Science.gov

Sample records for condition limits oral

  1. 34 CFR 34.9 - Conditions for an oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions for an oral hearing. 34.9 Section 34.9 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education ADMINISTRATIVE WAGE GARNISHMENT § 34.9 Conditions for an oral hearing. (a) We provide an oral hearing if you— (1) Request an oral hearing; and (2)...

  2. 34 CFR 34.9 - Conditions for an oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditions for an oral hearing. 34.9 Section 34.9 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education ADMINISTRATIVE WAGE GARNISHMENT § 34.9 Conditions for an oral hearing. (a) We provide an oral hearing if you— (1) Request an oral hearing; and (2)...

  3. 34 CFR 34.9 - Conditions for an oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditions for an oral hearing. 34.9 Section 34.9 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education ADMINISTRATIVE WAGE GARNISHMENT § 34.9 Conditions for an oral hearing. (a) We provide an oral hearing if you— (1) Request an oral hearing; and (2)...

  4. 34 CFR 34.9 - Conditions for an oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditions for an oral hearing. 34.9 Section 34.9 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education ADMINISTRATIVE WAGE GARNISHMENT § 34.9 Conditions for an oral hearing. (a) We provide an oral hearing if you— (1) Request an oral hearing; and (2)...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493....1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493....1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493....1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493....1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1220 - Condition: Oral pathology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Oral pathology. 493.1220 Section 493....1220 Condition: Oral pathology. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Oral pathology, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, and §§...

  10. Chronic conditions policies: oral health, a felt absence.

    PubMed

    Luis Schwab, Gerson; Tetu Moysés, Simone; Helena Sottile França, Beatriz; Iani Werneck, Renata; Frank, Erica; Jorge Moysés, Samuel

    2014-04-01

    The global health scenario shows an epidemic of non-communicable diseases that lead to long-term chronic conditions, some of which are incurable. Many infectious diseases, owing to their development and length, also generate chronic conditions. Similarly, non-morbid states, such as pregnancy, and some life cycles such as adolescence and ageing, follow the same logic. Among all these chronic conditions there is a significant interrelationship with oral health, both in parallel events and common risk factors. This article presents cross-sectional qualitative research into World Health Organisation recommended health policies to address chronic conditions. Several documents published by the organisation were analysed to verify the presence of references to oral health in relation to chronic conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases and diabetes as these most frequently have oral manifestations. The analysis showed no significant references to oral health or its indicators within the published texts. The study recognises the value of the work developed by the World Health Organisation, as well as its worldwide leadership role in the development of health policies for chronic conditions. This article proposes a coalition of dentistry organisations that could, in a more forceful and collective way, advocate for a greater presence of oral health in drafting policies addressing chronic conditions.

  11. The limits of oral history: ethics and methodology amid highly politicized research settings.

    PubMed

    Jessee, Erin

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, oral history has been celebrated by its practitioners for its humanizing potential, and its ability to democratize history by bringing the narratives of people and communities typically absent in the archives into conversation with that of the political and intellectual elites who generally write history. And when dealing with the narratives of ordinary people living in conditions of social and political stability, the value of oral history is unquestionable. However, in recent years, oral historians have increasingly expanded their gaze to consider intimate accounts of extreme human experiences, such as narratives of survival and flight in response to mass atrocities. This shift in academic and practical interests begs the questions: Are there limits to oral historical methods and theory? And if so, what are these limits? This paper begins to address these questions by drawing upon fourteen months of fieldwork in Rwanda and Bosnia-Hercegovina, during which I conducted multiple life history interviews with approximately one hundred survivors, ex-combatants, and perpetrators of genocide and related mass atrocities. I argue that there are limits to the application of oral history, particularly when working amid highly politicized research settings.

  12. New oral cut-off time limits in NSW.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Maria; Franco, Michele; Cochrane, Clint

    2016-11-01

    Standard collection procedure for the investigation of allegations of penile - oral assault has traditionally been the oral swab. Review of both the literature and NSW forensic laboratory results from oral swabbing has highlighted the sub-optimal nature of this method for the recovery of both sperm and offender DNA. 554 oral swabs, collected in NSW from 2010 to 2015, were analysed. Sperm detection occurred in only 4.2%. In the same period there was analysis of 104 oral rinses (of which 16.4% were positive for sperm) and 71 peri-oral samples (of which 18.3% were positive for sperm). As a result, a decision was made to revise forensic collection guidelines for sample collection in cases of penile - oral assault. Oral swabbing is no longer recommended. Current NSW forensic collection guidelines recommend the collection of both an oral rinse and a peri-oral (lip) swab. Samples are to be taken in the first 12 h after a penile - oral assault in all cases where there is a suspicion of oral assault. Oral collections may be extended to 24 h post penile - oral assault in those cases where there is either a clear recollection of ejaculation into the mouth (or ejaculation elsewhere prior to penile penetration of the mouth) or in those cases where a complainant is clear that there had been penile penetration of the mouth but is unable to recall whether or not ejaculation has taken place.

  13. Oral health and medical conditions among Amish children

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Marc-Allen; Milgrom, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Amish are a growing population who live a traditional, rural way of life, which makes them less accepting of modernism. Most Amish live in poverty and are detached from modern health care. In addition, the recent change of their lifestyle has been reported, such as consuming a nontraditional diet and the usage of electronic devices. As a result, their lifestyle change may have impacted their oral health. However, since only a single report about oral health among Amish children has been published approximately three decades ago it has not yet been updated. This study describes oral health among Amish children and their medical conditions during visits to a mobile dental unit (MDU). Material and Methods: The dental records of all patients (N=216) who visited a mobile dental unit were reviewed, which covers 1 year from May 20, 2011, the first date of service. The following factors were taken into consideration during the review process: parental perceptions of their children’s oral health care, dental care experiences, and general health information. Results: Fifty-four (27.8%) children, ages 3 to 17, have never received dental treatment before visiting the MDU; the average number of untreated decayed teeth was 6.8. In spite of this, most parents rated their children’s oral health as good or very good (87.7%). The high cost and long distance travel associated with routine, professional dental care makes it difficult for children to maintain good oral hygiene. Our analysis revealed that bleeding disorders were more prevalent among this gene pool compared to the nation at large; however, asthma was less common. Conclusions: There are oral and general health disparities among Amish children. There is a lack of awareness among Amish parents with regard to their children’s oral health. Key words:Amish, child, dental caries, mobile health units. PMID:28298971

  14. Influence of Musculoskeletal Conditions on Oral Health Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Jennifer L.; Lamster, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Both musculoskeletal disorders and diseases of the oral cavity are common and potentially serious problems among older persons, yet little attention has been given to the links between them. Several musculoskeletal diseases, including osteoporosis, Paget’s disease, and arthritic disorders, may directly involve the oral cavity and contiguous structures. Drugs used to treat musculoskeletal diseases, including corticosteroids and bisphosphonates, increase the risk of suppression of the immune system and osteonecrosis of the jaw, respectively. Many people with disabling osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions have difficulty practicing good oral hygiene and traveling to dental offices for professional help. Various inexpensive measures can help such individuals, including education of their caregivers and provision of antimicrobial mouthwashes and special toothbrushes. PMID:18511715

  15. Influence of combined oral contraceptives on the periodontal condition

    PubMed Central

    DOMINGUES, Roberta Santos; FERRAZ, Bruna Fidêncio Rahal; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; PASSANEZI, Euloir; SANT'ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi

    2012-01-01

    Most studies investigating the impact of oral contraceptives have been performed some years ago, when the level of sexual hormones was greater than the actual formulations. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of current combined oral contraceptives (COC) on periodontal tissues, correlating the clinical parameters examined with the total duration of continuous oral contraceptive intake. Material and methods Twenty-five women (19-35 years old) taking combined oral contraceptives for at least 1 year were included in the test group. The control group was composed by 25 patients at the same age range reporting no use of hormone-based contraceptive methods. Clinical parameters investigated included pocket probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), sulcular bleeding index (SBI) and plaque index (Pl.I). Data were statistically evaluated by unpaired t test, Pearson's correlation test and Spearman's correlation test. Results The test group showed increased PD (2.228±0.011 x 2.154±0.012; p<0.0001) and SBI (0.229±0.006 x 0.148±0.005, p<0.0001) than controls. No significant differences between groups were found in CAL (0.435±0.01 x 0.412±0.01; p=0.11). The control group showed greater Pl.I than the test group (0.206±0.007 x 0.303±0.008; p<0.0001). No correlation between the duration of oral contraceptive intake, age and periodontal parameters was observed. Conclusions These findings suggest that the use of currently available combined oral contraceptives can influence the periodontal conditions of the patients, independently of the level of plaque accumulation or total duration of medication intake, resulting in increased gingival inflammation. PMID:22666846

  16. [The oral cavity condition in patients with high blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Rosiak, Joanna; Kubić-Filiks, Beata; Szymańska, Jolanta

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of high blood pressure in adults is estimated at ca. 30-40% of the general population. Both hypertension disease and hypertensive drugs affect the condition of the patients' oral cavity. A review of the current literature shows that disorders most frequently found in the masticatory organ of patients with hypertension include: xerostomia, changes in salivary glands, gum hypertrophy, lichenoid lesions, taste disorders, and paraesthesias. The authors emphasize that patients with high blood pressure, along with the treatment of the underlying disease, should receive prophylactic and therapeutic dental care. This would enable reduction and/or elimination of unpleasant complaints, and also help prevent the emergence of secondary disorders in the patients' oral cavity as a result of hypertension pharmacotherapy.

  17. The effects of airborne fluorides on oral conditions in Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Haikel, Y.; Cahen, P.M.; Turlot, J.C.; Frank, R.M. )

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and severity of dental caries and dental fluorosis, as well as various other oral conditions, in 2378 subjects (ages seven to 60) living in the fluoridated area of Khouribga and the non-fluoridated area of Beni Mellal, Morocco. The community index of dental fluorosis (CFI) ranged from 1.99 to 2.80 in the high-fluoride area: Over 90% of the population was affected, and more than one-third of the subjects showed moderate dental fluorosis. However, in Beni Mellal, more than 96% of the dentate subjects examined were free of dental fluorosis, and the CFI of 0.02 was considered not significant. Significant differences were observed between the two areas with respect to caries prevalence. DMFT and DMFS indices were markedly lower in the fluorosis area of Khouribga. The oral conditions of subjects appeared to be better in Khouribga, where the gingival and calculus indices were significantly lower than in Beni Mellal. The analyses of covariance showed no significant differences in plaque accumulation (PI) between the Khouribga and Beni Mellal samples. However, a close statistical correlation was found between PI and GI in Beni Mellal and Khouribga.

  18. [An oral function improvement program utilizing health behavior theories ameliorates oral functions and oral hygienic conditions of pre-frail elderly persons].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    Oral function improvement programs utilizing health behavior theories are considered to be effective in preventing the need for long-term social care. In the present study, an oral function improvement program based upon health behavior theories was designed, and its utility was assessed in 102 pre-frail elderly persons (33 males, 69 females, mean age: 76.9 +/- 5.7) considered to be in potential need of long-term social care and attending a long-term care prevention class in Sayama City, Saitama Prefecture, Japan. The degree of improvement in oral functions (7 items) and oral hygienic conditions (3 items) was assessed by comparing oral health before and after participation in the program. The results showed statistically significant improvements in the following oral functions: (1) lip functions (oral diadochokinesis, measured by the regularity of the repetition of the syllable "Pa"), (2) tongue functions, (3) tongue root motor skills (oral diadochokinesis, measured by the regularity of the repetition of the syllables "Ta" and "Ka"), (4) tongue extension/retraction, (5) side-to-side tongue movement functions, (6) cheek motor skills, and (7) repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST). The following measures of oral hygiene also showed a statistically significant improvement: (1) debris on dentures or teeth, (2) coated tongue, and (3) frequency of oral cleaning. These findings demonstrated that an improvement program informed by health behavior theories is useful in improving oral functions and oral hygiene conditions.

  19. Chewing xylitol gum improves self-rated and objective indicators of oral health status under conditions interrupting regular oral hygiene.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Takafumi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Takeshita, Toru; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Chewing xylitol gum provides oral health benefits including inhibiting Streptococcus mutans plaque. It is thought to be especially effective in conditions where it is difficult to perform daily oral cleaning. Our study aim was to determine the effects of chewing xylitol gum on self-rated and objective oral health status under a condition interfering with oral hygiene maintenance. A randomized controlled intervention trial was conducted on 55 healthy ≥ 20-year-old men recruited from the Japan Ground Self Defense Force who were undergoing field training. Participants were randomly assigned to a test group (chewing gum; n = 27) or a control group (no gum; n = 28) and the researchers were blinded to the group assignments. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores of oral conditions subjectively evaluated oral health, and the stimulated salivary bacteria quantity objectively evaluated oral health 1 day before field training (baseline) and 4 days after the beginning of field training (follow-up). VAS scores of all three oral conditions significantly increased in the control group (malodor: p < 0.001; discomfort: p < 0.001; dryness: p < 0.001), but only two VAS scores increased in the test group (malodor: p = 0.021; discomfort: p = 0.002). The number of salivary total bacteria significantly increased in the control group (p < 0.01), while no significant change was observed in the test group (p = 0.668). Chewing xylitol gum positively affects self-rated and objective oral health status by controlling oral hygiene under conditions that interfere with oral hygiene maintenance.

  20. Limitations in Life Participation and Independence Due to Secondary Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The effects of secondary conditions across adults with autism, Down syndrome, and cerebral palsy were explored in terms of overall limitation in life participation and independence, changes over time, and the degree and nature of limitation in specific secondary conditions. Information was obtained for 35 adults with autism, 49 with Down syndrome,…

  1. Diagnostic aids for detection of oral precancerous conditions

    PubMed Central

    Messadi, Diana V

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer has a tendency to be detected at late stage which is detrimental to the patients because of its high mortality and morbidity rates. Early detection of oral cancer is therefore important to reduce the burden of this devastating disease. In this review article, the most common oral precancerous lesions are discussed and the importance of early diagnosis is emphasized. In addition, the most common non-invasive oral cancer devices that can aid the general practitioners in early diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:23743617

  2. 34 CFR 34.9 - Conditions for an oral hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Washington D.C. (3) We provide an in-person oral hearing with regard to debts based on student loan or grant obligations only at our regional service centers in Atlanta, Chicago, or San Francisco. (4) You must bear all... calls we place in order to conduct an oral hearing by telephone. (d)(1) To arrange the time and...

  3. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  4. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  5. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  6. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Equipment Requirements § 125.221 Icing conditions: Operating limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an... pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed the testing required under §...

  7. Oral health conditions affect functional and social activities of terminally-ill cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D.J.; Epstein, J.B.; Yao, Y.; Wilkie, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oral conditions are established complications in terminally-ill cancer patients. Yet despite significant morbidity, the characteristics and impact of oral conditions in these patients are poorly documented. The study objective was to characterize oral conditions in terminally-ill cancer patients to determine the presence, severity, and the functional and social impact of these oral conditions. Methods This was an observational clinical study including terminally-ill cancer patients (2.5–3 week life expectancy). Data were obtained via the Oral Problems Scale (OPS) that measures the presence of subjective xerostomia, orofacial pain, taste change, and the functional/social impact of oral conditions and a demographic questionnaire. A standardized oral examination was used to assess objective salivary hypofunction, fungal infection, mucosal erythema, and ulceration. Regression analysis and t test investigated the associations between measures. Results Of 104 participants, most were ≥50 years of age, female, and high-school educated; 45% were African American, 43% Caucasian, and 37% married. Oral conditions frequencies were: salivary hypofunction (98%), mucosal erythema (50%), ulceration (20%), fungal infection (36%), and other oral problems (46%). Xerostomia, taste change, and orofacial pain all had significant functional impact; p<.001, p=.042 and p<.001, respectively. Orofacial pain also had a significant social impact (p<.001). Patients with oral ulcerations had significantly more orofacial pain with a social impact than patients without ulcers (p=.003). Erythema was significantly associated with fungal infection and with mucosal ulceration (p<.001). Conclusions Oral conditions significantly affect functional and social activities in terminally-ill cancer patients. Identification and management of oral conditions in these patients should therefore be an important clinical consideration. PMID:24232310

  8. Efficacy of ozonized olive oil in the management of oral lesions and conditions: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Tarun; Arora, Neha; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Dixit, Avani; Jatti, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity is an open ecosystem that shows a dynamic balance between the entrance of microorganisms (bacterial, viral or fungal), colonization modalities, nutritional balance, and host defenses against their removal. The oral lesions including aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis, oral lichen planus, and angular cheilitis some of the common entities encountered in the clinical practice. A variety of treatment options is available in the literature for all of these lesions and conditions. Topical ozone therapy is a minimally invasive technique that can be used for these conditions without any side effects. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of ozonized olive oil in the treatment of oral lesions and conditions. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was carried out on 50 patients (aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis, oral lichen planus, and angular cheilitis). The ozonized olive oil was applied twice daily until the lesion regresses for a maximum of 6 months. Results: All the lesions regress in patients with aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis or showed improvement in the signs and symptoms in oral lichen planus patients. No toxicity or side effect was observed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Ozone therapy though requires a gaseous form to be more effective, but topical form can also bring out the positive results without any toxicity or side effect. Hence, it can be considered as a minimally invasive therapy for the oral infective and immunological conditions. PMID:27041901

  9. Relation between oral health and nutritional condition in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES JUNIOR, Humberto Lauro; SCELZA, Miriam F. Zaccaro; BOAVENTURA, Gilson Teles; CUSTÓDIO, Silvia Maria; MOREIRA, Emília Addison Machado; OLIVEIRA, Diane de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Oral health is a prerequisite for a good chewing function, which may have an impact on food choices and nutritional well-being. Objective This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between oral health status and nutritional status in the elderly. Material and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 33 elderly people from the Group for the Elderly Interdisciplinary Geriatrics and Gerontology Program, at Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi, RJ, Brazil, completed a questionnaire to collect information on socioeconomic status, eating habits, physical activity and health habits, undertook a clinical oral examination, blood test, and anthropometric measurements, and were allocated into groups according to age. The oral health status was assessed using the index for decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT). The nutritional status was assessed using hemoglobin, hematocrit and albumin concentrations in blood, anthropometric values and the body mass index. Results Tooth loss was the biggest nuisance to the elderly subjects (57.6%), followed by the use of dentures (30.3%) and ill-fitting dentures (33.3%). 66.6% of patients had difficulty in chewing, and 54.5% reported this to be due to prostheses and 13.6% to the absence of teeth. A significant correlation was found between DMFT and the value of suprailiac skinfold thickness (rho=0.380, p=0.029). Conclusion The results support the temporal association between tooth loss and detrimental changes in anthropometry, which could contribute to increased risk of developing chronic diseases. PMID:22437676

  10. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  11. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  12. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  13. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limitations. (a) No pilot may take off an aircraft that has frost, ice, or snow adhering to any rotor blade... may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot...

  14. On the entropy conditions for some flux limited diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselles, V.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we give a characterization of the notion of entropy solutions of some flux limited diffusion equations for which we can prove that the solution is a function of bounded variation in space and time. This includes the case of the so-called relativistic heat equation and some generalizations. For them we prove that the jump set consists of fronts that propagate at the speed given by Rankine-Hugoniot condition and we give on it a geometric characterization of the entropy conditions. Since entropy solutions are functions of bounded variation in space once the initial condition is, to complete the program we study the time regularity of solutions of the relativistic heat equation under some conditions on the initial datum. An analogous result holds for some other related equations without additional assumptions on the initial condition.

  15. Oral Health Condition and Treatment Needs of a Group of Nigerian Individuals with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oredugba, Folakemi A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the oral health condition and treatment needs of a group of individuals with Down syndrome in Nigeria. Method: Participants were examined for oral hygiene status, dental caries, malocclusion, hypoplasia, missing teeth, crowding and treatment needs. Findings were compared with controls across age…

  16. Relationships between self-rated oral health, subjective symptoms, oral health behavior and clinical conditions in Japanese university students: a cross-sectional survey at Okayama University

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-rated oral health is a valid and useful summary indicator of overall oral health status and quality of life. However, few studies on perception of oral health have been conducted among Japanese young adults. This study investigated whether oral health behavior, subjective oral symptoms, or clinical oral status were associated with self-rated oral health in Japanese young adults. Methods This cross-sectional survey included 2,087 students (1,183 males, 904 females), aged 18 and 19 years, at Okayama University, Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed and an oral examination was performed. Results In a structural equation modeling analysis, the score of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) significantly affected self-rated oral health (p <0.05) and the effect size was highest. Malocclusion, subjective symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and stomatitis, and poor oral health behavior significantly induced self-rated poor oral health with small effect sizes (p <0.05). Clinical periodontal conditions and Oral Hygiene Index-simplified were not related to self-rated oral health. Conclusion Self-rated oral health was influenced by subjective symptoms of TMD and stomatitis, oral health behavior, the score of DMFT, and malocclusion. The evaluation of these parameters may be a useful approach in routine dental examination to improve self-rated oral health in university students. PMID:24195632

  17. Flammability Limits of Gases Under Low Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehlow, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this combustion science investigation is to determine the effect of zero, fractional, and super gravity on the flammability limits of a premixed methane air flame in a standard 51 mm diameter flammability tube and to determine, if possible, the fluid flow associated with flame passage under zero-g conditions and the density (and hence, temperature) profiles associated with the flame under conditions of incipient extinction. This is accomplished by constructing an appropriate apparatus for placement in NASA's Lewis Research Center Lear Jet facility and flying the prescribed g-trajectories while the experiment is being performed. Data is recorded photographically using the visible light of the flame. The data acquired is: (1) the shape and propagation velocity of the flame under various g-conditions for methane compositions that are inside the flammable limits, and (2) the effect of gravity on the limits. Real time accelerometer readings for the three orthogonal directions are displayed in full view of the cameras and the framing rate of the cameras is used to measure velocities.

  18. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Limiting conditions/scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H(sub 2) from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: 1. Culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; 2. Mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; 3. Bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; 4. Evaluation of biological synthetic gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; 5. Process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and 6. Economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses.

  19. The Nutraceutical Bioavailability Classification Scheme: Classifying Nutraceuticals According to Factors Limiting their Oral Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Li, Fang; Xiao, Hang

    2015-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of a health-promoting dietary component (nutraceutical) may be limited by various physicochemical and physiological phenomena: liberation from food matrices, solubility in gastrointestinal fluids, interaction with gastrointestinal components, chemical degradation or metabolism, and epithelium cell permeability. Nutraceutical bioavailability can therefore be improved by designing food matrices that control their bioaccessibility (B*), absorption (A*), and transformation (T*) within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This article reviews the major factors influencing the gastrointestinal fate of nutraceuticals, and then uses this information to develop a new scheme to classify the major factors limiting nutraceutical bioavailability: the nutraceutical bioavailability classification scheme (NuBACS). This new scheme is analogous to the biopharmaceutical classification scheme (BCS) used by the pharmaceutical industry to classify drug bioavailability, but it contains additional factors important for understanding nutraceutical bioavailability in foods. The article also highlights potential strategies for increasing the oral bioavailability of nutraceuticals based on their NuBACS designation (B*A*T*).

  20. The co-solvent Cremophor EL limits absorption of orally administered paclitaxel in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malingré, M M; Schellens, J H; Van Tellingen, O; Ouwehand, M; Bardelmeijer, H A; Rosing, H; Koopman, F J; Schot, M E; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Beijnen, J H

    2001-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the co-solvents Cremophor EL and polysorbate 80 on the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel. 6 patients received in a randomized setting, one week apart oral paclitaxel 60 mg m(-2) dissolved in polysorbate 80 or Cremophor EL. For 3 patients the amount of Cremophor EL was 5 ml m(-2), for the other three 15 ml m(-2). Prior to paclitaxel administration patients received 15 mg kg(-1) oral cyclosporin A to enhance the oral absorption of the drug. Paclitaxel formulated in polysorbate 80 resulted in a significant increase in the maximal concentration (C(max)) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of paclitaxel in comparison with the Cremophor EL formulations (P = 0.046 for both parameters). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel C(max) and AUC values were 0.10 +/- 0.06 microM and 1.29 +/- 0.99 microM h(-1), respectively, whereas these values were 0.31 +/- 0.06 microM and 2.61 +/- 1.54 microM h(-1), respectively, when formulated in polysorbate 80. Faecal data revealed a decrease in excretion of unchanged paclitaxel for the polysorbate 80 formulation compared to the Cremophor EL formulations. The amount of paclitaxel excreted in faeces was significantly correlated with the amount of Cremophor EL excreted in faeces (P = 0.019). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel excretion in faeces was 38.8 +/- 13.0% of the administered dose, whereas this value was 18.3 +/-15.5% for the polysorbate 80 formulation. The results show that the co-solvent Cremophor EL is an important factor limiting the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel from the intestinal lumen. They highlight the need for designing a better drug formulation in order to increase the usefulness of the oral route of paclitaxel

  1. Oxygen Consumption Rates of Bacteria under Nutrient-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Timothy E.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Finkel, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Many environments on Earth experience nutrient limitation and as a result have nongrowing or very slowly growing bacterial populations. To better understand bacterial respiration under environmentally relevant conditions, the effect of nutrient limitation on respiration rates of heterotrophic bacteria was measured. The oxygen consumption and population density of batch cultures of Escherichia coli K-12, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8 were tracked for up to 200 days. The oxygen consumption per CFU (QO2) declined by more than 2 orders of magnitude for all three strains as they transitioned from nutrient-abundant log-phase growth to the nutrient-limited early stationary phase. The large reduction in QO2 from growth to stationary phase suggests that nutrient availability is an important factor in considering environmental respiration rates. Following the death phase, during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP), QO2 values of the surviving population increased with time and more cells were respiring than formed colonies. Within the respiring population, a subpopulation of highly respiring cells increased in abundance with time. Apparently, as cells enter LTSP, there is a viable but not culturable population whose bulk community and per cell respiration rates are dynamic. This result has a bearing on how minimal energy requirements are met, especially in nutrient-limited environments. The minimal QO2 rates support the extension of Kleiber's law to the mass of a bacterium (100-fg range). PMID:23770901

  2. Predictability of oral and laryngopharyngeal function for aspiration and limitation of oral intake in patients after surgery for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hey, Christiane; Lange, Benjamin P; Aere, Christina; Eberle, Silvia; Zaretsky, Yevgen; Sader, Robert; Stöver, Timo; Wagenblast, Jens

    2013-08-01

    Swallowing disorders are common in patients after surgery for head and neck cancer. The clinical assessment of oral and laryngopharyngeal abilities is widely used as a dysphagia assessment tool in this patient group, despite a lack of research. The goal of this study was to assess the predictability of clinical parameters for aspiration and limitation of oral intake. A swallowing disorder with the need for further intervention was identified by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in 65%, with aspiration in 49%, silently in 21%, and limited oral intake with tube dependency in 56% of studied patients. Four clinical parameters (dysglossia, wet voice, tongue motility, and tongue strength) correlated significantly with aspiration and limitation of oral intake. However, none of these clinical parameters was able to predict one of our two reference criteria, due to low positive likelihood ratios, mostly less than two. Clinical assessment is therefore inappropriate for early detection of swallowing disorders in such patients.

  3. Do Developmental Constraints and High Integration Limit the Evolution of the Marsupial Oral Apparatus?

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Anjali; Randau, Marcela; Polly, P. David; Weisbecker, Vera; Bennett, C. Verity; Hautier, Lionel; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental constraints can have significant influence on the magnitude and direction of evolutionary change, and many studies have demonstrated that these effects are manifested on macroevolutionary scales. Phenotypic integration, or the strong interactions among traits, has been similarly invoked as a major influence on morphological variation, and many studies have demonstrated that trait integration changes through ontogeny, in many cases decreasing with age. Here, we unify these perspectives in a case study of the ontogeny of the mammalian cranium, focusing on a comparison between marsupials and placentals. Marsupials are born at an extremely altricial state, requiring, in most cases, the use of the forelimbs to climb to the pouch, and, in all cases, an extended period of continuous suckling, during which most of their development occurs. Previous work has shown that marsupials are less disparate in adult cranial form than are placentals, particularly in the oral apparatus, and in forelimb ontogeny and adult morphology, presumably due to functional selection pressures on these two systems during early postnatal development. Using phenotypic trajectory analysis to quantify prenatal and early postnatal cranial ontogeny in 10 species of therian mammals, we demonstrate that this pattern of limited variation is also apparent in the development of the oral apparatus of marsupials, relative to placentals, but not in the skull more generally. Combined with the observation that marsupials show extremely high integration of the oral apparatus in early postnatal ontogeny, while other cranial regions show similar levels of integration to that observed in placentals, we suggest that high integration may compound the effects of the functional constraints for continuous suckling to ultimately limit the ontogenetic and adult disparity of the marsupial oral apparatus throughout their evolutionary history. PMID:27260858

  4. Amyloid Fibrillation of Insulin under Water-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Su; Lee, Jong Wha; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Kim, Hugh I.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrillation in water-organic mixtures has been widely studied to understand the effect of protein-solvent interactions on the fibrillation process. In this study, we monitored insulin fibrillation in formamide and its methyl derivatives (formamide, N-methyl formamide, N,N-dimethyl formamide) in the presence and absence of water. These model solvent systems mimic the cellular environment by providing denaturing conditions and a hydrophobic environment with limited water content. Thioflavin T (ThT) assay revealed that binary mixtures of water with formamide and its methyl derivatives enhanced fibrillation rates and β-sheet abundance, whereas organic solvents suppressed insulin fibrillation. We utilized solution small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the correlation between protein-solvent interactions and insulin fibrillation. SAXS experiments combined with simulated annealing of the protein indicated that the degree of denaturation of the hydrophobic core region at residues B11–B17 determines the fibrillation rate. In addition, DSC experiments suggested a crucial role of hydrophobic interactions in the fibrillation process. These results imply that an environment with limited water, which imitates a lipid membrane system, accelerates protein denaturation and the formation of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions during amyloid fibrillation. PMID:25418175

  5. Pesticides water decontamination in oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Nicoleta Alina; Ferrari, Federico; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Merli, Annalisa; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a laboratory bioreactor, with a functioning principle similar with that of biobed systems but working in oxygen-limited conditions, suitable for decontaminating wastewater mixtures with pesticides. The system is composed by two cylindrical plastic containers. The first one, where the pesticides solution is collected, is open, whereas the second one, where the biomass is disposed, is closed. The pesticides solution was pumped at the biomass surface and subsequently recollected and disposed in the first container. Four pesticides with different physical-chemical characteristics were tested. The results obtained showed a relatively good capacity of the developed prototype to decontaminate waste water containing the mixture of pesticides. The time of the experiment, the number of cycles that the solution made in the system and the environmental temperature have a significantly influence for the decontamination of acetochlor and chlorpyrifos whereas for the decontamination of terbuthylazine and metalaxyl no significant influence was observed. Even if the present prototype could represent a valid solution to manage the water pesticides residues in a farm and to increase the confidence of bystanders and residents, the practical difficulties when replacing the biomass could represent a limit of the system.

  6. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  7. First-wall and limiter conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hill, K.W.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sesnic, S.; Tenney, F.H.

    1984-10-01

    A progress report on the experimental studies of vacuum vessel conditioning during the first year of TFTR operation is presented. A previous paper described the efforts expended to condition the TFTR vessel prior to and during the initial plasma start-up experiments. During the start-up phase, discharge cleaning was performed with the vessel at room temperature. For the second phase of TFTR operations, which was directed towards the optimization of ohmically heated plasmas, the vacuum vessel could be heated to 150/sup 0/C. The internal configuration of the TFTR vessel was more complex during the second phase with the addition of a TiC/C moveable limiter array, Inconel bellows cover plates, and ZrAl getter pumps. A quantitative comparison is given on the effectiveness of vessel bakeout, glow discharge cleaning, and pulse discharge cleaning in terms of the total quantity of removed carbon and oxygen, residual gas base pressures and the resulting plasma impurity levels as measured by visible, uv, and soft x-ray spectroscopy. The initial experience with hydrogen isotope changeover in TFTR is presented including the results of the attempt to hasten the changeover time by using a glow discharge to precondition the vessel with the new isotope.

  8. Oral conditions of 1,049 patients referred to a university-based oral medicine and orofacial pain center.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Piedad; Clark, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    At the USC Orofacial Pain/Oral Medicine Center, 1,049 new patients seen from September 2003 to September 2005 were sorted according to their primary diagnosis. Two-thirds were female and 19.7% were over 64 years of age. The most prevalent diseases were categorized and compared with a similar study published 15 years ago. The seven categories included osseous disease (3.3%), mucogingival disease (17.8%), salivary/lymphatic disease (3.3%), TMD (46.3%); neuropathic pain/headache disorders (13.1%), motor/sleep disorders (9.1%), and miscellaneous (not included in above categories) (7.1%). The 35 most frequent diagnoses were sorted by the mean age of our patients and the male-female ratio was also determined. The oldest patients had burning mouth syndrome (68.1 +/- 14.7) and the youngest had internal derangements of the temporomandibular joints (27.9 +/- 14.0). These data could be used to provide information on the scope of oral medicine practice, to help practitioners create age-appropriate differential diagnoses, and to help dental school curriculum committees and graduate program directors assess their curricula to ensure they are including the full range of oral conditions in their programs.

  9. Oral and Craniofacial Clinical Signs Associated to Genetic Conditions in Human Identification Part I: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Fouad; Aoun, Nicole; el Husseini, Hassan; Jassar, Houssam; Sayah, Fida; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forensic dentistry is one of the most reliable methods used in human identification when other technique as fingerprint, DNA, visual identification cannot be used. Genetic disorders have several manifestations that can target the intra-oral cavity, the cranio-facial area or any location in the human body. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the scientific database (Medline and Science Direct) for the years 1990 to 2014 was carried out to find out all the available papers that indicate oral, cranio-facial signs, genetic and human identification. Results: A table with 10 genetic conditions was described with oral and cranio-facial signs that can help forensic specialist in human identification. Conclusion: This review showed a correlation between genetics, facial and intra-oral signs that would help forensic ondontologist in the identification procedures. PMID:26028912

  10. Flavor preferences conditioned by oral monosodium glutamate in mice.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2013-11-01

    The prototypic umami substance monosodium glutamate (MSG) reinforces preferences for its own flavor, as well as preferences for flavors associated with it, by conditioning processes. Mice of 3 inbred strains (C57BL/6J (B6), 129P3/J, and FVB/NJ) and 2 taste-knockout (KO) groups derived from the B6 lineage were initially indifferent to 200mM MSG, but this evaluation was altered by forced exposure to MSG. B6 and KO mice acquired an MSG preference, 129 mice remained indifferent, and FVB mice avoided MSG. The shifts in preference imply a postoral basis for MSG effects, suggesting that it could produce preferences for associated flavors. New mice were trained with a conditioned stimulus (CS+) flavor mixed in 200mM MSG and a CS- flavor in water. Similar to the parent B6 strain, mice missing the T1r3 element of an umami receptor or the downstream signaling component Trpm5 learned to prefer the CS+ flavor and subsequently showed similar preferences for MSG in an ascending concentration series. Consistent with their responses to forced exposure, the 129 strain did not acquire a significant CS+ preference, and the FVB strain avoided the CS+ flavor. The 129 and FVB strains showed little attraction in the ascending MSG concentration series. Together, these data indicate that the postoral effects of MSG can modulate responses to its own and MSG-paired flavors. The basis for strain differences in the responses to MSG is not certain, but the taste-signaling elements T1r3 and Trpm5, which are also present in the gut, are not required for mediation of this flavor learning.

  11. Investigation of the functional role of P-glycoprotein in limiting the oral bioavailability of lumefantrine.

    PubMed

    Wahajuddin; Raju, Kanumuri S R; Singh, Sheelendra P; Taneja, Isha

    2014-01-01

    In the quest to explore the reason for the low and variable bioavailability of lumefantrine, we investigated the possible role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in lumefantrine intestinal absorption. An in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion study in rats with the P-gp inhibitor verapamil or quinidine and an ATPase assay with human P-gp membranes indicated that lumefantrine is a substrate of P-gp which limits its intestinal absorption. To confirm these findings, an in vivo pharmacokinetic study was performed in rats. The oral administration of verapamil (10 mg/kg of body weight) along with lumefantrine caused a significant increase in its bioavailability with a concomitant decrease in clearance. The increase in bioavailability of lumefantrine could be due to inhibition of P-gp and/or cytochrome P450 3A in the intestine/liver by verapamil. However, in a rat intestinal microsomal stability study, lumefantrine was found to be resistant to oxidative metabolism. Further, an in situ permeation study clearly showed a significant role of P-gp in limiting the oral absorption of lumefantrine. Thus, the increase in lumefantrine bioavailability with verapamil is attributed in part to the P-gp-inhibitory ability of verapamil. In conclusion, lumefantrine is a substrate of P-gp, and active efflux by P-gp across the intestine partly contributed to the low/variable bioavailability of lumefantrine.

  12. Self-reported halitosis and emotional state: impact on oral conditions and treatments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Halitosis represents a common dental condition, although sufferers are often not conscious of it. The aim of this study was to examine behavior in a sample of Italian subjects with reference to self-reported halitosis and emotional state, and specifically the presence of dental anxiety. Methods The study was performed on Italian subjects (N = 1052; range 15-65 years). A self-report questionnaire was used to detect self-reported halitosis and other variables possibly linked to it (sociodemographic data, medical and dental history, oral hygiene, and others), and a dental anxiety scale (DAS) divided into two subscales that explore a patient's dental anxiety and dental anxiety concerning dentist-patient relations. Associations between self-reported halitosis and the abovementioned variables were examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Correlations between the two groups, with self-perceived halitosis and without, were also investigated with dental anxiety and with the importance attributed to one's own mouth and that of others. Results The rate of self-reported halitosis was 19.39%. The factors linked with halitosis were: anxiety regarding dentist patient relations (relational dental anxiety) (OR = 1.04, CI = 1.01-1.07), alcohol consumption (OR = 0.47, CI = 0.34-0.66), gum diseases (OR = 0.39, CI = 0.27-0.55), age > 30 years (OR = 1.01, CI = 1.00-1.02), female gender (OR = 0.71, CI = 0.51-0.98), poor oral hygiene (OR = 0.65, CI = 0.43-0.98), general anxiety (OR = 0.66, CI = 0.49-0.90), and urinary system pathologies (OR = 0.46, CI = 0.30-0.70). Other findings emerged concerning average differences between subjects with or without self-perceived halitosis, dental anxiety and the importance attributed to one's own mouth and that of others. Conclusions Halitosis requires professional care not only by dentists, but also psychological support as it is a problem that leads to avoidance behaviors and thereby limits relationships. It is also linked to

  13. Ten years of hospitalisation for oral health-related conditions in Western Australia: an unjust dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was: (1) to examine the demographics of in-patient oral health care by Aboriginal status; (2) to identify the mix of oral conditions by Aboriginal status; and (3) to describe trends over a 10-year period, comparing Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal groups. Hospitalisation data were obtained from the Western Australian Morbidity Data System (HMDS). The principal diagnosis, as classified by the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10AM), was obtained for every episode for adult patients who were discharged from all hospitals in Western Australia (WA) for the financial years 1999-2000 to 2008-09. Results indicated that more than 130000 persons were admitted to hospitals in WA over 10 years, for oral health-related conditions, at a direct cost of more than $400million. Most of those admitted were younger than 30 years, and 2.8% of all those admitted were Aboriginal people. Aboriginal people were admitted at significantly higher rates, for a very different mix of conditions, they were mostly from younger age groups, were mostly from very remote and the most disadvantaged areas and were almost all uninsured, compared with non-Aboriginal people. Hospital admissions for oral health-related conditions, as well as the mix of conditions that drive these hospitalisations, are strongly divided across social, racial and geographic variables, and remain a burden to the health-care system.

  14. [The impact of oral conditions in the quality of life municipal civil servants].

    PubMed

    Miotto, Maria Helena Monteiro de Barros; Almeida, Claudio Santos; Barcellos, Ludmilla Awad

    2014-09-01

    The scope of this article is to verify the prevalence of the impact produced by oral health conditions on the quality of life of civil servants and the possible association with social and demographic variables, utilization of dental services, dental pain and the need for prosthetics. A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess a random sample of 286 public employees. Data was collected using four questionnaires including the Oral Health Impact Profile. The association between the variables was measured using Fisher's Exact Test; the Odds Ratio evaluated the strength of association between impact and exposure. Logistic regression models were adjusted for each dimension. Ninety-three individuals (32.5%) declared impacts. The main impact prediction was associated with age, social and economic status, education, the use of dental services, the need for prosthetics and dental pain. A considerable number of individuals declared an impact on quality of life due to oral conditions.

  15. Impact of oral health conditions on the quality of life of workers.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Maria Júlia Campos; Greco, Rosangela Maria; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigênia; de Paula, Marcos Vinícius Queiroz

    2014-12-01

    Occupational health has been the scope of numerous studies, primarily due to the concern that the worker should enjoy good working conditions and a satisfactory quality of life. This study seeks to analyze the impact of oral health on the quality of life of workers at a public university using the simplified version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and associated factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 326 workers who responded the questions of OHIP-14 about self-rated health, oral morbidity, and socioeconomic and demographic questions. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to verify the association between the independent variables and OHIP-14. About 40% of the impact of oral health on quality of life can be explained by the variables: education level (p = 0,03), age (p = 0,03), reason for visiting a dentist (p = 0,01), oral health perception (p < 0,01) and satisfaction with teeth and mouth (p < 0,01). The use of OHIP-14 can be useful for planning programs and actions focused on health education for occupational health, prioritizing workers with greater psychosocial impacts caused by oral problems.

  16. 80 FR 44913 - Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Dental and Oral Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-07-28

    ... from the Dental and Oral Conditions Work Group (Work Group), which is comprised of subject matter... (singular, ramus). The Work Group recognized that, because the ramus is a portion of the mandible... Jan. 7, 2014). The Work Group developed rating criteria that takes into account restriction of...

  17. Digoxin products for oral use; revocation of conditions for marketing. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-06-26

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revoking the regulation establishing conditions for marketing digoxin products for oral use. This regulation is no longer necessary because the products, which are new drugs, can be regulated under the approval process for new drug applications (NDAs) and abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) as set forth in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act).

  18. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions Note: The...

  19. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  20. Limited mouth opening in oral submucous fibrosis: reasons, ramifications, and remedies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohit; Radhakrishnan, Raghu

    2016-10-15

    Limited mouth opening (LMO) in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) has been attributed to both the submucosal and muscle fibrosis (MF). While reflectory trismus was proposed before as an auxiliary mechanism by another group, the stretch-mediated muscle damage (MSD), histopathological changes in blood vessels (such as endothelial dysfunction, endothelial hypertrophy, and endarteritis obliterans), and upregulated anaerobic isoforms of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) have been proposed by us as complementary events leading to MF. Additionally, the amount of hypoxia-mediated upregulation of anaerobic isoforms of LDH determines the extent of MF. Radiotherapy (RT)-mediated release of reactive oxygen species causes vascular damage thereby worsening hypoxia. While the alteration in LDH levels secondary to hypoxia enhances fibrosis, RT worsens it. Oral squamous cell carcinoma occurring in the background of OSF is an absolute contraindication for RT as it augurs unfavorable prognosis. An algorithm to demonstrate this with evidence is clearly depicted. The role of HIF-1α in the progression of OSF and its malignant transformation, and the consideration of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a therapeutic remedy in OSF are underscored.

  1. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-07

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO{sub 2} show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of

  2. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-01

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO2 show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 1011-1013 Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of electron acceptors.

