteau, Adeline; Gautier, Philippe; Hall, Emma A.; Joss, Shelagh; Soares, Gabriela; Silva, João; Bober, Michael B.; Duker, Angela; Wise, Carol A.; Quigley, Alan J.; Phadke, Shubha R.; Wood, Andrew J.; Vagnarelli, Paola; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of chromosomes is essential for accurate segregation of the genome during mitosis. In vertebrates, two condensin complexes ensure timely chromosome condensation, sister chromatid disentanglement, and maintenance of mitotic chromosome structure. Here, we report that biallelic mutations in NCAPD2, NCAPH, or NCAPD3, encoding subunits of these complexes, cause microcephaly. In addition, hypomorphic Ncaph2 mice have significantly reduced brain size, with frequent anaphase chromatin bridge formation observed in apical neural progenitors during neurogenesis. Such DNA bridges also arise in condensin-deficient patient cells, where they are the consequence of failed sister chromatid disentanglement during chromosome compaction. This results in chromosome segregation errors, leading to micronucleus formation and increased aneuploidy in daughter cells. These findings establish “condensinopathies” as microcephalic disorders, with decatenation failure as an additional disease mechanism for microcephaly, implicating mitotic chromosome condensation as a key process ensuring mammalian cerebral cortex size. PMID:27737959

  6. Unfertilized frog eggs die by apoptosis following meiotic exit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A characteristic feature of frog reproduction is external fertilization accomplished outside the female's body. Mature fertilization-competent frog eggs are arrested at the meiotic metaphase II with high activity of the key meiotic regulators, maturation promoting factor (MPF) and cytostatic factor (CSF), awaiting fertilization. If the eggs are not fertilized within several hours of ovulation, they deteriorate and ultimately die by as yet unknown mechanism. Results Here, we report that the vast majority of naturally laid unfertilized eggs of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis spontaneously exit metaphase arrest under various environmental conditions and degrade by a well-defined apoptotic process within 48 hours after ovulation. The main features of this process include cytochrome c release, caspase activation, ATP depletion, increase of ADP/ATP ratio, apoptotic nuclear morphology, progressive intracellular acidification, and egg swelling. Meiotic exit seems to be a prerequisite for execution of the apoptotic program, since (i) it precedes apoptosis, (ii) apoptotic events cannot be observed in the eggs maintaining high activity of MPF and CSF, and (iii) apoptosis in unfertilized frog eggs is accelerated upon early meiotic exit. The apoptotic features cannot be observed in the immature prophase-arrested oocytes, however, the maturation-inducing hormone progesterone renders oocytes susceptible to apoptosis. Conclusions The study reveals that naturally laid intact frog eggs die by apoptosis if they are not fertilized. A maternal apoptotic program is evoked in frog oocytes upon maturation and executed after meiotic exit in unfertilized eggs. The meiotic exit is required for execution of the apoptotic program in eggs. The emerging anti-apoptotic role of meiotic metaphase arrest needs further investigation. PMID:22195698

  7. Maternal Setdb1 Is Required for Meiotic Progression and Preimplantation Development in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesun; Zhao, Hongbo; Dan, Jiameng; Kim, Soojin; Hardikar, Swanand; Hollowell, Debra; Lin, Kevin; Lu, Yue; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Chen, Taiping

    2016-04-01

    Oocyte meiotic progression and maternal-to-zygote transition are accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. The functional significance of these changes and the key epigenetic regulators involved are largely unknown. Here we show that Setdb1, a lysine methyltransferase, controls the global level of histone H3 lysine 9 di-methyl (H3K9me2) mark in growing oocytes. Conditional deletion of Setdb1 in developing oocytes leads to meiotic arrest at the germinal vesicle and meiosis I stages, resulting in substantially fewer mature eggs. Embryos derived from these eggs exhibit severe defects in cell cycle progression, progressive delays in preimplantation development, and degeneration before reaching the blastocyst stage. Rescue experiments by expressing wild-type or inactive Setdb1 in Setdb1-deficient oocytes suggest that the catalytic activity of Setdb1 is essential for meiotic progression and early embryogenesis. Mechanistically, up-regulation of Cdc14b, a dual-specificity phosphatase that inhibits meiotic progression, greatly contributes to the meiotic arrest phenotype. Setdb1 deficiency also leads to derepression of transposons and increased DNA damage in oocytes, which likely also contribute to meiotic defects. Thus, Setdb1 is a maternal-effect gene that controls meiotic progression and is essential for early embryogenesis. Our results uncover an important link between the epigenetic machinery and the major signaling pathway governing meiotic progression.

  8. Maternal Setdb1 Is Required for Meiotic Progression and Preimplantation Development in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Jiameng; Kim, Soojin; Hardikar, Swanand; Hollowell, Debra; Lin, Kevin; Lu, Yue; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Chen, Taiping

    2016-01-01

    Oocyte meiotic progression and maternal-to-zygote transition are accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. The functional significance of these changes and the key epigenetic regulators involved are largely unknown. Here we show that Setdb1, a lysine methyltransferase, controls the global level of histone H3 lysine 9 di-methyl (H3K9me2) mark in growing oocytes. Conditional deletion of Setdb1 in developing oocytes leads to meiotic arrest at the germinal vesicle and meiosis I stages, resulting in substantially fewer mature eggs. Embryos derived from these eggs exhibit severe defects in cell cycle progression, progressive delays in preimplantation development, and degeneration before reaching the blastocyst stage. Rescue experiments by expressing wild-type or inactive Setdb1 in Setdb1-deficient oocytes suggest that the catalytic activity of Setdb1 is essential for meiotic progression and early embryogenesis. Mechanistically, up-regulation of Cdc14b, a dual-specificity phosphatase that inhibits meiotic progression, greatly contributes to the meiotic arrest phenotype. Setdb1 deficiency also leads to derepression of transposons and increased DNA damage in oocytes, which likely also contribute to meiotic defects. Thus, Setdb1 is a maternal-effect gene that controls meiotic progression and is essential for early embryogenesis. Our results uncover an important link between the epigenetic machinery and the major signaling pathway governing meiotic progression. PMID:27070551

  9. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and CrossoverControl

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Peter M.; Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-06

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency.

  10. Meiotic process and aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Grell, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The process of meiosis is analyzed by dissecting it into its component parts using the early oocyte of Drosophila as a model. Entrance of the oocytes into premeiotic interphase signals initiation of DNA replication which continues for 30 h. Coincidentally, extensive synaptonemal complexes appear, averaging 50 ..mu..m (132 h), peaking at 75 ..mu..m (144 h) and continuing into early vitellarial stages. Recombinational response to heat, evidenced by enhancement or induction of exchange, is limited to the S-phase with a peak at 144 h coinciding with maximal extension of the SC. Coincidence of synapsis and recombination response with S at premeiotic interphase is contrary to their conventional localization at meiotic prophase. The interrelationship between exchange and nondisjunction has been clarified by the Distributive Pairing Model of meiosis. Originally revealed through high frequencies of nonrandom assortment of nonhomologous chromosomes, distributive pairing has been shown to follow and to be noncompetitive with exchange, to be based on size-recognition, not homology, and as a raison d'etre, to provide a segregational mechanism for noncrossover homologues. Rearrangements, recombination mutants and aneuploids may contribute noncrossover chromosomes to the distributive pool and so promote the nonhomologous associations responsible for nondisjunction of homologues and regular segregation of nonhomologues. 38 references, 15 figures. (ACR)

  11. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  12. A Gene Regulatory Program for Meiotic Prophase in the Fetal Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Mark E.; Mueller, Jacob L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Page, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal program of meiotic prophase, comprising events such as laying down of meiotic cohesins, synapsis between homologs, and homologous recombination, must be preceded and enabled by the regulated induction of meiotic prophase genes. This gene regulatory program is poorly understood, particularly in organisms with a segregated germline. We characterized the gene regulatory program of meiotic prophase as it occurs in the mouse fetal ovary. By profiling gene expression in the mouse fetal ovary in mutants with whole tissue and single-cell techniques, we identified 104 genes expressed specifically in pre-meiotic to pachytene germ cells. We characterized the regulation of these genes by 1) retinoic acid (RA), which induces meiosis, 2) Dazl, which is required for germ cell competence to respond to RA, and 3) Stra8, a downstream target of RA required for the chromosomal program of meiotic prophase. Initial induction of practically all identified meiotic prophase genes requires Dazl. In the presence of Dazl, RA induces at least two pathways: one Stra8-independent, and one Stra8-dependent. Genes vary in their induction by Stra8, spanning fully Stra8-independent, partially Stra8-independent, and fully Stra8-dependent. Thus, Stra8 regulates the entirety of the chromosomal program but plays a more nuanced role in governing the gene expression program. We propose that Stra8-independent gene expression enables the stockpiling of selected meiotic structural proteins prior to the commencement of the chromosomal program. Unexpectedly, we discovered that Stra8 is required for prompt down-regulation of itself and Rec8. Germ cells that have expressed and down-regulated Stra8 are refractory to further Stra8 expression. Negative feedback of Stra8, and subsequent resistance to further Stra8 expression, may ensure a single, restricted pulse of Stra8 expression. Collectively, our findings reveal a gene regulatory logic by which germ cells prepare for the chromosomal program of

  13. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    PubMed

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-08

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings.

  14. Meiotic Development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Doris Y.

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has become a powerful experimental organism with which to study meiotic processes that promote the accurate segregation of chromosomes during the generation of haploid gametes. Haploid reproductive cells are produced through one round of chromosome replication followed by two successive cell divisions. Characteristic meiotic chromosome structure and dynamics are largely conserved in C. elegans. Chromosomes adopt a meiosis-specific structure by loading cohesin proteins, assembling axial elements, and acquiring chromatin marks. Homologous chromosomes pair and form physical connections though synapsis and recombination. Synaptonemal complex and crossover formation allow for the homologs to stably associate prior to remodeling that facilitates their segregation. This chapter will cover conserved meiotic processes as well as highlight aspects of meiosis that are unique to C. elegans. PMID:22872477

  15. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vibranovski, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    In several different taxa, there is indubitable evidence of transcriptional silencing of the X and Y chromosomes in male meiotic cells of spermatogenesis. However, the so called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been recently a hot bed for debate in Drosophila melanogaster. This review covers cytological and genetic observations, data from transgenic constructs with testis-specific promoters, global expression profiles obtained from mutant, wild-type, larvae and adult testes as well as from cells of different stages of spermatogenesis. There is no dispute on that D. melanogaster spermatogenesis presents a down-regulation of X chromosome that does not result from the lack of dosage compensation. However, the issue is currently focused on the level of reduction of X-linked expression, the precise time it occurs and how many genes are affected. The deep examination of data and experiments in this review exposes the limitations intrinsic to the methods of studying MSCI in D. melanogaster. The current methods do not allow us to affirm anything else than the X chromosome down-regulation in meiosis (MSCI). Therefore, conclusion about level, degree or precise timing is inadequate until new approaches are implemented to know the details of MSCI or other processes involved for D. melanogaster model.

  16. Hed1 Promotes Meiotic Crossover Formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yoon-Ju; Joo, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Keun Pil; Hong, Soogil

    2017-02-28

    Homologous recombination occurs between homologous chromosomes and is significantly involved in programmed double-strand break (DSB) repair. Activation of two recombinases, Rad51 and Dmc1, is essential for an interhomolog bias during meiosis. Rad51 participates in both mitotic and meiotic recombination, and its strand exchange activity is regulated by an inhibitory factor during meiosis. Thus, activities of Rad51 and Dmc1 are coordinated to promote homolog bias. It has been reported that Hed1, a meiosis-specific protein in budding yeast, regulates Rad51-dependent recombination activity. Here, we investigated the role of Hed1 in meiotic recombination by ectopic expression of the protein after pre-meiotic replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA physical analysis revealed that the overexpression of Hed1 delays the DSB-to-joint molecule (JM) transition and promotes interhomolog JM formation. The study indicates a possible role of Hed1 in controlling the strand exchange activity of Rad51 and, eventually, meiotic crossover formation.

  17. Meiotic DSB patterning: A multifaceted process.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Tim J; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized two-step cell division responsible for genome haploidization and the generation of genetic diversity during gametogenesis. An integral and distinctive feature of the meiotic program is the evolutionarily conserved initiation of homologous recombination (HR) by the developmentally programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The inherently dangerous but essential act of DSB formation is subject to multiple forms of stringent and self-corrective regulation that collectively ensure fruitful and appropriate levels of genetic exchange without risk to cellular survival. Within this article we focus upon an emerging element of this control--spatial regulation--detailing recent advances made in understanding how DSBs are evenly distributed across the genome, and present a unified view of the underlying patterning mechanisms employed.

  18. RNA processing factors Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize RNA Pol III-dependent transcription and the localization of condensin at Pol III genes.

    PubMed

    Legros, Pénélope; Malapert, Amélie; Niinuma, Sho; Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Condensin-mediated chromosome condensation is essential for genome stability upon cell division. Genetic studies have indicated that the association of condensin with chromatin is intimately linked to gene transcription, but what transcription-associated feature(s) direct(s) the accumulation of condensin remains unclear. Here we show in fission yeast that condensin becomes strikingly enriched at RNA Pol III-transcribed genes when Swd2.2 and Sen1, two factors involved in the transcription process, are simultaneously deleted. Sen1 is an ATP-dependent helicase whose orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes both to terminate transcription of some RNA Pol II transcripts and to antagonize the formation of DNA:RNA hybrids in the genome. Using two independent mapping techniques, we show that DNA:RNA hybrids form in abundance at Pol III-transcribed genes in fission yeast but we demonstrate that they are unlikely to faciliate the recruitment of condensin. Instead, we show that Sen1 forms a stable and abundant complex with RNA Pol III and that Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize both the interaction of RNA Pol III with chromatin and RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. When Swd2.2 and Sen1 are lacking, the increased concentration of RNA Pol III and condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes is accompanied by the accumulation of topoisomerase I and II and by local nucleosome depletion, suggesting that Pol III-transcribed genes suffer topological stress. We provide evidence that this topological stress contributes to recruit and/or stabilize condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes in the absence of Swd2.2 and Sen1. Our data challenge the idea that a processive RNA polymerase hinders the binding of condensin and suggest that transcription-associated topological stress could in some circumstances facilitate the association of condensin.

  19. RBF1 promotes chromatin condensation through a conserved interaction with the Condensin II protein dCAP-D3.

    PubMed

    Longworth, Michelle S; Herr, Anabel; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2008-04-15

    The Drosophila retinoblastoma family of proteins (RBF1 and RBF2) and their mammalian homologs (pRB, p130, and p107) are best known for their regulation of the G1/S transition via the repression of E2F-dependent transcription. However, RB family members also possess additional functions. Here, we report that rbf1 mutant larvae have extensive defects in chromatin condensation during mitosis. We describe a novel interaction between RBF1 and dCAP-D3, a non-SMC component of the Condensin II complex that links RBF1 to the regulation of chromosome structure. RBF1 physically interacts with dCAP-D3, RBF1 and dCAP-D3 partially colocalize on polytene chromosomes, and RBF1 is required for efficient association of dCAP-D3 with chromatin. dCap-D3 mutants also exhibit chromatin condensation defects, and mutant alleles of dCap-D3 suppress cellular and developmental phenotypes induced by the overexpression of RBF1. Interestingly, this interaction is conserved between flies and humans. The re-expression of pRB into a pRB-deficient human tumor cell line promotes chromatin association of hCAP-D3 in a manner that depends on the LXCXE-binding cleft of pRB. These results uncover an unexpected link between pRB/RBF1 and chromatin condensation, providing a mechanism by which the functional inactivation of RB family members in human tumor cells may contribute to genome instability.

  20. RBF1 promotes chromatin condensation through a conserved interaction with the Condensin II protein dCAP-D3

    PubMed Central

    Longworth, Michelle S.; Herr, Anabel; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila retinoblastoma family of proteins (RBF1 and RBF2) and their mammalian homologs (pRB, p130, and p107) are best known for their regulation of the G1/S transition via the repression of E2F-dependent transcription. However, RB family members also possess additional functions. Here, we report that rbf1 mutant larvae have extensive defects in chromatin condensation during mitosis. We describe a novel interaction between RBF1 and dCAP-D3, a non-SMC component of the Condensin II complex that links RBF1 to the regulation of chromosome structure. RBF1 physically interacts with dCAP-D3, RBF1 and dCAP-D3 partially colocalize on polytene chromosomes, and RBF1 is required for efficient association of dCAP-D3 with chromatin. dCap-D3 mutants also exhibit chromatin condensation defects, and mutant alleles of dCap-D3 suppress cellular and developmental phenotypes induced by the overexpression of RBF1. Interestingly, this interaction is conserved between flies and humans. The re-expression of pRB into a pRB-deficient human tumor cell line promotes chromatin association of hCAP-D3 in a manner that depends on the LXCXE-binding cleft of pRB. These results uncover an unexpected link between pRB/RBF1 and chromatin condensation, providing a mechanism by which the functional inactivation of RB family members in human tumor cells may contribute to genome instability. PMID:18367646

  1. Condensin II Alleviates DNA Damage and Is Essential for Tolerance of Boron Overload Stress in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takuya; Inui, Yayoi Tsujimoto; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Mastui, Minami; Umeda, Masaaki; Fukui, Kiichi; Fujiwara, Toru

    2011-01-01

    Although excess boron (B) is known to negatively affect plant growth, its molecular mechanism of toxicity is unknown. We previously isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, hypersensitive to excess B (heb1-1 and heb2-1). In this study, we found that HEB1 and HEB2 encode the CAP-G2 and CAP-H2 subunits, respectively, of the condensin II protein complex, which functions in the maintenance of chromosome structure. Growth of Arabidopsis seedlings in medium containing excess B induced expression of condensin II subunit genes. Simultaneous treatment with zeocin, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and aphidicolin, which blocks DNA replication, mimicked the effect of excess B on root growth in the heb mutants. Both excess B and the heb mutations upregulated DSBs and DSB-inducible gene transcription, suggesting that DSBs are a cause of B toxicity and that condensin II reduces the incidence of DSBs. The Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant atr-2, which is sensitive to replication-blocking reagents, was also sensitive to excess B. Taken together, these data suggest that the B toxicity mechanism in plants involves DSBs and possibly replication blocks and that plant condensin II plays a role in DNA damage repair or in protecting the genome from certain genotoxic stressors, particularly excess B. PMID:21917552

  2. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  3. Meiotic recombination cold spots in chromosomal cohesion sites.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaru; Kugou, Kazuto; Fawcett, Jeffrey A; Mura, Sachiko; Ikeda, Sho; Innan, Hideki; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    Meiotic chromosome architecture called 'axis-loop structures' and histone modifications have been shown to regulate the Spo11-dependent formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that trigger meiotic recombination. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses followed by deep sequencing, we compared the genome-wide distribution of the axis protein Rec8 (the kleisin subunit of meiotic cohesin) with that of oligomeric DNA covalently bound to Spo11, indicative of DSB sites. The frequency of DSB sites is overall constant between Rec8 binding sites. However, DSB cold spots are observed in regions spanning ±0.8 kb around Rec8 binding sites. The axis-associated cold spots are not due to the exclusion of Spo11 localization from the axis, because ChIP experiments showed that substantial Spo11 persists at Rec8 binding sites during DSB formation. Spo11 fused with Gal4 DNA binding domain (Gal4BD-Spo11) tethered in close proximity (≤0.8 kb) to Rec8 binding sites hardly forms meiotic DSBs, in contrast with other regions. In addition, H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) remarkably decreases at Rec8 binding sites. These results suggest that reduced histone H3K4me3 in combination with inactivation of Spo11 activity on the axis discourages DSB hot spot formation.

  4. The SMC condensin complex is required for origin segregation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Tang, Olive W; Riley, Eammon P; Rudner, David Z

    2014-02-03

    SMC condensin complexes play a central role in organizing and compacting chromosomes in all domains of life [1, 2]. In the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, cells lacking SMC are viable only during slow growth and display decondensed chromosomes, suggesting that SMC complexes function throughout the genome [3, 4]. Here, we show that rapid inactivation of SMC or its partner protein ScpB during fast growth leads to a failure to resolve newly replicated origins and a complete block to chromosome segregation. Importantly, the loss of origin segregation is not due to an inability to unlink precatenated sister chromosomes by Topoisomerase IV. In support of the idea that ParB-mediated recruitment of SMC complexes to the origin is important for their segregation, cells with reduced levels of SMC that lack ParB are severely impaired in origin resolution. Finally, we demonstrate that origin segregation is a task shared by the condensin complex and the parABS partitioning system. We propose that origin-localized SMC constrains adjacent DNA segments along their lengths, drawing replicated origins in on themselves and away from each other. This SMC-mediated lengthwise condensation, bolstered by the parABS system, drives origin segregation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  6. Condensins exert force on chromatin-nuclear envelope tethers to mediate nucleoplasmic reticulum formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bozler, Julianna; Nguyen, Huy Q; Rogers, Gregory C; Bosco, Giovanni

    2014-12-30

    Although the nuclear envelope is known primarily for its role as a boundary between the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotes, it plays a vital and dynamic role in many cellular processes. Studies of nuclear structure have revealed tissue-specific changes in nuclear envelope architecture, suggesting that its three-dimensional structure contributes to its functionality. Despite the importance of the nuclear envelope, the factors that regulate and maintain nuclear envelope shape remain largely unexplored. The nuclear envelope makes extensive and dynamic interactions with the underlying chromatin. Given this inexorable link between chromatin and the nuclear envelope, it is possible that local and global chromatin organization reciprocally impact nuclear envelope form and function. In this study, we use Drosophila salivary glands to show that the three-dimensional structure of the nuclear envelope can be altered with condensin II-mediated chromatin condensation. Both naturally occurring and engineered chromatin-envelope interactions are sufficient to allow chromatin compaction forces to drive distortions of the nuclear envelope. Weakening of the nuclear lamina further enhanced envelope remodeling, suggesting that envelope structure is capable of counterbalancing chromatin compaction forces. Our experiments reveal that the nucleoplasmic reticulum is born of the nuclear envelope and remains dynamic in that they can be reabsorbed into the nuclear envelope. We propose a model where inner nuclear envelope-chromatin tethers allow interphase chromosome movements to change nuclear envelope morphology. Therefore, interphase chromatin compaction may be a normal mechanism that reorganizes nuclear architecture, while under pathological conditions, such as laminopathies, compaction forces may contribute to defects in nuclear morphology. Copyright © 2015 Bozler et al.

  7. The Mek1 phosphorylation cascade plays a role in meiotic recombination of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Saito, Takamune T; Russell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Mek1 is a Chk2/Rad53/Cds1-related protein kinase that is required for proper meiotic progression of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, the molecular mechanisms of Mek1 regulation and Mek1 phosphorylation targets are unclear. Here, we report that Mek1 is phosphorylated at serine-12 (S12), S14 and threonine-15 (T15) by Rad3 (ATR) and/or Tel1 (ATM) kinases that are activated by meiotic programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mutations of these sites by alanine replacement caused abnormal meiotic progression and recombination rates. Phosphorylation of these sites triggers autophosphorylation of Mek1; indeed, alanine replacement mutations of Mek1-T318 and -T322 residues in the activation loop of Mek1 reduced Mek1 kinase activity and meiotic recombination rates. Substrates of Mek1 include Mus81-T275, Rdh54-T6 and Rdh54-T673. Mus81-T275 is known to regulate the Mus81 function in DNA cleavage, whereas Rdh54-T6A/T673A mutant cells showed abnormal meiotic recombination. Taken together, we conclude that the phosphorylation of Mek1 by Rad3 or Tel1, Mek1 autophosphorylation and Mus81 or Rdh54 phosphorylation by Mek1 regulate meiotic progression in S. pombe. PMID:21084840

  8. Meiotic DSB patterning: A multifaceted process

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Tim J.; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Meiosis is a specialized two-step cell division responsible for genome haploidization and the generation of genetic diversity during gametogenesis. An integral and distinctive feature of the meiotic program is the evolutionarily conserved initiation of homologous recombination (HR) by the developmentally programmed induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The inherently dangerous but essential act of DSB formation is subject to multiple forms of stringent and self-corrective regulation that collectively ensure fruitful and appropriate levels of genetic exchange without risk to cellular survival. Within this article we focus upon an emerging element of this control—spatial regulation—detailing recent advances made in understanding how DSBs are evenly distributed across the genome, and present a unified view of the underlying patterning mechanisms employed. PMID:26730703

  9. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  10. Modulation of meiotic homologous recombination by DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins which translocate along DNA capable of dismantling DNA-DNA interactions and/or removing proteins bound to DNA. These biochemical capabilities make DNA helicases main regulators of crucial DNA metabolic processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. This budding topic will focus on reviewing the function of DNA helicases important for homologous recombination during meiosis, and discuss recent advances in how these modulators of meiotic recombination are themselves regulated. The emphasis is placed on work in the two model yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has vastly expanded our understanding of meiotic homologous recombination, a process whose correct execution is instrumental for healthy gamete formation, and thus functioning sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. In vitro topological loading of bacterial condensin MukB on DNA, preferentially single-stranded DNA rather than double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Hironori; Yano, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Condensin is the major driving force in the segregation of daughter chromosomes in prokaryotes. Core subunits of condensin belong to the SMC protein family, whose members are characterized by a unique ATPase activity and dimers with a V-shaped structure. The V-shaped dimers might close between head domains, forming a ring structure that can encircle DNA. Indeed, cohesin, which is a subfamily of SMC proteins, encircles double-stranded DNA to hold sister chromatids in eukaryotes. However, the question of whether or not condensin encircles the chromosomal DNA remains highly controversial. Here we report that MukB binds topologically to DNA in vitro, and this binding is preferentially single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rather than double-stranded DNA. The binding of MukB to ssDNA does not require ATP. In fact, thermal energy enhances the binding. The non-SMC subunits MukF and MukE did stimulate the topological binding of MukB, although they hindered DNA-binding of MukB. Recent reports on the distribution of condensin in genomes reveal that actively transcribed genes in yeast and humans are enriched in condensin. In consideration of all these results, we propose that the binding specificity of condensin to chromosome is provided not by the DNA sequence but by the DNA structure, which is ssDNA. PMID:27387439

  12. The fission yeast MTREC and EJC orthologs ensure the maturation of meiotic transcripts during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Marayati, Bahjat Fadi; Hoskins, Victoria; Boger, Robert W.; Tucker, James F.; Fishman, Emily S.; Bray, Andrew S.; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a highly regulated process by which genetic information is transmitted through sexual reproduction. It encompasses unique mechanisms that do not occur in vegetative cells, producing a distinct, well-regulated meiotic transcriptome. During vegetative growth, many meiotic genes are constitutively transcribed, but most of the resulting mRNAs are rapidly eliminated by the Mmi1-MTREC (Mtl1-Red1 core) complex. While Mmi1-MTREC targets premature meiotic RNAs for degradation by the nuclear 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exosome during mitotic growth, its role in meiotic gene expression during meiosis is not known. Here, we report that Red5, an essential MTREC component, interacts with pFal1, an ortholog of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4aIII in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In mammals, together with MAGO (Mnh1), Rnps1, and Y14, elF4AIII (pFal1) forms the core of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is essential for transcriptional surveillance and localization of mature mRNAs. In fission yeast, two EJC orthologs, pFal1 and Mnh1, are functionally connected with MTREC, specifically in the process of meiotic gene expression during meiosis. Although pFal1 interacts with Mnh1, Y14, and Rnps1, its association with Mnh1 is not disrupted upon loss of Y14 or Rnps1. Mutations of Red1, Red5, pFal1, or Mnh1 produce severe meiotic defects; the abundance of meiotic transcripts during meiosis decreases; and mRNA maturation processes such as splicing are impaired. Since studying meiosis in mammalian germline cells is difficult, our findings in fission yeast may help to define the general mechanisms involved in accurate meiotic gene expression in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27365210

  13. The fission yeast MTREC and EJC orthologs ensure the maturation of meiotic transcripts during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Marayati, Bahjat Fadi; Hoskins, Victoria; Boger, Robert W; Tucker, James F; Fishman, Emily S; Bray, Andrew S; Zhang, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Meiosis is a highly regulated process by which genetic information is transmitted through sexual reproduction. It encompasses unique mechanisms that do not occur in vegetative cells, producing a distinct, well-regulated meiotic transcriptome. During vegetative growth, many meiotic genes are constitutively transcribed, but most of the resulting mRNAs are rapidly eliminated by the Mmi1-MTREC (Mtl1-Red1 core) complex. While Mmi1-MTREC targets premature meiotic RNAs for degradation by the nuclear 3'-5' exoribonuclease exosome during mitotic growth, its role in meiotic gene expression during meiosis is not known. Here, we report that Red5, an essential MTREC component, interacts with pFal1, an ortholog of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4aIII in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe In mammals, together with MAGO (Mnh1), Rnps1, and Y14, elF4AIII (pFal1) forms the core of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is essential for transcriptional surveillance and localization of mature mRNAs. In fission yeast, two EJC orthologs, pFal1 and Mnh1, are functionally connected with MTREC, specifically in the process of meiotic gene expression during meiosis. Although pFal1 interacts with Mnh1, Y14, and Rnps1, its association with Mnh1 is not disrupted upon loss of Y14 or Rnps1. Mutations of Red1, Red5, pFal1, or Mnh1 produce severe meiotic defects; the abundance of meiotic transcripts during meiosis decreases; and mRNA maturation processes such as splicing are impaired. Since studying meiosis in mammalian germline cells is difficult, our findings in fission yeast may help to define the general mechanisms involved in accurate meiotic gene expression in higher eukaryotes.

  14. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RDN1 locus is sequestered from interchromosomal meiotic ectopic recombination in a SIR2-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, E S; Shafer, B K; Strathern, J N

    2000-01-01

    Meiotic ectopic recombination occurs at similar frequencies among many sites in the yeast genome, suggesting that all loci are similarly accessible to homology searching. In contrast, we found that his3 sequences integrated in the RDN1 (rDNA) locus were unusually poor participants in meiotic recombination with his3 sequences at other sites. We show that the low rate of meiotic ectopic recombination resulted from the poor ability of RDN1::his3 to act as a donor sequence. SIR2 partially repressed interchromosomal meiotic ectopic recombination at RDN1, consistent with its role in regulating recombination, gene expression, and retrotransposition within RDN1. We propose that RDN1 is physically sequestered from meiotic homology searching mechanisms. PMID:10880466

  15. Backcrossing to increase meiotic stability in triticale.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, R M; Assis, R; Brammer, S P; Nascimento Junior, A; Da-Silva, P R

    2015-09-22

    Triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) is an intergeneric hybrid derived from a cross between wheat and rye. As a newly created allopolyploid, the plant shows instabilities during the meiotic process, which may result in the loss of fertility. This genomic instability has hindered the success of triticale-breeding programs. Therefore, strategies should be developed to obtain stable triticale lines for use in breeding. In some species, backcrossing has been effective in increasing the meiotic stability of lineages. To assess whether backcrossing has the same effect in triticale, indices of meiotic abnormalities, meiotic index, and pollen viability were determined in genotypes from multiple generations of triticale (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1a, and BC1b). All analyzed genotypes exhibited instability during meiosis, and their meiotic index values were all lower than normal. However, the backcrosses BC1a and BC1b showed the lowest mean meiotic abnormalities and the highest meiotic indices, demonstrating higher stability. All genotypes showed a high rate of pollen viability, with the backcrosses BC1a and BC1b again exhibiting the best values. Statistical analyses confirmed that backcrossing positively affects the meiotic stability of triticale. Our results show that backcrossing should be considered by breeders aiming to obtain triticale lines with improved genomic stability.

  16. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  17. Probing the mechanical architecture of the vertebrate meiotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Takagi, Jun; Shimamoto, Yuta; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kuwana, Kenta; Shimoyama, Isao; Gaetz, Jedidiah; Kapoor, Tarun M; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2009-02-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis depends on the assembly of a microtubule-based spindle of proper shape and size. Current models for spindle-size control focus on reaction diffusion-based chemical regulation and balance in activities of motor proteins. Although several molecular perturbations have been used to test these models, controlled mechanical perturbations have not been possible. Here we report a piezoresistive dual cantilever-based system to test models for spindle-size control and examine the mechanical features, such as deformability and stiffness, of the vertebrate meiotic spindle. We found that meiotic spindles prepared in Xenopus laevis egg extracts were viscoelastic and recovered their original shape in response to small compression. Larger compression resulted in plastic deformation, but the spindle adapted to this change, establishing a stable mechanical architecture at different sizes. The technique we describe here may also be useful for examining the micromechanics of other cellular organelles.

  18. Aurora B inhibitor barasertib prevents meiotic maturation and subsequent embryo development in pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shiqiang; Peng, Xu; Yang, Xiaoliu; Sozar, Sparksi; Muneri, Caroline W; Xu, Yaping; Chen, Changchao; Cui, Panpan; Xu, Weichao; Rui, Rong

    2016-07-15

    Barasertib, a highly selective Aurora B inhibitor, has been widely used in a variety of cells to investigate the role of Aurora B kinase, which has been implicated in various functions in the mitotic process. However, effects of barasertib on the meiotic maturation process are not fully understood, particularly in porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. In the present study, the effects of barasertib on the meiotic maturation and developmental competence of pig oocytes were investigated, and the possible roles of Aurora B were also evaluated in porcine oocytes undergoing meiosis. Initially, we examined the expression and subcellular localization of Aurora B using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent staining. Aurora B was found to express and exhibit specific dynamic intracellular localization during porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. Aurora B was observed around the chromosomes after germinal vesicle breakdown. Then it was transferred to the spindle region after metaphase I stage, and was particularly concentrated at the central spindles at telophase I stage. barasertib treatment resulted in the failure of polar body extrusion in pig oocytes, with a larger percentage of barasertib-treated oocytes remaining at the pro-metaphase I stage. Additional results reported that barasertib treatment had no effect on chromosome condensation but resulted in a significantly higher percentage of the treated oocytes with aberrant spindles and misaligned chromosomes during the first meiotic division. In addition, inhibition of Aurora B with lower concentrations of barasertib during pig oocyte meiotic maturation decreased the subsequent embryo developmental competence. Thus, these results illustrate that barasertib has significant effects on porcine oocyte meiotic maturation and subsequent development through Aurora B inhibition, and this regulation is related to its effects on spindle formation and chromosome alignment during the first meiotic division in porcine oocytes.

  19. Impact of histone H4K16 acetylation on the meiotic recombination checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cavero, Santiago; Herruzo, Esther; Ontoso, David; San-Segundo, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    In meiotic cells, the pachytene checkpoint or meiotic recombination checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that monitors critical processes, such as recombination and chromosome synapsis, which are essential for proper distribution of chromosomes to the meiotic progeny. Failures in these processes lead to the formation of aneuploid gametes. Meiotic recombination occurs in the context of chromatin; in fact, the histone methyltransferase Dot1 and the histone deacetylase Sir2 are known regulators of the pachytene checkpoint in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report here that Sas2-mediated acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16ac), one of the Sir2 targets, modulates meiotic checkpoint activity in response to synaptonemal complex defects. We show that, like sir2, the H4-K16Q mutation, mimicking constitutive acetylation of H4K16, eliminates the delay in meiotic cell cycle progression imposed by the checkpoint in the synapsis-defective zip1 mutant. We also demonstrate that, like in dot1, zip1-induced phosphorylation of the Hop1 checkpoint adaptor at threonine 318 and the ensuing Mek1 activation are impaired in H4-K16 mutants. However, in contrast to sir2 and dot1, the H4-K16R and H4-K16Q mutations have only a minor effect in checkpoint activation and localization of the nucleolar Pch2 checkpoint factor in ndt80-prophase-arrested cells. We also provide evidence for a cross-talk between Dot1-dependent H3K79 methylation and H4K16ac and show that Sir2 excludes H4K16ac from the rDNA region on meiotic chromosomes. Our results reveal that proper levels of H4K16ac orchestrate this meiotic quality control mechanism and that Sir2 impinges on additional targets to fully activate the checkpoint. PMID:28357333

  20. Retinoic acid homeostasis through aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 mediates meiotic entry in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruijuan; Fang, Lingling; Cheng, Yunying; He, Xue; Jiang, Wentao; Dong, Ranran; Shi, Hongjuan; Jiang, Dongneng; Sun, Lina; Wang, Deshou

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis is a process unique to the differentiation of germ cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is the key factor controlling the sex-specific timing of meiotic initiation in tetrapods; however, the role of RA in meiotic initiation in teleosts has remained unclear. In this study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2, and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 were isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a species without stra8. The expression of aldh1a2 was up-regulated and expression of cyp26a1 was down-regulated before the meiotic initiation in ovaries and in testes. Treatment with RA synthase inhibitor or disruption of Aldh1a2 by CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in delayed meiotic initiation, with simultaneous down-regulation of cyp26a1 and up-regulation of sycp3. By contrast, treatment with an inhibitor of RA catabolic enzyme and disruption of cyp26a1 resulted in earlier meiotic initiation, with increased expression of aldh1a2 and sycp3. Additionally, treatment of XY fish with estrogen (E2) and XX fish with fadrozole led to sex reversal and reversion of meiotic initiation. These results indicate that RA is indispensable for meiotic initiation in teleosts via a stra8 independent signaling pathway where both aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 are critical. In contrast to mammals, E2 is a major regulator of sex determination and meiotic initiation in teleosts. PMID:25976364

  1. Retinoic acid homeostasis through aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 mediates meiotic entry in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruijuan; Fang, Lingling; Cheng, Yunying; He, Xue; Jiang, Wentao; Dong, Ranran; Shi, Hongjuan; Jiang, Dongneng; Sun, Lina; Wang, Deshou

    2015-05-15

    Meiosis is a process unique to the differentiation of germ cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is the key factor controlling the sex-specific timing of meiotic initiation in tetrapods; however, the role of RA in meiotic initiation in teleosts has remained unclear. In this study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2, and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 were isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a species without stra8. The expression of aldh1a2 was up-regulated and expression of cyp26a1 was down-regulated before the meiotic initiation in ovaries and in testes. Treatment with RA synthase inhibitor or disruption of Aldh1a2 by CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in delayed meiotic initiation, with simultaneous down-regulation of cyp26a1 and up-regulation of sycp3. By contrast, treatment with an inhibitor of RA catabolic enzyme and disruption of cyp26a1 resulted in earlier meiotic initiation, with increased expression of aldh1a2 and sycp3. Additionally, treatment of XY fish with estrogen (E2) and XX fish with fadrozole led to sex reversal and reversion of meiotic initiation. These results indicate that RA is indispensable for meiotic initiation in teleosts via a stra8 independent signaling pathway where both aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 are critical. In contrast to mammals, E2 is a major regulator of sex determination and meiotic initiation in teleosts.