  3. Oral health conditions and frailty in Mexican community-dwelling elderly: a cross sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Oral health is an important component of general well-being for the elderly. Oral health-related problems include loss of teeth, nonfunctional removable dental prostheses, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontitis, and root caries. They affect food selection, speaking ability, mastication, social relations, and quality of life. Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that confers vulnerability to negative health-related outcomes. The association between oral health and frailty has not been explored thoroughly. This study sought to identify associations between the presence of some oral health conditions, and frailty status among Mexican community-dwelling elderly. Methods Analysis of baseline data of the Mexican Study of Nutritional and Psychosocial Markers of Frailty, a cohort study carried out in a representative sample of people aged 70 and older residing in one district of Mexico City. Frailty was defined as the presence of three or more of the following five components: weight loss, exhaustion, slowness, weakness, and low physical activity. Oral health variables included self-perception of oral health compared with others of the same age; utilization of dental services during the last year, number of teeth, dental condition (edentate, partially edentate, or completely dentate), utilization and functionality of removable partial or complete dentures, severe periodontitis, self-reported chewing problems and xerostomia. Covariates included were gender, age, years of education, cognitive performance, smoking status, recent falls, hospitalization, number of drugs, and comorbidity. The association between frailty and dental variables was determined performing a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Final models were adjusted by socio-demographic and health factors Results Of the 838 participants examined, 699 had the information needed to establish the criteria for diagnosis of frailty. Those who had a higher probability of being frail included women (OR

  4. National Survey of Oral/Dental Conditions Related to Tobacco and Alcohol Use in Mexican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Hernández-Cruz, Pedro; Ávila-Burgos, Leticia; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases are a major burden on individuals and health systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether consumption of tobacco and alcohol were associated with the prevalence of oral/dental problems in Mexican adults. Using data from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003, a cross-sectional study part of the World Health Survey, dental information from a representative sample of Mexico (n = 22,229, N = 51,155,740) was used to document self-reported oral/dental problems in the 12 months prior to the survey. Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors. Three models were generated for each age group (18–30, 31–45 and 46–98 years). The prevalence of oral/dental conditions was 25.7%. Adjusting for sex, schooling, socioeconomic position, diabetes, and self-reported health, those who used tobacco (sometimes or daily) (OR = 1.15, p = 0.070; OR = 1.24, p < 0.01; and OR = 1.16, p < 0.05, for each age group respectively) or alcohol (moderate or high) (OR = 1.26, p < 0.001; OR = 1.18, p < 0.01 and OR = 1.30, p < 0.001, for each age group respectively) had a higher risk of reporting oral/dental problems. Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health. PMID:24642844

  5. Histological evaluation of oral maintenance programs upon gingival condition in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Hănţoiu, Tudor Alexandru; Hănţoiu, Liana Georgiana; Monea, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to conduct a histological evaluation of gingival condition in patients under orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, according to different oral hygiene maintenance programs. We performed a randomized prospective study on 36 patients with fixed orthodontic appliances (17-25 years of age) divided in three study groups. The investigations were represented by measurements of plaque index and sulcular bleeding index, followed by pathological examination of specimens from gingival tissue. Treatment of orthodontic patients must follow an interdisciplinary approach. All modalities of oral hygiene procedures and their effect on the periodontal tissues must be explained to the patient prior to fixed orthodontic treatment. Fixed orthodontics do not induce periodontal disease if basic principles of oral hygiene are followed in compliant patients, which are correctly instructed to deal with real challenge, represented by complete elimination of debris and bacterial accumulation.

  6. Enhancement of oscillatory activity in the endopiriform nucleus of rats raised under abnormal oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Hasumoto-Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2014-02-21

    Endopiriform nucleus (EPN) is located deep to the piriform cortex, and has neural connections with not only neighboring sensory areas but also subcortical areas where emotional and nociceptive information is processed. Well-balanced oral condition might play an important role in stability of brain activities. When the oral condition is impaired, several areas in the brain might be affected. In the present study, we investigated whether abnormal conditions of oral region influence neural activities in the EPN. Orthodontic appliance that generates continuous force and chronic pain-related stress was fixed to maxillary incisors of rats, and raised. Field potential recordings were made from the EPN of brain slices. We previously reported that the EPN has an ability to generate membrane potential oscillation. In the present study, we have applied the same methods to assess activities of neuron clusters in the EPN. In the case of normal rats, stable field potential oscillations were induced in the EPN by application of low-frequency electrical stimulation under the medium with caffeine. In the case of rats with the orthodontic appliance, stable field potential oscillations were also induced, but both duration of oscillatory activities and wavelet number were increased. The enhanced oscillations were depressed by blockade of NMDA receptors. Thus, impairment of oral health under application of continuous orthodontic force and chronic pain-related stress enhanced neural activities in the EPN, in which up-regulation of NMDA receptors may be concerned. These findings suggest that the EPN might be involved in information processing with regard to abnormal conditions of oral region.

  7. 43 CFR 2741.7 - Acreage limitations and general conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... extent that the conveyances would not have exceeded the limitations of said year. (c) No patents shall be issued under the act unless and until the public lands are officially surveyed. This requirement does...

  8. 43 CFR 2741.7 - Acreage limitations and general conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... extent that the conveyances would not have exceeded the limitations of said year. (c) No patents shall be issued under the act unless and until the public lands are officially surveyed. This requirement does...

  9. 43 CFR 2741.7 - Acreage limitations and general conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... extent that the conveyances would not have exceeded the limitations of said year. (c) No patents shall be issued under the act unless and until the public lands are officially surveyed. This requirement does...

  10. 14 CFR 135.227 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... limitations. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 62696, Dec. 1, 2009. (a) No pilot may take off an... authorized by the Administrator. (b) No certificate holder may authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot... expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has completed all applicable training as required...

  11. Biological effects of extreme environmental conditions. [considering limits of biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imshenetskiy, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Actions of extreme physical and chemical space factors on microorganisms and plants are elaborated in order to establish limits for the biosphere. Considered are effects of low and high temperatures; ionizing and ultraviolet radiation; various gases; and effects of vibration, desiccation and acceleration.

  12. Advances and limitations of visual conditioning protocols in harnessed bees.

    PubMed

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Mota, Theo

    2016-12-18

    Bees are excellent invertebrate models for studying visual learning and memory mechanisms, because of their sophisticated visual system and impressive cognitive capacities associated with a relatively simple brain. Visual learning in free-flying bees has been traditionally studied using an operant conditioning paradigm. This well-established protocol, however, can hardly be combined with invasive procedures for studying the neurobiological basis of visual learning. Different efforts have been made to develop protocols in which harnessed honey bees could associate visual cues with reinforcement, though learning performances remain poorer than those obtained with free-flying animals. Especially in the last decade, the intention of improving visual learning performances of harnessed bees led many authors to adopt distinct visual conditioning protocols, altering parameters like harnessing method, nature and duration of visual stimulation, number of trials, inter-trial intervals, among others. As a result, the literature provides data hardly comparable and sometimes contradictory. In the present review, we provide an extensive analysis of the literature available on visual conditioning of harnessed bees, with special emphasis on the comparison of diverse conditioning parameters adopted by different authors. Together with this comparative overview, we discuss how these diverse conditioning parameters could modulate visual learning performances of harnessed bees.

  13. Discrimination of premalignant conditions of oral cancer using Raman spectroscopy of urinary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumalai, Brindha; Rajasekaran, Ramu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-03-01

    Oral cancers are considered to be one of the most commonly occurring malignancy worldwide. Over 70% of the cases report to the doctor only in advanced stages of the disease, resulting in poor survival rates. Hence it is necessary to detect the disease at the earliest which may increase the five year survival rate up to 90%. Among various optical spectroscopic techniques, Raman spectroscopy has been emerged as a tool in identifying several diseased conditions, including oral cancers. Around 30 - 80% of the malignancies of the oral cavity arise from premalignant lesions. Hence, understanding the molecular/spectral differences at the premalignant stage may help in identifying the cancer at the earliest and increase patient's survival rate. Among various bio-fluids such as blood, urine and saliva, urine is considered as one of the diagnostically potential bio-fluids, as it has many metabolites. The distribution and the physiochemical properties of the urinary metabolites may vary due to the changes associated with the pathologic conditions. The present study is aimed to characterize the urine of 70 healthy subjects and 51 pre-malignant patients using Raman spectroscopy under 785nm excitation, to know the molecular/spectral differences between healthy subjects and premalignant conditions of oral malignancy. Principal component analysis based Linear discriminant analysis were also made to find the statistical significance and the present technique yields the sensitivity and specificity of 86.3% and 92.9% with an overall accuracy of 90.9% in the discrimination of premalignant conditions from healthy subjects urine.

  14. The Limits of Knowledge Management in Contemporary Corporate Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on Jean-François Lyotard's (1984) seminal study "The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge" to reflect on two macro-level catastrophes: the global financial crisis (GFC) of 2009 (and its continuing effects throughout the Eurozone and elsewhere) and Fukushima. These two case studies probe aspects of these grand…

  15. 14 CFR 125.221 - Icing conditions: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 74 FR 62696, Dec. 1, 2009. (a) No pilot may take off an airplane that has frost, ice, or snow... authorize an airplane to take off and no pilot may take off an airplane any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may reasonably be expected to adhere to the airplane unless the pilot has...

  16. 33 CFR 330.4 - Conditions, limitations, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with any existing or proposed Federal project. (c) State 401 water quality certification. (1) State 401 water quality certification pursuant to section 401 of the Clean Water Act, or waiver thereof, is... issues a 401 water quality certification which includes special conditions, the division engineer...

  17. 33 CFR 330.4 - Conditions, limitations, and restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... issues a 401 water quality certification which includes special conditions, the division engineer will... without prejudice until the state issues an individual 401 water quality certification or waives its right... state action on the individual section 401 water quality certification. If a state issues a...

  18. [Oral health conditions diagnostic in cerebral palsy individuals of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Patrícia Osório; Garcias, Gilberto de Lima

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy (CP) is an encephalic static lesion defined as a non-progressive disorder of movements and posture. It is usually associated with epilepsy, speaking, hearing and sight disorders and also mental retardation. Even though, people who have CP need special care for the prevention of factors linked to oral problems, in the odontological context, the literary information is contradictory when it comes to the incidence of oral diseases on patients who have cerebral palsy. In order to determine the oral health and associated factors conditions, an epidemiological research has been made in 41 children who have cerebral palsy. The variables taken into account were: social-economical aspects, risk factors for the development of oral diseases, access to odontological care, caries index, periodontal disease, malocclusion and dental fluorose. Children who were examined showed a higher level of gingivitis and caries experience, mainly on the primary dentition, and also severe malocclusions, factors that indicate the need of early intervention, whether with educational programs or healing assistance. The study has shown that, in addition to the quantitative necessity of care, it is also necessary to improve the quality of these patients' consultations.

  19. Stability of vaccinia-vectored recombinant oral rabies vaccine under field conditions: a 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Joseph R; Fry, Alethea M; Siev, David; Slate, Dennis; Lewis, Charles; Gatewood, Donna M

    2011-10-01

    Rabies is an incurable zoonotic disease caused by rabies virus, a member of the rhabdovirus family. It is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Control methods, including oral rabies vaccination (ORV) programs, have led to a reduction in the spread and prevalence of the disease in wildlife. This study evaluated the stability of RABORAL, a recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine that is used in oral rabies vaccination programs. The vaccine was studied in various field microenvironments in order to describe its viability and facilitate effective baiting strategies. Field microenvironments influenced the stability of this vaccine in this study. This study emphasizes the importance of understanding how vaccines perform under varying field conditions in order to plan effective baiting strategies.

  20. Bacterial diversity in saliva and oral health-related conditions: the Hisayama Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Toru; Kageyama, Shinya; Furuta, Michiko; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Kenji; Shibata, Yukie; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Akifusa, Sumio; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2016-02-01

    This population-based study determined the salivary microbiota composition of 2,343 adult residents of Hisayama town, Japan, using 16S rRNA gene next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Of 550 identified species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs), 72 were common, in ≥75% of all individuals, as well as in ≥75% of the individuals in the lowest quintile of phylogenetic diversity (PD). These “core” OTUs constituted 90.9 ± 6.1% of each microbiome. The relative abundance profiles of 22 of the core OTUs with mean relative abundances ≥1% were stratified into community type I and community type II by partitioning around medoids clustering. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a lower PD was associated with better conditions for oral health, including a lower plaque index, absence of decayed teeth, less gingival bleeding, shallower periodontal pockets and not smoking, and was also associated with tooth loss. By contrast, multiple Poisson regression analysis demonstrated that community type II, as characterized by a higher ratio of the nine dominant core OTUs, including Neisseria flavescens, was implicated in younger age, lower body mass index, fewer teeth with caries experience, and not smoking. Our large-scale data analyses reveal variation in the salivary microbiome among Japanese adults and oral health-related conditions associated with the salivary microbiome.

  1. Bacterial diversity in saliva and oral health-related conditions: the Hisayama Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Toru; Kageyama, Shinya; Furuta, Michiko; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Kenji; Shibata, Yukie; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Akifusa, Sumio; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    This population-based study determined the salivary microbiota composition of 2,343 adult residents of Hisayama town, Japan, using 16S rRNA gene next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Of 550 identified species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs), 72 were common, in ≥75% of all individuals, as well as in ≥75% of the individuals in the lowest quintile of phylogenetic diversity (PD). These “core” OTUs constituted 90.9 ± 6.1% of each microbiome. The relative abundance profiles of 22 of the core OTUs with mean relative abundances ≥1% were stratified into community type I and community type II by partitioning around medoids clustering. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a lower PD was associated with better conditions for oral health, including a lower plaque index, absence of decayed teeth, less gingival bleeding, shallower periodontal pockets and not smoking, and was also associated with tooth loss. By contrast, multiple Poisson regression analysis demonstrated that community type II, as characterized by a higher ratio of the nine dominant core OTUs, including Neisseria flavescens, was implicated in younger age, lower body mass index, fewer teeth with caries experience, and not smoking. Our large-scale data analyses reveal variation in the salivary microbiome among Japanese adults and oral health-related conditions associated with the salivary microbiome. PMID:26907866

  2. Oral anticancer drugs: how limited dosing options and dose reductions may affect outcomes in comparative trials and efficacy in patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R; Fojo, Tito

    2014-05-20

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials.

  3. Oral Anticancer Drugs: How Limited Dosing Options and Dose Reductions May Affect Outcomes in Comparative Trials and Efficacy in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R.; Fojo, Tito

    2014-01-01

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials. PMID:24711558

  4. Autofluorescence guided diagnostic evaluation of suspicious oral mucosal lesions: opportunities, limitations, and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2011-03-01

    Wide-filed autofluorescence examination is currently considered as a standard of care for screening and diagnostic evaluation of early neoplastic changes of the skin, cervix, lung, bladder, gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Naturally occurring fluorophores within the tissue absorb UV and visible light and can re-emit some of this light at longer wavelengths in the form of fluorescence. This non-invasive tissue autofluorescence imaging is used in optical diagnostics, especially in the early detection of cancer. Usually, malignant transformation is associated with thickening of the epithelium, enhanced cellular density due to increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio which may attenuate the excitation leading to a decrease in collagen autofluorescence. Hence, dysplastic and cancerous tissues often exhibit decreased blue-green autofluorescence and appear darker compared to uninvolved mucosa. Currently, there are three commercially available devices to examine tissue autofluorescence in the oral cavity. In this study we used the oral cancer screening device IdentafiTM 3000 to examine the tissue reflectance and autofluorescence of PML and confounding lesions of the oral cavity. Wide-field autofluorescence imaging enables rapid inspection of large mucosal surfaces, to aid in recognition of suspicious lesions and may also help in discriminate the PML (class 1) from some of the confounding lesions (class II). However, the presence of inflammation or pigments is also associated with loss of stromal autofluorescence, and may give rise to false-positive results with widefield fluorescence imaging. Clinicians who use these autofluorescence based oral cancer screening devices should be aware about the benign oral mucosal lesions that may give false positivity so that unnecessary patient's anxiety and the need for scalpel biopsy can be eliminated.

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  8. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Y of... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Y of Part...

  9. What Conditions Limit Sports Participation? Experience with 10,540 Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnes, Scott A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Researchers evaluated results from five years of preseason examinations on student athletes to determine which conditions limited sports participation. Hypertension, ophthalmologic and genitourinary abnormalities, and musculoskeletal problems were the most common limiting conditions. Preseason examinations need to follow guidelines based on…

  10. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE...

  11. Evaluation of the antineoplastic activity of gallic acid in oral squamous cell carcinoma under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Talita A; Farias, Lucyana C; Fraga, Carlos A; Feltenberger, John D; Melo, Geraldo A; Coletta, Ricardo D; Souza Santos, Sergio H; de Paula, Alfredo M B; Guimaraes, Andre L

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop and test a theoretical model that could explain the mechanism of action of gallic acid (GA) in the oral squamous cell carcinoma context for the first time. The theoretical model was developed using bioinformatics and interaction network analysis to evaluate the effect of GA on oral squamous cell carcinoma. In a second step to confirm theoretical results, migration, invasion, proliferation, and gene expression (Col1A1, E-cadherin, HIF-1α, and caspase-3) were performed under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Our study indicated that treatment with GA resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in neoplastic cells. Observation of the molecular mechanism showed that GA upregulates E-cadherin expression and downregulates Col1A1 and HIF-1α expression, suggesting that GA might be a potential anticancer compound. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that GA significantly reduces cell proliferation, invasion, and migration by increasing E-cadherin and repressing Col1A1.

  12. Evaluation of oral tilmicosin efficacy against severe cryptosporidiosis in neonatal kids under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Paraud, C; Pors, I; Chartier, C

    2010-05-28

    Many compounds have been screened for their potential anti-cryptosporidial activity in ruminants but none of them has been totally efficient in controlling the disease. Macrolide antibiotics have demonstrated some activity against Cryptosporidium spp. in humans. Tilmicosin is a macrolide antibiotic, available in France in an oral form (Pulmotil AC, Lilly France). The preventive efficacy of tilmicosin was evaluated in a goat farm experiencing severe clinical cryptosporidiosis in kids. Twenty-two kids were separated from their dams just after birth and placed in a separated pen. They were divided into 3 groups: an untreated group (10 kids), group 1 (6 kids) receiving tilmicosin at 25mg/kg BW/day and group 2 (6 kids) receiving tilmicosin at 50mg/kg BW/day. Tilmicosin was individually given by oral route from day 2 of age for 10 days. Three times a week, individual faecal samples were performed to assess the oocyst output. Clinical data, i.e. diarrhea and mortality, were recorded. In control kids, the highest prevalence and intensity of excretion were observed between day 6 and day 16 of age and mortality reached 90%. Excretion dynamic and clinical consequences were similar in both treated kid groups. Finally, tilmicosin did not demonstrate any activity against severe kid cryptosporidiosis in field conditions.

  13. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin Zhang, Xiangyi; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ∼1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  14. The financial repercussions of new work-limiting health conditions for older workers.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Jody; Stapleton, David C

    2012-01-01

    This analysis used propensity score matching to construct a comparison sample that is observationally similar at baseline interview to older workers who later experience the onset of a medical condition that limits their ability to work. Using these matched onset and comparison samples, we studied trajectories in earnings and income around onset of the work limitation. Earnings two years after onset for the work-limitation group were 50% lower and poverty rates were nearly double. Income from unemployment insurance, workers' compensation, and retirement and disability benefits offset only a small amount of the earnings declines, resulting in decreased overall household income after onset of the work-limiting condition.

  15. A double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial of topical 2% viscous lidocaine in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Painful infectious mouth conditions are a common presentation to emergency departments. Although self limiting, painful ulcerative lesions and inflamed mucosa can decrease oral intake and can lead to dehydration. Oral analgesia is of limited efficacy and is often refused by the patient. Despite widespread use of oral 2% viscous lidocaine for many years, there is little evidence for its efficacy as an analgesic and in aiding oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions. This study aims to establish the effectiveness of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in these children by comparing it with placebo. Methods/Design This study is a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial of children between 6 months and 8 years of age with painful infectious mouth conditions defined as gingivostomatitis (herpetic or non herpetic), ulcerative pharyngitis, herpangina and hand foot and mouth disease as assessed by the treating clinician in association with a history of poor oral fluid intake. It will be conducted at a single tertiary paediatric emergency department in Melbourne Australia. 20 patients have already been randomised to receive 2% lidocaine or placebo in a pilot study to determine the sample size in a preplanned adaptive design. A further 80 patients will be randomised to receive either 2% lidocaine or placebo. The placebo agent is identical to lidocaine in terms of appearance, flavour and smell. All clinical and research staff involved, patients and their parents will be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint is the amount of fluid ingested by each child, expressed in ml/kg, within 60 minutes from the time of administration of the study mixture. Secondary endpoints are the proportion of patients ingesting 5 ml/kg and 10 ml/kg at 30 and 60 minutes after drug administration and the incidence of adverse events. Longer term outcomes will include the proportion of patients requiring hospital admission and length

  16. Family history of cancer, personal history of medical conditions and risk of oral cavity cancer in France: the ICARE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of family history of cancer and personal history of other medical conditions in the aetiology of the oral cavity cancer in France. Methods We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls included in a population-based case–control study, the ICARE study. Odds-ratios (ORs) associated with family history of cancer and personal medical conditions and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression and were adjusted for age, gender, area of residence, education, body mass index, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Results Personal history of oral candidiasis was related to a significantly increased risk of oral cavity cancer (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.1-12.1). History of head and neck cancers among the first-degree relatives was associated with an OR of 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-2.8). The risk increased with the number of first-degree relatives with head and neck cancer. Conclusion A family history of head and neck cancer is a marker of an increased risk of oral cavity cancer and should be taken into account to target prevention efforts and screening. Further studies are needed to clarify the association between oral cavity cancer and personal history of candidiasis. PMID:24286495

  17. Justification of Filter Selection for Robot Balancing in Conditions of Limited Computational Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momot, M. V.; Politsinskaia, E. V.; Sushko, A. V.; Semerenko, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper considers the problem of mathematical filter selection, used for balancing of wheeled robot in conditions of limited computational resources. The solution based on complementary filter is proposed.

  18. Pontine Stimulation Overcomes Developmental Limitations in the Neural Mechanisms of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, John H., Jr; Rabinak, Christine A.; Campolattaro, Matthew M.

    2005-01-01

    Pontine neuronal activation during auditory stimuli increases ontogenetically between postnatal days (P) P17 and P24 in rats. Pontine neurons are an essential component of the conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway for eyeblink conditioning, providing mossy fiber input to the cerebellum. Here we examined whether the developmental limitation in pontine…

  19. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  20. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  1. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  2. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  3. 42 CFR 410.39 - Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.39 Prostate cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations... cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for the...

  4. 34 CFR 675.20 - Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAMS Federal Work-Study Program § 675.20 Eligible employers and general conditions and limitation on employment... agreement with that agency or organization. The agreement must set forth the FWS work conditions....

  5. Optimal allocation of the limited oral cholera vaccine supply between endemic and epidemic settings

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean M.; Lessler, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently established a global stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) to be preferentially used in epidemic response (reactive campaigns) with any vaccine remaining after 1 year allocated to endemic settings. Hence, the number of cholera cases or deaths prevented in an endemic setting represents the minimum utility of these doses, and the optimal risk-averse response to any reactive vaccination request (i.e. the minimax strategy) is one that allocates the remaining doses between the requested epidemic response and endemic use in order to ensure that at least this minimum utility is achieved. Using mathematical models, we find that the best minimax strategy is to allocate the majority of doses to reactive campaigns, unless the request came late in the targeted epidemic. As vaccine supplies dwindle, the case for reactive use of the remaining doses grows stronger. Our analysis provides a lower bound for the amount of OCV to keep in reserve when responding to any request. These results provide a strategic context for the fulfilment of requests to the stockpile, and define allocation strategies that minimize the number of OCV doses that are allocated to suboptimal situations. PMID:26423441

  6. Optimal allocation of the limited oral cholera vaccine supply between endemic and epidemic settings.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean M; Lessler, Justin

    2015-10-06

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently established a global stockpile of oral cholera vaccine (OCV) to be preferentially used in epidemic response (reactive campaigns) with any vaccine remaining after 1 year allocated to endemic settings. Hence, the number of cholera cases or deaths prevented in an endemic setting represents the minimum utility of these doses, and the optimal risk-averse response to any reactive vaccination request (i.e. the minimax strategy) is one that allocates the remaining doses between the requested epidemic response and endemic use in order to ensure that at least this minimum utility is achieved. Using mathematical models, we find that the best minimax strategy is to allocate the majority of doses to reactive campaigns, unless the request came late in the targeted epidemic. As vaccine supplies dwindle, the case for reactive use of the remaining doses grows stronger. Our analysis provides a lower bound for the amount of OCV to keep in reserve when responding to any request. These results provide a strategic context for the fulfilment of requests to the stockpile, and define allocation strategies that minimize the number of OCV doses that are allocated to suboptimal situations.

  7. Reducing Conservatism in Aircraft Engine Response Using Conditionally Active Min-Max Limit Regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Current aircraft engine control logic uses a Min-Max control selection structure to prevent the engine from exceeding any safety or operational limits during transients due to throttle commands. This structure is inherently conservative and produces transient responses that are slower than necessary. In order to utilize the existing safety margins more effectively, a modification to this architecture is proposed, referred to as a Conditionally Active (CA) limit regulator. This concept uses the existing Min-Max architecture with the modification that limit regulators are active only when the operating point is close to a particular limit. This paper explores the use of CA limit regulators using a publicly available commercial aircraft engine simulation. The improvement in thrust response while maintaining all necessary safety limits is demonstrated in a number of cases.

  8. Effect of handling and storage conditions and stabilizing agent on the recovery of viral RNA from oral fluid of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Muehlhauser, V

    2014-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in using oral fluid to determine herd health and documenting the circulation of viruses in commercial swine populations but little is known about the stability of viruses in oral fluid. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a zoonotic virus which is widespread in swine herds. Information on optimal handling methods such as heat treatments, freezing and RNA stabilization agents is needed to prevent or minimize degradation of viral RNA by degradative enzymes. The objectives of the study were to determine optimum handling conditions of the oral fluid before RNA extraction and to compare the performance of the RNeasy Protect Saliva Mini kit, which contains a stabilizing agent, with that of the QIAamp Viral RNA Mini kit, which does not contain a stabilizing agent. Preliminary studies with oral fluid inoculated with HEV indicated that a heat treatment of 60°C for 15min was detrimental to HEV RNA. HEV was recovered from 25/25 and 24/25 samples of oral fluid when samples were incubated for ≤24h at 4°C and 30days at -20°C, respectively, without a stabilizing agent and extracted with the QiaAMP kit. In contrast, HEV RNA was detected in 16/25 and 11/25 samples when samples were incubated with a stabilizing agent for 24h at 37°C and 30days at -20°C, respectively, and extracted with the RNeasy Protect Saliva kit. Moreover, the mean number of genome copies/ml of HEV recovered from oral fluid stored at -20°C without the stabilizing agent was 2.9 log units higher than oral fluid stored at -20°C in the presence of the stabilizing agent. The recovery of RNA from HEV, F-RNA coliphage MS2 and murine norovirus (MNV), which are surrogates for norovirus, was significantly greater when oral fluid was incubated for 24h at 4°C than when oral fluid was stabilized with RNAprotect Saliva Reagent for 24h at 37°C, where the relative differences between the two processes were 1.4, 1.8, and 2.7 log genome copies/ml for MS2, MNV, and HEV, respectively. The findings

  9. Model-based condition monitoring of PEM fuel cell using Hotelling T 2 control limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X.; Tang, J.; Sammes, N.; Ding, Y.

    Although a variety of design and control strategies have been proposed to improve the performance of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems, temporary faults in such systems still might occur during operations due to the complexity of the physical process and the functional limitations of some components. The development of an effective condition monitoring system that can detect these faults in a timely manner is complicated by the operating condition variation, the significant variability/uncertainty of the fuel cell system, and the measurement noise. In this research, we propose a model-based condition monitoring scheme that employs the Hotelling T 2 statistical analysis for fault detection of PEM fuel cells. Under a given operating condition, the instantaneous load current, the temperature and fuel/gas source pressures of the fuel cell are measured. These measurements are then fed into a lumped parameter dynamic fuel cell model for the establishment of the baseline under the same operating condition for comparison. The fuel cell operation is simulated under statistical sampling of parametric uncertainties with specified statistics (mean and variance) that account for the system variability/uncertainty and measurement noise. This yields a group of output voltages (under the same operating condition but with uncertainties) as the baseline. Fault detection is facilitated by comparing the real-time measurement of the fuel cell output voltage with the baseline voltages by employing the Hotelling T 2 statistical analysis. The baseline voltages are used to evaluate the output T 2 statistics under normal operating condition. Then, with a given confidence level the upper control limit can be specified. Fault condition will be declared if the T 2 statistics of real-time voltage measurement exceeds the upper control limit. This model-based robust condition monitoring scheme can deal with the operating condition variation, various uncertainties in a fuel cell

  10. Methods to Assess the Impact of Mass Oral Cholera Vaccination Campaigns under Real Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deen, Jacqueline; Ali, Mohammad; Sack, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest to use oral cholera vaccination as an additional strategy to water and sanitation interventions against endemic and epidemic cholera. There are two internationally-available and WHO-prequalified oral cholera vaccines: an inactivated vaccine containing killed whole-cells of V. cholerae O1 with recombinant cholera toxin B-subunit (WC/rBS) and a bivalent inactivated vaccine containing killed whole cells of V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 (BivWC). The efficacy, effectiveness, direct and indirect (herd) protection conferred by WC/rBS and BivWC are well established. Yet governments may need local evidence of vaccine impact to justify and scale-up mass oral cholera vaccination campaigns. We discuss various approaches to assess oral cholera vaccine protection, which may be useful to policymakers and public health workers considering deployment and evaluation of the vaccine. PMID:24516595

  11. [The use of the new direct oral anticoagulants among older subjects: The limits of the evidence-based medicine?].

    PubMed

    Vogel, T; Lang, P-O; Kaltenbach, G; Karcher, P

    2015-12-01

    The growing use of direct oral anticoagulants, in particular among older subjects, raises questions about the limits of the evidence-based medicine. The phase III studies that have validated the efficacy and the safety profile of these molecules (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) in their both indications, the venous thromboembolic disease and the non-valvular atrial fibrillation raise concerns in four major fields: the financial support of pharmaceutical companies, the links of interest for many authors with the industry, the study design (exclusively non-inferiority studies), and the poor representativeness of the older subjects included. All these points are discussed, using data of sub-groups studies, post-marketing studies and recent meta-analysis. The lack of data for the very old subjects, with frailty or comorbidities, remains the main concern from these phase III studies.

  12. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  13. Metformin increases PDH and suppresses HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions and induces cell death in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Talita Antunes; Farias, Lucyana Conceição; Santos, Eliane Sobrinho; de Carvalho Fraga, Carlos Alberto; Orsini, Lissur Azevedo; de Freitas Teles, Leandro; Feltenberger, John David; de Jesus, Sabrina Ferreira; de Souza, Marcela Gonçalves; Sousa Santos, Sérgio Henrique; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista

    2016-01-01

    Background Metformin is a biguanide, belonging to the oral hypoglycemic agents and is a widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Evidence indicate that Metformin inhibits cell proliferation in several human cancers and inhibits the Warburg phenomenon in tumor cells. Results Low PDH levels were observed in OSCC, and Metformin promotes an increase in PDH levels in hypoxic conditions. Metformin also reduced HIF-1α mRNA and protein levels. Metformin demonstrated antiproliferative effects, inhibited migration, increased the number of apoptotic cells and increased the transcription of caspase 3. Objective The present study aims to explore the effects of Metformin in hypoxic conditions. Specifically, we focused on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) HIF-1α levels and the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell phenotype. Additionally, we also investigated a theoretical consequence of Metformin treatment. Methods PDH levels in patients with OSCC and oral dysplasia were evaluated. Metformin was administered in vitro to test the effect of Metformin under hypoxic conditions. The results were complemented by Bioinformatics analyses. Conclusions In conclusion, our current findings show that Metformin reduces HIF-1α gene expression and increases PDH expression. Metformin inhibits cell proliferation and migration in the OSCC cell line model. Additionally, Metformin enhances the number of apoptotic cells and caspase 3 levels. Interestingly enough, Metformin did not increase the mutant p53 levels under hypoxic conditions. PMID:27474170

  14. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prediction of the transport of sand in channels armored with gravel downstream of dams is difficult but necessary for the range of bed conditions from supply limited to capacity transport. Previous work has shown that information on the mean elevation of the sand relative to the gravel and on the s...

  15. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  16. 78 FR 6273 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office THE PRESIDIO TRUST 36 CFR Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... consideration, shall remove pet excrement and deposit it in refuse containers. DATES: The comment period for...

  17. 77 FR 69785 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... consideration, shall remove pet excrement and deposit it in refuse containers. The Trust invites comments on the... requirement throughout Area B that pet excrement be removed and deposited in refuse containers. 1....

  18. 29 CFR 2590.701-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime... imposed by Employer U's plan, has diabetes, as well as retinal degeneration, a foot condition, and...

  19. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  20. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  1. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  2. 50 CFR 22.32 - Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... depredation control order. 22.32 Section 22.32 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... Golden Eagles § 22.32 Conditions and limitations on taking under depredation control order. (a) Whenever the taking of golden eagles without a permit is authorized for the seasonal protection of...

  3. Oral submucous fibrosis: a premalignant condition in a 14-year-old Indian girl

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Anshula; Kiran, Shital; Dhillon, Steffi; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old Indian girl presented with difficulty in mouth opening and burning sensation while eating. On examination, blanching of the oral mucosa with diffuse white pigmented lesion of size 3.5 to 2 cm along with melanotic pigmentation was seen on the left buccal mucosa posteriorly. The patient was diagnosed with oral submucous fibrosis. A comprehensive treatment plan was made based on conservative management that included motivation and intense counselling of the patient and her parents so that she quits the habit of chewing areca nut and tobacco, along with systemic treatment of vitamin B complex supplements, antioxidants, multivitamins and oral physiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the difficulties faced by the clinical practitioners in providing treatment because of the taboos and myths associated with surgical treatment modality in rural population as well as to emphasise the menace of increasing consumption and availability of tobacco and areca nut to children. PMID:24334472

  4. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  5. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  6. Oral conditions and dysphagia in Japanese, community-dwelling middle- and older- aged adults, independent in daily living

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Akinari; Takahashi, Ippei; Kurauchi, Sizuka; Soma, Yuki; Oyama, Toshiaki; Tamura, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Takao; Murashita, Kouichi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Prevention, early detection and effective rehabilitation of dysphagia are important issues to be considered in an aging society. Previous studies have shown conflicting findings regarding the association between dysphagia and its potential risk factors, including age, malnutrition, oral conditions, lifestyle and medical history. Herein, we assessed the prevalence and association of dysphagia with potential risk factors in 50- to 79-year-old adults dwelling in a community in Japan. Patients and methods In this study, there were 532 participants (185 males and 347 females). Participants who responded positively to the question “Do you sometimes choke on drinks/food such as tea and soup?” or those who presented with abnormal repetitive saliva swallowing test findings were diagnosed with dysphagia. The data collected from these participants included the following: number of teeth, occurrence of oral dryness, age, body mass index, serum albumin concentration, smoking, drinking and exercise habits, presence of diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and questions from the Mini–Mental State Examination. Results Dysphagia was observed in 33 males (17.8%) and 76 females (21.9%). To explore the effect of the potential risk factors on the prevalence of dysphagia, a model was built by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Using the forced entry method, oral dryness (odds ratio [OR] =3.683 and P=0.003 in males; OR =1.797 and P=0.032 in females) and the number of teeth (OR =0.946 and P=0.038 in males) were found to be significantly related to dysphagia. Conclusion This cross-sectional study demonstrated associations between oral conditions and dysphagia. Factors such as oral dryness and number of teeth may contribute to dysphagia more so than aging, lifestyle and comorbidity in community-dwelling adults over the age of 50. PMID:28352164

  7. Computing cellular automata spectra under fixed boundary conditions via limit graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruivo, Eurico L. P.; de Oliveira, Pedro P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular automata are fully discrete complex systems with parallel and homogeneous behavior studied both from the theoretical and modeling viewpoints. The limit behaviors of such systems are of particular interest, as they give insight into their emerging properties. One possible approach to investigate such limit behaviors is the analysis of the growth of graphs describing the finite time behavior of a rule in order to infer its limit behavior. Another possibility is to study the Fourier spectrum describing the average limit configurations obtained by a rule. While the former approach gives the characterization of the limit configurations of a rule, the latter yields a qualitative and quantitative characterisation of how often particular blocks of states are present in these limit configurations. Since both approaches are closely related, it is tempting to use one to obtain information about the other. Here, limit graphs are automatically adjusted by configurations directly generated by their respective rules, and use the graphs to compute the spectra of their rules. We rely on a set of elementary cellular automata rules, on lattices with fixed boundary condition, and show that our approach is a more reliable alternative to a previously described method from the literature.

  8. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa S; Helmy Nabo, Manal Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Iron overload causes iron deposition and accumulation in the liver, heart, skin, and other tissues resulting in serious tissue damages. Significant blood clearance from iron and ferritin using wet cupping therapy (WCT) has been reported. WCT is an excretory form of treatment that needs more research efforts. WCT is an available, safe, simple, economic, and time-saving outpatient modality of treatment that has no serious side effects. There are no serious limitations or precautions to discontinue WCT. Interestingly, WCT has solid scientific and medical bases (Taibah mechanism) that explain its effectiveness in treating many disease conditions differing in etiology and pathogenesis. WCT utilizes an excretory physiological principle (pressure-dependent excretion) that resembles excretion through renal glomerular filtration and abscess evacuation. WCT exhibits a percutaneous excretory function that clears blood (through fenestrated skin capillaries) and interstitial fluids from pathological substances without adding a metabolic or detoxification burden on the liver and the kidneys. Interestingly, WCT was reported to decrease serum ferritin (circulating iron stores) significantly by about 22.25% in healthy subjects (in one session) and to decrease serum iron significantly to the level of causing iron deficiency (in multiple sessions). WCT was reported to clear blood significantly of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, uric acid, inflammatory mediators, and immunoglobulin antibodies (rheumatoid factor). Moreover, WCT was reported to enhance the natural immunity, potentiate pharmacological treatments, and to treat many different disease conditions. There are two distinct methods of WCT: traditional WCT and Al-hijamah (WCT of prophetic medicine). Both start and end with skin sterilization. In traditional WCT, there are two steps, skin scarification followed by suction using plastic cups (double S technique); Al-hijamah is a three

  9. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa S; Helmy Nabo, Manal Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Iron overload causes iron deposition and accumulation in the liver, heart, skin, and other tissues resulting in serious tissue damages. Significant blood clearance from iron and ferritin using wet cupping therapy (WCT) has been reported. WCT is an excretory form of treatment that needs more research efforts. WCT is an available, safe, simple, economic, and time-saving outpatient modality of treatment that has no serious side effects. There are no serious limitations or precautions to discontinue WCT. Interestingly, WCT has solid scientific and medical bases (Taibah mechanism) that explain its effectiveness in treating many disease conditions differing in etiology and pathogenesis. WCT utilizes an excretory physiological principle (pressure-dependent excretion) that resembles excretion through renal glomerular filtration and abscess evacuation. WCT exhibits a percutaneous excretory function that clears blood (through fenestrated skin capillaries) and interstitial fluids from pathological substances without adding a metabolic or detoxification burden on the liver and the kidneys. Interestingly, WCT was reported to decrease serum ferritin (circulating iron stores) significantly by about 22.25% in healthy subjects (in one session) and to decrease serum iron significantly to the level of causing iron deficiency (in multiple sessions). WCT was reported to clear blood significantly of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, uric acid, inflammatory mediators, and immunoglobulin antibodies (rheumatoid factor). Moreover, WCT was reported to enhance the natural immunity, potentiate pharmacological treatments, and to treat many different disease conditions. There are two distinct methods of WCT: traditional WCT and Al-hijamah (WCT of prophetic medicine). Both start and end with skin sterilization. In traditional WCT, there are two steps, skin scarification followed by suction using plastic cups (double S technique); Al-hijamah is a three

  10. Growth of Geobacter sulfurreducens under nutrient-limiting conditions in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Núñez, Abraham; Rothermich, Mary; Sharma, Manju; Lovley, Derek

    2005-05-01

    A system for growing Geobacter sulfurreducens under anaerobic conditions in chemostats was developed in order to study the physiology of this organism under conditions that might more closely approximate those found in the subsurface than batch cultures. Geobacter sulfurreducens could be cultured under acetate-limiting conditions with fumarate or Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor at growth rates between 0.04 and 0.09 h(-1). The molar growth yield was threefold higher with fumarate as the electron acceptor than with Fe(III), despite the lower mid-point potential of the fumarate/succinate redox couple. When growth was limited by availability of fumarate, high steady-state concentrations were detected, suggesting that fumarate is unlikely to be an important electron acceptor in sedimentary environments. The half-saturation constant, Ks, for acetate in Fe(III)-grown cultures (10 microM) suggested that the growth of Geobacter species is likely to be acetate limited in most subsurface sediments, but that when millimolar quantities of acetate are added to the subsurface in order to promote the growth of Geobacter for bioremediation applications, this should be enough to overcome any acetate limitations. When the availability of electron acceptors, rather than acetate, limited growth, G. sulfurreducens was less efficient in incorporating acetate into biomass but had higher respiration rates, a desirable physiological characteristic when adding acetate to stimulate the activity of Geobacter species during in situ uranium bioremediation. These results demonstrate that the ability to study the growth of G. sulfurreducens under steady-state conditions can provide insights into its physiological characteristics that have relevance for its activity in a diversity of sedimentary environments.

  11. A water use and growth model for Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.

    1992-12-31

    To investigate the environmental impact of plantation forestry using fast-growing tree species in southern India, a program of field studies was initiated in 1987 specifically to measure the water use, nutrient uptake and growth rates of the plantations. A water use and growth (WAG) model is proposed for calculating transpiration and growth of Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions. The model is based on the measured relationships between transpiration rate and basal cross-sectional area and soil moisture availability. The volume growth rate (in water-limited conditions) is assumed to be proportional to the volume of water transpired. The model is calibrated using (deuterium tracing) measurements of transpiration and measurements of growth recorded at the Puradal experimental plantation, Karnataka, southern India.

  12. Bayesian methodology to estimate and update safety performance functions under limited data conditions: a sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Shahram; Miranda-Moreno, Luis F; Lord, Dominique; Fu, Liping

    2014-03-01

    In road safety studies, decision makers must often cope with limited data conditions. In such circumstances, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), which relies on asymptotic theory, is unreliable and prone to bias. Moreover, it has been reported in the literature that (a) Bayesian estimates might be significantly biased when using non-informative prior distributions under limited data conditions, and that (b) the calibration of limited data is plausible when existing evidence in the form of proper priors is introduced into analyses. Although the Highway Safety Manual (2010) (HSM) and other research studies provide calibration and updating procedures, the data requirements can be very taxing. This paper presents a practical and sound Bayesian method to estimate and/or update safety performance function (SPF) parameters combining the information available from limited data with the SPF parameters reported in the HSM. The proposed Bayesian updating approach has the advantage of requiring fewer observations to get reliable estimates. This paper documents this procedure. The adopted technique is validated by conducting a sensitivity analysis through an extensive simulation study with 15 different models, which include various prior combinations. This sensitivity analysis contributes to our understanding of the comparative aspects of a large number of prior distributions. Furthermore, the proposed method contributes to unification of the Bayesian updating process for SPFs. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the developed methodology. Therefore, the suggested approach offers considerable promise as a methodological tool to estimate and/or update baseline SPFs and to evaluate the efficacy of road safety countermeasures under limited data conditions.