  2. Human SMC2 Protein, a Core Subunit of Human Condensin Complex, Is a Novel Transcriptional Target of the WNT Signaling Pathway and a New Therapeutic Target*

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Verónica; Súarez-López, Lucía; Castaño, Julio; Messent, Anthea; Abasolo, Ibane; Fernandez, Yolanda; Guerra-Moreno, Angel; Espín, Eloy; Armengol, Manel; Musulen, Eva; Ariza, Aurelio; Sayós, Joan; Arango, Diego; Schwartz, Simó

    2012-01-01

    Human SMC2 is part of the condensin complex, which is responsible for tightly packaging replicated genomic DNA prior to segregation into daughter cells. Engagement of the WNT signaling pathway is known to have a mitogenic effect on cells, but relatively little is known about WNT interaction with mitotic structural organizer proteins. In this work, we described the novel transcriptional regulation of SMC2 protein by direct binding of the β-catenin·TCF4 transcription factor to the SMC2 promoter. Furthermore, we identified the precise region in the SMC2 promoter that is required for β-catenin-mediated promoter activation. Finally, we explored the functional significance of down-regulating SMC2 protein in vivo. Treatment of WNT-activated intestinal tumor cells with SMC2 siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation in nude mice, compared with untreated controls (p = 0.02). Therefore, we propose that WNT signaling can directly activate SMC2 transcription as a key player in the mitotic cell division machinery. Furthermore, SMC2 represents a new target for oncological therapeutic intervention. PMID:23095742

  3. Theory of meiotic spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furthauer, Sebastian; Foster, Peter; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The meiotic spindle is a biological structure that self assembles from the intracellular medium to separate chromosomes during meiosis. It consists of filamentous microtubule (MT) proteins that interact through the fluid in which they are suspended and via the associated molecules that orchestrate their behavior. We aim to understand how the interplay between fluid medium, MTs, and regulatory proteins allows this material to self-organize into the spindle's highly stereotyped shape. To this end we develop a continuum model that treats the spindle as an active liquid crystal with MT turnover. In this active material, molecular motors, such as dyneins which collect MT minus ends and kinesins which slide MTs past each other, generate active fluid and material stresses. Moreover nucleator proteins that are advected with and transported along MTs control the nucleation and depolymerization of MTs. This theory captures the growth process of meiotic spindles, their shapes, and the essential features of many perturbation experiments. It thus provides a framework to think about the physics of this complex biological suspension.

  4. Aurora-A mediated histone H3 phosphorylation of threonine 118 controls condensin I and cohesin occupancy in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Wike, Candice L; Graves, Hillary K; Hawkins, Reva; Gibson, Matthew D; Ferdinand, Michelle B; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Zhihong; Hudson, Damien F; Ottesen, Jennifer J; Poirier, Michael G; Schumacher, Jill; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H3 threonine 118 (H3 T118ph) weakens histone DNA-contacts, disrupting the nucleosome structure. We show that Aurora-A mediated H3 T118ph occurs at pericentromeres and chromosome arms during prophase and is lost upon chromosome alignment. Expression of H3 T118E or H3 T118I (a SIN mutation that bypasses the need for the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeler SWI/SNF) leads to mitotic problems including defects in spindle attachment, delayed cytokinesis, reduced chromatin packaging, cohesion loss, cohesin and condensin I loss in human cells. In agreement, overexpression of Aurora-A leads to increased H3 T118ph levels, causing cohesion loss, and reduced levels of cohesin and condensin I on chromatin. Normal levels of H3 T118ph are important because it is required for development in fruit flies. We propose that H3 T118ph alters the chromatin structure during specific phases of mitosis to promote timely condensin I and cohesin disassociation, which is essential for effective chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11402.001 PMID:26878753

  5. Aym1, a mouse meiotic gene identified by virtue of its ability to activate early meiotic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Malcov, Mira; Cesarkas, Karen; Stelzer, Gil; Shalom, Sarah; Dicken, Yosef; Naor, Yaniv; Goldstein, Ronald S; Sagee, Shira; Kassir, Yona; Don, Jeremy

    2004-12-01

    Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that operate during differentiation of mitotically dividing spermatogonia cells into spermatocytes lags way behind what is known about other differentiating systems. Given the evolutionary conservation of the meiotic process, we screened for mouse proteins that could specifically activate early meiotic promoters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells, when fused to the Gal4 activation domain (Gal4AD). Our screen yielded the Aym1 gene that encodes a short peptide of 45 amino acids. We show that a Gal4AD-AYM1 fusion protein activates expression of reporter genes through the promoters of the early meiosis-specific genes IME2 and HOP1, and that this activation is dependent on the DNA-binding protein Ume6. Aym1 is transcribed predominantly in mouse primary spermatocytes and in gonads of female embryos undergoing the corresponding meiotic divisions. Aym1 immunolocalized to nuclei of primary spermatocytes and oocytes and to specific type A spermatogonia cells, suggesting it might play a role in the processes leading to meiotic competence. The potential functional relationship between AYM1 and yeast proteins that regulate expression of early meiotic genes is discussed.

  6. Estrogen receptors in granulosa cells govern meiotic resumption of pre-ovulatory oocytes in mammals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xin, Qiliang; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Huarong; Zhang, Wenqiang; Yang, Ye; Zhang, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Chao; Xu, Yang; Duan, Enkui; Xia, Guoliang

    2017-03-09

    In mammals, oocytes are arrested at the diplotene stage of meiosis I until the pre-ovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH) surge triggers meiotic resumption through the signals in follicular granulosa cells. In this study, we show that the estradiol (E2)-estrogen receptors (ERs) system in follicular granulosa cells has a dominant role in controlling oocyte meiotic resumption in mammals. We found that the expression of ERs was controlled by gonadotropins under physiological conditions. E2-ERs system was functional in maintaining oocyte meiotic arrest by regulating the expression of natriuretic peptide C and natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPPC/NPR2), which was achieved through binding to the promoter regions of Nppc and Npr2 genes directly. In ER knockout mice, meiotic arrest was not sustained by E2 in most cumulus-oocyte complexes in vitro and meiosis resumed precociously in pre-ovulatory follicles in vivo. In human granulosa cells, similar conclusions are reached that ER levels were controlled by gonadotropins and E2-ERs regulated the expression of NPPC/NPR2 levels. In addition, our results revealed that the different regulating patterns of follicle-stimulating hormone and LH on ER levels in vivo versus in vitro determined their distinct actions on oocyte maturation. Taken together, these findings suggest a critical role of E2-ERs system during oocyte meiotic progression and may propose a novel approach for oocyte in vitro maturation treatment in clinical practice.

  7. Meiotic and mitotic recombination in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kathryn P; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Meiotic crossovers facilitate the segregation of homologous chromosomes and increase genetic diversity. The formation of meiotic crossovers was previously posited to occur via two pathways, with the relative use of each pathway varying between organisms; however, this paradigm could not explain all crossovers, and many of the key proteins involved were unidentified. Recent studies that identify some of these proteins reinforce and expand the model of two meiotic crossover pathways. The results provide novel insights into the evolutionary origins of the pathways, suggesting that one is similar to a mitotic DNA repair pathway and the other evolved to incorporate special features unique to meiosis.

  8. OsHUS1 facilitates accurate meiotic recombination in rice.

    PubMed

    Che, Lixiao; Wang, Kejian; Tang, Ding; Liu, Qiaoquan; Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Yafei; Hu, Qing; Shen, Yi; Yu, Hengxiu; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2014-06-01

    Meiotic recombination normally takes place between allelic sequences on homologs. This process can also occur between non-allelic homologous sequences. Such ectopic interaction events can lead to chromosome rearrangements and are normally avoided. However, much remains unknown about how these ectopic interaction events are sensed and eliminated. In this study, using a screen in rice, we characterized a homolog of HUS1 and explored its function in meiotic recombination. In Oshus1 mutants, in conjunction with nearly normal homologous pairing and synapsis, vigorous, aberrant ectopic interactions occurred between nonhomologous chromosomes, leading to multivalent formation and subsequent chromosome fragmentation. These ectopic interactions relied on programmed meiotic double strand breaks and were formed in a manner independent of the OsMER3-mediated interference-sensitive crossover pathway. Although early homologous recombination events occurred normally, the number of interference-sensitive crossovers was reduced in the absence of OsHUS1. Together, our results indicate that OsHUS1 might be involved in regulating ectopic interactions during meiosis, probably by forming the canonical RAD9-RAD1-HUS1 (9-1-1) complex.

  9. Three-dimensional topology of the SMC2/SMC4 subcomplex from chicken condensin I revealed by cross-linking and molecular modelling

    PubMed Central

    Barysz, Helena; Kim, Ji Hun; Chen, Zhuo Angel; Hudson, Damien F.; Rappsilber, Juri; Gerloff, Dietlind L.; Earnshaw, William C.

    2015-01-01

    SMC proteins are essential components of three protein complexes that are important for chromosome structure and function. The cohesin complex holds replicated sister chromatids together, whereas the condensin complex has an essential role in mitotic chromosome architecture. Both are involved in interphase genome organization. SMC-containing complexes are large (more than 650 kDa for condensin) and contain long anti-parallel coiled-coils. They are thus difficult subjects for conventional crystallographic and electron cryomicroscopic studies. Here, we have used amino acid-selective cross-linking and mass spectrometry combined with structure prediction to develop a full-length molecular draft three-dimensional structure of the SMC2/SMC4 dimeric backbone of chicken condensin. We assembled homology-based molecular models of the globular heads and hinges with the lengthy coiled-coils modelled in fragments, using numerous high-confidence cross-links and accounting for potential irregularities. Our experiments reveal that isolated condensin complexes can exist with their coiled-coil segments closely apposed to one another along their lengths and define the relative spatial alignment of the two anti-parallel coils. The centres of the coiled-coils can also approach one another closely in situ in mitotic chromosomes. In addition to revealing structural information, our cross-linking data suggest that both H2A and H4 may have roles in condensin interactions with chromatin. PMID:25716199

  10. Topoisomerase II– and Condensin-Dependent Breakage of MEC1ATR-Sensitive Fragile Sites Occurs Independently of Spindle Tension, Anaphase, or Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Hashash, Nadia; Johnson, Anthony L.; Cha, Rita S.

    2012-01-01

    Fragile sites are loci of recurrent chromosome breakage in the genome. They are found in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans and are implicated in genome instability, evolution, and cancer. In budding yeast, inactivation of Mec1, a homolog of mammalian ATR, leads to chromosome breakage at fragile sites referred to as replication slow zones (RSZs). RSZs are proposed to be homologous to mammalian common fragile sites (CFSs) whose stability is regulated by ATR. Perturbation during S phase, leading to elevated levels of stalled replication forks, is necessary but not sufficient for chromosome breakage at RSZs or CFSs. To address the nature of additional event(s) required for the break formation, we examined involvement of the currently known or implicated mechanisms of endogenous chromosome breakage, including errors in replication fork restart, premature mitotic chromosome condensation, spindle tension, anaphase, and cytokinesis. Results revealed that chromosome breakage at RSZs is independent of the RAD52 epistasis group genes and of TOP3, SGS1, SRS2, MMS4, or MUS81, indicating that homologous recombination and other recombination-related processes associated with replication fork restart are unlikely to be involved. We also found spindle force, anaphase, or cytokinesis to be dispensable. RSZ breakage, however, required genes encoding condensin subunits (YCG1, YSC4) and topoisomerase II (TOP2). We propose that chromosome break formation at RSZs following Mec1 inactivation, a model for mammalian fragile site breakage, is mediated by internal chromosomal stress generated during mitotic chromosome condensation. PMID:23133392

  11. Sororin is enriched at the central region of synapsed meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Philip W; Eyster, Craig; Chen, Jingrong; Pezza, Roberto J; Rankin, Susannah

    2017-06-01

    During meiotic prophase, cohesin complexes mediate cohesion between sister chromatids and promote pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes. Precisely how the activity of cohesin is controlled to promote these events is not fully understood. In metazoans, cohesion establishment between sister chromatids during mitotic divisions is accompanied by recruitment of the cohesion-stabilizing protein Sororin. During somatic cell division cycles, Sororin is recruited in response to DNA replication-dependent modification of the cohesin complex by ESCO acetyltransferases. How Sororin is recruited and acts in meiosis is less clear. Here, we have surveyed the chromosomal localization of Sororin and its relationship to the meiotic cohesins and other chromatin modifiers with the objective of determining how Sororin contributes to meiotic chromosome dynamics. We show that Sororin localizes to the cores of meiotic chromosomes in a manner that is dependent on synapsis and the synaptonemal complex protein SYCP1. In contrast, cohesin, with which Sororin interacts in mitotic cells, shows axial enrichment on meiotic chromosomes even in the absence of synapsis between homologs. Using high-resolution microscopy, we show that Sororin is localized to the central region of the synaptonemal complex. These results indicate that Sororin regulation during meiosis is distinct from its regulation in mitotic cells and may suggest that it interacts with a distinctly different partner to ensure proper chromosome dynamics in meiosis.

  12. Spermatogenesis-Specific Features of the Meiotic Program in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shakes, Diane C.; Wu, Jui-ching; Sadler, Penny L.; LaPrade, Kristen; Moore, Landon L.; Noritake, Alana; Chu, Diana S.

    2009-01-01

    In most sexually reproducing organisms, the fundamental process of meiosis is implemented concurrently with two differentiation programs that occur at different rates and generate distinct cell types, sperm and oocytes. However, little is known about how the meiotic program is influenced by such contrasting developmental programs. Here we present a detailed timeline of late meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans using cytological and molecular landmarks to interrelate changes in chromosome dynamics with germ cell cellularization, spindle formation, and cell cycle transitions. This analysis expands our understanding C. elegans spermatogenesis, as it identifies multiple spermatogenesis-specific features of the meiotic program and provides a framework for comparative studies. Post-pachytene chromatin of spermatocytes is distinct from that of oocytes in both composition and morphology. Strikingly, C. elegans spermatogenesis includes a previously undescribed karyosome stage, a common but poorly understood feature of meiosis in many organisms. We find that karyosome formation, in which chromosomes form a constricted mass within an intact nuclear envelope, follows desynapsis, involves a global down-regulation of transcription, and may support the sequential activation of multiple kinases that prepare spermatocytes for meiotic divisions. In spermatocytes, the presence of centrioles alters both the relative timing of meiotic spindle assembly and its ultimate structure. These microtubule differences are accompanied by differences in kinetochores, which connect microtubules to chromosomes. The sperm-specific features of meiosis revealed here illuminate how the underlying molecular machinery required for meiosis is differentially regulated in each sex. PMID:19696886

  13. Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation of Mer2 facilitates initiation of yeast meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Kouji; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Kakusho, Naoko; Kugou, Kazuto; Kawasaki, Yasuo; Shibata, Takehiko; Masai, Hisao; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2008-02-01

    Meiosis ensures genetic diversification of gametes and sexual reproduction. For successful meiosis, multiple events such as DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation must occur coordinately in a strict regulated order. We investigated the meiotic roles of Cdc7 kinase in the initiation of meiotic recombination, namely, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) mediated by Spo11 and other coactivating proteins. Genetic analysis using bob1-1 cdc7Delta reveals that Cdc7 is essential for meiotic DSBs and meiosis I progression. We also demonstrate that the N-terminal region of Mer2, a Spo11 ancillary protein required for DSB formation and phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), contains two types of Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation sites near the CDK site (Ser30): One (Ser29) is essential for meiotic DSB formation, and the others exhibit a cumulative effect to facilitate DSB formation. Importantly, mutations on these sites confer severe defects in DSB formation even when the CDK phosphorylation is present at Ser30. Diploids of cdc7Delta display defects in the chromatin binding of not only Spo11 but also Rec114 and Mei4, other meiotic coactivators that may assist Spo11 binding to DSB hot spots. We thus propose that Cdc7, in concert with CDK, regulates Spo11 loading to DSB sites via Mer2 phosphorylation.

  14. Condensin controls recruitment of RNA polymerase II to achieve nematode X-chromosome dosage compensation

    PubMed Central

    Kruesi, William S; Core, Leighton J; Waters, Colin T; Lis, John T; Meyer, Barbara J

    2013-01-01

    The X-chromosome gene regulatory process called dosage compensation ensures that males (1X) and females (2X) express equal levels of X-chromosome transcripts. The mechanism in Caenorhabditis elegans has been elusive due to improperly annotated transcription start sites (TSSs). Here we define TSSs and the distribution of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) genome-wide in wild-type and dosage-compensation-defective animals to dissect this regulatory mechanism. Our TSS-mapping strategy integrates GRO-seq, which tracks nascent transcription, with a new derivative of this method, called GRO-cap, which recovers nascent RNAs with 5′ caps prior to their removal by co-transcriptional processing. Our analyses reveal that promoter-proximal pausing is rare, unlike in other metazoans, and promoters are unexpectedly far upstream from the 5′ ends of mature mRNAs. We find that C. elegans equalizes X-chromosome expression between the sexes, to a level equivalent to autosomes, by reducing Pol II recruitment to promoters of hermaphrodite X-linked genes using a chromosome-restructuring condensin complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00808.001 PMID:23795297

  15. Condensin controls recruitment of RNA polymerase II to achieve nematode X-chromosome dosage compensation.

    PubMed

    Kruesi, William S; Core, Leighton J; Waters, Colin T; Lis, John T; Meyer, Barbara J

    2013-06-18

    The X-chromosome gene regulatory process called dosage compensation ensures that males (1X) and females (2X) express equal levels of X-chromosome transcripts. The mechanism in Caenorhabditis elegans has been elusive due to improperly annotated transcription start sites (TSSs). Here we define TSSs and the distribution of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) genome-wide in wild-type and dosage-compensation-defective animals to dissect this regulatory mechanism. Our TSS-mapping strategy integrates GRO-seq, which tracks nascent transcription, with a new derivative of this method, called GRO-cap, which recovers nascent RNAs with 5' caps prior to their removal by co-transcriptional processing. Our analyses reveal that promoter-proximal pausing is rare, unlike in other metazoans, and promoters are unexpectedly far upstream from the 5' ends of mature mRNAs. We find that C. elegans equalizes X-chromosome expression between the sexes, to a level equivalent to autosomes, by reducing Pol II recruitment to promoters of hermaphrodite X-linked genes using a chromosome-restructuring condensin complex. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00808.001.

  16. SMC condensin entraps chromosomal DNA by an ATP hydrolysis dependent loading mechanism in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Larissa; Bürmann, Frank; Minnen, Anita; Shin, Ho-Chul; Toseland, Christopher P; Oh, Byung-Ha; Gruber, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Smc–ScpAB forms elongated, annular structures that promote chromosome segregation, presumably by compacting and resolving sister DNA molecules. The mechanistic basis for its action, however, is only poorly understood. Here, we have established a physical assay to determine whether the binding of condensin to native chromosomes in Bacillus subtilis involves entrapment of DNA by the Smc–ScpAB ring. To do so, we have chemically cross-linked the three ring interfaces in Smc–ScpAB and thereafter isolated intact chromosomes under protein denaturing conditions. Exclusively species of Smc–ScpA, which were previously cross-linked into covalent rings, remained associated with chromosomal DNA. DNA entrapment is abolished by mutations that interfere with the Smc ATPase cycle and strongly reduced when the recruitment factor ParB is deleted, implying that most Smc–ScpAB is loaded onto the chromosome at parS sites near the replication origin. We furthermore report a physical interaction between native Smc–ScpAB and chromosomal DNA fragments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06659.001 PMID:25951515

  17. Extensive meiotic asynapsis in mice antagonises meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin and consequently disrupts meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Bourc'his, Déborah; de Rooij, Dirk G; Bestor, Timothy H; Turner, James M A; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2008-07-28

    Chromosome synapsis during zygotene is a prerequisite for the timely homologous recombinational repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Unrepaired DSBs are thought to trigger apoptosis during midpachytene of male meiosis if synapsis fails. An early pachytene response to asynapsis is meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), which, in normal males, silences the X and Y chromosomes (meiotic sex chromosome inactivation [MSCI]). In this study, we show that MSUC occurs in Spo11-null mouse spermatocytes with extensive asynapsis but lacking meiotic DSBs. In contrast, three mutants (Dnmt3l, Msh5, and Dmc1) with high levels of asynapsis and numerous persistent unrepaired DSBs have a severely impaired MSUC response. We suggest that MSUC-related proteins, including the MSUC initiator BRCA1, are sequestered at unrepaired DSBs. All four mutants fail to silence the X and Y chromosomes (MSCI failure), which is sufficient to explain the midpachytene apoptosis. Apoptosis does not occur in mice with a single additional asynapsed chromosome with unrepaired meiotic DSBs and no disturbance of MSCI.

  18. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2009-05-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  19. Meiotic Recombination in Arabidopsis Is Catalysed by DMC1, with RAD51 Playing a Supporting Role

    PubMed Central

    Da Ines, Olivier; Degroote, Fabienne; Goubely, Chantal; Amiard, Simon; Gallego, Maria E.; White, Charles I.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination establishes the chiasmata that physically link pairs of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, ensuring their balanced segregation at the first meiotic division and generating genetic variation. The visible manifestation of genetic crossing-overs, chiasmata are the result of an intricate and tightly regulated process involving induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their repair through invasion of a homologous template DNA duplex, catalysed by RAD51 and DMC1 in most eukaryotes. We describe here a RAD51-GFP fusion protein that retains the ability to assemble at DNA breaks but has lost its DNA break repair capacity. This protein fully complements the meiotic chromosomal fragmentation and sterility of Arabidopsis rad51, but not rad51 dmc1 mutants. Even though DMC1 is the only active meiotic strand transfer protein in the absence of RAD51 catalytic activity, no effect on genetic map distance was observed in complemented rad51 plants. The presence of inactive RAD51 nucleofilaments is thus able to fully support meiotic DSB repair and normal levels of crossing-over by DMC1. Our data demonstrate that RAD51 plays a supporting role for DMC1 in meiotic recombination in the flowering plant, Arabidopsis. PMID:24086145

  20. Meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis is catalysed by DMC1, with RAD51 playing a supporting role.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; Degroote, Fabienne; Goubely, Chantal; Amiard, Simon; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2013-01-01

    Recombination establishes the chiasmata that physically link pairs of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, ensuring their balanced segregation at the first meiotic division and generating genetic variation. The visible manifestation of genetic crossing-overs, chiasmata are the result of an intricate and tightly regulated process involving induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their repair through invasion of a homologous template DNA duplex, catalysed by RAD51 and DMC1 in most eukaryotes. We describe here a RAD51-GFP fusion protein that retains the ability to assemble at DNA breaks but has lost its DNA break repair capacity. This protein fully complements the meiotic chromosomal fragmentation and sterility of Arabidopsis rad51, but not rad51 dmc1 mutants. Even though DMC1 is the only active meiotic strand transfer protein in the absence of RAD51 catalytic activity, no effect on genetic map distance was observed in complemented rad51 plants. The presence of inactive RAD51 nucleofilaments is thus able to fully support meiotic DSB repair and normal levels of crossing-over by DMC1. Our data demonstrate that RAD51 plays a supporting role for DMC1 in meiotic recombination in the flowering plant, Arabidopsis.

  1. Cyclic AMP in oocytes controls meiotic prophase I and primordial folliculogenesis in the perinatal mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yijing; Teng, Zhen; Li, Ge; Mu, Xinyi; Wang, Zhengpin; Feng, Lizhao; Niu, Wanbao; Huang, Kun; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Xia, Guoliang

    2015-01-15

    In mammalian ovaries, a fixed population of primordial follicles forms during the perinatal stage and the oocytes contained within are arrested at the dictyate stage of meiotic prophase I. In the current study, we provide evidence that the level of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in oocytes regulates oocyte meiotic prophase I and primordial folliculogenesis in the perinatal mouse ovary. Our results show that the early meiotic development of oocytes is closely correlated with increased levels of intra-oocyte cAMP. Inhibiting cAMP synthesis in fetal ovaries delayed oocyte meiotic progression and inhibited the disassembly and degradation of synaptonemal complex protein 1. In addition, inhibiting cAMP synthesis in in vitro cultured fetal ovaries prevented primordial follicle formation. Finally, using an in situ oocyte chromosome analysis approach, we found that the dictyate arrest of oocytes is essential for primordial follicle formation under physiological conditions. Taken together, these results suggest a role for cAMP in early meiotic development and primordial follicle formation in the mouse ovary. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Prevention of DNA Rereplication Through a Meiotic Recombination Checkpoint Response

    PubMed Central

    Najor, Nicole A.; Weatherford, Layne; Brush, George S.

    2016-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unnatural stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 during meiosis can trigger extra rounds of DNA replication. When programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated but not repaired due to absence of DMC1, a pathway involving the checkpoint gene RAD17 prevents this DNA rereplication. Further genetic analysis has now revealed that prevention of DNA rereplication also requires MEC1, which encodes a protein kinase that serves as a central checkpoint regulator in several pathways including the meiotic recombination checkpoint response. Downstream of MEC1, MEK1 is required through its function to inhibit repair between sister chromatids. By contrast, meiotic recombination checkpoint effectors that regulate gene expression and cyclin-dependent kinase activity are not necessary. Phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is catalyzed by Mec1 and the related Tel1 protein kinase in response to DSBs, and can help coordinate activation of the Rad53 checkpoint protein kinase in the mitotic cell cycle, is required for the full checkpoint response. Phosphorylation sites that are targeted by Rad53 in a mitotic S phase checkpoint response are also involved, based on the behavior of cells containing mutations in the DBF4 and SLD3 DNA replication genes. However, RAD53 does not appear to be required, nor does RAD9, which encodes a mediator of Rad53, consistent with their lack of function in the recombination checkpoint pathway that prevents meiotic progression. While this response is similar to a checkpoint mechanism that inhibits initiation of DNA replication in the mitotic cell cycle, the evidence points to a new variation on DNA replication control. PMID:27678521

  3. Analysis of the gene expression profile of mouse male meiotic germ cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Pellegrino; Dolci, Susanna; Sette, Claudio; Capolunghi, Federica; Pellegrini, Manuela; Loiarro, Maria; Di Agostino, Silvia; Paronetto, Maria Paola; Grimaldi, Paola; Merico, Daniele; Martegani, Enzo; Geremia, Raffaele

    2004-05-01

    Wide genome analysis of difference in gene expression between spermatogonial populations from 7-day-old mice and pachytene spermatocytes from 18-day-old mice was performed using Affymetrix gene chips representing approximately 12,500 mouse known genes or EST sequences, spanning approximately 1/3rd of the mouse genome. To delineate differences in the profile of gene expression between mitotic and meiotic stages of male germ cell differentiation, expressed genes were grouped in functional clusters. The analysis confirmed the previously described pre-meiotic or meiotic expression for several genes, in particular for those involved in the regulation of the mitotic and meiotic cell cycle, and for those whose transcripts are accumulated during the meiotic stages to be translated later in post-meiotic stages. Differential expression of several additional genes was discovered. In few cases (pro-apoptotic factors Bak, Bad and Bax), data were in conflict with the previously published stage-dependent expression of genes already known to be expressed in male germ cells. Northern blot analysis of selected genes confirmed the results obtained with the microarray chips. Six of these were novel genes specifically expressed in pachytene spermatocytes: a chromatin remodeling factor (chrac1/YCL1), a homeobox gene (hmx1), a novel G-coupled receptor for an unknown ligand (Gpr19), a glycoprotein of the intestinal epithelium (mucin 3), a novel RAS activator (Ranbp9), and the A630056B21Rik gene (predicted to encode a novel zinc finger protein). These studies will help to delineate the global patterns of gene expression characterizing male germ cell differentiation for a better understanding of regulation of spermatogenesis in mammals.

  4. Cytoplasm replacement following germinal vesicle transfer restores meiotic maturation and spindle assembly in meiotically arrested oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, John; Liu, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Both the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments are essential for the acquisition of meiotic competence. This study assessed the role of the cytoplasm in meiosis resumption in meiotically arrested oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. Mouse oocytes at GV stage were meiotically arrested with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). GV transfer was performed between IBMX-treated and non-treated (control) mouse oocytes, and between control mouse and human GV oocytes. Extrusion of first polar body (PB) was examined as an indication of nuclear maturation. Meiotic spindle assembly and chromosome alignment were examined by immunostaining. Results indicated that oocytes arrested with IBMX for 24 and 48 h exhibited reduced ability for meiotic maturation and for extruding the first PB when compared with controls (P < 0.01). IBMX-treated oocytes reconstituted with cytoplasm, but not GV, of control oocytes restored the assembly of meiotic spindle and meiotic maturation. Mouse oocytes reconstituted with GV of human oocytes underwent meiosis similar to that observed in mice, but not humans. Additionally, human oocytes reconstituted by mouse GV underwent meiosis similar to that observed in humans, but not mice. These findings suggest that cytoplasm replacement by GV transfer could represent a potential therapeutic option for women who do not produce mature oocytes during IVF. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epigenetic control of meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Yelina, Natasha; Diaz, Patrick; Lambing, Christophe; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-03-01

    Meiotic recombination is a deeply conserved process within eukaryotes that has a profound effect on patterns of natural genetic variation. During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair and undergo DNA double strand breaks generated by the Spo11 endonuclease. These breaks can be repaired as crossovers that result in reciprocal exchange between chromosomes. The frequency of recombination along chromosomes is highly variable, for example, crossovers are rarely observed in heterochromatin and the centromeric regions. Recent work in plants has shown that crossover hotspots occur in gene promoters and are associated with specific chromatin modifications, including H2A.Z. Meiotic chromosomes are also organized in loop-base arrays connected to an underlying chromosome axis, which likely interacts with chromatin to organize patterns of recombination. Therefore, epigenetic information exerts a major influence on patterns of meiotic recombination along chromosomes, genetic variation within populations and evolution of plant genomes.

  6. Centromere Associations in Meiotic Chromosome Pairing.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; White, Charles I

    2015-01-01

    Production of gametes of halved ploidy for sexual reproduction requires a specialized cell division called meiosis. The fusion of two gametes restores the original ploidy in the new generation, and meiosis thus stabilizes ploidy across generations. To ensure balanced distribution of chromosomes, pairs of homologous chromosomes (homologs) must recognize each other and pair in the first meiotic division. Recombination plays a key role in this in most studied species, but it is not the only actor and particular chromosomal regions are known to facilitate the meiotic pairing of homologs. In this review, we focus on the roles of centromeres and in particular on the clustering and pairwise associations of nonhomologous centromeres that precede stable pairing between homologs. Although details vary from species to species, it is becoming increasingly clear that these associations play active roles in the meiotic chromosome pairing process, analogous to those of the telomere bouquet.

  7. Rad3-Cds1 mediates coupling of initiation of meiotic recombination with DNA replication. Mei4-dependent transcription as a potential target of meiotic checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Keiko; Masai, Hisao

    2006-01-20

    Premeiotic S-phase and meiotic recombination are known to be strictly coupled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the checkpoint pathway regulating this coupling has been largely unknown. In fission yeast, Rad3 is known to play an essential role in coordination of DNA replication and cell division during both mitotic growth and meiosis. Here we have examined whether the Rad3 pathway also regulates the coupling of DNA synthesis and recombination. Inhibition of premeiotic S-phase with hydroxyurea completely abrogates the progression of meiosis, including the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB formation is restored in rad3 mutant even in the presence of hydroxyurea, although repair of DSBs does not take place or is significantly delayed, indicating that the subsequent recombination steps may be still inhibited. Examination of the roles of downstream checkpoint kinases reveals that Cds1, but not Chk1 or Mek1, is required for suppression of DSB in the presence of hydroxyurea. Transcriptional induction of some rec+ genes essential for DSB occurs at a normal timing and to a normal level in the absence of DNA synthesis in both the wild-type and cds1delta cells. On the other hand, the transcriptional induction of the mei4+ transcription factor and cdc25+ phosphatase, which is significantly suppressed by hydroxyurea in the wild-type cells, occurs almost to a normal level in cds1delta cells even in the presence of hydroxyurea. These results show that the Rad3-Cds1 checkpoint pathway coordinates initiation of meiotic recombination and meiotic cell divisions with premeiotic DNA synthesis. Because mei4+ is known to be required for DSB formation and cdc25+ is required for activation of meiotic cell divisions, we propose an intriguing possibility that the Rad3-Cds1 meiotic checkpoint pathway may target transcription of these factors.

  8. Haploinsufficiency of an RB-E2F1-Condensin II complex leads to aberrant replication and aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Coschi, Courtney H; Ishak, Charles A; Gallo, David; Marshall, Aren; Talluri, Srikanth; Wang, Jianxin; Cecchini, Matthew J; Martens, Alison L; Percy, Vanessa; Welch, Ian; Boutros, Paul C; Brown, Grant W; Dick, Frederick A

    2014-07-01

    Genome instability is a characteristic of malignant cells; however, evidence for its contribution to tumorigenesis has been enigmatic. In this study, we demonstrate that the retinoblastoma protein, E2F1, and Condensin II localize to discrete genomic locations including major satellite repeats at pericentromeres. In the absence of this complex, aberrant replication ensues followed by defective chromosome segregation in mitosis. Surprisingly, loss of even one copy of the retinoblastoma gene reduced recruitment of Condensin II to pericentromeres and caused this phenotype. Using cancer genome data and gene-targeted mice, we demonstrate that mutation of one copy of RB1 is associated with chromosome copy-number variation in cancer. Our study connects DNA replication and chromosome structure defects with aneuploidy through a dosage-sensitive complex at pericentromeric repeats. Genome instability is inherent to most cancers and is the basis for selective killing of cancer cells by genotoxic therapeutics. In this report, we demonstrate that instability can be caused by loss of a single allele of the retinoblastoma gene that prevents proper replication and condensation of pericentromeric chromosomal regions, leading to elevated levels of aneuploidy in cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Gibberellin Induces Diploid Pollen Formation by Interfering with Meiotic Cytokinesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    De Storme, Nico

    2017-01-01

    The plant hormone gibberellic acid (GA) controls many physiological processes, including cell differentiation, cell elongation, seed germination, and response to abiotic stress. In this study, we report that exogenous treatment of flowering Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with GA specifically affects the process of male meiotic cytokinesis leading to meiotic restitution and the production of diploid (2n) pollen grains. Similar defects in meiotic cell division and reproductive ploidy stability occur in Arabidopsis plants depleted of RGA and GAI, two members of the DELLA family that function as suppressor of GA signaling. Cytological analysis of the double rga-24 gai-t6 mutant revealed that defects in male meiotic cytokinesis are not caused by alterations in meiosis I (MI or meiosis II (MII) chromosome dynamics, but instead result from aberrations in the spatial organization of the phragmoplast-like radial microtubule arrays (RMAs) at the end of meiosis II. In line with a role for GA in the genetic regulation of the male reproductive system, we additionally show that DELLA downstream targets MYB33 and MYB65 are redundantly required for functional RMA biosynthesis and male meiotic cytokinesis. By analyzing the expression of pRGA::GFP-RGA in the wild-type Landsberg erecta background, we demonstrate that the GFP-RGA protein is specifically expressed in the anther cell layers surrounding the meiocytes and microspores, suggesting that appropriate GA signaling in the somatic anther tissue is critical for male meiotic cell wall formation and thus plays an important role in consolidating the male gametophytic ploidy consistency. PMID:27621423

  10. A high throughput genetic screen identifies new early meiotic recombination functions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Muyt, Arnaud; Pereira, Lucie; Vezon, Daniel; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Gendrot, Ghislaine; Chambon, Aurélie; Lainé-Choinard, Sandrine; Pelletier, Georges; Mercier, Raphaël; Nogué, Fabien; Grelon, Mathilde

    2009-09-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalysed by the widely conserved Spo11 protein. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spo11 requires nine other proteins for meiotic DSB formation; however, unlike Spo11, few of these are conserved across kingdoms. In order to investigate this recombination step in higher eukaryotes, we took advantage of a high-throughput meiotic mutant screen carried out in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A collection of 55,000 mutant lines was screened, and spo11-like mutations, characterised by a drastic decrease in chiasma formation at metaphase I associated with an absence of synapsis at prophase, were selected. This screen led to the identification of two populations of mutants classified according to their recombination defects: mutants that repair meiotic DSBs using the sister chromatid such as Atdmc1 or mutants that are unable to make DSBs like Atspo11-1. We found that in Arabidopsis thaliana at least four proteins are necessary for driving meiotic DSB repair via the homologous chromosomes. These include the previously characterised DMC1 and the Hop1-related ASY1 proteins, but also the meiotic specific cyclin SDS as well as the Hop2 Arabidopsis homologue AHP2. Analysing the mutants defective in DSB formation, we identified the previously characterised AtSPO11-1, AtSPO11-2, and AtPRD1 as well as two new genes, AtPRD2 and AtPRD3. Our data thus increase the number of proteins necessary for DSB formation in Arabidopsis thaliana to five. Unlike SPO11 and (to a minor extent) PRD1, these two new proteins are poorly conserved among species, suggesting that the DSB formation mechanism, but not its regulation, is conserved among eukaryotes.

  11. Bdf1 Bromodomains Are Essential for Meiosis and the Expression of Meiotic-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Perot, Jonathan; Arlotto, Marie; Mietton, Flore; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-François; Ferro, Myriam; Govin, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Bromodomain and Extra-terminal motif (BET) proteins play a central role in transcription regulation and chromatin signalling pathways. They are present in unicellular eukaryotes and in this study, the role of the BET protein Bdf1 has been explored in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutation of Bdf1 bromodomains revealed defects on both the formation of spores and the meiotic progression, blocking cells at the exit from prophase, before the first meiotic division. This phenotype is associated with a massive deregulation of the transcription of meiotic genes and Bdf1 bromodomains are required for appropriate expression of the key meiotic transcription factor NDT80 and almost all the Ndt80-inducible genes, including APC complex components. Bdf1 notably accumulates on the promoter of Ndt80 and its recruitment is dependent on Bdf1 bromodomains. In addition, the ectopic expression of NDT80 during meiosis partially bypasses this dependency. Finally, purification of Bdf1 partners identified two independent complexes with Bdf2 or the SWR complex, neither of which was required to complete sporulation. Taken together, our results unveil a new role for Bdf1 –working independently from its predominant protein partners Bdf2 and the SWR1 complex–as a regulator of meiosis-specific genes. PMID:28068333

  12. Characterization of fission yeast meiotic mutants based on live observation of meiotic prophase nuclear movement.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Y; Ding, D Q; Yamamoto, A; Tsutsumi, C; Chikashige, Y

    2000-01-01

    We characterized four meiotic mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by live observation of nuclear movement. Nuclei were stained with either the DNA-specific fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 or jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused with the N-terminal portion of DNA polymerase alpha. We first followed nuclear dynamics in wild-type cells to determine the temporal sequence of meiotic events: nuclear fusion in the conjugated zygote is immediately followed by oscillatory nuclear movements that continue for 146 min; then, after coming to rest, the nucleus remains in the center of the cell for 26 min before the first meiotic division. Next we examined nuclear dynamics in four meiotic mutants: mei1 (also called mat2), mei4, dhc1, and taz1. Mei1 and mei4 both arrest during meiotic prophase; our observations, however, show that the timing of mei1 arrest is quite different from that of mei4: the mei1 mutant arrests after nuclear fusion but before starting the oscillatory nuclear movements, while the mei4 mutant arrests after the nucleus has completed the oscillatory movements but before the first meiotic division. We also show examples of the dynamic phenotypes of dhc1 and taz1, both of which complete meiosis but exhibit impaired nuclear movement and reduced frequencies of homologous recombination: the dhc1 mutant exhibits no nuclear movement after nuclear fusion, while the taz1 mutant exhibits severely impaired nuclear movement after nuclear fusion.