  13. Functional genomics analysis of free fatty acid production under continuous phosphate limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, J Tyler; Korosh, Travis C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-10-13

    Free fatty acids (FFA) are an attractive platform chemical that serves as a functional intermediate in metabolic pathways for producing oleochemicals. Many groups have established strains of Escherichia coli capable of producing various chain-length mixtures of FFA by heterologous expression of acyl-ACP thioesterases. For example, high levels of dodecanoic acid are produced by an E. coli strain expressing the Umbellularia californica FatB2 thioesterase, BTE. Prior studies achieved high dodecanoic acid yields and productivities under phosphate-limiting media conditions. In an effort to understand the metabolic and physiological changes that led to increased FFA production, the transcriptome of this strain was assessed as a function of nutrient limitation and growth rate. FFA generation under phosphate limitation led to consistent changes in transporter expression, osmoregulation, and central metabolism. Guided by these results, targeted knockouts led to a further ~11 % in yield in FFA.

  14. [Relation between oral health conditions and diabetes mellitus in a japanese population from Bauru-SP-Brazil].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Nilce Emy; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; Franco, Laércio Joel; Iunes, Magid; Freitas, José Alberto de Souza; Lopes, Eymar Sampaio

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the oral health condition in a Japanese population aged 40 to 79, in Bauru, Brazil as well as its association with the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance. It involved 530 subjects, from both sexes. All persons of first generation (Issei) and a random sample of one third of second generation (Nisei) were submitted to a home interview. A clinical examination, oral glucose tolerance test, and examination of oral health conditions took place at the Hospital of Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomaly - USP. The data were processed by Epi-Info program and 22.9% of the individuals presented diabetes mellitus (group I), 15.1% impaired glucose tolerance (group II), and 61.9% were considered normoglycemics (group III). The percentage of edentulous subjects was 45.9% for the total sample, and values of 58.4%, 46.7%, and 41.2% were observed for groups I, II, and III, respectively. Among the edentulous subjects, no one showed necessity of making a total prothesis. These data indicate that tooth loss showed significant association with the occurrence of diabetes mellitus, but there was no significant association with glucose intolerance.

  15. Child- and family impacts of infants’ oral conditions in Tanzania and Uganda– a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early childhood dental caries impacts on the quality of life of children and their families. This study set out to assess the psychometric properties of an oral health related quality of life, OHRQoL, measure, based on items emanating from the Child-and Family impact sections of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS), in Kiswahili and Luganda speaking communities. It was hypothesized that the Child- and Family impact scores would discriminate between children with and without clinically defined dental problems and reported good and bad oral health. Method Kiswahili and Luganda versions of the Child- and Family impact scores were derived through translation in pilot studies. Totals of 1221 and 816 child/caretaker pairs attending health care facilities in Manyara, Tanzania and Kampala, Uganda, were recruited into the study. After caretakers completed the interview, their children underwent oral clinical examination. Results Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha) was > 0.80 with respect to the Child impact score and 0.79 regarding the Family impact score. Multiple variable logistic- and Poisson regression analyses revealed that the Kiswahili and Luganda versions of the Child- and Family impact score associated in the expected direction with child’s oral diseases as with their reported health and oral health status. In Manyara, multiple logistic regression revealed that the ORs of reporting Child impacts were 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-3.4) and 2.2 (1.3-3.4) among caretakers who confirmed linear hypoplasia and teething symptoms, respectively. In Kampala, the ORs for reporting Child impacts were 2.3 (95% CI 1.3-3.9), 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.5), 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.3) and 2.7 (95% CI 1.3-5.8) among those who confirmed teeth present, hypoplasia, teething symptoms and tooth bud extractions, respectively. The odds ratios for reporting Family impacts were 2.7 (95% CI 1.5-4.7), 1.5 (95% CI 1.1- 2.1) and 4.6 (95% CI 2.0-10.7) if reporting LEH, teething

  16. Role of microRNAs involved in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorous limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giao N; Rothstein, Steven J; Spangenberg, German; Kant, Surya

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs which target and regulate the expression of genes involved in several growth, development, and metabolism processes. Recent researches have shown involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of uptake and utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and more importantly for plant adaptation to N and P limitation conditions by modifications in plant growth, phenology, and architecture and production of secondary metabolites. Developing strategies that allow for the higher efficiency of using both N and P fertilizers in crop production is important for economic and environmental benefits. Improved crop varieties with better adaptation to N and P limiting conditions could be a key approach to achieve this effectively. Furthermore, understanding on the interactions between N and P uptake and use and their regulation is important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in plants. This review describes the possible functions of different miRNAs and their cross-talk relevant to the plant adaptive responses to N and P limiting conditions. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of these processes at molecular level and importance of biological adaptation for improved N and P use efficiency is discussed.

  17. Role of microRNAs involved in plant response to nitrogen and phosphorous limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Giao N.; Rothstein, Steven J.; Spangenberg, German; Kant, Surya

    2015-01-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs which target and regulate the expression of genes involved in several growth, development, and metabolism processes. Recent researches have shown involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of uptake and utilization of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and more importantly for plant adaptation to N and P limitation conditions by modifications in plant growth, phenology, and architecture and production of secondary metabolites. Developing strategies that allow for the higher efficiency of using both N and P fertilizers in crop production is important for economic and environmental benefits. Improved crop varieties with better adaptation to N and P limiting conditions could be a key approach to achieve this effectively. Furthermore, understanding on the interactions between N and P uptake and use and their regulation is important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in plants. This review describes the possible functions of different miRNAs and their cross-talk relevant to the plant adaptive responses to N and P limiting conditions. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of these processes at molecular level and importance of biological adaptation for improved N and P use efficiency is discussed. PMID:26322069

  18. Resonant condition for storage ring short wavelength FEL with power exceeding Renieri limit

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Wu, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of operating a storage ring FEL with resonant conditions providing for preservation of electron beam structure on an optical wave scale. We suggest tuning the storage ring betatron and synchrotron tunes on one of the high (N-th) order resonances to compensate dynamic diffusion of optical phase. This mode of operation does not require isochronicity of the ring lattice. In these conditions optical phase will be restored after N turns around the ring and stochastic conditions used in the derivation of Renieri limit are no longer applicable. We discuss the influence of high order terms in electron motion, RF frequency stability, and synchrotron radiation effects on preservation of optical phase.

  19. Water swallow screening test for patients after surgery for head and neck cancer: early identification of dysphagia, aspiration and limitations of oral intake.

    PubMed

    Hey, Christiane; Lange, Benjamin P; Eberle, Silvia; Zaretsky, Yevgen; Sader, Robert; Stöver, Timo; Wagenblast, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are at high risk for oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) following surgical therapy. Early identification of OD can improve outcomes and reduce economic burden. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of a water screening test using increasing volumes postsurgically for patients with HNC (N=80) regarding the early identification of OD in general, and whether there is a need for further instrumental diagnostics to investigate the presence of aspiration as well as to determine the limitations of oral intake as defined by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. OD in general was identified in 65%, with aspiration in 49%, silent aspiration in 21% and limitations of oral intake in 56%. Despite a good sensitivity, for aspiration of 100% and for limitations of oral intake of 97.8%, the presented water screening test did not satisfactorily predict either of these reference criteria due to its low positive likelihood ratio (aspiration=2.6; limitations of oral intake=3.1). However, it is an accurate tool for the early identification of OD in general, with a sensitivity of 96.2% and a positive likelihood ratio of 5.4 in patients after surgery for HNC.

  20. Oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, G T

    2001-04-01

    Oral candidoses are frequently encountered in the practice of dentistry. Although most oral candidoses are symptomless, the can indicate the presence of an underlying systemic disease, and the persistence of oral candidosis following appropriate conventional management may be one of the first signs of undiagnosed immunosuppression. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans is the most commonly isolated species from oral candidal lesions; however, the non-albicans Candida spp. are also implicated in the aetiology of oral candidoses. The effective management of oral candidosis is dependent on an accurate diagnosis, identification and elimination of any predisposing factors (where possible), and the prescription of either topical or systemic antifungal agents. Oral candidosis may have significant implications for the general health of immunosuppressed patients, particularly when caused by the non-albicans spp. and, in cases of severe immunosuppression, systemic candidosis can be life-threatening. This article outlines the clinical presentation and appropriate management for the commonly presenting oral candidal conditions.

  1. Limiting conditions of the horizontal transmission of the Drosophila C virus in its host ( D. melanogaster)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomariz-Zilber, Eliane; Jeune, Bernard; Thomas-Orillard, Michèle

    1998-04-01

    We carried out experiments with virus infected females on the horizontal transmission of Drosophila C virus on artificial culture medium and under controlled conditions. The numerical results made it possible to build up an empirical model. We tested the values of the rearing parameters under nearly natural conditions in boxes containing pieces of rotting apple. A good agreement between observed and estimated values led to the following conclusions: (i) The horizontal transmission of the Drosophila C virus is facilitated via the contamination of the nutritive medium by the cadavers or the feces of virus-infected females (ii) The contamination depends on the richness of viral particles of the contaminating flies. We also confirmed under 'natural' conditions the insufficient contamination of the male flies which justifies the use of females as 'reservoirs' of the virus. The estimation of the biological limiting conditions for horizontal transfer of the virus is the following: a minimum of two contaminating females have to stay for at least two days on an initially uninfected milieu so that a durable contamination of at least some females results. Under these conditions, the richness in viral particles in the contaminated flies is lower than that in the contaminating females and therefore the long term virus infection remains problematical.

  2. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  3. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  4. Calcification and photosynthesis of the coral acropora cervicornis under calcium limited conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathfon, Megan; Brewer, Debbie

    1997-01-01

    Differing hypothesis about the function of calcification are based on an interesting dilemma. Is the purpose of calcification mainly a structural and protective one or does calcification serve other functions? Does photosynthesis increase carbonate ion activity and cause calcification or does calcification increase CO2 levels and stimulate photsynthesis? It is proposed that calcification in corals is not dependent upon photosynthesis but upon calcium levels in the water. Under normal ocean conditions, corals convert a certain percentage of energy to photosynthesis and respiration and another percentage to calcification. As corals become nutrient stressed, particularly calcium limited, the ratio of photosynthesis to calcification shifts towards calcification in order to generate protons. The protons generated during calcification may stimulate photosynthesis and aid in the uptake of nutrients and biocarbonates. The results of the calcification experiment show a trend towards increased calcification and decreased photosynthesis when the coral Acropora cervicornis is calcium limited, but the data are inconclusive and further research is needed.

  5. Discriminative ability of the generic and condition specific Oral Impact on Daily Performance (OIDP) among adolescents with and without hypodontia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to (1) investigate to what extent the generic and condition specific (CS) forms of the oral impact of daily performance (OIDP) inventory discriminate between a group of patients with hypodontia and a group of patients having malocclusion, (2) assess the association of the generic and CS OIDP with severity and localisation of hypodontia, whilst adjusting for patients’ age and sex. Methods A total of 163 patients aged 10–17 years were included in a cross-sectional study. Two groups were investigated: 62 patients with non-syndromic hypodontia and 101 non-hypodontia patients. Both groups had a malocclusion of similar treatment need. All patients underwent a clinical and radiographic examination and completed a Norwegian version of the generic and the CS OIDP inventory. CS scores were established for impacts attributed to hypodontia. Results The mean number of missing teeth in the hypodontia group was 6.2. The prevalence of generic and CS oral impacts in the hypodontia group were 64% and 30%, and the corresponding rates in the non-hypodontia group were 62% and 10%. The generic OIDP did not discriminate between the two groups with respect to overall scores. The CS OIDP discriminated strongly between patients with and without hypodontia regarding problems with emotional status, showing teeth, social contact, speaking and carrying out work. Compared to the non-hypodontia group, patients with hypodontia, with severe hypodontia (≥ 6 missing teeth) and upper anterior hypodontia were respectively 3.4, 2.5 and 7.0 times more likely to report any oral impact attributed to small teeth, gaps between teeth and missing teeth. Conclusions Hypodontia and malocclusion patients report a considerable burden of oral impacts. The CS-OIDP measure discriminated most effectively between patients with and without hypodontia and was related to severity and upper anterior localisation of hypodontia. PMID:24884584

  6. Structural modifications of the salivary conditioning film upon exposure to sodium bicarbonate: implications for oral lubrication and mouthfeel.

    PubMed

    Ash, A; Wilde, P J; Bradshaw, D J; King, S P; Pratten, J R

    2016-03-14

    The salivary conditioning film (SCF) that forms on all surfaces in the mouth plays a key role in lubricating the oral cavity. As this film acts as an interface between tongue, enamel and oral mucosa, it is likely that any perturbations to its structure could potentially lead to a change in mouthfeel perception. This is often experienced after exposure to oral hygiene products. For example, consumers that use dentifrice that contain a high concentration of sodium bicarbonate (SB) often report a clean mouth feel after use; an attribute that is clearly desirable for oral hygiene products. However, the mechanisms by which SB interacts with the SCF to alter lubrication in the mouth is unknown. Therefore, saliva and the SCF was exposed to high ionic strength and alkaline solutions to elucidate whether the interactions observed were a direct result of SB, its high alkalinity or its ionic strength. Characteristics including bulk viscosity of saliva and the viscoelasticity of the interfacial salivary films that form at both the air/saliva and hydroxyapatite/saliva interfaces were tested. It was hypothesised that SB interacts with the SCF in two ways. Firstly, the ionic strength of SB shields electrostatic charges of salivary proteins, thus preventing protein crosslinking within the film and secondly; the alkaline pH (≈8.3) of SB reduces the gel-like structure of mucins present in the pellicle by disrupting disulphide bridging of the mucins via the ionization of their cysteine's thiol group, which has an isoelectric point of ≈8.3.

  7. Stroke prevention in the elderly atrial fibrillation patient with comorbid conditions: focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Turagam, Mohit K; Velagapudi, Poonam; Flaker, Greg C

    2015-01-01

    Stroke prevention in elderly atrial fibrillation patients remains a challenge. There is a high risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism but also a high risk of bleeding if anticoagulants are prescribed. The elderly have increased chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, polypharmacy, and overall frailty. For all these reasons, anticoagulant use is underutilized in the elderly. In this manuscript, the benefits of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin in the elderly patient population with multiple comorbid conditions are reviewed. PMID:26366064

  8. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Today! Limited Edition T-Shirt Buy Today! The Oral Cancer Foundation The Oral Cancer Foundation is a national ... trustworthy health information: verify here. Social Networks The Oral Cancer Foundation 3419 Via Lido #205 Newport Beach Ca ...

  9. A necessary condition for applying MUSIC algorithm in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taehoon; Park, Won-Kwang

    2015-09-01

    Throughout various results of numerical simulations, it is well-known that MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm can be applied in the limited-view inverse scattering problems. However, the application is somehow heuristic. In this contribution, we identify a necessary condition of MUSIC for imaging of collection of small, perfectly conducting cracks. This is based on the fact that MUSIC imaging functional can be represented as an infinite series of Bessel function of integer order of the first kind. Numerical experiments from noisy synthetic data supports our investigation.

  10. Pedestrian evacuation in view and hearing limited condition: The impact of communication and memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuqi; Jia, Bin; Jiang, Rui; Shan, Jingjing

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies pedestrian evacuation in view and hearing limited condition based on the social force approach. It is assumed that there are two types of pedestrians: Informed individuals know the exit location whereas uninformed individuals do not. The uninformed individuals can communicate with the informed ones within their perceptual fields, thus learning to know and memorize the exit location. We consider cases with and without communication/memory. The simulations show communication and memory are able to enhance the evacuation efficiency. We also investigate the impact of communication on the efficiency of an emergency exit.

  11. Analysis of the influence of parenteral cancer chemotherapy on the health condition of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Rahnama, Mansur; Madej-Czerwonka, Barbara; Jastrzębska-Jamrogiewicz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study The present study was aimed at estimating the prevalence of oral complications in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Material and methods The study was conducted on a group of 58 patients treated with chemotherapy (study group). The control group consisted of 30 healthy patients. Dental status and oral mucosa were examined using the criteria of the National Cancer Institute Toxicity Criteria Scale. The levels of stimulated and unstimulated saliva flow were analysed. Results In the group of patients treated with chemotherapy, 59% of patients had inflammatory changes of the soft tissues of the mouth, such as erythema, erosions, or ulcers, which were discovered during dental examination. Such changes occurred in only 10% of patients in the control group. Six of the patients treated with chemotherapy reported pain with intensity was so severe that it caused swallowing difficulties. Patients in the study group frequently complained about the presence of dry mouth, taste disturbances, nausea, and vomiting. These symptoms occurred in 70% of patients undergoing oncological treatment. In both stimulated and unstimulated saliva secretion, the rates were significantly lower in patients from the research group, when compared to the control group. PMID:26199575

  12. Assessment of bacterial community structure in nitrifying biofilm under inorganic carbon-sufficient and -limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyokwan; Chung, Yun-Chul; Yang, Heejeong; Lee, Changsoo; Aryapratama, Rio; Yoo, Young J; Lee, Seockheon

    2015-01-01

    In this work, nitrification and changes in the composition of the total bacterial community under inorganic carbon (IC)-limited conditions, in a nitrifying moving bed biofilm reactor, was investigated. A culture-independent analysis of cloning and sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene was applied to quantify the bacterial diversity and to determine bacterial taxonomic assignment. IC concentrations had significant effects on the stability of ammonia-oxidation as indicated by the reduction of the nitrogen conversion rate with high NH4(+)-N loadings. The predominance of Nitrosomonas europaea was maintained in spite of changes in the IC concentration. In contrast, heterotrophic bacterial species contributed to a high bacterial diversity, and to a dynamic shift in the bacterial community structure, under IC-limited conditions. In this study, individual functions of heterotrophic bacteria were estimated based on taxonomic information. Possible key roles of coexisting heterotrophic bacteria are the assimilation of organic compounds of extracellular polymeric substances produced by nitrifiers, and biofilm formation by providing a filamentous structure and aggregation properties.

  13. Growth and physiology of Thiobacillus novellus under nutrient-limited mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Leefeldt, R H; Matin, A

    1980-01-01

    Thiobacillus novellus was cultivated in a chemostate under the individual limitations of thiosulfate, glucose, and thiosulfate plus glucose. At dilution rate (D) of 0.05 h-1 or lower, the steady-state biomass concentration in mixotrophic medium was additive of the heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass at corresponding D values. The ambient concentrations of thiosulfate, glucose, or both in the various cultures were low and were very similar in mixotrophic, heterotrophic, and autotrophic environments at a given D value. At D = 0.05 h-1, mixotrophic cells possessed higher activities of sulfite oxidase and thiosulfate oxidation compared to autotrophic cells, as well as higher activities of glucose enzymes and glucose oxidation than heterotrophic cells. Thus, in contrast to nutrient-excess conditions, in nutrient-limited mixotrophic environments at these D values, T. novellus did not exhibit characteristics of uncoupled substrate oxidation, inhibition of substrate utilization, and repression of enzymes of energy metabolism. It is concluded that T. novellus responds to mixotrophic growth conditions differently in environments of different nutritional status, and the ecological and physiological significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:7380804

  14. Microbial lipid production by Rhodosporidium toruloides under sulfate-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siguo; Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hongwei; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2011-01-01

    Novel biochemical approaches remain to be developed to improve microbial lipid technology. This study demonstrated that sulfate limitation was effective to promote accumulating substantial amounts of intracellular lipid by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides Y4. When it was cultivated using a medium with an initial carbon-to-sulfur (C/S) molar ratio of 46,750, cellular lipid content reached up to 58.3%. The time courses of cell growth, lipid accumulation and nutrient depletion were analyzed and discussed in terms of lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, lipid accumulation under sulfate-limited conditions was effective regardless of the presence of a high concentration of nitrogen sources. Thus, lipid contents almost held constant at near 57% in the media with an initial C/S molar ratio of 11,380 although the carbon-to-nitrogen molar ratio ranged from 28.3 to 5.7. Taken together, our results established the sulfate-limitation approach to control lipid biosynthesis, which should be valuable to explore nitrogen-rich raw materials as the feedstock for lipid production.

  15. Oceanographic Conditions Limit the Spread of a Marine Invader along Southern African Shores

    PubMed Central

    Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo I.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Serrão, Ester A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can affect the function and structure of natural ecological communities, hence understanding and predicting their potential for spreading is a major ecological challenge. Once established in a new region, the spread of invasive species is largely controlled by their dispersal capacity, local environmental conditions and species interactions. The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is native to the Mediterranean and is the most successful marine invader in southern Africa. Its distribution there has expanded rapidly and extensively since the 1970s, however, over the last decade its spread has ceased. In this study, we coupled broad scale field surveys, Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) and Lagrangian Particle Simulations (LPS) to assess the current invaded distribution of M. galloprovincialis in southern Africa and to evaluate what prevents further spread of this species. Results showed that all environmentally suitable habitats in southern Africa have been occupied by the species. This includes rocky shores between Rocky Point in Namibia and East London in South Africa (approx. 2800 km) and these limits coincide with the steep transitions between cool-temperate and subtropical-warmer climates, on both west and southeast African coasts. On the west coast, simulations of drifting larvae almost entirely followed the northward and offshore direction of the Benguela current, creating a clear dispersal barrier by advecting larvae away from the coast. On the southeast coast, nearshore currents give larvae the potential to move eastwards, against the prevalent Agulhas current and beyond the present distributional limit, however environmental conditions prevent the establishment of the species. The transition between the cooler and warmer water regimes is therefore the main factor limiting the northern spread on the southeast coast; however, biotic interactions with native fauna may also play an important role. PMID:26114766

  16. Methods and background characteristics of the TOHNN study: a population-based study of oral health conditions in northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Holde, Gro Eirin; Oscarson, Nils; Tillberg, Anders; Marstrander, Peter; Jönsson, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    potential to generate new knowledge on a wide range of oral health conditions beneficial to the population in Troms County. Due to the high participation rate, generalization both nationally and to the circumpolar area ought to be possible. PMID:26900910

  17. MYB10 and MYB72 Are Required for Growth under Iron-Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christine M.; Hindt, Maria N.; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  18. The terrestrial green macroalga Prasiola calophylla (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta): ecophysiological performance under water-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Herburger, Klaus; Blaas, Kathrin; Lewis, Louise A; Karsten, Ulf

    2017-01-09

    The phylogenetic placement of Prasiola calophylla, from an anthropogenic habitat previously shown to contain a novel UV sunscreen compound, was confirmed by analysis of its rbcL gene. This alga has the capacity to tolerate strong water-limiting conditions. The photosynthetic performance and ultrastructural changes under desiccation and osmotic stress were investigated. Freshly harvested thalli showed an effective quantum yield of PSII [Y(II)] of 0.52 ± 0.06 that decreased to ∼60% of the initial value at 3000 mM sorbitol, and 4000 mM sorbitol led to a complete loss of Y(II). The Y(II) of thalli exposed to controlled desiccating conditions at 60% relative humidity (RH) ceased within 240 min, whereas zero values were reached after 120 min at 20% RH. All investigated samples completely recovered Y(II) within ∼100 min after rehydration. Relative electron transport rates (rETR) were temperature dependent, increasing from 5, 10, to 25 °C but strongly declining at 45 °C. Transmission electron microscopy of samples desiccated for 2.5 h showed an electron dense appearance of the entire cytoplasm when compared to control samples. Thylakoid membranes were still visible in desiccated cells, corroborating the ability to recover. Control and desiccated cells contained numerous storage lipids and starch grains, providing reserves. Overall, P. calophylla showed a high capacity to cope with water-limiting conditions on a physiological and structural basis. A lipophilic outer layer of the cell walls might contribute to reduce water evaporation in this poikilohydric organism.

  19. Optimization of plant mineral nutrition under growth-limiting conditions in a lunar greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaets, I.; Voznyuk, T.; Kovalchuk, M.; Rogutskyy, I.; Lukashov, D.; Mytrokhyn, O.; Mashkovska, S.; Foing, B.; Kozyrovska, N.

    It may be assumed that the first plants in a lunar base will play a main role in forming a protosoil of acceptable fertility needed for purposively growing second generation plants like wheat, rice, tulips, etc. The residues of the first-generation plants could be composted and transformed by microorganisms into a soil-like substrate within a loop of regenerative life support system. The lunar regolith may be used as a substrate for plant growth at the very beginning of a mission to reduce its cost. The use of microbial communities for priming plants will allow one to facilitate adaption to stressful conditions and to support the plant development under growth limiting conditions. Well-defined plant-associated bacteria were used for growing three cultivars to colonize French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) in anorthosite, a substrate of low bioavailability, analogous to a lunar rock. The consortium was composed of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and the bacterium Paenibacillus sp. IMBG156 which stimulated seed germination, better plant development, and finally, the flowering of inoculated tagetes. In contrast, control plants grew poorly in the anorthosite and practically did not survive until flowering. Analysis of bacterial community composition showed that all species colonized plant roots, however, the rate of colonization depended on the allelopatic characteristics of marigold varieties. Bacteria of consortium were able to liberate some elements (Ca, Fe, Mn, Si, Ni, Cu, Zn) from substrate anorthosite. Plant colonization by mixed culture of bacterial strains resulted in the increase of accumulation of K, Mg, Mn by the plant and in the lowering of the level of toxic metal accumulation. It was assumed that a rationally assembled consortium of bacterial strains promoted germination of marygold seeds and supported the plant development under growth limiting conditions by means of bioleaching plant essential nutritional elements and by protecting the plant against

  20. Genomic sweep and potential genetic rescue during limiting environmental conditions in an isolated wolf population.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jennifer R; Vucetich, Leah M; Hedrick, Philip W; Peterson, Rolf O; Vucetich, John A

    2011-11-22

    Genetic rescue, in which the introduction of one or more unrelated individuals into an inbred population results in the reduction of detrimental genetic effects and an increase in one or more vital rates, is a potentially important management tool for mitigating adverse effects of inbreeding. We used molecular techniques to document the consequences of a male wolf (Canis lupus) that immigrated, on its own, across Lake Superior ice to the small, inbred wolf population in Isle Royale National Park. The immigrant's fitness so exceeded that of native wolves that within 2.5 generations, he was related to every individual in the population and his ancestry constituted 56 per cent of the population, resulting in a selective sweep of the total genome. In other words, all the male ancestry (50% of the total ancestry) descended from this immigrant, plus 6 per cent owing to the success of some of his inbred offspring. The immigration event occurred in an environment where space was limiting (i.e. packs occupied all available territories) and during a time when environmental conditions had deteriorated (i.e. wolves' prey declined). These conditions probably explain why the immigration event did not obviously improve the population's demography (e.g. increased population numbers or growth rate). Our results show that the beneficial effects of gene flow may be substantial and quickly manifest, short-lived under some circumstances, and how the demographic benefits of genetic rescue might be masked by environmental conditions.

  1. The supporting effects of high luminous conditions on grade 3 oral reading fluency scores.

    PubMed

    Mott, Michael S; Robinson, Daniel H; Williams-Black, Thea H; McClelland, Susan S

    2014-01-01

    The universality of the impact of daylight is a common thread that defines humanity. Day light affects us in a variety of ways -visually, psychologically and biologically. Artificial lighting research has explored ways in which artificial lighting may substitute for daylight and enhance human health and wellbeing. Recently, a study by Mott et al. 2011 found that the usage of high intensity, yet glare free lighting, (referred to as Focus light setting) during reading instruction increased grade 3 students' oral reading fluency (ORF) scores, a key index of reading comprehension. The current study further explored the effect of Focus lighting during literacy instruction with at-risk grade 3 students (n = 172). Over the course of an academic year, the Focus lighting students increased their ORF scores at a greater rate than did the Normal lighting students. These findings, in combination with earlier lighting research, suggest that artificial lighting plays a key role in helping to create an effective learning environment to ensure children reach their full potential. More systematic research, however, is needed to understand the mechanisms by which artificial lighting may contribute to the learning environment: visually, biologically and/or psychologically.

  2. Orthodontic treatment and management of limited mouth opening and oral lesions in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain: case report.

    PubMed

    Paduano, S; Iodice, G; Farella, M; Silva, R; Michelotti, A

    2009-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by dramatic impairment of pain perception since birth and is generally caused by a hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy with loss of the small-calibre, nociceptive nerve fibres. We report a 9-year-old case, with a generalized congenital insensitivity to pain. The patient was referred to our Department by a private orthodontist for severe limited mouth opening and multiple oral ulcers which greatly worsened after starting the orthodontic treatment. The management of his oral lesions of the limited mouth opening and of the orthodontic treatment are described. The management approach aimed to improve mandibular range of motion and associated stretching and a self-modeling mouthguard to avoid cheek self-biting. This protocol allowed continuing the orthodontic treatment to restore the occlusion. Finally, good occlusion, normal function and better quality of patient's life were achieved.

  3. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    clay content and with study site as a random effect. (III) Threshold values of texture and climatc effects were identified using a regression tree. Three mean annual temperature classes for texture dependent BSC growth limitation were identified: (1) <9 °C with a threshold value of 25% silt and clay (limited growth on coarser soils), (2) 9-19 °C, where texture did have no influence on relative crust biomass, and (3) >19 °C at soils with <4 or >17% silt and clay. Because biocrust development is limited under certain climatic and soil texture conditions, it is suggested to consider soil texture for biocrust rehabilitation purposes and in biogeochemical modeling of cryptogamic ground covers. References Belnap, J. & Eldridge, D. 2001. Disturbance and Recovery of Biological Soil Crusts. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Biological Soil Crusts: Structure, Function, and Management, Springer, Berlin. Belnap, J. 2001. Biological Soil Crusts and Wind Erosion. In: Belnap, J. & Lange, O. (eds.) Fischer, T., Subbotina, M. 2014. Climatic and soil texture threshold values for cryptogamic cover development: a meta analysis. Biologia 69/11:1520-1530,

  4. Structure of curved crystals in the thermodynamic limit and the perfect screening condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travesset, Alex

    2016-12-01

    The dislocation and disclination density defining the structure of a crystal constrained on a general curved background is computed analytically in the thermodynamic limit, when the number of particles is arbitrarily large. It is shown that the minimum of the elastic energy, where strains are optimally close to zero, can be formulated in terms of a connection (a rule on how to parallel transport vectors), which allows to provide an explicit solution in the thermodynamic limit that consists of disclinations surrounded by scars (grain boundaries with variable spacing). The approach allows to compute the interaction potential. For a sphere, a full characterization of the scars is provided, and it is shown that the potential of interaction among disclinations "dressed" by scars is inversely proportional to the sinus of the geodesic distance and that the ground state consists of 12 dressed disclinations that display icosahedral symmetry. The case of a torus is also considered. More generally, the thermodynamic solution implements a "perfect screening" condition, where defects completely screen the Gaussian curvature. Implications for the problem of melting are discussed.

  5. Limitations of ichnofossil approach for evaluating paleo-bottom-water redox conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Savrda, C.E.; Bottjer, D.

    1987-05-01

    Information on trace fossil diversity, burrow size, and depth of burrow penetration has been incorporated into an ichnofossil tiering model designed for the evaluation of paleo-bottom-water redox conditions. Previous applications to a variety of Phanerozoic strata indicate that this trace fossil approach is more effective than previously emphasized criteria for reconstructing relative degree of oxygenation as well as rates and magnitudes of temporal change in oxygenation. However, the trace fossil model is not without limitations. Presently, they recognize four factors that could limit the accuracy of ichnology-based redox reconstructions: (1) information loss - increases in penetration depth (associated with reoxygenation) that occur at rates in excess of sedimentation rate will destroy a portion of the previous record of oxygenation whereas extended residence times of deep-tier organisms may mask the record through excessive overprinting; (2) inadequate structure visibility - required information on trace fossil assemblage composition and cross cutting relationships is unobtainable for strata where original or diagenetically enhanced contrast between burrows and surrounding sediments is lacking; (3) complexity introduced by rapid deposition - periodic turbidite deposition can mask the desired oxygen signal through substrate modification, temporary modification of faunal composition and behavior, and/or temporary water chemistry changes; and (4) changes in substrate consistency - temporal variation in substrate stiffness (e.g., development of firmgrounds) may result in intrastratal variation in trace fossil tiering structure. The success of future applications of the ichnologic approach depends upon thorough consideration of these factors.

  6. Cultivar Mixture Cropping Increased Water Use Efficiency in Winter Wheat under Limited Irrigation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunqi; Zhang, Yinghua; Ji, Wei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Bin; Li, Jinpeng; Han, Meikun; Xu, Xuexin; Wang, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cultivar mixture cropping on yield, biomass, and water use efficiency (WUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were investigated under non-irrigation (W0, no irrigation during growth stage), one time irrigation (W1, irrigation applied at stem elongation) and two times irrigation (W2, irrigation applied at stem elongation and anthesis) conditions. Nearly 90% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments experienced an increase in grain yield as compared with the mean of the pure stands under W0, those for W1 and W2 were 80% and 85%, respectively. Over 75% of cultivar mixture cropping treatments got greater biomass than the mean of the pure stands under the three irrigation conditions. Cultivar mixture cropping cost more water than pure stands under W0 and W1, whereas the water consumption under W2 decreased by 5.9%–6.8% as compared with pure stands. Approximately 90% of cultivar mixtures showed an increase of 5.4%–34.5% in WUE as compared with the mean of the pure stands, and about 75% of cultivar mixtures had 0.8%–28.5% higher WUE than the better pure stands under W0. Similarly, there were a majority of mixture cropping treatments with higher WUE than the mean and the better one of the pure stands under W1 and W2. On the whole, proper cultivar mixture cropping could increase yield and WUE, and a higher increase in WUE occurred under limited irrigation condition. PMID:27362563

  7. Limited sampling strategies to estimate exposure to the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin gallate, in fasting and fed conditions.

    PubMed

    Foster, David R; Sowinski, Kevin M; Chow, H H Sherry; Overholser, Brian R

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an efficient sampling strategy to predict epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) pharmacokinetics after green tea administration. Ten healthy subjects received a single 800-mg oral dose of EGCG administered as Polyphenon E under both fasting and fed conditions. Plasma samples were serially collected over 24 hours and EGCG concentrations were determined. A one-compartment model with a lag time for absorption best fit the concentration-time data. Maximum A Posteriori Bayesian (MAPB) priors were developed by simultaneously fitting pharmacokinetic parameters from both study phases. The D-optimal sampling designs were determined and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. The original model with the estimators was used to fit the simulated data with the optimized sampling schemes. Two and three optimal sampling strategies (OSS-2 and OSS-3, respectively) were developed. The median two sampling times for OSS-2 were 1.3 and 6.9 hours (fasting conditions) and 3.4 and 8.7 hours (fed conditions). The median three sampling times for OSS-3 were 0.7, 1.4, and 7.0 hours (fasting conditions) and 1.4, 3.6, and 8.7 hours (fed conditions). The predictive power of OSS-3 was greater than that of OSS-2, under both fasted and fed conditions, and both strategies had greater predictive performance under fasting conditions. The sampling schemes were accurate and precise in predicting EGCG oral clearance (or area under the curve with known doses), and hence exposure, under both fasting and fed conditions. The increased predictive performance for estimating pharmacokinetic parameters under fasting conditions appeared to be the result of a decreased variability in absorption.

  8. Periodontal conditions and associated factors among adults and the elderly: findings from the first National Oral Health Survey in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Susana M; Alvarez, Ramón; Andrade, Ernesto; Piccardo, Virginia; Francia, Alejandro; Massa, Fernando; Correa, Marcos Britto; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2015-11-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal conditions in the Uruguayan adult and elderly population and its association with socioeconomic and behavioral characteristics. Data from adults (35-44, n = 358) and elderly (65-74, n = 411) who participated in the first National Oral Health Survey, Uruguay, 2011, were used. The survey included a household questionnaire addressing socioeconomic characteristics, and tobacco use. Bleeding on probing (BOP), periodontal pockets (CPI) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured by clinical examination. A multivariable analysis was carried out. Considering both age groups, the prevalence of mild/severe periodontal disease was 21.8% and 9.12% for severe periodontal disease. Adjusted analyses revealed an association between high education and all outcomes. Attendance at dental services was negatively associated with BOP and mild to severe periodontitis. Periodontal outcomes were higher in disadvantaged socioeconomic groups. Tobacco consumption has a strong association with periodontal disease in the elderly.

  9. Evaluating and Assessing Student Oral Presentations: A Limited but Effective Role for Employers in the Geography Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Andrew; Bull, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Argues that employer/student programs on a small scale can be as effective as larger endeavors. Describes a pilot project where employer involvement focused solely on evaluation and feedback of geography students' oral presentations. Discusses the benefits and problems of the program. (MJP)

  10. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart T to... - Examples of Conditions Which May Restrict or Limit Exposure to Hyperbaric Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., presence of residual effects, response to therapy, number of occurrences, diving mode, or degree and... or drug use. Conditions requiring continuous medication for control (e.g., antihistamines, steroids, barbiturates, moodaltering drugs, or insulin). Meniere's disease. Hemoglobinopathies. Obstructive...

  11. Transcriptional Characterization of a Widely-Used Grapevine Rootstock Genotype under Different Iron-Limited Conditions.

    PubMed

    Vannozzi, Alessandro; Donnini, Silvia; Vigani, Gianpiero; Corso, Massimiliano; Valle, Giorgio; Vitulo, Nicola; Bonghi, Claudio; Zocchi, Graziano; Lucchin, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Iron chlorosis is a serious deficiency that affects orchards and vineyards reducing quality and yield production. Chlorotic plants show abnormal photosynthesis and yellowing shoots. In grapevine iron uptake and homeostasis are most likely controlled by a mechanism known as "Strategy I," characteristic of non-graminaceous plants and based on a system of soil acidification, iron reduction and transporter-mediated uptake. Nowadays, grafting of varieties of economic interest on tolerant rootstocks is widely used practice against many biotic and abiotic stresses. Nevertheless, many interspecific rootstocks, and in particular those obtained by crossing exclusively non-vinifera genotypes, can show limited nutrient uptake and transport, in particular for what concerns iron. In the present study, 101.14, a commonly used rootstock characterized by susceptibility to iron chlorosis was subjected to both Fe-absence and Fe-limiting conditions. Grapevine plantlets were grown in control, Fe-deprived, and bicarbonate-supplemented hydroponic solutions. Whole transcriptome analyses, via mRNA-Seq, were performed on root apices of stressed and unstressed plants. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) confirmed that Strategy I is the mechanism responsible for iron uptake in grapevine, since many orthologs genes to the Arabidopsis "ferrome" were differentially regulated in stressed plant. Molecular differences in the plant responses to Fe absence and presence of bicarbonate were also identified indicating the two treatments are able to induce response-mechanisms only partially overlapping. Finally, we measured the expression of a subset of genes differentially expressed in 101.14 (such as IRT1, FERRITIN1, bHLH38/39) or known to be fundamental in the "strategy I" mechanism (AHA2 and FRO2) also in a tolerant rootstock (M1) finding important differences which could be responsible for the different degrees of tolerance observed.

  12. Transcriptional Characterization of a Widely-Used Grapevine Rootstock Genotype under Different Iron-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vannozzi, Alessandro; Donnini, Silvia; Vigani, Gianpiero; Corso, Massimiliano; Valle, Giorgio; Vitulo, Nicola; Bonghi, Claudio; Zocchi, Graziano; Lucchin, Margherita

    2017-01-01

    Iron chlorosis is a serious deficiency that affects orchards and vineyards reducing quality and yield production. Chlorotic plants show abnormal photosynthesis and yellowing shoots. In grapevine iron uptake and homeostasis are most likely controlled by a mechanism known as “Strategy I,” characteristic of non-graminaceous plants and based on a system of soil acidification, iron reduction and transporter-mediated uptake. Nowadays, grafting of varieties of economic interest on tolerant rootstocks is widely used practice against many biotic and abiotic stresses. Nevertheless, many interspecific rootstocks, and in particular those obtained by crossing exclusively non-vinifera genotypes, can show limited nutrient uptake and transport, in particular for what concerns iron. In the present study, 101.14, a commonly used rootstock characterized by susceptibility to iron chlorosis was subjected to both Fe-absence and Fe-limiting conditions. Grapevine plantlets were grown in control, Fe-deprived, and bicarbonate-supplemented hydroponic solutions. Whole transcriptome analyses, via mRNA-Seq, were performed on root apices of stressed and unstressed plants. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) confirmed that Strategy I is the mechanism responsible for iron uptake in grapevine, since many orthologs genes to the Arabidopsis “ferrome” were differentially regulated in stressed plant. Molecular differences in the plant responses to Fe absence and presence of bicarbonate were also identified indicating the two treatments are able to induce response-mechanisms only partially overlapping. Finally, we measured the expression of a subset of genes differentially expressed in 101.14 (such as IRT1, FERRITIN1, bHLH38/39) or known to be fundamental in the “strategy I” mechanism (AHA2 and FRO2) also in a tolerant rootstock (M1) finding important differences which could be responsible for the different degrees of tolerance observed. PMID:28105035

  13. Performance of Airborne Precision Spacing Under Realistic Wind Conditions and Limited Surveillance Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieland, Frederick; Santos, Michel; Krueger, William; Houston, Vincent E.

    2011-01-01

    With the expected worldwide increase of air traffic during the coming decade, both the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), as well as Eurocontrol's Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) program have, as part of their plans, air traffic management (ATM) solutions that can increase performance without requiring time-consuming and expensive infrastructure changes. One such solution involves the ability of both controllers and flight crews to deliver aircraft to the runway with greater accuracy than they can today. Previous research has shown that time-based spacing techniques, wherein the controller assigns a time spacing to each pair of arriving aircraft, can achieve this goal by providing greater runway delivery accuracy and producing a concomitant increase in system-wide performance. The research described herein focuses on one specific application of time-based spacing, called Airborne Precision Spacing (APS), which has evolved over the past ten years. This research furthers APS understanding by studying its performance with realistic wind conditions obtained from atmospheric sounding data and with realistic wind forecasts obtained from the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) short-range weather forecast. In addition, this study investigates APS performance with limited surveillance range, as provided by the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system, and with an algorithm designed to improve APS performance when ADS-B surveillance data is unavailable. The results presented herein quantify the runway threshold delivery accuracy of APS under these conditions, and also quantify resulting workload metrics such as the number of speed changes required to maintain spacing.

  14. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    PubMed Central

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel ‘attack box’ method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance byI. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials. PMID:25417785

  15. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    PubMed

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-02-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel 'attack box' method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance by I. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials.

  16. Kinetically limited weathering at low denudation rates in semiarid climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jérôme; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Christl, Marcus

    2016-02-01

    Biogeochemical cycling within the Critical Zone depends on the interactions between minerals and fluids controlling chemical weathering and physical erosion rates. In this study, we explore the role of water availability in controlling soil chemical weathering in semiarid climatic conditions. Weathering rates and intensities were evaluated for nine soil profiles located on convex ridge crests of three mountain ranges in the Spanish Betic Cordillera. We combine a geochemical mass balance with 10Be cosmogenic nuclides to constrain chemical weathering intensities and long-term denudation rates. As such, this study presents new data on chemical weathering and 10Be-derived denudation for understudied semiarid climate systems. In the Betic Cordillera, chemical weathering intensities are relatively low (~5 to 30% of the total denudation of the soil) and negatively correlated with the magnitude of the water deficit in soils. Chemical mass losses are inversely related to denudation rates (14-109 mm/kyr) and positively to soil thickness (14-58 cm); these results are consistent with kinetic limitation of chemical weathering rates. A worldwide compilation of chemical weathering data suggests that soil water balance may regulate the coupling between chemical weathering and physical erosion by modulating soil solute fluxes. Therefore, future landscape evolution models that seek to link chemical weathering and physical erosion should include soil water flux as an essential driver of weathering.

  17. Replacement of in vivo acute oral toxicity studies by in vitro cytotoxicity methods: opportunities, limits and regulatory status.

    PubMed

    Ukelis, Ute; Kramer, Peter-Jürgen; Olejniczak, Klaus; Mueller, Stefan O

    2008-06-01

    The development of a new medicinal product is a long and costly process in particular due to the regulatory requirements for quality, safety and efficacy. There is a common interest to increase the efficiency of drug development and to provide new, better quality medicinal products much faster to the public. One possible way to economize time and costs, as well as to consider animal protection issues, is to introduce new alternative methods into non-clinical toxicity testing. Currently, animal tests are mandatory for the evaluation of acute toxicity of chemicals and new drugs. The replacement of the in vivo tests by alternative in vitro assays would offer the opportunity to screen and assess numerous compounds at the same time, to predict acute oral toxicity and thus accelerate drug development. Moreover, the substitution of in vivo tests by in vitro methods shows a proactive pursuit of ethical and animal welfare issues. Importantly, the implementation of in vitro assays for acute oral toxicity would require the establishment of common test guidelines across the EU, USA and Japan, i.e., the regions of ICH (International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use). Presently, alternative in vitro tests are being investigated internationally. Yet, in order to achieve regulatory acceptance and implementation of in vitro assays, convincing results from validation studies are required. In this review, we discuss the current regulatory status of acute oral toxicity testing and point out achievements of alternative methods. We describe the application of in vitro tests, correlating in vitro with in vivo data. The use of in vitro data to predict in vivo acute oral toxicity is analyzed using the Registry of Cytotoxicity, an official independent database. We have then analyzed opportunities and drawbacks for future implementation of in vitro test methods, with particular focus on industrial use.

  18. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Example 4. (i) Facts. A group health plan provides coverage for the treatment of acne, subject to a lifetime limit of $2,000. The plan counts against this $2,000 lifetime limit on acne treatment...

  19. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... this section. Example 4. (i) Facts. A group health plan provides coverage for the treatment of acne, subject to a lifetime limit of $2,000. The plan counts against this $2,000 lifetime limit acne...

  20. Effects of Specimen Collection Methodologies and Storage Conditions on the Short-Term Stability of Oral Microbiome Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ting; Srinivasan, Usha; Ramadugu, Kirtana; Shedden, Kerby A.; Neiswanger, Katherine; Trumble, Erika; Li, Jiean J.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Crout, Richard J.; Weyant, Robert J.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community profiling of the oral microbiome requires the recovery of quality sequences in order to accurately describe microbial community structure and composition. Our objective was to assess the effects of specimen collection method, storage medium, and storage conditions on the relative abundance of taxa in saliva and plaque identified using 16S rRNA genes. We also assessed short-term changes in taxon composition and relative abundance and compared the salivary and dental plaque communities in children and adults. Over a 2-week period, four successive saliva and dental plaque specimens were collected from four adults with no dental decay (108 samples), and two successive specimens were collected from six children with four or more erupted teeth (48 samples). There were minimal differences in community composition at the phylum and operational taxonomic unit levels between dental plaque collection using a scaler and collection using a CytoSoft brush. Plaque samples stored in OMNIgene medium showed higher within-sample Shannon diversity, were compositionally different, and were more similar to each other than plaque stored in liquid dental transport medium. Saliva samples stored in OMNIgene recovered similar communities for at least a week following storage at room temperature. However, the microbial communities recovered from plaque and saliva stored in OMNIgene were significantly different in composition from their counterparts stored in liquid dental transport medium. Dental plaque communities collected from the same tooth type over four successive visits from the same adult did not significantly differ in structure or composition. IMPORTANCE Large-scale epidemiologic studies require collection over time and space, often with multiple teams collecting, storing, and processing data. Therefore, it is essential to understand how sensitive study results are to modest changes in collection and storage protocols that may occur with variation in personnel

  1. Quantifying the performance of charge-coupled devices in ambient conditions - Oral presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dungee, Ryan

    2015-08-22

    Telescope surveys have given us a great deal of information about our universe, but the images they capture carry with them an inherent limitation. The question then is how do we take this information to the next level? The answer: the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). DESI is an instrument that will measure the distance to tens of millions of galaxies in our night sky. This information can be combined with already existing images to construct a three dimensional map of our universe providing a great deal of new opportunities for cosmological research. The DESI guidance system consists of 10 detectors called charge-coupled devices (CCDs). Each CCD is made of silicon atoms that emit electrons when struck with light, the electrons are counted and then used to reconstruct an image. But, CCDs suffer from an issue known as ‘dark current’ which are false counts that come from thermal motions of the silicon atoms. This is particularly problematic since they contribute to the uncertainty of a measurement without contributing to our signal. This causes a drop in the signal to noise ratio, a value that needs to be maximized in order to meet DESI’s high precision requirements. This summer was spent ensuring the DESI guidance system would meet its specifications. Data was collected using a CCD of the same type that would be used on DESI and the effectiveness of dark current removal was tested. Exposures were taken for a wide range of temperatures and exposure lengths and a number of dark current removal methods were implemented. While further testing is required, the initial results are quite promising and the DESI guidance system is on track to meet its specifications

  2. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains.

  3. Predicted limits for evaporative cooling in heat stress relief of cattle in warm conditions.

    PubMed

    Berman, A

    2009-10-01

    Evaporative cooling of ambient air (EC) is a main path for heat stress relief in cattle kept in the shade of semi-confining structures. Evaporative cooling is particularly efficient in hot dry climates. We examined the potential of EC for heat stress relief in cattle in moderately warm and humid climates. The feasibility was examined by the reduction in ambient temperature (T(ac)) produced by EC as a function of ambient temperature (T(a)) and humidity (RH(a)). A data set (n = 139) of temperature and relative humidity (RH) produced by EC over a range of air temperature (25 to 50 degrees C) and humidity (10 to 70% RH) was analyzed by polynomial second order regressions. The analyses produced equations for the relations between ambient air temperature and ambient humidity and between respective conditions in air cooled by EC (T(c), RH(c)). Linear regressions were computed for a narrower temperature range (30 to 40 degrees C). In all equations, R(2) were >0.94 and regression terms were statistically significant. The T(ac) obtained by EC diminished by 0.3 degrees C per degrees C rise in T(a), indicating a reduced efficiency of EC with rising T(a). The T(ac) obtained by EC also was markedly reduced by rising ambient humidity and increased by RH(c). An attempt to sustain T(ac) at greater RH(a) by allowing a rise in RH(c) would only restore 2/3 of the reduction in T(ac) because the coefficient for the RH(a) effect on T(ac) is 1.5 larger than that of RH(c). The T(ac) attained by EC partially depends on the humidity in the cooled environment. Elevated RH(c) may impede animal skin and respiratory evaporative heat loss and lead to moisture accumulation in bedding. If the upper desired limit for RH(c) is 70%, at RH(a) smaller than 45% (typical for hot-dry environments) the T(ac) is larger than 7.5 degrees C, at RH(a) greater than 55% T(ac) is reduced to less than 5 degrees C, and at RH(a) of 57.5 to 60% T(ac) is about 2.5 degrees C. Coupling EC with forced air movement when T

  4. Blood culture series benefit may be limited to selected clinical conditions: time to reassess.

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Simeunovic, G; Sharma, M; Fakih, M G; Johnson, L B; Briski, L; Lebar, W

    2015-04-01

    Blood cultures are often submitted as series (two to three sets per 24 hours) to maximize sample recovery. We assessed the actual benefit of additional sets. Blood cultures submitted from adults (≥ 18 years old) over 1 year (1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013) were examined. The medical records of patients with positive cultures were reviewed. Cultures with commensal organisms were considered contamination in the absence of a source and clinical findings. The impact of additional sets on antibiotic therapy was estimated. We evaluated 15,394 blood cultures. They were submitted as two to five sets per 24 hours in 12,236 (79.5%) instances. Pathogens were detected in 1227 sets, representing 741 bacteremias, of which 618 (83.4%) were detected in the first set and 123 (16.6%) in the additional sets. Pathogens missed in the first set were recovered from patients receiving antibiotics (n = 72; 58.5%) and after undergoing a procedure (n = 54; 43.9%). The additional sets' results could have influenced antibiotic therapy in 76/6235 (1.2%) instances, including 40 (0.6%) antibiotic switches and 36 (0.6%) possible extensions of therapy. The potential impact of the detection of missed pathogens on antibiotic therapy was not apparent in patients who had an endovascular infection (26/27, 96.3%) and those who lacked an obvious source of pathogens (10/10, 100%). These findings suggest that one blood culture is probably adequate in patients with an obvious source of pathogens. Blood culture series are beneficial in patients without an obvious source of pathogens and in those with endovascular infections. It is time to reassess the benefit of blood culture series, perhaps limiting them to selected conditions.

  5. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Sabir, Jamal S; Alfassi, Fahad A; Hajarah, Nahid H; Kabli, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Ashworth, Matt P; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock.

  6. Evaluation and staging of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx: limitations despite technological breakthroughs.

    PubMed

    Zafereo, Mark E

    2013-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (SCCOC) and squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (SCCOP) represent two distinct disease entities. SCCOC continues to be related to tobacco risk factors, and the current anatomic staging system provides useful prognostic value. Most patients with SCCOP in Western countries now have HPV-associated tumors, and tumor HPV status is considered the most important prognostic factor. Smoking status is emerging as an important prognostic factor for HPV-driven SCCOP, independent of tumor HPV status. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and FDG-PET/CT imaging are diagnostic staging tools useful in select patients with SCCOC and SCCOP.

  7. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  8. limited potentiation of blood pressure in response to oral tyramine by the anti-Parkinson brain selective multifunctional monoamine oxidase-AB inhibitor, M30.

    PubMed

    Gal, Shunit; Abassi, Zaid A; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2010-08-01

    One of the limitations of non-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors as anti-depressant or anti-Parkinson drugs is their ability to potentiate the cardiovascular effect of oral tyramine, resulting from inhibition of systemic MAO-A and release of noradrenaline. We have investigated the cardiovascular effect of oral tyramine in response to the novel multifunctional, brain selective MAO-AB inhibitor, M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline], and compared it to the classical non-selective inhibitor tranylcypromine (TCP) in rats. We also measured MAO-A and B in the striatum, hippocampus, liver, and small intestine and determined brain levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin. At the doses employed, intraperitoneal (i.p.) M30 (5 and 10 mg/kg) selectively inhibited brain MAO-A and B by more than 85%, with little inhibition of liver and small intestine enzymes while raising striatal levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin. In contrast to TCP (10 mg/kg, i.p.), which fully inhibits both enzymes in the brain and systemic organs and significantly potentiates the tyramine pressor effect, M30 had a limited pressor effect as compared to it and controls. The limited potentiation of tyramine pressor effect by M30, its ability to raise brain levels of aminergic neurotransmitters together with its neuroprotective and neurorestorative activities make this drug potentially important as an anti-depressant and anti-Parkinsonian agent, for which it is being developed.

  9. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 3, the...

  10. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... health plan provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In...

  11. 29 CFR 2590.701-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 3, the...

  12. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 3, the...

  13. 29 CFR 2590.701-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 3, the...

  14. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... health plan provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In...

  15. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provides coverage for the treatment of diabetes, generally not subject to any lifetime dollar limit. However, if an individual was diagnosed with diabetes before the effective date of coverage under the plan, diabetes coverage is subject to a lifetime limit of $10,000. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example 3, the...

  16. 40 CFR 122.44 - Establishing limitations, standards, and other permit conditions (applicable to State NPDES...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., or controls a pollutant or practice not limited in the permit. (d) Water quality standards and State... quality. (i) Limitations must control all pollutants or pollutant parameters (either conventional...; (ii) Requirements for construction site operators to control waste such as discarded...

  17. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ..., the engine mounts and the supporting structures must be designed to withstand a ``limit engine torque... structures be able to support limit loads without detrimental permanent deformation, meaning that supporting... of producing much higher transient loads on the engine mounts and supporting structures. As a...

  18. Limited clonal relatedness between gut IgA plasma cells and memory B cells after oral immunization

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, Mats; Hazanov, Helena; Strömberg, Anneli; Komban, Rathan; Holmqvist, Joel; Köster, Sofia; Mattsson, Johan; Sikora, Per; Mehr, Ramit; Lycke, Nils Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how memory B cells are induced and relate to long-lived plasma cells is important for vaccine development. Immunity to oral vaccines has been considered short-lived because of a poor ability to develop IgA B-cell memory. Here we demonstrate that long-lived mucosal IgA memory is readily achieved by oral but not systemic immunization in mouse models with NP hapten conjugated with cholera toxin and transfer of B1-8high/GFP+ NP-specific B cells. Unexpectedly, memory B cells are poorly related to long-lived plasma cells and less affinity-matured. They are α4β7-integrin+CD73+PD-L2+CD80+ and at systemic sites mostly IgM+, while 80% are IgA+ in Peyer's patches. On reactivation, most memory B cells in Peyer's patches are GL7−, but expand in germinal centres and acquire higher affinity and more mutations, demonstrating strong clonal selection. CCR9 expression is found only in Peyer's patches and appears critical for gut homing. Thus, gut mucosal memory possesses unique features not seen after systemic immunization. PMID:27596266

  19. On the nonradiative and quasistatic conditions and the limitations of circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zozaya, Alfonso

    2007-06-01

    Field theory is used to analyze a simple circuit and to deduce the conditions for nonradiative and quasistatic fields. From the condition for quasistatic fields, which is the more stringent of the two, Kirchhoff's voltage equation and its range of validity are deduced. These conditions for the validity of circuit theory are not treated appropriately in the undergraduate curricula. A simple numerical problem is given to illustrate these ideas.

  20. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  1. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  2. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  3. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  4. 42 CFR 410.37 - Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.37 Colorectal cancer screening tests: Conditions for and...) Colorectal cancer screening tests means any of the following procedures furnished to an individual for...

  5. Prediction of sand transport over immobile gravel from supply limited to capacity conditions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prediction of the transport of sand in armored gravel reaches downstream of dams is complicated by variable bed conditions ranging from sand transported through gravel to sand in transport over buried gravel. Knowledge of the rate of sand transport in these conditions, however, is necessary for...

  6. Limited condition dependence of male acoustic signals in the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus

    PubMed Central

    Franzke, Alexandra; Reinhold, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In many animal species, male acoustic signals serve to attract a mate and therefore often play a major role for male mating success. Male body condition is likely to be correlated with male acoustic signal traits, which signal male quality and provide choosy females indirect benefits. Environmental factors such as food quantity or quality can influence male body condition and therefore possibly lead to condition-dependent changes in the attractiveness of acoustic signals. Here, we test whether stressing food plants influences acoustic signal traits of males via condition-dependent expression of these traits. We examined four male song characteristics, which are vital for mate choice in females of the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus. Only one of the examined acoustic traits, loudness, was significantly altered by changing body condition because of drought- and moisture-related stress of food plants. No condition dependence could be observed for syllable to pause ratio, gap duration within syllables, and onset accentuation. We suggest that food plant stress and therefore food plant quality led to shifts in loudness of male grasshopper songs via body condition changes. The other three examined acoustic traits of males do not reflect male body condition induced by food plant quality. PMID:22957192

  7. An Analysis of Sequential Variables in Pavlovian Conditioning Employing Extended and Limited Acquisition Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ronald Mellado; Capaldi, E. John

    2006-01-01

    Sequential theory's memory model of learning has been successfully applied in response contingent instrumental conditioning experiments (Capaldi, 1966, 1967, 1994; Capaldi & Miller, 2003). However, it has not been systematically tested in nonresponse contingent Pavlovian conditioning experiments. The present experiments attempted to determine if…

  8. Employment status, employment conditions, and limiting illness: prospective evidence from the British household panel survey 1991–2001

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, M; Sacker, A; Clarke, P

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the relation of the incidence of, and recovery from, limiting illness to employment status, occupational social class, and income over time in an initially healthy sample of working age men and women. Methods: Cox proportional hazards models. Results: There were large differences in the risk of limiting illness according to occupational social class, with men and women in the least favourable employment conditions nearly four times more likely to become ill than those in the most favourable. Unemployment and economic inactivity also had a powerful effect on illness incidence. Limiting illness was not a permanent state for most participants in the study. Employment status was also related to recovery. Conclusions: Having secure employment in favourable working conditions greatly reduces the risk of healthy people developing limiting illness. Secure employment increases the likelihood of recovery. These findings have considerable implications for both health inequality and economic policies. PMID:15143119

  9. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  10. Condition and size of damselflies: a field study of food limitation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L

    1989-10-01

    Based on evidence from field manipulations, several authors have recently suggested that interference competition among larval odonates reduces individual growth rates and biomass by reducing foraging rates. This study was designed to test the effects of food shortage on "condition" (relative mass per unit head width) of larval Ischnura verticalis (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) under laboratory conditions and to use these results to estimate the degree of food shortage of larvae under naturally occurring field conditions. In the laboratory, there were marked differences in condition of larvae fed diets ranging from ad libitum feeding with worms to ad libitum feeding with Daphnia 1 day out of every 8. Condition of larvae collected from May through October from 17 different sites in southern Ontario indicated that, for most of the year, larvae had conditions similar to those fed ad libitum with Daphnia in the laboratory. There was no evidence that larval condition was related to population density. Condition of larvae in most sites during July was similar to that of larvae fed poor diets in the laboratory. It is unlikely that the low conditions were due to competition as there were no correlations with density across sites and population densities during July were at their lowest. Adult head widths showed a seasonal decline from mid June to the end of the flight season. There was no evidence that head widths were related to population density although there was some evidence that head widths of males were positively related to larval condition. My results do not support the hypothesis that competition is important in affecting foraging rates and subsequent development of larvae. Contrasts between my results and other studies may stem from difficulties with the interpretation of field experiments, that densities in my study may have been low due to fish predation, and/or that I. verticalis larvae are slow moving relative to other larvae and thus less likely to interact.

  11. System-Wide Adaptations of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 to Phosphate-Limited Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Florence; de Santiago-Torio, Ana; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Carlson, Hans K.; Watson, Nicki; Daye, Mirna; Summons, Roger E.; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of lipids devoid of phosphorus suggests that the availability of phosphorus limits microbial growth and activity in many anoxic, stratified environments. To better understand the response of anaerobic bacteria to phosphate limitation and starvation, this study combines microscopic and lipid analyses with the measurements of fitness of pooled barcoded transposon mutants of the model sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. Phosphate-limited G20 has lower growth rates and replaces more than 90% of its membrane phospholipids by a mixture of monoglycosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG), glycuronic acid diacylglycerol (GADG) and ornithine lipids, lacks polyphosphate granules, and synthesizes other cellular inclusions. Analyses of pooled and individual mutants reveal the importance of the high-affinity phosphate transport system (the Pst system), PhoR, and glycolipid and ornithine lipid synthases during phosphate limitation. The phosphate-dependent synthesis of MGDG in G20 and the widespread occurrence of the MGDG/GADG synthase among sulfate reducing ∂-Proteobacteria implicate these microbes in the production of abundant MGDG in anaerobic environments where the concentrations of phosphate are lower than 10 μM. Numerous predicted changes in the composition of the cell envelope and systems involved in transport, maintenance of cytoplasmic redox potential, central metabolism and regulatory pathways also suggest an impact of phosphate limitation on the susceptibility of sulfate reducing bacteria to other anthropogenic or environmental stresses. PMID:28030630

  12. Evaluation of a Theory-Driven E-Learning Intervention for Future Oral Healthcare Providers on Secondary Prevention of Disordered Eating Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBate, Rita D.; Severson, Herbert H.; Cragun, Deborah L.; Gau, Jeff M.; Merrell, Laura K.; Bleck, Jennifer R.; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott L.; Brown, Kelli R. McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.; Hendricson, William

    2013-01-01

    Oral healthcare providers have a clinical opportunity for early detection of disordered eating behaviors because they are often the first health professionals to observe overt oral and physical signs. Curricula regarding early recognition of this oral/systemic medical condition are limited in oral health educational programs. Web-based learning…

  13. Assessment and treatment of nonpain conditions in life-limiting disease.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Alice E

    2011-05-01

    The "Pawspice" philosophy, which the author introduced at the 2000 American Veterinary Medical Association meeting, focuses on symptom management along with a kinder, gentler, or modified approach to standard therapy. Many veterinarians have preconceived bias or ingrained beliefs about aging, serious illness, multiple comorbidities, and cancer, which may cause a negative or dismissive approach toward palliative treatment, especially in geriatric pets. Veterinarians and their v-teams must overcome this insensitive attitude about life-limiting disease. This article describes assessment, treatment, and home management of some nonpainful life-limiting diseases, including cancer and age-related decline of vital functions in the Pawspice setting.

  14. [Questionnaire survey of air extruded jelly dosage form (I) - oral condition of elder patients and applicability of air extruded jelly formulation - ].

    PubMed

    Hanawa, Takehisa; Tokutake, Noboru; Oguchi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Elderly patients tend to have troubles with oral conditions such as the impairment of deglutition capability (difficulty in swallowing), in addition to a decline in physical performance. An air extruded jelly formulation (AEJF) has been developed as a new formulation consisting of jelly and clean air under increased pressure. As jelly is discharged smoothly by pushing the air portion, elderly patients are able to easily take jelly from the package. In this study, survey questionnaires after a patient's trial of AEJF were conducted to characterize the intra-oral condition and reveal the applicability of AEJF in elderly patients. The subjects were 108 patients (ranging in age from 50 to 79) with chronic diseases who take some oral medicine regularly. A questionnaire on the oral state and compliance level was conducted before the trial of AEJF. The ratios of subjects with deglutition impairment and dryness of the mouth were 29.7% and 36.1%, respectively. Non-compliance was observed in 31.5% of the subjects. After the trial using AEJF, 94.5% of subjects felt that AEJF was easy to swallow. The ratio of the patients expecting AEJF to be an oral formulation was 89.3%, and those with an intention of daily use was 83.4%. A majority of the subjects, 63.9%, intended to switch their present formulations to AEJF. Especially, a high ratio was found among subjects who presently take a powder formulation or more than 5 kinds of medicines daily. Based on these results, AEJF is expected to improve the adherence of elderly patients to their medicine dosage regimens, and to improve compliance among those with oral troubles or some other hindrance to compliance.

  15. Comparison of surgical conditions following premedication with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery: A randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat Pai, Rohini V; Badiger, Santhoshi; Sachidananda, Roopa; Basappaji, Santhosh Mysore Chandramouli; Shanbhag, Raghunath; Rao, Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) provides a challenge and an opportunity to the anesthesiologists to prove their mettle and give the surgeons a surgical field which can make their delicate surgery safer,more precise and faster. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical field and the rate of blood loss in patients premedicated with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery. Material and Methods: ASA I or II patients who were scheduled to undergo ESS were randomly allocated to group D (n = 30) or group C (n = 30). The patients' vital parameters, propofol infusion rate, and rate of blood loss were observed and calculated. The surgeon, who was blinded, rated the visibility of the surgical field from grade 0-5. Results: In the clonidine group, the rate of blood loss, the surgical time, propofol infusion rate was found to be statistically lower as compared to the diazepam group. Also a higher number of patients in the clonidine group had a better surgical score (better surgical field) than the diazepam group and vice versa. Conclusions: Premedication with clonidine as compared to diazepam, provides a better surgical field with less blood loss in patients undergoing ESS. PMID:27275059

  16. 40 CFR 122.44 - Establishing limitations, standards, and other permit conditions (applicable to State NPDES...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... procedures which account for existing controls on point and nonpoint sources of pollution, the variability of... ocean discharges; (8) Incorporate alternative effluent limitations or standards where warranted by... identified in a storm water pollution prevention plan are adequate and properly implemented in...

  17. Inclusive and Integrated Schooling for Children with Limited Abilities: Problems and Conditions Necessary for Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liubavina, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    For more than twenty years now the system of education in Russia has been adopting the ideas of integrated schooling for children with limited abilities. The absence of positive outcomes has been confirmed by the results of numerous surveys (Malofeev 2007, 2011; Nazarova 1996, 2009). In this article, N. V. Liubavina writes that the time has now…

  18. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... engine mounts and the supporting structures must be designed to withstand a ``limit engine torque load... occur about once in the lifetime of any airplane. Section 25.305 requires that supporting structures be... of producing much higher transient loads on the engine mounts and supporting structures. As a...

  19. Limiting conditions for applying the spherical section assumption in contact angle estimation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Jaideep

    2003-03-01

    The shape of liquid drops on solid surfaces deviates from the spherical as tension decreases and gravity effects start affecting the drop shape. This paper attempts to define this deviation and estimates the dimensionless Eotvos number limits above which the deviation becomes "significant." The use of these limiting values can facilitate estimation of contact angle in the following manner. It is well known that the equilibrium contact angle made by a liquid drop on a solid surface can be estimated from measurements of two drop parameters. These parameters can be any two chosen from the drop volume, height, and wetted radius. In case the effect of gravity on the drop shape is negligible, simple algebraic relations derived from the spherical section assumption exist, from which the contact angle can be estimated. In systems where the "spherical section" assumption is invalid, the Laplace equation for the drop shape has been solved numerically with any two of the above parameters as the constraints, to obtain the contact angle. In this paper, Eotvos numbers at which the deviation of the drop profile from the spherical is significant enough to result in contact angle deviation of 1 degrees are estimated. The limiting values of Eotvos number, expressed as a function of the original contact angle made by the spherical profile, are obtained by solving the Laplace equation for the drop shape with the drop volume and wetted radius constraints for decreasing values of Interfacial tension. These limiting values are also estimated for different drop sizes and for cases where the drop phase is heavier (sessile) and lighter (buoyant) than the surrounding fluid. The independence of the Eotvos number estimates from the sign of the density difference as well as the drop size is shown. These Eotvos number limits can be used to check if the spherical section assumption, with the resulting simple algebraic relations, can be used for contact angle estimation and other shape

  20. Monitoring strategies for re-establishment of ecological reference conditions: possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Alve, Elisabeth; Lepland, Aivo; Magnusson, Jan; Backer-Owe, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The ecological status of an environment should be evaluated by comparison with local "reference conditions", here defined as the pre-industrial ecological status of the 19th century. This pilot study illustrates how micropalaeontological monitoring, using benthic foraminifera (protists) and associated geochemical parameters preserved in inner Oslofjord (Norway) sediments, characterise local reference conditions. In order to optimise the usefulness of the ecological information held by foraminifera and enable characterisation of temporal changes in environmental quality beyond time intervals covered by biological time-series, the Norwegian governmental macrofauna-based classification system is applied on fossil benthic foraminiferal assemblages. Quantitative comparisons demonstrate deteriorating ecological status in response to increased anthropogenic forcing (eutrophication, micropollutants), including a 73% loss in number of foraminiferal species. Despite reduced pollution during the past decades and, at one site, capping of polluted sediments with clean clay, the reference conditions are far from re-established. Micropalaeontological monitoring requires net sediment accumulation basins and careful considerations of taphonomic processes.

  1. 76 FR 63822 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G280 Airplane, Limit Engine Torque Loads...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ...) Model G280 Airplane, Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine Stoppage AGENCY: Federal Aviation... conditions are issued for the Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) model G280 airplane. This airplane will have a...: Federal Aviation Administration, Transport Airplane Directorate, Attn: Rules Docket (ANM-113), Docket...

  2. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 /> to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may...

  3. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 /> to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may...

  4. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may hold...

  5. 7 CFR 301.76-5 - General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited permit; provisions for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid § 301.76-5 General conditions governing the issuance of any certificate or limited... Act (7 U.S.C. 7714) 2 /> to prevent the spread of Asian citrus psyllid; and 2 An inspector may...

  6. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services, intensive services, or training services, or act as a One-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE AND...

  7. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local...-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF...

  8. 20 CFR 661.310 - Under what limited conditions may a Local Board directly be a provider of core services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Under what limited conditions may a Local...-Stop Operator? 661.310 Section 661.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER...

  9. GCM Simulations of Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" Conditions: Implications for the Environmental Limits on Terrestrial Metazoans and Their Extraterrestrial Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth intervals provide excellent opportunities to examine the environmental limits on terrestrial metazoans. A series of GCM simulations was run in order to quantify climatic conditions during these intervals. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. High-frequency limit of the transport cross section in scattering by an obstacle with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksenko, A. I.; Cruz, J. P.; Lakshtanov, E. L.

    2008-06-01

    The scalar scattering of a plane wave by a strictly convex obstacle with impedance boundary conditions is considered. A uniform bound of the total cross section for all values of the frequency is presented. The high-frequency limit of the transport cross section is calculated and presented as a classical functional of the variational calculus.

  11. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. 410.19 Section 410.19 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL...

  12. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. 410.19 Section 410.19 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL...

  13. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. 410.19 Section 410.19 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL...

  14. 42 CFR 410.19 - Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms: Condition for and limitation on coverage. 410.19 Section 410.19 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL...

  15. Photosystem II cycle activity and alternative electron transport in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under dynamic light conditions and nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Lavaud, Johann; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Alternative electron sinks are an important regulatory mechanism to dissipate excessively absorbed light energy particularly under fast changing dynamic light conditions. In diatoms, the cyclic electron transport (CET) around Photosystem II (PS II) is an alternative electron transport pathway (AET) that contributes to avoidance of overexcitation under high light illumination. The combination of nitrogen limitation and high-intensity irradiance regularly occurs under natural conditions and is expected to force the imbalance between light absorption and the metabolic use of light energy. The present study demonstrates that under N limitation, the amount of AET and the activity of CETPSII in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were increased. Thereby, the activity of CETPSII was linearly correlated with the amount of AET rates. It is concluded that CETPSII significantly contributes to AET in P. tricornutum. Surprisingly, CETPSII was found to be activated already at the end of the dark period under N-limited conditions. This coincided with a significantly increased degree of reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. The analysis of the macromolecular composition of cells of P. tricornutum under N-limited conditions revealed a carbon allocation in favor of carbohydrates during the light period and their degradation during the dark phase. A possible linkage between the activity of CETPSII and degree of reduction of the PQ pool on the one side and the macromolecular changes on the other is discussed.

  16. Performance of transient limiters under laboratory, simulated, and rocket-triggered lightning conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hasbrouck, R.T.; Johnson, J.P.; Breitmeier, J.

    1989-07-02

    We have designed and tested a prototype system that implements a lightning-protection method referred to as the ''fortress concept.'' The fortress, a structure similar to a Faraday cage, protects the critical system by surrounding it with a continuous metallic skin. Each electrical conductor that must enter the fortress is enclosed within a cable, which is, in turn, enclosed in a metallic shield that terminates at the entry point and is electrically bonded to the fortress' outer metallic surface. Within the fortress, each penetrating conductor is protected by a transient limiter. The system was tested by means of full-threat-level simulated lightning and actual lightening triggered by rockets. Several limited components were subsequently tested by using a laboratory-type surge generator to investigate certain anomalous responses. This paper reviews the fortress concept, discusses the operation of the limiters, and examines their performance. Explanations are offered for the anomalous responses, and several important design considerations and trade-offs are offered. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  17. The effect of limiter conditioning on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Manos, D.M.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Dylla, H.F.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements by moveable Langmuir probes and edge spectroscopy diagnostics have documented the conditioning effect of low density helium-initiated discharge sequences on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) edge plasma. Langmuir probe measurements show in general that the edge electron density n{sub e} decreases by less than a factor of 2 while the edge electron temperature T{sub e} doubles. Radial profiles to the plasma boundary show that the density scrape-off length increases somewhat while the temperature scrape-off length decreases substantially. The particle flux density is unaffected. The spectral emission of C 2 decreases by a factor of 2, a much smaller change than that exhibited by the D{sub {alpha}} signal. These results complement previous accounts of the conditioning technique. Comparisons of these He conditioning measurements are made to edge measurements during a deuterium density scan experiment, showing many similarities, and to an existing edge model of the conditioning process, showing qualitative agreement. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  18. The effect of limiter conditioning on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Nyberg, I.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Timberlake, J.; Ulrickson, M.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Measurements by moveable Langmuir probes and edge spectroscopy diagnostics have documented the conditioning effect of low-density helium-initiated discharge sequences on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor edge plasma. Langmuir probe measurements shown in general that the edge electron density {ital n}{sub {ital e}} decreases by less than a factor of 2 while the edge electron temperature {ital T}{sub {ital e}} doubles. Radial profiles to the plasma boundary show that the density scrape-off length increases somewhat while the temperature scrape-off length decreases substantially. The particle flux density is unaffected. The spectral emission of C II decreases by a factor of 2, a much smaller change than that exhibited by the {ital D}{sub {alpha}} signal. These results complement previous accounts of the conditioning technique. Comparisons of these He conditioning measurements are made to edge measurements during a deuterium density scan experiment, showing many similarities, and to an existing edge model of the conditioning process, showing qualitative agreement.

  19. 26 CFR 54.9801-3 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast cancer at any time prior to A's enrollment date in the plan. Nine months after A's enrollment date in the plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast...

  20. 45 CFR 146.111 - Limitations on preexisting condition exclusion period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... on genetic information, A has a predisposition towards breast cancer. A was not diagnosed with breast... plan, A is diagnosed with breast cancer. (ii) Conclusion. In this Example, the plan may not impose a preexisting condition exclusion with respect to A's breast cancer because, prior to A's enrollment date, A...

  1. 42 CFR 410.16 - Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.16 Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for... Part B benefits as described in sections 1861(s)(10), (jj), (nn), (oo), (pp), (qq)(1), (rr), (uu), (vv... and vitamins. (3) Family history, including a review of medical events in the beneficiary's...

  2. 42 CFR 410.16 - Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.16 Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for... Part B benefits as described in sections 1861(s)(10), (jj), (nn), (oo), (pp), (qq)(1), (rr), (uu), (vv... and vitamins. (3) Family history, including a review of medical events in the beneficiary's...

  3. 42 CFR 410.16 - Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.16 Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for... Part B benefits as described in sections 1861(s)(10), (jj), (nn), (oo), (pp), (qq)(1), (rr), (uu), (vv... and vitamins. (3) Family history, including a review of medical events in the beneficiary's...

  4. 42 CFR 410.16 - Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for and limitations on coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.16 Initial preventive physical examination: Conditions for... Part B benefits as described in sections 1861(s)(10), (jj), (nn), (oo), (pp), (qq)(1), (rr), (uu), (vv... and vitamins. (3) Family history, including a review of medical events in the beneficiary's...

  5. Microbial responses to disturbance following the conversion of CRP land to cropland under water limiting conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The conversion of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands to croplands potentially reduces ecological benefits such as high soil health condition that resist to disturbance (i.e. extreme weather). Soil CO2 flux primarily comes from root and microbes’ respirations and is sensitive to changes in soil...

  6. Mouse breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) mediates etoposide resistance and transport, but etoposide oral availability is limited primarily by P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Allen, John D; Van Dort, Sonja C; Buitelaar, Marije; van Tellingen, Olaf; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2003-03-15

    The breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP (BCRP/ABCG2)] has not previously been directly identified as a source of resistance to epipodophyllotoxins.However, when P-glycoprotein (P-gp)- and Mrp1-deficient mouse fibroblast and kidney cell lines were selected for resistance to etoposide, amplification and overexpression of Bcrp1 emerged as the dominant resistance mechanism in five of five cases. Resistance was accompanied by reduced intracellular etoposide accumulation. Bcrp1 sequence in all of the resistant lines was wild-type in the region spanning the R482 mutation hot spot known to alter the substrate specificity of mouse Bcrp1 (mouse cognate of BCRP) and human BCRP. Transduced wild-type Bcrp1 cDNA mediated resistance to etoposide and teniposide in fibroblast lines and trans-epithelial etoposide transport in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. Bcrp1-mediated etoposide resistance was reversed by two structurally different BCRP/Bcrp1 inhibitors, GF120918 and Ko143. BCRP/Bcrp1 (inhibition) might thus impact on the antitumor activity and pharmacokinetics of epipodophyllotoxins. However, treatment of P-gp-deficient mice with GF120918 did not improve etoposide oral uptake, suggesting that Bcrp1 activity is not a major limiting factor in this process. In contrast, use of GF120918 to inhibit P-gp in wild-type mice increased the plasma levels of etoposide after oral administration 4-5-fold. It may thus be worthwhile to test inhibition of P-gp in humans to improve the oral availability of etoposide.

  7. A reduced population of CD103(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells has a limited impact on oral Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Santoscoy, María; Wenzel, Ulf Alexander; Persson, Emma; Yrlid, Ulf; Agace, William; Wick, Mary Jo

    2016-08-01

    CD103(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DC) are the major migratory DC subset in the small intestine lamina propria (siLP) and their survival is dependent on the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4). Mice with a DC-specific deletion of irf4 (CD11c-cre.Irf4 mice) have reduced mucosal CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC and altered T cell differentiation to protein antigen. The influence of CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC on oral infection with the gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella, however, is poorly understood and is investigated here. We show that, despite being infected with Salmonella, CD11c-cre.Irf4 mice (called Cre(+) mice) conserve the reduction in CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC observed in naive Cre(+) mice, particularly in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) but also in the siLP at day 3 post infection. Moreover, Salmonella-infected Cre(+) mice have a similar bacterial burden in intestinal tissues (siLP, MLN and Peyer's patches) as well as the spleen compared to infected Cre(-) controls. The T cell compartment, including the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing T cells, is not altered in intestinal tissues of Salmonella-infected Cre(+) mice relative to infected Cre(-) controls. In addition, no difference between infected Cre(+) and Cre(-) mice was observed in either the concentration of IL-6 or IL-17 in whole tissue lysates of siLP, MLN or Peyer's patches or in the serum concentration of Salmonella-specific IgG and IgM. Overall the data suggest that the reduction of CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC in Cre(+) mice has little if any impact on Salmonella burden in infected tissues or eliciting effector functions important in host survival at later stages of the infection.

  8. The novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernandez, Cristhiam M; Garcia, David A

    2013-03-01

    After the introduction of warfarin, long-term oral anticoagulation treatment remained unchanged for more than 50 years. Most recently, with the development and approval of new oral anticoagulants, the treatment of medical conditions that require thrombosis prophylaxis and long-term anticoagulation has become more complex. In the case of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention after orthopedic surgery, the new oral agents will be less costly than the parenteral alternative. In other settings (such as atrial fibrillation or treatment of acute VTE), the new agents will offer additional convenience at higher cost, but the degree to which they will reduce clinically important events such as thrombosis or bleeding will be limited, especially for patients on optimally controlled warfarin. As the use of the new oral anticoagulants becomes more widespread, it will be important for all clinicians to have a basic understanding of their pharmacology, advantages, and limitations. Although the need to measure or reverse the effect of these drugs will arise infrequently, clinicians--especially hematologists--will desire evidence-based recommendations about how to manage such scenarios, which will require research studies.

  9. Impact of oral health conditions on the quality of life of preschool children and their families: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental caries, traumatic dental injury (TDI) and malocclusion are common oral health conditions among preschool children and can have both physical and psychosocial consequences. Thus, it is important to measure the impact these on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of children. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of oral health conditions on the OHRQoL of preschool children and their families. Methods A preschool-based, cross-sectional study was carried out with 843 preschool children in the city of Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered the Brazilian Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale and a questionnaire addressing socio-demographic data as well as the parent’s/caregiver’s perceptions regarding their child’s health. Clinical exams were performed by three researchers who had undergone a calibration process for the diagnosis of dental caries, TDI and malocclusion (K = 0.83-0.85). Hierarchical Poisson regression was employed to determine the strength of associations between oral health conditions and OHRQoL (α = 5%). The multivariate model was run on three levels obeying a hierarchical approach from distal to proximal determinants: 1) socio-demographic data; 2) perceptions of health; and 3) oral health conditions. Results The prevalence of impact from oral health conditions on OHRQoL was 32.1% among the children and 26.2% among the families. The following variables were significantly associated with a impact on OHRQoL among the children: birth order of child (PR = 1.430; 95% CI: 1.045-1.958), parent’s/caregiver’s perception of child’s oral health as poor (PR = 1.732; 95% CI: 1.399-2.145), cavitated lesions (PR = 2.596; 95% CI: 1.982-3.400) and TDI (PR = 1.413; 95% CI: 1.161-1.718). The following variables were significantly associated with a impact on OHRQoL among the families: parent’s/caregiver’s perception of child’s oral health as poor (PR = 2.116; 95% CI

  10. An Individual-Based Diploid Model Predicts Limited Conditions Under Which Stochastic Gene Expression Becomes Advantageous

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Osada, Naoki; Araki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest the existence of a stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) in many organisms, and its non-negligible effect on their phenotype and fitness. To date, however, how SGE affects the key parameters of population genetics are not well understood. SGE can increase the phenotypic variation and act as a load for individuals, if they are at the adaptive optimum in a stable environment. On the other hand, part of the phenotypic variation caused by SGE might become advantageous if individuals at the adaptive optimum become genetically less-adaptive, for example due to an environmental change. Furthermore, SGE of unimportant genes might have little or no fitness consequences. Thus, SGE can be advantageous, disadvantageous, or selectively neutral depending on its context. In addition, there might be a genetic basis that regulates magnitude of SGE, which is often referred to as “modifier genes,” but little is known about the conditions under which such an SGE-modifier gene evolves. In the present study, we conducted individual-based computer simulations to examine these conditions in a diploid model. In the simulations, we considered a single locus that determines organismal fitness for simplicity, and that SGE on the locus creates fitness variation in a stochastic manner. We also considered another locus that modifies the magnitude of SGE. Our results suggested that SGE was always deleterious in stable environments and increased the fixation probability of deleterious mutations in this model. Even under frequently changing environmental conditions, only very strong natural selection made SGE adaptive. These results suggest that the evolution of SGE-modifier genes requires strict balance among the strength of natural selection, magnitude of SGE, and frequency of environmental changes. However, the degree of dominance affected the condition under which SGE becomes advantageous, indicating a better opportunity for the evolution of SGE in different genetic

  11. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  12. Factors limiting endurance of armor, artillery, and infantry units under simulated NBC conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, T.M.; Tharion, W.J.; Banderet, L.E.; Lussier, A.R.

    1986-03-13

    The war of the future will require 72-hour operations in environments contaminated with nuclear/biological/chemical (NBC) agents. The 1985 P2NBC2 (Physiological and Psychological Effects of NBC and Extended Operations on Combined Arms Crews) Program assessed soldier endurance and performance under simulated NBC conditions. A total of 175 soldiers were observed during four tests differing in design, site, climatic conditions, and performance demands. In all but one of the iterations where the full chemical-protective ensemble (MOPP 4) was used without cooling, soldier endurance fell far short of the projected requirement. Psychological data were analyzed to determine which factors were associated with the incidence of casualties. The findings showed that perceived intensity of symptoms resembling the hyperventilation syndrome was significantly greater in soldiers classified as Casualties. Five of these symptoms (painful breathing, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, headache, and nausea) showed Casualty-Survivor differences in all tests. Symptom intensity was attributed to two factors. (1) External conditions. Thermal stress exacerbated the five basic symptoms, induced others (tetany and paresthesia), and decreased endurance. Periodic relief from respirator use attenuated these symptoms and enhanced endurance. (2) Individual differences. Significant Casualty-Survivor differences in anxiety, depression, and cognitive strategy scores indicated that perception of hyperventilation symptoms and endurance were related to personality variables. Hyperventilation symptoms could incapacitate the soldier or induce removal of the protective mask under actual chemical attack.