  13. SACY-1 DEAD-Box Helicase Links the Somatic Control of Oocyte Meiotic Maturation to the Sperm-to-Oocyte Switch and Gamete Maintenance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongseop; Govindan, J. Amaranath; Tu, Zheng Jin; Greenstein, David

    2012-01-01

    In sexually reproducing animals, oocytes arrest at diplotene or diakinesis and resume meiosis (meiotic maturation) in response to hormones. In Caenorhabditis elegans, major sperm protein triggers meiotic resumption through a mechanism involving somatic Gαs–adenylate cyclase signaling and soma-to-germline gap-junctional communication. Using genetic mosaic analysis, we show that the major effector of Gαs–adenylate cyclase signaling, protein kinase A (PKA), is required in gonadal sheath cells for oocyte meiotic maturation and dispensable in the germ line. This result rules out a model in which cyclic nucleotides must transit through sheath-oocyte gap junctions to activate PKA in the germ line, as proposed in vertebrate systems. We conducted a genetic screen to identify regulators of oocyte meiotic maturation functioning downstream of Gαs–adenylate cyclase–PKA signaling. We molecularly identified 10 regulatory loci, which include essential and nonessential factors. sacy-1, which encodes a highly conserved DEAD-box helicase, is an essential germline factor that negatively regulates meiotic maturation. SACY-1 is a multifunctional protein that establishes a mechanistic link connecting the somatic control of meiotic maturation to germline sex determination and gamete maintenance. Modulatory factors include multiple subunits of a CoREST-like complex and the TWK-1 two-pore potassium channel. These factors are not absolutely required for meiotic maturation or its negative regulation in the absence of sperm, but function cumulatively to enable somatic control of meiotic maturation. This work provides insights into the genetic control of meiotic maturation signaling in C. elegans, and the conserved factors identified here might inform analysis in other systems through either homology or analogy. PMID:22887816

  14. Bivalent Formation 1, a plant-conserved gene, encodes an OmpH/coiled-coil motif-containing protein required for meiotic recombination in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Han, Jingluan; Chen, Yuanling; Wang, Yingxiang; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2017-03-24

    Meiosis is essential for eukaryotic sexual reproduction and plant fertility. In comparison with over 80 meiotic genes identified in Arabidopsis, there are only ~30 meiotic genes characterized in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Many genes involved in the regulation of meiotic progression remain to be determined. In this study, we identified a sterile rice mutant and cloned a new meiotic gene, OsBVF1 (Bivalent Formation 1) by map-based cloning. Molecular genetics and cytological approaches were carried out to address the function of OsBVF1 in meiosis. Phylogenetic analyses were used to study the evolution of OsBVF1 and its homologs in plant species. Here we showed that the bvf1 male meiocytes were defective in formation of meiotic double strand break, thereby resulting in a failure of bivalent formation in diakinesis and unequal chromosome segregation in anaphase I. The causal gene, OsBVF1, encodes a unique OmpH/coiled-coil motif-containing protein and its homologs are highly conserved in the plant kingdom and seem to be a single-copy gene in the majority of plant species. Our study demonstrates that OsBVF1 is a novel plant-conserved factor involved in meiotic recombination in rice, providing a new insight into understanding of meiotic progression regulation.

  15. Meiotic recombination hotspots - a comparative view.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-07-01

    During meiosis homologous chromosomes pair and undergo reciprocal genetic exchange, termed crossover. Meiotic recombination has a profound effect on patterns of genetic variation and is an important tool during crop breeding. Crossovers initiate from programmed DNA double-stranded breaks that are processed to form single-stranded DNA, which can invade a homologous chromosome. Strand invasion events mature into double Holliday junctions that can be resolved as crossovers. Extensive variation in the frequency of meiotic recombination occurs along chromosomes and is typically focused in narrow hotspots, observed both at the level of DNA breaks and final crossovers. We review methodologies to profile hotspots at different steps of the meiotic recombination pathway that have been used in different eukaryote species. We then discuss what these studies have revealed concerning specification of hotspot locations and activity and the contributions of both genetic and epigenetic factors. Understanding hotspots is important for interpreting patterns of genetic variation in populations and how eukaryotic genomes evolve. In addition, manipulation of hotspots will allow us to accelerate crop breeding, where meiotic recombination distributions can be limiting. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence. PMID:21510849

  17. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  18. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx (-/-) pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration.

  19. Mature cystic teratomas arise from meiotic oocytes, but not from pre-meiotic oogonia.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroshi; Usui, Hirokazu; Qu, Jia; Shozu, Makio

    2016-04-01

    Mature cystic teratomas (MCTs) in the ovaries have been thought to originate from germ cells from all developmental stages, i.e., from pre-meiotic oogonia through meiotic oocytes to mature post-meiotic ova. This view was based on research on MCTs by classical methods, including those involving centromeric heteromorphisms in karyotypes, enzyme polymorphisms, and DNA polymorphisms. However, insufficient genomic information was obtained in those studies. The current study aimed to confirm the cytogenetic origin of ovarian MCTs by using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism analysis to obtain sufficient genomic information, especially in connection with centromeric loci. Tissue samples of MCTs (57 ovaries from 51 patients, 91 MCTs, 156 specimens in total) obtained from cystectomies or oophorectomies were used. We categorized the specimens into two groups: i) solid components of MCTs and ii) cyst walls. The numbers of solid components of MCTs from pre-meiotic oogonia, primary oocytes, secondary oocytes, and ova were 0, 33, 16, and 15, respectively. There were no pre-meiotic oogonia in this series of solid-component specimens. We propose a hypothesis for the tumorigenesis of ovarian MCTs: the precursors of ovarian MCTs are not functional oocytes or ova, but are primary oocytes that have escaped from meiotic arrest. This hypothesis could satisfactorily explain the lack of pre-meiotic teratomas observed in this study and the nearly equal distribution of teratomas originating from primary oocytes, secondary oocytes, and ova in previous studies. Furthermore, this hypothesis could provide a starting point for determining the mechanism underlying tumorigenesis of ovarian MCTs.

  20. On the transition from the meiotic to mitotic cell cycle during early mouse development.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Jacek Z; Ciemerych, Maria A; Hupalowska, Anna; Sikora-Polaczek, Marta; Polanski, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Here, we outline the mechanisms involved in the regulation of cell divisions during oocyte maturation and early cleavages of the mouse embryo. Our interest is focused on the regulation of meiotic M-phases and the first embryonic mitoses that are differently tuned and are characterized by specifically modified mechanisms, some of which have been recently identified. The transitions between the M-phases during this period of development, as well as associated changes in their regulation, are of key importance for both the meiotic maturation of oocytes and the further development of the mammalian embryo. The mouse is an excellent model for studies of the cell cycle during oogenesis and early development. Nevertheless, a number of molecular mechanisms described here were discovered or confirmed during the study of other species and apply also to other mammals including humans.

  1. Php4 Is a Key Player for Iron Economy in Meiotic and Sporulating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Ariane; Rallis, Charalampos; Normant, Vincent; Garant, Jean-Michel; Bähler, Jürg; Labbé, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is essential for sexually reproducing organisms, including the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In meiosis, chromosomes replicate once in a diploid precursor cell (zygote), and then segregate twice to generate four haploid meiotic products, named spores in yeast. In S. pombe, Php4 is responsible for the transcriptional repression capability of the heteromeric CCAAT-binding factor to negatively regulate genes encoding iron-using proteins under low-iron conditions. Here, we show that the CCAAT-regulatory subunit Php4 is required for normal progression of meiosis under iron-limiting conditions. Cells lacking Php4 exhibit a meiotic arrest at metaphase I. Microscopic analyses of cells expressing functional GFP-Php4 show that it colocalizes with chromosomal material at every stage of meiosis under low concentrations of iron. In contrast, GFP-Php4 fluorescence signal is lost when cells undergo meiosis under iron-replete conditions. Global gene expression analysis of meiotic cells using DNA microarrays identified 137 genes that are regulated in an iron- and Php4-dependent manner. Among them, 18 genes are expressed exclusively during meiosis and constitute new putative Php4 target genes, which include hry1+ and mug14+. Further analysis validates that Php4 is required for maximal and timely repression of hry1+ and mug14+ genes. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation approach, we show that Php4 specifically associates with hry1+ and mug14+ promoters in vivo. Taken together, the results reveal that in iron-starved meiotic cells, Php4 is essential for completion of the meiotic program since it participates in global gene expression reprogramming to optimize the use of limited available iron. PMID:27466270

  2. Epigenetic status determines germ cell meiotic commitment in embryonic and postnatal mammalian gonads.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2010-01-15

    The meiotic cell cycle is required for production of fertilization-competent gametes. Germ cell meiotic commitment requires expression of Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), which is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid (RA). Meiotic suppression in embryonic male germ cells is believed to result from sex-specific differences in CYP26B1-catalyzed RA metabolism in the developing gonads. Here we show in mice that RA-induced Stra8 transcription is epigenetically controlled and requires a co-activator that binds proximal to the RA response elements (RAREs) in the Stra8 promoter. Embryonic male germ cells exposed in utero to the class I/II histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), show premature Stra8 activation and meiotic entry without altered Cyp26b1 expression. We also show that Stra8 expression is detectable and physiologically regulated in adult mouse ovaries. Further, oogenesis induction in adult females using TSA is associated with Stra8 activation, and these events are absent in mice deficient in the RA precursor vitamin A. Finally, all of the actions of TSA in premeiotic germ cells in vitro and in mouse ovaries in vivo can be reproduced with the small molecule HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Thus, the ability of RA to transcriptionally induce expression of the meiosis-commitment gene, Stra8, is epigenetically controlled and this process involves a novel co-activator that functions upstream of the RAREs. These events not only coordinate the sex-specific timing of meiotic entry during embryogenesis, but also contribute to the regulation of oogenesis in adult female mammals.

  3. Epigenetic status determines germ cell meiotic commitment in embryonic and postnatal mammalian gonads

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Tilly, Jonathan L.

    2017-01-01

    The meiotic cell cycle is required for production of fertilization-competent gametes. Germ cell meiotic commitment requires expression of Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (Stra8), which is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid (RA). Meiotic suppression in embryonic male germ cells is believed to result from sex-specific differences in CYP26B1-catalyzed RA metabolism in the developing gonads. Here we show in mice that RA-induced Stra8 transcription is epigenetically controlled and requires a co-activator that binds proximal to the RA response elements (RAREs) in the Stra8 promoter. Embryonic male germ cells exposed in utero to the class I/II histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, trichostatin-A (TSA), show premature Stra8 activation and meiotic entry without altered Cyp26bl expression. We also show that Stra8 expression is detectable and physiologically regulated in adult mouse ovaries. Further, oogenesis induction in adult females using TSA is associated with Stra8 activation, and these events are absent in mice deficient in the RA precursor vitamin A. Finally, all of the actions of TSA in premeiotic germ cells in vitro and in mouse ovaries in vivo can be reproduced with the small molecule HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Thus, the ability of RA to transcriptionally induce expression of the meiosis-commitment gene, Stra8, is epigenetically controlled and this process involves a novel co-activator that functions upstream of the RAREs. These events not only coordinate the sex-specific timing of meiotic entry during embryogenesis, but also contribute to the regulation of oogenesis in adult female mammals. PMID:20009537

  4. The epigenetic modifications and the anterior to posterior characterization of meiotic entry during mouse oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Yang, Fan; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Feng, Yan-Ni; Li, Lan; Dyce, Paul W; Shen, Wei; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2017-02-24

    The meiotic initiation of mammalian oogonia is a critical step during the development of primordial germ cells (PGCs) to mature oocytes. In this study, a systematic investigation of epigenetic modifications and DAZL gene expression during oogonia meiotic entry were performed. We found that the expression of DAZL was epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation of CpG islands within its promoter region. During meiotic entry, a continuously increasing level of 5hmC, a stable epigenetic marker usually associated with the activation of gene expression, was observed from 11.5 to 16.5 dpc (days post coitum). Meanwhile trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone3 (H3K27me3), usually associated with repression of gene expression, had a sustainable increase from 12.5 to 16.5 dpc. Finally, by equally dividing the ovaries into three regions representing the anterior, the middle, and the posterior of the ovary and performing immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR on the individual regions, we provided further evidences that the meiotic entry and progression of female germ cells is in an anterior to posterior pattern.

  5. Many X-linked microRNAs escape meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Ro, Seungil; Michaels, Jason D; Park, Chanjae; McCarrey, John R; Yan, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis is characterized by transcriptional silencing of genes on both the X and Y chromosomes in mid-to-late pachytene spermatocytes. MSCI is believed to result from meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA because the X and Y chromosomes remain largely unpaired throughout first meiotic prophase. However, unlike X-chromosome inactivation in female embryonic cells, where 25-30% of X-linked structural genes have been reported to escape inactivation, previous microarray- and RT-PCR-based studies of expression of >364 X-linked mRNA-encoding genes during spermatogenesis have failed to reveal any X-linked gene that escapes the silencing effects of MSCI in primary spermatocytes. Here we show that many X-linked miRNAs are transcribed and processed in pachytene spermatocytes. This unprecedented escape from MSCI by these X-linked miRNAs suggests that they may participate in a critical function at this stage of spermatogenesis, including the possibility that they contribute to the process of MSCI itself, or that they may be essential for post-transcriptional regulation of autosomal mRNAs during the late meiotic and early postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.

  6. A DNA topoisomerase VI-like complex initiates meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Vrielynck, Nathalie; Chambon, Aurélie; Vezon, Daniel; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; De Muyt, Arnaud; Mézard, Christine; Mayer, Claudine; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-02-26

    The SPO11 protein catalyzes the formation of meiotic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and is homologous to the A subunit of an archaeal topoisomerase (topo VI). Topo VI are heterotetrameric enzymes comprising two A and two B subunits; however, no topo VIB involved in meiotic recombination had been identified. We characterized a structural homolog of the archaeal topo VIB subunit [meiotic topoisomerase VIB-like (MTOPVIB)], which is essential for meiotic DSB formation. It forms a complex with the two Arabidopsis thaliana SPO11 orthologs required for meiotic DSB formation (SPO11-1 and SPO11-2) and is absolutely required for the formation of the SPO11-1/SPO11-2 heterodimer. These findings suggest that the catalytic core complex responsible for meiotic DSB formation in eukaryotes adopts a topo VI-like structure.

  7. Human Male Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G.; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity. PMID:22355370

  8. Human male meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Marieke; Vosters, Sanne; Merkx, Gerard; D'Hauwers, Kathleen; Wansink, Derick G; Ramos, Liliana; de Boer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian male gametogenesis the sex chromosomes are distinctive in both gene activity and epigenetic strategy. At first meiotic prophase the heteromorphic X and Y chromosomes are placed in a separate chromatin domain called the XY body. In this process, X,Y chromatin becomes highly phosphorylated at S139 of H2AX leading to the repression of gonosomal genes, a process known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which has been studied best in mice. Post-meiotically this repression is largely maintained. Disturbance of MSCI in mice leads to harmful X,Y gene expression, eventuating in spermatocyte death and sperm heterogeneity. Sperm heterogeneity is a characteristic of the human male. For this reason we were interested in the efficiency of MSCI in human primary spermatocytes. We investigated MSCI in pachytene spermatocytes of seven probands: four infertile men and three fertile controls, using direct and indirect in situ methods. A considerable degree of variation in the degree of MSCI was detected, both between and within probands. Moreover, in post-meiotic stages this variation was observed as well, indicating survival of spermatocytes with incompletely inactivated sex chromosomes. Furthermore, we investigated the presence of H3K9me3 posttranslational modifications on the X and Y chromatin. Contrary to constitutive centromeric heterochromatin, this heterochromatin marker did not specifically accumulate on the XY body, with the exception of the heterochromatic part of the Y chromosome. This may reflect the lower degree of MSCI in man compared to mouse. These results point at relaxation of MSCI, which can be explained by genetic changes in sex chromosome composition during evolution and candidates as a mechanism behind human sperm heterogeneity.

  9. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step in homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.

  10. Does MAX open up a new avenue for meiotic research?

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ayumu; Hirasaki, Masataka; Okuda, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    Meiosis is a central event of sexual reproduction. Like somatic cells, germ cells conduct mitosis to increase their cell number, but unlike somatic cells, germ cells switch their cell division mode from mitosis to meiosis at a certain point in gametogenesis. However, the molecular basis of this switch remains elusive. In this review article, we give an overview of the onset of mammalian meiosis, including our recent finding that MYC Associated Factor X (MAX) prevents ectopic and precocious meiosis in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and germ cells, respectively. We present a hypothetical model of a MAX-centered molecular network that regulates meiotic entry in mammals and propose that inducible Max knockout ESCs provide an excellent platform for exploring the molecular mechanisms of meiosis initiation, while excluding other aspects of gametogenesis.

  11. Meiotic chromosome abnormalities in human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Renée H

    2006-08-01

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion in the information about chromosome abnormalities in human sperm and the meiotic events that predispose to these abnormalities. We have determined that all chromosomes are susceptible to nondisjunction, but chromosomes 21 and 22 and, especially, the sex chromosomes have an increased frequency of aneuploidy. Studies are just beginning on the effects of potential mutagens on the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. The effects of pesticides and cancer therapeutic agents have been reviewed. In the last decade, there has been a great impetus to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men because the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) made it possible for these men to father pregnancies. A large number of studies have demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosomally abnormal sperm and children, even when they have a normal somatic karyotype. Meiotic studies on the pachytene stage of spermatogenesis have demonstrated that infertile men have impaired chromosome synapsis, a significantly decreased frequency of recombination, and an increased frequency of chromosomes completely lacking a recombination site. Such errors make these cells susceptible to meiotic arrest and the production of aneuploid gametes.

  12. Meiotic Recombination in the Giraffe (G. reticulata).

    PubMed

    Vozdova, Miluse; Fröhlich, Jan; Kubickova, Svatava; Sebestova, Hana; Rubes, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the reticulated giraffe (G. reticulata) was identified as a distinct species, which emphasized the need for intensive research in this interesting animal. To shed light on the meiotic process as a source of biodiversity, we analysed the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination in 2 reticulated giraffe males. We used immunofluorescence detection of synaptonemal complex protein (SYCP3), meiotic double strand breaks (DSB, marked as RAD51 foci) in leptonema, and crossovers (COs, as MLH1 foci) in pachynema. The mean number of autosomal MLH1 foci per cell (27), which resulted from a single, distally located MLH1 focus observed on most chromosome arms, is one of the lowest among mammalian species analysed so far. The CO/DSB conversion ratio was 0.32. The pseudoautosomal region was localised in the Xq and Yp termini by FISH and showed an MLH1 focus in 83% of the pachytene cells. Chromatin structures corresponding to the nucleolus organiser regions were observed in the pachytene spermatocytes. The results are discussed in the context of known data on meiosis in Cetartiodactyla, depicting that the variation in CO frequency among species of this taxonomic group is mostly associated with their diploid chromosome number. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Vacuole Partitioning during Meiotic Division in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, A. D.; Shaw, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the partitioning of the yeast vacuole during meiotic division. In pulse-chase experiments, vacuoles labeled with the lumenal ade2 fluorophore or the membrane-specific dye FM 4-64 were not inherited by haploid spores. Instead, these fluorescent markers were excluded from spores and trapped between the spore cell walls and the ascus. Serial optical sections using a confocal microscope confirmed that spores did not inherit detectable amounts of fluorescently labeled vacuoles. Moreover, indirect immunofluorescence studies established that an endogenous vacuolar membrane protein, alkaline phosphatase, and a soluable vacuolar protease, carboxypeptidase Y, were also detected outside spores after meiotic division. Spores that did not inherit ade2- or FM 4-64-labeled vacuoles did generate an organelle that could be visualized by subsequent staining with vacuole-specific fluorophores. These data contrast with genetic evidence that a soluble vacuolar protease is inherited by spores. When the partitioning of both types of markers was examined in sporulating cultures, the vacuolar protease activity was inherited by spores while fluorescently labeled vacuoles were largely excluded from spores. Our results indicate that the majority of the diploid vacuole, both soluble contents and membrane-bound components, are excluded from spores formed during meiotic division. PMID:8889511

  14. Meioc maintains an extended meiotic prophase I in mice

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y. Q. Shirleen; Godfrey, Alexander K.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Page, David C.

    2017-01-01

    The meiosis-specific chromosomal events of homolog pairing, synapsis, and recombination occur over an extended meiotic prophase I that is many times longer than prophase of mitosis. Here we show that, in mice, maintenance of an extended meiotic prophase I requires the gene Meioc, a germ-cell specific factor conserved in most metazoans. In mice, Meioc is expressed in male and female germ cells upon initiation of and throughout meiotic prophase I. Mouse germ cells lacking Meioc initiate meiosis: they undergo pre-meiotic DNA replication, they express proteins involved in synapsis and recombination, and a subset of cells progress as far as the zygotene stage of prophase I. However, cells in early meiotic prophase—as early as the preleptotene stage—proceed to condense their chromosomes and assemble a spindle, as if having progressed to metaphase. Meioc-deficient spermatocytes that have initiated synapsis mis-express CYCLIN A2, which is normally expressed in mitotic spermatogonia, suggesting a failure to properly transition to a meiotic cell cycle program. MEIOC interacts with YTHDC2, and the two proteins pull-down an overlapping set of mitosis-associated transcripts. We conclude that when the meiotic chromosomal program is initiated, Meioc is simultaneously induced so as to extend meiotic prophase. Specifically, MEIOC, together with YTHDC2, promotes a meiotic (as opposed to mitotic) cell cycle program via post-transcriptional control of their target transcripts. PMID:28380054

  15. Meiotic abnormalities and spermatogenic parameters in severe oligoasthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, J M; García, F; Veiga, A; Calderón, G; Egozcue, S; Egozcue, J; Barri, P N

    1999-02-01

    The incidence of meiotic abnormalities and their relationship with different spermatogenic parameters was assessed in 103 male patients with presumably idiopathic severe oligoasthenozoospermia (motile sperm concentration < or = 1.5 x 10(6)/ml). Meiosis on testicular biopsies was independently evaluated by two observers. Meiotic patterns included normal meiosis and two meiotic abnormalities, i.e. severe arrest and synaptic anomalies. A normal pattern was found in 64 (62.1%), severe arrest in 21 (20.4%) and synaptic anomalies in 18 (17.5%). The overall rate of meiotic abnormalities was 37.9%. Most (66.7%) meiotic abnormalities occurred in patients with a sperm concentration < or = 1 x 10(6)/ml. In this group, total meiotic abnormalities were found in 57.8% of the patients; of these, 26.7% had synaptic anomalies. When the sperm concentration was < or = 0.5 x 10(6)/ml, synaptic anomalies were detected in 40% of the patients. In patients with increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations, total meiotic abnormalities occurred in 54.8% (synaptic anomalies in 22.6%). There were statistically significant differences among the three meiotic patterns in relation to sperm concentration (P < 0.001) and serum FSH concentration (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, sperm concentration < or = 1 x 10(6)/ml and/or FSH concentration > 10 IU/l were the only predictors of meiotic abnormalities.

  16. Meiotic drive of chromosomal knobs reshaped the maize genome.

    PubMed Central

    Buckler, E S; Phelps-Durr, T L; Buckler, C S; Dawe, R K; Doebley, J F; Holtsford, T P

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic drive is the subversion of meiosis so that particular genes are preferentially transmitted to the progeny. Meiotic drive generally causes the preferential segregation of small regions of the genome; however, in maize we propose that meiotic drive is responsible for the evolution of large repetitive DNA arrays on all chromosomes. A maize meiotic drive locus found on an uncommon form of chromosome 10 [abnormal 10 (Ab10)] may be largely responsible for the evolution of heterochromatic chromosomal knobs, which can confer meiotic drive potential to every maize chromosome. Simulations were used to illustrate the dynamics of this meiotic drive model and suggest knobs might be deleterious in the absence of Ab10. Chromosomal knob data from maize's wild relatives (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and mexicana) and phylogenetic comparisons demonstrated that the evolution of knob size, frequency, and chromosomal position agreed with the meiotic drive hypothesis. Knob chromosomal position was incompatible with the hypothesis that knob repetitive DNA is neutral or slightly deleterious to the genome. We also show that environmental factors and transposition may play a role in the evolution of knobs. Because knobs occur at multiple locations on all maize chromosomes, the combined effects of meiotic drive and genetic linkage may have reshaped genetic diversity throughout the maize genome in response to the presence of Ab10. Meiotic drive may be a major force of genome evolution, allowing revolutionary changes in genome structure and diversity over short evolutionary periods. PMID:10471723

  17. Ikbkap/Elp1 deficiency causes male infertility by disrupting meiotic progression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Jung; Shen, Li; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Falnes, Pål Ø; Zhang, Yi

    2013-05-01

    Mouse Ikbkap gene encodes IKAP--one of the core subunits of Elongator--and is thought to be involved in transcription. However, the biological function of IKAP, particularly within the context of an animal model, remains poorly characterized. We used a loss-of-function approach in mice to demonstrate that Ikbkap is essential for meiosis during spermatogenesis. Absence of Ikbkap results in defects in synapsis and meiotic recombination, both of which result in increased apoptosis and complete arrest of gametogenesis. In Ikbkap-mutant testes, a few meiotic genes are down-regulated, suggesting IKAP's role in transcriptional regulation. In addition, Ikbkap-mutant testes exhibit defects in wobble uridine tRNA modification, supporting a conserved tRNA modification function from yeast to mammals. Thus, our study not only reveals a novel function of IKAP in meiosis, but also suggests that IKAP contributes to this process partly by exerting its effect on transcription and tRNA modification.

  18. Ionizing irradiation-induced radical stress stalls live meiotic chromosome movements by altering the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Illner, Doris; Scherthan, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis generates haploid cells or spores for sexual reproduction. As a prelude to haploidization, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine to undergo segregation during the first meiotic division. During the entire meiotic prophase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomes perform rapid movements that are suspected to contribute to the regulation of recombination. Here, we investigated the impact of ionizing radiation (IR) on movements of GFP–tagged bivalents in live pachytene cells. We find that exposure of sporulating cultures with >40 Gy (4-krad) X-rays stalls pachytene chromosome movements. This identifies a previously undescribed acute radiation response in yeast meiosis, which contrasts with its reported radioresistance of up to 1,000 Gy in survival assays. A modified 3′-end labeling assay disclosed IR-induced dsDNA breaks (DSBs) in pachytene cells at a linear dose relationship of one IR-induced DSB per cell per 5 Gy. Dihydroethidium staining revealed formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated cells. Immobility of fuzzy-appearing irradiated bivalents was rescued by addition of radical scavengers. Hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS did reduce bivalent mobility similar to 40 Gy X IR, while they failed to induce DSBs. IR- and H2O2-induced ROS were found to decompose actin cables that are driving meiotic chromosome mobility, an effect that could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. Hence, it appears that the meiotic actin cytoskeleton is a radical-sensitive system that inhibits bivalent movements in response to IR- and oxidant-induced ROS. This may be important to prevent motility-driven unfavorable chromosome interactions when meiotic recombination has to proceed in genotoxic environments. PMID:24046368

  19. The Pch2 AAA+ ATPase promotes phosphorylation of the Hop1 meiotic checkpoint adaptor in response to synaptonemal complex defects

    PubMed Central

    Herruzo, Esther; Ontoso, David; González-Arranz, Sara; Cavero, Santiago; Lechuga, Ana; San-Segundo, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic cells possess surveillance mechanisms that monitor critical events such as recombination and chromosome synapsis. Meiotic defects resulting from the absence of the synaptonemal complex component Zip1 activate a meiosis-specific checkpoint network resulting in delayed or arrested meiotic progression. Pch2 is an evolutionarily conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the checkpoint-induced meiotic block in the zip1 mutant, where Pch2 is only detectable at the ribosomal DNA array (nucleolus). We describe here that high levels of the Hop1 protein, a checkpoint adaptor that localizes to chromosome axes, suppress the checkpoint defect of a zip1 pch2 mutant restoring Mek1 activity and meiotic cell cycle delay. We demonstrate that the critical role of Pch2 in this synapsis checkpoint is to sustain Mec1-dependent phosphorylation of Hop1 at threonine 318. We also show that the ATPase activity of Pch2 is essential for its checkpoint function and that ATP binding to Pch2 is required for its localization. Previous work has shown that Pch2 negatively regulates Hop1 chromosome abundance during unchallenged meiosis. Based on our results, we propose that, under checkpoint-inducing conditions, Pch2 also possesses a positive action on Hop1 promoting its phosphorylation and its proper distribution on unsynapsed chromosome axes. PMID:27257060

  20. Nucleolar association of pEg7 and XCAP-E, two members of Xenopus laevis condensin complex in interphase cells.

    PubMed

    Uzbekov, Rustem; Timirbulatova, Elmira; Watrin, Erwan; Cubizolles, Fabien; Ogereau, David; Gulak, Pavel; Legagneux, Vincent; Polyakov, Vladimir Ju; Le Guellec, Katherine; Kireev, Igor

    2003-05-01

    Cell cycle dynamics and localization of condensins--multiprotein complexes involved in late stages of mitotic chromosome condensation--were studied in Xenopus laevis XL2 cell line. Western blot analysis of synchronized cells showed that the ratio of levels of both pEg7 and XCAP-E to beta-tubulin levels remains almost constant from G1 to M phase. pEg7 and XCAP-E were localized to the mitotic chromosomes and were detected in interphase nuclei. Immunostaining for condensins and nucleolar proteins UBF, fibrillarin and B23 revealed that both XCAP-E and pEg7 are localized in the granular component of the nucleolus. Nucleolar labeling of both proteins is preserved in segregated nucleoli after 6 hours of incubation with actinomycin D (5 mg/ml), but the size of the labeled zone was significantly smaller. The data suggest a novel interphase function of condensin subunits in spatial organization of the nucleolus and/or ribosome biogenesis.

  1. The initial phase of chromosome condensation requires Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of the CAP-D3 subunit of condensin II

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Kota; Hirayama, Youko; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Oyama, Masaaki; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Obuse, Chikashi; Hirota, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The cell cycle transition from interphase into mitosis is best characterized by the appearance of condensed chromosomes that become microscopically visible as thread-like structures in nuclei. Biochemically, launching the mitotic program requires the activation of the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1), but whether and how Cdk1 triggers chromosome assembly at mitotic entry are not well understood. Here we report that mitotic chromosome assembly in prophase depends on Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of the condensin II complex. We identified Thr 1415 of the CAP-D3 subunit as a Cdk1 phosphorylation site, which proved crucial as it was required for the Polo kinase Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) to localize to chromosome axes through binding to CAP-D3 and thereby hyperphosphorylate the condensin II complex. Live-cell imaging analysis of cells carrying nonphosphorylatable CAP-D3 mutants in place of endogenous protein suggested that phosphorylation of Thr 1415 is required for timely chromosome condensation during prophase, and that the Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of condensin II facilitates its ability to assemble chromosomes properly. These observations provide an explanation for how Cdk1 induces chromosome assembly in cells entering mitosis, and underscore the significance of the cooperative action of Plk1 with Cdk1. PMID:21498573

  2. Functional dynamics of H3K9 methylation during meiotic prophase progression.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Makoto; Nozaki, Masami; Takeda, Naoki; Shinkai, Yoichi

    2007-07-25

    Histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation is a crucial epigenetic mark of heterochromatin formation and transcriptional silencing. G9a is a major mammalian H3K9 methyltransferase at euchromatin and is essential for mouse embryogenesis. Here we describe the roles of G9a in germ cell development. Mutant mice in which G9a is specifically inactivated in the germ-lineage displayed sterility due to a drastic loss of mature gametes. G9a-deficient germ cells exhibited perturbation of synchronous synapsis in meiotic prophase. Importantly, mono- and di-methylation of H3K9 (H3K9me1 and 2) in G9a-deficient germ cells were significantly reduced and G9a-regulated genes were overexpressed during meiosis, suggesting that G9a-mediated epigenetic gene silencing is crucial for proper meiotic prophase progression. Finally, we show that H3K9me1 and 2 are dynamically and sex-differentially regulated during the meiotic prophase. This genetic and biochemical evidence strongly suggests that a specific set of H3K9 methyltransferase(s) and demethylase(s) coordinately regulate gametogenesis.

  3. G beta gamma signaling reduces intracellular cAMP to promote meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gill, Arvind; Hammes, Stephen R

    2007-02-01

    In nearly every vertebrate species, elevated intracellular cAMP maintains oocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Prior to ovulation, gonadotropins trigger various intra-ovarian processes, including the breakdown of gap junctions, the activation of EGF receptors, and the secretion of steroids. These events in turn decrease intracellular cAMP levels in select oocytes to allow meiotic progression, or maturation, to resume. Studies suggest that cAMP levels are kept elevated in resting oocytes by constitutive G protein signaling, and that the drop in intracellular cAMP that accompanies maturation may be due in part to attenuation of this inhibitory G protein-mediated signaling. Interestingly, one of these G protein regulators of meiotic arrest is the Galpha(s) protein, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise intracellular cAMP in two important animal models of oocyte development: Xenopus leavis frogs and mice. In addition to G(alpha)(s), constitutive Gbetagamma activity similarly stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise cAMP and prevent maturation in Xenopus oocytes; however, the role of Gbetagamma in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes has not been examined. Here we show that Gbetagamma does not contribute to the maintenance of murine oocyte meiotic arrest. In fact, contrary to observations in frog oocytes, Gbetagamma signaling in mouse oocytes reduces cAMP and promotes oocyte maturation, suggesting that Gbetagamma might in fact play a positive role in promoting oocyte maturation. These observations emphasize that, while many general concepts and components of meiotic regulation are conserved from frogs to mice, specific differences exist that may lead to important insights regarding ovarian development in vertebrates.

  4. Analysis of meiotic sister chromatid cohesion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Aaron F.

    2016-01-01

    In sexually reproducing organisms, the formation of healthy gametes (sperm and eggs) requires the proper establishment and release of meiotic sister chromatid cohesion (SCC). SCC tethers replicated sisters from their formation in premeiotic S phase until the stepwise removal of cohesion in anaphase of meiosis I and II allows the separation of homologs and then sisters. Defects in the establishment or release of meiotic cohesion cause chromosome segregation errors that lead to the formation of aneuploid gametes and inviable embryos. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an excellent model for studies of meiotic sister chromatid cohesion due to its genetic tractability and the excellent cytological properties of the hermaphrodite gonad. Moreover, mutants defective in the establishment or maintenance of meiotic SCC nevertheless produce abundant gametes, allowing analysis of the pattern of chromosome segregation. Here I will describe two approaches for analysis of meiotic cohesion in C. elegans. The first approach relies on cytology to detect and quantify defects in SCC. The second approach relies on PCR and restriction digests to identify embryos that inherited an incorrect complement of chromosomes due to aberrant meiotic chromosome segregation. Both approaches are sensitive enough to identify rare errors and precise enough to reveal distinctive phenotypes resulting from mutations that perturb meiotic SCC in different ways. The robust, quantitative nature of these assays should strengthen phenotypic comparisons of different meiotic mutants and enhance the reproducibility of data generated by different investigators. PMID:27797074

  5. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-09-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast.

  6. Identification of DSB-1, a protein required for initiation of meiotic recombination in Caenorhabditis elegans, illuminates a crossover assurance checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Ericca L; Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Rosu, Simona; Ahringer, Julie; Villeneuve, Anne M; Dernburg, Abby F

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination, an essential aspect of sexual reproduction, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs are catalyzed by the widely-conserved Spo11 enzyme; however, the activity of Spo11 is regulated by additional factors that are poorly conserved through evolution. To expand our understanding of meiotic regulation, we have characterized a novel gene, dsb-1, that is specifically required for meiotic DSB formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. DSB-1 localizes to chromosomes during early meiotic prophase, coincident with the timing of DSB formation. DSB-1 also promotes normal protein levels and chromosome localization of DSB-2, a paralogous protein that plays a related role in initiating recombination. Mutations that disrupt crossover formation result in prolonged DSB-1 association with chromosomes, suggesting that nuclei may remain in a DSB-permissive state. Extended DSB-1 localization is seen even in mutants with defects in early recombination steps, including spo-11, suggesting that the absence of crossover precursors triggers the extension. Strikingly, failure to form a crossover precursor on a single chromosome pair is sufficient to extend the localization of DSB-1 on all chromosomes in the same nucleus. Based on these observations we propose a model for crossover assurance that acts through DSB-1 to maintain a DSB-permissive state until all chromosome pairs acquire crossover precursors. This work identifies a novel component of the DSB machinery in C. elegans, and sheds light on an important pathway that regulates DSB formation for crossover assurance.

  7. DAF-2 and ERK couple nutrient availability to meiotic progression during Caenorhabditis elegans oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Andrew L; Chen, Jessica; Joo, Hyoe-Jin; Drake, Melanie; Shidate, Miri; Kseib, Cedric; Arur, Swathi

    2013-10-28

    Coupling the production of mature gametes and fertilized zygotes to favorable nutritional conditions improves reproductive success. In invertebrates, the proliferation of female germline stem cells is regulated by nutritional status. However, in mammals, the number of female germline stem cells is set early in development, with oocytes progressing through meiosis later in life. Mechanisms that couple later steps of oogenesis to environmental conditions remain largely undefined. We show that, in the presence of food, the DAF-2 insulin-like receptor signals through the RAS-ERK pathway to drive meiotic prophase I progression and oogenesis; in the absence of food, the resultant inactivation of insulin-like signaling leads to downregulation of the RAS-ERK pathway, and oogenesis is stalled. Thus, the insulin-like signaling pathway couples nutrient sensing to meiotic I progression and oocyte production in C. elegans, ensuring that oocytes are only produced under conditions favorable for the survival of the resulting zygotes.

  8. Loss of MAX results in meiotic entry in mouse embryonic and germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ayumu; Hirasaki, Masataka; Hishida, Tomoaki; Wu, Jun; Okamura, Daiji; Ueda, Atsushi; Nishimoto, Masazumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Okuda, Akihiko

    2016-03-30

    Meiosis is a unique process that allows the generation of reproductive cells. It remains largely unknown how meiosis is initiated in germ cells and why non-germline cells do not undergo meiosis. We previously demonstrated that knockdown of Max expression, a gene encoding a partner of MYC family proteins, strongly activates expression of germ cell-related genes in ESCs. Here we find that complete ablation of Max expression in ESCs results in profound cytological changes reminiscent of cells undergoing meiotic cell division. Furthermore, our analyses uncovers that Max expression is transiently attenuated in germ cells undergoing meiosis in vivo and its forced reduction induces meiosis-like cytological changes in cultured germline stem cells. Mechanistically, Max depletion alterations are, in part, due to impairment of the function of an atypical PRC1 complex (PRC1.6), in which MAX is one of the components. Our data highlight MAX as a new regulator of meiotic onset.