  13. Teleportation of qubit states through dissipative channels: Conditions for surpassing the no-cloning limit

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdemir, Sahin Kaya; Bartkiewicz, Karol; Liu, Yu-xi; Miranowicz, Adam

    2007-10-15

    We investigate quantum teleportation through dissipative channels and calculate teleportation fidelity as a function of damping rates. It is found that the average fidelity of teleportation and the range of states to be teleported depend on the type and rate of the damping in the channel. Using the fully entangled fraction, we derive two bounds on the damping rates of the channels: one is to beat the classical limit and the second is to guarantee the nonexistence of any other copy with better fidelity. The effect of the initially distributed maximally entangled state on the process is presented; the concurrence and the fully entangled fraction of the shared states are discussed. We intend to show that prior information on the dissipative channel and the range of qubit states to be teleported is helpful for the evaluation of the success of teleportation, where success is defined as surpassing the fidelity limit imposed by the fidelity of the 1-to-2 optimal cloning machine for the specific range of qubits.

  14. Oral myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P.; Chande, Mayura S.; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency. PMID:22114438

  15. The solubility limited source term for cement-conditioned wastes: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, F.P.

    1999-07-01

    An important function of the cement backfill in a nuclear waste repository is to react with aqueous waste species and reduce their solubility. However, to quantify backfill performance it is first necessary to prove the existence and establish the nature of the chemical solubility controls. This can be done by characterizing the solubility-limiting phases, determining their solubility and thermodynamic functions, and assessing their stability and persistence and solubility during backfill degradation. Much of the necessary data must be acquired experimentally. The title paper describes briefly the progress of experimental work on selected species including nickel, chromium(III,VI), tin(IV), molybdenum(VI), uranium(VI), Ce(III,IV), thorium, actinide simulants (III,IV) and chloride. Data needs are assessed and although much experimental work remains to be done, methodologies have been developed which will expedite progress. The expectation of a more quantitative performance assessment of cement barriers is, therefore, attainable.

  16. Decoupling criterion based on limited energy loss condition for groove measurement using optical scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Mengzhou; Li, Qiang; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-12-01

    In confocal metrology, the lateral and axial responses are coupled in narrow regions near groove edges. This coupling results in an area with an uncertain profile, particularly for measurements of tight structures or deep grooves. In this paper, to delineate the area with measurement accuracy loss, an analytical model depicting the coupling relationships between the groove depth, the coupled portions and the NA of the objective used is introduced. Based on this model, the limited energy lost (LEL) decoupling criterion is presented that can enable users to choose suitable numerical apertures before performing measurements, predict the extents of the areas with measurement accuracy loss, and identify readout areas that yield accurate height measurements. The theory was verified by using confocal microscopes and is also applicable to far-field optical scanning metrology.

  17. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: FT-IR spectroscopic studies of yeast grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Rozenfelde, Linda; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrobiosis is a unique state of living organisms when metabolism is temporarily and reversibly delayed in response to the extreme desiccation of cells. The production of dry active preparations of yeast grown under anaerobic conditions is not currently possible because preparations are extremely sensitive to the dehydration procedure, though they could be very helpful in different biotechnological processes, including bioethanol production. To characterize mechanisms responsible for such sensitivity to the dehydration procedure, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to study the composition of aerobically grown yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistant to dehydration and grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation and sensitive to dehydration. Results indicated that significantly lower amounts of lipids in cells, grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation, may be related to the mechanisms of sensitivity. Dehydration of both resistant and sensitive S. cerevisiae cells was accompanied by similar changes in main cellular compounds. Amounts of nucleic acids and proteins decreased slightly, whereas that of lipids and carbohydrates increased. Artificially reduced sensitivity to dehydration in S. cerevisiae cells, grown under conditions of severe oxygen limitation, led to the increase in the lipid concentration. The chemical composition of S. cerevisiae membranes is proposed to dictate the resistance to dehydration in resistant and sensitive cells.

  18. The effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride paste (CPP-ACPF) on oral and salivary conditions of patients undergoing chemotherapy: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Banava, Sepideh; Houshyari, Mohammad; Safaie, Tahmineh

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral and saliva conditions of patients undergoing chemotherapy is often affected by the medication they receive. Up to now, no appropriate medication that possesses the positive effects of chemotherapy without presenting oral complications has been introduced. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effects of CPP-ACPF paste on the oral and salivary status of patients undergoing chemotherapy. Methods From October 2013 to April 2014, 20 patients in chemotherapy treatment plans and who met the inclusion criteria enrolled in this randomized parallel single-blind controlled clinical trial in Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) patients received their daily medication of cancer therapy center (group 1, control); 2) patients applied CPP-ACPF Crème (MI paste plus, GC USA) twice a day as instructed (group 2). The baseline status of oral conditions of patients (mucositis, dry mouth, infection, diminished tasting sense, difficulty in food intake, burning sensation of mucosa, saliva and dental plaque pH, rest and stimulated saliva, buffering capacity of saliva) were recorded and reevaluated after 21 and 42 days. The data were analyzed with a Mann-Whitney U-test. Results A total of 20 patients were allocated randomly to groups 1 and 2. The Mann-Whitney U-test showed that application of CPP-ACPF paste twice daily did not cause any significant difference in oral complication of the subject group compared with the control group (p>0.05). Among salivary signs, resting and stimulated saliva rates and saliva buffering capacity had significantly altered in the CPP-ACPF group in day 21 and 42 in comparison with those of the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion Application of CPP-ACPF paste before and during chemotherapy can improve the salivary status of patients undergoing this treatment. PMID:26767110

  19. Water-Limiting Conditions Alter the Structure and Biofilm-Forming Ability of Bacterial Multispecies Communities in the Alfalfa Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Bogino, Pablo; Abod, Ayelén; Nievas, Fiorela; Giordano, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that adhere to biotic or abiotic surfaces and are enclosed in a protective matrix of extracellular compounds. An important advantage of the biofilm lifestyle for soil bacteria (rhizobacteria) is protection against water deprivation (desiccation or osmotic effect). The rhizosphere is a crucial microhabitat for ecological, interactive, and agricultural production processes. The composition and functions of bacterial biofilms in soil microniches are poorly understood. We studied multibacterial communities established as biofilm-like structures in the rhizosphere of Medicago sativa (alfalfa) exposed to 3 experimental conditions of water limitation. The whole biofilm-forming ability (WBFA) for rhizospheric communities exposed to desiccation was higher than that of communities exposed to saline or nonstressful conditions. A culture-dependent ribotyping analysis indicated that communities exposed to desiccation or saline conditions were more diverse than those under the nonstressful condition. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected strains showed that the rhizospheric communities consisted primarily of members of the Actinobacteria and α- and γ-Proteobacteria, regardless of the water-limiting condition. Our findings contribute to improved understanding of the effects of environmental stress factors on plant-bacteria interaction processes and have potential application to agricultural management practices. PMID:24223979

  20. Ammonia-limited conditions cause of Thaumarchaeal dominance in volcanic grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Daebeler, Anne; Bodelier, Paul L E; Hefting, Mariet M; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-03-01

    The first step of nitrification is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). It is largely unknown, by which mechanisms these microbes are capable of coexistence and how their respective contribution to ammonia oxidation may differ with varying soil characteristics. To determine how different levels of ammonium availability influence the extent of archaeal and bacterial contributions to ammonia oxidation, microcosm incubations with controlled ammonium levels were conducted. Net nitrification was monitored and ammonia-oxidizer communities were quantified. Additionally, the nitrification inhibitor allylthiourea (ATU) was applied to discriminate between archaeal and bacterial contributions to soil ammonia oxidation. Thaumarchaeota, which were the only ammonia oxidizers detectable at the start of the incubation, grew in all microcosms, but AOB later became detectable in ammonium amended microcosms. Low and high additions of ammonium increasingly stimulated AOB growth, while AOA were only stimulated by the low addition. Treatment with ATU had no effect on net nitrification and sizes of ammonia-oxidizing communities suggesting that the effective concentration of ATU to discriminate between archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation is not the same in different soils. Our results support the niche-differentiating potential of ammonium concentration for AOA and AOB, and we conclude that ammonium limitation can be a major reason for absence of detectable AOB in soil.

  1. Conditions and limitations on learning in the adaptive management of mallard harvests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, F.A.; Kendall, W.L.; Dubovsky, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service adopted a protocol for the adaptive management of waterfowl hunting regulations (AHM) to help reduce uncertainty about the magnitude of sustainable harvests. To date, the AHM process has focused principally on the midcontinent population of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), whose dynamics are described by 4 alternative models. Collectively, these models express uncertainty (or disagreement) about whether harvest is an additive or a compensatory form of mortality and whether the reproductive process is weakly or strongly density-dependent. Each model is associated with a probability or 'weight,' which describes its relative ability to predict changes in population size. These Bayesian probabilities are updated annually using a comparison of population size predicted under each model with that observed by a monitoring program. The current AHM process is passively adaptive, in the sense that there is no a priori consideration of how harvest decisions might affect discrimination among models. We contrast this approach with an actively adaptive approach, in which harvest decisions are used in part to produce the learning needed to increase long-term management performance. Our investigation suggests that the passive approach is expected to perform nearly as well as an optimal actively adaptive approach, particularly considering the nature of the model set, management objectives and constraints, and current regulatory alternatives. We offer some comments about the nature of the biological hypotheses being tested and describe some of the inherent limitations on learning in the AHM process.

  2. On the choice of limiters in a numerical approximation of a chemotaxis system with non-linear boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheva, G.

    2012-10-01

    A mathematical model for haematopoietic stem cells migration towards their niche in the bone marrow has been proposed in the literature. It consists of a chemotaxis system of partial differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions and an additional ordinary differential equation on a part of the computational boundary. The aim in the current paper is first to answer some of the open questions of a recently introduced finite volume scheme for this chemotaxis system of differential equations and second to investigate the influence of the boundary conditions on the choice of flux limiters (the generalized minmod, Koren, van Leer limiters are investigated) used to ensure positivity and non-oscillating nature of the numerical solution.

  3. Assessment of Oral Conditions and Quality of Life in Morbid Obese and Normal Weight Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Joselene Martinelli; Moura-Grec, Patrícia Garcia de; Freitas, Adriana Rodrigues de; Sales-Peres, Arsênio; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the impact of oral disease on the quality of life of morbid obese and normal weight individuals. Cohort was composed of 100 morbid-obese and 50 normal-weight subjects. Dental caries, community periodontal index, gingival bleeding on probing (BOP), calculus, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, dental wear, stimulated salivary flow, and salivary pH were used to evaluate oral diseases. Socioeconomic and the oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) questionnaires showed the quality of life in both groups. Unpaired Student, Fisher's Exact, Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney, and Multiple Regression tests were used (p<0.05). Obese showed lower socio-economic level than control group, but no differences were found considering OIDP. No significant differences were observed between groups considering the number of absent teeth, bruxism, difficult mastication, calculus, initial caries lesion, and caries. However, saliva flow was low, and the salivary pH was changed in the obese group. Enamel wear was lower and dentine wear was higher in obese. More BOP, insertion loss, and periodontal pocket, especially the deeper ones, were found in obese subjects. The regression model showed gender, smoking, salivary pH, socio-economic level, periodontal pocket, and periodontal insertion loss significantly associated to obesity. However, both OIDP and BOP did not show significant contribution to the model. The quality of life of morbid obese was more negatively influenced by oral disease and socio-economic factors than in normal weight subjects.

  4. Metacognitive Awareness and the Fluency of Task-Based Oral Output across Planning Conditions: The Case of Iranian TEFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifoori, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    The present inquiry inspected the impact of metacognitive awareness on the fluency of 114 Iranian TEFL learners' task-based oral output. The participants in six intact classes were selected from a population of 120 English sophomores based on their scores on proficiency pre-test. The classes were randomly assigned as two tripartite groups of…

  5. Limited physical contact through a mesh barrier is sufficient for social reward-conditioned place preference in adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Peartree, Natalie A; Hood, Lauren E; Thiel, Kenneth J; Sanabria, Federico; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Chandler, Kayla N; Neisewander, Janet L

    2012-02-01

    Adolescence is a period of enhanced sensitivity to social influences and vulnerability to drug abuse. Social reward in adolescent rats has been demonstrated with the conditioned place preference (CPP) model, but it is not clear whether limited contact with another rat without play is sufficient to produce reward. We investigated this issue using an apparatus containing two main compartment, each with a wire mesh barrier that allowed rats placed on either side of the barrier to have limited physical contact. Adolescent male rats were given two conditioning sessions/day for 2 or 8 days following baseline preference tests. Rats were placed into their preferred side alone for one daily 10-min session and into their initially non-preferred side (i.e., CS) for the other session during which they either had restricted or unrestricted physical access to another rat (Rat/Mesh or Rat/Phys, respectively) or to a tennis ball (Ball/Mesh or Ball/Phys, respectively) unconditioned stimulus (US). Only the Rat/Phys group exhibited CPP after 2 CS-US pairings; however, after 8 CS-US pairings, the Rat/Mesh and Ball/Phys groups also exhibited CPP. During conditioning, the rat US elicited more robust approach and contact behavior compared to the ball, regardless of physical or restricted access. The incidence of contact and/or approach increased as the number of exposures increased. The results suggest that the rank order of US reward efficacy was physical contact with a rat>limited contact with a rat>physical contact with a ball, and that rough-and-tumble play is not necessary to establish social reward-CPP. The findings have important implications for emerging drug self-administration models in which two rats self-administering drug intravenously have limited physical contact via a mesh barrier shared between their respective operant conditioning chambers.

  6. Profiling of spatial metabolite distributions in wheat leaves under normal and nitrate limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, J. William; Chandra, Surya; Xu, Yun; Dunn, Warwick B.; Correa, Elon; Hopkins, Laura; Goodacre, Royston; Tobin, Alyson K.; Bowsher, Caroline G.

    2015-01-01

    The control and interaction between nitrogen and carbon assimilatory pathways is essential in both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic tissue in order to support metabolic processes without compromising growth. Physiological differences between the basal and mature region of wheat (Triticum aestivum) primary leaves confirmed that there was a change from heterotrophic to autotrophic metabolism. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the suitability and phenotypic reproducibility of the leaf growth conditions. Principal Component–Discriminant Function Analysis (PC–DFA) revealed distinct clustering between base, and tip sections of the developing wheat leaf, and from plants grown in the presence or absence of nitrate. Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight/Mass Spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) combined with multivariate and univariate analyses, and Bayesian network (BN) analysis, distinguished different tissues and confirmed the physiological switch from high rates of respiration to photosynthesis along the leaf. The operation of nitrogen metabolism impacted on the levels and distribution of amino acids, organic acids and carbohydrates within the wheat leaf. In plants grown in the presence of nitrate there was reduced levels of a number of sugar metabolites in the leaf base and an increase in maltose levels, possibly reflecting an increase in starch turnover. The value of using this combined metabolomics analysis for further functional investigations in the future are discussed. PMID:25680480

  7. Comparative studies of S-layer proteins from Bacillus stearothermophilus strains expressed during growth in continuous culture under oxygen-limited and non-oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Sára, M; Sleytr, U B

    1994-01-01

    The specific properties of S-layer proteins from three different Bacillus stearothermophilus strains revealing oblique, square, or hexagonal lattice symmetry were preserved during growth in continuous culture on complex medium only under oxygen-limited conditions in which glucose was used as the sole carbon source. When oxygen limitation was relieved, amino acids became metabolized, cell density increased, and different S-layer proteins from wild-type strains became rapidly replaced by a new common type of S-layer protein with an apparent subunit molecular weight of 97,000 which assembled into an identical oblique (p2) lattice type. During switching from wild-type strains to variants, patches of the S-layer lattices characteristics for wild-type strains, granular regions, and areas with oblique lattice symmetry could be observed on the surface of individual cells from all organisms. The granular regions apparently consisted of mixtures of the S-layer proteins from the wild-type strains and the newly synthesized p2 S-layer proteins from the variants. S-layer proteins from wild-type strains possessed identical N-terminal regions but led to quite different cleavage products upon peptide mapping, indicating that they are encoded by different genes. Chemical analysis including N-terminal sequencing and peptide mapping showed that the oblique S-layer lattices synthesized under increased oxygen supply were composed of identical protein species. Images PMID:7961489

  8. The capacity of Porphyromonas gingivalis to multiply under iron-limiting conditions correlates with its pathogenicity in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Grenier, D; Goulet, V; Mayrand, D

    2001-07-01

    Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis have various abilities to induce infections in an animal model. The hypothesis of this study was that pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis could multiply under iron-limiting conditions, while non-pathogenic strains could not. Three pathogenic strains (W50, W83, and ATCC 49417) grew to a final optical density (660 nm) > 2 in horse serum, while the growth of the 3 non-pathogenic strains (ATCC 33277, LB13D-2, and HW24D-1) was negligible. When an excess of hemin or ferric chloride was added to the serum, significant growth of the non-pathogenic strains occurred. Under iron-limiting conditions, the pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis had a much lower requirement for human iron-loaded transferrin and hemin than the non-pathogenic strains. Proteolytic degradation of transferrin, which may be associated with the release of iron, was not markedly different for pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. In addition, no relationship could be established between the level of 55Fe uptake from 55Fe-transferrin and the pathogenicity of strains. Our study provided evidence that the ability of P. gingivalis to multiply in vitro under iron-limiting conditions may be correlated with its ability to induce infections in an animal model. Isolates of P. gingivalis possessing a low requirement for iron are likely to have a higher potential for initiating periodontal infections.

  9. Arsenic-induced phosphate limitation under experimental Early Proterozoic oceanic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Hemmingsson, Christoffer; Holm, Mikaela; Chiu, Beverly; Iñiguez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of phosphorus concentrations associated with modern hydrothermal Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides and ancient Fe(III) oxide-rich iron formations, is used to estimate bioavailable Precambrian marine phosphorus (P) concentrations. This led to the proposition of a low dissolved P budget of ∼10-25% of present-day levels, before ∼1.9 billion years ago. Estimates incorporating ancient marine Si levels ≥ 0.67 mM instead suggested global dissolved P levels greater than today. Here we unite current experimental models that have considered NaCl solutions containing elevated dissolved Fe(II), Si, Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions in the incorporation of P in Precambrian marine Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides, in addition to arsenic as a hydrothermal proxy. We show that the coprecipitation of dissolved P and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides from arsenic-rich marine waters produces an average P distribution coefficient of ∼0.072 (± 0.01) μM-1. This is comparable to the ∼ 0.07 μM-1 predicted for Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides in modern arsenic-rich, submarine hydrothermal settings, from which the lower Early Proterozoic dissolved marine P concentrations were predicted. As/P molar ratios below modern seawater ratios removed the negative feedback effect high Si impose on P scavenging by Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides. The binding of As(III) to Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides exhibits a lower competitive influence on P fixation. As(V) that likely became prominent in the surficially oxidized Early Proterozoic oceans induced dissolved P limitation because of preferential P sequestration at the expense of dissolved As(V) enrichment. The control of As on P scavenging by the precipitating Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides is strong regardless of common seawater cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+). The data suggest that the application of Si and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides as an ancient seawater P proxy should consider chemical variability between depositional basins, taking into account the rather strong role hydrothermal arsenic has on the distribution of P

  10. A strong conditional mutualism limits and enhances seed dispersal and germination of a tropical palm.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Rob; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2010-04-01

    Seed predation and seed dispersal can have strong effects on early life history stages of plants. These processes have often been studied as individual effects, but the degree to which their relative importance co-varies with seed predator abundance and how this influences seed germination rates is poorly understood. Therefore, we used a combination of observations and field experiments to determine the degree to which germination rates of the palm Astrocaryum mexicanum varied with abundance of a small mammal seed predator/disperser, Heteromys desmarestianus, in a lowland tropical forest. Patterns of abundance of the two species were strongly related; density of H. desmarestianus was low in sites with low density of A. mexicanum and vice versa. Rates of predation and dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds depended on abundance of H. desmarestianus; sites with high densities of H. desmarestianus had the highest rates of seed predation and lowest rates of seed germination, but a greater total number of seeds were dispersed and there was greater density of seedlings, saplings, and adults of A. mexicanum in these sites. When abundance of H. desmarestianus was experimentally reduced, rates of seed predation decreased, but so did dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds. Critically, rates of germination of dispersed seeds were 5 times greater than undispersed seeds. The results suggest that the relationship between A. mexicanum and H. desmarestianus is a conditional mutualism that results in a strong local effect on the abundance of each species. However, the magnitude and direction of these effects are determined by the relative strength of opposing, but related, mechanisms. A. mexicanum nuts provide H. desmarestianus with a critical food resource, and while seed predation on A. mexicanum nuts by H. desmarestianus is very intense, A. mexicanum ultimately benefits because of the relatively high germination rates of its seeds that are dispersed by H. desmarestianus.

  11. A strong conditional mutualism limits and enhances seed dispersal and germination of a tropical palm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klinger, R.; Rejmanek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Seed predation and seed dispersal can have strong effects on early life history stages of plants. These processes have often been studied as individual effects, but the degree to which their relative importance co-varies with seed predator abundance and how this influences seed germination rates is poorly understood. Therefore, we used a combination of observations and field experiments to determine the degree to which germination rates of the palm Astrocaryum mexicanum varied with abundance of a small mammal seed predator/disperser, Heteromysdesmarestianus, in a lowland tropical forest. Patterns of abundance of the two species were strongly related; density of H. desmarestianus was low in sites with low density of A. mexicanum and vice versa. Rates of predation and dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds depended on abundance of H. desmarestianus; sites with high densities of H. desmarestianus had the highest rates of seed predation and lowest rates of seed germination, but a greater total number of seeds were dispersed and there was greater density of seedlings, saplings, and adults of A. mexicanum in these sites. When abundance of H. desmarestianus was experimentally reduced, rates of seed predation decreased, but so did dispersal of A. mexicanum seeds. Critically, rates of germination of dispersed seeds were 5 times greater than undispersed seeds. The results suggest that the relationship between A. mexicanum and H. desmarestianus is a conditional mutualism that results in a strong local effect on the abundance of each species. However, the magnitude and direction of these effects are determined by the relative strength of opposing, but related, mechanisms. A. mexicanum nuts provide H. desmarestianus with a critical food resource, and while seed predation on A. mexicanum nuts by H. desmarestianus is very intense, A. mexicanum ultimately benefits because of the relatively high germination rates of its seeds that are dispersed by H. desmarestianus. ?? The Author(s) 2010.

  12. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  13. Exploring the Limits of Cell Adhesion under Shear Stress within Physiological Conditions and beyond on a Chip

    PubMed Central

    Stamp, Melanie E. M.; Jötten, Anna M.; Kudella, Patrick W.; Breyer, Dominik; Strobl, Florian G.; Geislinger, Thomas M.; Wixforth, Achim; Westerhausen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion processes are of ubiquitous importance for biomedical applications such as optimization of implant materials. Here, not only physiological conditions such as temperature or pH, but also topographical structures play crucial roles, as inflammatory reactions after surgery can diminish osseointegration. In this study, we systematically investigate cell adhesion under static, dynamic and physiologically relevant conditions employing a lab-on-a-chip system. We screen adhesion of the bone osteosarcoma cell line SaOs-2 on a titanium implant material for pH and temperature values in the physiological range and beyond, to explore the limits of cell adhesion, e.g., for feverish and acidic conditions. A detailed study of different surface roughness Rq gives insight into the correlation between the cells’ abilities to adhere and withstand shear flow and the topography of the substrates, finding a local optimum at Rq = 22 nm. We use shear stress induced by acoustic streaming to determine a measure for the ability of cell adhesion under an external force for various conditions. We find an optimum of cell adhesion for T = 37 °C and pH = 7.4 with decreasing cell adhesion outside the physiological range, especially for high T and low pH. We find constant detachment rates in the physiological regime, but this behavior tends to collapse at the limits of 41 °C and pH 4. PMID:27775638

  14. Exploring the Limits of Cell Adhesion under Shear Stress within Physiological Conditions and beyond on a Chip.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Melanie E M; Jötten, Anna M; Kudella, Patrick W; Breyer, Dominik; Strobl, Florian G; Geislinger, Thomas M; Wixforth, Achim; Westerhausen, Christoph

    2016-10-21

    Cell adhesion processes are of ubiquitous importance for biomedical applications such as optimization of implant materials. Here, not only physiological conditions such as temperature or pH, but also topographical structures play crucial roles, as inflammatory reactions after surgery can diminish osseointegration. In this study, we systematically investigate cell adhesion under static, dynamic and physiologically relevant conditions employing a lab-on-a-chip system. We screen adhesion of the bone osteosarcoma cell line SaOs-2 on a titanium implant material for pH and temperature values in the physiological range and beyond, to explore the limits of cell adhesion, e.g., for feverish and acidic conditions. A detailed study of different surface roughness Rq gives insight into the correlation between the cells' abilities to adhere and withstand shear flow and the topography of the substrates, finding a local optimum at Rq = 22 nm. We use shear stress induced by acoustic streaming to determine a measure for the ability of cell adhesion under an external force for various conditions. We find an optimum of cell adhesion for T = 37 °C and pH = 7.4 with decreasing cell adhesion outside the physiological range, especially for high T and low pH. We find constant detachment rates in the physiological regime, but this behavior tends to collapse at the limits of 41 °C and pH 4.

  15. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - II: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is normally described by an expression, here termed the conventional (CONV) description, that is restricted to the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption condition (CCLWA), i.e. when the single pass absorbance is significantly smaller than the empty cavity losses, i.e. when α0 L < < π / F. To describe NICE-OHMS signals beyond this limit two simplified extended descriptions (termed the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT), which are assumed to be valid under the relaxed cavity-limited weak absorption condition (RCLWA), i.e. when α0 L < π / F, and a full description (denoted FULL), presumed to be valid also when the α0 L < π / F condition does not hold, have recently been derived in an accompanying work (Ma W, et al. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical Description. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jqsrt.2015.09.007). The present work constitutes an experimental verification and assessment of the validity of these, performed in the Doppler limit for a set of Fα0 L / π values (up to 3.5); it is shown under which conditions the various descriptions are valid. It is concluded that for samples with Fα0 L / π up to 0.01, all descriptions replicate the data well. It is shown that the CONV description is adequate and provides accurate assessments of the signal strength (and thereby the analyte concentration) up to Fα0 L / π of around 0.1, while the ELET is accurate for Fα0 L / π up to around 0.3. The ELFT description mimics the Db NICE-OHMS signal well for Fα0 L / π up to around unity, while the FULL description is adequate for all Fα0 L / π values investigated. Access to these descriptions both increases considerably the dynamic range of the technique and

  16. Hypoxic areas, density-dependence and food limitation drive the body condition of a heavily exploited marine fish predator

    PubMed Central

    Käll, Filip; Hansson, Martin; Baranova, Tatjana; Karlsson, Olle; Lundström, Karl; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Hjelm, Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the factors regulating fish condition is crucial in ecology and the management of exploited fish populations. The body condition of cod (Gadus morhua) in the Baltic Sea has dramatically decreased during the past two decades, with large implications for the fishery relying on this resource. Here, we statistically investigated the potential drivers of the Baltic cod condition during the past 40 years using newly compiled fishery-independent biological data and hydrological observations. We evidenced a combination of different factors operating before and after the ecological regime shift that occurred in the Baltic Sea in the early 1990s. The changes in cod condition related to feeding opportunities, driven either by density-dependence or food limitation, along the whole period investigated and to the fivefold increase in the extent of hypoxic areas in the most recent 20 years. Hypoxic areas can act on cod condition through different mechanisms related directly to species physiology, or indirectly to behaviour and trophic interactions. Our analyses found statistical evidence for an effect of the hypoxia-induced habitat compression on cod condition possibly operating via crowding and density-dependent processes. These results furnish novel insights into the population dynamics of Baltic Sea cod that can aid the management of this currently threatened population. PMID:27853557

  17. First assessment of classical swine fever marker vaccine candidate CP7_E2alf for oral immunization of wild boar under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Feliziani, Francesco; Blome, Sandra; Petrini, Stefano; Giammarioli, Monica; Iscaro, Carmen; Severi, Giulio; Convito, Luca; Pietschmann, Jana; Beer, Martin; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2014-04-11

    Oral vaccination against classical swine fever (CSF) is a potent tool to control disease outbreaks in wild boar. So far, vaccination campaigns have been carried out using live attenuated vaccines that do not allow serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Although this drawback is acceptable for wild boar, the use of marker vaccines would facilitate studies on disease and vaccination dynamics. Recently, the CSF marker vaccine candidate CP7_E2alf was assessed for oral immunization under laboratory conditions. Promising results prompted efforts to study the vaccine candidate under field conditions and in bait formulation. In this context, two oral vaccination campaigns were carried out with CP7_E2alf bait vaccines in two areas called 'faunistic-hunting farms' in the region of Umbria, Italy. One campaign was conducted using single vaccination, the second with the routinely employed double vaccination strategy. Both campaigns were carried out before concerted hunting actions were performed. Bait uptake, vaccine virus detection and antibody responses were assessed along with inspections upon gutting. As a comparator, seven wild boar were hand-fed with baits under laboratory conditions. In the field, bait uptake ranged from 63.7% to 98.7%, whereas antibody prevalence reached only 33.3-35.1%. The marker serology showed a strong influence of sample quality on the test outcome with a total of 85% of samples being classified correctly. Vaccine virus was not detectable. Under hand feeding conditions, six out of seven wild boar took up at least one bait, and five of them showed detectable antibody levels seven weeks after vaccination. These results were supplemented by stability tests. Appropriate stability of vaccine virus was shown both under field and laboratory conditions. In total, most results were in line with our expectations. However, optimization of the DIVA assay has to be attempted in the future.

  18. In vivo effects of the pure aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist GNF-351 after oral administration are limited to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Krausz, Kristopher W; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Tanaka, Naoki; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu G; Perdew, Gary H; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose GNF-351 is a potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) antagonist that inhibits dioxin response element-dependent and independent activities. Here, the absorption, metabolism and in vivo AHR antagonist activity of GNF-351 were investigated. Experimental Approach LC-MS metabolomics was used to analyse GNF-351 metabolism in vitro and in vivo. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes were employed to determine the enzymes involved in GNF-351 metabolism. Analysis of target AHR genes was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of GNF-351 towards AHR activation. Key Results Several phase I metabolites were generated after GNF-351 was incubated with microsomes from human or mouse liver and intestine, including two oxidized GNF-351 and one tri-demethylated GNF-351. Poor absorption from the intestine resulted in no detectable levels of GNF-351 in mouse serum (0–6 h) and urine (24 h) and almost all GNF-351 was found in the faeces after 24 h. Analysis of faeces further revealed all the in vitro phase I metabolites. Novel metabolites were detected, including one di-oxidized GNF-351, two oxidized and tri-demethylated GNF-351, one dehydrogenated product of oxidized GNF-351, and one sulfation product of di-oxidized GNF-351. Cytochromes P450 were demonstrated to be the major enzymes involved in metabolism of GNF-351. After oral administration to mice, GNF-351 readily inhibited β-naphthoflavone-induced AHR activation in ileum and colon, but not that in the liver. Conclusion and Implications While poor absorption and extensive metabolism after oral administration limited the in vivo effects of the pure AHR antagonist GNF-351 in liver, it could be used to inhibit AHR activation in intestine and colon. PMID:24417285

  19. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Is Required to Maintain Visual Conditioning-Induced Behavioral Plasticity by Limiting Local Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to regulate neuronal plasticity by limiting dendritic protein synthesis, but direct demonstration of a requirement for FMRP control of local protein synthesis during behavioral plasticity is lacking. Here we tested whether FMRP knockdown in Xenopus optic tectum affects local protein synthesis in vivo and whether FMRP knockdown affects protein synthesis-dependent visual avoidance behavioral plasticity. We tagged newly synthesized proteins by incorporation of the noncanonical amino acid azidohomoalanine and visualized them with fluorescent noncanonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT). Visual conditioning and FMRP knockdown produce similar increases in FUNCAT in tectal neuropil. Induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally in FMRP knockdown animals, but plasticity degrades over 24 h. These results indicate that FMRP affects visual conditioning-induced local protein synthesis and is required to maintain the visual conditioning-induced behavioral plasticity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability. Exaggerated dendritic protein synthesis resulting from loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is thought to underlie cognitive deficits in FXS, but no direct evidence has demonstrated that FMRP-regulated dendritic protein synthesis affects behavioral plasticity in intact animals. Xenopus tadpoles exhibit a visual avoidance behavior that improves with visual conditioning in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. We showed that FMRP knockdown and visual conditioning dramatically increase protein synthesis in neuronal processes. Furthermore, induction of visual conditioning-dependent behavioral plasticity occurs normally after FMRP knockdown, but performance rapidly deteriorated in the absence of FMRP. These studies show that FMRP negatively regulates local protein synthesis and is required to maintain visual

  20. Assessment of Oral Conditions and Quality of Life in Morbid Obese and Normal Weight Individuals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Adriana Rodrigues; Sales-Peres, Arsênio; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the impact of oral disease on the quality of life of morbid obese and normal weight individuals. Cohort was composed of 100 morbid-obese and 50 normal-weight subjects. Dental caries, community periodontal index, gingival bleeding on probing (BOP), calculus, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, dental wear, stimulated salivary flow, and salivary pH were used to evaluate oral diseases. Socioeconomic and the oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP) questionnaires showed the quality of life in both groups. Unpaired Student, Fisher’s Exact, Chi-Square, Mann-Whitney, and Multiple Regression tests were used (p<0.05). Obese showed lower socio-economic level than control group, but no differences were found considering OIDP. No significant differences were observed between groups considering the number of absent teeth, bruxism, difficult mastication, calculus, initial caries lesion, and caries. However, saliva flow was low, and the salivary pH was changed in the obese group. Enamel wear was lower and dentine wear was higher in obese. More BOP, insertion loss, and periodontal pocket, especially the deeper ones, were found in obese subjects. The regression model showed gender, smoking, salivary pH, socio-economic level, periodontal pocket, and periodontal insertion loss significantly associated to obesity. However, both OIDP and BOP did not show significant contribution to the model. The quality of life of morbid obese was more negatively influenced by oral disease and socio-economic factors than in normal weight subjects. PMID:26177268

  1. Changed oral conditions, between 1963 and 1999, in the population of the Tokelau atolls of the South Pacific.

    PubMed

    Cutress, T W

    2001-12-01

    In 1999, an oral health survey was included in an assessment of the community oral health programme of the Tokelau Islands population. This provided a comparison with a similar survey in 1963. In a convenience sample of 386 children and adults, approximately 30 percent of the total population, the deciduous (number of df teeth) and permanent (number of DMF teeth) tooth scores across all age groupings were higher in 1999 compared with 1963. For 15- to 19-year-olds, the mean DMF scores were 8 and 1; and for 35- to 44-year-olds, the scores were 18 and 4 in 1999 and 1963 respectively. The prominent feature of the DMF scores for those over age 25 years was the numbers of missing (M) teeth. The mean number of M teeth at 20-24 years was 5 and 0, and at 35-44 years, 13 and 2 respectively in 1999 and 1963. Periodontal disease was endemic in adults in both surveys. A serious decline in oral health has occurred over the past 35 years.

  2. Towards lag phase of microbial populations at growth-limiting conditions: The role of the variability in the growth limits of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-02

    The water activity (aw) growth limits of unheated and heat stressed Listeria monocytogenes individual cells were studied. The aw limits varied from 0.940 to 0.997 and 0.951 to 0.997 for unheated and heat stressed cells, respectively. Due to the above variability a decrease in aw results in the presence of a non-growing fraction in the population leading to an additional pseudo-lag in population growth. In this case the total apparent lag of the population is the sum of the physiological lag of the growing cells (time required to adjust to the new environment) and the pseudo-lag. To investigate the effect of aw on the above lag components, the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes on tryptone soy agar with aw adjusted to values ranging from 0.997 to 0.940 was monitored. The model of B&R was fitted to the data for the estimation of the apparent lag. In order to estimate the physiological lag of the growing fraction of the inoculum, the model was refitted to the growth data using as initial population level the number of cells that were able to grow (estimated from the number of colonies formed on the agar at the end of storage) and excluding the rest data during the lag. The results showed that for the unheated cells the apparent lag was almost identical to the physiological lag for aw values ranging from 0.997 to 0.970, as the majority of the cells in the initial population was able to grow in these conditions. As the aw decreased from 0.970 to 0.940 however, the number of cells in the population which were able to grow, decreased resulting to an increase in the pseudo-lag. The maximum value of pseudo-lag was 13.1h and it was observed at aw=0.940 where 10% of the total inoculated cells were able to grow. For heat stressed populations a pseudo-lag started to increase at higher aw conditions (0.982) compared to unheated cells. In contrast to the apparent lag, a linear relation between physiological lag and aw was observed for both unheated and heat stressed cells.

  3. Oil viscosity limitation on dispersibility of crude oil under simulated at-sea conditions in a large wave tank.

    PubMed

    Trudel, Ken; Belore, Randy C; Mullin, Joseph V; Guarino, Alan

    2010-09-01

    This study determined the limiting oil viscosity for chemical dispersion of oil spills under simulated sea conditions in the large outdoor wave tank at the US National Oil Spill Response Test Facility in New Jersey. Dispersant effectiveness tests were completed using crude oils with viscosities ranging from 67 to 40,100 cP at test temperature. Tests produced an effectiveness-viscosity curve with three phases when oil was treated with Corexit 9500 at a dispersant-to-oil ratio of 1:20. The oil viscosity that limited chemical dispersion under simulated at-sea conditions was in the range of 18,690 cP to 33,400 cP. Visual observations and measurements of oil concentrations and droplet size distributions in the water under treated and control slicks correlated well with direct measurements of effectiveness. The dispersant effectiveness versus oil viscosity relationship under simulated at sea conditions at Ohmsett was most similar to those from similar tests made using the Institut Francais du Pétrole and Exxon Dispersant Effectiveness (EXDET) test methods.

  4. Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens under excess and limitation of electron donors. Part II. Mimicking environmental conditions during cultivation in retentostats.

    PubMed

    Marozava, Sviatlana; Röling, Wilfred F M; Seifert, Jana; Küffner, Robert; von Bergen, Martin; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    The strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens was cultivated in retentostats under acetate and acetate plus benzoate limitation in the presence of Fe(III) citrate in order to investigate its physiology under close to natural conditions. Growth rates below 0.003h(-1) were achieved in the course of cultivation. A nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach (nano-LC-MS/MS) with subsequent label-free quantification was performed on proteins extracted from cells sampled at different time points during retentostat cultivation. Proteins detected at low (0.002h(-1)) and high (0.06h(-1)) growth rates were compared between corresponding growth conditions (acetate or acetate plus benzoate). Carbon limitation significantly increased the abundances of several catabolic proteins involved in the degradation of substrates not present in the medium (ethanol, butyrate, fatty acids, and aromatic compounds). Growth rate-specific physiology was reflected in the changed abundances of energy-, chemotaxis-, oxidative stress-, and transport-related proteins. Mimicking natural conditions by extremely slow bacterial growth allowed to show how G. metallireducens optimized its physiology in order to survive in its natural habitats, since it was prepared to consume several carbon sources simultaneously and to withstand various environmental stresses.

  5. The behavior of fuel-lean premixed flames in a standard flammability limit tube under controlled gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wherley, B. L.; Strehlow, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel-lean flames in methane-air mixtures from 4.90 to 6.20 volume percent fuel and propane-air mixtures from 1.90 to 3.00 volume percent fuel were studied in the vicinity of the limit for a variety of gravity conditions. The limits were determined and the behavior of the flames studied for one g upward, one g downward, and zero g propagation. Photographic records of all flammability tube firings were obtained. The structure and behavior of these flames were detailed including the variations of the curvature of the flame front, the skirt length, and the occurrence of cellular instabilities with varying gravity conditions. The effect of ignition was also discussed. A survey of flame speeds as a function of mixture strength was made over a range of lean mixture compositions for each of the fuels studied. The results were presented graphically with those obtained by other researchers. The flame speed for constant fractional gravity loadings were plotted as a function of gravity loadings from 0.0 up to 2.0 g's against flame speeds extracted from the transient gravity flame histories for corresponding gravity loadings. The effects of varying gravity conditions on the extinguishment process for upward and downward propagating flames were investigated.

  6. Impact of Australian Dekkera bruxellensis strains grown under oxygen-limited conditions on model wine composition and aroma.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Chris D; Langhans, Geoffrey; Henschke, Paul A; Grbin, Paul R

    2013-12-01

    Spoilage of red wine by the yeast species Dekkera bruxellensis is a common problem for the global wine industry. When conditions are conducive for growth of these yeasts in wine, they efficiently convert non-volatile hydroxycinnamic acids into aroma-active ethylphenols, thereby reducing the quality of the wine. It has been demonstrated previously that dissolved oxygen is a key factor which stimulates D. bruxellensis growth in wine. We demonstrate that whereas the presence of oxygen accelerates the growth of this species, oxygen-limited conditions favour 4-ethylphenol production. Consequently, we evaluated wine spoilage potential of three D. bruxellensis strains (AWRI1499, AWRI1608 and AWRI1613) under oxygen-limited conditions. Each strain was cultured in a chemically-defined wine medium and the fermentation products were analysed using HPLC and HS-SPME-GC/MS. The strains displayed different growth characteristics but were equally capable of producing ethylphenols. On the other hand, significant differences were observed for 18 of the remaining 33 metabolites analysed and duo-trio sensory analysis indicated significant aroma differences between wines inoculated with AWRI1499 and AWRI1613. When these wines were spiked with low concentrations of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, no sensorial differences could be perceived. Together these data suggest that the three predominant D. bruxellensis strains previously isolated during a large survey of Australian wineries do not differ substantively in their capacity to grow in, and spoil, a model wine medium.

  7. Impaired growth under iron-limiting conditions associated with the acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    López-Rojas, Rafael; García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Labrador-Herrera, Gema; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii has been associated with reduced bacterial fitness and virulence, although the mechanisms underlying this fitness loss have not been well characterised. In this study, the role played by environmental iron levels on the growth and survival of colistin-resistant strains of A. baumannii was assessed. Growth assays with the colistin-susceptible ATCC 19606 strain and its colistin-resistant derivative RC64 [colistin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64 mg/L] demonstrated that the strains grew similarly in rich laboratory medium (Mueller-Hinton broth), whereas RC64 demonstrated impaired growth compared with ATCC 19606 in human serum (>100-fold at 24 h). Compared with RC64, ATCC 19606 grew in the presence of higher concentrations of the iron-specific chelator 2,2'-bipyridine and grew more readily under iron-limiting conditions in solid and liquid media. In addition, iron supplementation of human serum increased the growth of RC64 compared with unsupplemented human serum to a greater extent than ATCC 19606. The ability of 11 colistin-resistant clinical isolates with mutations in the pmrB gene to grow in iron-replete and iron-limiting conditions was assessed, demonstrating that eight of the strains showed reduced growth under iron limitation. Individual mutations in the pmrB gene did not directly correlate with a decreased capacity for growth under iron limitation, suggesting that mutations in pmrB may not directly produce this phenotype. Together these results indicate that acquisition of colistin resistance in A. baumannii can be associated with a decreased ability to grow in low-iron environments.

  8. Fe and P solubilization under limiting conditions by bacteria isolated from Carex kobomugi roots at the Hasaki coast.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hiroaki; Akiyama, Masaru; Kobayashi, Katsuichiro; Yamaji, Keiko

    2013-03-01

    Our objective was simply to report a sedge species, Carex kobomugi Ohwi that has beneficial bacterial associations under low Fe and P conditions of the Hasaki coast, Japan. C. kobomugi is the dominant species in our study area and grows closest to the sea. C. kobomugi showed higher Fe and P content, while these nutrients were less available under alkaline root-zone soil. Within the roots, mycorrhizal fungal colonization was absent, and endophytic fungal colonization was low. On the contrary, endophytic bacteria (e.g. Bacillus sp., Streptomyces luteogriseus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) were isolated, which exhibited both siderophore production and inorganic phosphate solubilization under Fe or P limited conditions. Our results suggest that colonization of root tissue by these bacteria contribute to the Fe and P uptakes by C. kobomugi by increasing availability in the soil.

  9. Oral health-related quality of life in complete denture wearers depending on their socio-demographic background, prosthetic-related factors and clinical condition

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Carmen; Suárez-García, María J.; Del Río, Jaime; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Montero, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the differences in impact on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among complete denture wearers depending on their socio-demographic characteristics, prosthetic-related factors and oral status. Study Design: 51 patients aged 50-90 years treated, from 2005 to 2010, with at least one complete denture at the Department of Buccofacial Prostheses of the Complutense University (Madrid) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. All of the participants answered the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14sp) questionnaire. The additive scoring method was used. The prevalence of impacts was calculated by using the occasional threshold (OHIP-14sp score≥2). Socio-demographic and prosthetic-related variables were gathered. Patients underwent clinical examination to assess their oral condition. Descriptive probes and Chi-Square tests were run (p≤0.05). Results: The predominant participants’ profile was that of a man with a mean age of 69 years wearing complete dentures in both the maxilla and the mandible. The prevalence of impact was 23.5%, showing an average score of 19±9.8. The most affected domains were “functional limitation” and “physical pain”, followed by “physical disability”. Minor impacts were recorded for the psychological and social subscales (“psychological discomfort”, “psychological disability”, “social disability” and “handicap”). The prosthesis’ location significantly influenced the overall patient satisfaction, the lower dentures being the less comfortable. Having a complete removable denture as antagonist significantly hampered the patient satisfaction. Patients without prosthetic stomatitis and those who need repairing or changing their prostheses, recorded significantly higher OHIP-14sp total scores. Conclusions: The use of conventional complete dentures brings negative impacts in the OHRQoL of elderly patients, mainly in case of lower prostheses that required reparation or substitution

  10. Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts for ethanol production from renewable sources under oxygen-limited and low-pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Galafassi, Silvia; Merico, Annamaria; Pizza, Francesca; Hellborg, Linda; Molinari, Francesco; Piškur, Jure; Compagno, Concetta

    2011-08-01

    Industrial fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol requires microorganisms able to utilise a broad range of carbon sources and generate ethanol at high yield and productivity. D. bruxellensis has recently been reported to contaminate commercial ethanol processes, where it competes with Saccharomyces cerevisiae [4, 26]. In this work Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts were studied to explore their potential to produce ethanol from renewable sources under conditions suitable for industrial processes, such as oxygen-limited and low-pH conditions. Over 50 strains were analysed for their ability to utilise a variety of carbon sources, and some strains grew on cellobiose and pentoses. Two strains of D. bruxellensis were able to produce ethanol at high yield (0.44 g g(-1) glucose), comparable to those reported for S. cerevisiae. B. naardenensis was shown to be able to produce ethanol from xylose. To obtain ethanol from synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysates we developed a two-step fermentation strategy: the first step under aerobic conditions for fast production of biomass from mixtures of hexoses and pentoses, followed by a second step under oxygen limitation to promote ethanol production. Under these conditions we obtained biomass and ethanol production on synthetic lignocellulosic hydrolysates, with ethanol yields ranging from 0.2 to 0.3 g g(-1) sugar. Hexoses, xylose and arabinose were consumed at the end of the process, resulting in 13 g l(-1) of ethanol, even in the presence of furfural. Our studies showed that Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts have clear potential for further development for industrial processes aimed at production of ethanol from renewable sources.

  11. Safety and efficacy of glycopyrrolate oral solution for management of pathologic drooling in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy and other neurologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Robert S; Davidson, Jennifer; Lee, Hak-Myung; Cavanaugh, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of oral glycopyrrolate solution 1 mg/5 mL for 24 weeks in pediatric patients with chronic moderate-to- severe drooling associated with cerebral palsy and other neurologic conditions. Methods In this multicenter, open-label, 24-week study, males and females aged 3–18 years weighing at least 27 lb received oral glycopyrrolate solution, starting at 0.02 mg/kg three times daily and titrated in increments of 0.02 mg/kg every 5–7 days for 4 weeks to an optimal maintenance dose or a maximum dose of 0.1 mg/kg, but not exceeding 3 mg three times daily. Safety was assessed by description and tabulation of all adverse events. The primary efficacy endpoint was response, defined as at least a three-point change from baseline to week 24 on the modified Teacher’s Drooling Scale. Results Of 137 intent-to-treat participants, 10 (7.3%) received the maximum dose of 0.1 mg/kg three times daily; 122 (89%) had at least one treatment-emergent adverse event, 47% related to oral glycopyrrolate solution, with most being mild-to-moderate in intensity. The most commonly reported treatment-emergent adverse events were constipation (20.4%), vomiting (17.5%), diarrhea (17.5%), pyrexia (14.6%), dry mouth (10.9%), flushing (10.9%), and nasal congestion (10.9%). Nineteen patients (13.9%) discontinued treatment due to an adverse event, but no adverse event was specifically associated with discontinuation. Two patients had clinically significant toxicity grade shifts, one each in platelet count and calcium concentration. No deaths occurred on treatment; deaths of three patients (multisystem organ failure, anoxic encephalopathy, and aspiration pneumonia) within 30 days of their last dose were not considered to be treatment-related. At 24 weeks, 52.3% (95% confidence interval 43.7–60.9) of patients were responders, with at least a three-point decrease in modified Teacher’s Drooling Scale from baseline, with 83.5% of

  12. Oxygen Response of the Wine Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 Grown under Carbon-Sufficient, Nitrogen-Limited Enological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aceituno, Felipe F.; Orellana, Marcelo; Torres, Jorge; Mendoza, Sebastián; Slater, Alex W.; Melo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Discrete additions of oxygen play a critical role in alcoholic fermentation. However, few studies have quantitated the fate of dissolved oxygen and its impact on wine yeast cell physiology under enological conditions. We simulated the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations that occur after a pump-over during the winemaking process by sparging nitrogen-limited continuous cultures with oxygen-nitrogen gaseous mixtures. When the dissolved oxygen concentration increased from 1.2 to 2.7 μM, yeast cells changed from a fully fermentative to a mixed respirofermentative metabolism. This transition is characterized by a switch in the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and an activation of NADH shuttling from the cytosol to mitochondria. Nevertheless, fermentative ethanol production remained the major cytosolic NADH sink under all oxygen conditions, suggesting that the limitation of mitochondrial NADH reoxidation is the major cause of the Crabtree effect. This is reinforced by the induction of several key respiratory genes by oxygen, despite the high sugar concentration, indicating that oxygen overrides glucose repression. Genes associated with other processes, such as proline uptake, cell wall remodeling, and oxidative stress, were also significantly affected by oxygen. The results of this study indicate that respiration is responsible for a substantial part of the oxygen response in yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. This information will facilitate the development of temporal oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. PMID:23001663

  13. Conditional solvation thermodynamics of isoleucine in model peptides and the limitations of the group-transfer model.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2014-04-17

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute-solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance.

  14. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  15. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  16. Preferential depletion of zinc within Costa Rica upwelling dome creates conditions for zinc co-limitation of primary production

    PubMed Central

    Dreux Chappell, P.; Vedmati, Jagruti; Selph, Karen E.; Cyr, Heather A.; Jenkins, Bethany D.; Landry, Michael R.; Moffett, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The Costa Rica Dome (CRD) is a wind-driven feature characterized by high primary production and an unusual cyanobacterial bloom in surface waters. It is not clear whether this bloom arises from top-down or bottom-up processes. Several studies have argued that trace metal geochemistry within the CRD contributes to the composition of the phytoplankton assemblages, since cyanobacteria and eukaryotic phytoplankton have different transition metal requirements. Here, we report that total dissolved zinc (Zn) is significantly depleted relative to phosphate (P) and silicate (Si) within the upper water column of the CRD compared with other oceanic systems, and this may create conditions favorable for cyanobacteria, which have lower Zn requirements than their eukaryotic competitors. Shipboard grow-out experiments revealed that while Si was a limiting factor under our experimental conditions, additions of Si and either iron (Fe) or Zn led to higher biomass than Si additions alone. The addition of Fe and Zn alone did not lead to significant enhancements. Our results suggest that the depletion of Zn relative to P in upwelled waters may create conditions in the near-surface waters that favor phytoplankton with low Zn requirements, including cyanobacteria. PMID:27275028

  17. A relational understanding of sibling experiences of children with rare life-limiting conditions: findings from a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Cari; Gibson, Faith; Adams, Sally; Anderson, Gillian; Forbat, Liz

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) and Batten disease are rare life-limiting conditions (LLCs) characterised by progressive and permanent physical and cognitive decline. The impact of such conditions on families, and notably on siblings, has not yet been described or documented. This paper presents data from a UK-wide study that sought to understand the family experience of supporting a child with the rare degenerative LLCs of MPS and Batten disease. The aim of this paper is to report sibling experiences related to these rare degenerative and progressive conditions, in order to inform the future development of supportive interventions. Eight siblings of children with MPS (n = 7) and Batten Disease (n = 1) participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews. A card sort technique was utilised to support and engage the children. Siblings are clearly impacted emotionally, pragmatically and relationally by the ill health of another child in the family. The data indicate four key themes which demonstrate impacts on siblings: perceptions of the condition and its symptoms, impact on daily life, emotional consequences and ways of coping. Siblings often had considerable knowledge of the condition and took on important roles in symptom management. However, these experiences were in the context of managing relationships within the family (often protecting parents from an awareness of how much they knew) and relationships at school (including distraction from learning and being bullied by peers). The data highlight how sibling experiences are generated through a combination of negative disability discourses and support through peers and family members. The data indicate how these features shift as a consequence of witnessing the advancement of their brother's or sister's condition and the emotional sequelae of disease progression. Exploration of siblings' experiences of living with such rare progressive and degenerative LLCs suggest the focus of interventions to support this

  18. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weiguang; Silander, Isak; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is conventionally described by an expression (here referred to as the CONV expression) that is restricted to the case when the single-pass absorbance, α0L, is much smaller than the empty cavity losses, π/F [here termed the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption (CCLWA) condition]. This limits the applicability of the technique, primarily its dynamic range and calibration capability. To remedy this, this work derives extended descriptions of Db NICE-OHMS that are not restricted to the CCLWA condition. First, the general principles of Db NICE-OHMS are scrutinized in some detail. Based solely upon a set of general assumptions, predominantly that it is appropriate to linearize the Beer-Lambert law, that the light is modulated to a triplet, and that the Pound-Drever-Hall sidebands are fully reflected, a general description of Db NICE-OHMS that is not limited to any specific restriction on α0L vs. π/F, here referred to as the FULL description, is derived. However, this description constitutes a set of equations to which no closed form solution has been found. Hence, it needs to be solved numerically (by iterations), which is inconvenient. To circumvent this, for the cases when α0L<π/F but without the requirement that the stronger CCLWA condition needs to be fulfilled, a couple of simplified extended expressions that are expressible in closed analytical form, referred to as the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT, have been derived. An analysis based on simulations validates the various descriptions and assesses to which extent they agree. It is shown that in the CCLWA limit, all extended descriptions revert to the CONV expression. The latter one deviates though from the extended ones for α0L around and above 0.1π/F. The two simplified extended descriptions agree

  19. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  20. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  1. Non-limiting food conditions for growth and production of the copepod community in a highly productive upwelling zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano, Rubén; Bustos-Ríos, Evelyn; Hidalgo, Pamela; Morales, Carmen E.

    2016-09-01

    Zooplankton production is critical for understanding marine ecosystem dynamics. This work estimates copepod growth and production in the coastal upwelling and coastal transition zones off central-southern Chile (~35 to 37°S) during a 3-year time series (2004, 2005, and 2006) at a fixed shelf station, and from spring-summer spatial surveys during the same period. To estimate copepod production (CP), we used species-biomasses and associated C-specific growth rates from temperature dependent equations (food-saturated) for the dominant species, which we assumed were maximal growth rates (gmax). Using chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for food conditions, we determined a size-dependent half-saturation constant with the Michaelis-Menten equation to derive growth rates (g) under the effect of food limitation. These food-dependent C-specific growth rates were much lower (<0.1 d-1) than those observed in the field for the dominant species, while gmax for same species, in the range of 0.19-0.23 d-1 better represented the necessary growth to attain observed adult sizes of at least two copepods, Paracalanus cf. indicus and Calanus chilensis. Copepod biomass (CB) and rates of maximal copepod production (CPmax) obtained with gmax were higher in the coastal upwelling zone (<50 km from shore), and correlated significantly to oceanographic variables associated with upwelling conditions. Both CPmax and gmax exhibited negative trends at the fixed station from 2004 to 2006 in association with increased duration of upwelling in the latter year. Annual CPmax ranged between 24 and 52 g C m-2 y-1 with a mean annual P/B ratio of 7.3. We concluded that interannual variation in copepod production resulted from factors and processes regulating copepod abundance and biomass in the absence of bottom-up control, allowing copepods to grow without limitation due to food resources.

  2. Oral health promotion for our ageing Australian population.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J M

    2003-03-01

    The ageing Australian population living in the new millennium has dental needs that are very different and more complex than those experienced by previous older adult cohorts during the twentieth century. A summary of the oral health status of older Australians is presented, together with a review of the important relationships between general health and oral health. The key to maintaining and improving older adults' oral health status is the use of oral health promotion strategies that focus not only on dental characteristics, but also on the life characteristics of older adults, and on their quality of life issues. Traditionally, there has been very limited geriatric oral health promotion, with several myths contributing to this situation. Contemporary geriatric oral health promotion in the new millenium has an evidence-based and planned approach. It encompasses not only the treatment of oral diseases and conditions, but has an increased focus on the prevention of oral diseases and conditions to enhance oral health status and older adults' quality of life. Using the Ottawa Charter and a functional dependence classification, a geriatric oral health promotion matrix is presented, using a specific example of Australian residential care.

  3. Use of the Priestley-Taylor evaporation equation for soil water limited conditions in a small forest clearcut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, A.L.; Childs, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Priestley-Taylor equation, a simplification of the Penman equation, was used to allow calculations of evapotranspiration under conditions where soil water supply limits evapotranspiration. The Priestley-Taylor coefficient, ??, was calculated to incorporate an exponential decrease in evapotranspiration as soil water content decreases. The method is appropriate for use when detailed meteorological measurements are not available. The data required to determine the parameter for the ?? coefficient are net radiation, soil heat flux, average air temperature, and soil water content. These values can be obtained from measurements or models. The dataset used in this report pertains to a partially vegetated clearcut forest site in southwest Oregon with soil depths ranging from 0.48 to 0.70 m and weathered bedrock below that. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the Bowen ratio method, and the calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient was fitted to these estimates by nonlinear regression. The calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient (?????) was found to be approximately 0.9 when the soil was near field capacity (0.225 cm3 cm-3). It was not until soil water content was less than 0.14 cm3 cm-3 that soil water supply limited evapotranspiration. The soil reached a final residual water content near 0.05 cm3 cm-3 at the end of the growing season. ?? 1991.

  4. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    PubMed

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  5. Application of thresholds of potential concern and limits of acceptable change in the condition assessment of a significant wetland.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kerrylee; Saintilan, Neil; Colloff, Matthew J; Wen, Li

    2013-10-01

    We propose a framework in which thresholds of potential concern (TPCs) and limits of acceptable change (LACs) are used in concert in the assessment of wetland condition and vulnerability and apply the framework in a case study. The lower Murrumbidgee River floodplain (the 'Lowbidgee') is one of the most ecologically important wetlands in Australia and the focus of intense management intervention by State and Federal government agencies. We used a targeted management stakeholder workshop to identify key values that contribute to the ecological significance of the Lowbidgee floodplain, and identified LACs that, if crossed, would signify the loss of significance. We then used conceptual models linking the condition of these values (wetland vegetation communities, waterbirds, fish species and the endangered southern bell frog) to measurable threat indicators, for which we defined a management goal and a TPC. We applied this framework to data collected across 70 wetland storages', or eco-hydrological units, at the peak of a prolonged drought (2008) and following extensive re-flooding (2010). At the suggestion of water and wetland mangers, we neither aggregated nor integrated indices but reported separately in a series of chloropleth maps. The resulting assessment clearly identified the effect of rewetting in restoring indicators within TPC in most cases, for most storages. The scale of assessment was useful in informing the targeted and timely management intervention and provided a context for retaining and utilising monitoring information in an adaptive management context.

  6. The activity of nodules of the supernodulating mutant Mtsunn is not limited by photosynthesis under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Ricardo A; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-04-10

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants.

  7. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  8. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions.

  9. Investigations of Internal Flow Fields of Constant-Area Mixing-Tubes under Starting-Limit Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Eijiro; Tomioka, Sadatake; Sakuranaka, Noboru; Watanabe, Syuichi; Masuya, Goro

    Flow fields in the constant-area mixing tubes of ejector jets were investigated under the starting-limit conditions of an aerodynamic choking mode by performing numerical simulations and cold flow experiments. Pressure recovery was almost completed in the shock-train region. The length of the shock-train region (Lst) was measured under various conditions. Lst was proportional to the mass flow rate ratio of the secondary flow to the primary flow when this ratio was less than 0.15. On the other hand, Lst became almost constant when the mass flow rate ratio exceeded 0.15. Numerical studies showed that this change was caused by the difference in the mechanism of the flow fields. In the cases with low air mass flow rates, the primary and secondary flows almost mixed in a region between the inlets of the mixing tubes and the choking points. The pressure was recovered by a pseudo-shock-wave generated downstream of the choking point. On the other hand, when the mass flow rate ratio was higher than 0.15, the primary and secondary flows were clearly separated at the choking point. The pressure recovery was achieved by the mixing between the primary and secondary flows downstream of the choking point.

  10. On the spatial distribution of the transpiration and soil moisture of a Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystem in water-limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Matteo; Corona, Roberto; Montaldo, Nicola; Albertson, John D.; Oren, Ram

    2014-05-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are characterized by a strong heterogeneity, and often by water-limited conditions. In these conditions contrasting plant functional types (PFT, e.g. grass and woody vegetation) compete for the water use. Both the vegetation cover spatial distribution and the soil properties impact the soil moisture (SM) spatial distribution. Indeed, vegetation cover density and type affects evapotranspiration (ET), which is the main lack of the soil water balance in these ecosystems. With the objective to carefully estimate SM and ET spatial distribution in a Mediterranean water-limited ecosystem and understanding SM and ET relationships, an extended field campaign is carried out. The study was performed in a heterogeneous ecosystem in Orroli, Sardinia (Italy). The experimental site is a typical Mediterranean ecosystem where the vegetation is distributed in patches of woody vegetation (wild olives mainly) and grass. Soil depth is low and spatially varies between 10 cm and 40 cm, without any correlation with the vegetation spatial distribution. ET, land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by an eddy covariance technique based micrometeorological tower. But in heterogeneous ecosystems a key assumption of the eddy covariance theory, the homogeneity of the surface, is not preserved and the ET estimate may be not correct. Hence, we estimate ET of the woody vegetation using the thermal dissipation method (i.e. sap flow technique) for comparing the two methodologies. Due the high heterogeneity of the vegetation and soil properties of the field a total of 54 sap flux sensors were installed. 14 clumps of wild olives within the eddy covariance footprint were identified as the most representative source of flux and they were instrumented with the thermal dissipation probes. Measurements of diameter at the height of sensor installation (height of 0.4 m above ground) were recorded in all the clumps. Bark thickness and sapwood depth were measured on several

  11. Areca nut-induced buccal mucosa fibroblast contraction and its signaling: a potential role in oral submucous fibrosis--a precancer condition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Chi; Lin, Li-Deh; Wu, Hui-Lin; Ho, Yuan-Soon; Hsien, Hsiang-Chi; Wang, Tong-Mei; Jeng, Po-Yuan; Cheng, Ru-Hsiu; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2013-05-01

    Betel quid (BQ) chewing is an oral habit that increases the risk of oral cancer and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF), a precancerous condition showing epithelial atrophy and tissue fibrosis. Persistent fibroblast contraction may induce the fibrotic contracture of tissue. In this study, we found that areca nut extract (ANE) (200-1200 µg/ml) stimulated buccal mucosa fibroblast (OMF)-populated collagen gel contraction. Arecoline but not arecaidine-two areca alkaloids, slightly induced the OMF contraction. Exogenous addition of carboxylesterase (2U/ml) prevented the arecoline- but not ANE-induced OMF contraction. OMF expressed inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptors. ANE-induced OMF (800 µg/ml) contraction was inhibited by U73122 [phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor] and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (IP3 receptor antagonist), respectively. Ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and verapamil, two calcium mobilization modulators, also suppressed the ANE-induced OMF contraction. ANE induced calcium/calmodulin kinase II and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in OMF. Moreover, W7 (a Ca(2+)/calmodulin inhibitor), HA1077 (Rho kinase inhibitor), ML-7 (MLC kinase inhibitor) and cytochalasin B (actin filament polymerization inhibitor) inhibited the ANE-induced OMF contraction. Although ANE elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in OMF, catalase, superoxide dismutase and N-acetyl-L-cysteine showed no obvious effect on ANE-elicited OMF contraction. These results indicate that BQ chewing may affect the wound healing and fibrotic processes in OSF via inducing OMF contraction by ANE and areca alkaloids. AN components-induced OMF contraction was related to PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/calmodulin and Rho signaling pathway as well as actin filament polymerization, but not solely due to ROS production.

  12. Probing the diversity of healthy oral microbiome with bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2016-12-01

    The human oral cavity contains a highly personalized microbiome essential to maintaining health, but capable of causing oral and systemic diseases. Thus, an in-depth definition of "healthy oral microbiome" is critical to understanding variations in disease states from preclinical conditions, and disease onset through progressive states of disease. With rapid advances in DNA sequencing and analytical technologies, population-based studies have documented the range and diversity of both taxonomic compositions and functional potentials observed in the oral microbiome in healthy individuals. Besides factors specific to the host, such as age and race/ethnicity, environmental factors also appear to contribute to the variability of the healthy oral microbiome. Here, we review bioinformatic techniques for metagenomic datasets, including their strengths and limitations. In addition, we summarize the interpersonal and intrapersonal diversity of the oral microbiome, taking into consideration the recent large-scale and longitudinal studies, including the Human Microbiome Project. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(12): 662-670].

  13. Probing the diversity of healthy oral microbiome with bioinformatics approaches

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lee, Jae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The human oral cavity contains a highly personalized microbiome essential to maintaining health, but capable of causing oral and systemic diseases. Thus, an in-depth definition of “healthy oral microbiome” is critical to understanding variations in disease states from preclinical conditions, and disease onset through progressive states of disease. With rapid advances in DNA sequencing and analytical technologies, population-based studies have documented the range and diversity of both taxonomic compositions and functional potentials observed in the oral microbiome in healthy individuals. Besides factors specific to the host, such as age and race/ethnicity, environmental factors also appear to contribute to the variability of the healthy oral microbiome. Here, we review bioinformatic techniques for metagenomic datasets, including their strengths and limitations. In addition, we summarize the interpersonal and intrapersonal diversity of the oral microbiome, taking into consideration the recent large-scale and longitudinal studies, including the Human Microbiome Project. PMID:27697111

  14. Post-oral fat stimulation of intake and conditioned flavor preference in C57BL/6J mice: A concentration-response study.

    PubMed

    Ackroff, Karen; Sclafani, Anthony

    2014-04-22

    Fat appetite is determined not only by orosensory (flavor) stimuli but also by the post-oral actions of dietary fat, which promote increased attraction to the flavors of high-fat foods. Experiment 1 presents a concentration-response analysis of how intragastric (IG) fat self-infusions stimulate intake and condition flavor preferences in C57BL/6J mice trained 1h/day. Separate groups of food-restricted mice consumed a flavored saccharin solution (the CS-) paired with IG self-infusions of water (Test 0) followed by a different flavored solution (the CS+) paired with IG self-infusions of 1.6, 3.2, 6.4 or 12.8% Intralipid (IL, soybean oil) (Tests 1-3). Following additional CS- and CS+ training sessions, a two-bottle CS+ vs. CS- choice test was conducted without infusions. Infusions of 3.2-12.8% IL stimulated CS+ licking in the first test session and more so in subsequent test sessions, and also conditioned significant CS+ preferences. These effects were similar to those previously observed with isocaloric glucose infusions (8-32%). IG infusion of 1.6% IL stimulated intake slightly but did not condition a CS+ preference comparable to the actions of isocaloric 4% glucose. Experiment 2 compared these subthreshold IL and glucose concentrations with that of a 1.6% IL+4% glucose infusion. This mixture stimulated 1-h CS+ licking more rapidly but generated a preference similar to that of 1.6% IL. In 23h/day tests, however, the IL+glucose mixture stimulated greater CS+ intakes and preferences than did 1.6% IL or 4% glucose. These findings show that fat, like glucose, rapidly generates concentration-dependent post-oral signals that stimulate intake and enhance preferences for energy-rich foods in mice.

  15. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    PubMed

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of single oral dose trazodone: a randomized, two-period, cross-over trial in healthy, adult, human volunteers under fed condition

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Prashant; Agrawal, Yadvendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the bioequivalence of single dose trazodone hydrochloride USP 100 mg tablets administered as an oral dose under fed condition. Methods:This study was an open-label, balanced, randomized, two-sequence, two-treatment, two-period, single oral dose, crossover bioequivalence study in healthy, adult, human subjects under fed conditions. After an overnight fast of at least 10 h, the subjects were served a high fat and high calorie vegetarian breakfast, which they were required to consume within 30 min. A single oral dose (100 mg) of either the test or the reference product was administered to the subjects. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0−t) and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0−∞) were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data. Bioequivalence was concluded if the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the adjusted geometric mean (gMean) ratios for Cmax and AUC were within the predetermined range of 80–125%, in accordance with regulatory requirements. Results:For the test formulation, the trazodone gMean Cmax was 1480.9 ng/mL (vs. 1520.2 ng/mL for reference), AUC0−t was 18193.0 ng·h/mL (vs. 18209.8 ng·h/mL) and AUC0−∞ was 19346.3 ng·h/mL (vs. 19393.4 ng·h/mL). The 90% CIs for the ratio (test/reference) were 93.0–102.0% for Cmax, 96.7–103.2% for AUC0−t and 96.1–103.5% for AUC0−∞. There were no deaths or serious adverse events during the conduct of the study. Conclusion:Test product when compared with the Reference product meets the bioequivalence criteria with respect to the extent of absorption of trazodone under fed condition. PMID:26483693

  17. Aggression behaviour induced by oral administration of the Janus-kinase inhibitor tofacitinib, but not oclacitinib, under stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Tomoki; Tschernig, Thomas; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A; Bäumer, Wolfgang

    2015-10-05

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have recently been developed for allergic diseases. We focused on the 2 different JAK inhibitors, tofacitinib (selective for JAK3) and oclacitinib (selective for JAK1 and 2), to clarify the mechanism of anti-inflammatory and anti-itching potency of these drugs. In the process of detecting anti-itching potency, we observed that tofacitinib treated mice showed aggression behaviour. The objective of the study reported here was to investigate the aggressive behaviour induced by tofacitinib by using a mouse model of allergic dermatitis and the resident-intruder test. For the allergic dermatitis model, female BALB/c mice were sensitised and challenged topically with toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI). Vehicle, tofacitinib or oclacitinib, was administered orally 30 min before TDI challenge. Scratching, aggression and standing behaviours were monitored in the 60 min period immediately following challenge of TDI. Another group of male BALB/c mice treated with vehicle, tofacitinib or oclacitinib was evaluated in the resident-intruder test and brains were obtained to determine blood brain barrier penetration. In the allergic dermatitis model, a significant increase in aggression and standing behaviour was only obvious in the tofacitinib treatment group. There was no effect in non-sensitised mice, but similar aggression was also induced by tofacitinib in male resident-intruder test. Penetration of blood-brain barrier was observed both in tofacitinib and oclacitinib treated mice. These results suggest that aggression was induced by tofacitinib under some kind of stressful environment. This study indicates a possible role of the JAK-STAT pathway in modulation of aggression behaviour.

  18. Cocoa butter-like lipid production ability of non-oleaginous and oleaginous yeasts under nitrogen-limited culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yongjun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-02-06

    Cocoa butter (CB) extracted from cocoa beans is the main raw material for chocolate production. However, growing chocolate demands and limited CB production has resulted in a shortage of CB supply. CB is mainly composed of three different kinds of triacylglycerols (TAGs), POP (C16:0-C18:1-C16:0), POS (C16:0-C18:1-C18:0), and SOS (C18:0-C18:1-C18:0). The storage lipids of yeasts, mainly TAGs, also contain relative high-level of C16 and C18 fatty acids and might be used as CB-like lipids (CBL). In this study, we cultivated six different yeasts, including one non-oleaginous yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D, and five oleaginous yeast strains, Trichosporon oleaginosus DSM11815, Rhodotorula graminis DSM 27356, Lipomyces starkeyi DSM 70296, Rhodosporidium toruloides DSM 70398, and Yarrowia lipolytica CBS 6124, in nitrogen-limited medium and compared their CBL production ability. Under the same growth conditions, we found that TAGs were the main lipids in all six yeasts and that T. oleaginosus can produce more TAGs than the other five yeasts. Less than 3% of the total TAGs were identified as potential SOS in the six yeasts. However, T. oleaginosus produced 27.8% potential POP and POS at levels of 378 mg TAGs/g dry cell weight, hinting that this yeast may have potential as a CBL production host after further metabolic engineering in future.

  19. Limitations of the rheological mucoadhesion method: the effect of the choice of conditions and the rheological synergism parameter.

    PubMed

    Hägerström, Helene; Edsman, Katarina

    2003-04-01

    This work demonstrates several limitations of the simple rheological method that is widely used to investigate mucoadhesion of polymer gels. We establish the importance of the choice of conditions and the synergism parameter for the results obtained in comparative studies. Dynamic rheological measurements were performed on gels based on four slightly different poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol) polymers and their corresponding mixtures with porcine stomach mucin and bovine submaxillary gland mucin. The rationale for the comparison of the polymers had a large influence on the results obtained. The method does not give the same ranking order when two different comparison strategies are used. Moreover, we show that the results obtained are also sensitive to where in the 'rheological range' the comparison is made, e.g., at which value of G'. Positive values of the synergism parameters are, for example, only seen with weak gels. The choice of synergism parameter also has a bearing on the results obtained, and here we suggest a new refined relative parameter, the log ratio (log(G'(mix)/G'(p))). We also investigated the adhesion of the gel preparations to porcine nasal mucosa, using tensile strength measurements. Increased gel strength resulted in stronger adhesion, which is in contrast to the results from the rheological method, where the positive values of the synergism parameters were seen only with weak gels. On the basis of the limitations demonstrated and discussed, we recommend that the rheological method should not be used as a stand-alone method for the studying of mucoadhesive properties of polymer gels.

  20. Methods for automatized detection of rapid changes in lateral boundary condition fields for NWP limited area models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, M.

    2015-08-01

    Three-hourly temporal resolution of lateral boundary data for limited area models (LAMs) can be too infrequent to resolve rapidly moving storms. This problem is expected to be worse with increasing horizontal resolution. In order to detect intensive disturbances in surface pressure moving rapidly through the model domain, a filtered surface pressure field (MCUF) is computed operationally in the ARPEGE global model of Météo France. The field is distributed in the coupling files along with conventional meteorological fields used for lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the operational forecast using limited area model ALADIN (Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational) in the Meteorological and Hydrological Service of Croatia (DHMZ). Here an analysis is performed of the MCUF field for the LACE coupling domain for the period from 23 January 2006, when it became available, until 15 November 2014. The MCUF field is a good indicator of rapidly moving pressure disturbances (RMPDs). Its spatial and temporal distribution can be associated with the usual cyclone tracks and areas known to be supporting cyclogenesis. An alternative set of coupling files from the IFS operational run in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is also available operationally in DHMZ with 3-hourly temporal resolution, but the MCUF field is not available. Here, several methods are tested that detect RMPDs in surface pressure a posteriori from the IFS model fields provided in the coupling files. MCUF is computed by running ALADIN on the coupling files from IFS. The error function is computed using one-time-step integration of ALADIN on the coupling files without initialization, initialized with digital filter initialization (DFI) or scale-selective DFI (SSDFI). Finally, the amplitude of changes in the mean sea level pressure is computed from the fields in the coupling files. The results are compared to the MCUF field of ARPEGE and the results of same

  1. Complete study of suprathermal oxygen particles in Mars upper thermosphere and exosphere over the range of limiting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeille, Arnaud; Combi, Michael; Tenishev, Valeriy; Bougher, Stephen; Nagy, Andrew

    As a part of a global effort, the dynamics of the flow of energetic particles through the Martian upper atmosphere has been studied. Being the most important reaction, the dissociative recombination (DR) of O2+ is responsible of most of the production of hot atomic oxygen deep in the thermosphere of Mars. To understand the Martian exosphere, it is then necessary to employ a global kinetic model which can include a self-consistent description of both thermosphere collisional region and exospheric collisionless domain. In this study, we have used our Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model in combination with the 3D Mars Thermosphere General Circulation Model (MTGCM) of Bougher et al. to describe self-consistently the region of the upper thermosphere where the exosphere is generated, the entire exosphere, and its feedback into the thermosphere generally. Along with the effect of ionization, the DSMC method allows us to provide profiles of density and temperature, atmospheric loss rates and return fluxes as functions of the Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) for all cases considered. To present a complete description of this physical problem we examined several of the most limiting cases spanning spatial and temporal domains. Along with solar activity variability, these include comparisons between the polar meridian and the equator at equinox and between the summer and winter polar meridians at perihelion and aphelion conditions, respectively. The contribution of the different physical and chemical escape processes was studied and compared for the present but also earlier Mars epochs characterized by different solar inputs (1 EUV, 3 EUV and 5 EUV) for Equinox conditions. Support for this work comes from NASA Mars Fundamental Research grant NNG05GL80G.

  2. The course of physical functional limitations and occupational conditions in a middle-aged working population in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical functional limitations (PFL) have mainly been studied in older populations. The aim of this study was to better understand the course of PFL and associations with occupational factors by gender in a middle-aged working population. Methods The data came from 16,950 workers in the ESTEV (Enquête Santé Travail et Vieillissement) cohort in France. PFL were assessed using the physical abilities section of the Nottingham Health Profile. Occupational conditions were measured with a self-administered questionnaire covering physical and psychosocial factors in 1990 and 1995. Multivariate analyses were used to assess the associations. Results The PFL appearance rate in 1995 was the same by gender (6.3%); the rate of PFL recovery was higher in men (23.9% versus 20.9%). Age was an independent factor of PFL at age 47 years or older in both genders after adjusting for confounding factors. The PFL appearance rate in 1995 was higher with physical occupational exposure in 1990, such as awkward work with a dose relation in both genders, while the PFL recovery rate decreased significantly only for men. Exposure to psychosocial occupational conditions, such as having the means to produce quality work in 1990, was significantly associated with a decreased PFL appearance rate in 1995 in both genders, and having high decision latitude in 1990 was associated with a decreased PFL appearance rate in 1995 only in men. Changes in exposure to occupational factors between 1990 and 1995 were associated with the PFL appearance and recovery rates in 1995 in both genders. Conclusions After five years, the course of PFL in this working population changed and was associated with physical and psychosocial occupational factors. Relationships were stronger for the PFL appearance rate in both genders and were weaker for recovery from PFL, mainly among women. PMID:22494385

  3. Rate-limited mass transfer of octane, decane, and dodecane into nonionic surfactants solutions under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Prak, Dianne J Luning

    2008-05-01

    A key component to predicting the success of utilizing surfactants to enhance the removal of organic liquids from soil system is quantifying micellar solubilization kinetics. In this study, a flow reactor was employed to investigate the influence of surfactant ethoxylate chain length on the rates of solubilization of octane, decane, and dodecane in micellar solutions of a homologous series of purified dodecyl alcohol ethoxylates. Effluent concentration data were fit using a finite element model utilizing a linear-driving-force model to represent mass transfer at the interface. For flow rates between 0.1 and 2 ml min(-1), mass transfer coefficients ranged from 5 x 10(-8) to 7 x 10(-7)m s(-1) and did not vary in a systematic way with either solute structure or surfactant ethoxylate chain length and were lower than those found in pure water. Correlations developed for the Sherwood number based on diffusion coefficients of surfactant micelles containing organic material (organic-laden micelle) exhibit a velocity dependence similar to that found for systems based on aqueous diffusion. These results suggest that under gentle flowing conditions, the mass transfer is limited by diffusion of the organic-laden micelle. Although these trends are specific for this experimental system, the results demonstrate the importance of selecting the proper diffusion coefficient when modeling surfactant solubilization processes.

  4. NAP (davunetide) protects primary hippocampus culture by modulating expression profile of antioxidant genes during limiting oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Meena, R; Sethy, N K; Das, M; Sharma, M; Bhargava, K

    2015-04-01

    Hypoxia is a well-known threat to neuronal cells and triggers the pathophysiological syndromes in extreme environments such as high altitudes and traumatic conditions such as stroke. Among several prophylactic molecules proven suitable for ameliorating free radical damage, NAP (an octapeptide with initial amino acids: asparagine/N, alanine/A, and proline/P) can be considered superlative, primarily due to its high permeability into brain through blood-brain barrier and observed activity at femtomolar concentrations. Several mechanisms of action of NAP have been hypothesized for its protective role during hypoxia, yet any distinct mechanism is unknown. Oxidative stress is advocated as the leading event in hypoxia; we, therefore, investigated the regulation of key antioxidant genes to understand the regulatory role of NAP in providing neuroprotection. Primary neuronal culture of rat was subjected to cellular hypoxia by limiting the oxygen concentration to 0.5% for 72 h and observing the prophylactic efficacies of 15fM NAP by conventional cell death assays using flow cytometry. We performed real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to comprehend the regulatory mechanism. Further, we validated the significantly regulated candidates by enzyme assays and immunoblotting. In the present study, we report that NAP regulates a major clad of cellular antioxidants and there is an involvement of more than one route of action in neuroprotection during hypoxia.

  5. Activity-Limiting Musculoskeletal Conditions in US Veterans Compared to Non-Veterans: Results from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Past military service is associated with health outcomes, both positive and negative. In this study we use the 2013 National Health Interview Survey to examine the constellation of conditions referred to as musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) for Veterans and non-veterans with health conditions that limit their daily activities. Multivariate logistic regression analysis reveal that Veterans are more likely to report MSDs like neck and back problems, fracture bone and joint problems as an activity limiting problem compared to non-veterans. The relationship between age and reports of activity limiting MSDs is moderated by Veteran status. Veterans in this sample report more activity limiting MSDs at younger ages compared to non-veterans and fewer MSDs at older ages. This research contributes to our understanding of potentially limiting health conditions at earlier ages for Veterans. PMID:28005905

  6. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  7. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Signs & Symptoms? Should You Have an Oral Cancer Exam? U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health About Oral Cancer Oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and ...

  8. Oral Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  9. Strain localization in brittle-ductile shear zones: fluid abundant vs fluid limited conditions (an example from Wyangala area, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruzeniece, L.; Piazolo, S.

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on physiochemical processes occurring in a brittle-ductile shear zone at both fluid-present and fluid-limited conditions. In the studied shear zone (Wyangala, SE Australia), a coarse-grained two feldspar-quartz-biotite granite is transformed into a medium grained orthogneiss at the shear zone margins and a fine-grained quartz-muscovite phyllonite in the central parts. The orthogneiss displays cataclasis of feldspar and crystal-plastic deformation of quartz. Quartz accommodates most of the deformation and is extensively recrystallized showing distinct crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Feldspar-to-muscovite, biotite-to-muscovite and albitization reactions occur locally at porphyroclasts' fracture surfaces and margins. However, the bulk rock composition shows very little change in respect to the wall rock composition. In contrast, in the shear zone centre quartz occurs as large, weakly deformed porphyroclasts, in sizes similar to that in the wall rock, suggesting that it has undergone little deformation. Feldspars and biotite are almost completely reacted to muscovite, which is arranged in a fine-grained interconnected matrix. Muscovite-rich layers contain significant amounts of fine-grained intermixed quartz with random CPO. These domains are interpreted to have accommodated most of the strain. Bulk rock chemistry data shows a significant increase in SiO2 and depletion in NaO content compared to the wall rock composition. We suggest that the high and low strain fabrics represent markedly different scenarios and cannot be interpreted as a simple sequential development with respect to strain. We suggest that the fabrics and mineralogical changes in the shear zone centre have formed due to fluid influx probably along an initially brittle fracture. Here, hydration reactions dramatically changed the rheological properties of the rock. In the newly produced muscovite-quartz layers creep cavitation associated with grain boundary sliding and

  10. CD36 gene deletion reduces fat preference and intake but not post-oral fat conditioning in mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A; Ackroff, K; Abumrad, N A

    2007-11-01

    Several findings suggest the existence of a "fatty" taste, and the CD36 fatty acid translocase is a candidate taste receptor. The present study compared fat preference and acceptance in CD36 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice using nutritive (triglyceride and fatty acid) and nonnutritive (Sefa Soyate oil) emulsions. In two-bottle tests (24 h/day) naive KO mice, unlike WT mice, displayed little or no preference for dilute soybean oil, linoleic acid, or Sefa Soyate emulsions. At high concentrations (2.5-20%), KO mice developed significant soybean oil preferences, although they consumed less oil than WT mice. The postoral actions of fat likely conditioned these preferences. KO mice, like WT mice, learned to prefer a flavored solution paired with intragastric soybean oil infusions. These findings support CD36 mediation of a gustatory component to fat preference but demonstrate that it is not essential for fat-conditioned flavor preferences. The finding that oil-naive KO mice failed to prefer a nonnutritive oil, assumed to provide texture rather than taste cues, requires explanation. Finally, CD36 deletion decreased fat consumption and enhanced the ability of the mice to compensate for the calories provided by their optional fat intake.

  11. In vivo confocal microscopy for the oral cavity: Current state of the field and future potential.

    PubMed

    Maher, N G; Collgros, H; Uribe, P; Ch'ng, S; Rajadhyaksha, M; Guitera, P

    2016-03-01

    Confocal microscopy (CM) has been shown to correlate with oral mucosal histopathology in vivo. The purposes of this review are to summarize what we know so far about in vivo CM applications for oral mucosal pathologies, to highlight some current developments with CM devices relevant for oral applications, and to formulate where in vivo CM could hold further application for oral mucosal diagnosis and management. Ovid Medline® and/or Google® searches were performed using the terms 'microscopy, confocal', 'mouth neoplasms', 'mouth mucosa', 'leukoplakia, oral', 'oral lichen planus', 'gingiva', 'cheilitis', 'taste', 'inflammatory oral confocal', 'mucosal confocal' and 'confocal squamous cell oral'. In summary, inclusion criteria were in vivo use of any type of CM for the human oral mucosa and studies on normal or pathological oral mucosa. Experimental studies attempting to identify proteins of interest and microorganisms were excluded. In total 25 relevant articles were found, covering 8 main topics, including normal oral mucosal features (n=15), oral dysplasia or neoplasia (n=7), inflamed oral mucosa (n=3), taste impairment (n=3), oral autoimmune conditions (n=2), pigmented oral pathology/melanoma (n=1), delayed type hypersensitivity (n=1), and cheilitis glandularis (n=1). The evidence for using in vivo CM in these conditions is poor, as it is limited to mainly small descriptive studies. Current device developments for oral CM include improved probe design. The authors propose that future applications for in vivo oral CM may include burning mouth syndrome, intra-operative mapping for cancer surgery, and monitoring and targeted biopsies within field cancerization.

  12. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? 203.42 Section 203.42 Mineral Resources BUREAU... Deep Gas Wells on Leases Not Subject to Deep Water Royalty Relief § 203.42 What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? The conditions...