  9. DAF-2 and ERK Couple Nutrient Availability to Meiotic Progression during Caenorhabditis elegans Oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Andrew L.; Chen, Jessica; Joo, Hyoe-Jin; Drake, Melanie; Shidate, Miri; Kseib, Cedric; Arur, Swathi

    2013-01-01

    Coupling the production of mature gametes and fertilized zygotes to favorable nutritional conditions improves reproductive success. In invertebrates, the proliferation of female germ line stem cells is regulated by nutritional status. But, in mammals the number of female germ line stem cells is set early in development, with oocytes progressing through meiosis later in life. Mechanisms that couple later steps of oogenesis to environmental conditions remain largely undefined. We show that in the presence of food, the DAF-2 insulin-like receptor signals through the RAS-ERK pathway to drive meiotic prophase I progression and oogenesis; in the absence of food, the resultant inactivation of insulin-like signaling leads to downregulation of RAS-ERK pathway, and oogenesis is stalled. Thus, the insulin-like signaling pathway couples nutrient sensing to meiotic I progression and oocyte production in C. elegans, ensuring that oocytes are only produced under conditions favorable for the survival of the resulting zygotes. PMID:24120884

  10. Epsin2 promotes polarity establishment and meiotic division through activating Cdc42 in mouse oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqi; Liu, Xiaohui; Ma, Rujun; Hou, Xiaojing; Ge, Juan; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Epsins are a conserved family of endocytic adaptors essential for diverse biological events. However, its role in oocytes remains completely unknown. Here, we report that specific depletion of Epsin2 in mouse oocytes significantly disrupts meiotic progression. Confocal microscopy reveals that Epsin2 knockdown results in the failure of actin cap formation and polar body extrusion during meiosis, indicative of the importance of Epsin2 in polarity establishment and cytokinesis. In addition, spindle defects and chromosome misalignment are readily observed in oocytes depleted of Epsin2. Moreover, we find that Epsin2 knockdown markedly decreases the activity of Cdc42 in oocytes and importantly, that the dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42 (Cdc42Q61L) is capable of partially rescuing the deficient phenotypes of Epsin2-knockdown oocytes. Together, our data identify Epsin2 as a novel player in regulating oocyte maturation, and demonstrate that Epsin2 promotes polarity establishment and meiotic division via activating Cdc42. PMID:27463009

  11. Loss of MAX results in meiotic entry in mouse embryonic and germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayumu; Hirasaki, Masataka; Hishida, Tomoaki; Wu, Jun; Okamura, Daiji; Ueda, Atsushi; Nishimoto, Masazumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Okuda, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a unique process that allows the generation of reproductive cells. It remains largely unknown how meiosis is initiated in germ cells and why non-germline cells do not undergo meiosis. We previously demonstrated that knockdown of Max expression, a gene encoding a partner of MYC family proteins, strongly activates expression of germ cell-related genes in ESCs. Here we find that complete ablation of Max expression in ESCs results in profound cytological changes reminiscent of cells undergoing meiotic cell division. Furthermore, our analyses uncovers that Max expression is transiently attenuated in germ cells undergoing meiosis in vivo and its forced reduction induces meiosis-like cytological changes in cultured germline stem cells. Mechanistically, Max depletion alterations are, in part, due to impairment of the function of an atypical PRC1 complex (PRC1.6), in which MAX is one of the components. Our data highlight MAX as a new regulator of meiotic onset. PMID:27025988

  12. Roles of CDK and DDK in Genome Duplication and Maintenance: Meiotic Singularities

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Cells reproduce using two types of divisions: mitosis, which generates two daughter cells each with the same genomic content as the mother cell, and meiosis, which reduces the number of chromosomes of the parent cell by half and gives rise to four gametes. The mechanisms that promote the proper progression of the mitotic and meiotic cycles are highly conserved and controlled. They require the activities of two types of serine-threonine kinases, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and the Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK). CDK and DDK are essential for genome duplication and maintenance in both mitotic and meiotic divisions. In this review, we aim to highlight how these kinases cooperate to orchestrate diverse processes during cellular reproduction, focusing on meiosis-specific adaptions of their regulation and functions in DNA metabolism. PMID:28335524

  13. Transcription reactivation during the first meiotic prophase in bugs is not dependent on synapsis.

    PubMed

    Viera, Alberto; Parra, María Teresa; Rufas, Julio S; Page, Jesús

    2016-02-22

    During meiosis, transcription is precisely regulated in relation to the process of chromosome synapsis. In mammals, transcription is very low until the completion of synapsis in early pachytene, and then reactivates during mid pachytene, up to the end of diplotene. Moreover, chromosomes or chromosomal regions that do not achieve synapsis undergo a specific process of inactivation called meiotic silencing of unpaired chromatin (MSUC). Sex chromosomes, which are mostly unsynapsed, present a special case of inactivation named meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Although processes that are similar to MSUC/MSCI have been described in other species like Sordaria and Caenorhabditis elegans, very few studies have been developed in insects. We present a study on the relationships between synapsis and transcription in two hemipteran species (Graphosoma italicum and Carpocoris fuscispinus) that possess holocentric chromosomes but develop different synaptic patterns. We have found that transcription, revealed by the presence of RNA polymerase II, is very low at the beginning of meiosis, but robustly increases during zygotene, long before the completion of synapsis, excepting in the sex chromosomes. In fact, we show that histone H3 methylation at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) may be present in the sex chromosomes at leptotene, thus acting as a likely epigenetic mark for this inactive state. Our results suggest that the meiotic transcription in these two species is differently regulated from that of mammals and, therefore, offer new opportunities to understand the relationship between synapsis and transcription and the mechanisms that govern MSUC/MSCI processes.

  14. Rec8 guides canonical Spo11 distribution along yeast meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kugou, Kazuto; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Shintaro; Ito, Masaru; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Mori, Saori; Katou, Yuki; Itoh, Takehiko; Matsumoto, Kouji; Shibata, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2009-07-01

    Spo11-mediated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are temporally and spatially controlled. The meiotic cohesin Rec8 has been implicated in regulating DSB formation, but little is known about the features of their interplay. To elucidate this point, we investigated the genome-wide localization of Spo11 in budding yeast during early meiosis by chromatin immunoprecipitation using high-density tiling arrays. We found that Spo11 is dynamically localized to meiotic chromosomes. Spo11 initially accumulated around centromeres and thereafter localized to arm regions as premeiotic S phase proceeded. During this stage, a substantial proportion of Spo11 bound to Rec8 binding sites. Eventually, some of Spo11 further bound to both DSB and Rec8 sites. We also showed that such a change in a distribution of Spo11 is affected by hydroxyurea treatment. Interestingly, deletion of REC8 influences the localization of Spo11 to centromeres and in some of the intervals of the chromosomal arms. Thus, we observed a lack of DSB formation in a region-specific manner. These observations suggest that Rec8 would prearrange the distribution of Spo11 along chromosomes and will provide clues to understanding temporal and spatial regulation of DSB formation.

  15. Oocyte nucleus controls progression through meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Zbigniew; Hoffmann, Steffen; Tsurumi, Chizuko

    2005-05-15

    We analyzed progression through the meiotic maturation in oocytes manipulated to replace the prophase oocyte nucleus with the nucleus from a cumulus cell, a pachytene spermatocyte or the pronucleus from a fertilized egg. Removal of the oocyte nucleus led to a significant reduction in histone H1 kinase activity. Replacement of the oocyte nucleus by a pronucleus followed by culture resulted in premature pseudomeiotic division and occasional abnormal cytokinesis; however, histone H1 kinase activity was rescued, microtubules formed a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were condensed. In addition to the anomalies observed after pronuclear transfer, those after transfer of the nucleus from a cumulus cell or spermatocyte included a dramatically impaired ability to form the bipolar spindle or to condense chromosomes, and histone H1 kinase activity was not rescued. Expression of a cyclin B-YFP in enucleated oocytes receiving the cumulus cell nucleus rescued histone H1 kinase activity, but spindle formation and chromosome condensation remained impaired, indicating a pleiotropic effect of oocyte nucleus removal. However, when the cumulus cell nucleus was first transformed into pronuclei (transfer into a metaphase II oocyte followed by activation), such pronuclei supported maturation after transfer into the oocyte in a manner similar to that of normal pronuclei. These results show that the oocyte nucleus contains specific components required for the control of progression through the meiotic maturation and that some of these components are also present in pronuclei.

  16. A positive but complex association between meiotic double-strand break hotspots and open chromatin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Berchowitz, Luke E; Hanlon, Sean E; Lieb, Jason D; Copenhaver, Gregory P

    2009-12-01

    During meiosis, chromatin undergoes extensive changes to facilitate recombination, homolog pairing, and chromosome segregation. To investigate the relationship between chromatin organization and meiotic processes, we used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) to map open chromatin during the transition from mitosis to meiosis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that meiosis-induced opening of chromatin is associated with meiotic DSB hotpots. The positive association between open chromatin and DSB hotspots is most prominent 3 h into meiosis, when the early meiotic genes DMC1 and HOP1 exhibit maximum transcription and the early recombination genes SPO11 and RAD51 are strongly up-regulated. While the degree of chromatin openness is positively associated with the occurrence of recombination hotspots, many hotspots occur outside of open chromatin. Of particular interest, many DSB hotspots that fell outside of meiotic open chromatin nonetheless occurred in chromatin that had recently been open during mitotic growth. Finally, we find evidence for meiosis-specific opening of chromatin at the regions adjacent to boundaries of subtelomeric sequences, which exhibit specific crossover control patterns hypothesized to be regulated by chromatin.

  17. Non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit D2 gene polymorphisms are associated with Parkinson's disease: a Han Chinese study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Liu, Ling; Huang, Jinsha; Shao, Liang; Wang, Hongcai; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit D2 (NCAPD2), an important protein in chromosome condensation, gene polymorphisms are associated with Alzheimer's disease. But no study has shown the relationship between NCAPD2 polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease. Here, we conducted a case-control study to investigate the relationship between NCAPD2 polymorphisms and the risk of Parkinson's disease in a Han Chinese population. Two single nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) of NCAPD2 (rs7311174 and rs2072374) showed significant p values (p = 0.046 and p = 0.043, respectively) in 265 patients and 267 controls. Further analysis showed an effect of age and gender on the relationship between the two SNPs and the risk for Parkinson's disease. The A allele of rs7311174 and the T allele of rs2072374 were protective in the male patients (p = 0.016 and p = 0.019, respectively). The frequencies of the T allele of rs7311174 and the C allele of rs2072374 were significantly associated with late-onset Parkinson's disease (p = 0.048 and p = 0.044, respectively). This research demonstrates a positive relationship between the NCAPD2 gene and the risk for Parkinson's disease in a Han Chinese population and provides a potential genetic marker for sporadic Parkinson's disease.

  18. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation marks meiotic recombination initiation sites.

    PubMed

    Borde, Valérie; Robine, Nicolas; Lin, Waka; Bonfils, Sandrine; Géli, Vincent; Nicolas, Alain

    2009-01-21

    The function of histone modifications in initiating and regulating the chromosomal events of the meiotic prophase remains poorly understood. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we examined the genome-wide localization of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) along meiosis and its relationship to gene expression and position of the programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate interhomologue recombination, essential to yield viable haploid gametes. We find that the level of H3K4me3 is constitutively higher close to DSB sites, independently of local gene expression levels. Without Set1, the H3K4 methylase, 84% of the DSB sites exhibit a severely reduced DSB frequency, the reduction being quantitatively correlated with the local level of H3K4me3 in wild-type cells. Further, we show that this differential histone mark is already established in vegetative cells, being higher in DSB-prone regions than in regions with no or little DSB. Taken together, our results demonstrate that H3K4me3 is a prominent and preexisting mark of active meiotic recombination initiation sites. Novel perspectives to dissect the various layers of the controls of meiotic DSB formation are discussed.

  19. SLX2 interacting with BLOS2 is differentially expressed during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xin-Jie; Shi, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Bo; Chen, Lei; Tang, Wen-Hao; Huang, Jin; Lian, Ying; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Gametogenesis is a complex biological process of producing cells for sexual reproduction. Xlr super family members containing a conserved COR1 domain play essential roles in gametogenesis. In the present study, we identified that Slx2, a novel member of Xlr super family, is specifically expressed in the meiotic oocytes, which is demonstrated by western blotting and immunohistochemistry studies. In the first meiotic prophase, SLX2 is unevenly distributed in the nuclei of oocytes, during which phase SLX2 is partly co-localized with SYCP3 in synaptonemal complex and γH2AX in the nucleus of oocytes. Interestingly, the localization of SLX2 was found to be switched into the cytoplasm of oocytes after prometaphase I during oocyte maturation. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that SLX2 interacts with BLOS2, which is a novel centrosome-associated protein, and co-localized with γ-Tubulin, which is a protein marker of chromosome segregation in meiosis. These results indicated that SLX2 might get involved in chromosomes segregation during meiosis by interaction with BLOS2. In conclusion, SLX2 might be a novel gametogenesis-related protein that could play multiple roles in regulation of meiotic processes including synaptonemal complex assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:24870619

  20. Meiotic recombination, synapsis, meiotic inactivation and sperm aneuploidy in a chromosome 1 inversion carrier.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Gordon; Chow, Victor; Ma, Sai

    2012-01-01

    Disrupted meiotic behaviour of inversion carriers may be responsible for suboptimal sperm parameters in these carriers. This study investigated meiotic recombination, synapsis, transcriptional silencing and chromosome segregation effects in a pericentric inv(1) carrier. Recombination (MLH1), synapsis (SYCP1, SYCP3) and transcriptional inactivation (γH2AX, BRCA1) were examined by fluorescence immunostaining. Chromosome specific rates of recombination were determined by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Furthermore, testicular sperm was examined for aneuploidy and segregation of the inv(1). Our findings showed that global recombination rates were similar to controls. Recombination on the inv(1) and the sex chromosomes were reduced. The inv(1) associated with the XY body in 43.4% of cells, in which XY recombination was disproportionately absent, and 94.3% of cells displayed asynapsed regions which displayed meiotic silencing regardless of their association with the XY body. Furthermore, a low frequency of chromosomal imbalance was observed in spermatozoa (3.4%). Our results suggest that certain inversion carriers may display unimpaired global recombination and impaired recombination on the involved and the sex chromosomes during meiosis. Asynapsis or inversion-loop formation in the inverted region may be responsible for impaired spermatogenesis and may prevent sperm-chromosome imbalance.

  1. Depletion of Key Meiotic Genes and Transcriptome-Wide Abiotic Stress Reprogramming Mark Early Preparatory Events Ahead of Apomeiotic Transition

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jubin N.; Kirioukhova, Olga; Pawar, Pallavi; Tayyab, Muhammad; Mateo, Juan L.; Johnston, Amal J.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dissection of apomixis – an asexual reproductive mode – is anticipated to solve the enigma of loss of meiotic sex, and to help fixing elite agronomic traits. The Brassicaceae genus Boechera comprises of both sexual and apomictic species, permitting comparative analyses of meiotic circumvention (apomeiosis) and parthenogenesis. Whereas previous studies reported local transcriptome changes during these events, it remained unclear whether global changes associated with hybridization, polyploidy and environmental adaptation that arose during evolution of Boechera might serve as (epi)genetic regulators of early development prior apomictic initiation. To identify these signatures during vegetative stages, we compared seedling RNA-seq transcriptomes of an obligate triploid apomict and a diploid sexual, both isolated from a drought-prone habitat. Uncovered were several genes differentially expressed between sexual and apomictic seedlings, including homologs of meiotic genes ASYNAPTIC 1 (ASY1) and MULTIPOLAR SPINDLE 1 (MPS1) that were down-regulated in apomicts. An intriguing class of apomict-specific deregulated genes included several NAC transcription factors, homologs of which are known to be transcriptionally reprogrammed during abiotic stress in other plants. Deregulation of both meiotic and stress-response genes during seedling stages might possibly be important in preparation for meiotic circumvention, as similar transcriptional alteration was discernible in apomeiotic floral buds too. Furthermore, we noted that the apomict showed better tolerance to osmotic stress in vitro than the sexual, in conjunction with significant upregulation of a subset of NAC genes. In support of the current model that DNA methylation epigenetically regulates stress, ploidy, hybridization and apomixis, we noted that ASY1, MPS1 and NAC019 homologs were deregulated in Boechera seedlings upon DNA demethylation, and ASY1 in particular seems to be repressed by global DNA

  2. A Single Cohesin Complex Performs Mitotic and Meiotic Functions in the Protist Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Howard-Till, Rachel A.; Lukaszewicz, Agnieszka; Novatchkova, Maria; Loidl, Josef

    2013-01-01

    The cohesion of sister chromatids in the interval between chromosome replication and anaphase is important for preventing the precocious separation, and hence nondisjunction, of chromatids. Cohesion is accomplished by a ring-shaped protein complex, cohesin; and its release at anaphase occurs when separase cleaves the complex's α-kleisin subunit. Cohesin has additional roles in facilitating DNA damage repair from the sister chromatid and in regulating gene expression. We tested the universality of the present model of cohesion by studying cohesin in the evolutionarily distant protist Tetrahymena thermophila. Localization of tagged cohesin components Smc1p and Rec8p (the α-kleisin) showed that cohesin is abundant in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. RNAi knockdown experiments demonstrated that cohesin is crucial for normal chromosome segregation and meiotic DSB repair. Unexpectedly, cohesin does not detach from chromosome arms in anaphase, yet chromosome segregation depends on the activity of separase (Esp1p). When Esp1p is depleted by RNAi, chromosomes become polytenic as they undergo multiple rounds of replication, but fail to separate. The cohesion of such bundles of numerous chromatids suggests that chromatids may be connected by factors in addition to topological linkage by cohesin rings. Although cohesin is not detected in transcriptionally active somatic nuclei, its loss causes a slight defect in their amitotic division. Notably, Tetrahymena uses a single version of α-kleisin for both mitosis and meiosis. Therefore, we propose that the differentiation of mitotic and meiotic cohesins found in most other model systems is not due to the need of a specialized meiotic cohesin, but due to additional roles of mitotic cohesin. PMID:23555314

  3. A single cohesin complex performs mitotic and meiotic functions in the protist tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Howard-Till, Rachel A; Lukaszewicz, Agnieszka; Novatchkova, Maria; Loidl, Josef

    2013-03-01

    The cohesion of sister chromatids in the interval between chromosome replication and anaphase is important for preventing the precocious separation, and hence nondisjunction, of chromatids. Cohesion is accomplished by a ring-shaped protein complex, cohesin; and its release at anaphase occurs when separase cleaves the complex's α-kleisin subunit. Cohesin has additional roles in facilitating DNA damage repair from the sister chromatid and in regulating gene expression. We tested the universality of the present model of cohesion by studying cohesin in the evolutionarily distant protist Tetrahymena thermophila. Localization of tagged cohesin components Smc1p and Rec8p (the α-kleisin) showed that cohesin is abundant in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. RNAi knockdown experiments demonstrated that cohesin is crucial for normal chromosome segregation and meiotic DSB repair. Unexpectedly, cohesin does not detach from chromosome arms in anaphase, yet chromosome segregation depends on the activity of separase (Esp1p). When Esp1p is depleted by RNAi, chromosomes become polytenic as they undergo multiple rounds of replication, but fail to separate. The cohesion of such bundles of numerous chromatids suggests that chromatids may be connected by factors in addition to topological linkage by cohesin rings. Although cohesin is not detected in transcriptionally active somatic nuclei, its loss causes a slight defect in their amitotic division. Notably, Tetrahymena uses a single version of α-kleisin for both mitosis and meiosis. Therefore, we propose that the differentiation of mitotic and meiotic cohesins found in most other model systems is not due to the need of a specialized meiotic cohesin, but due to additional roles of mitotic cohesin.

  4. Scaling and fractal behaviour underlying meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Waxman, D; Stoletzki, N

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate some of the mathematical properties of meiotic recombination. Working within the framework of a genetic model with n loci, where alpha alleles are possible at each locus, we find that the proportion of all possible diploid parental genotypes that can produce a particular haploid gamete is exp[-n log(alpha(2)/[2alpha-1])]. We show that this proportion connects recombination with a fractal geometry of dimension log(2alpha-1)/log(alpha). The fractal dimension of a geometric object manifests itself when it is measured at increasingly smaller length scales. Decreasing the length scale of a geometric object is found to be directly analogous, in a genetics problem, to specifying a multilocus haplotype at a larger number of loci, and it is here that the fractal dimension reveals itself.

  5. Isolation of Meiotic Recombinants from Mouse Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Francesca; Jasin, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination during meiosis is critical for the formation of gametes. Recombination is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks which preferentially occur at hotspots dispersed throughout the genome. These double-strand breaks are repaired from the homolog, resulting in either a crossover or noncrossover product. Multiple noncrossover events are required for homolog pairing, and at least one crossover is critical for proper chromosome segregation at the first meiotic division. Consequently, homologous recombination in meiosis occurs at high frequencies. This chapter describes how to characterize crossovers and noncrossovers at a hotspot in mice using allele-specific PCR. Amplification of recombinant products directly from sperm DNA is a powerful approach to determine recombination frequencies and map recombination breakpoints, providing insight into homologous recombination mechanisms. PMID:21660699

  6. Regulation of the G2/M Transition in Rodent Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of maturation in meiotically competent mammalian oocytes is a complex process involving the carefully coordinated exchange of signals between the somatic and germ cell compartments of the ovarian follicle via paracrine and cell-cell coupling pathways. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how such signaling controls both meiotic arrest and gonadotropin-triggered meiotic resumption in competent oocytes and relates them to the historical context. Emphasis will be on rodent systems, where many of these new findings have taken place. A regulatory scheme is then proposed that integrates this information into an overall framework for meiotic regulation that demonstrates the complex interplay between different follicular compartments. PMID:20578061

  7. Meiotic behavior of Brachiaria decumbens hybrids.

    PubMed

    Souza, V F; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B; Bione, N C P; Menon, M U; Mendes-Bonato, A B

    2015-10-21

    Brachiaria decumbens is a forage grass of inestimable value for livestock in Brazil due to its production of good quality forage even when planted on acid and poor soils, although it is susceptible to pasture spittlebugs. Only one cultivar, cv. Basilisk, has been used as the pollen donor in crosses with Brachiaria ruziziensis since 1988 at Embrapa Gado de Corte Research Center. Breeding within the species only became possible from 2009 when sexual accessions were successfully tetraploidized using colchicine. Three sexual genotypes were obtained and hybridization within B. decumbens was finally achieved. Here, we evaluated microspore tetrads using conventional cytology and found meiotic indexes above 78% for all three female genitors (cD24-2, cD24-27, cD24-45), but a low meiotic index (<22%) in the natural apomictic genitor D62 (cv. Basilisk) and in 49 hybrids. Analysis of the relationship between abnormal tetrad frequency and non-viable pollen grains yielded a highly significant Pearson correlation coefficient. The t-test proved significant for the progeny of cD24-45 x D62, with lower abnormalities and pollen sterility when compared to the other two progenies resulting from cD24-2 and cD24-27 crossed to D62, but these two did not differ. Apomictic hybrids such as S036 and X030 with low pollen sterility have the potential for use in cultivar development, whereas the sexual hybrids T012, X072, and X078 might be of use as female genitors in polycross blocks if they display good agronomic traits.

  8. Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Price, Thomas A R; Wedell, Nina; Kokko, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this longstanding puzzle involves female multiple mating (polyandry). Because many meiotic drivers severely reduce the sperm competitive ability of their male carriers, females are predicted to evolve more frequent polyandry and thereby promote sperm competition when a meiotic driver invades. Consequently, the driving chromosome's relative fitness should decline, halting or reversing its spread. We used formal modeling to show that this initially appealing hypothesis cannot resolve the puzzle alone: other selective pressures (e.g., low fitness of drive homozygotes) are required to establish a stable meiotic drive polymorphism. However, polyandry and meiotic drive can strongly affect one another's frequency, and polyandrous populations may be resistant to the invasion of rare drive mutants. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Proteins involved in meiotic recombination: a role in male infertility?

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Matthew L; Hassold, Terry J; Carrell, Douglas T

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic recombination results in the formation of crossovers, by which genetic information is exchanged between homologous chromosomes during prophase I of meiosis. Recombination is a complex process involving many proteins. Alterations in the genes involved in recombination may result in infertility. Molecular studies have improved our understanding of the roles and mechanisms of the proteins and protein complexes involved in recombination, some of which have function in mitotic cells as well as meiotic cells. Human gene sequencing studies have been performed for some of these genes and have provided further information on the phenotypes observed in some infertile individuals. However, further studies are needed to help elucidate the particular role(s) of a given protein and to increase our understanding of these protein systems. This review will focus on our current understanding of proteins involved in meiotic recombination from a genomic perspective, summarizing our current understanding of known mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that may affect male fertility by altering meiotic recombination.

  10. The Cdk1 and Ime2 protein kinases trigger exit from meiotic prophase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inhibiting the Sum1 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Shin, Marcus E; Skokotas, Aikaterini; Winter, Edward

    2010-06-01

    The induction of middle meiotic promoters is a key regulatory event in the life cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls exit from prophase, meiosis, and spore formation. The Sum1 repressor and Ndt80 activator proteins control middle promoters by binding to overlapping DNA elements. NDT80 is controlled by a tightly regulated middle meiotic promoter through a positive autoregulatory loop and is repressed in vegetative cells by Sum1. It has previously been shown that the meiosis-specific kinase Ime2 promotes the removal of Sum1 from DNA. Here, we show that Sum1 is also regulated by the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdk1. While sum1 phosphosite mutants that are insensitive to Cdk1 or Ime2 complete meiosis and form spores, a mutant that is insensitive to both Ime2 and Cdk1 (sum1-ci) blocks meiotic development in prophase with an ndt80Delta-like phenotype. Ectopic expression of NDT80 or mutation of a Sum1-binding element in the NDT80 promoter bypasses the sum1-ci block. Hst1 is a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase that is linked to Sum1 by the Rfm1 tethering factor. Deletion of HST1 or RFM1 also bypasses the sum1-ci block. These results demonstrate that Sum1 functions as a key meiotic brake through the NDT80 promoter and that Cdk1 and Ime2 trigger exit from meiotic prophase by inhibiting the Sum1 transcriptional repression complex.

  11. The Cdk1 and Ime2 Protein Kinases Trigger Exit from Meiotic Prophase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Inhibiting the Sum1 Transcriptional Repressor ▿

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Marcus E.; Skokotas, Aikaterini; Winter, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The induction of middle meiotic promoters is a key regulatory event in the life cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls exit from prophase, meiosis, and spore formation. The Sum1 repressor and Ndt80 activator proteins control middle promoters by binding to overlapping DNA elements. NDT80 is controlled by a tightly regulated middle meiotic promoter through a positive autoregulatory loop and is repressed in vegetative cells by Sum1. It has previously been shown that the meiosis-specific kinase Ime2 promotes the removal of Sum1 from DNA. Here, we show that Sum1 is also regulated by the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdk1. While sum1 phosphosite mutants that are insensitive to Cdk1 or Ime2 complete meiosis and form spores, a mutant that is insensitive to both Ime2 and Cdk1 (sum1-ci) blocks meiotic development in prophase with an ndt80Δ-like phenotype. Ectopic expression of NDT80 or mutation of a Sum1-binding element in the NDT80 promoter bypasses the sum1-ci block. Hst1 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase that is linked to Sum1 by the Rfm1 tethering factor. Deletion of HST1 or RFM1 also bypasses the sum1-ci block. These results demonstrate that Sum1 functions as a key meiotic brake through the NDT80 promoter and that Cdk1 and Ime2 trigger exit from meiotic prophase by inhibiting the Sum1 transcriptional repression complex. PMID:20385771

  12. Polymorphism and reproductive mode in the rotifer, Asplanchna sieboldi: relationship between meiotic oogenesis and shape of body-wall outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Kabay, M E; Gilbert, J J

    1977-07-01

    Sexuality and polymorphism are closely coupled in the rotifer Asplanchna sieboldi. In a graded response to dietary tocopherol, embryos develop body-wall outgrowths of various sizes and shapes. Also in a graded response to this compound, some of the affected females produce eggs undergoing meiotic instead of mitotic oogenesis. The haploid eggs of such mictic females develop parthenogenetically into males instead of females. The incidence of mictic females among animals with different shapes was studied among cohorts from mothers subjected to different inducing conditions. The hypothesis that external tocopherol concentrations absolutely fix the probability of meiotic oogenesis was rejected. The other extreme hypothesis, that the probability of meiotic oogenesis is fixed by morphotype, was rejected for animals at the low end of the morphotypic scale but accepted for the more strongly-affected individuals. The probability of meiotic oogenesis is thus constant for the higher morphotypes. The ascertainment of morphotype frequencies in natural or laboratory populations may suffice for estimating the incidence of sexual forms; furthermore studies of factors affecting the body-wall-outgrowth response may also bear directly upon regulation of sexual reproduction in this species.

  13. TRAPPII is required for cleavage furrow ingression and localization of Rab11 in dividing male meiotic cells of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Robinett, Carmen C; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Gatti, Maurizio; Fuller, Margaret T

    2009-12-15

    Although membrane addition is crucial for cytokinesis in many animal cell types, the specific mechanisms supporting cleavage furrow ingression are not yet understood. Mutations in the gene brunelleschi (bru), which encodes the Drosophila ortholog of the yeast Trs120p subunit of TRAPPII, cause failure of furrow ingression in male meiotic cells. In non-dividing cells, Brunelleschi protein fused to GFP is dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and enriched at Golgi organelles, similarly to another Drosophila TRAPPII subunit, dBet3. Localization of the membrane-trafficking GTPase Rab11 to the cleavage furrow requires wild-type function of bru, and genetic interactions between bru and Rab11 increase the failure of meiotic cytokinesis and cause synthetic lethality. bru also genetically interacts with four wheel drive (fwd), which encodes a PI4Kbeta, such that double mutants exhibit enhanced failure of male meiotic cytokinesis. These results suggest that Bru cooperates with Rab11 and PI4Kbeta to regulate the efficiency of membrane addition to the cleavage furrow, thus promoting cytokinesis in Drosophila male meiotic cells.

  14. Meiotic DNA joint molecule resolution depends on Nse5-Nse6 of the Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex.

    PubMed

    Wehrkamp-Richter, Sophie; Hyppa, Randy W; Prudden, John; Smith, Gerald R; Boddy, Michael N

    2012-10-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is crucial to form viable, healthy offspring and in most species, it requires programmed recombination between homologous chromosomes. In fission yeast, meiotic recombination is initiated by Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) and generates single Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates, which are resolved by the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease to generate crossovers and thereby allow proper chromosome segregation. Although Mus81 contains the active site for HJ resolution, the regulation of Mus81-Eme1 is unclear. In cells lacking Nse5-Nse6 of the Smc5-Smc6 genome stability complex, we observe persistent meiotic recombination intermediates (DNA joint molecules) resembling HJs that accumulate in mus81Δ cells. Elimination of Rec12 nearly completely rescues the meiotic defects of nse6Δ and mus81Δ single mutants and partially rescues nse6Δ mus81Δ double mutants, indicating that these factors act after DNA double-strand break formation. Likewise, expression of the bacterial HJ resolvase RusA partially rescues the defects of nse6Δ, mus81Δ and nse6Δ mus81Δ mitotic cells, as well as the meiotic defects of nse6Δ and mus81Δ cells. Partial rescue likely reflects the accumulation of structures other than HJs, such as hemicatenanes, and an additional role for Nse5-Nse6 most prominent during mitotic growth. Our results indicate a regulatory role for the Smc5-Smc6 complex in HJ resolution via Mus81-Eme1.

  15. Cytological techniques to study human female meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Roig, Ignasi; Garcia-Caldés, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Most of the human aneuploidies have a maternal origin. This feature makes the study of human female meiosis a fundamental topic to understand the reasons leading to this important social problem. Unfortunately, due to sample collection difficulties, not many studies have been performed on human female meiotic prophase. In this chapter we present a comprehensive collection of protocols that allows the study of human female meiotic prophase through different technical approaches using both spread and structurally preserved oocytes.

  16. Meiotic behavior as a selection tool in silage corn breeding.

    PubMed

    Souza, V F; Pagliarini, M S; Scapim, C A; Rodovalho, M; Faria, M V

    2010-10-19

    In breeding programs, commercial hybrids are frequently used as a source of inbred lines to obtain new hybrids. Considering that maize production is dependent on viable gametes, the selection of populations to obtain inbred lines with high meiotic stability could contribute to the formation of new silage corn hybrids adapted to specific region. We evaluated the meiotic stability of five commercial hybrids of silage corn used in southern Brazil with conventional squashing methods. All of them showed meiotic abnormalities. Some abnormalities, such as abnormal chromosome segregation and absence of cytokinesis, occurred in all the genotypes, while others, including cytomixis and abnormal spindle orientation, were found only in some genotypes. The hybrid SG6010 had the lowest mean frequency of abnormal cells (21.27%); the highest frequency was found in the hybrid P30K64 (44.43%). However, the frequency of abnormal meiotic products was much lower in most genotypes, ranging from 7.63% in the hybrid CD304 to 43.86% in Garra. Taking into account the percentage of abnormal meiotic products and, hence, meiotic stability, only the hybrids CD304, P30K64, SG6010, and P30F53 are recommended to be retained in the breeding program to obtain inbred lines to create new hybrids.

  17. High efficiency of meiotic gynogenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinchard, J.; Dabrowski, K.; Garcia-Abiado, M. -A.

    2006-01-01

    Induction of androgenesis and gynogenesis by applying a pressure (PS) or heat shock (HS) to double the haploid chromosomal set results in progenies possessing only chromosomes from a single parent. This has never been accomplished in representatives of Agnatha. The objective of this study was to induce gynogenesis and androgenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. For gynogenesis experiments, ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated sperm was used to activate sea lamprey eggs and HS or PS were applied to inhibit the second meiotic division and consequently induce diploidy in the embryos. The UV irradiation of immobilized sperm was performed for 1 min at 1,719 J m-2. HS of 35 ?? 1??C for 2 min and PS of 9,000 psi for 4 min were applied at different times after egg activation (8, 12, 20, and 24 min or 8, 16, and 24 min for HS or PS, respectively). Regardless of the induction time of the HS, survivals at pre-hatching stage were similar. In contrast, PS applied 8 min after activation appears to increase survival rate of pre-hatched embryos in comparison to 16 and 24 min after activation. In control groups, without shock treatment (no diploidization), there were no survivors. All deformed, gynogenetic embryos were confirmed to be haploids and died prior to burying themselves in the sand. We confirmed by flow cytometry that progenies produced using both shock methods surviving to the next stage, burying in the substrate, were diploid gynogenetic. For the androgenesis experiments, UV-irradiated eggs (1,719 J m-2 for 1 min) were fertilized with non-treated sperm and HS was applied to restore diploidy of the eggs. Several attempts have been made to optimize the parameters used. HS of 35 ?? 1??C was applied 110, 140, 170, 200, and 230 min after activation for 2 min. Low yields of androgens were obtained and all animals died within a week after hatching. These techniques will allow to establish meiotic gynogenetic lines of sea lamprey for determining sex differentiation in this species

  18. High efficiency of meiotic gynogenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Rinchard, Jacques; Dabrowski, Konrad; Garcia-Abiado, Mary-Ann

    2006-11-15

    Induction of androgenesis and gynogenesis by applying a pressure (PS) or heat shock (HS) to double the haploid chromosomal set results in progenies possessing only chromosomes from a single parent. This has never been accomplished in representatives of Agnatha. The objective of this study was to induce gynogenesis and androgenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. For gynogenesis experiments, ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated sperm was used to activate sea lamprey eggs and HS or PS were applied to inhibit the second meiotic division and consequently induce diploidy in the embryos. The UV irradiation of immobilized sperm was performed for 1 min at 1,719 J m(-2). HS of 35+/-1 degrees C for 2 min and PS of 9,000 psi for 4 min were applied at different times after egg activation (8, 12, 20, and 24 min or 8, 16, and 24 min for HS or PS, respectively). Regardless of the induction time of the HS, survivals at pre-hatching stage were similar. In contrast, PS applied 8 min after activation appears to increase survival rate of pre-hatched embryos in comparison to 16 and 24 min after activation. In control groups, without shock treatment (no diploidization), there were no survivors. All deformed, gynogenetic embryos were confirmed to be haploids and died prior to burying themselves in the sand. We confirmed by flow cytometry that progenies produced using both shock methods surviving to the next stage, burying in the substrate, were diploid gynogenetic. For the androgenesis experiments, UV-irradiated eggs (1,719 J m(-2) for 1 min) were fertilized with non-treated sperm and HS was applied to restore diploidy of the eggs. Several attempts have been made to optimize the parameters used. HS of 35+/-1 degrees C was applied 110, 140, 170, 200, and 230 min after activation for 2 min. Low yields of androgens were obtained and all animals died within a week after hatching. These techniques will allow to establish meiotic gynogenetic lines of sea lamprey for determining sex differentiation

  19. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  20. Systems Biology Analysis Merging Phenotype, Metabolomic and Genomic Data Identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and Cellular Maintenance Processes as Major Contributors to Genetic Variability in Bovine Feed Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M.; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  1. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    DOE PAGES

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step inmore » homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.« less

  2. Effects of the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate (CPA) on oocyte meiotic maturation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rime, Hélène; Nguyen, Thaovi; Ombredane, Kevin; Fostier, Alexis; Bobe, Julien

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we aimed at characterizing the effect of cyproterone acetate (CPA), an anti-androgenic compound, on oocyte meiotic maturation in a freshwater teleost fish species, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Fully-grown post-vitellogenic ovarian follicles were incubated in vitro with CPA, luteinizing hormone (Lh) or a combination of CPA and Lh. Incubations were also performed using a combination of Lh and testosterone (T). The occurrence of oocyte maturation (i.e., resumption of the meiotic process) was assessed by monitoring germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) after a 72h in vitro incubation. The effect of CPA on the production of 17,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20βP), the natural maturation-inducing steroid (MIS), was quantified by radioimmunoassay. Our results show that CPA dramatically inhibits Lh-induced oocyte maturation and MIS synthesis. We also observed a synergistic effect of Lh and T on oocyte maturation in highly competent oocytes (i.e., able to resume meiosis after stimulation by low doses of Lh). Our results also show that a combination of CPA and Lh inhibits phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), kinases that are associated with oocyte maturation in many species. As a whole, our results indicate that CPA has a potential to alter meiotic maturation in rainbow trout. Further analyses are, however, needed to determine the mechanisms by which this anti-androgen interferes with the meiotic process. Furthermore, the present study provides a framework for better understanding of the ecological consequences of exposure to anti-androgens and resulting meiotic maturation abnormalities observed in trout.