  13. Epilepsy and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  14. Dose confirmation and non-interference evaluations of the oral efficacy of a combination of milbemycin oxime and spinosad against the dose limiting parasites, adult cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) and hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum), in dogs.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Daniel E; Wiseman, Scott

    2012-03-23

    %) and post-treatment residual flea efficacy at Day 30 was 100% for both groups as compared to the vehicle control. The presence of MO in combination with spinosad did not interfere with the flea efficacy of spinosad as compared to the spinosad only group. MO alone did not demonstrate any flea efficacy. Post-treatment, the geometric mean A. caninum worm counts were significantly different (p-value<0.0001) between the spinosad and MO combination group as compared to the vehicle control group. The worm counts in the MO only group and the combination group were not statistically different. The spinosad and MO combination group (99.8% reduction) and the MO only treatment group (99.5% reduction) both demonstrated significantly different hookworm efficacy as compared to the vehicle control group. The presence of spinosad in combination with MO did not interfere with the hookworm efficacy of MO as compared to the MO only group. Spinosad alone did not demonstrate any hookworm efficacy. In summary, flavored spinosad and MO combination tablets administered orally to dogs at the lower end (30-45 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-0.75 mg/kg MO) of the US commercial tablet unit dose range (30-60 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-1.0mg/kg MO) were both safe and highly efficacious delivering 100% knockdown and 30 days of residual adult flea control on experimentally infested dogs as well as >99% adult hookworm efficacy evaluated under laboratory conditions. Interference between either drugs was not demonstrated for both of these dose limiting parasites.

  15. Effects of oral intake of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 (SBL88™) on dry skin conditions: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Masahiro; Saiki, Asako; Matsui, Yuuta; Tsuchimoto, Norihiko; Nakakita, Yasukazu; Takata, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    Lactobacilli are important in intestinal homeostasis, which involves the regulation of immune function, digestive health, cholesterol absorption and intestinal tumor growth amongst others. Our previous investigations have suggested that oral intake of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) SBC8803 (SBL88™) suppresses dermatitis by modulating the immune function in an atopic dermatitis mouse model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of heat-killed L. brevis SBC8803 intake on skin hydration conditions in humans. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted with volunteers with slightly higher levels of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) on the forearm. The subjects (126 people aged between 21 and 59 years) were randomly allocated to three groups so that the level of TEWL and the age were distributed equally among the groups. The subjects took placebo or heat-killed L. brevis SBC8803 at a daily dose of 25 or 50 mg for 12 weeks. Following the exclusion of eight subjects for plausible reasons (two withdrawals from the study, two for study violations, one for not meeting exclusion criteria and three due to their physical condition), 118 subjects were subjected to the analysis. The results of the present study revealed that following the analysis of the whole populations, marginal differences were observed in TEWL (for example, suppression of skin water loss) at the neck in the 25 mg/day group at week 8 and at the lower eye region in the 50 mg/day group at week 4 (P=0.05 and 0.09, respectively, compared with the placebo group analyzed by Dunnett's test). A significant increase in corneal hydration was also observed at the neck in the 25 mg/day group at week 12 (P=0.06, as compared with the placebo group as analyzed by Dunnett's test). In the analysis of the subpopulations whose habitual frequency of taking lactic fermentation products was less than once per week, the levels of corneal hydration at the neck (in the 50 mg

  16. Effects of oral intake of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis SBC8803 (SBL88™) on dry skin conditions: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Masahiro; Saiki, Asako; Matsui, Yuuta; Tsuchimoto, Norihiko; Nakakita, Yasukazu; Takata, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are important in intestinal homeostasis, which involves the regulation of immune function, digestive health, cholesterol absorption and intestinal tumor growth amongst others. Our previous investigations have suggested that oral intake of heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis (L. brevis) SBC8803 (SBL88™) suppresses dermatitis by modulating the immune function in an atopic dermatitis mouse model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of heat-killed L. brevis SBC8803 intake on skin hydration conditions in humans. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted with volunteers with slightly higher levels of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) on the forearm. The subjects (126 people aged between 21 and 59 years) were randomly allocated to three groups so that the level of TEWL and the age were distributed equally among the groups. The subjects took placebo or heat-killed L. brevis SBC8803 at a daily dose of 25 or 50 mg for 12 weeks. Following the exclusion of eight subjects for plausible reasons (two withdrawals from the study, two for study violations, one for not meeting exclusion criteria and three due to their physical condition), 118 subjects were subjected to the analysis. The results of the present study revealed that following the analysis of the whole populations, marginal differences were observed in TEWL (for example, suppression of skin water loss) at the neck in the 25 mg/day group at week 8 and at the lower eye region in the 50 mg/day group at week 4 (P=0.05 and 0.09, respectively, compared with the placebo group analyzed by Dunnett's test). A significant increase in corneal hydration was also observed at the neck in the 25 mg/day group at week 12 (P=0.06, as compared with the placebo group as analyzed by Dunnett's test). In the analysis of the subpopulations whose habitual frequency of taking lactic fermentation products was less than once per week, the levels of corneal hydration at the neck (in the 50 mg

  17. 78 FR 67320 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 series Airplane; Pitch and Roll Limiting by Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... feature(s) associated with the Electronic Flight Control System that limits pitch and roll attitude... order to substantiate the pitch and roll attitude limiting functions and the appropriateness of the... attitudes greater than +30 degrees and less than -15 degrees, and roll angles greater than plus or minus...

  18. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. (a) Additional... limited permit attached to the consignee's copy of the waybill. (5) The nursery stock is moved...

  19. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid... certificates and limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian... be moved interstate is clearly labeled with the certificate. (4) A copy of the certificate will...

  20. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid... certificates and limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian... be moved interstate is clearly labeled with the certificate. (4) A copy of the certificate will...

  1. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian citrus psyllid... certificates and limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for Asian... been sealed with an agricultural seal placed by an inspector. (3) The container that will be...

  2. 7 CFR 301.76-6 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined only for Asian citrus... issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined... be moved interstate is clearly labeled with the certificate. (4) A copy of the certificate will...

  3. Genetic stability and mutant selection in Sabin 2 strain of oral poliovirus vaccine grown under different cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Taffs, R E; Chumakov, K M; Rezapkin, G V; Lu, Z; Douthitt, M; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S

    1995-06-01

    Mutations that consistently accumulated in the attenuated Sabin 2 strain of poliovirus during propagation in cell cultures were identified by sequence heterogeneity assay and quantified by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage (MAPREC). Eight additional sites previously identified in stool isolates were also examined by MAPREC in the virus passages. The pattern of selectable mutations and the rate of their accumulation depended on the type and confluence of the cell culture and the temperature of virus growth. Five unstable genomic sites were identified in Sabin 2 virus passaged 10 times at 34 degrees in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, with the mutations accumulating in the range 1 to 24%. Accumulation of these mutations did not appear to result in a loss of attenuated phenotype since the virus passaged under these conditions passed the monkey neurovirulence test (MNVT). The content of the 481-G revertant known to be related to neurovirulence in monkeys did not increase. Thus, our results suggest that upon growth of Sabin 2 virus in AGMK cells at 34 degrees, the key determinant(s) of attenuation remained stable, and the mutations that occurred did not affect monkey neurovirulence. In virus passaged 10 times at 37 degrees in AGMK cells, 4 unstable genomic sites were identified, in some of them accumulating up to 12% of the mutants. This virus sample severely failed the MNVT. Virus passaged in Vero cells at 34 and 37 degrees accumulated mutants at 7 and 14 genomic sites, respectively, including 481-G in both cases, with almost complete substitution of the original nucleotides at some of the sites. We tested 44 commercial monopools of Type 2 OPV and found out that all of them contained 481-G revertants in the range 0.4-1.1%. An increase in the 481-G revertants in passaged viruses to the level of 4% and above correlated with failure of these samples by the MNVT. Since the pattern of selectable mutations differed in viruses grown in the two

  4. Beclomethasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medical conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, or eczema (a skin disease), they may worsen when your oral steroid dose is decreased. Tell your doctor if this happens or if you experience any ...

  5. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medical conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, or eczema (a skin disease), they may worsen when your oral steroid dose is decreased. Tell your doctor if this happens or if you experience any ...

  6. Towards understanding oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  7. The Sky is the Limit: Free Boundary Conditions in AdS3 Chern-Simons Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolo, Luis; Sundborg, Bo

    We test the effects of new diffeomorphism invariant boundary terms in SL(2,R)×SL(2,R) Chern-Simons theory. The gravitational interpretation corresponds to free AdS3 boundary conditions, without restrictions on the boundary geometry. The boundary theory is the theory of a string in a target AdS3. Its Virasoro conditions can eliminate ghosts. Generalisations to SL(N,R)×SL(N,R) higher spin theories and many other questions are still unexplored.

  8. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  9. Using Multiple Approaches, including δ18O Signatures of Phosphate to Investigate Potential Phosphorus Limitation and Cycling under Changing Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, K.; Paytan, A.; Field, C. B.; Honn, E.; Edwards, E.; Gottlieb, R.

    2012-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting or co-limiting nutrient in terrestrial systems. It has been proposed that it will play an even greater role in ecosystems experiencing some of the many predicted effects of climate change, in particular release from nitrogen limitation. Recent work in 2007 by Menge et al. suggests that this is indeed a possibility. To investigate the potential for P limitation, and P cycling under multiple controlled conditions we collected samples from the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) in May 2011. For over a decade the JRGCE has been manipulating four key parameters predicted to change in the future in a native Californian grassland system. Elevated Nitrogen deposition, increased precipitation, increased pCO2, and increased temperature are applied and monitored in a split plot design at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in the eastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. Work done previously at the site using a suite of indicators of the potential P limitation suggest P limitation in some of the manipulated plots in the JRGCE. In this study we replicate a subset of the prior analyses to compare inter-annual signals of P limitation, and further attempt to utilize the oxygen isotopes of phosphate to investigate P cycling in soils at JRGCE. A fractional soil extraction process for phosphate enables separation of several operationally defined P pools, and provides auxiliary information regarding the relative concentrations of bio-available P, and relevant minerals in this grassland system under the varied conditions.

  10. Assessment of the limits to peak power of 1100nm broad area single emitter diode lasers under short pulse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Crump, P.; Pietrzak, A.; Schultz, C.; Klehr, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Liero, A.; Ginolas, A.; Einfeldt, S.; Bugge, F.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2009-02-01

    High power diode lasers are the root source of optical energy in all high performance laser systems. As their performance advances, diode lasers are increasingly taking the place of other sources. Short pulse, sub-microsecond-class, high power lasers are important for many applications but historically, diode lasers have not been able to reach high enough peak pulse powers with adequate reliability, limited by physical effects such as facet failure. By combining robust facet passivation with thick super large optical cavity waveguides, greatly increased optical output power can be achieved. We present here the results of a study using commercial high current short pulse sources (>200A, <500ns) to assess the performance and endurance limits of high power broad area devices. We find that our lasers can be driven with a peak power density of over 110MWcm-2 without failure for more than 3×107 pulses. For example, on testing to 240A, single emitter 200μm stripe 1100nm broad area devices reach 124W (46μJ) without failure, and 60μm stripes reach 88W. In practice, high injection effects such as carrier accumulation in waveguide typically limit peak power. We review these remaining limitations, and discuss how they can be overcome.

  11. Strategies for maintaining fruit quality in northern highbush blueberry under water limited conditions: Deficit irrigation and reduced crop loads

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many commercial blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) fields are irrigated, but mandatory water restrictions may soon limit the availability of irrigation water in several important blueberry growing regions such as California and eastern Washington. New strategies are needed to maintain fruit quality with less...

  12. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. (a) Additional... moved interstate in that container. (4) A copy of the certificate is attached to the consignee's copy...

  13. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. (a) Additional... moved interstate in that container. (4) A copy of the certificate is attached to the consignee's copy...

  14. 7 CFR 301.76-7 - Additional conditions for issuance of certificates and limited permits for regulated articles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. 301.76... permits for regulated articles moved interstate from areas quarantined for citrus greening. (a) Additional... moved interstate in that container. (4) A copy of the certificate is attached to the consignee's copy...

  15. 78 FR 11554 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Limit Pilot Forces for Sidestick Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... to be operated with only one hand. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate... is designed to be operated using only one hand. The requirement of 14 CFR 25.397(c), which defines... to be operated using only one hand. The requirement of 14 CFR 25.397(c), which defines limit...

  16. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome.

  17. No evidence of carbon limitation with tree age and height in Nothofagus pumilio under Mediterranean and temperate climate conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Frida I.; Fajardo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Trees universally decrease their growth with age. Most explanations for this trend so far support the hypothesis that carbon (C) gain becomes limited with age; though very few studies have directly assessed the relative reductions of C gain and C demand with tree age. It has also been suggested that drought enhances the effect of C gain limitation in trees. Here tests were carried out to determine whether C gain limitation is causing the growth decay with tree age, and whether drought accentuates its effect. Methods The balance between C gain and C demand across tree age and height ranges was estimated. For this, the concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) in stems and roots of trees of different ages and heights was measured in the deciduous temperate species Nothofagus pumilio. An ontogenetic decrease in NSCs indicates support for C limitation. Furthermore, the importance of drought in altering the C balance with ontogeny was assessed by sampling the same species in Mediterranean and humid climate locations in the southern Andes of Chile. Wood density (WD) and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) were also determined to examine drought constraints on C gain. Key Results At both locations, it was effectively found that tree growth ultimately decreased with tree age and height. It was found, however, that NSC concentrations did not decrease with tree age or height when WD was considered, suggesting that C limitation is not the ultimate mechanism causing the age/height-related declining tree growth. δ13C decreased with tree age/height at the Mediterranean site only; drought effect increased with tree age/height, but this pattern was not mirrored by the levels of NSCs. Conclusions The results indicate that concentrations of C storage in N. pumilio trees do not decrease with tree age or height, and that reduced C assimilation due to summer drought does not alter this pattern. PMID:21852277

  18. Good Oral Health and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Scardina, G. A.; Messina, P.

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A poor diet was significantly associated with increased odds of oral disease. Dietary advice for the prevention of oral diseases has to be a part of routine patient education practices. Inconsistencies in dietary advice may be linked to inadequate training of professionals. Literature suggests that the nutrition training of dentists and oral health training of dietitians and nutritionists is limited. PMID:22363174

  19. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  20. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells? 203.42 Section 203.42 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT RELIEF OR REDUCTION...

  1. The Importance of Awareness and Communication for the Inclusion of Young People with Life-Limiting and Life-Threatening Conditions in Mainstream Schools and Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asprey, Anthea; Nash, Tricia

    2006-01-01

    Anthea Asprey and Tricia Nash both belong to the Children's Hospice South West Research Group, based at the University of Exeter. In this article, they report one aspect of a research project designed to determine the adequacy of support for young people with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions in the education system. They describe here…

  2. 20 CFR 662.420 - Under what limited conditions may the Local Board be designated or certified as the One-Stop...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Board be designated or certified as the One-Stop operator? 662.420 Section 662.420 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DESCRIPTION OF THE ONE-STOP SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT One-Stop Operators § 662.420 Under what limited conditions may...

  3. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y; Hayes, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through chronic inflammation. High-throughput genetic-based assays now make it possible to comprehensively survey the human oral microbiome, the totality of bacteria in the oral cavity. Establishing the association of the oral microbiome with cancer risk may lead to significant advances in understanding of cancer etiology, potentially opening a new research paradigm for cancer prevention.

  4. Approaches to managing uncertainty in people with life-limiting conditions: role of communication and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Etkind, S N; Koffman, J

    2016-07-01

    Patients with any major illness can expect to experience uncertainty about the nature of their illness, its treatment and their prognosis. Prognostic uncertainty is a particular source of patient distress among those living with life-limiting disease. Uncertainty also affects professionals and it has been argued that the level of professional tolerance of uncertainty can affect levels of investigation as well as healthcare resource use. We know that the way in which uncertainty is recognised, managed and communicated can have important impacts on patients' treatment and quality of life. Current approaches to uncertainty in life-limiting illness include the use of care bundles and approaches that focus on communication and education. The experience in communicating in difficult situations that specialist palliative care professionals can provide may also be of benefit for patients with life-limiting illness in the context of uncertainty. While there are a number of promising approaches to uncertainty, as yet few interventions targeted at recognising and addressing uncertainty have been fully evaluated and further research is needed in this area.

  5. 77 FR 69571 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Limit Pilot Forces for Sidestick Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... features: The Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane is equipped with a sidestick controller instead of a... The Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane is equipped with a sidestick controller instead of a... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550...

  6. Anti-proliferative activity of oral anti-hyperglycemic agents on human vascular smooth muscle cells: thiazolidinediones (glitazones) have enhanced activity under high glucose conditions

    PubMed Central

    Little, Peter J; Osman, Narin; de Dios, Stephanie T; Cemerlang, Nelly; Ballinger, Mandy; Nigro, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Background Inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) proliferation by oral anti-hyperglycemic agents may have a role to play in the amelioration of vascular disease in diabetes. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) inhibit vSMC proliferation but it has been reported that they anomalously stimulate [3H]-thymidine incorporation. We investigated three TZDs, two biguanides and two sulfonylureas for their ability of inhibit vSMC proliferation. People with diabetes obviously have fluctuating blood glucose levels thus we determined the effect of media glucose concentration on the inhibitory activity of TZDs in a vSMC preparation that grew considerably more rapidly under high glucose conditions. We further explored the mechanisms by which TZDs increase [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Methods VSMC proliferation was investigated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counting. Activation and inhibition of thymidine kinase utilized short term [3H]-thymidine uptake. Cell cycle events were analyzed by FACS. Results VSMC cells grown for 3 days in DMEM with 5% fetal calf serum under low (5 mM glucose) and high (25 mM glucose) increased in number by 2.5 and 4.7 fold, respectively. Rosiglitazone and pioglitazone showed modest but statistically significantly greater inhibitory activity under high versus low glucose conditions (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). We confirmed an earlier report that troglitazone (at low concentrations) causes enhanced incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into DNA but did not increase cell numbers. Troglitazone inhibited serum mediated thymidine kinase induction in a concentration dependent manner. FACS analysis showed that troglitazone and rosiglitazone but not pioglitazone placed a slightly higher percentage of cells in the S phase of a growing culture. Of the biguanides, metformin had no effect on proliferation assessed as [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell numbers whereas phenformin was inhibitory in both assays albeit at high concentrations

  7. Oral health problems and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ki; Baker, Lindsey A.; Davarian, Shieva; Crimmins, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Previous studies have shown the relationship between individual oral health conditions and mortality; however, the relationship between mortality and multiple oral health conditions has not been examined. This study investigates the link between individual oral health problems and oral comorbidity and mortality risk. Materials and methods Data are derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, which is linked to the National Death Index for mortality follow-up through 2006. We estimated the risk of mortality among people with three individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontitis as well as with oral comorbidity—or having all three conditions. Results Significant tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease were associated with increased odds of dying. The relationship between oral health conditions and mortality disappeared when controlling for sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral indicators. Having multiple oral health problems was associated with an even higher rate of mortality. Conclusion Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying. PMID:24416472

  8. Centrosome misorientation mediates slowing of the cell cycle under limited nutrient conditions in Drosophila male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, Therese M; Chiang, C-Y Ason; Inaba, Mayu; Yuan, Hebao; Salzmann, Viktoria; Roth, Caitlin E; Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2012-04-01

    Drosophila male germline stem cells (GSCs) divide asymmetrically, balancing self-renewal and differentiation. Although asymmetric stem cell division balances between self-renewal and differentiation, it does not dictate how frequently differentiating cells must be produced. In male GSCs, asymmetric GSC division is achieved by stereotyped positioning of the centrosome with respect to the stem cell niche. Recently we showed that the centrosome orientation checkpoint monitors the correct centrosome orientation to ensure an asymmetric outcome of the GSC division. When GSC centrosomes are not correctly oriented with respect to the niche, GSC cell cycle is arrested/delayed until the correct centrosome orientation is reacquired. Here we show that induction of centrosome misorientation upon culture in poor nutrient conditions mediates slowing of GSC cell proliferation via activation of the centrosome orientation checkpoint. Consistently, inactivation of the centrosome orientation checkpoint leads to lack of cell cycle slowdown even under poor nutrient conditions. We propose that centrosome misorientation serves as a mediator that transduces nutrient information into stem cell proliferation, providing a previously unappreciated mechanism of stem cell regulation in response to nutrient conditions.

  9. Dwarf and tiller-enhancing 1 regulates growth and development by influencing boron uptake in boron limited conditions in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Liu, Ling-Long; Ren, Yu-Long; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Zhou, Kun-Neng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Dan; Zheng, Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Lin, Qi-Bing; Wang, Jiu-Lin; Wu, Fu-Qing; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Chun-Ming; Zhai, Hu-Qu; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jian-Min

    2015-07-01

    Boron (B) is essential for plant growth, and B deficiency causes severe losses in crop yield. Here we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant named dwarf and tiller-enhancing 1 (dte1), which exhibits defects under low-B conditions, including retarded growth, increased number of tillers and impaired pollen fertility. Map-based cloning revealed that dte1 encodes a NOD26-LIKE INTRINSIC PROTEIN orthologous to known B channel proteins AtNIP5;1 in Arabidopsis and TASSEL-LESS1 in maize. Its identity was verified by transgenic complementation and RNA-interference. Subcellular localization showed DTE1 is mainly localized in the plasma membrane. The accumulation of DTE1 transcripts both in roots and shoots significantly increased within 3h of the onset of B starvation, but decreased within 1h of B replenishment. GUS staining indicated that DTE1s are expressed abundantly in exodermal cells in roots, as well as in nodal region of adult leaves. Although the dte1 mutation apparently reduces the total B content in plants, it does not affect in vivo B concentrations under B-deficient conditions. These data provide evidence that DTE1 is critical for vegetative growth and reproductive development in rice grown under B-deficient conditions.

  10. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, A.S.; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  11. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  12. Depth Limits of Slow Slip Events at the Japan Trench: Insights from Friction Experiments under In-Situ Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, M.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Hirose, T.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip occurred just before the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake on a shallow portion (less than 20 km depth) in the Tohoku subduction zone (Ito et al., 2013). The area where slow slip occurred overlapped with the seismogenic zone. To understand such diverse slip behaviour around the Japan Trench, not only the major earthquakes but also the slow slip events, it is essential to reveal the frictional properties of rocks distributed at the Tohoku subduction zone. We thus conducted friction experiments using a rotary shear apparatus on smectite-rich pelagic sediments retrieved from the plate-boundary thrust during IODP Expedition 343. The sediments were disaggregated and simulated gouges were then sheared at temperatures of 20-200oC, an effective normal stress of 50 MPa and a pore fluid pressure of 50 MPa. We conducted velocity-stepping sequences (0.3 to 100 μm/s) to determine the rate and state parameter (a-b) and investigated the effects of temperature and slip rate on slip stability.Our results show that at low temperatures of 20 and 50oC, the simulated gouges exhibit negative values of (a-b) with a background friction coefficient of 0.38, except at the highest slip rate of 0.1 mm/s. However, the gouges show neutral to positive values of (a-b) at temperatures of >100oC with the same background friction coefficient as at lower temperatures. In addition, the value of parameter (a-b) depends significantly on slip rates: at temperatures of 20 and 50oC it increases from negative to neutral (or slightly positive at 20oC) with increasing slip rates to 0.1 mm/s, whereas it tends to decrease with increasing slip rate at temperatures higher than 100oC. The downdip temperature limit of the slow slip events at Japan Trench (Ito et al., 2013) seems to be in the range between 100 to 150oC. The transition in (a-b) value from neutral to positive, particularly at lower slip rates, occurs at the same temperature range. Hence, this could correspond to the observed downdip

  13. The EPQ model under conditions of two levels of trade credit and limited storage capacity in supply chain management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kun-Jen

    2013-09-01

    An inventory problem involves a lot of factors influencing inventory decisions. To understand it, the traditional economic production quantity (EPQ) model plays rather important role for inventory analysis. Although the traditional EPQ models are still widely used in industry, practitioners frequently question validities of assumptions of these models such that their use encounters challenges and difficulties. So, this article tries to present a new inventory model by considering two levels of trade credit, finite replenishment rate and limited storage capacity together to relax the basic assumptions of the traditional EPQ model to improve the environment of the use of it. Keeping in mind cost-minimisation strategy, four easy-to-use theorems are developed to characterise the optimal solution. Finally, the sensitivity analyses are executed to investigate the effects of the various parameters on ordering policies and the annual total relevant costs of the inventory system.

  14. Growth and photosynthetic limitation analysis of the Cd-accumulator Salicornia ramosissima under excessive cadmium concentrations and optimum salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Romero, Jesús Alberto; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for plants, and its excess impairs plant performance. Physiological impacts of Cd excess are well known in non-tolerant plants, however this information is scarce for Cd-tolerant plants. A glasshouse experiment was designed to investigate the effect of five different Cd levels (0, 0.05, 0.20, 0.65 and 1.35 mM Cd) on the growth, photosynthetic apparatus (PSII chemistry), gas exchange characteristics, photosynthetic pigments profiles, water relations and nutritional balance of the Cd-accumulator Salicornia ramosissima. Ours results confirmed the accumulation capacity of S. ramosissima, as indicated the bioaccumulation factor (BC) greater than 1.0 for all Cd levels. Furthermore, after 21 days of treatment S. ramosissima growth was not highly affected by Cd. Total photosynthetic limitation increased from 38% at 0.05 mM Cd to 70% at 1.35 mM Cd. CO2 diffusion restriction imposed the main contribution to total photosynthetic limitation. Mesophyll conductance reduction was of major importance (with between 69 and 86%), followed by stomatal conductance (with between 9 and 20%). Maximum carboxylation rate (Vc,max), remained stable until 0.2 mM Cd, and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, qP) and pigments concentrations were not significantly decreased by increased Cd supply. Finally, S. ramosissima water relations (intrinsic water use efficiency and relative water content) and nutritional level did not highly vary between Cd treatments. Thus, our finding suggested that Cd tolerance S. ramosissima is in certain degree supported by the tolerance of its carbon assimilation enzyme (RuBisCO) and with the high functionality and integrity of the PSII reaction center under Cd excess.

  15. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival.

  16. Discriminative ability of the generic and condition-specific Child-Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (Child-OIDP) by the Limpopo-Arusha School Health (LASH) Project: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Generic and condition-specific (CS) oral-health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL) instruments assess the impacts of general oral conditions and specific oral diseases. Focusing schoolchildren from Arusha and Dar es Salaam, in Tanzania, this study compared the discriminative ability of the generic Child OIDP with respect to dental caries and periodontal problems across the study sites. Secondly, the discriminative ability of the generic-and the CS Child OIDP attributed to dental caries, periodontal problems and malocclusion was compared with respect to various oral conditions as part of a construct validation. Methods In Arusha, 1077 school children (mean age 14.9 years, range 12-17 years) and 1601 school children in Dar es Salaam (mean age 13.0 years, range 12-14 years) underwent oral clinical examinations and completed the Kiswahili version of the generic and CS Child-OIDP inventories. The discriminative ability was assessed as differences in overall mean and prevalence scores between groups, corresponding effect sizes and odd ratios, OR. Results The differences in the prevalence scores and the overall mean generic Child-OIDP scores were significant between the groups with (DMFT > 0) and without (DMFT = 0) caries experience and with (simplified oral hygiene index [OHI-S] > 1) and without periodontal problems (OHI-S ≤ 1) in Arusha and Dar es Salaam. In Dar es Salaam, differences in the generic and CS Child-OIDP scores were observed between the groups with and without dental caries, differences in the generic Child-OIDP scores were observed between the groups with and without periodontal problems, and differences in the CS Child-OIDP scores were observed between malocclusion groups. The adjusted OR for the association between dental caries and the CS Child-OIDP score attributed to dental caries was 5.4. The adjusted OR for the association between malocclusion and CS Child-OIDP attributed to malocclusion varied from 8.8 to 2.5. Conclusion The generic

  17. Young adults as users of adult healthcare: experiences of young adults with complex or life-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Beresford, B; Stuttard, L

    2014-08-01

    Awareness is growing that young adults may have distinctive experiences of adult healthcare and that their needs may differ from those of other adult users. In addition, the role of adult health teams in supporting positive transitions from paediatrics is increasingly under discussion. This paper contributes to these debates. It reports a qualitative study of the experiences of young adults - all with complex chronic health conditions - as users of adult health services. Key findings from the study are reported, including an exploration of factors that help to explain interviewees' experiences. Study findings are discussed in the context of existing evidence from young adults in adult healthcare settings and theories of 'young adulthood'. Implications for training and practice are considered, and priorities for future research are identified.

  18. Predictive Simulation of Gas Adsorption in Fixed-Beds and Limitations due to the Ill-Posed Danckwerts Boundary Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The 1-D axially dispersed plug flow model is a mathematical model widely used for the simulation of adsorption processes. Lumped mass transfer coefficients such as the Glueckauf linear driving force (LDF) term and the axial dispersion coefficient are generally obtained by fitting simulation results to the experimental breakthrough test data. An approach is introduced where these parameters, along with the only free parameter in the energy balance equations, are individually fit to specific test data that isolates the appropriate physics. It is shown that with this approach this model provides excellent simulation results for the C02 on zeolite SA sorbent/sorbate system; however, for the H20 on zeolite SA system, non-physical deviations from constant pattern behavior occur when fitting dispersive experimental results with a large axial dispersion coefficient. A method has also been developed that determines a priori what values of the LDF and axial dispersion terms will result in non-physical simulation results for a specific sorbent/sorbate system when using the one-dimensional axially dispersed plug flow model. A relationship between the steepness of the adsorption equilibrium isotherm as indicated by the distribution factor, the magnitude of the axial dispersion and mass transfer coefficient, and the resulting non-physical behavior is derived. This relationship is intended to provide a guide for avoiding non-physical behavior by limiting the magnitude of the axial dispersion term on the basis of the mass transfer coefficient and distribution factor.

  19. Tenax extraction for exploring rate-limiting factors in methyl-β-cyclodextrin enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs under denitrifying conditions in a red paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Jiang, Xin; Kengara, Fredrick Orori

    2014-01-15

    The effectiveness of anaerobic bioremediation systems for PAH-contaminated soil may be constrained by low contaminants bioaccessibility due to limited aqueous solubility and lack of suitable electron acceptors. Information on what is the rate-limiting factor in bioremediation process is of vital importance in the decision in what measures can be taken to assist the biodegradation efficacy. In the present study, four different microcosms were set to study the effect of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and nitrate addition (N) on PAHs biodegradation under anaerobic conditions in a red paddy soil. Meanwhile, sequential Tenax extraction combined with a first-three-compartment model was employed to evaluate the rate-limiting factors in MCD enhanced anaerobic biodegradation of PAHs. Microcosms with both 1% (w/w) MCD and 20mM N addition produced maximum biodegradation of total PAHs of up to 61.7%. It appears rate-limiting factors vary with microcosms: low activity of degrading microorganisms is the vital rate-limiting factor for control and MCD addition treatments (CK and M treatments); and lack of bioaccessible PAHs is the main rate-limiting factor for nitrate addition treatments (N and MN treatments). These results have practical implications for site risk assessment and cleanup strategies.

  20. Nitrogen availability impacts oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) plant water status and proline production efficiency under water-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Albert, Benjamin; Le Cahérec, Françoise; Niogret, Marie-Françoise; Faes, Pascal; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Leport, Laurent; Bouchereau, Alain

    2012-08-01

    Large amounts of nitrogen (N) fertilizers are used in the production of oilseed rape. However, as low-input methods of crop management are introduced crops will need to withstand temporary N deficiency. In temperate areas, oilseed rape will also be affected by frequent drought periods. Here we evaluated the physiological and metabolic impact of nitrate limitation on the oilseed rape response to water deprivation. Different amounts of N fertilizer were applied to plants at the vegetative stage, which were then deprived of water and rehydrated. Both water and N depletion accelerated leaf senescence and reduced leaf development. N-deprived plants exhibited less pronounced symptoms of wilting during drought, probably because leaves were smaller and stomata were partially closed. Efficiency of proline production, a major stress-induced diversion of nitrogen metabolism, was assessed at different positions along the whole plant axis and related to leaf developmental stage and water status indices. Proline accumulation, preferentially in younger leaves, accounted for 25-85% of the free amino acid pool. This was mainly due to a better capacity for proline synthesis in fully N-supplied plants whether they were subjected to drought or not, as deduced from the expression patterns of the proline metabolism BnP5CS and BnPDH genes. Although less proline accumulated in the oldest leaves, a significant amount was transported from senescing to emerging leaves. Moreover, during rehydration proline was readily recycled. Our results therefore suggest that proline plays a significant role in leaf N remobilization and in N use efficiency in oilseed rape.

  1. Limited Clinical Utility of Remote Ischemic Conditioning in Renal Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ran; Xin, Hui; Lu, Tian-Ze; Li, Ming-Hao; Song, Kai-Wei; Wang, Min; Zhu, Yun-Peng; Zhu, Meng; Geng, Li-Guo; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Liu-Hua; Zhang, Sheng-Li; Zhu, Jia-Geng; Jia, Rui-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Objective We conducted this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate whether remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) could improve graft functions in kidney transplantation. Methods PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were comprehensively searched to identify all eligible studies by October 5, 2016. The treatment effects were examined with risk ratio (RR) and weighted mean difference with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The statistical significance and heterogeneity were assessed with both Z-test and Q-test. Results A total of six RCTs including 651 recipients, were eventually identified. Compared to the controls, RIC could reduce the incidence of delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation (random-effects model: RR = 0.89; fixed-effect model: RR = 0.84). However, the decrease did not reveal statistical significance. The subgroup analysis by RIC type demonstrated no significant difference among the three interventions in protecting renal allografts against DGF. Furthermore, no significant difference could be observed in the incidence of acute rejection, graft loss, 50% fall in serum creatinine, as well as the estimated glomerular filtration rate and hospital stay between the RIC and Control groups. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggested that RIC might exert renoprotective functions in human kidney transplantation, and further well-designed RCTs with large sample size are warranted to assess its clinical efficacy. PMID:28129389

  2. Medical Underwriting In Long-Term Care Insurance: Market Conditions Limit Options For Higher-Risk Consumers.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Portia Y; Grabowski, David C; Cohen, Marc; Shi, Xiaomei; Stevenson, David G

    2016-08-01

    A key feature of private long-term care insurance is that medical underwriters screen out would-be buyers who have health conditions that portend near-term physical or cognitive disability. We applied common underwriting criteria based on data from two long-term care insurers to a nationally representative sample of individuals in the target age range (50-71 years) for long-term care insurance. The screening criteria put upper bounds on the current proportion of Americans who could gain coverage in the individual market without changes to medical underwriting practice. Specifically, our simulations show that in the target age range, approximately 30 percent of those whose wealth meets minimum industry standards for suitability for long-term care insurance would have their application for such insurance rejected at the underwriting stage. Among the general population-without considering financial suitability-we estimated that 40 percent would have their applications rejected. The predicted rejection rates are substantially higher than the rejection rates of about 20-25 percent of applicants in the actual market. In evaluating reforms for long-term care financing and their potential to increase private insurance rates, as well as to reduce financial pressure on public safety-net programs, policy makers need to consider the role of underwriting in the market for long-term care insurance.

  3. Cell-cell and cell-surface interactions mediated by cellulose and a novel exopolysaccharide contribute to Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and fitness under water-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Lindsey; Li, Xiaohong; Halverson, Larry J

    2011-05-01

    The composition of the exopolysaccharide matrix of Pseudomonas putida mt2 biofilms is relatively undefined as well as the contributions of each polymer to ecological fitness. Here, we describe the role of two putative exopolysaccharide gene clusters, putida exopolysaccharide A (pea) and bacterial cellulose (bcs) in biofilm formation and stability, rhizosphere colonization and matrix hydration under water-limiting conditions. Our findings suggest that pea is involved in the production of a novel glucose, galactose, and mannose-rich polymer that contributes to cell-cell interactions necessary for pellicle and biofilm formation and stability. In contrast, Bcs plays a minor role in biofilm formation and stability, although it does contribute to rhizosphere colonization based on a competition assay. We show that pea expression is highly induced transiently under water-limiting conditions but only slightly by high osmolarity, as determined by qRT-PCR. In contrast, both forms of water stress highly induced bcs expression. Cells deficient in making one or more exopolysaccharide experienced greater dehydration-mediated cell-envelope stress, leading to increased alginate promoter activity. However, this did not lead to increased exopolysaccharide production, except in bcs or pea mutants unable to produce alginate, indicating that P. putida compensates by producing, presumably more Pea or Bcs exopolysaccharides, to facilitate biofilm hydration. Collectively, the data suggest that Pea and Bcs contribute to biofilm formation and in turn their presence contributes to fitness under water-limiting conditions, but not to the extent of alginate.

  4. Steady-State Growth under Inorganic Carbon Limitation Conditions Increases Energy Consumption for Maintenance and Enhances Nitrous Oxide Production in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Giguere, Andrew; Chaplen, Frank; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to obtain energy for growth on carbon dioxide (CO2) and can also produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. We interrogated the growth, physiological, and transcriptome responses of N. europaea to conditions of replete (>5.2 mM) and limited inorganic carbon (IC) provided by either 1.0 mM or 0.2 mM sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) supplemented with atmospheric CO2. IC-limited cultures oxidized 25 to 58% of available NH3 to nitrite, depending on the dilution rate and Na2CO3 concentration. IC limitation resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in cellular maintenance energy requirements compared to those for NH3-limited cultures. Rates of N2O production increased 2.5- and 6.3-fold under the two IC-limited conditions, increasing the percentage of oxidized NH3-N that was transformed to N2O-N from 0.5% (replete) up to 4.4% (0.2 mM Na2CO3). Transcriptome analysis showed differential expression (P ≤ 0.05) of 488 genes (20% of inventory) between replete and IC-limited conditions, but few differences were detected between the two IC-limiting treatments. IC-limited conditions resulted in a decreased expression of ammonium/ammonia transporter and ammonia monooxygenase subunits and increased the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism, including the genes for RuBisCO (cbb gene cluster), carbonic anhydrase, folate-linked metabolism of C1 moieties, and putative C salvage due to oxygenase activity of RuBisCO. Increased expression of nitrite reductase (gene cluster NE0924 to NE0927) correlated with increased production of N2O. Together, these data suggest that N. europaea adapts physiologically during IC-limited steady-state growth, which leads to the uncoupling of NH3 oxidation from growth and increased N2O production. IMPORTANCE Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an important process in the global nitrogen cycle. This process is generally dependent

  5. Recognition and management of common acute conditions of the oral cavity resulting from tooth decay, periodontal disease, and trauma: an update for the family physician.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul C; Kanjirath, Preetha

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of common and/or significant diseases of the oral cavity that the family physician is likely to encounter, with an emphasis on pathogenesis, recognition, complications, and management. Topics reviewed include the sequelae of dental caries, periodontal disease, and trauma. Prevention and early intervention strategies are emphasized. Recent updates and practical issues for the family physician are highlighted.

  6. Oral hygiene, dentition, sexual habits and risk of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talamini, R; Vaccarella, S; Barbone, F; Tavani, A; Vecchia, C La; Herrero, R; Muñoz, N; Franceschi, S

    2000-01-01

    In an Italian case-control study of oral cancer, number of missing teeth and other aspects of dental care were similar, but the general condition of the mouth, as indicated by gum bleeding, tartar deposits and mucosal irritation, was worse among oral cancer cases than controls. No differences were detected in sexual practices (including oral sex) and (previous) sexually transmitted infections. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027440

  7. The ColRS system of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is required for virulence and growth in iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Pandey, Alok; Vishnu Priya, M R; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight of rice, produces siderophores only under iron-limiting conditions. We screened 15 400 mTn5-induced mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and isolated 27 mutants that produced siderophores even under iron-replete conditions. We found that the mTn5 insertions in 25 of these mutants were in or close to six genes. Mutants with insertions in five of these genes [colS, XOO1806 (a conserved hypothetical protein), acnB, prpR and prpB] exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. Insertions in a sixth gene, XOO0007 (a conserved hypothetical protein), were found to affect the ability to grow on iron-limiting medium, but did not affect the virulence. Targeted gene disruptants for colR (encoding the predicted cognate regulatory protein for ColS) also exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. colR and colS mutants were defective in the elicitation of hypersensitive response symptoms on the nonhost tomato. In addition, colR and colS mutants induced a rice basal defence response, suggesting that they are compromised in the suppression of host innate immunity. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that a functional ColRS system is required for the optimal expression of several genes encoding components of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Our results demonstrate the role of several novel genes, including colR/colS, in the promotion of growth on iron-limiting medium and the virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  8. Effects of cocaine self-administration history under limited and extended access conditions on in vivo striatal dopamine neurochemistry and acoustic startle in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Porche’ Kirkland; Davis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Rationale The transition from infrequent and controlled cocaine use to dependence may involve enduring changes in neurobiology as a consequence of persistent drug use. Objective The present study utilized an intravenous drug self-administration protocol of increasing cocaine access to evaluate potential changes in dopamine function in vivo, including changes in sensitivity to psychostimulants. Materials and methods Drug-naïve rhesus monkeys were provided limited access (1 h) to cocaine self-administration for 60 days followed by 60 days under an extended access condition (4 h). Basal levels of striatal extracellular dopamine and its metabolites, as well as the effectiveness of cocaine and amphetamine to elevate dopamine, were determined with in vivo microdialysis before the initiation of cocaine self-administration and during limited and extended access. The effect of cocaine and amphetamine on the acoustic startle response was also examined to assess complementary behavioral changes as a function of drug history. Results Extended access to cocaine self-administration lead to increased daily intake compared to limited access conditions but did not result in escalated intake over time. However, cocaine- and amphetamine-induced increases in striatal dopamine were diminished as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Surprisingly, there was no effect of drug-taking history on sensitivity to psychostimulant-induced enhancement of startle amplitude. Conclusions The present experiments provide evidence of a hypofunctional dopamine system that is not associated with an escalation in drug intake or reflected in measures of acoustic startle. PMID:19365621

  9. Oral myiasis in children.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M H Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M R

    2012-04-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed.

  10. Metabolic Flux Analysis of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 ΔnrtABCD Mutant Reveals a Mechanism for Metabolic Adaptation to Nitrogen-Limited Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Toya, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic flux redirection during nitrogen-limited growth was investigated in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 glucose-tolerant (GT) strain under photoautotrophic conditions by isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA). A ΔnrtABCD mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed to reproduce phenotypes arising during nitrogen starvation. The ΔnrtABCD mutant and the wild-type GT strain were cultured under photoautotrophic conditions by a photobioreactor. Intracellular metabolites were labeled over a time course using NaH13CO3 as a carbon source. Based on these data, the metabolic flux distributions in the wild-type and ΔnrtABCD cells were estimated by INST-MFA. The wild-type GT and ΔnrtABCD strains displayed similar distribution patterns, although the absolute levels of metabolic flux were lower in ΔnrtABCD. Furthermore, the relative flux levels for glycogen metabolism, anaplerotic reactions and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were increased in ΔnrtABCD. This was probably due to the increased expression of enzyme genes that respond to nitrogen depletion. Additionally, we found that the ratio of ATP/NADPH demand increased slightly in the ΔnrtABCD mutant. These results indicated that futile ATP consumption increases under nitrogen-limited conditions because the Calvin-Benson cycle and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway form a metabolic futile cycle that consumes ATP without CO2 fixation and NADPH regeneration.