  3. Whole-Genome Analysis of Individual Meiotic Events in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals That Noncrossover Gene Conversions Are Insensitive to Interference and the Centromere Effect

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Danny E.; Smith, Clarissa B.; Kazemi, Nazanin Yeganeh; Cockrell, Alexandria J.; Arvanitakis, Alexandra V.; Blumenstiel, Justin P.; Jaspersen, Sue L.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2016-01-01

    A century of genetic analysis has revealed that multiple mechanisms control the distribution of meiotic crossover events. In Drosophila melanogaster, two significant positional controls are interference and the strongly polar centromere effect. Here, we assess the factors controlling the distribution of crossovers (COs) and noncrossover gene conversions (NCOs) along all five major chromosome arms in 196 single meiotic divisions to generate a more detailed understanding of these controls on a genome-wide scale. Analyzing the outcomes of single meiotic events allows us to distinguish among different classes of meiotic recombination. In so doing, we identified 291 NCOs spread uniformly among the five major chromosome arms and 541 COs (including 52 double crossovers and one triple crossover). We find that unlike COs, NCOs are insensitive to the centromere effect and do not demonstrate interference. Although the positions of COs appear to be determined predominately by the long-range influences of interference and the centromere effect, each chromosome may display a different pattern of sensitivity to interference, suggesting that interference may not be a uniform global property. In addition, unbiased sequencing of a large number of individuals allows us to describe the formation of de novo copy number variants, the majority of which appear to be mediated by unequal crossing over between transposable elements. This work has multiple implications for our understanding of how meiotic recombination is regulated to ensure proper chromosome segregation and maintain genome stability. PMID:26944917

  4. Cytostatic Factor Proteins Are Present in Male Meiotic Cells and β-Nerve Growth Factor Increases Mos Levels in Rat Late Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Chassaing, Emeric; Montillet, Guillaume; Sabido, Odile; Durand, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background In co-cultures of pachytene spermatocytes with Sertoli cells, β-NGF regulates the second meiotic division by blocking secondary spermatocytes in metaphase (metaphase II), and thereby lowers round spermatid formation. In vertebrates, mature oocytes are arrested at metaphase II until fertilization, because of the presence of cytostatic factor (CSF) in their cytoplasm. By analogy, we hypothesized the presence of CSF in male germ cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here, that Mos, Emi2, cyclin E and Cdk2, the four proteins of CSF, and their respective mRNAs, are present in male rat meiotic cells; this was assessed by using Western blotting, immunocytochemistry and reverse transcriptase PCR. We measured the relative cellular levels of Mos, Emi2, Cyclin E and Cdk2 in the meiotic cells by flow cytometry and found that the four proteins increased throughout the first meiotic prophase, reaching their highest levels in middle to late pachytene spermatocytes, then decreased following the meiotic divisions. In co-cultures of pachytene spermatocytes with Sertoli cells, β-NGF increased the number of metaphases II, while enhancing Mos and Emi2 levels in middle to late pachytene spermatocytes, pachytene spermatocytes in division and secondary spermatocytes. Conclusion/Significance Our results suggest that CSF is not restricted to the oocyte. In addition, they reinforce the view that NGF, by enhancing Mos in late spermatocytes, is one of the intra-testicular factors which adjusts the number of round spermatids that can be supported by Sertoli cells. PMID:19802389

  5. Budding Yeast SLX4 Contributes to the Appropriate Distribution of Crossovers and Meiotic Double-Strand Break Formation on Bivalents During Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Higashide, Mika; Shinohara, Miki

    2016-01-01

    The number and distribution of meiosis crossover (CO) events on each bivalent are strictly controlled by multiple mechanisms to assure proper chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Slx4 is a multi-functional scaffold protein for structure-selective endonucleases, such as Slx1 and Rad1 (which are involved in DNA damage repair), and is also a negative regulator of the Rad9-dependent signaling pathway with Rtt107. Slx4 has been believed to play only a minor role in meiotic recombination. Here, we report that Slx4 is involved in proper intrachromosomal distribution of meiotic CO formation, especially in regions near centromeres. We observed an increase in uncontrolled CO formation only in a region near the centromere in the slx4∆ mutant. Interestingly, this phenomenon was not observed in the slx1∆, rad1∆, or rtt107∆ mutants. In addition, we observed a reduced number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and altered meiotic DSB distribution on chromosomes in the slx4∆ mutant. This suggests that the multi-functional Slx4 is required for proper CO formation and meiotic DSB formation. PMID:27172214

  6. Finding the Correct Partner: The Meiotic Courtship

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Homologous chromosomes are usually separated at the entrance of meiosis; how they become paired is one of the outstanding mysteries of the meiotic process. Reduction of spacing between homologues makes possible the occurrence of chromosomal interactions leading to homology detection and the formation of bivalents. In many organisms, telomere-led chromosome movements are generated that bring homologues together. Additional movements produced by chromatin conformational changes at early meiosis may also facilitate homologous contacts. Organisms used in the study of meiosis show a surprising variety of strategies for homology detection. In dipterans, homologous chromosomes remain paired throughout most of development. Pairing seems to arise as a balance between promoter and suppressor pairing genes. Some fungi, plants and animals, use mechanisms based on recombinational interactions. Other mechanisms leading to homology search are recombination-independent and require specialized pairing sites. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, each chromosome carries a pairing center consisting of a chromosome-specific DNA-protein complex, and in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sme2 locus encodes a meiosis-specific non-coding RNA that mediates on homologous recognition. In addition, mismatch correction plays a relevant role, especially in polyploids, which evolved genetic systems that suppress pairing between non-homologous related (homoeologus) chromosomes. PMID:24278707

  7. Role of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) in maintenance of meiotic arrest in fish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter

    2017-03-01

    An essential role for GPER (formerly known as GPR30) in regulating mammalian reproduction has not been identified to date, although it has shown to be involved in the regulation a broad range of other estrogen-dependent functions. In contrast, an important reproductive role for GPER in the maintenance of oocyte meiotic arrest has been identified in teleost fishes, which is briefly reviewed here. Recent studies have clearly shown that ovarian follicle production of estradiol-17β (E2) maintains meiotic arrest in several teleost species through activation of GPER coupled to a stimulatory G protein (Gs) on oocyte plasma membranes resulting in stimulation of cAMP production and maintenance of elevated cAMP levels. Studies with denuded zebrafish oocytes and with microinjection of GPER antisense oligonucleotides into oocytes have demonstrated the requirement for both ovarian follicle production of estrogens and expression of GPER on the oocyte surface for maintenance of meiotic arrest. This inhibitory action of E2 on the resumption of meiosis is mimicked by the GPER-selective agonist G-1, by the GPER agonists and nuclear ER antagonists, ICI 182,780 and tamoxifen, and also by the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) and related alkylphenols. GPER also maintains meiotic arrest of zebrafish oocytes through estrogen- and BPA-dependent GPER activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Interestingly, progesterone receptor component 1 (PGRMC1) is also involved in estrogen maintenance of meiotic arrest through regulation of EGFR expression on the oocyte plasma membrane. The preovulatory surge in LH secretion induces the ovarian synthesis of progestin hormones that activate a membrane progestin receptor alpha (mPRα)/inhibitory G protein (Gi) pathway. It also increases ovarian synthesis of the catecholestrogen, 2-hydroxy-estradiol-17β (2-OHE2) which inhibits the GPER/Gs/adenylyl cyclase pathway. Both of these LH actions

  8. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  9. Suppression of Meiotic Recombination by CENP-B Homologs in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Peter; Cam, Hugh P.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination (HR) is not uniform across eukaryotic genomes, creating regions of HR hot- and coldspots. Previous study reveals that the Spo11 homolog Rec12 responsible for initiation of meiotic double-strand breaks in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is not targeted to Tf2 retrotransposons. However, whether Tf2s are HR coldspots is not known. Here, we show that the rates of HR across Tf2s are similar to a genome average but substantially increase in mutants deficient for the CENP-B homologs. Abp1, which is the most prominent of the CENP-B family members and acts as the primary determinant of HR suppression at Tf2s, is required to prevent gene conversion and maintain proper recombination exchange of homologous alleles flanking Tf2s. In addition, Abp1-mediated suppression of HR at Tf2s requires all three of its domains with distinct functions in transcriptional repression and higher-order genome organization. We demonstrate that HR suppression of Tf2s can be robustly maintained despite disruption to chromatin factors essential for transcriptional repression and nuclear organization of Tf2s. Intriguingly, we uncover a surprising cooperation between the histone methyltransferase Set1 responsible for histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and the nonhomologous end joining pathway in ensuring the suppression of HR at Tf2s. Our study identifies a molecular pathway involving functional cooperation between a transcription factor with epigenetic regulators and a DNA repair pathway to regulate meiotic recombination at interspersed repeats. PMID:26354768

  10. Meiotic recombination breakpoints are associated with open chromatin and enriched with repetitive DNA elements in potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meiotic recombination provides the framework for the genetic variation in natural and artificial populations of eukaryotes through the creation of novel haplotypes. Thus, determining the molecular characteristics of meiotic recombination remains essential for future plant breeding efforts, which hea...

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities, meiotic behavior and fertility in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Villagómez, D A F; Pinton, A

    2008-01-01

    Since the advent of the surface microspreading technique for synaptonemal complex analysis, increasing interest in describing the synapsis patterns of chromosome abnormalities associated with fertility of domestic animals has been noticed during the past three decades. In spite of the number of scientific reports describing the occurrence of structural chromosome abnormalities, their meiotic behavior and gametic products, little is known in domestic animal species about the functional effects of such chromosome aberrations in the germ cell line of carriers. However, some interesting facts gained from recent and previous studies on the meiotic behavior of chromosome abnormalities of domestic animals permit us to discuss, in the frame of recent knowledge emerging from mouse and human investigations, the possible mechanism implicated in the well known association between meiotic disruption and chromosome pairing failure. New cytogenetic techniques, based on molecular and immunofluorescent analyses, are allowing a better description of meiotic processes, including gamete production. The present communication reviews the knowledge of the meiotic consequences of chromosome abnormalities in domestic animals.

  12. Meiotic Consequences of Genetic Divergence Across the Murine Pseudoautosomal Region

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.

    2017-01-01

    The production of haploid gametes during meiosis is dependent on the homology-driven processes of pairing, synapsis, and recombination. On the mammalian heterogametic sex chromosomes, these key meiotic activities are confined to the pseudoautosomal region (PAR), a short region of near-perfect sequence homology between the X and Y chromosomes. Despite its established importance for meiosis, the PAR is rapidly evolving, raising the question of how proper X/Y segregation is buffered against the accumulation of homology-disrupting mutations. Here, I investigate the interplay of PAR evolution and function in two interfertile house mouse subspecies characterized by structurally divergent PARs, Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. castaneus. Using cytogenetic methods to visualize the sex chromosomes at meiosis, I show that intersubspecific F1 hybrids harbor an increased frequency of pachytene spermatocytes with unsynapsed sex chromosomes. This high rate of asynapsis is due, in part, to the premature release of synaptic associations prior to completion of prophase I. Further, I show that when sex chromosomes do synapse in intersubspecific hybrids, recombination is reduced across the paired region. Together, these meiotic defects afflict ∼50% of spermatocytes from F1 hybrids and lead to increased apoptosis in meiotically dividing cells. Despite flagrant disruption of the meiotic program, a subset of spermatocytes complete meiosis and intersubspecific F1 males remain fertile. These findings cast light on the meiotic constraints that shape sex chromosome evolution and offer initial clues to resolve the paradox raised by the rapid evolution of this functionally significant locus. PMID:28100589

  13. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast. PMID:26348709

  14. Cytogenetic analysis of meiotic cells obtained from stallion testes.

    PubMed

    Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika; Dardzińska, Aneta; Pawlina, Klaudia; Słota, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    A normal course of meiosis and the associated course of spermatogenesis in males are very significant from the viewpoint of animal breeding, in particular animal reproduction. This takes on special significance when studying late-maturing animals such as horses. The aim of the study was to analyse meiotic cells, with particular consideration of synaptonemal complexes obtained from the testes of young stallions and cryptorchids, based on observations of the X-Y bivalent. The analysis was performed in successive stages of meiotic division using the FISH technique. The greatest diversity and most advanced meiotic stages were observed in the normal testis of a unilateral cryptorchid. No abnormalities were observed that could have caused cryptorchidism in the analysed horses.

  15. MPS3 mediates meiotic bouquet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Michael N.; Lee, Chih-Ying; Wilkerson, Joseph L.; Dresser, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    In meiotic prophase, telomeres associate with the nuclear envelope and accumulate adjacent to the centrosome/spindle pole to form the chromosome bouquet, a well conserved event that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p. Ndj1p interacts with Mps3p, a nuclear envelope SUN domain protein that is required for spindle pole body duplication and for sister chromatid cohesion. Removal of the Ndj1p-interaction domain from MPS3 creates an ndj1Δ-like separation-of-function allele, and Ndj1p and Mps3p are codependent for stable association with the telomeres. SUN domain proteins are found in the nuclear envelope across phyla and are implicated in mediating interactions between the interior of the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Our observations indicate a general mechanism for meiotic telomere movements. PMID:17495028

  16. Segregation for fertility and meiotic stability in novel Brassica allohexaploids.

    PubMed

    Mwathi, Margaret W; Gupta, Mehak; Atri, Chaya; Banga, Surinder S; Batley, Jacqueline; Mason, Annaliese S

    2017-04-01

    Allohexaploid Brassica populations reveal ongoing segregation for fertility, while genotype influences fertility and meiotic stability. Creation of a new Brassica allohexaploid species is of interest for the development of a crop type with increased heterosis and adaptability. At present, no naturally occurring, meiotically stable Brassica allohexaploid exists, with little data available on chromosome behaviour and meiotic control in allohexaploid germplasm. In this study, 100 plants from the cross B. carinata × B. rapa (A2 allohexaploid population) and 69 plants from the cross (B. napus × B. carinata) × B. juncea (H2 allohexaploid population) were assessed for fertility and meiotic behaviour. Estimated pollen viability, self-pollinated seed set, number of seeds on the main shoot, number of pods on the main shoot, seeds per ten pods and plant height were measured for both the A2 and H2 populations and for a set of reference control cultivars. The H2 population had high segregation for pollen viability and meiotic stability, while the A2 population was characterised by low pollen fertility and a high level of chromosome loss. Both populations were taller, but had lower average fertility trait values than the control cultivar samples. The study also characterises fertility and meiotic chromosome behaviour in genotypes and progeny sets in heterozygous allotetraploid Brassica derived lines, and indicates that genotypes of the parents and H1 hybrids are affecting chromosome pairing and fertility phenotypes in the H2 population. The identification and characterisation of factors influencing stability in novel allohexaploid Brassica populations will assist in the development of this as a new crop species for food and agricultural benefit.

  17. APC(FZR1) prevents nondisjunction in mouse oocytes by controlling meiotic spindle assembly timing.

    PubMed

    Holt, Janet E; Lane, Simon I R; Jennings, Phoebe; García-Higuera, Irene; Moreno, Sergio; Jones, Keith T

    2012-10-01

    FZR1 is an anaphase-promoting complex (APC) activator best known for its role in the mitotic cell cycle at M-phase exit, in G1, and in maintaining genome integrity. Previous studies also established that it prevents meiotic resumption, equivalent to the G2/M transition. Here we report that mouse oocytes lacking FZR1 undergo passage through meiosis I that is accelerated by ~1 h, and this is due to an earlier onset of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) satisfaction and APC(CDC20) activity. However, loss of FZR1 did not compromise SAC functionality; instead, earlier SAC satisfaction was achieved because the bipolar meiotic spindle was assembled more quickly in the absence of FZR1. This novel regulation of spindle assembly by FZR1 led to premature bivalent attachment to microtubules and loss of kinetochore-bound MAD2. Bivalents, however, were observed to congress poorly, leading to nondisjunction rates of 25%. We conclude that in mouse oocytes FZR1 controls the timing of assembly of the bipolar spindle and in so doing the timing of SAC satisfaction and APC(CDC20) activity. This study implicates FZR1 as a major regulator of prometaphase whose activity helps to prevent chromosome nondisjunction.

  18. Ikbkap/Elp1 Deficiency Causes Male Infertility by Disrupting Meiotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fu-Jung; Shen, Li; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Falnes, Pål Ø.; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Mouse Ikbkap gene encodes IKAP—one of the core subunits of Elongator—and is thought to be involved in transcription. However, the biological function of IKAP, particularly within the context of an animal model, remains poorly characterized. We used a loss-of-function approach in mice to demonstrate that Ikbkap is essential for meiosis during spermatogenesis. Absence of Ikbkap results in defects in synapsis and meiotic recombination, both of which result in increased apoptosis and complete arrest of gametogenesis. In Ikbkap-mutant testes, a few meiotic genes are down-regulated, suggesting IKAP's role in transcriptional regulation. In addition, Ikbkap-mutant testes exhibit defects in wobble uridine tRNA modification, supporting a conserved tRNA modification function from yeast to mammals. Thus, our study not only reveals a novel function of IKAP in meiosis, but also suggests that IKAP contributes to this process partly by exerting its effect on transcription and tRNA modification. PMID:23717213

  19. CEP63 deficiency promotes p53-dependent microcephaly and reveals a role for the centrosome in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Marko; Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Terré, Berta; Gómez, Rocío; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Pacheco, Sarai; Knobel, Philip A; Martínez-Marchal, Ana; Aivio, Suvi; Palenzuela, Lluís; Wolfrum, Uwe; McKinnon, Peter J; Suja, José A; Roig, Ignasi; Costanzo, Vincenzo; Lüders, Jens; Stracker, Travis H

    2015-07-09

    CEP63 is a centrosomal protein that facilitates centriole duplication and is regulated by the DNA damage response. Mutations in CEP63 cause Seckel syndrome, a human disease characterized by microcephaly and dwarfism. Here we demonstrate that Cep63-deficient mice recapitulate Seckel syndrome pathology. The attrition of neural progenitor cells involves p53-dependent cell death, and brain size is rescued by the deletion of p53. Cell death is not the result of an aberrant DNA damage response but is triggered by centrosome-based mitotic errors. In addition, Cep63 loss severely impairs meiotic recombination, leading to profound male infertility. Cep63-deficient spermatocytes display numerical and structural centrosome aberrations, chromosome entanglements and defective telomere clustering, suggesting that a reduction in centrosome-mediated chromosome movements underlies recombination failure. Our results provide novel insight into the molecular pathology of microcephaly and establish a role for the centrosome in meiotic recombination.

  20. CEP63 deficiency promotes p53-dependent microcephaly and reveals a role for the centrosome in meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Marjanović, Marko; Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Terré, Berta; Gómez, Rocío; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Pacheco, Sarai; Knobel, Philip A.; Martínez-Marchal, Ana; Aivio, Suvi; Palenzuela, Lluís; Wolfrum, Uwe; McKinnon, Peter J.; Suja, José A.; Roig, Ignasi; Costanzo, Vincenzo; Lüders, Jens; Stracker, Travis H.

    2015-01-01

    CEP63 is a centrosomal protein that facilitates centriole duplication and is regulated by the DNA damage response. Mutations in CEP63 cause Seckel syndrome, a human disease characterized by microcephaly and dwarfism. Here we demonstrate that Cep63 deficient mice recapitulate Seckel syndrome pathology. The attrition of neural progenitor cells involves p53-dependent cell death and brain size is rescued by the deletion of p53. Cell death is not the result of an aberrant DNA damage response but is triggered by centrosome-based mitotic errors. In addition, Cep63 loss severely impairs meiotic recombination, leading to profound male infertility. Cep63 deficient spermatocytes display numerical and structural centrosome aberrations, chromosome entanglements and defective telomere clustering, suggesting that a reduction in centrosome-mediated chromosome movements underlies recombination failure. Our results provide novel insight into the molecular pathology of microcephaly and establish a role for the centrosome in meiotic recombination. PMID:26158450

  1. HURP permits MTOC sorting for robust meiotic spindle bipolarity, similar to extra centrosome clustering in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Manuel; Kolano, Agnieszka; Kwon, Mijung; Li, Chao-Chin; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Pellman, David; Brunet, Stéphane; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2010-12-27

    In contrast to somatic cells, formation of acentriolar meiotic spindles relies on the organization of microtubules (MTs) and MT-organizing centers (MTOCs) into a stable bipolar structure. The underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We show that this process is impaired in hepatoma up-regulated protein (Hurp) knockout mice, which are viable but female sterile, showing defective oocyte divisions. HURP accumulates on interpolar MTs in the vicinity of chromosomes via Kinesin-5 activity. By promoting MT stability in the spindle central domain, HURP allows efficient MTOC sorting into distinct poles, providing bipolarity establishment and maintenance. Our results support a new model for meiotic spindle assembly in which HURP ensures assembly of a central MT array, which serves as a scaffold for the genesis of a robust bipolar structure supporting efficient chromosome congression. Furthermore, HURP is also required for the clustering of extra centrosomes before division, arguing for a shared molecular requirement of MTOC sorting in mammalian meiosis and cancer cell division.

  2. CRL4-DCAF1 ubiquitin E3 ligase directs protein phosphatase 2A degradation to control oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Ji, Shu-Yan; Sha, Qian-Qian; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Fan, Heng-Yu

    2015-08-18

    Oocyte meiosis is a specialized cell cycle that gives rise to fertilizable haploid gametes and is precisely controlled in various dimensions. We recently found that E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4 is required for female fertility by regulating DNA hydroxymethylation to maintain oocyte survival and to promote zygotic genome reprogramming. However, not all phenotypes of CRL4-deleted oocytes could be explained by this mechanism. Here we show that CRL4 controls oocyte meiotic maturation by proteasomal degradation of protein phosphatase 2A scaffold subunit, PP2A-A. Oocyte-specific deletion of DDB1 or DCAF1 (also called VPRBP) results in delayed meiotic resumption and failure to complete meiosis I along with PP2A-A accumulation. DCAF1 directly binds to and results in the poly-ubiquitination of PP2A-A. Moreover, combined deletion of Ppp2r1a rescues the meiotic defects caused by DDB1/DCAF1 deficiency. These results provide in vivo evidence that CRL4-directed PP2A-A degradation is physiologically essential for regulating oocyte meiosis and female fertility.

  3. H3 Thr3 phosphorylation is crucial for meiotic resumption and anaphase onset in oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Wei, Haojie; Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Ma, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Haspin-catalyzed histone H3 threonine 3 (Thr3) phosphorylation facilitates chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) docking at centromeres, regulating indirectly chromosome behavior during somatic mitosis. It is not fully known about the expression and function of H3 with phosphorylated Thr3 (H3T3-P) during meiosis in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the expression and sub-cellular distribution of H3T3-P, as well as its function in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed that H3T3-P expression was only detected after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), and gradually increased to peak level at metaphase I (MI), but sharply decreased at metaphase II (MII). Immunofluorescence showed H3T3-P was only brightly labeled on chromosomes after GVBD, with relatively high concentration across the whole chromosome axis from pro-metaphase I (pro-MI) to MI. Specially, H3T3-P distribution was exclusively limited to the local space between sister centromeres at MII stage. Haspin inhibitor, 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITu), dose- and time-dependently blocked H3T3-P expression in mouse oocytes. H3T3-P inhibition delayed the resumption of meiosis (GVBD) and chromatin condensation. Moreover, the loss of H3T3-P speeded up the meiotic transition to MII of pro-MI oocytes in spite of the presence of non-aligned chromosomes, even reversed MI-arrest induced with Nocodazole. The inhibition of H3T3-P expression distinguishably damaged MAD1 recruitment on centromeres, which indicates the spindle assembly checkpoint was impaired in function, logically explaining the premature onset of anaphase I. Therefore, Haspin-catalyzed histone H3 phosphorylation is essential for chromatin condensation and the following timely transition from meiosis I to meiosis II in mouse oocytes during meiotic division.

  4. H3 Thr3 phosphorylation is crucial for meiotic resumption and anaphase onset in oocyte meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Wei, Haojie; Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Ma, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Haspin-catalyzed histone H3 threonine 3 (Thr3) phosphorylation facilitates chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) docking at centromeres, regulating indirectly chromosome behavior during somatic mitosis. It is not fully known about the expression and function of H3 with phosphorylated Thr3 (H3T3-P) during meiosis in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the expression and sub-cellular distribution of H3T3-P, as well as its function in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed that H3T3-P expression was only detected after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), and gradually increased to peak level at metaphase I (MI), but sharply decreased at metaphase II (MII). Immunofluorescence showed H3T3-P was only brightly labeled on chromosomes after GVBD, with relatively high concentration across the whole chromosome axis from pro-metaphase I (pro-MI) to MI. Specially, H3T3-P distribution was exclusively limited to the local space between sister centromeres at MII stage. Haspin inhibitor, 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITu), dose- and time-dependently blocked H3T3-P expression in mouse oocytes. H3T3-P inhibition delayed the resumption of meiosis (GVBD) and chromatin condensation. Moreover, the loss of H3T3-P speeded up the meiotic transition to MII of pro-MI oocytes in spite of the presence of non-aligned chromosomes, even reversed MI-arrest induced with Nocodazole. The inhibition of H3T3-P expression distinguishably damaged MAD1 recruitment on centromeres, which indicates the spindle assembly checkpoint was impaired in function, logically explaining the premature onset of anaphase I. Therefore, Haspin-catalyzed histone H3 phosphorylation is essential for chromatin condensation and the following timely transition from meiosis I to meiosis II in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26636626

  5. Meiotic HORMA domain proteins prevent untimely centriole disengagement during Caenorhabditis elegans spermatocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Schvarzstein, Mara; Pattabiraman, Divya; Bembenek, Joshua N; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2013-03-05

    In many species where oocytes lack centrosomes, sperm contribute both genetic material and centriole(s) to the zygote. Correct centriole organization during male meiosis is critical to guarantee a normal bipolar mitotic spindle in the zygote. During Caenorhabditis elegans male meiosis, centrioles normally undergo two rounds of duplication, resulting in haploid sperm each containing a single tightly engaged centriole pair. Here we identify an unanticipated role for C. elegans HORMA (Hop1/Rev7/Mad2) domain proteins HTP-1/2 and HIM-3 in regulating centriole disengagement during spermatocyte meiosis. In him-3 and htp-1 htp-2 mutants, centrioles separate inappropriately during meiosis II, resulting in spermatids with disengaged centrioles. Moreover, extra centrosomes are detected in a subset of zygotes. Together, these data implicate HIM-3 and HTP-1/2 in preventing centriole disengagement during meiosis II. We showed previously that HTP-1/2 prevents premature loss of sister chromatid cohesion during the meiotic divisions by inhibiting removal of meiotic cohesin complexes containing the REC-8 subunit. Worms lacking REC-8, or expressing a mutant separase protein with elevated local concentration at centrosomes and in sperm, likewise exhibit inappropriate centriole separation during spermatocyte meiosis. These observations are consistent with HIM-3 and HTP-1/2 preventing centriole disengagement by inhibiting separase-dependent cohesin removal. Our data suggest that the same specialized meiotic mechanisms that function to prevent premature release of sister chromatid cohesion during meiosis I in C. elegans also function to inhibit centriole separation at meiosis II, thereby ensuring that the zygote inherits the appropriate complement of chromosomes and centrioles.

  6. Characterization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Copper Transporter Proteins in Meiotic and Sporulating Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Plante, Samuel; Ioannoni, Raphaël; Beaudoin, Jude; Labbé, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Meiosis requires copper to undertake its program in which haploid gametes are produced from diploid precursor cells. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, copper is transported by three members of the copper transporter (Ctr) family, namely Ctr4, Ctr5, and Ctr6. Although central for sexual differentiation, very little is known about the expression profile, cellular localization, and physiological contribution of the Ctr proteins during meiosis. Analysis of gene expression of ctr4+ and ctr5+ revealed that they are primarily expressed in early meiosis under low copper conditions. In the case of ctr6+, its expression is broader, being detected throughout the entire meiotic process with an increase during middle- and late-phase meiosis. Whereas the expression of ctr4+ and ctr5+ is exclusively dependent on the presence of Cuf1, ctr6+ gene expression relies on two distinct regulators, Cuf1 and Mei4. Ctr4 and Ctr5 proteins co-localize at the plasma membrane shortly after meiotic induction, whereas Ctr6 is located on the membrane of vacuoles. After meiotic divisions, Ctr4 and Ctr5 disappear from the cell surface, whereas Ctr6 undergoes an intracellular re-location to co-localize with the forespore membrane. Under copper-limiting conditions, disruption of ctr4+ and ctr6+ results in altered SOD1 activity, whereas these mutant cells exhibit substantially decreased levels of CAO activity mostly in early- and middle-phase meiosis. Collectively, these results emphasize the notion that Ctr proteins exhibit differential expression, localization, and contribution in delivering copper to SOD1 and Cao1 proteins during meiosis. PMID:24569997

  7. Positive Feedback of NDT80 Expression Ensures Irreversible Meiotic Commitment in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Dai; Yang, Yang; Lacefield, Soni

    2014-01-01

    In budding yeast, meiotic commitment is the irreversible continuation of the developmental path of meiosis. After reaching meiotic commitment, cells finish meiosis and gametogenesis, even in the absence of the meiosis-inducing signal. In contrast, if the meiosis-inducing signal is removed and the mitosis-inducing signal is provided prior to reaching meiotic commitment, cells exit meiosis and return to mitosis. Previous work has shown that cells commit to meiosis after prophase I but before entering the meiotic divisions. Since the Ndt80 transcription factor induces expression of middle meiosis genes necessary for the meiotic divisions, we examined the role of the NDT80 transcriptional network in meiotic commitment. Using a microfluidic approach to analyze single cells, we found that cells commit to meiosis in prometaphase I, after the induction of the Ndt80-dependent genes. Our results showed that high-level expression of NDT80 is important for the timing and irreversibility of meiotic commitment. A modest reduction in NDT80 levels delayed meiotic commitment based on meiotic stages, although the timing of each meiotic stage was similar to that of wildtype cells. A further reduction of NDT80 resulted in the surprising finding of inappropriately uncommitted cells: withdrawal of the meiosis-inducing signal and addition of the mitosis-inducing signal to cells at stages beyond metaphase I caused return to mitosis, leading to multi-nucleate cells. Since Ndt80 enhances its own transcription through positive feedback, we tested whether positive feedback ensured the irreversibility of meiotic commitment. Ablating positive feedback in NDT80 expression resulted in a complete loss of meiotic commitment. These findings suggest that irreversibility of meiotic commitment is a consequence of the NDT80 transcriptional positive feedback loop, which provides the high-level of Ndt80 required for the developmental switch of meiotic commitment. These results also illustrate the

  8. OSD1 promotes meiotic progression via APC/C inhibition and forms a regulatory network with TDM and CYCA1;2/TAM.

    PubMed

    Cromer, Laurence; Heyman, Jefri; Touati, Sandra; Harashima, Hirofumi; Araou, Emilie; Girard, Chloe; Horlow, Christine; Wassmann, Katja; Schnittger, Arp; De Veylder, Lieven; Mercier, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle control is modified at meiosis compared to mitosis, because two divisions follow a single DNA replication event. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) promote progression through both meiosis and mitosis, and a central regulator of their activity is the APC/C (Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome) that is especially required for exit from mitosis. We have shown previously that OSD1 is involved in entry into both meiosis I and meiosis II in Arabidopsis thaliana; however, the molecular mechanism by which OSD1 controls these transitions has remained unclear. Here we show that OSD1 promotes meiotic progression through APC/C inhibition. Next, we explored the functional relationships between OSD1 and the genes known to control meiotic cell cycle transitions in Arabidopsis. Like osd1, cyca1;2/tam mutation leads to a premature exit from meiosis after the first division, while tdm mutants perform an aberrant third meiotic division after normal meiosis I and II. Remarkably, while tdm is epistatic to tam, osd1 is epistatic to tdm. We further show that the expression of a non-destructible CYCA1;2/TAM provokes, like tdm, the entry into a third meiotic division. Finally, we show that CYCA1;2/TAM forms an active complex with CDKA;1 that can phosphorylate OSD1 in vitro. We thus propose that a functional network composed of OSD1, CYCA1;2/TAM, and TDM controls three key steps of meiotic progression, in which OSD1 is a meiotic APC/C inhibitor.

  9. [Cortical cytoskeletal ring in prophase II leads to correction of abnormalities of the first meiotic division and to meiotic restitution of pollen mother cell nucleus].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V; Zaporozhchenko, I A; Maksiutova, Iu R; Shatskaia, O A

    2007-01-01

    The deviation of prophase cytoskeletal ring formation was determined during meiotic division in 50% of pollen mother cells (PMCs) in maize haploid No 1498 (Zea mays). At prophase in both meiotic divisions the cytoskeletal ring is formed in cortical region of cytoplasm instead of perinuclear. Sometimes formation of both perinuclear and cortical rings is observed in the same cell. It has been shown that in multinucleate PMCs the cortical ring leads to the consolidation of chromosomes into common spindle and to meiotic restitution.

  10. Expression and epigenomic landscape of the sex chromosomes in mouse post-meiotic male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Charlotte; Vaiman, Daniel; Tores, Frederic; Cocquet, Julie

    2016-01-01

    but are nevertheless regulated differently than autosomes and accumulate different chromatin marks. We propose that post-meiotic selective constraints are at the basis of the enrichment of spermatid-specific genes and of the peculiar chromatin composition of the sex chromosomes and of parts of chromosome 14.

  11. EZH2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by interacting with and stabilizing spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubRI

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yi; Lu, Danyu; Jiang, Hao; Chi, Xiaochun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) trimethylates histone H3 Lys 27 and plays key roles in a variety of biological processes. Stability of spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 is essential for mitosis in somatic cells and for meiosis in oocytes. However, the role of EZH2 in oocyte meiotic maturation was unknown. Here, we presented a mechanism underlying EZH2 control of BubR1 stability in the meiosis of mouse oocytes. We identified a methyltransferase activity-independent function of EZH2 by demonstrating that EZH2 regulates spindle assembly and the polar body I extrusion. EZH2 was increased with the oocyte progression from GVBD to MII, while EZH2 was concentrated on the chromosomes. Interestingly, inhibition of EZH2 methyltranferase activity by DZNep or GSK343 did not affect oocyte meiotic maturation. However, depletion of EZH2 by morpholino led to chromosome misalignment and abnormal spindle assembly. Furthermore, ectopic expression of EZH2 led to oocyte meiotic maturation arrested at the MI stage followed by chromosome misalignment and aneuploidy. Mechanistically, EZH2 directly interacted with and stabilized BubR1, an effect driving EZH2 into the concert of meiosis regulation. Collectively, we provided a paradigm that EZH2 is required for mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27226494

  12. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  13. [Meiotic chromosomes of the tree frog Smilisca baudinii (Anura: Hylidae)].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Guzmán, Javier; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber

    2011-03-01

    The Mexican tree frog Smilisca baudinii, is a very common frog in Central America. In spite their importance to keep the ecological equilibrium of the rainforest, its biology and genetics are poorly known. In order to contribute with its biological knowledge, we described the typical meiotic karyotype based in standard cytogenetic protocols to specimens collected in Tabasco, Mexico. The study was centered in the analysis of 131 chromosome spreads at meiotic stage from two adults of the species (one female and one male). The metaphase analysis allowed the establishment of the modal haploid number of 1n = 12 bivalent chromosomes. The chromosomic formulae from the haploid bivalent karyotype was integrated by 12 biarmed chromosomes characterized by twelve pairs of metacentric-submetacentric (msm) chromosomes. The meiotic counting gives the idea that diploid chromosome number is integrated by a complement of 2n = 24 biarmed chromosomes. The presence of sex chromosomes from female and male meiotic spreads was not observed. Current results suggest that S. baudinii chromosome structure is well shared among Hylidae family and "B" chromosomes are particular structures that have very important evolutionary consequences in species diversification.

  14. wtf genes are prolific dual poison-antidote meiotic drivers

    PubMed Central

    Nuckolls, Nicole L; Bravo Núñez, María Angélica; Eickbush, Michael T; Young, Janet M; Lange, Jeffrey J; Yu, Jonathan S; Smith, Gerald R; Jaspersen, Sue L; Malik, Harmit S; Zanders, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    Meiotic drivers are selfish genes that bias their transmission into gametes, defying Mendelian inheritance. Despite the significant impact of these genomic parasites on evolution and infertility, few meiotic drive loci have been identified or mechanistically characterized. Here, we demonstrate a complex landscape of meiotic drive genes on chromosome 3 of the fission yeasts Schizosaccharomyces kambucha and S. pombe. We identify S. kambucha wtf4 as one of these genes that acts to kill gametes (known as spores in yeast) that do not inherit the gene from heterozygotes. wtf4 utilizes dual, overlapping transcripts to encode both a gamete-killing poison and an antidote to the poison. To enact drive, all gametes are poisoned, whereas only those that inherit wtf4 are rescued by the antidote. Our work suggests that the wtf multigene family proliferated due to meiotic drive and highlights the power of selfish genes to shape genomes, even while imposing tremendous costs to fertility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26033.001 PMID:28631612

  15. Genetic Dissection of Meiotic Cytokinesis in Drosophila MalesD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Farkas, Rebecca M.; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Lindsley, Dan L.; Wakimoto, Barbara T.; Fuller, Margaret T.; Gatti, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    We have used Drosophila male meiosis as a model system for genetic dissection of the cytokinesis mechanism. Drosophila mutants defective in meiotic cytokinesis can be easily identified by their multinucleate spermatids. Moreover, the large size of meiotic spindles allows characterization of mutant phenotypes with exquisite cytological resolution. We have screened a collection of 1955 homozygous mutant male sterile lines for those with multinucleate spermatids, and thereby identified mutations in 19 genes required for cytokinesis. These include 16 novel loci and three genes, diaphanous, four wheel drive, and pebble, already known to be involved in Drosophila cytokinesis. To define the primary defects leading to failure of cytokinesis, we analyzed meiotic divisions in male mutants for each of these 19 genes. Examination of preparations stained for tubulin, anillin, KLP3A, and F-actin revealed discrete defects in the components of the cytokinetic apparatus, suggesting that these genes act at four major points in a stepwise pathway for cytokinesis. Our results also indicated that the central spindle and the contractile ring are interdependent structures that interact throughout cytokinesis. Moreover, our genetic and cytological analyses provide further evidence for a cell type-specific control of Drosophila cytokinesis, suggesting that several genes required for meiotic cytokinesis in males are not required for mitotic cytokinesis. PMID:15004238

  16. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-10-16

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency.

  17. Multiple roles of Spo11 in meiotic chromosome behavior.

    PubMed

    Celerin, M; Merino, S T; Stone, J E; Menzie, A M; Zolan, M E

    2000-06-01

    Spo11, a type II topoisomerase, is likely to be required universally for initiation of meiotic recombination. However, a dichotomy exists between budding yeast and the animals Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster with respect to additional roles of Spo11 in meiosis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spo11 is required for homolog pairing, as well as axial element (AE) and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation. All of these functions are Spo11 independent in C.elegans and D.melanogaster. We examined Spo11 function in a multicellular fungus, Coprinus cinereus. The C.cinereus spo11-1 mutant shows high levels of homolog pairing and occasionally forms full-length AEs, but no SC. In C.cinereus, Spo11 is also required for maintenance of meiotic chromosome condensation and proper spindle formation. Meiotic progression in spo11-1 is aberrant; late in meiosis basidia undergo programmed cell death (PCD). To our knowledge, this is the first example of meiotic PCD outside the animal kingdom. Ionizing radiation can partially rescue spo11-1 for both AE and SC formation and viable spore production, suggesting that the double-strand break function of Spo11 is conserved and is required for these functions.

  18. Does Stellate cause meiotic drive in Drosophila melanogaster?

    PubMed Central

    Belloni, Massimo; Tritto, Patrizia; Bozzetti, Maria Pia; Palumbo, Gioacchino; Robbins, Leonard G

    2002-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster males deficient for the crystal (cry) locus of the Y chromosome that carry between 15 and 60 copies of the X-linked Stellate (Ste) gene are semisterile, have elevated levels of nondisjunction, produce distorted sperm genotype ratios (meiotic drive), and evince hyperactive transcription of Ste in the testes. Ste seems to be the active element in this system, and it has been proposed that the ancestral Ste gene was "selfish" and increased in frequency because it caused meiotic drive. This hypothetical evolutionary history is based on the idea that Ste overexpression, and not the lack of cry, causes the meiotic drive of cry(-) males. To test whether this is true, we have constructed a Ste-deleted X chromosome and examined the phenotype of Ste(-)/cry(-) males. If hyperactivity of Ste were necessary for the transmission defects seen in cry(-) males, cry(-) males completely deficient for Ste would be normal. Although it is impossible to construct a completely Ste(-) genotype, we find that Ste(-)/cry(-) males have exactly the same phenotype as Ste(+)/cry(-) males. The deletion of all X chromosome Ste copies not only does not eliminate meiotic drive and nondisjunction, but it also does not even reduce them below the levels produced when the X carries 15 copies of Ste. PMID:12196400

  19. Induction of meiotic maturation in Xenopus oocytes by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Stith, B.J.; Maller, J.L.

    1987-04-01

    Fully grown Xenopus oocytes are physiologically arrested at the G2/prophase border of the first meiotic division. Addition in vitro of progesterone or insulin causes release of the G2/prophase block and stimulates meiotic cell division of the oocyte, leading to maturation of the oocyte into an unfertilized egg. The possibility that the products of polyphosphoinositide breakdown, diacylglycerol and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate are involved in occyte maturation was investigated. Microinjection of IP/sub 3/ into oocytes just prior to addition of progesterone or insulin accelerated the rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) by up to 25%. Half-maximal acceleration occurred at an intracellular IP/sub 3/ concentration of 1 ..mu..M. Treatment of oocytes with the diacylglycerol analog and tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) induced GVBD in the absence of hormone. Half-maximal induction of GVBD occurred with 150 nM TPA and was blocked by pretreatment of oocytes with 10 nM cholera toxin. Microinjection of highly purified protein kinase C from rat brain oocytes did not induce maturation but markedly accelerated the rate of insulin-induced oocyte maturation. However, injection of the enzyme had no effect on progesterone action. These results indicate that protein kinase C is capable of regulating oocyte maturation of Xenopus.

  20. Expression Profiling of MAP Kinase–Mediated Meiotic Progression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo. PMID:17096596

  1. Expression profiling of MAP kinase-mediated meiotic progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-11-10

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo.

  2. Meiotic Recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe: A Paradigm for Genetic and Molecular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cromie, Gareth; Smith, Gerald R.

    2009-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is especially well-suited for both genetic and biochemical analysis of meiotic recombination. Recent studies have revealed ~50 gene products and two DNA intermediates central to recombination, which we place into a pathway from parental to recombinant DNA. We divide recombination into three stages – chromosome alignment accompanying nuclear “horsetail” movement, formation of DNA breaks, and repair of those breaks – and we discuss the roles of the identified gene products and DNA intermediates in these stages. Although some aspects of recombination are similar to those in the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, other aspects are distinctly different. In particular, many proteins required for recombination in one species have no clear ortholog in the other, and the roles of identified orthologs in regulating recombination often differ. Furthermore, in S. pombe the dominant joint DNA molecule intermediates contain single Holliday junctions, and intersister joint molecules are more frequent than interhomolog types, whereas in S. cerevisiae interhomolog double Holliday junctions predominate. We speculate that meiotic recombination in other organisms shares features of each of these yeasts. PMID:20157622

  3. Dynamic Behavior of Microtubules during Dynein-dependent Nuclear Migrations of Meiotic Prophase in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Ayumu; Tsutsumi, Chihiro; Kojima, Hiroaki; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    During meiotic prophase in fission yeast, the nucleus migrates back and forth between the two ends of the cell, led by the spindle pole body (SPB). This nuclear oscillation is dependent on astral microtubules radiating from the SPB and a microtubule motor, cytoplasmic dynein. Here we have examined the dynamic behavior of astral microtubules labeled with the green fluorescent protein during meiotic prophase with the use of optical sectioning microscopy. During nuclear migrations, the SPB mostly follows the microtubules that extend toward the cell cortex. SPB migrations start when these microtubules interact with the cortex and stop when they disappear, suggesting that these microtubules drive nuclear migrations. The microtubules that are followed by the SPB often slide along the cortex and are shortened by disassembly at their ends proximal to the cortex. In dynein-mutant cells, where nuclear oscillations are absent, the SPB never migrates by following microtubules, and microtubule assembly/disassembly dynamics is significantly altered. Based on these observations, together with the frequent accumulation of dynein at a cortical site where the directing microtubules interact, we propose a model in which dynein drives nuclear oscillation by mediating cortical microtubule interactions and regulating the dynamics of microtubule disassembly at the cortex. PMID:11739791

  4. Competition between meiotic and apomictic pathways during ovule and seed development results in clonality.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, Diego H; Martínez, Eric J; Quarin, Camilo L

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic and apomictic reproductive pathways develop simultaneously in facultative aposporous species, and compete to form a seed as a final goal. This developmental competition was evaluated in tetraploid genotypes of Paspalum malacophyllum in order to understand the low level of sexuality in facultative apomictic populations. Cyto-embryology on ovules, flow cytometry on seeds and progeny tests by DNA fingerprinting were used to measure the relative incidence of each meiotic or apomictic pathway along four different stages of the plant's life cycle, namely the beginning and end of gametogenesis, seed formation and adult offspring. A high variation in the frequencies of sexual and apomictic pathways occurred at the first two stages. A trend of radical decline in realized sexuality was then observed. Sexual and apomictic seeds were produced, but the efficiency of the sexual pathway dropped drastically, and exclusively clonal offspring remained. Both reproductive pathways are unstable at the beginning of development, and only the apomictic one remains functional. Key factors reducing sexuality are the faster growth and parthenogenetic development in the aposporous pathway, and an (epi)genetically negative background related to the extensive gene de-regulation pattern responsible for apomixis. The effects of inbreeding depression during post-fertilization development may further decrease the frequency of effective sexuality. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Depletion of the LINC complex disrupts cytoskeleton dynamics and meiotic resumption in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yibo; Lee, In-Won; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84) and KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne/homology) proteins constitute the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex on the nuclear envelope. To date, the SUN1/KASH5 complex is known to function as meiotic-specific factors. In this study, gene-silencing methods were used to explore the roles of SUN1 and KASH5 in mouse oocytes after prophase. SUN1 was detected throughout the nucleus; however, KASH5 was dispersed through the cell. After germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), SUN1 and KASH5 migrated during spindle formation and localized to the spindle poles at the MII stage. Most oocytes were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage after depletion of either SUN1 or KASH5. The DNA damage response was triggered in SUN1-depleted oocytes and thus gave rise to the G2/M checkpoint protein, p-CHK1. Oocytes that underwent GVBD had relatively small and abnormal spindles and lower levels of cytoplasm F-actin mesh. Immunofluorescence results also indicated the dislocation of pericentrin and P150Glued after SUN1 or KASH5 depletion. Furthermore, KASH5 localized exclusively near the oocyte cortex after SUN1 depletion, but SUN1 localization was unaffected in KASH5-depleted oocytes. Taken together, the results suggest that SUN1 and KASH5 are essential factors in the regulation of meiotic resumption and spindle formation. PMID:26842404

  6. Evolution of meiotic recombination genes in maize and teosinte.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Gaganpreet K; Warzecha, Tomasz; Pawlowski, Wojciech P

    2017-01-25

    Meiotic recombination is a major source of genetic variation in eukaryotes. The role of recombination in evolution is recognized but little is known about how evolutionary forces affect the recombination pathway itself. Although the recombination pathway is fundamentally conserved across different species, genetic variation in recombination components and outcomes has been observed. Theoretical predictions and empirical studies suggest that changes in the recombination pathway are likely to provide adaptive abilities to populations experiencing directional or strong selection pressures, such as those occurring during species domestication. We hypothesized that adaptive changes in recombination may be associated with adaptive evolution patterns of genes involved in meiotic recombination. To examine how maize evolution and domestication affected meiotic recombination genes, we studied patterns of sequence polymorphism and divergence in eleven genes controlling key steps in the meiotic recombination pathway in a diverse set of maize inbred lines and several accessions of teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize. We discovered that, even though the recombination genes generally exhibited high sequence conservation expected in a pathway controlling a key cellular process, they showed substantial levels and diverse patterns of sequence polymorphism. Among others, we found differences in sequence polymorphism patterns between tropical and temperate maize germplasms. Several recombination genes displayed patterns of polymorphism indicative of adaptive evolution. Despite their ancient origin and overall sequence conservation, meiotic recombination genes can exhibit extensive and complex patterns of molecular evolution. Changes in these genes could affect the functioning of the recombination pathway, and may have contributed to the successful domestication of maize and its expansion to new cultivation areas.

  7. Sex Chromosome Meiotic Drive in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Presgraves, D. C.; Severance, E.; Wilkinson, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotically driven sex chromosomes can quickly spread to fixation and cause population extinction unless balanced by selection or suppressed by genetic modifiers. We report results of genetic analyses that demonstrate that extreme female-biased sex ratios in two sister species of stalk-eyed flies, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni and C. whitei, are due to a meiotic drive element on the X chromosome (X(d)). Relatively high frequencies of X(d) in C. dalmanni and C. whitei (13-17% and 29%, respectively) cause female-biased sex ratios in natural populations of both species. Sex ratio distortion is associated with spermatid degeneration in male carriers of X(d). Variation in sex ratios is caused by Y-linked and autosomal factors that decrease the intensity of meiotic drive. Y-linked polymorphism for resistance to drive exists in C. dalmanni in which a resistant Y chromosome reduces the intensity and reverses the direction of meiotic drive. When paired with X(d), modifying Y chromosomes (Y(m)) cause the transmission of predominantly Y-bearing sperm, and on average, production of 63% male progeny. The absence of sex ratio distortion in closely related monomorphic outgroup species suggests that this meiotic drive system may predate the origin of C. whitei and C. dalmanni. We discuss factors likely to be involved in the persistence of these sex-linked polymorphisms and consider the impact of X(d) on the operational sex ratio and the intensity of sexual selection in these extremely sexually dimorphic flies. PMID:9383060

  8. KLP-7 acts through the Ndc80 complex to limit pole number in C. elegans oocyte meiotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Amy A; Sugioka, Kenji; Chuang, Chien-Hui; Lowry, Joshua B; Bowerman, Bruce

    2015-09-14

    During oocyte meiotic cell division in many animals, bipolar spindles assemble in the absence of centrosomes, but the mechanisms that restrict pole assembly to a bipolar state are unknown. We show that KLP-7, the single mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK)/kinesin-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans, is required for bipolar oocyte meiotic spindle assembly. In klp-7(-) mutants, extra microtubules accumulated, extra functional spindle poles assembled, and chromosomes frequently segregated as three distinct masses during meiosis I anaphase. Moreover, reducing KLP-7 function in monopolar klp-18(-) mutants often restored spindle bipolarity and chromosome segregation. MCAKs act at kinetochores to correct improper kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments, and depletion of the Ndc-80 kinetochore complex, which binds microtubules to mediate kinetochore attachment, restored bipolarity in klp-7(-) mutant oocytes. We propose a model in which KLP-7/MCAK regulates k-MT attachment and spindle tension to promote the coalescence of early spindle pole foci that produces a bipolar structure during the acentrosomal process of oocyte meiotic spindle assembly.

  9. KLP-7 acts through the Ndc80 complex to limit pole number in C. elegans oocyte meiotic spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Amy A.; Sugioka, Kenji; Chuang, Chien-Hui; Lowry, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    During oocyte meiotic cell division in many animals, bipolar spindles assemble in the absence of centrosomes, but the mechanisms that restrict pole assembly to a bipolar state are unknown. We show that KLP-7, the single mitotic centromere–associated kinesin (MCAK)/kinesin-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans, is required for bipolar oocyte meiotic spindle assembly. In klp-7(−) mutants, extra microtubules accumulated, extra functional spindle poles assembled, and chromosomes frequently segregated as three distinct masses during meiosis I anaphase. Moreover, reducing KLP-7 function in monopolar klp-18(−) mutants often restored spindle bipolarity and chromosome segregation. MCAKs act at kinetochores to correct improper kinetochore–microtubule (k–MT) attachments, and depletion of the Ndc-80 kinetochore complex, which binds microtubules to mediate kinetochore attachment, restored bipolarity in klp-7(−) mutant oocytes. We propose a model in which KLP-7/MCAK regulates k–MT attachment and spindle tension to promote the coalescence of early spindle pole foci that produces a bipolar structure during the acentrosomal process of oocyte meiotic spindle assembly. PMID:26370499

  10. Spatiotemporal Asymmetry of the Meiotic Program Underlies the Predominantly Distal Distribution of Meiotic Crossovers in Barley[W

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, James D.; Perry, Ruth M.; Barakate, Abdellah; Ramsay, Luke; Waugh, Robbie; Halpin, Claire; Armstrong, Susan J.; Franklin, F. Chris H.

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis involves reciprocal exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes to generate new allelic combinations. In cereals, the distribution of genetic crossovers, cytologically visible as chiasmata, is skewed toward the distal regions of the chromosomes. However, many genes are known to lie within interstitial/proximal regions of low recombination, creating a limitation for breeders. We investigated the factors underlying the pattern of chiasma formation in barley (Hordeum vulgare) and show that chiasma distribution reflects polarization in the spatiotemporal initiation of recombination, chromosome pairing, and synapsis. Consequently, meiotic progression in distal chromosomal regions occurs in coordination with the chromatin cycles that are a conserved feature of the meiotic program. Recombination initiation in interstitial and proximal regions occurs later than distal events, is not coordinated with the cycles, and rarely progresses to form chiasmata. Early recombination initiation is spatially associated with early replicating, euchromatic DNA, which is predominately found in distal regions. We demonstrate that a modest temperature shift is sufficient to alter meiotic progression in relation to the chromosome cycles. The polarization of the meiotic processes is reduced and is accompanied by a shift in chiasma distribution with an increase in interstitial and proximal chiasmata, suggesting a potential route to modify recombination in cereals. PMID:23104831

  11. The GTPase SPAG-1 orchestrates meiotic program by dictating meiotic resumption and cytoskeleton architecture in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunjie; Wu, Di; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Jiao, Xiaofei; Guan, Kaifeng; Huo, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, a finite population of oocytes is generated during embryogenesis, and proper oocyte meiotic divisions are crucial for fertility. Sperm-associated antigen 1 (SPAG-1) has been implicated in infertility and tumorigenesis; however, its relevance in cell cycle programs remains rudimentary. Here we explore a novel role of SPAG-1 during oocyte meiotic progression. SPAG-1 associated with meiotic spindles and its depletion severely compromised M-phase entry (germinal vesicle breakdown [GVBD]) and polar body extrusion. The GVBD defect observed was due to an increase in intraoocyte cAMP abundance and decrease in ATP production, as confirmed by the activation of AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK). SPAG-1 RNA interference (RNAi)–elicited defective spindle morphogenesis was evidenced by the dysfunction of γ-tubulin, which resulted from substantially reduced phosphorylation of MAPK and irregularly dispersed distribution of phospho-MAPK around spindles instead of concentration at spindle poles. Significantly, actin expression abruptly decreased and formation of cortical granule–free domains, actin caps, and contractile ring disrupted by SPAG-1 RNAi. In addition, the spindle assembly checkpoint remained functional upon SPAG-1 depletion. The findings broaden our knowledge of SPAG-1, showing that it exerts a role in oocyte meiotic execution via its involvement in AMPK and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27053660

  12. Numerical and spatial patterning of yeast meiotic DNA breaks by Tel1.

    PubMed

    Mohibullah, Neeman; Keeney, Scott

    2017-02-01

    The Spo11-generated double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination are dangerous lesions that can disrupt genome integrity, so meiotic cells regulate their number, timing, and distribution. Mechanisms of this regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we use Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes, a byproduct of DSB formation, to reveal aspects of the contribution of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA damage-responsive kinase Tel1 (ortholog of mammalian ATM). A tel1Δ mutant has globally increased amounts of Spo11-oligonucleotide complexes and altered Spo11-oligonucleotide lengths, consistent with conserved roles for Tel1 in control of DSB number and processing. A kinase-dead tel1 mutation similarly increases Spo11-oligonucleotide levels but mutating known Tel1 phosphotargets on Hop1 and Rec114 does not, implicating Tel1 kinase activity and clarifying roles of Tel1 phosphorylation substrates. Deep sequencing of Spo11 oligonucleotides demonstrates that Tel1 shapes the genome-wide DSB landscape in unexpected ways. Early in meiosis, Tel1 absence causes widespread changes in DSB distributions across large chromosomal domains. Many of these changes are erased as meiosis proceeds, however, illustrating homeostatic behavior of DSB regulatory systems. We further find that effects of Tel1 are distinct but partially overlapping with previously described contributions of the recombination regulator Cst9 (also known as Zip3). Finally, we provide evidence indicating that Tel1-dependent DSB interference influences the population-average DSB landscape but also demonstrate that locally inhibitory effects of an artificial hotspot insertion can be both Tel1-independent and chromosomal context-dependent. Our findings delineate Tel1 roles in regulating number and location of DSBs and illuminate the complex interplay between Tel1 and other pathways for DSB control.

  13. Genetic analysis of sex chromosomal meiotic mutants in Drosophilia melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baker, B S; Carpenter, A T

    1972-06-01

    A total of 209 ethyl methanesulfonate-treated X chromosomes were screened for meiotic mutants that either (1) increased sex or fourth chromosome nondisjunction at either meiotic division in males; (2) allowed recombination in such males; (3) increased nondisjunction of the X chromosome at either meiotic division in females; or (4) caused such females, when mated to males heterozygous for Segregation-Distorter (SD) and a sensitive homolog to alter the strength of meiotic drive in males.-Twenty male-specific meiotic mutants were found. Though the rates of nondisjunction differed, all twenty mutants were qualitatively similar in that (1) they alter the disjunction of the X chromosome from the Y chromosome; (2) among the recovered sex-chromosome exceptional progeny, there is a large excess of those derived from nullo-XY as compared to XY gametes; (3) there is a negative correlation between the frequency of sex-chromosome exceptional progeny and the frequency of males among the regular progeny. In their effects on meiosis these mutants are similar to In(1)sc(4L)sc(8R), which is deleted for the basal heterochromatin. These mutants, however, have normal phenotypes and viabilities when examined as X/0 males, and furthermore, a mapping of two of the mutants places them in the euchromatin of the X chromosome. It is suggested that these mutants are in genes whose products are involved in insuring the proper functioning of the basal pairing sites which are deleted in In(1)sc(4L)sc(8R), and in addition that there is a close connection, perhaps causal, between the disruption of normal X-Y pairing (and, therefore, disjunction) and the occurrence of meiotic drive in the male.-Eleven mutants were found which increased nondisjunction in females. These mutants were characterized as to (1) the division at which they acted; (2) their effect on recombination; (3) their dominance; (4) their effects on disjunction of all four chromosome pairs. Five female mutants caused a nonuniform

  14. Translational control of meiotic cell cycle progression and spermatid differentiation in male germ cells by a novel eIF4G homolog

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Catherine C.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    Translational control is crucial for proper timing of developmental events that take place in the absence of transcription, as in meiotic activation in oocytes, early embryogenesis in many organisms, and spermatogenesis. Here we show that a novel form of the translation initiation complex component eIF4G in Drosophila, eIF4G2, is required specifically for male germ cells to undergo meiotic division and proper spermatid differentiation. Flies mutant for eIF4G2 are viable and female fertile but male sterile. Spermatocytes form, but the germ cells in mutant males skip the major events of the meiotic divisions and form aberrant spermatids with large nuclei. Consistent with the failure to undergo the meiotic divisions, function of eIF4G2 is required post-transcriptionally for normal accumulation of the core cell cycle regulatory proteins Twine and CycB in mature spermatocytes. Loss of eIF4G2 function also causes widespread defects in spermatid differentiation. Although differentiation markers Dj and Fzo are expressed in late-stage eIF4G2 mutant germ cells, several key steps of spermatid differentiation fail, including formation of a compact mitochondrial derivative and full elongation. Our results suggest that an alternate form of the translation initiation machinery may be required for regulation and execution of key steps in male germ cell differentiation. PMID:17611220

  15. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4bΔ/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis. PMID:26832838

  16. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-02-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4b(Δ)/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis.

  17. Meiotic pairing and gene expression disturbance in germ cells from an infertile boar with a balanced reciprocal autosome-autosome translocation.

    PubMed

    Barasc, Harmonie; Congras, Annabelle; Mary, Nicolas; Trouilh, Lidwine; Marquet, Valentine; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Mouney-Bonnet, Nathalie; Acloque, Hervé; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Individuals carrying balanced constitutional reciprocal translocations generally have a normal phenotype, but often present reproductive disorders. The aim of our research was to analyze the meiotic process in an oligoasthenoteratospermic boar carrying an asymmetric reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 14. Different multivalent structures (quadrivalent and trivalent plus univalent) were identified during chromosome pairing analysis. Some of these multivalents were characterized by the presence of unpaired autosomal segments with histone γH2AX accumulation sometimes associated with the XY body. Gene expression in spermatocytes was studied by RNA-DNA-FISH and microarray-based testis transcriptome analysis. Our results revealed a decrease in gene expression for chromosomes 1 and 14 and an up-regulated expression of X-chromosome genes for the translocated boar compared with normal individuals. We hypothesized that the observed meiotic arrest and reproductive failure in this boar might be due to silencing of crucial autosomal genes (MSUC) and disturbance of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Further analysis revealed abnormal meiotic recombination (frequency and distribution) and the production of a high rate of unbalanced spermatozoa.

  18. Alternative meiotic chromatid segregation in the holocentric plant Luzula elegans

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Stefan; Jankowska, Maja; Schubert, Veit; Kumke, Katrin; Ma, Wei; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Holocentric chromosomes occur in a number of independent eukaryotic lineages. They form holokinetic kinetochores along the entire poleward chromatid surfaces, and owing to this alternative chromosome structure, species with holocentric chromosomes cannot use the two-step loss of cohesion during meiosis typical for monocentric chromosomes. Here we show that the plant Luzula elegans maintains a holocentric chromosome architecture and behaviour throughout meiosis, and in contrast to monopolar sister centromere orientation, the unfused holokinetic sister centromeres behave as two distinct functional units during meiosis I, resulting in sister chromatid separation. Homologous non-sister chromatids remain terminally linked after metaphase I, by satellite DNA-enriched chromatin threads, until metaphase II. They then separate at anaphase II. Thus, an inverted sequence of meiotic sister chromatid segregation occurs. This alternative meiotic process is most likely one possible adaptation to handle a holocentric chromosome architecture and behaviour during meiosis. PMID:25296379

  19. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  20. SEX-RATIO MEIOTIC DRIVE AND INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION

    PubMed Central

    Unckless, Robert L.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that processes occurring within a species may impact the interactions between species. For example, since competitive ability is sensitive to parameters including reproductive rate, carrying capacity and competition efficiency, the outcome of interspecific competition may be influenced by any process that alters these attributes. While several such scenarios have been discussed, the influence of selfish genetic elements within one species on competition between species has not received theoretical treatment. We show that, with strong competition, sex-ratio meiotic drive systems can result in a significant shift in community composition because the effective birth rate in the population may be increased by a female-biased sex-ratio. Using empirical data we attempt to estimate the magnitude of this effect in several Drosophila species. We infer that meiotic drive elements, selfish genetic elements within species, can provide a substantial competitive advantage to that species within a community. PMID:24835887

  1. Control of meiotic recombination frequency in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Ian R

    2012-11-01

    Sexual eukaryotes reproduce via the meiotic cell division, where ploidy is halved and homologous chromosomes undergo reciprocal genetic exchange, termed crossover (CO). CO frequency has a profound effect on patterns of genetic variation and species evolution. Relative CO rates vary extensively both within and between plant genomes. Plant genome size varies by over 1000-fold, largely due to differential expansion of repetitive sequences, and increased genome size is associated with reduced CO frequency. Gene versus repeat sequences associate with distinct chromatin modifications, and evidence from plant genomes indicates that this epigenetic information influences CO patterns. This is consistent with data from diverse eukaryotes that demonstrate the importance of chromatin structure for control of meiotic recombination. In this review I will discuss CO frequency patterns in plant genomes and recent advances in understanding recombination distributions.

  2. Interplay between modifications of chromatin and meiotic recombination hotspots.

    PubMed

    Brachet, Elsa; Sommermeyer, Vérane; Borde, Valérie

    2012-02-01

    Meiotic recombination lies at the heart of sexual reproduction. It is essential for producing viable gametes with a normal haploid genomic content and its dysfunctions can be at the source of aneuploidies, such as the Down syndrome, or many genetic disorders. Meiotic recombination also generates genetic diversity that is transmitted to progeny by shuffling maternal and paternal alleles along chromosomes. Recombination takes place at non-random chromosomal sites called 'hotspots'. Recent evidence has shown that their location is influenced by properties of chromatin. In addition, many studies in somatic cells have highlighted the need for changes in chromatin dynamics to allow the process of recombination. In this review, we discuss how changes in the chromatin landscape may influence the recombination map, and reciprocally, how recombination events may lead to epigenetic modifications at sites of recombination, which could be transmitted to progeny.

  3. Effects of clinostat rotation on mouse meiotic maturation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on meiosis, fertilization, and early embryonic development in mammals are being examined by using a clinostat to reorient the cells with respect to the gravity vector. A clinostat capable of supporting mammalian cells in tissue culture has been developed. Initial studies have focused on examining the effects of clinostat rotation on meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Oocytes recovered from ovarian follicles were subjected to clinostat rotation on a horizontal or vertical axis or to static conditions for a 16 hr period. No gross morphological changes and no effects on germinal vesicle breakdown were observed under any rotation conditions (1/4, 1, 10, 30, 100 RPM). Success of meiotic progression to Metaphase II was comparable among experimental and control groups except at 100 RPM, where a slight inhibition was observed.

  4. A computational model predicts Xenopus meiotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, Rose; Heald, Rebecca; Nédélec, François

    2010-12-27

    The metaphase spindle is a dynamic bipolar structure crucial for proper chromosome segregation, but how microtubules (MTs) are organized within the bipolar architecture remains controversial. To explore MT organization along the pole-to-pole axis, we simulated meiotic spindle assembly in two dimensions using dynamic MTs, a MT cross-linking force, and a kinesin-5-like motor. The bipolar structures that form consist of antiparallel fluxing MTs, but spindle pole formation requires the addition of a NuMA-like minus-end cross-linker and directed transport of MT depolymerization activity toward minus ends. Dynamic instability and minus-end depolymerization generate realistic MT lifetimes and a truncated exponential MT length distribution. Keeping the number of MTs in the simulation constant, we explored the influence of two different MT nucleation pathways on spindle organization. When nucleation occurs throughout the spindle, the simulation quantitatively reproduces features of meiotic spindles assembled in Xenopus egg extracts.

  5. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  6. Effects of clinostat rotation on mouse meiotic maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wolgemuth, D J; Grills, G S

    1984-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on meiosis, fertilization, and early embryonic development in mammals are being examined by using a clinostat to reorient the cells with respect to the gravity vector. A clinostat capable of supporting mammalian cells in tissue culture has been developed. Initial studies have focused on examining the effects of clinostat rotation on meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Oocytes recovered from ovarian follicles were subjected to clinostat rotation on a horizontal or vertical axis or to static conditions for a 16 hr period. No gross morphological changes and no effects on germinal vesicle breakdown were observed under any rotation conditions (1/4, 1, 10, 30, 100 RPM). Success of meiotic progression to Metaphase II was comparable among experimental and control groups except at 100 RPM, where a slight inhibition was observed.

  7. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  8. Molecular dissection of Neurospora Spore killer meiotic drive elements.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Thomas M; Rehard, David G; Xiao, Hua; Shiu, Patrick K T

    2012-07-24

    Meiotic drive is a non-Mendelian inheritance phenomenon in which certain selfish genetic elements skew sexual transmission in their own favor. In some cases, progeny or gametes carrying a meiotic drive element can survive preferentially because it causes the death or malfunctioning of those that do not carry it. In Neurospora, meiotic drive can be observed in fungal spore killing. In a cross of Spore killer (Sk) × WT (Sk-sensitive), the ascospores containing the Spore killer allele survive, whereas the ones with the sensitive allele degenerate. Sk-2 and Sk-3 are the most studied meiotic drive elements in Neurospora, and they each theoretically contain two essential components: a killer element and a resistance gene. Here we report the identification and characterization of the Sk resistance gene, rsk (resistant to Spore killer). rsk seems to be a fungal-specific gene, and its deletion in a killer strain leads to self-killing. Sk-2, Sk-3, and naturally resistant isolates all use rsk for resistance. In each killer system, rsk sequences from an Sk strain and a resistant isolate are highly similar, suggesting that they share the same origin. Sk-2, Sk-3, and sensitive rsk alleles differ from each other by their unique indel patterns. Contrary to long-held belief, the killer targets not only late but also early ascospore development. The WT RSK protein is dispensable for ascospore production and is not a target of the spore-killing mechanism. Rather, a resistant version of RSK likely neutralizes the killer element and prevents it from interfering with ascospore development.

  9. DNA polymerase beta is critical for mouse meiotic synapsis.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Jonason, Alan S; Gorton, Timothy S; Mihaylov, Ivailo; Pan, Jing; Keeney, Scott; de Rooij, Dirk G; Ashley, Terry; Keh, Agnes; Liu, Yanfeng; Banerjee, Urmi; Zelterman, Daniel; Sweasy, Joann B

    2010-01-20

    We have shown earlier that DNA polymerase beta (Pol beta) localizes to the synaptonemal complex (SC) during Prophase I of meiosis in mice. Pol beta localizes to synapsed axes during zygonema and pachynema, and it associates with the ends of bivalents during late pachynema and diplonema. To test whether these localization patterns reflect a function for Pol beta in recombination and/or synapsis, we used conditional gene targeting to delete the PolB gene from germ cells. We find that Pol beta-deficient spermatocytes are defective in meiotic chromosome synapsis and undergo apoptosis during Prophase I. We also find that SPO11-dependent gammaH2AX persists on meiotic chromatin, indicating that Pol beta is critical for the repair of SPO11-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). Pol beta-deficient spermatocytes yielded reduced steady-state levels of the SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes that are formed when SPO11 is removed from the ends of DSBs, and cytological experiments revealed that chromosome-associated foci of replication protein A (RPA), RAD51 and DMC1 are less abundant in Pol beta-deficient spermatocyte nuclei. Localization of Pol beta to meiotic chromosomes requires the formation of SPO11-dependent DSBs. Taken together, these findings strongly indicate that Pol beta is required at a very early step in the processing of meiotic DSBs, at or before the removal of SPO11 from DSB ends and the generation of the 3' single-stranded tails necessary for subsequent strand exchange. The chromosome synapsis defects and Prophase I apoptosis of Pol beta-deficient spermatocytes are likely a direct consequence of these recombination defects.

  10. Control of Meiotic Crossovers: From Double-Strand Break Formation to Designation

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis, the mechanism of creating haploid gametes, is a complex cellular process observed across sexually reproducing organisms. Fundamental to meiosis is the process of homologous recombination, whereby DNA double-strand breaks are introduced into the genome and are subsequently repaired to generate either noncrossovers or crossovers. Although homologous recombination is essential for chromosome pairing during prophase I, the resulting crossovers are critical for maintaining homolog interactions and enabling accurate segregation at the first meiotic division. Thus, the placement, timing, and frequency of crossover formation must be exquisitely controlled. In this review, we discuss the proteins involved in crossover formation, the process of their formation and designation, and the rules governing crossovers, all within the context of the important landmarks of prophase I. We draw together crossover designation data across organisms, analyze their evolutionary divergence, and propose a universal model for crossover regulation. PMID:27648641

  11. Genetic controls of meiotic recombination and somatic DNA metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, B S; Boyd, J B; Carpenter, A T; Green, M M; Nguyen, T D; Ripoll, P; Smith, P D

    1976-01-01

    Recombination-defective meiotic mutants and mutagen-sensitive mutants of D. melanogaster have been examined for their effects on meiotic chromosome behavior, sensitivity to killing by mutagens, somatic chromosome integrity, and DNA repair processes. Several loci have been identified that specify functions that are necessary for both meiotic recombination and DNA repair processes, whereas mutants at combination and DNA repair processes, whereas mutants at other loci appear to be defective in only one pathway of DNA processing. PMID:825857

  12. A meiotic DNA polymerase from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Matsuda, S; Sono, A; Sakaguchi, K

    1994-01-01

    A meiotic DNA polymerase [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7], which likely has a role in meiotic DNA repair, was isolated from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. The purified fraction displays three bands in SDS/PAGE, at molecular masses of 72 kDa, 65 kDa and 36 kDa. Optimal activity is at pH 7.0-8.0 in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ and 50 mM KCl and at 28-30 degrees C, which is the temperature for meiosis. This enzyme is resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and sensitive to 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, suggesting that it is a beta-like DNA polymerase. These characteristics are similar to those of Coprinus DNA polymerase beta [Sakaguchi and Lu (1982) Mol. Cell. Biol. 2, 752-757]. In Western-blot analysis, the antiserum against the Coprinus polymerase reacts only with the 65 kDa band, which coincides with the molecular mass of the Coprinus polymerase. Western-blot analysis also showed that the antiserum could react with crude extracts not only from the Agaricales family, to which Agaricus and Coprinus belong, but also from different mushroom families and Saccharomyces. The Agaricus polymerase activity can be found only in the meiotic-cell-rich fraction, but the enzyme is also present in the somatic cells in an inactive state. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172591

  13. Homologue engagement controls meiotic DNA break number and distribution.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Drew; Mohibullah, Neeman; Zhu, Xuan; Keeney, Scott

    2014-06-12

    Meiotic recombination promotes genetic diversification as well as pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes, but the double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate recombination are dangerous lesions that can cause mutation or meiotic failure. How cells control DSBs to balance between beneficial and deleterious outcomes is not well understood. Here we test the hypothesis that DSB control involves a network of intersecting negative regulatory circuits. Using multiple complementary methods, we show that DSBs form in greater numbers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking ZMM proteins, a suite of recombination-promoting factors traditionally regarded as acting strictly downstream of DSB formation. ZMM-dependent DSB control is genetically distinct from a pathway tying break formation to meiotic progression through the Ndt80 transcription factor. These counterintuitive findings suggest that homologous chromosomes that have successfully engaged one another stop making breaks. Genome-wide DSB maps uncover distinct responses by different subchromosomal domains to the ZMM mutation zip3 (also known as cst9), and show that Zip3 is required for the previously unexplained tendency of DSB density to vary with chromosome size. Thus, feedback tied to ZMM function contributes in unexpected ways to spatial patterning of recombination.

  14. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in patients with male meiotic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Aran, B; Veiga, A; Vidal, F; Parriego, M; Vendrell, J M; Santaló, J; Egozcue, J; Barri, P N

    2004-04-01

    Indications and candidates for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) have increased in recent years. This study evaluates whether IVF-intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) results could be improved by selecting embryos through PGD-AS (aneuploidy screening) in couples in whom the male partner presents meiotic abnormalities. Two hundred and fifty-six embryos were biopsied and 183 were suitable for analysis (73.2%). Ninety-two embryos showed normal chromosomal analysis (50.3% of the analysed embryos and 57.5% of the diagnosed embryos). Pregnancy, abortion and implantation rates were compared with 66 IVF-ICSI cycles performed in 44 patients with meiotic abnormalities without PGD (control group). No statistically significant differences in the pregnancy rate (52 versus 43.9%), implantation rate (32.1 versus 23.5%) and miscarriage rate (15.4 versus 10.3%) were observed between the groups. Although the embryos obtained from men with meiotic abnormalities showed a high frequency of chromosome abnormalities, no improvements in pregnancy and implantation rates were obtained after PGD-AS in the series analysed.

  15. Meiotic recombination proteins localize to linear elements in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Estreicher, Anna; Kohli, Jürg; Loidl, Josef

    2006-08-01

    In fission yeast, meiotic prophase nuclei develop structures known as linear elements (LinEs), instead of a canonical synaptonemal complex. LinEs contain Rec10 protein. While Rec10 is essential for meiotic recombination, the precise role of LinEs in this process is unknown. Using in situ immunostaining, we show that Rec7 (which is required for meiosis-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation) aggregates in foci on LinEs. The strand exchange protein Rad51, which is known to mark the sites of DSBs, also localizes to LinEs, although to a lesser degree. The number of Rec7 foci corresponds well with the average number of genetic recombination events per meiosis suggesting that Rec7 marks the sites of recombination. Rec7 and Rad51 foci do not co-localize, presumably because they act sequentially on recombination sites. The localization of Rec7 is dependent on Rec10 but independent of the DSB-inducing protein Rec12/Spo11. Neither Rec7 nor Rad51 localization depends on the LinE-associated proteins Hop1 and Mek1, but the formation of Rad51 foci depends on Rec10, Rec7, and, as expected, Rec12/Spo11. We propose that LinEs form around designated recombination sites before the induction of DSBs and that most, if not all, meiotic recombination initiates within the setting provided by LinEs.

  16. Unresolved issues in pre-meiotic anther development.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Timothy; Egger, Rachel L; Zhang, Han; Walbot, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the diversity of other floral organs, the steps in anther ontogeny, final cell types, and overall organ shape are remarkably conserved among Angiosperms. Defects in pre-meiotic anthers that alter cellular composition or function typically result in male-sterility. Given the ease of identifying male-sterile mutants, dozens of genes with key roles in early anther development have been identified and cloned in model species, ordered by time of action and spatiotemporal expression, and used to propose explanatory models for critical steps in cell fate specification. Despite rapid progress, fundamental issues in anther development remain unresolved, and it is unclear if insights from one species can be applied to others. Here we construct a comparison of Arabidopsis, rice, and maize immature anthers to pinpoint distinctions in developmental pace. We analyze the mechanisms by which archesporial (pre-meiotic) cells are specified distinct from the soma, discuss what constitutes meiotic preparation, and review what is known about the secondary parietal layer and its terminal periclinal division that generates the tapetal and middle layers. Finally, roles for small RNAs are examined, focusing on the grass-specific phasiRNAs.

  17. Microfilament Distribution in Maize Meiotic Mutants Correlates with Microtubule Organization.

    PubMed Central

    Staiger, CJ; Cande, WZ

    1991-01-01

    Microtubules and microfilaments often codistribute in plants; their presumed interaction can be tested with drugs although it is not always clear that these are without side effects. In this study, we exploited mutants defective in meiotic cell division to investigate in a noninvasive way the relationship between the two cytoskeletal elements. By staining unfixed, permeabilized cells with rhodamine-phalloidin, spatial and temporal changes in microfilament distribution during maize meiosis were examined. In wild-type microsporocytes, a microtubule array that radiates from the nucleus disappeared during spindle formation and returned at late telophase. This result differed from the complex cytoplasmic microfilament array that is present at all stages, including karyokinesis and cytokinesis. During division, a second class of microfilaments also was observed in the spindle and phragmoplast. To analyze this apparent association of microtubules and microfilaments, we examined several meiotic mutants known to have stage-specific disruptions in their microtubule arrays. Two mutations that altered the number or form of meiotic spindles also led to a dramatic reorganization of F-actin. In contrast, rearrangement of nonspindle, cytoplasmic microtubules did not lead to concomitant changes in F-actin distribution. These results suggested that microtubules and microfilaments interact in a cell cycle-specific and site-specific fashion during higher plant meiosis. PMID:12324607

  18. ARG-walker: inference of individual specific strengths of meiotic recombination hotspots by population genomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Meiotic recombination hotspots play important roles in various aspects of genomics, but the underlying mechanisms for regulating the locations and strengths of recombination hotspots are not yet fully revealed. Most existing algorithms for estimating recombination rates from sequence polymorphism data can only output average recombination rates of a population, although there is evidence for the heterogeneity in recombination rates among individuals. For genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of recombination hotspots, an efficient algorithm that estimates the individualized strengths of recombination hotspots is highly desirable. Results In this work, we propose a novel graph mining algorithm named ARG-walker, based on random walks on ancestral recombination graphs (ARG), to estimate individual-specific recombination hotspot strengths. Extensive simulations demonstrate that ARG-walker is able to distinguish the hot allele of a recombination hotspot from the cold allele. Integrated with output of ARG-walker, we performed GWAS on the phased haplotype data of the 22 autosome chromosomes of the HapMap Asian population samples of Chinese and Japanese (JPT+CHB). Significant cis-regulatory signals have been detected, which is corroborated by the enrichment of the well-known 13-mer motif CCNCCNTNNCCNC of PRDM9 protein. Moreover, two new DNA motifs have been identified in the flanking regions of the significantly associated SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), which are likely to be new cis-regulatory elements of meiotic recombination hotspots of the human genome. Conclusions Our results on both simulated and real data suggest that ARG-walker is a promising new method for estimating the individual recombination variations. In the future, it could be used to uncover the mechanisms of recombination regulation and human diseases related with recombination hotspots. PMID:26679564

  19. Neonatal bisphenol A exposure induces meiotic arrest and apoptosis of spermatogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meina; Bu, Pengli; Li, Fengjie; Lan, Shijian; Wu, Hongjuan; Yuan, Lu; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial plasticizer, which is ubiquitously present in the environment and organisms. As an endocrine disruptor, BPA has caused significant concerns regarding its interference with reproductive function. However, little is known about the impact of BPA exposure on early testicular development. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of neonatal BPA exposure on the first wave of spermatogenesis. Newborn male mice were subcutaneously injected with BPA (0.01, 0.1 and 5 mg/kg body weight) daily from postnatal day (PND) 1 to 21. Histological analysis of testes at PND 22 revealed that BPA-treated testes contained mostly spermatogonia and spermatocytes with markedly less round spermatids, indicating signs of meiotic arrest. Terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed that BPA treatment significantly increased the number of apoptotic germ cells per tubule, which corroborated the observation of meiotic arrest. In addition, BPA caused abnormal proliferation of germ cells as revealed by Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical staining. Mechanistically, BPA-treated testes displayed a complete lack of BOULE expression, which is a conserved key regulator for spermatogenesis. Moreover, BPA significantly increased the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) α and β in the developing testis. The present study demonstrated that neonatal BPA exposure disrupted meiosis progression during the first wave of spermatogenesis, which may be, at least in part, due to inhibition of BOULE expression and/or up-regulation of ERα/β expression in BPA-exposed developing testis. PMID:26863571

  20. Pre-meiotic bands and novel meiotic spindle ontogeny in quadrilobed sporocytes of leafy liverworts (Jungermannidae, Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Brown, Roy C; Lemmon, Betty E

    2009-10-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy were used to study the nucleation and organization of microtubules during meiosis in two species of leafy liverworts, Cephalozia macrostachya and Telaranea longifolia. This is the first such study of sporogenesis in the largest group of liverworts important as living representatives of some of the first land plant lineages. These studies show that cytoplasmic quadrilobing of pre-meiotic sporocytes into future spore domains is initiated by girdling bands of gamma-tubulin and microtubules similar to those recently described in lobed sporocytes of simple thalloid liverworts. However, spindle ontogeny is not like other liverworts studied and is, in fact, probably unique among bryophytes. Following the establishment of quadrilobing, numerous microtubules diverge from the bands and extend into the enlarging lobes. The bands disappear and are replaced by microtubules that arise from gamma-tubulin associated with the nuclear envelope. This microtubule system extends into the four lobes and is gradually reorganized into a quadripolar spindle, each half spindle consisting of a pair of poles straddling opposite cleavage furrows. Chromosomes move on this spindle to the polar cleavage furrows. The reniform daughter nuclei, each curved over a cleavage furrow, immediately enter second meiotic division with spindles now terminating in the lobes. Phragmoplasts that develop in the interzones among the haploid tetrad nuclei guide deposition of cell plates that join with the pre-meiotic furrows resulting in cleavage of the tetrad of spores. These observations document a significant variation in the innovative process of sporogenesis evolved in early land plants.

  1. Meiotic recombination initiated by a double-strand break in rad50{Delta} yeast cells otherwise unable to initiate meiotic recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Malkova, A.; Haber, J.E.; Dawson, D.

    1996-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have developed a system to compare the properties of meiotic DSBs with those created by the site-specific HO endonuclease. HO endonuclease was expressed under the control of the meiotic-specific SPO13 promoter, creating a DSB at a single site on one of yeast`s 16 chromosomes. In Rad{sup +} strains the times of appearance of the HO-induced DSBs and of subsequent recombinants are coincident with those induced by normal meiotic DSBs. Physical monitoring of DNA showed that SPO13::HO induced gene conversions both in Rad{sup +} and in rad50{Delta} cells that cannot initiate normal meiotic DSBs. We find that the RAD50 gene is important, but not essential, for recombination even after a DSB has been created in a meiotic cell. In rad50{Delta} cells, some DSBs are not repaired until a broken chromosome has been packaged into a spore and is subsequently germinated. This suggests that a broken chromosome does not signal an arrest of progression through meiosis. The recombination defect in rad50{Delta} diploids is not, however, meiotic specific, as mitotic rad50 diploids, experiencing an HO-induced DSB, exhibit similar departures from wild-type recombination. 57 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Transforming growth factor beta-1 decreases the yield of the second meiotic division of rat pachytene spermatocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Damestoy, Anne; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Vigier, Michèle; Sabido, Odile; Durand, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Background TGF beta and its receptors are present in both germ cells and somatic cells of the male gonad. However, knock-out strategies for studying spermatogenesis regulation by TGF beta have been disappointing since TGF beta-or TGF beta receptor-null mice do not survive longer than a few weeks. Methods In the present study, we addressed the role of TGF beta-1 on the completion of meiosis by rat pachytene spermatocytes (PS) cocultured with Sertoli cells. Identification and counting of meiotic cells were performed by cytology and cytometry. Results Under our culture conditions, some PS differentiated into round spermatids (RS). When TGF beta-1 was added to the culture medium, neither the number of PS or of secondary spermatocytes nor the half-life of RS was modified by the factor. By contrast, the number of RS and the amount of TP1 mRNA were lower in TGF beta-1-treated cultures than in control cultures. Very few metaphase I cells were ever observed both in control and TGF beta-1-treated wells. Higher numbers of metaphase II were present and their number was enhanced by TGF beta-1 treatment. A TGF beta-like bioactivity was detected in control culture media, the concentration of which increased with the time of culture. Conclusion These results indicate that TGF beta-1 did not change greatly, if any, the yield of the first meiotic division but likely enhanced a bottleneck at the level of metaphase II. Taken together, our results suggest strongly that TGF beta participates in an auto/paracrine pathway of regulation of the meiotic differentiation of rat spermatocytes. PMID:15941479

  3. Functional role of the bovine oocyte-specific protein JY-1 in meiotic maturation, cumulus expansion, and subsequent embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Bon; Wee, Gabbine; Zhang, Kun; Folger, Joseph K; Knott, Jason G; Smith, George W

    2014-03-01

    Oocyte-expressed genes regulate key aspects of ovarian follicular development and early embryogenesis. We previously demonstrated a requirement of the oocyte-specific protein JY-1 for bovine early embryogenesis. Given that JY-1 is present in oocytes throughout folliculogenesis, and oocyte-derived JY-1 mRNA is temporally regulated postfertilization, we hypothesized that JY-1 levels in oocytes impact nuclear maturation and subsequent early embryogenesis. A novel model system, whereby JY-1 small interfering RNA was microinjected into cumulus-enclosed germinal vesicle-stage oocytes and meiotic arrest maintained for 48 h prior to in vitro maturation (IVM), was validated and used to determine the effect of reduced oocyte JY-1 expression on nuclear maturation, cumulus expansion, and embryonic development after in vitro fertilization. Depletion of JY-1 protein during IVM effectively reduced cumulus expansion, percentage of oocytes progressing to metaphase II, proportion of embryos that cleaved early, total cleavage rates and development to 8- to 16-cell stage, and totally blocked development to the blastocyst stage relative to controls. Supplementation with JY-1 protein during oocyte culture rescued effects of JY-1 depletion on meiotic maturation, cumulus expansion, and early cleavage, but did not rescue development to 8- to 16-cell and blastocyst stages. However, effects of JY-1 depletion postfertilization on development to 8- to 16-cell and blastocyst stages were rescued by JY-1 supplementation during embryo culture. In conclusion, these results support an important functional role for oocyte-derived JY-1 protein during meiotic maturation in promoting progression to metaphase II, cumulus expansion, and subsequent embryonic development.

  4. Understanding and Manipulating Meiotic Recombination in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division, essential in most reproducing organisms to halve the number of chromosomes, thereby enabling the restoration of ploidy levels during fertilization. A key step of meiosis is homologous recombination, which promotes homologous pairing and generates crossovers (COs) to connect homologous chromosomes until their separation at anaphase I. These CO sites, seen cytologically as chiasmata, represent a reciprocal exchange of genetic information between two homologous nonsister chromatids. This gene reshuffling during meiosis has a significant influence on evolution and also plays an essential role in plant breeding, because a successful breeding program depends on the ability to bring the desired combinations of alleles on chromosomes. However, the number and distribution of COs during meiosis is highly constrained. There is at least one CO per chromosome pair to ensure accurate segregation of homologs, but in most organisms, the CO number rarely exceeds three regardless of chromosome size. Moreover, their positions are not random on chromosomes but exhibit regional preference. Thus, genes in recombination-poor regions tend to be inherited together, hindering the generation of novel allelic combinations that could be exploited by breeding programs. Recently, much progress has been made in understanding meiotic recombination. In particular, many genes involved in the process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have been identified and analyzed. With the coming challenges of food security and climate change, and our enhanced knowledge of how COs are formed, the interest and needs in manipulating CO formation are greater than ever before. In this review, we focus on advances in understanding meiotic recombination and then summarize the attempts to manipulate CO formation. Last, we pay special attention to the meiotic recombination in polyploidy, which is a common genomic feature for many crop plants. PMID:28108697

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9. By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2. This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events. PMID:27733454

  6. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G; Sherman, Stephanie L; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-12-07

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9 By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2 This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events.

  7. Cheaters sometimes prosper: distortion of mendelian segregation by meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Lyttle, T W

    1993-06-01

    Two of Mendel's three laws were quickly discarded as information on the organization and transmission of genes accumulated at the beginning of this century, but his law of segregation has shown remarkable staying power. In fact, within most of population genetic theory for sexual diploids is buried the tacit assumption that heterozygous alleles are represented in gametes in a 1:1 ratio. Nevertheless, there is a small, but important, group of genetic systems that subvert the law of segregation, and show 'meiotic drive'.

  8. Meiotic chromosomal variation resulting from irradiation of pollen in maize.

    PubMed

    Viccini, Lyderson F; De Carvalho, Carlos R

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize an induction strategy of chromosome aberrations in maize inbred line L-869. Pollen grains irradiated with 0, 36 and 72 Gy were used for fertilization. Resulting seeds were planted in a greenhouse to assess the number of abnormal meiotic cells. Germination, height, sterility and mortality were verified. Cells with delayed separation of chromosomes, translocation, deficiency, abnormal pairing, later condensation and anaphase bridges were observed. The number of abnormalities increased as the dosage increased but chromosome aberration types were the same regardless of the dosages used. Various chromosome-altered plants were obtained without viability loss

  9. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  10. Reversible meiotic abnormalities in azoospermic men with bilateral varicocele after microsurgical correction.

    PubMed

    North, M O; Lellei, I; Rives, N; Erdei, E; Dittmar, A; Barbet, J P; Tritto, G

    2004-05-01

    Because of a possible relationship between microenvironmental disturbances and meiotic abnormalities and of a straight relationship between lower-quality semen in patient carrying a varicocele and first meiotic non-disjunction, bilateral bipolar testicular biopsies are realized according the thermic differential gradient described in varicocele. Systematic meiotic studies of multiple testicular biopsies from 65 azoospermic men with bilateral varicocele were done in a multi-centric study on microsurgical correction of bilateral varicocele with microthermic intra-operative evaluation using minimally invasive thermal microsensors (Betatherm 10K3MCD2). In the present study abnormal temperature raising, histomorphometric abnormalities (spermatocyte arrest) and meiotic abnormalities (class IIC) are strongly correlated. In the ten patients submitted to another testicular biopsy procedure six months after surgery for TESE, normal thermal differential is registered and no meiotic abnormalities recurrences are found.

  11. A mammalian KASH domain protein coupling meiotic chromosomes to the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Henning F.; Kim, Dae In; Wright, Graham D.; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Roux, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome pairing is an essential meiotic event that ensures faithful haploidization and recombination of the genome. Pairing of homologous chromosomes is facilitated by telomere-led chromosome movements and formation of a meiotic bouquet, where telomeres cluster to one pole of the nucleus. In metazoans, telomere clustering is dynein and microtubule dependent and requires Sun1, an inner nuclear membrane protein. Here we provide a functional analysis of KASH5, a mammalian dynein-binding protein of the outer nuclear membrane that forms a meiotic complex with Sun1. This protein is related to zebrafish futile cycle (Fue), a nuclear envelope (NE) constituent required for pronuclear migration. Mice deficient in this Fue homologue are infertile. Males display meiotic arrest in which pairing of homologous chromosomes fails. These findings demonstrate that telomere attachment to the NE is insufficient to promote pairing and that telomere attachment sites must be coupled to cytoplasmic dynein and the microtubule system to ensure meiotic progression. PMID:24062341

  12. The mouse Spo11 gene is required for meiotic chromosome synapsis.

    PubMed

    Romanienko, P J; Camerini-Otero, R D

    2000-11-01

    The Spo11 protein initiates meiotic recombination by generating DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is required for meiotic synapsis in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, Spo11 homologs are dispensable for synapsis in C. elegans and Drosophila yet required for meiotic recombination. Disruption of mouse Spo11 results in infertility. Spermatocytes arrest prior to pachytene with little or no synapsis and undergo apoptosis. We did not detect Rad51/Dmc1 foci in meiotic chromosome spreads, indicating DSBs are not formed. Cisplatin-induced DSBs restored Rad51/Dmc1 foci and promoted synapsis. Spo11 localizes to discrete foci during leptotene and to homologously synapsed chromosomes. Other mouse mutants that arrest during meiotic prophase (Atm -/-, Dmc1 -/-, mei1, and Morc(-/-)) showed altered Spo11 protein localization and expression. We speculate that there is an additional role for Spo11, after it generates DSBs, in synapsis.

  13. DNA replication and damage checkpoints and meiotic cell cycle controls in the fission and budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, H; Nurse, P

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms ensure the order of cell cycle events to preserve genomic integrity. Among these, the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints prevent chromosome segregation when DNA replication is inhibited or DNA is damaged. Recent studies have identified an outline of the regulatory networks for both of these controls, which apparently operate in all eukaryotes. In addition, it appears that these checkpoints have two arrest points, one is just before entry into mitosis and the other is prior to chromosome separation. The former point requires the central cell-cycle regulator Cdc2 kinase, whereas the latter involves several key regulators and substrates of the ubiquitin ligase called the anaphase promoting complex. Linkages between these cell-cycle regulators and several key checkpoint proteins are beginning to emerge. Recent findings on post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions of the checkpoint proteins provide new insights into the checkpoint responses, although the functional significance of these biochemical properties often remains unclear. We have reviewed the molecular mechanisms acting at the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the modifications of these controls during the meiotic cell cycle. We have made comparisons with the controls in fission yeast and other organisms, mainly the distantly related budding yeast. PMID:10861204

  14. Autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation system, which contributes to development and differentiation of various organisms. Yeast cells undergo meiosis under nitrogen-starved conditions and require autophagy for meiosis initiation. However, the precise roles of autophagy in meiosis remain unclear. Here, we show that autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast. Autophagy-defective strains bearing a mutation in the autophagy core factor gene atg1, atg7, or atg14 exhibit deformed nuclear structures during meiosis. These mutant cells require an extracellular nitrogen supply for meiosis progression following their entry into meiosis and show delayed meiosis progression even with a nitrogen supply. In addition, they show frequent chromosome dissociation from the spindle together with spindle overextension, forming extra nuclei. Furthermore, Aurora kinase, which regulates chromosome segregation and spindle elongation, is significantly increased at the centromere and spindle in the mutant cells. Aurora kinase down-regulation eliminated delayed initiation of meiosis I and II, chromosome dissociation, and spindle overextension, indicating that increased Aurora kinase activity may cause these aberrances in the mutant cells. Our findings show a hitherto unrecognized relationship of autophagy with the nuclear structure, regulation of cell cycle progression, and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

  15. Extensive Recombination of a Yeast Diploid Hybrid through Meiotic Reversion

    PubMed Central

    Laureau, Raphaëlle; Loeillet, Sophie; Salinas, Francisco; Bergström, Anders; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Liti, Gianni; Nicolas, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In somatic cells, recombination between the homologous chromosomes followed by equational segregation leads to loss of heterozygosity events (LOH), allowing the expression of recessive alleles and the production of novel allele combinations that are potentially beneficial upon Darwinian selection. However, inter-homolog recombination in somatic cells is rare, thus reducing potential genetic variation. Here, we explored the property of S. cerevisiae to enter the meiotic developmental program, induce meiotic Spo11-dependent double-strand breaks genome-wide and return to mitotic growth, a process known as Return To Growth (RTG). Whole genome sequencing of 36 RTG strains derived from the hybrid S288c/SK1 diploid strain demonstrates that the RTGs are bona fide diploids with mosaic recombined genome, derived from either parental origin. Individual RTG genome-wide genotypes are comprised of 5 to 87 homozygous regions due to the loss of heterozygous (LOH) events of various lengths, varying between a few nucleotides up to several hundred kilobases. Furthermore, we show that reiteration of the RTG process shows incremental increases of homozygosity. Phenotype/genotype analysis of the RTG strains for the auxotrophic and arsenate resistance traits validates the potential of this procedure of genome diversification to rapidly map complex traits loci (QTLs) in diploid strains without undergoing sexual reproduction. PMID:26828862

  16. Meiotic Chromosome Pairing in Triploid and Tetraploid Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Loidl, J.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability (~40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. PMID:7789756

  17. Meiotic chromosome pairing in triploid and tetraploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Loidl, J.

    1995-04-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability ({approximately}40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Meiotic recombination analysis in female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Pigozzi, M I; Del Priore, L

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in female ducks was directly studied by immunolocalization of MLH1 protein, a mismatch repair protein of mature recombination nodules. In total, 6820 crossovers were scored along the autosomal synaptonemal complexes in 122 meiotic nuclei. From this analysis we predict that the female map length of the duck is 2845 cM, with a genome wide recombination rate of 2 cM/Mb. MLH1-focus mapping along the six largest bivalents shows regional variations of recombination frequencies that can be linked to differences in chromosome morphology. From this MLH1 mapping it can be inferred that distally located markers will appear more separated in genetic maps than physically equidistant markers located near the centromeres on bivalents 1 and 2. Instead, markers at interstitial positions on the acrocentric bivalents 3-6 will appear more tightly linked than expected on the basis of their physical distance because recombination is comparatively lower at the mid region of these chromosomes. The present results provide useful information to complement linkage mapping in ducks and extend previous knowledge about the variation of recombination rates among domestic Galloanserae.

  19. Organization and roles of nucleosomes at mouse meiotic recombination hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Getun, Irina V.; Wu, Zhen K.; Bois, Philippe R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Meiotic double strand breaks (DSBs) occur at discrete regions in the genome coined hotspots. Precisely what directs site selection of these DSBs is hotly debated and in particular it is unclear which chromatin features, and regulatory factors are necessary for a genomic region to initiate and resolve DSBs as a crossover (CO) event. In human and mouse, one layer of hotspot selection control is a recognition sequence element present at these sites that is bound by the Prdm9 zinc-finger protein. Furthermore, an overall open chromatin structure is thought to be required to allow access of the recombination machinery, and this is often dictated by the packaging of DNA around nucleosomes. We recently defined the nucleosome occupancy maps of four mouse recombination hotspots throughout meiosis. These analyses revealed no obvious dynamic changes in nucleosome occupancy, suggesting an intrinsic nature of recombinogenic sites, yet they also revealed that nucleosomes define zones of exclusion for CO resolution. Here, we discuss new evidence implicating nucleosome occupancy in recombinogenic repair and its potential roles in controlling chromatin structure at mouse meiotic hotspots. PMID:22572955

  20. Microinjected progesterone reinitiates meiotic maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tso, J; Thibier, C; Mulner, O; Ozon, R

    1982-01-01

    Microinjection of progesterone dissolved in paraffin oil induces the reinitiation of meiotic maturation in the Xenopus oocyte; 50% maturation is obtained when 50 nl of a 50 microM solution is microinjected into the oocyte. The kinetics of the response to microinjected progesterone are similar to the kinetics of response to externally applied hormone. When an aqueous solution of progesterone is microinjected instead of an oil solution, maturation is never observed, a result which confirms previous work. Leakage of the steroid into the external medium was estimated to range from 1.6 pmol/hr when microinjection was performed in oil to 3.6 pmol/hr when it was performed in aqueous solution. Metabolism of the hormone microinjected in oil is weak (less than 20%) as compared to that after aqueous microinjection (greater than 80%). Progesterone microinjected in oil decreases the cAMP content as does externally applied hormone. We therefore conclude that progesterone acts initially on an intracellular site in order to trigger meiotic maturation of the Xenopus oocyte. PMID:6291050

  1. Inventory and phylogenetic analysis of meiotic genes in monogonont rotifers.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Schurko, Andrew M; Hecox-Lea, Bette; Welch, David B Mark; Stelzer, Claus-Peter; Logsdon, John M

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology is how sexual reproduction has persisted in eukaryotic lineages. As cyclical parthenogens, monogonont rotifers are a powerful model for examining this question, yet the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in this lineage is currently understudied. To examine genes involved in meiosis, we generated partial genome assemblies for 2 distantly related monogonont species, Brachionus calyciflorus and B. manjavacas. Here we present an inventory of 89 meiotic genes, of which 80 homologs were identified and annotated from these assemblies. Using phylogenetic analysis, we show that several meiotic genes have undergone relatively recent duplication events that appear to be specific to the monogonont lineage. Further, we compare the expression of "meiosis-specific" genes involved in recombination and all annotated copies of the cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 between obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of B. calyciflorus. We show that "meiosis-specific" genes are expressed in both CP and OP strains, whereas the expression of one of the CDC20 genes is specific to cyclical parthenogenesis. The data presented here provide insights into mechanisms of cyclical parthenogenesis and establish expectations for studies of obligate asexual relatives of monogononts, the bdelloid rotifer lineage.

  2. Inventory and Phylogenetic Analysis of Meiotic Genes in Monogonont Rotifers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing question in evolutionary biology is how sexual reproduction has persisted in eukaryotic lineages. As cyclical parthenogens, monogonont rotifers are a powerful model for examining this question, yet the molecular nature of sexual reproduction in this lineage is currently understudied. To examine genes involved in meiosis, we generated partial genome assemblies for 2 distantly related monogonont species, Brachionus calyciflorus and B. manjavacas. Here we present an inventory of 89 meiotic genes, of which 80 homologs were identified and annotated from these assemblies. Using phylogenetic analysis, we show that several meiotic genes have undergone relatively recent duplication events that appear to be specific to the monogonont lineage. Further, we compare the expression of “meiosis-specific” genes involved in recombination and all annotated copies of the cell cycle regulatory gene CDC20 between obligate parthenogenetic (OP) and cyclical parthenogenetic (CP) strains of B. calyciflorus. We show that “meiosis-specific” genes are expressed in both CP and OP strains, whereas the expression of one of the CDC20 genes is specific to cyclical parthenogenesis. The data presented here provide insights into mechanisms of cyclical parthenogenesis and establish expectations for studies of obligate asexual relatives of monogononts, the bdelloid rotifer lineage. PMID:23487324

  3. In vitro and in vivo studies reveal that hamster oocyte meiotic arrest is maintained only transiently by follicular fluid, but persistently by membrana/cumulus granulosa cell contact.

    PubMed

    Racowsky, C; Baldwin, K V

    1989-08-01

    Studies were carried out with the golden Syrian hamster to investigate the capacity of follicular fluid to maintain oocyte meiotic arrest and to determine the importance of cumulus-membrana granulosa cell contact in the regulation of meiotic status. The follicular fluid studies were conducted by cytological assessment of meiotic stage up to 6 hr after transferring cumulus-free oocytes into antra of explanted "host" follicles in vitro or into follicles of anesthetized animals prior to the gonadotropin surge at proestrus in vivo. The cumulus-membrana granulosa contact studies were undertaken with explanted follicles in which the oocyte-cumulus complex was dislodged from the underlying membrana granulosa, released into the antrum, and subsequently allowed to reestablish contact during 6 hr of incubation within the follicle. The extent of recontact of the dislodged complex with the underlying membrana granulosa was assessed visually at the end of incubation and was classified as close, moderate, or none. These various degrees of contact typically involved the following number of cumulus cells, as determined by serial sectioning of a representative sample of follicles after dislodgement and subsequent incubation: close, 32.7 +/- 1.78; moderate, 9.0 +/- 2.1; and no contact, 0. After 6 hr of incubation either in vitro or in vivo, few transferred oocytes remained at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage (18.8 +/- 8.7 and 17.3 +/- 4.0% GV, respectively). However, time course experiments revealed that meiotic resumption was significantly delayed in transferred oocytes compared with either liberated oocytes, spontaneously maturing oocytes, or follicle-enclosed oocytes induced to mature by luteinizing hormone in vitro (after 4 hr, transferred, 31.3 +/- 6.0% GV; liberated, 0% GV; follicle-enclosed, 0% GV; after 6 hr, 0% transferred oocytes exhibited a GV). In the dislodgement studies, after 6 hr of incubation, 26% of complexes reestablished close contact with the underlying membrana

  4. Formation of interference-sensitive meiotic cross-overs requires sufficient DNA leading-strand elongation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiyue; Cheng, Zhihao; Wang, Cong; Hong, Yue; Su, Hang; Wang, Jun; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis halves diploid genomes to haploid and is essential for sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. Meiotic recombination ensures physical association of homologs and their subsequent accurate segregation and results in the redistribution of genetic variations among progeny. Most organisms have two classes of cross-overs (COs): interference-sensitive (type I) and -insensitive (type II) COs. DNA synthesis is essential for meiotic recombination, but whether DNA synthesis has a role in differentiating meiotic CO pathways is unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis POL2A, the homolog of the yeast DNA polymerase-ε (a leading-strand DNA polymerase), is required for plant fertility and meiosis. Mutations in POL2A cause reduced fertility and meiotic defects, including abnormal chromosome association, improper chromosome segregation, and fragmentation. Observation of prophase I cell distribution suggests that pol2a mutants likely delay progression of meiotic recombination. In addition, the residual COs in pol2a have reduced CO interference, and the double mutant of pol2a with mus81, which affects type II COs, displayed more severe defects than either single mutant, indicating that POL2A functions in the type I pathway. We hypothesize that sufficient leading-strand DNA elongation promotes formation of some type I COs. Given that meiotic recombination and DNA synthesis are conserved in divergent eukaryotes, this study and our previous study suggest a novel role for DNA synthesis in the differentiation of meiotic recombination pathways. PMID:26392549

  5. Formation of interference-sensitive meiotic cross-overs requires sufficient DNA leading-strand elongation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiyue; Cheng, Zhihao; Wang, Cong; Hong, Yue; Su, Hang; Wang, Jun; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2015-10-06

    Meiosis halves diploid genomes to haploid and is essential for sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. Meiotic recombination ensures physical association of homologs and their subsequent accurate segregation and results in the redistribution of genetic variations among progeny. Most organisms have two classes of cross-overs (COs): interference-sensitive (type I) and -insensitive (type II) COs. DNA synthesis is essential for meiotic recombination, but whether DNA synthesis has a role in differentiating meiotic CO pathways is unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis POL2A, the homolog of the yeast DNA polymerase-ε (a leading-strand DNA polymerase), is required for plant fertility and meiosis. Mutations in POL2A cause reduced fertility and meiotic defects, including abnormal chromosome association, improper chromosome segregation, and fragmentation. Observation of prophase I cell distribution suggests that pol2a mutants likely delay progression of meiotic recombination. In addition, the residual COs in pol2a have reduced CO interference, and the double mutant of pol2a with mus81, which affects type II COs, displayed more severe defects than either single mutant, indicating that POL2A functions in the type I pathway. We hypothesize that sufficient leading-strand DNA elongation promotes formation of some type I COs. Given that meiotic recombination and DNA synthesis are conserved in divergent eukaryotes, this study and our previous study suggest a novel role for DNA synthesis in the differentiation of meiotic recombination pathways.

  6. Sisters Unbound Is Required for Meiotic Centromeric Cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E.; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B.; McKee, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162

  7. Functional interactions between SPO11 and REC102 during initiation of meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kee, Kehkooi; Keeney, Scott

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination requires the products of at least 10 genes. Spo11p is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the DNA cleaving activity, but the roles of the other proteins, and the interactions among them, are not well understood. This study demonstrates genetic and physical interactions between the products of SPO11 and another early meiotic gene required for DSB formation, REC102. We found that epitope-tagged versions of SPO11 and REC102 that by themselves were capable of supporting normal or nearly normal levels of meiotic recombination conferred a severe synthetic cold-sensitive phenotype when combined in the same cells. DSB formation, meiotic gene conversion, and spore viability were drastically reduced in the doubly tagged strain at a nonpermissive temperature. This conditional defect could be partially rescued by expression of untagged SPO11, but not by expression of untagged REC102, indicating that tagged REC102 is fully dominant for this synthetic phenotype. Both tagged and wild-type Spo11p co-immunoprecipitated with tagged Rec102p from meiotic cell extracts, indicating that these proteins are present in a common complex in vivo. Tagged Rec102p localized to the nucleus in whole cells and to chromatin on spread meiotic chromosomes. Our results are consistent with the idea that a multiprotein complex that includes Spo11p and Rec102p promotes meiotic DSB formation.

  8. Drosophila Aurora B Kinase Is Required for Histone H3 Phosphorylation and Condensin Recruitment during Chromosome Condensation and to Organize the Central Spindle during Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Giet, Régis; Glover, David M.

    2001-01-01

    Aurora/Ipl1-related kinases are a conserved family of enzymes that have multiple functions during mitotic progression. Although it has been possible to use conventional genetic analysis to dissect the function of aurora, the founding family member in Drosophila (Glover, D.M., M.H. Leibowitz, D.A. McLean, and H. Parry. 1995. Cell. 81:95–105), the lack of mutations in a second aurora-like kinase gene, aurora B, precluded this approach. We now show that depleting Aurora B kinase using double-stranded RNA interference in cultured Drosophila cells results in polyploidy. aurora B encodes a passenger protein that associates first with condensing chromatin, concentrates at centromeres, and then relocates onto the central spindle at anaphase. Cells depleted of the Aurora B kinase show only partial chromosome condensation at mitosis. This is associated with a reduction in levels of the serine 10 phosphorylated form of histone H3 and a failure to recruit the Barren condensin protein onto chromosomes. These defects are associated with abnormal segregation resulting from lagging chromatids and extensive chromatin bridging at anaphase, similar to the phenotype of barren mutants (Bhat, M.A., A.V. Philp, D.M. Glover, and H.J. Bellen. 1996. Cell. 87:1103–1114.). The majority of treated cells also fail to undertake cytokinesis and show a reduced density of microtubules in the central region of the spindle. This is accompanied by a failure to correctly localize the Pavarotti kinesin-like protein, essential for this process. We discuss these conserved functions of Aurora B kinase in chromosome transmission and cytokinesis. PMID:11266459

  9. Meiotic silencing and fragmentation of the male germline restricted chromosome in zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2010-06-01

    During male meiotic prophase in mammals, X and Y are in a largely unsynapsed configuration, which is thought to trigger meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). In avian species, females are ZW, and males ZZ. Although Z and W in chicken oocytes show complete, largely heterologous synapsis, they too undergo MSCI, albeit only transiently. The W chromosome is already inactive in early meiotic prophase, and inactive chromatin marks may spread on to the Z upon synapsis. Mammalian MSCI is considered as a specialised form of the general meiotic silencing mechanism, named meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Herein, we studied the avian form of MSUC, by analysing the behaviour of the peculiar germline restricted chromosome (GRC) that is present as a single copy in zebra finch spermatocytes. In the female germline, this chromosome is present in two copies, which normally synapse and recombine. In contrast, during male meiosis, the single GRC is always eliminated. We found that the GRC in the male germline is silenced from early leptotene onwards, similar to the W chromosome in avian oocytes. The GRC remains largely unsynapsed throughout meiotic prophase I, although patches of SYCP1 staining indicate that part of the GRC may self-synapse. In addition, the GRC is largely devoid of meiotic double strand breaks. We observed a lack of the inner centromere protein INCENP on the GRC and elimination of the GRC following metaphase I. Subsequently, the GRC forms a micronucleus in which the DNA is fragmented. We conclude that in contrast to MSUC in mammals, meiotic silencing of this single chromosome in the avian germline occurs prior to, and independent of DNA double strand breaks and chromosome pairing, hence we have named this phenomenon meiotic silencing prior to synapsis (MSPS).

  10. The eggshell is required for meiotic fidelity, polar-body extrusion and polarization of the C. elegans embryo

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Wendy L; Krizus, Aldis; Dennis, James W

    2006-01-01

    Background Fertilization restores the diploid state and begins the process by which the single-cell oocyte is converted into a polarized, multicellular organism. In the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, two of the earliest events following fertilization are secretion of the chitinous eggshell and completion of meiosis, and in this report we demonstrate that the eggshell is essential for multiple developmental events at the one-cell stage. Results We show that the GLD (Germline differentiation abnormal)-1-regulated hexosamine pathway enzyme, glucosamine-6-phosphate N-acetyltransferase (GNA)-2, is required for synthesis of uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), the substrate for eggshell chitin synthesis by chitin synthase-1 (CHS-1). Furthermore, while chs-1(RNAi) or combined RNAi with the chitin-binding proteins, CEJ-1 and B0280.5, does not interfere with normal meiotic timing, lagging chromosomes are observed at meiosis, and polar-body extrusion fails. We also demonstrate that chitin, and either CEJ-1 or B0280.5, are essential for the osmotic/permeability barrier and for movement of the sperm pronucleus/centrosome complex to the cortex, which is associated with the initiation of polarization. Conclusion Our results indicate that the eggshell is required in single-cell C. elegans development, playing an essential role in multiple actin-dependent early events. Furthermore, the earliest meiotic roles precede osmotic barrier formation, indicating that the role of the eggshell is not limited to generation of the osmotic barrier. PMID:17042944

  11. Platypus chain reaction: directional and ordered meiotic pairing of the multiple sex chromosome chain in Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Daish, Tasman; Casey, Aaron; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes are phylogenetically and phenotypically unique animals with an unusually complex sex chromosome system that is composed of ten chromosomes in platypus and nine in echidna. These chromosomes are alternately linked (X1Y1, X2Y2, ...) at meiosis via pseudoautosomal regions and segregate to form spermatozoa containing either X or Y chromosomes. The physical and epigenetic mechanisms involved in pairing and assembly of the complex sex chromosome chain in early meiotic prophase I are completely unknown. We have analysed the pairing dynamics of specific sex chromosome pseudoautosomal regions in platypus spermatocytes during prophase of meiosis I. Our data show a highly coordinated pairing process that begins at the terminal Y5 chromosome and completes with the union of sex chromosomes X1Y1. The consistency of this ordered assembly of the chain is remarkable and raises questions about the mechanisms and factors that regulate the differential pairing of sex chromosomes and how this relates to potential meiotic silencing mechanisms and alternate segregation.

  12. MZF6D, a novel KRAB zinc-finger gene expressed exclusively in meiotic male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Looman, Camilla; Mark, Charlotta; Abrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars

    2003-08-01

    Spermatogenesis takes place in the seminiferous tubule in the testes and culminates in the production of spermatozoa (male gametes). Here we report the identification of a novel mouse zinc-finger gene, MZF6D, which is selectively expressed in meiotic spermatocytes. The MZF6D protein contains an N-terminally located repressor domain, a KRAB domain, followed by at least seven successive Krüppel zinc-finger motifs. The KRAB domain of MZF6D, which consists of a KRAB A box and the newly identified KRAB C box, has previously been shown to interact with TIF1beta, which is the common corepressor of all KRAB zinc-finger proteins. Northern blot analysis shows that the expression of MZF6D is restricted to testes. This was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of a panel of mouse tissues. In situ hybridization of sections from adult mouse testes localizes the expression to meiotic spermatocytes, suggesting a specific role for MZF6D in the regulation of spermatogenesis.

  13. Essential role of the Cdk2 activator RingoA in meiotic telomere tethering to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Isoda, Michitaka; Shibuya, Hiroki; del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Igea, Ana; Suja, José A.; Shackleton, Sue; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. Genetic analysis in mice has revealed an essential role for Cdk2 in meiosis, which renders Cdk2 knockout (KO) mice sterile. Here we show that mice deficient in RingoA, an atypical activator of Cdk1 and Cdk2 that has no amino acid sequence homology to cyclins, are sterile and display meiotic defects virtually identical to those observed in Cdk2 KO mice including non-homologous chromosome pairing, unrepaired double-strand breaks, undetectable sex-body and pachytene arrest. Interestingly, RingoA is required for Cdk2 targeting to telomeres and RingoA KO spermatocytes display severely affected telomere tethering as well as impaired distribution of Sun1, a protein essential for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Our results identify RingoA as an important activator of Cdk2 at meiotic telomeres, and provide genetic evidence for a physiological function of mammalian Cdk2 that is not dependent on cyclins. PMID:27025256

  14. Functional interactions of Rec24, the fission yeast ortholog of mouse Mei4, with the meiotic recombination–initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Bonfils, Sandrine; Rozalén, Ana E.; Smith, Gerald R.; Moreno, Sergio; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    A physical connection between each pair of homologous chromosomes is crucial for reductional chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division and therefore for successful meiosis. Connection is provided by recombination (crossing over) initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although the topoisomerase-like protein Spo11 makes DSBs and is evolutionarily conserved, how Spo11 (Rec12 in fission yeast) is regulated to form DSBs at the proper time and place is poorly understood. Several additional (accessory) proteins for DSB formation have been inferred in different species from yeast to mice. Here, we show that Rec24 is a bona fide accessory protein in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rec24 is required genome-wide for crossing-over and is recruited to meiotic chromosomes during prophase in a Rec12-independent manner forming foci on linear elements (LinEs), structurally related to the synaptonemal complex of other eukaryotes. Stabilization of Rec24 on LinEs depends on another accessory protein, Rec7, with which Rec24 forms complexes in vivo. We propose that Rec24 marks LinE-associated recombination sites, that stabilization of its binding by Rec7 facilitates the loading or activation of Rec12, and that only stabilized complexes containing Rec24 and Rec7 promote DSB formation. Based on the recent report of Rec24 and Rec7 conservation, interaction between Rec24 and Rec7 might be widely conserved in DSB formation. PMID:21429938

  15. Prevention of maternal aging-associated oocyte aneuploidy and meiotic spindle defects in mice by dietary and genetic strategies.

    PubMed

    Selesniemi, Kaisa; Lee, Ho-Joon; Muhlhauser, Ailene; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2011-07-26

    Increased meiotic spindle abnormalities and aneuploidy in oocytes of women of advanced maternal ages lead to elevated rates of infertility, miscarriage, and trisomic conceptions. Despite the significance of the problem, strategies to sustain oocyte quality with age have remained elusive. Here we report that adult female mice maintained under 40% caloric restriction (CR) did not exhibit aging-related increases in oocyte aneuploidy, chromosomal misalignment on the metaphase plate, meiotic spindle abnormalities, or mitochondrial dysfunction (aggregation, impaired ATP production), all of which occurred in oocytes of age-matched ad libitum-fed controls. The effects of CR on oocyte quality in aging females were reproduced by deletion of the metabolic regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Thus, CR during adulthood or loss of PGC-1α function maintains female germline chromosomal stability and its proper segregation during meiosis, such that ovulated oocytes of aged female mice previously maintained on CR or lacking PGC-1α are comparable to those of young females during prime reproductive life.

  16. PRDM9 variation strongly influences recombination hot-spot activity and meiotic instability in humans.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Lam, Kwan-Wood G; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; May, Celia A; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2010-10-01

    PRDM9 has recently been identified as a likely trans regulator of meiotic recombination hot spots in humans and mice. PRDM9 contains a zinc finger array that, in humans, can recognize a short sequence motif associated with hot spots, with binding to this motif possibly triggering hot-spot activity via chromatin remodeling. We now report that human genetic variation at the PRDM9 locus has a strong effect on sperm hot-spot activity, even at hot spots lacking the sequence motif. Subtle changes within the zinc finger array can create hot-spot nonactivating or enhancing variants and can even trigger the appearance of a new hot spot, suggesting that PRDM9 is a major global regulator of hot spots in humans. Variation at the PRDM9 locus also influences aspects of genome instability-specifically, a megabase-scale rearrangement underlying two genomic disorders as well as minisatellite instability-implicating PRDM9 as a risk factor for some pathological genome rearrangements.

  17. X chromosome effect on maternal recombination and meiotic drive in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    de La Casa-Esperón, Elena; Loredo-Osti, J Concepción; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Briscoe, Tammi L; Malette, Jan Michel; Vaughan, Joe E; Morgan, Kenneth; Sapienza, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    We observed that maternal meiotic drive favoring the inheritance of DDK alleles at the Om locus on mouse chromosome 11 was correlated with the X chromosome inactivation phenotype of (C57BL/6-Pgk1(a) x DDK)F(1) mothers. The basis for this unexpected observation appears to lie in the well-documented effect of recombination on meiotic drive that results from nonrandom segregation of chromosomes. Our analysis of genome-wide levels of meiotic recombination in females that vary in their X-inactivation phenotype indicates that an allelic difference at an X-linked locus is responsible for modulating levels of recombination in oocytes. PMID:12196408

  18. Roles for mismatch repair family proteins in promoting meiotic crossing over

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; Alani, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) family complexes Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 act with Exo1 and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 in a meiotic double strand break repair pathway that results in the asymmetric cleavage of double Holliday junctions (dHJ) to form crossovers. This review discusses how meiotic roles for Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 do not fit paradigms established for post-replicative MMR. We also outline models used to explain how these factors promote the formation of meiotic crossovers required for the accurate segregation of chromosome homologs during the Meiosis I division. PMID:26686657

  19. A Novel Predicted Bromodomain-Related Protein Affects Coordination Between Meiosis and Spermiogenesis in Drosophila and Is Required for Male Meiotic Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Bergner, Laura M.; Hickman, F. Edward; Wood, Kathleen H.; Wakeman, Carolyn M.; Stone, Hunter H.; Campbell, Tessa J.; Lightcap, Samantha B.; Favors, Sheena M.; Aldridge, Amanda C.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal coordination of meiosis with spermatid morphogenesis is crucial for successful generation of mature sperm cells. We identified a recessive male sterile Drosophila melanogaster mutant, mitoshell, in which events of spermatid morphogenesis are initiated too early, before meiotic onset. Premature mitochondrial aggregation and fusion lead to an aberrant mitochondrial shell around premeiotic nuclei. Despite successful meiotic karyokinesis, improper mitochondrial localization in mitoshell testes is associated with defective astral central spindles and a lack of contractile rings, leading to meiotic cytokinesis failure. We mapped and cloned the mitoshell gene and found that it encodes a novel protein with a bromodomain-related region. It is conserved in some insect lineages. Bromodomains typically bind to histone acetyl-lysine residues and therefore are often associated with chromatin. The Mitoshell bromodomain-related region is predicted to have an alpha helical structure similar to that of bromodomains, but not all the crucial residues in the ligand-binding loops are conserved. We speculate that Mitoshell may participate in transcriptional regulation of spermatogenesis-specific genes, though perhaps with different ligand specificity compared to traditional bromodomains. PMID:20491580

  20. Matefin/SUN-1 phosphorylation is part of a surveillance mechanism to coordinate chromosome synapsis and recombination with meiotic progression and chromosome movement.

    PubMed

    Woglar, Alexander; Daryabeigi, Anahita; Adamo, Adele; Habacher, Cornelia; Machacek, Thomas; La Volpe, Adriana; Jantsch, Verena

    2013-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation during meiosis I depends on the establishment of a crossover between homologous chromosomes. This requires induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), alignment of homologs, homolog association by synapsis, and repair of DSBs via homologous recombination. The success of these events requires coordination between chromosomal events and meiotic progression. The conserved SUN/KASH nuclear envelope bridge establishes transient linkages between chromosome ends and cytoskeletal forces during meiosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this bridge is essential for bringing homologs together and preventing nonhomologous synapsis. Chromosome movement takes place during synapsis and recombination. Concomitant with the onset of chromosome movement, SUN-1 clusters at chromosome ends associated with the nuclear envelope, and it is phosphorylated in a chk-2- and plk-2-dependent manner. Identification of all SUN-1 phosphomodifications at its nuclear N terminus allowed us to address their role in prophase I. Failures in recombination and synapsis led to persistent phosphorylations, which are required to elicit a delay in progression. Unfinished meiotic tasks elicited sustained recruitment of PLK-2 to chromosome ends in a SUN-1 phosphorylation-dependent manner that is required for continued chromosome movement and characteristic of a zygotene arrest. Furthermore, SUN-1 phosphorylation supported efficient synapsis. We propose that signals emanating from a failure to successfully finish meiotic tasks are integrated at the nuclear periphery to regulate chromosome end-led movement and meiotic progression. The single unsynapsed X chromosome in male meiosis is precluded from inducing a progression delay, and we found it was devoid of a population of phosphorylated SUN-1. This suggests that SUN-1 phosphorylation is critical to delaying meiosis in response to perturbed synapsis. SUN-1 may be an integral part of a checkpoint system to monitor establishment of the

  1. The C. elegans DSB-2 protein reveals a regulatory network that controls competence for meiotic DSB formation and promotes crossover assurance.

    PubMed

    Rosu, Simona; Zawadzki, Karl A; Stamper, Ericca L; Libuda, Diana E; Reese, Angela L; Dernburg, Abby F; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2013-01-01

    For most organisms, chromosome segregation during meiosis relies on deliberate induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and repair of a subset of these DSBs as inter-homolog crossovers (COs). However, timing and levels of DSB formation must be tightly controlled to avoid jeopardizing genome integrity. Here we identify the DSB-2 protein, which is required for efficient DSB formation during C. elegans meiosis but is dispensable for later steps of meiotic recombination. DSB-2 localizes to chromatin during the time of DSB formation, and its disappearance coincides with a decline in RAD-51 foci marking early recombination intermediates and precedes appearance of COSA-1 foci marking CO-designated sites. These and other data suggest that DSB-2 and its paralog DSB-1 promote competence for DSB formation. Further, immunofluorescence analyses of wild-type gonads and various meiotic mutants reveal that association of DSB-2 with chromatin is coordinated with multiple distinct aspects of the meiotic program, including the phosphorylation state of nuclear envelope protein SUN-1 and dependence on RAD-50 to load the RAD-51 recombinase at DSB sites. Moreover, association of DSB-2 with chromatin is prolonged in mutants impaired for either DSB formation or formation of downstream CO intermediates. These and other data suggest that association of DSB-2 with chromatin is an indicator of competence for DSB formation, and that cells respond to a deficit of CO-competent recombination intermediates by prolonging the DSB-competent state. In the context of this model, we propose that formation of sufficient CO-competent intermediates engages a negative feedback response that leads to cessation of DSB formation as part of a major coordinated transition in meiotic prophase progression. The proposed negative feedback regulation of DSB formation simultaneously (1) ensures that sufficient DSBs are made to guarantee CO formation and (2) prevents excessive DSB levels that could have deleterious

  2. Meiotic DNA joint molecule resolution depends on Nse5–Nse6 of the Smc5–Smc6 holocomplex

    PubMed Central

    Wehrkamp-Richter, Sophie; Hyppa, Randy W.; Prudden, John; Smith, Gerald R.; Boddy, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is crucial to form viable, healthy offspring and in most species, it requires programmed recombination between homologous chromosomes. In fission yeast, meiotic recombination is initiated by Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) and generates single Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates, which are resolved by the Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease to generate crossovers and thereby allow proper chromosome segregation. Although Mus81 contains the active site for HJ resolution, the regulation of Mus81–Eme1 is unclear. In cells lacking Nse5–Nse6 of the Smc5–Smc6 genome stability complex, we observe persistent meiotic recombination intermediates (DNA joint molecules) resembling HJs that accumulate in mus81Δ cells. Elimination of Rec12 nearly completely rescues the meiotic defects of nse6Δ and mus81Δ single mutants and partially rescues nse6Δ mus81Δ double mutants, indicating that these factors act after DNA double-strand break formation. Likewise, expression of the bacterial HJ resolvase RusA partially rescues the defects of nse6Δ, mus81Δ and nse6Δ mus81Δ mitotic cells, as well as the meiotic defects of nse6Δ and mus81Δ cells. Partial rescue likely reflects the accumulation of structures other than HJs, such as hemicatenanes, and an additional role for Nse5–Nse6 most prominent during mitotic growth. Our results indicate a regulatory role for the Smc5–Smc6 complex in HJ resolution via Mus81–Eme1. PMID:22855558

  3. Meiotic chromosome behavior in spread preparations of yeast

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome behavior in meiosis is well characterized from cytological and genetic descriptions but little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms, largely because no one experimental system has been developed to support an integrated application of modern cytological, genetic, and molecular biological methods. To combine efficient analyses of meiotic chromosome structure and function in a single organism, we have extended to yeast methods for making spread preparations of nuclei. Features of yeast meiosis that parallel meiosis in large eukaryotes, such as bouquet formation and prophase chromosome condensation that occurs in concert with synaptonemal complex formation, are evident for the first time. The ability to analyze large numbers of nuclei at the light and electron microscopes in preparations amenable to a variety of cytological and immunocytological techniques will facilitate the description of meiosis at the molecular level in yeast. PMID:2450094

  4. Pre-Meiotic Anther Development: Cell Fate Specification and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Walbot, Virginia; Egger, Rachel L

    2016-04-29

    Research into anther ontogeny has been an active and developing field, transitioning from a strictly lineage-based view of cellular differentiation events to a more complex understanding of cell fate specification. Here we describe the modern interpretation of pre-meiotic anther development, from the earliest cell specifications within the anther lobes through SPL/NZZ-, MSP1-, and MEL1-dependent pathways as well as the initial setup of the abaxial and adaxial axes and outgrowth of the anther lobes. We then continue with a look at the known information regarding further differentiation of the somatic layers of the anther (the epidermis, endothecium, middle layer, and tapetum), with an emphasis on male-sterile mutants identified as defective in somatic cell specification. We also describe the differences in developmental stages among species and use this information to discuss molecular studies that have analyzed transcriptome, proteome, and small-RNA information in the anther.

  5. Self-organization of dynein motors generates meiotic nuclear oscillations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sven K; Pavin, Nenad; Maghelli, Nicola; Jülicher, Frank; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva M

    2009-04-21

    Meiotic nuclear oscillations in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are crucial for proper chromosome pairing and recombination. We report a mechanism of these oscillations on the basis of collective behavior of dynein motors linking the cell cortex and dynamic microtubules that extend from the spindle pole body in opposite directions. By combining quantitative live cell imaging and laser ablation with a theoretical description, we show that dynein dynamically redistributes in the cell in response to load forces, resulting in more dynein attached to the leading than to the trailing microtubules. The redistribution of motors introduces an asymmetry of motor forces pulling in opposite directions, leading to the generation of oscillations. Our work provides the first direct in vivo observation of self-organized dynamic dynein distributions, which, owing to the intrinsic motor properties, generate regular large-scale movements in the cell.

  6. Confinement induces actin flow in a meiotic cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pinot, Mathieu; Steiner, Villier; Dehapiot, Benoit; Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Chesnel, Franck; Blanchoin, Laurent; Kervrann, Charles; Gueroui, Zoher

    2012-01-01

    In vivo, F-actin flows are observed at different cell life stages and participate in various developmental processes during asymmetric divisions in vertebrate oocytes, cell migration, or wound healing. Here, we show that confinement has a dramatic effect on F-actin spatiotemporal organization. We reconstitute in vitro the spontaneous generation of F-actin flow using Xenopus meiotic extracts artificially confined within a geometry mimicking the cell boundary. Perturbations of actin polymerization kinetics or F-actin nucleation sites strongly modify the network flow dynamics. A combination of quantitative image analysis and biochemical perturbations shows that both spatial localization of F-actin nucleators and actin turnover play a decisive role in generating flow. Interestingly, our in vitro assay recapitulates several symmetry-breaking processes observed in oocytes and early embryonic cells. PMID:22753521

  7. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Hornecker, Jacey L; Samollow, Paul B; Robinson, Edward S; Vandeberg, John L; McCarrey, John R

    2007-11-01

    In eutherian mammals, the X and Y chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during spermatogenesis in males. However, following fertilization, both the paternally (Xp) and maternally (Xm) inherited X chromosomes are active in the inner cell mass of the female blastocyst, and then random inactivation of one X chromosome occurs in each cell, leading to a mosaic pattern of X-chromosome activity in adult female tissues. In contrast, marsupial females show a nonrandom pattern of X chromosome activity, with repression of the Xp in all somatic tissues. Here, we show that MSCI also occurs during spermatogenesis in marsupials in a manner similar to, but more stable than that in eutherians. These findings support the suggestion that MSCI may have provided the basis for an early dosage compensation mechanism in mammals based solely on gametogenic events, and that random X-chromosome inactivation during embryogenesis may have evolved subsequently in eutherian mammals.

  8. Natriuretic peptides stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption in bovine.

    PubMed

    De Cesaro, Matheus P; Macedo, Mariana P; Santos, Joabel T; Rosa, Paulo R A; Ludke, Charles A; Rissi, Vitor B; Gasperin, Bernardo G; Gonçalves, Paulo B D

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of mRNA encoding natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors in the cumulus-oocyte complex in cattle, a monovular mammalian species, and also to investigate the role of NPs in oocyte meiotic resumption in vitro. mRNA was observed for the NP precursor type-A (NPPA), type-C (NPPC), NP receptor-1 (NPR-1), receptor-2 (NPR-2) and receptor-3 (NPR-3) in bovine cumulus cells, and NPR-2 mRNA was observed in oocytes. These results are different from those obtained in mouse and pig models. The effects of NPPA, NP precursor type-B (NPPB) and NPPC on the resumption of arrested meiosis maintained by forskolin were studied at three different doses (10, 100 and 1000nM) with a 12h culture system. The germinal vesicle breakdown rates were greater (P≤0.05) in oocytes that were cultured in the presence of one or a combination of NPs (from 44% to 73%) than the negative control (from 24% to 27%). Additionally, it was demonstrated that the concentration of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) is increased by NPPA and NPPC in oocytes and cumulus cells after 3h of in vitro maturation. However, in both groups, the concentration of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in the oocyte did not increase between 3 and 6h of culture, even when forskolin was used. In summary, we observed the presence of mRNA for NPs and their receptors in the bovine cumulus-oocyte complex and demonstrated that, in vitro, NPPA, NPPB and NPPC stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption in a monovular species.

  9. Aberrant meiotic behavior in Agave tequilana Weber var. azul

    PubMed Central

    Ruvalcaba-Ruiz, Domingo; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Background Agave tequilana Weber var. azul, is the only one variety permitted by federal law in México to be used for tequila production which is the most popular contemporary alcoholic beverage made from agave and recognized worldwide. Despite the economic, genetic, and ornamental value of the plant, it has not been subjected to detailed cytogenetic research, which could lead to a better understanding of its reproduction for future genetic improvement. The objective of this work was to study the meiotic behavior in pollen mother cells and its implications on the pollen viability in Agave tequilana Weber var. azul. Results The analysis of Pollen Mother Cells in anaphase I (A-I) showed 82.56% of cells with a normal anaphase and, 17.44% with an irregular anaphase. In which 5.28% corresponded to cells with side arm bridges (SAB); 3.68% cells with one bridge and one fragment; 2.58% of irregular anaphase showed cells with one or two lagging chromosomes and 2.95% showed one acentric fragment; cells with two bridges and cells with two bridges and one acentric fragment were observed in frequencies of 1.60% and 1.35% respectively. In anaphase II some cells showed bridges and fragments too. Aberrant A-I cells had many shrunken or empty pollen grains (42.00%) and 58.00 % viable pollen. Conclusion The observed meiotic irregularities suggest that structural chromosome aberrations have occurred, such as heterozygous inversions, sister chromatid exchanges, deletions and duplications which in turn are reflected in a low pollen viability. PMID:12396234

  10. The temporal response of recombination events to gamma radiation of meiotic cells in Sordaria brevicollis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L A

    1982-01-01

    The temporal frequencies of different stages of prophase I were determined cytologically in Sordaria brevicollis (Olive and Fantini) as the basis for ascertaining the degree of synchrony in meiosis in this ascomycete. Croziers, karyogamy-zygotene and pachytene asci were shown to be in significant majorities at three distinct periods of the meiotic cycle. The response of recombination frequency to ionizing radiation was examined for the entire meiotic cycle. Three radiosensitive periods were determined. This response, which correlated temporally with each of the three peaks in ascal frequency, is interpreted as showing that the meiotic cycle of this organism is divided into periods of recombination commitment (radiation reduced frequencies) during the pre-meiotic S phase and recombination consummation (radiation induced frequencies) during zygotene and pachytene. The results are discussed in the context of the time at which recombination is consummated in eukaryotes such as yeast and Drosophila.

  11. Mitotic and meiotic chromosome studies in silky anteater Cyclopes didactylus (Myrmecophagidae: Xenarthra).

    PubMed

    Jorge, W

    2000-01-01

    The karyotype of a male pigmy anteater, Cyclopes didactylus, an endangered species from the Amazon region, is described. The size and morphology of the X and Y chromosomes in mitotic and meiotic analyses is recorded and discussed.

  12. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies. PMID:27104744

  13. Multiple modes of chromatin configuration at natural meiotic recombination hot spots in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kouji; Steiner, Walter W; Shibata, Takehiko; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2007-11-01

    The ade6-M26 meiotic recombination hot spot of fission yeast is defined by a cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-like heptanucleotide sequence, 5'-ATGACGT-3', which acts as a binding site for the Atf1/Pcr1 heterodimeric transcription factor required for hot spot activation. We previously demonstrated that the local chromatin around the M26 sequence motif alters to exhibit higher sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease before the initiation of meiotic recombination. In this study, we have examined whether or not such alterations in chromatin occur at natural meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. At one of the most prominent DSB sites, mbs1 (meiotic break site 1), the chromatin structure has a constitutively accessible configuration at or near the DSB sites. The establishment of the open chromatin state and DSB formation are independent of the CRE-binding transcription factor, Atf1. Analysis of the chromatin configuration at CRE-dependent DSB sites revealed both differences from and similarities to mbs1. For example, the tdh1+ locus, which harbors a CRE consensus sequence near the DSB site, shows a meiotically induced open chromatin configuration, similar to ade6-M26. In contrast, the cds1+ locus is similar to mbs1 in that it exhibits a constitutive open configuration. Importantly, Atf1 is required for the open chromatin formation in both tdh1+ and cds1+. These results suggest that CRE-dependent meiotic chromatin changes are intrinsic processes related to DSB formation in fission yeast meiosis. In addition, the results suggest that the chromatin configuration in natural meiotic recombination hot spots can be classified into at least three distinct categories: (i) an Atf1-CRE-independent constitutively open chromatin configuration, (ii) an Atf1-CRE-dependent meiotically induced open chromatin configuration, and (iii) an Atf1-CRE-dependent constitutively open chromatin configuration.

  14. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  15. Meiotic behavior and chromosome number of Urochloa adspersa (Trin.) R. D. Webster from the Brazilian Chaco.

    PubMed

    Felismino, M F; Maior, R L S; Damasceno, G A; Pott, A; Pagliarini, M S

    2015-07-06

    This is the first report of meiotic division in Uro-chloa adspersa (Trin.) collected from the Brazilian Chaco. Meiotic analyses were performed on three specimens of U. adspersa named G10, G15, and G16. Inflorescences were collected and fixed in a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid (3:1, v/v) for 24 h and then stored in 70% alcohol. Diakinesis revealed different chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. All three plants were polyploids: G10 and G15 exhibited 2n = 6x = 54 chromosomes (arranged in 27 bivalents), while G16 exhibited 2n = 4x = 36 chromosomes (18 bivalents). Meiotic behavior was mainly normal in the hexaploid G15 and the tetraploid G16 (5.3 and 6.2% of the cells were abnormal, respective-ly), revealing only a few meiotic abnormalities that are common to polyploids, i.e., those related to irregular chromosome segregation. G10 exhibited other meiotic abnormalities during meiosis II, such as chromosome stickiness, irregular spindle orientation, and irregular cytokinesis, which led to the formation of a few triads, resulting in 16.9% of the cells being abnormal. The origin of these abnormalities is discussed, and we suggest that the genes that control meiotic steps may be present in the Urochloa gene pool.

  16. Nuclear Localization of PRDM9 and Its Role in Meiotic Chromatin Modifications and Homologous Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L.; Baker, Christopher L.; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc-finger domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ-cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema, but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function, and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots. PMID:25894966

  17. Nuclear localization of PRDM9 and its role in meiotic chromatin modifications and homologous synapsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L; Baker, Christopher L; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc finger (ZNF) domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots.

  18. Bisphenol A exposure at an environmentally relevant dose induces meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Renyan; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Wu, Hongjuan; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Whether environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may induce reproductive disorders is still controversial but certain studies have reported that BPA may cause meiotic abnormalities in C. elegans and female mice. However, little is known about the effect of BPA on meiosis in adult males. To determine whether BPA exposure at an environmentally relevant dose could induce meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 20 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. We found that BPA significantly increased the proportion of stage VII seminiferous epithelium and decreased the proportion of stage VIII. Consequently, spermiation was inhibited and spermatogenesis was disrupted. Further investigation revealed that BPA exposure delayed meiosis initiation in the early meiotic stage and induced the accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the late meiotic stage. The latter event subsequently activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (ATM). Our results suggest that long-term exposure to BPA may lead to continuous meiotic abnormalities and ultimately put mammalian reproductive health at risk.

  19. Sperm ultrastructure and meiotic segregation in an infertile 47, XYY man.

    PubMed

    Moretti, E; Anichini, C; Sartini, B; Collodel, G

    2007-12-01

    The majority of 47, XYY males are fertile and contribute to produce chromosomally normal children. In 47, XYY carriers, most meiotic studies indicated that the extra Y chromosomes were lost in the pre-meiotic stages, but in some cases the presence of one X and the two Y chromosomes has been detected during prophase I as an X univalent plus a YY bivalent. The aim of this study was to describe sperm parameters and meiotic segregation in a case of an infertile man with a 47, XYY karyotype. Sperm morphology was evaluated for the first time by transmission electron microscopy highlighting apoptosis and necrosis as the most frequent pathologies. Meiotic segregation was explored by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique, which makes us capable of detecting aneuploidies of sex chromosomes. The fact that the frequency of 1818XY diploidy was very high reveals an error occurring during first meiotic division. Polymerase chain reaction analysis did not show any Y microdeletion. The combination of these two techniques led us to clarify the status of the spermatogenic process, showing an altered meiotic segregation concomitant with the presence of sperm apoptosis and necrosis in a patient 47, XYY.

  20. Most meiotic CAG repeat tract-length alterations in yeast are SPO11 dependent.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, C; Nag, Dilip K

    2002-03-01

    The expansion of trinucleotide repeat sequences associated with hereditary neurological diseases is believed from earlier studies to be due to errors in DNA replication. However, more recent studies have indicated that recombination may play a significant role in triplet repeat expansion. CAG repeat tracts have been shown to induce double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis in yeast, and DSB formation is dependent on the meiotic recombination machinery. The rate of meiotic instability is several fold higher than mitotic instability. To determine whether DSB repair is responsible for the high rate of repeat tract-length alterations, the frequencies of meiotic repeat-tract instability were compared in wild-type and spo11 mutant strains. In the spo11 background, the rate of meiotic repeat-tract instability remained at the mitotic level, suggesting that meiotic alterations of CAG repeat tracts in yeast occur by the recombination mechanism. Several of these meiotic tract-length alterations are due to DSB repair involving use of the sister chromatid as a template.

  1. A role for vasa in regulating mitotic chromosome condensation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Kai, Toshie

    2011-01-11

    Vasa (Vas) is a conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase expressed in germline cells that localizes to a characteristic perinuclear structure called nuage. Previous studies have shown that Vas has diverse functions, with roles in regulating mRNA translation, germline differentiation, pole plasm assembly, and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA)-mediated transposon silencing. Although vas has also been implicated in the regulation of germline proliferation in Drosophila and mice, little is known about whether Vas plays a role during the mitotic cell cycle. Here, we report a translation-independent function of vas in regulating mitotic chromosome condensation in the Drosophila germline. During mitosis, Vas facilitates robust chromosomal localization of the condensin I components Barren (Barr) and CAP-D2. Vas specifically associates with Barr and CAP-D2, but not with CAP-D3 (a condensin II component). The mitotic function of Vas is mediated by the formation of perichromosomal Vas bodies during mitosis, which requires the piRNA pathway components aubergine and spindle-E. Our results suggest that Vas functions during mitosis and may link the piRNA pathway to mitotic chromosome condensation in Drosophila.

  2. Evolutionarily diverse determinants of meiotic DNA break and recombination landscapes across the genome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Kyle R.; Sasaki, Mariko; Milman, Neta

    2014-01-01

    Fission yeast Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) initiates meiotic recombination by forming developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB distributions influence patterns of heredity and genome evolution, but the basis of the highly nonrandom choice of Rec12 cleavage sites is poorly understood, largely because available maps are of relatively low resolution and sensitivity. Here, we determined DSBs genome-wide at near-nucleotide resolution by sequencing the oligonucleotides attached to Rec12 following DNA cleavage. The single oligonucleotide size class allowed us to deeply sample all break events. We find strong evidence across the genome for differential DSB repair accounting for crossover invariance (constant cM/kb in spite of DSB hotspots). Surprisingly, about half of all crossovers occur in regions where DSBs occur at low frequency and are widely dispersed in location from cell to cell. These previously undetected, low-level DSBs thus play an outsized and crucial role in meiosis. We further find that the influence of underlying nucleotide sequence and chromosomal architecture differs in multiple ways from that in budding yeast. DSBs are not strongly restricted to nucleosome-depleted regions, as they are in budding yeast, but are nevertheless spatially influenced by chromatin structure. Our analyses demonstrate that evolutionarily fluid factors contribute to crossover initiation and regulation. PMID:25024163

  3. The dissection of meiotic chromosome movement in mice using an in vivo electroporation technique.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Hiroki; Morimoto, Akihiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    During meiosis, the rapid movement of telomeres along the nuclear envelope (NE) facilitates pairing/synapsis of homologous chromosomes. In mammals, the mechanical properties of chromosome movement and the cytoskeletal structures responsible for it remain poorly understood. Here, applying an in vivo electroporation (EP) technique in live mouse testis, we achieved the quick visualization of telomere, chromosome axis and microtubule organizing center (MTOC) movements. For the first time, we defined prophase sub-stages of live spermatocytes morphologically according to GFP-TRF1 and GFP-SCP3 signals. We show that rapid telomere movement and subsequent nuclear rotation persist from leptotene/zygotene to pachytene, and then decline in diplotene stage concomitant with the liberation of SUN1 from telomeres. Further, during bouquet stage, telomeres are constrained near the MTOC, resulting in the transient suppression of telomere mobility and nuclear rotation. MTs are responsible for these movements by forming cable-like structures on the NE, and, probably, by facilitating the rail-tacking movements of telomeres on the MT cables. In contrast, actin regulates the oscillatory changes in nuclear shape. Our data provide the mechanical scheme for meiotic chromosome movement throughout prophase I in mammals.

  4. Mechanism of haploidy-dependent unreductional meiotic cell division in polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiwen; Xu, Steven S; Zhu, Xianwen

    2010-06-01

    Unreductional meiotic cell division (UMCD) generates unreduced gametes and leads to polyploidy. The tetraploid wheat "Langdon" (LDN) undergoes normal meiosis, but its polyhaploid undergoes UMCD. Here, we found that sister kinetochores oriented syntelically at meiosis I in LDN, but amphitelically in LDN polyhaploid and the interspecific hybrid of LDN with Aegilops tauschii. We also observed that sister centromere cohesion persisted until anaphase II in LDN, LDN polyhaploid, and the interspecific hybrid. Meiocytes with all chromosomes oriented amphitelically underwent UMCD in LDN polyhaploid, and the interspecific hybrid, suggesting the tension created by the amphitelic orientation of sister kinetochores and persistence of centromeric cohesion between sister chromatids at meiosis I contribute to the onset of UMCD. Most likely, some ploidy-regulated genes were responsible for kinetochore orientation at meiosis I in LDN and LDN-derived polyhaploids. In addition, we found sister kinetochores of synapsed chromosomes oriented syntelically, whereas asynapsed chromosomes oriented either amphitelically or syntelically. Thus, synapsis probably is another factor for the coordination of kinetochore orientation in LDN.

  5. Identification of Arabidopsis meiotic cyclins reveals functional diversification among plant cyclin genes.

    PubMed

    Bulankova, Petra; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Fellner, Nicole; Riha, Karel

    2013-05-01

    Meiosis is a modified cell division in which a single S-phase is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation resulting in the production of haploid gametes. The meiotic mode of chromosome segregation requires extensive remodeling of the basic cell cycle machinery and employment of unique regulatory mechanisms. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins represent an ancient molecular module that drives and regulates cell cycle progression. The cyclin gene family has undergone a massive expansion in angiosperm plants, but only a few cyclins were thoroughly characterized. In this study we performed a systematic immunolocalization screen to identify Arabidopsis thaliana A- and B-type cyclins expressed in meiosis. Many of these cyclins exhibit cell-type-specific expression in vegetative tissues and distinct subcellular localization. We found six A-type cyclins and a single B-type cyclin (CYCB3;1) to be expressed in male meiosis. Mutant analysis revealed that these cyclins contribute to distinct meiosis-related processes. While A2 cyclins are important for chromosome segregation, CYCB3;1 prevents ectopic cell wall formation. We further show that cyclin SDS does not contain a D-box and is constitutively expressed throughout meiosis. Analysis of plants carrying cyclin SDS with an introduced D-box motif determined that, in addition to its function in recombination, SDS acts together with CYCB3;1 in suppressing unscheduled cell wall synthesis. Our phenotypic and expression data provide extensive evidence that multiplication of cyclins is in plants accompanied by functional diversification.

  6. Multiple Trans-Sensing Interactions Affect Meiotically Heritable Epigenetic States at the Maize pl1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Stephen M.; Hollick, Jay B.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between specific maize purple plant1 (pl1) alleles result in heritable changes of gene regulation that are manifested as differences in anthocyanin pigmentation. Transcriptionally repressed states of Pl1-Rhoades alleles (termed Pl′) are remarkably stable and invariably facilitate heritable changes of highly expressed states (termed Pl-Rh) in Pl′/Pl-Rh plants. However, Pl′ can revert to Pl-Rh when hemizygous, when heterozygous with pl1 alleles other than Pl1-Rhoades, or in the absence of trans-acting factors required to maintain repressed states. Cis-linked features of Pl1-Rhoades responsible for these trans-sensing behaviors remain unknown. Here, genetic tests of a pl1 allelic series identify two potentially separate cis-linked features: one facilitating repression of Pl-Rh and another stabilizing Pl′ in trans. Neither function is affected in ethyl-methanesulfonate-induced Pl1-Rhoades derivatives that produce truncated PL1 peptides, indicating that PL1 is unlikely to mediate trans interactions. Both functions, however, are impaired in a spontaneous Pl1-Rhoades derivative that fails to produce detectable pl1 RNA. Pl′-like states can also repress expression of a pl1-W22 allele, but this repression is not meiotically heritable. As the Pl′ state is not associated with unique small RNA species representing the pl1-coding region, the available data suggest that interactions between elements required for transcription underlie Pl1-Rhoades epigenetic behaviors. PMID:17435245

  7. The Opposing Actions of Arabidopsis CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY7 and WINGS APART-LIKE1 and 2 Differ in Mitotic and Meiotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sayantan; Yang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion, which is mediated by the cohesin complex, is essential for the proper segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. Stable binding of cohesin with chromosomes is regulated in part by the opposing actions of CTF7 (CHROMOSOME TRANSMISSION FIDELITY7) and WAPL (WINGS APART-LIKE). In this study, we characterized the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana CTF7 and WAPL by conducting a detailed analysis of wapl1-1 wapl2 ctf7 plants. ctf7 plants exhibit major defects in vegetative growth and development and are completely sterile. Inactivation of WAPL restores normal growth, mitosis, and some fertility to ctf7 plants. This shows that the CTF7/WAPL cohesin system is not essential for mitosis in vegetative cells and suggests that plants may contain a second mechanism to regulate mitotic cohesin. WAPL inactivation restores cohesin binding and suppresses ctf7-associated meiotic cohesion defects, demonstrating that WAPL and CTF7 function as antagonists to regulate meiotic sister chromatid cohesion. The ctf7 mutation only had a minor effect on wapl-associated defects in chromosome condensation and centromere association. These results demonstrate that WAPL has additional roles that are independent of its role in regulating chromatin-bound cohesin. PMID:26813623

  8. SPR-5 is a histone H3K4 demethylase with a role in meiotic double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Nottke, Amanda C; Beese-Sims, Sara E; Pantalena, Luiz F; Reinke, Valerie; Shi, Yang; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2011-08-02

    Regulation of histone methylation levels has long been implicated in multiple cellular processes, many of which involve transcription. Here, however, we report a unique role for the Caenorhabditis elegans histone demethylase SPR-5 in meiotic DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR). SPR-5 shows enzymatic activity toward H3K4me2 both in vitro and in the nematode germline, and spr-5 mutants show several phenotypes indicating a perturbation of DSBR, including increased p53-dependent germ cell apoptosis, increased levels of the DSBR marker RAD-51, and sensitivity toward DSB-inducing treatments. spr-5 mutants show no transcriptional misregulation of known DSBR involved genes. Instead, SPR-5 shows a rapid subcellular relocalization upon DSB-inducing treatment, which suggests that SPR-5 may function directly in DSBR.

  9. Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B Act Sequentially to Correctly Orient Chromosomes on the Meiotic Spindle of Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Régis E.; Kim, Seoyoung; Obeso, David; Straight, Paul D.; Winey, Mark; Dawson, Dean S.

    2013-01-01

    The conserved kinases Mps1 and Ipl1/Aurora B are critical for enabling chromosomes to attach to microtubules such that partner chromosomes will be segregated correctly from each other, but the precise roles of these kinases have been unclear. Here, imaging of live yeast cells was performed to elucidate the stages of chromosome-microtubule interactions, and their regulation by Ipl1 and Mps1, through meiosis I. Ipl1 was found to release kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) associations following meiotic entry, liberating chromosomes to begin homologous pairing. Surprisingly, most chromosome pairs were found to begin their spindle interactions with incorrect kMT attachments. Ipl1 released these improper connections while Mps1 triggered the formation of new force-generating microtubule attachments. This microtubule release and reattachment cycle can prevent catastrophic chromosome segregation errors in meiosis. PMID:23371552

  10. Unique subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Plk1 (Ser137 and Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division and pPlk1Ser137 involvement in spindle formation and REC8 cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Qunyuan; Ma, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is pivotal for proper mitotic progression, its targeting activity is regulated by precise subcellular positioning and phosphorylation. Here we assessed the protein expression, subcellular localization and possible functions of phosphorylated Plk1 (pPlk1Ser137 and pPlk1Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed a peptide of pPlk1Ser137 with high and stable expression from germinal vesicle (GV) until metaphase II (MII), while pPlk1Thr210 was detected as one large single band at GV stage and 2 small bands after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which maintained stable up to MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed pPlk1Ser137 was colocalized with microtubule organizing center (MTOC) proteins, γ-tubulin and pericentrin, on spindle poles, concomitantly with persistent concentration at centromeres and dynamic aggregation between chromosome arms. Differently, pPlk1Thr210 was persistently distributed across the whole body of chromosomes after meiotic resumption. The specific Plk1 inhibitor, BI2536, repressed pPlk1Ser137 accumulation at MTOCs and between chromosome arms, consequently disturbed γ-tubulin and pericentrin recruiting to MTOCs, destroyed meiotic spindle formation, and delayed REC8 cleavage, therefore arresting oocytes at metaphase I (MI) with chromosome misalignment. BI2536 completely reversed the premature degradation of REC8 and precocious segregation of chromosomes induced with okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor to protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, the protein levels of pPlk1Ser137 and pPlk1Thr210, as well as the subcellular distribution of pPlk1Thr210, were not affected by BI2536. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Plk1 activity is required for meiotic spindle assembly and REC8 cleavage, with pPlk1Ser137 is the action executor, in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26654596

  11. A Quality Control Mechanism Coordinates Meiotic Prophase Events to Promote Crossover Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Deshong, Alison J.; Ye, Alice L.; Lamelza, Piero; Bhalla, Needhi

    2014-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation relies on homologous chromosomes being linked by at least one crossover, the obligate crossover. Homolog pairing, synapsis and meiosis specific DNA repair mechanisms are required for crossovers but how they are coordinated to promote the obligate crossover is not well understood. PCH-2 is a highly conserved meiotic AAA+-ATPase that has been assigned a variety of functions; whether these functions reflect its conserved role has been difficult to determine. We show that PCH-2 restrains pairing, synapsis and recombination in C. elegans. Loss of pch-2 results in the acceleration of synapsis and homolog-dependent meiotic DNA repair, producing a subtle increase in meiotic defects, and suppresses pairing, synapsis and recombination defects in some mutant backgrounds. Some defects in pch-2 mutants can be suppressed by incubation at lower temperature and these defects increase in frequency in wildtype worms grown at higher temperature, suggesting that PCH-2 introduces a kinetic barrier to the formation of intermediates that support pairing, synapsis or crossover recombination. We hypothesize that this kinetic barrier contributes to quality control during meiotic prophase. Consistent with this possibility, defects in pch-2 mutants become more severe when another quality control mechanism, germline apoptosis, is abrogated or meiotic DNA repair is mildly disrupted. PCH-2 is expressed in germline nuclei immediately preceding the onset of stable homolog pairing and synapsis. Once chromosomes are synapsed, PCH-2 localizes to the SC and is removed in late pachytene, prior to SC disassembly, correlating with when homolog-dependent DNA repair mechanisms predominate in the germline. Indeed, loss of pch-2 results in premature loss of homolog access. Altogether, our data indicate that PCH-2 coordinates pairing, synapsis and recombination to promote crossover assurance. Specifically, we propose that the conserved function of PCH-2 is to destabilize pairing

  12. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis outcomes and meiotic segregation analysis of robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ko, Duck Sung; Cho, Jae Won; Lee, Hyoung-Song; Kim, Jin Yeong; Kang, Inn Soo; Yang, Kwang Moon; Lim, Chun Kyu

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the meiotic segregation patterns of cleavage-stage embryos from robertsonian translocation carriers and aneuploidy of chromosome 18 according to meiotic segregation patterns. Retrospective study. Infertility center and laboratory of reproductive biology and infertility. Sixty-two couples with robertsonian translocation carriers. One blastomere was biopsied from embryos and diagnosed with the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Translocation chromosomes were analyzed with the use of locus-specific and subtelomeric FISH probes. Aneuploidy of chromosome 18 was assessed simultaneously with translocation chromosomes. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) outcomes, meiotic segregation patterns of robertsonian translocation, and aneuploidy of chromosome 18 depending on meiotic segregation patterns. Two hundred seventy embryos of 332 transferrable embryos were transferred in 113 cycles, and 27 healthy babies were born. The alternate segregation was significantly higher in male carriers than in female carriers (43.9% vs. 29.9%, respectively), and adjacent segregation was higher in female carriers than in male carriers (44.7% vs. 38.7%, respectively). Aneuploidy of chromosome 18 was significantly increased in 3:0-segregated or chaotic embryos. Forty-seven alternate embryos were excluded from embryo replacement owing to aneuploidy of chromosome 18. In carriers of robertsonian translocation, meiotic segregation showed differences between men and women. Frequent meiotic errors caused by premature predivision or nondisjunction and less stringent checkpoint in women might cause such differences between sexes. Aneuploidy of chromosome 18 might be influenced by meiotic segregation of translocation chromosomes. Factors that cause malsegregation, such as 3:0 or chaotic segregation, seem to play a role in aneuploidy of chromosome 18. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sisters unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Recombination Proteins Mediate Meiotic Spatial Chromosome Organization and Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Storlazzi, Aurora; Gargano, Silvana; Ruprich-Robert, Gwenael; Falque, Matthieu; David, Michelle; Kleckner, Nancy; Zickler, Denise

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic chromosome pairing involves not only recognition of homology but also juxtaposition of entire chromosomes in a topologically regular way. Analysis of filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora reveals that recombination protein