  11. Online analysis of single cyanobacteria and algae cells under nitrogen-limited conditions using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cahill, John F; Darlington, Thomas K; Fitzgerald, Christine; Schoepp, Nathan G; Beld, Joris; Burkart, Michael D; Prather, Kimberly A

    2015-08-18

    Metabolomics studies typically perform measurements on populations of whole cells which provide the average representation of a collection of many cells. However, key mechanistic information can be lost using this approach. Investigating chemistry at the single cell level yields a more accurate representation of the diversity of populations within a cell sample; however, this approach has many analytical challenges. In this study, an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used for rapid analysis of single algae and cyanobacteria cells with diameters ranging from 1 to 8 μm. Cells were aerosolized by nebulization and directly transmitted into the ATOFMS. Whole cells were determined to remain intact inside the instrument through a combination of particle sizing and imaging measurements. Differences in cell populations were observed after perturbing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells via nitrogen deprivation. Thousands of single cells were measured over a period of 4 days for nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-limited conditions. A comparison of the single cell mass spectra of the cells sampled under the two conditions revealed an increase in the dipalmitic acid sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), a chloroplast membrane lipid, under nitrogen-limited conditions. Single cell peak intensity distributions demonstrate the ability of the ATOFMS to measure metabolic differences of single cells. The ATOFMS provides an unprecedented maximum throughput of 50 Hz, enabling the rapid online measurement of thousands of single cell mass spectra.

  12. Orthopedic, ophthalmic, and psychiatric diseases primarily affect activity limitation for Japanese males and females: Based on the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Myojin, Tomoya; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Keiko; Okada, Eisaku; Shibata, Yosuke; Nakamura, Mieko; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthy life expectancy (HLE) is used as one of the primary objectives of fundamental health promotion plans and social development plans. Activity limitation is used to calculate HLE, but little study has been done to identify determinants of activity limitation in order to extend HLE. The purpose of this study is to identify diseases and injuries that commonly lead to activity limitation to prioritize countermeasures against activity limitation. Methods We used anonymous data from the 2007 “Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions,” collected by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan according to the Statistics Act, Article 36. We used logistic regression analyses and calculated odds ratios (ORs) after adjusting for age and sex. Limitation in daily activities was applied as the dependent variable, and each disease/injury was applied as an independent variable in this analysis. Furthermore, population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated. Results The provided data included 98,789 subjects. We used data for 75,986 valid subjects aged 12 years or older. The following diseases showed high PAF: backache (PAF 13.27%, OR 3.88), arthropathia (PAF 7.61%, OR 4.82), eye and optical diseases (PAF 6.39%, OR 2.01), and depression and other mental diseases (PAF 5.70%, OR 11.55). PAFs of cerebrovascular diseases, hypertension, and diabetes were higher for males than for females; on the other hand, PAFs of orthopedic diseases were higher among females. Conclusions Our results indicate that orthopedic diseases, ophthalmic diseases, and psychiatric diseases particularly affect activity limitation. PMID:28142015

  13. A Comprehensive Approach to Assess Arabidopsis Survival Phenotype in Water-Limited Condition Using a Non-invasive High-Throughput Phenomics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Vello, Emilio; Tomita, Akiko; Diallo, Amadou Oury; Bureau, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid rise in global population and the challenges caused by climate changes, the maximization of plant productivity and the development of sustainable agriculture strategies are vital for food security. One of the resources more affected in this new environment will be the limitation of water. In this study, we describe the use of non-invasive technologies exploiting sensors for visible, fluorescent, and near-infrared lights to accurately screen survival phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to water-limited conditions. We implemented two drought protocols and a robust analysis methodology that enabled us to clearly assess the wilting or dryness status of the plants at different time points using a phenomics platform. In conclusion, our approach has shown to be very accurate and suitable for experiments where hundred of samples have to be screened making a manual evaluation unthinkable. This approach can be used not only in functional genomics studies but also in agricultural applications. PMID:26697051

  14. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    PubMed

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues.

  15. Effect of Fuel Composition, Engine Operating Variables, and Spark-Plug Type and Condition on Preignition-Limited Performance of an R-2800 Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfender, John F.

    1946-01-01

    The preignition characteristics of the R-2800 cylinder, as effected by fuel consumption, engine operating variables, and spark plug type and condition, were evaluated. The effects on preignition-limited performance of various percentages of aromatics (benzene, toluene, cumene, xylene) in a base fuel of triptane were investigated. Two paraffins (triptane and S + 6.0 ml TEL/gal) and two refinery blends (28-R and 33-R) were preignition rated. The effect of changes in the following engine operating variables on preignition limit was determined: inlet-air temperature, rear spark plug gasket temperature, engine speed, spark advance, tappet clearance, and oil consumption. Preignition limits of the R-2800 cylinder using Champion C34S and C35S and AC-LS86, LS87, and LS88 spark plugs were established and the effect of spark plug deterioration was investigated. No definite trends in preignition-limited indicated mean effective pressure were indicated for aromatics as a class when increased percentages of different aromatics were added to a base fuel of triptane. Three types of fuel (aromatics, paraffins, and refinery blends) showed a preignition range for this cylinder from 65 to 104 percent when based on the performance of S plus 6.0 ml TEL per gallon as 100 percent. The R-2800 cylinder is therefore relatively insensitive to fuel composition when compared to a CFR F-4 engine, which had a pre-ignition range from 72 to 100 percent for the same fuels. Six engine operating variables were investigated with the following results: preignition-limited indicated mean effective pressure decreased, with increases in engine speed, rear spark plug gasket temperature, inlet-air temperature, and spark advance beyond 20 F B.T.C. and was unaffected by rate of oil consumption or by tappet clearance. Spark plugs were rated over a range of preignition-limited indicated mean effective pressure from 200 to 390 pounds per square inch at a fuel-air ratio of 0.07 in the following order of increased

  16. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Sankari, S. Leena; Masthan, K. M. K.; Rajesh, E.

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment. PMID:26015696

  17. Controls on dissolved organic matter (DOM) degradation in a headwater stream: the influence of photochemical and hydrological conditions in determining light-limitation or substrate-limitation of photo-degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, R. M.; Harrold, K. H.; Neilson, B. T.; Kling, G. W.

    2015-11-01

    -degradation is "light-limited" or "substrate-limited". We suggest that degradation of DOM in CDOM-rich streams or ponds similar to Imnavait is typically light-limited under most flow conditions. Thus, export of DOM from this stream will be less under conditions that increase the light available for DOM photo-degradation (i.e., low flows, sunny days).

  18. Method to identify potential phosphorus rate-limiting conditions in post-denitrification biofilm reactors within systems designed for simultaneous low-level effluent nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Joshua P; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Daigger, Glen T; deBarbadillo, Christine; Murthy, Sudhir; Sørensen, Kim H; Stinson, Beverly

    2012-12-01

    Water-quality standards requiring simultaneous low level effluent N and P concentrations are increasingly common in Europe and the United States of America. Moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) and biologically active filters (BAFs) have been used as post-denitrification biofilm reactors in processes designed and operated for this purpose (Boltz et al., 2010a). There is a paucity of information describing systematic design and operational protocols that will minimize the potential for phosphorus rate-limited conditions as well as a lack of information describing the interaction between these post-denitrification biofilm reactors and unit processes that substantially alter phosphorus speciation (e.g., chemically enhanced clarification). In this paper, a simple mathematical model for estimating the threshold below which P becomes rate-limiting, and the model is presented and evaluated by comparing its predictions with operational data from post-denitrification MBBRs and BAFs. Ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)-P), which is the dissolved reactive component of total phosphorus, was a primary indicator of P rate-limiting conditions in the evaluated post-denitrification biofilm reactors. The threshold below which PO(4)-P becomes the rate-limiting substrate is defined: S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) = 0.0086 g P/g N and S(PO4-P):S(M) = 0.0013 g P/g COD. Additional analyses indicate J(NOx-N)(avg) =0.48 g/m2/d when S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) > 0.0086, and J(NOx-N)(avg) = 0.06 g/m2/d when S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) < 0.0086. Effluent nitrate-nitrogen plus nitrite-nitrogen concentration (S(NOx-N)) from the evaluated post-denitrification biofilm reactors began to rapidly increase when S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) was 0.01, approximately (consistent with the rate-limitation threshold of S(PO4-P):S(NOx-N) < 0.0086 predicted by the mathematical model described in this paper). Depending on the processes used at a given WWTP, optimizing chemically enhanced clarification to increase the amount of PO(4)-P that remains in the clarifiers

  19. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  20. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  1. Global oral health inequalities: task group--implementation and delivery of oral health strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheiham, A; Alexander, D; Cohen, L; Marinho, V; Moysés, S; Petersen, P E; Spencer, J; Watt, R G; Weyant, R

    2011-05-01

    This paper reviews the shortcomings of present approaches to reduce oral diseases and inequalities, details the importance of social determinants, and links that to research needs and policies on implementation of strategies to reduce oral health inequalities. Inequalities in health are not narrowing. Attention is therefore being directed at determinants of major health conditions and the extent to which those common determinants vary within, between, and among groups, because if inequalities in health vary across groups, then so must underlying causes. Tackling inequalities in health requires strategies tailored to determinants and needs of each group along the social gradient. Approaches focusing mainly on downstream lifestyle and behavioral factors have limited success in reducing health inequalities. They fail to address social determinants, for changing people's behaviors requires changing their environment. There is a dearth of oral health research on social determinants that cause health-compromising behaviors and on risk factors common to some chronic diseases. The gap between what is known and implemented by other health disciplines and the dental fraternity needs addressing. To re-orient oral health research, practice, and policy toward a 'social determinants' model, a closer collaboration between and integration of dental and general health research is needed. Here, we suggest a research agenda that should lead to reductions in global inequalities in oral health.

  2. In vivo analysis of NH4+ transport and central N-metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic N-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, H F; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; van Helmond, W; Pieterse M, M; Heijnen, J J; Wahl, S A

    2016-09-16

    Ammonium is the most common N-source for yeast fermentations. Although, its transport and assimilation mechanisms are well documented, there have been only few attempts to measure the in vivo intracellular concentration of ammonium and assess its impact on gene expression. Using an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-based method we were able to measure the intracellular ammonium concentration in N-limited aerobic chemostat cultivations using three different N-sources (ammonium, urea and glutamate) at the same growth rate (0.05 h(-1)). The experimental results suggest that, at this growth rate, a similar concentration of intracellular ammonium, about 3.6 mmol NH4(+)/LIC, is required to supply the reactions in the central N-metabolism independent of the N-source. Based on the experimental results and different assumptions, the vacuolar and cytosolic ammonium concentrations were estimated. Furthermore, we identified a futile cycle caused by NH3 leakage to the extracellular space, which can cost up to 30% of the ATP production of the cell under N-limited conditions, and a futile redox cycle between reactions Gdh1 and Gdh2. Finally, using shotgun proteomics with labeled reference-relative protein expression, differences between the various environmental conditions were identified and correlated with previously identified N-compound sensing mechanisms.

  3. Characterization of the Proteomic Profiles of the Brown Tide Alga Aureoumbra lagunensis under Phosphate- and Nitrogen-Limiting Conditions and of Its Phosphate Limitation-Specific Protein with Alkaline Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-Ming; Sun, Jin; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Jing, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    The persistent bloom of the brown tide alga Aureoumbra lagunensis has been reported in coastal embayments along southern Texas, but the molecular mechanisms that sustain such algal bloom are unknown. We compared the proteome and physiological parameters of A. lagunensis grown in phosphate (P)-depleted, P- and nitrogen (N)-depleted, and nutrient-replete cultures. For the proteomic analysis, samples from three conditions were subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Because of the paucity of genomic resources in this species, a de novo cross-species protein search was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins, which revealed their involvement in several key biological processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis, antioxidative protection, and protein degradation, suggesting that A. lagunensis may adopt intracellular nutrient compensation, extracellular organic nutrient regeneration, and damage protection to thrive in P-depleted environments. A highly abundant P limitation-specific protein, tentatively identified as a putative alkaline phosphatase, was further characterized by enzyme activity assay on nondenaturing gel and confocal microscopy, which confirmed that this protein has alkaline phosphatase activity, is a cytoplasmic protein, and is closely associated with the cell membrane. The abundance, location, and functional expression of this alkaline phosphatase all indicate the importance of organic P utilization for A. lagunensis under P limitation and the possible role of this alkaline phosphatase in regenerating phosphate from extra- or intracellular organic phosphorus. PMID:22247172

  4. Dissipation kinetics and pre-harvest residue limit of pyriofenone in oriental melon (Cucumis melo Var. makuwa) grown under regulated climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyung Suk; Kabir, Md Humayun; Abd El-Aty, A M; Lee, Han Sol; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Chang, Byung-Joon; Shin, Ho-Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2017-02-23

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection was used to estimate the disappearance rates as well as the pre-harvest residue limits of pyriofenone in oriental melon (Cucumis melo var. makuwa) grown under greenhouse conditions in two different locations (A and B) in Seongju, Republic of Korea. The identity of the compound in standard solution and representative field incurred samples was confirmed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated in terms of linearity, limits of detection and quantification, accuracy (expressed as recovery) and precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) for accurate and precise quantitation. Notably, the residual levels of field incurred samples collected over days 0-10 post-application were below the maximum residue level (0.2 mg/kg) established by the Korean Ministry of Food and Drug Safety. Site A showed lower residue levels and a higher decline rate than site B, which might be attributed to seasonal variation (high temperature) and increased metabolic and enzyme profiling in the mature fruits. The half-lives were similar, 4.9 and 4.3 days, at sites A and B, respectively. Using the pre-harvest residue limit, we predicted the residue amounts at 10 and 5 days before harvest, which resulted in concentrations lower than the provisional maximum residue level at harvest time.

  5. Phycobilisome-Deficient Strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Have Reduced Size and Require Carbon-Limiting Conditions to Exhibit Enhanced Productivity1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Bombelli, Paolo; Dennis, John S.; Scott, Stuart A.; Smith, Alison G.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing excessive light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms may increase biomass yields by limiting photoinhibition and increasing light penetration in dense cultures. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 harvests light via the phycobilisome, which consists of an allophycocyanin core and six radiating rods, each with three phycocyanin (PC) discs. Via targeted gene disruption and alterations to the promoter region, three mutants with two (pcpcT→C) and one (ΔCpcC1C2:pcpcT→C) PC discs per rod or lacking PC (olive) were generated. Photoinhibition and chlorophyll levels decreased upon phycobilisome reduction, although greater penetration of white light was observed only in the PC-deficient mutant. In all strains cultured at high cell densities, most light was absorbed by the first 2 cm of the culture. Photosynthesis and respiration rates were also reduced in the ΔCpcC1C2:pcpcT→C and olive mutants. Cell size was smaller in the pcpcT→C and olive strains. Growth and biomass accumulation were similar between the wild-type and pcpcT→C under a variety of conditions. Growth and biomass accumulation of the olive mutant were poorer in carbon-saturated cultures but improved in carbon-limited cultures at higher light intensities, as they did in the ΔCpcC1C2:pcpcT→C mutant. This study shows that one PC disc per rod is sufficient for maximal light harvesting and biomass accumulation, except under conditions of high light and carbon limitation, and two or more are sufficient for maximal oxygen evolution. To our knowledge, this study is the first to measure light penetration in bulk cultures of cyanobacteria and offers important insights into photobioreactor design. PMID:24760817

  6. Recent advances in oral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Rebecca; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A

    2014-01-01

    Oral vaccination is the most challenging vaccination method due to the administration route. However, oral vaccination has socio-economic benefits and provides the possibility of stimulating both humoral and cellular immune responses at systemic and mucosal sites. Despite the advantages of oral vaccination, only a limited number of oral vaccines are currently approved for human use. During the last decade, extensive research regarding antigen-based oral vaccination methods have improved immunogenicity and induced desired immunological outcomes. Nevertheless, several factors such as the harsh gastro-intestinal environment and oral tolerance impede the clinical application of oral delivery systems. To date, human clinical trials investigating the efficacy of these systems are still lacking. This review addresses the rationale and key biological and physicochemical aspects of oral vaccine design and highlights the use of yeast-derived β-glucan microparticles as an oral vaccine delivery platform. PMID:24553259

  7. Controls on dissolved organic matter (DOM) degradation in a headwater stream: the influence of photochemical and hydrological conditions in determining light-limitation or substrate-limitation of photo-degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, R. M.; Harrold, K. H.; Neilson, B. T.; Kling, G. W.

    2015-07-01

    -degradation is "light-limited" or "substrate-limited". We suggest that degradation, and thus export, of DOM in CDOM-rich streams or ponds similar to Imnavait is typically light-limited under most flow conditions.

  8. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) gene deletion boosts glucose metabolism in Escherichia coli under oxygen-limited culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Soya; Shimizu, Kumiko; Kihira, Chie; Iwabu, Yuki; Kato, Ryuichi; Sugimoto, Makoto; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex regulator (PdhR) is a transcriptional regulator that negatively regulates formation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), NADH dehydrogenase (NDH)-2, and cytochrome bo3 oxidase in Escherichia coli. To investigate the effects of a PdhR defect on glucose metabolism, a pdhR deletion mutant was derived from the wild-type E. coli W1485 strain by λ Red-mediated recombination. While no difference in the fermentation profiles was observed between the two strains under oxygen-sufficient conditions, under oxygen-limited conditions, the growth level of the wild-type strain was significantly decreased with retarded glucose consumption accompanied by by-production of substantial amounts of pyruvic acid and acetic acid. In contrast, the mutant grew and consumed glucose more efficiently than did the wild-type strain with enhanced respiration, little by-production of pyruvic acid, less production yield and rates of acetic acid, thus displaying robust metabolic activity. As expected, increased activities of PDHc and NDH-2 were observed in the mutant. The increased activity of PDHc may explain the loss of pyruvic acid by-production, probably leading to decreased acetic acid formation, and the increased activity of NDH-2 may explain the enhanced respiration. Measurement of the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio in the mutant revealed more oxidative or more reductive intracellular environments than those in the wild-type strain under oxygen-sufficient and -limited conditions, respectively, suggesting another role of PdhR: maintaining redox balance in E. coli. The overall results demonstrate the biotechnological advantages of pdhR deletion in boosting glucose metabolism and also improve our understanding of the role of PdhR in bacterial physiology.

  9. End-point limiting-dilution real-time PCR assay for evaluation of hepatitis C virus quasispecies in serum: performance under optimal and suboptimal conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Sumathi; Xia, Guo-Liang; Ganova-Raeva, Lilia M; Nainan, Omana V; Khudyakov, Yury

    2008-08-01

    An approach for determination of hepatitis C virus (HCV) quasispecies by end-point limiting-dilution real-time PCR (EPLD-PCR) is described. It involves isolation of individual coexisting sequence variants of the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) of the HCV genome from serum specimens using a limiting-dilution protocol. EPLD-PCR applied to an HCV outbreak study provided insights into the epidemiological relationships between incident and chronic cases. When applied to samples from a longitudinal study of infected patients, HVR1 sequences from each sampling time-point were observed to group as distinct phylogenetic clusters. Melting peak analysis conducted on EPLD-PCR products generated from these patients could be used for evaluation of HVR1 sequence heterogeneity without recourse to clonal sequencing. Further, to better understand the mechanism of single-molecule PCR, experiments were conducted under optimal and suboptimal annealing temperatures. Under all temperature conditions tested, HVR1 variants from the major phylogenetic clusters of quasispecies could be amplified, revealing that successful HVR1 quasispecies analysis is not contingent to dilution of starting cDNA preparations to a single-molecule state. It was found that EPLD-PCR conducted at suboptimal annealing temperatures generated distributions of unique-sequence variants slightly different from the distribution obtained by PCR conducted at the optimal temperature. Hence, EPLD-PCR conditions can be manipulated to access different subpopulations of HCV HVR1 quasispecies, thus, improving the range of the quasispecies detection. Although EPLD-PCR conducted at different conditions detect slightly different quasispecies populations, as was shown in this study, the resulted samples of quasispecies are completely suitable for molecular epidemiological investigation in different clinical and epidemiological settings.

  10. Design of a smartphone-camera-based fluorescence imaging system for the detection of oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uthoff, Ross

    Shown is the design of the Smartphone Oral Cancer Detection System (SOCeeDS). The SOCeeDS attaches to a smartphone and utilizes its embedded imaging optics and sensors to capture images of the oral cavity to detect oral cancer. Violet illumination sources excite the oral tissues to induce fluorescence. Images are captured with the smartphone's onboard camera. Areas where the tissues of the oral cavity are darkened signify an absence of fluorescence signal, indicating breakdown in tissue structure brought by precancerous or cancerous conditions. With this data the patient can seek further testing and diagnosis as needed. Proliferation of this device will allow communities with limited access to healthcare professionals a tool to detect cancer in its early stages, increasing the likelihood of cancer reversal.

  11. Application of cytology and molecular biology in diagnosing premalignant or malignant oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Ravi; Gupta, Anurag; Singh, Mamta; Ibrahim, Rahela

    2006-03-23

    Early detection of a premalignant or cancerous oral lesion promises to improve the survival and the morbidity of patients suffering from these conditions. Cytological study of oral cells is a non-aggressive technique that is well accepted by the patient, and is therefore an attractive option for the early diagnosis of oral cancer, including epithelial atypia and squamous cell carcinoma. However its usage has been limited so far due to poor sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing oral malignancies. Lately it has re-emerged due to improved methods and it's application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. Newer diagnostic techniques such as "brush biopsy" and molecular studies have been developed. Recent advances in cytological techniques and novel aspects of applications of scraped or exfoliative cytology for detecting these lesions and predicting their progression or recurrence are reviewed here.

  12. Associations between chronic conditions, body functions, activity limitations and participation restrictions: a cross-sectional approach in Spanish non-clinical populations

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Blázquez, Carmen; Damián, Javier; Andrés-Prado, María José; Almazán-Isla, Javier; Alcalde-Cabero, Enrique; Forjaz, Maria João; Castellote, Juan Manuel; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Comín, Magdalena; de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyse the relationships between chronic conditions, body functions, activity limitations and participation restrictions in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting 2 geographical areas in the Autonomous Region of Aragon, Spain, namely, a rural area, Cinco Villas, and an urban area in the city of Zaragoza. Participants 864 individuals selected by simple random sampling from the register of Social Security card holders, aged 50 years and over, positive to disability screening. Main outcome measures ICF Checklist—body function domains, WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0, 36-item (WHODAS-36)) global scores and medical diagnoses (chronic conditions) from primary care records. Results Mild disability (WHODAS-36 level 5–24%) was present in 51.5% of the sample. In the adjusted ordinal regression model with WHODAS-36 as the dependent variable, disability was substantially associated with moderate-to-complete impairment in the following functions: mental, OR 212.8 (95% CI 72 to 628.9); neuromusculoskeletal, OR 44.8 (24.2 to 82.8); and sensory and pain, OR 6.3 (3.5 to 11.2). In the relationship between health conditions and body function impairments, the strongest links were seen for: dementia with mental functions, OR 50.6 (25.1 to 102.1); cerebrovascular disease with neuromusculoskeletal function, OR 5.8 (3.5 to 9.7); and chronic renal failure with sensory function and pain, OR 3.0 (1.49 to 6.4). Dementia, OR 8.1 (4.4 to 14.7) and cerebrovascular disease, OR 4.1 (2.7 to 6.4) were associated with WHODAS-36 scores. Conclusions Body functions are heterogeneously linked to limitations in activities and restrictions on participation, with the highest impact being due to mental and musculoskeletal functions. This may be relevant for disability assessment and intervention design, particularly if defined on a body function basis. Control of specific health

  13. Oral health in children with physical (Cerebral Palsy) and intellectual (Down Syndrome) disabilities: Systematic review I

    PubMed Central

    de Nova-García, Manuel-Joaquín; Mourelle-Martínez, Mª Rosa; Bartolomé-Villar, Begona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, patients with physical and/or intellectual disabilities presented greater oral pathology, owing to their condition and to other external factors. Improved social and health conditions make it necessary to update knowledge on their oral and dental health. Material and Methods For this purpose, a bibliographic review was done regarding the state of oral health of children with these two types of disability, in comparison with a control group. Some of the guidelines of the PRISMA statement were taken into account. The ranking of the articles found is based on the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The final number of articles evaluated was 14. Parameters such as dental caries, oral hygiene, gingival health, dental traumas, malocclusion and habits were considered. Results There is no consensus among authors regarding dental caries, oral hygiene and gingival health. The different results obtained are due in part to the fact that the methodologies used were not the same. However, it has been noted that, when studying other parameters and regardless of the methodology employed, the results obtained are similar. Conclusions Children with physical and intellectual disabilities constitute a group that needs early and regular dental care in order to prevent and limit the severity of the pathologies observed. Key words:Oral health, dental caries, malocclusion, oral habits, dental trauma, oral hygiene, disabled child, cerebral palsy and Down syndrome. PMID:27398187

  14. Phosphorus as a driver of nitrogen limitation and sustained eutrophic conditions in Bolinao and Anda, Philippines, a mariculture-impacted tropical coastal area.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Charissa M; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyajima, Toshihiro; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Morimoto, Naoko; Umezawa, Yu; Herrera, Eugene; Tsuchiya, Takumi; Yoshikai, Masaya; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-04-15

    The dynamics of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was studied in mariculture areas around Bolinao and Anda, Philippines to examine its possible link to recurring algal blooms, hypoxia and fish kills. They occur despite regulation on number of fish farm structures in Bolinao to improve water quality after 2002, following a massive fish kill in the area. Based on spatiotemporal surveys, coastal waters remained eutrophic a decade after imposing regulation, primarily due to decomposition of uneaten and undigested feeds, and fish excretions. Relative to Redfield ratio (16), these materials are enriched in P, resulting in low N/P ratios (~6.6) of regenerated nutrients. Dissolved inorganic P (DIP) in the water reached 4μM during the dry season, likely exacerbated by increase in fish farm structures in Anda. DIP enrichment created an N-limited condition that is highly susceptible to sporadic algal blooms whenever N is supplied from freshwater during the wet season.

  15. Microwave-Assisted Superheating and/or Microwave-Specific Superboiling (Nucleation-Limited Boiling) of Liquids Occurs under Certain Conditions but is Mitigated by Stirring.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Anthony; Hunt, Jacob; Stiegman, Albert; Dudley, Gregory B

    2015-12-04

    Temporary superheating and sustained nucleation-limited "superboiling" of unstirred liquids above the normal atmospheric boiling point have been documented during microwave heating. These phenomena are reliably observed under prescribed conditions, although the duration (of superheating) and magnitude (of superheating and superboiling) vary according to system parameters such as volume of the liquid and the size and shape of the vessel. Both phenomena are mitigated by rapid stirring with an appropriate stir bar and/or with the addition of boiling chips, which provide nucleation sites to support the phase-change from liquid to gas. With proper experimental design and especially proper stirring, the measured temperature of typical organic reaction mixtures heated at reflux will be close to the normal boiling point temperature of the solvent, whether heated using microwave radiation or conventional convective heat transfer. These observations are important to take into consideration when comparing reaction rates under conventional and microwave heating.

  16. Small dispersion limit of the Korteweg-de Vries equation with periodic initial conditions and analytical description of the Zabusky-Kruskal experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guo; Biondini, Gino; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We study the small dispersion limit of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with periodic boundary conditions and we apply the results to the Zabusky-Kruskal experiment. In particular, we employ a WKB approximation for the solution of the scattering problem for the KdV equation [i.e., the time-independent Schrödinger equation] to obtain an asymptotic expression for the trace of the monodromy matrix and thereby of the spectrum of the problem. We then perform a detailed analysis of the structure of said spectrum (i.e., band widths, gap widths and relative band widths) as a function of the dispersion smallness parameter ɛ. We then formulate explicit approximations for the number of solitons and corresponding soliton amplitudes as a function of ɛ. Finally, by performing an appropriate rescaling, we compare our results to those in the famous Zabusky and Kruskal's paper, showing very good agreement with the numerical results.

  17. Impact of sea-level rise on cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef island beaches under modal and cyclonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Baldock, T E; Golshani, A; Atkinson, A; Shimamoto, T; Wu, S; Callaghan, D P; Mumby, P J

    2015-08-15

    A one-dimensional wave model is combined with an analytical sediment transport model to investigate the likely influence of sea-level rise on net cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef and lagoon island beaches. The modelling considers if changes in the nearshore wave height and wave period in the lagoon induced by different water levels over the reef flat are likely to lead to net offshore or onshore movement of sediment. The results indicate that the effects of SLR on net sediment movement are highly variable and controlled by the bathymetry of the reef and lagoon. A significant range of reef-lagoon bathymetry, and notably shallow and narrow reefs, appears to lead hydrodynamic conditions and beaches that are likely to be stable or even accrete under SLR. Loss of reef structural complexity, particularly on the reef flat, increases the chance of sediment transport away from beaches and offshore.

  18. Different CO2 laser vaporization protocols for the therapy of oral precancerous lesions and precancerous conditions: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Deppe, Herbert; Mücke, Thomas; Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Hauck, Wolfgang; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Hölzle, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Use of the CO(2) laser (λ = 10.6 μm, continuous wave, defocused) is an established procedure for the treatment of premalignant lesions. Through employment of the sp-mode as well as scanners, thermal laser effects can be reduced but, on the other hand, a lesser degree of destruction of dysplastic cells could lead to an increased recurrence rate. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the recurrence rates resulting from different methods of CO(2) laser vaporization. From May 1995 to May, 2005, 145 patients with a total of 148 premalignant lesions of the oral mucosa were treated in a prospective clinical study. Sixty-two lesions in 62 patients were vaporized with the defocused CO(2) laser (group 1). In a further 45 lesions (43 patients, group 2), a scanner was additionally employed. In the remaining 41 lesions (40 patients, group 3), vaporization was carried out in the sp-mode in which the scanner was also used. In September, 2005, recurrence rates in the three groups were evaluated. Use of the scanner in sp-mode resulted in the most irregular tissue vaporization. This can be accounted for by the irregular paths of the laser beam and the pulsed delivery of the laser energy. Statistically significant lowest recurrence rates were yielded by the defocused cw-technique followed by the cw-scanner and the sp-mode. These results indicate that for CO(2) laser treatment of premalignant lesions of the oral mucosa, the best results can be achieved with the defocused technique. It may be assumed that other methods with lesser penetration of thermal effects (e.g. sp, scanner) do not reach the deeper-lying cells and, consequently, render higher rates of recurrence.

  19. Functional characterization of the rice UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 1, OsUGE1: a potential role in cell wall carbohydrate partitioning during limiting nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Guevara, David R; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Yaish, Mahmoud W; Mei-Bi, Yong; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Plants grown under inadequate mineralized nitrogen (N) levels undergo N and carbon (C) metabolic re-programming which leads to significant changes in both soluble and insoluble carbohydrate profiles. However, relatively little information is available on the genetic factors controlling carbohydrate partitioning during adaptation to N-limitation conditions in plants. A gene encoding a uridine-diphospho-(UDP)-glucose 4-epimerase (OsUGE-1) from rice (Oryza sativa) was found to be N-responsive. We developed transgenic rice plants to constitutively over-express the OsUGE-1 gene (OsUGE1-OX1-2). The transgenic rice lines were similar in size to wild-type plants at the vegetative stage and at maturity regardless of the N-level tested. However, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained 18-24% more sucrose and 12-22% less cellulose in shoots compared to wild-type when subjected to sub-optimal N-levels. Interestingly, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained proportionally more galactose and glucose in the hemicellulosic polysaccharide profile of plants compared to wild-type plants when grown under low N. The altered cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation in the OsUGE1-OX lines appears to be mediated by OsUGE1 via the repression of the cellulose synthesis associated genes, OsSus1, OsCesA4, 7, and 9. This relationship may implicate a novel control point for the deposition of UDP-glucose to the complex polysaccharide profiles of rice cell walls. However, a direct relationship between OsUGE1 and cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation requires further investigation.

  20. Functional Characterization of the Rice UDP-glucose 4-epimerase 1, OsUGE1: A Potential Role in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Partitioning during Limiting Nitrogen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, David R.; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Yaish, Mahmoud W.; Mei-Bi, Yong; Rothstein, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants grown under inadequate mineralized nitrogen (N) levels undergo N and carbon (C) metabolic re-programming which leads to significant changes in both soluble and insoluble carbohydrate profiles. However, relatively little information is available on the genetic factors controlling carbohydrate partitioning during adaptation to N-limitation conditions in plants. A gene encoding a uridine-diphospho-(UDP)-glucose 4-epimerase (OsUGE-1) from rice (Oryza sativa) was found to be N-responsive. We developed transgenic rice plants to constitutively over-express the OsUGE-1 gene (OsUGE1-OX1–2). The transgenic rice lines were similar in size to wild-type plants at the vegetative stage and at maturity regardless of the N-level tested. However, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained 18–24% more sucrose and 12–22% less cellulose in shoots compared to wild-type when subjected to sub-optimal N-levels. Interestingly, OsUGE1-OX lines maintained proportionally more galactose and glucose in the hemicellulosic polysaccharide profile of plants compared to wild-type plants when grown under low N. The altered cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation in the OsUGE1-OX lines appears to be mediated by OsUGE1 via the repression of the cellulose synthesis associated genes, OsSus1, OsCesA4, 7, and 9. This relationship may implicate a novel control point for the deposition of UDP-glucose to the complex polysaccharide profiles of rice cell walls. However, a direct relationship between OsUGE1 and cell wall C-partitioning during N-limitation requires further investigation. PMID:24788752

  1. Urban legends series: oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, M; Polonelli, L; Aguirre-Urizar, J M; Carrozzo, M; McCullough, M J

    2013-04-01

    Candida species (spp) are commensal yeast that can only instigate oral infection (oral candidosis - OC) when there is an underlying predisposing condition in the host. We investigated four controversial topics on OC: (i) How can a microbiological determination of OC be made as Candida spp. are commensal yeasts and not all of them form hyphae or pseudohyphae during infection? (ii) Is median rhomboid glossitis (MRG) a manifestation of candidal infection? (iii) Can candidal infection cause palate papillary hyperplasia (PPH)? (iv) What is the best therapeutic treatment for denture-associated erythematous stomatitis (DAES)? Results from extensive literature searches, including a systematic review, suggested the following: (i) the diagnosis of OC merely on the basis of the presence of yeasts is an oversimplification of a complex process. No convincing evidence of a single test or method better able to discriminate the transition from candidal saprophytism to pathogenicity has been reported in the literature; (ii-iii) conclusive evidence of a direct aetiopathogenic relationship between MRG and PPH and candidal infection has not been found; and (iv) only limited evidence is available for any DAES treatment, thus making it impossible to make strong therapeutic recommendations.

  2. Normal Oral Flora and the Oral Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Lakshman; Matsubara, Victor H

    2017-04-01

    The oral ecosystem comprises the oral flora, so-called oral microbiome, the different anatomic microniches of the oral cavity, and its bathing fluid, saliva. The oral microbiome comprises a group of organisms and includes bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. The oral microbiome exists suspended in saliva as planktonic phase organisms or attached to oral surfaces as a plaque biofilm. Homeostasis of the plaque biofilm and its symbiotic relationship with the host is critical for oral health. Disequilibrium or dysbiosis within the plaque biofilms is the initiating event that leads to major oral diseases, such as caries and periodontal disease.

  3. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7–overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  4. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-06-13

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7-overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement.

  5. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended.

  6. Oral medications.

    PubMed

    Albretsen, Jay C

    2002-03-01

    Many medications are available today by prescription or in over-the-counter preparations. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, and management procedures necessary for some oral medications. The medications reviewed include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, amphetamines or amphetamine like drugs, carprofen, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, pseudoephedrine, calcium channel blockers, and baclofen.

  7. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  8. Oral administration of fermented milk supplemented with synbiotics can influence the physiological condition of Wistar rats in a dose-sensitive and sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    MIAO, Junjie; LANG, Chunhui; KANG, Zhiyuan; ZHU, Hong; WANG, Shijie; LI, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Fermented milk supplemented with two probiotic strains (Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM) and a prebiotic (isomaltooligosaccharide) was orally administered to Wistar rats for 30 days using three dosages. A commercial yogurt was used as a placebo. After treatment, the total protein, hemoglobin, and albumin levels in serum were significantly increased in female rats compared with those in the control group (p<0.05), whereas no significant change occurred in the male rats. A significant decrease in serum glucose levels was observed in male rats administered a low dosage of the tested fermented milk (p<0.05). The serum triglyceride level was significantly decreased in both male and female rats (p<0.05). No significant differences were found between rats groups in body weight, food intake, food utilization rate, red blood cell counts, white blood cell counts, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and total cholesterol. These results suggest that the fermented milk supplemented with synbiotics altered the nutritive status of the host animal and contributed to their health. However, such potent health-promoting effects could be deeply associated with the dose and sex specific. Therefore, different physiological targets and population characteristics should be managed with different combinations of probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:27200262

  9. Epidemiological study on improving the QOL and oral conditions of the aged--Part 1: The relationship between the status of tooth preservation and QOL.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Hatanaka, Y; Imaki, M; Ogawa, Y; Miyatani, S; Tanada, S

    2001-11-01

    In part 1 of this epidemiological study, a survey was conducted for all senior citizens aged 70 and over who resided in a mountainous village in the mid-section of Hyogo Prefecture. It focused on the relationship among the number of existing teeth, life environment, health status, and activities of daily living; and the correlation between oral status and QOL was analyzed. The daily activities of individuals were compared between those having one or more teeth and others who were totally edentulous. Subsequently, it was found that for both males and females, the odds ratio was significantly high for the dentulous individuals, in comparison with edentulous individuals, to exhibit a behavior indicative of a better QOL (such as "opportunity for conversation with family members or others)", "regular physical activities", and "attend meetings or group outings"). The result of this survey indicates that the presence of teeth is very closely related to one's daily activities. It was concluded that preventing tooth loss is vital for maintaining the masticatory function; so to prevent tooth loss, periodontal disease must be averted.

  10. A deficiency in the flavoprotein of Arabidopsis mitochondrial complex II results in elevated photosynthesis and better growth in nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Daniela; Meneses, Marco; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Araújo, Wagner L; Tapia, Rodrigo; Gómez, Isabel; Holuigue, Loreto; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Fernie, Alisdair R; Jordana, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Mitochondrial complex II (succinate dehydrogenase [SDH]) plays roles both in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the respiratory electron transport chain. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), its flavoprotein subunit is encoded by two nuclear genes, SDH1-1 and SDH1-2. Here, we characterize heterozygous SDH1-1/sdh1-1 mutant plants displaying a 30% reduction in SDH activity as well as partially silenced plants obtained by RNA interference. We found that these plants displayed significantly higher CO(2) assimilation rates and enhanced growth than wild-type plants. There was a strong correlation between CO(2) assimilation and stomatal conductance, and both mutant and silenced plants displayed increased stomatal aperture and density. By contrast, no significant differences were found for dark respiration, chloroplastic electron transport rate, CO(2) uptake at saturating concentrations of CO(2), or biochemical parameters such as the maximum rates of carboxylation by Rubisco and of photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, photosynthesis is enhanced in SDH-deficient plants by a mechanism involving a specific effect on stomatal function that results in improved CO(2) uptake. Metabolic and transcript profiling revealed that mild deficiency in SDH results in limited effects on metabolism and gene expression, and data suggest that decreases observed in the levels of some amino acids were due to a higher flux to proteins and other nitrogen-containing compounds to support increased growth. Strikingly, SDH1-1/sdh1-1 seedlings grew considerably better in nitrogen-limiting conditions. Thus, a subtle metabolic alteration may lead to changes in important functions such as stomatal function and nitrogen assimilation.

  11. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  12. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma.

  13. Oral Health and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  14. Dissolution of unirradiated UO{sub 2} fuel under oxidizing conditions: Evaluation of solubility (steady state) limiting factors (EQ3/6)

    SciTech Connect

    Ollila, K.

    1997-12-31

    The solubility behavior of unirradiated UO{sub 2} pellets was studied under oxic, air-saturated conditions in deionized water, in NaHCO{sub 3} solutions and in two types of synthetic groundwater (25 C). The Allard groundwater represents natural fresh groundwater conditions at great depths in granite bedrock and bentonite groundwater simulates the effects of bentonite on granitic fresh groundwater. The release of uranium was measured during static batch dissolution experiments of long duration (6 years). A comparison was made with the theoretical solubility data calculated with the geochemical code, EQ3/6, in order to evaluate solubility (steady state) limiting factors. Various hypotheses for redox control (redox potential of the bulk solution or redox potential at the surface) were tested in the modeling of calculations. The measured concentrations for uranium at steady-state in deionized water were equal to the solubility of schoepite (pO{sub 2} = 0.2 atm). In NaHCO{sub 3} solutions with lower carbonate concentrations (0.98--1.96 mmol/l) and in Allard groundwater they were close to the calculated solubilities of U at the U{sub 3}O{sub 7}/U{sub 3}O{sub 8} redox potential. In bentonite groundwater, the results suggest the formation of a secondary phase with a lower solubility. Only uranium oxide with a crystal structure of uraninite (UO{sub 2}-U{sub 3}O{sub 7}) was identified in all waters, when analyzing particulate material in the solutions after contact with UO{sub 2} pellets.

  15. Comparative Study of Oral Isotretinoin Versus Oral Isotretinoin + 20% Salicylic Acid Peel in the Treatment of Active Acne

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Bikash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sanjita; Panda, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acne is a self limiting condition that often results in scarring and disfigurement disproportionate to its clinical severity. Isotretinoin is considered the gold standard in the medical management of severe form of acne vulgaris. Salicyclic acid (SA) peels, a β- hydroxy acid peel has got sebosuppressive effect and helps in faster resolution of acne with minimal scarring. It also decreases the post inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Combining both the modalities is usually not advocated because of expected excessive dryness and irritation Aims: To compare the efficacy of oral isotretinoin and oral isotretinoin with 20% SA peels in patients with moderate to severe acne. Materials and Methods: 60 consecutive patients with moderate to severe facial acne attending the skin department were randomized in to 2 groups. 1st group received 20mg oral isotretinoin once daily for 16 weeks and 2nd group received 20mg oral isotretinoin once daily along with 20% SA peels every two weeks for 16 weeks. Baseline grading of acne was done with Michelsons Acne severity index (MASI).Right and left sides of the face were scored separately and total score was taken. Severity score was assessed monthly .Clinical photographs were obtained for evaluation every month. Patients were asked to follow up once every 2 weeks or earlier in case of any adverse events. Results: Patients in both the groups revealed a reduction in the number of lesions. The 1st group showed a reduction of approximately 73.4% after receiving 20mg oral isotretinoin for 16 weeks. The 2nd group showed a reduction of approximately 92.5 % after receiving 20mg oral isotretinoin along with 20% SA peel once every 2 weeks for 16 weeks. Conclusion: Both oral isotretinoin and combination of oral isotretinoin with 20% SA peels once every 2 weeks are effective in treating moderate to severe acne but the combination showed significantly better clearance of acne than monotherapy with isotretinoin. PMID:24470716

  16. The effect of oral appliances that advanced the mandible forward and limited mouth opening in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Okuno, K; Sato, K; Arisaka, T; Hosohama, K; Gotoh, M; Taga, H; Sasao, Y; Hamada, S

    2014-07-01

    Oral appliances (OAs) have demonstrated efficacy in treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but many different OA devices are available. The Japanese Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine supported the use of OAs that advanced the mandible forward and limited mouth opening and suggested an evaluation of their effects in comparison with untreated or CPAP. A systematic search was undertaken in 16 April 2012. The outcome measures of interest were as follows: Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI), lowest SpO2 , arousal index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the SF-36 Health Survey. We performed this meta-analysis using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Five studies remained eligible after applying the exclusion criteria. Comparing OA and control appliance, OA significantly reduced the weighted mean difference (WMD) in both AHI and the arousal index (favouring OA, AHI: -7.05 events h(-1) ; 95% CI, -12.07 to -2.03; P = 0.006, arousal index: -6.95 events h(-1) ; 95% CI, -11.75 to -2.15; P = 0.005). OAs were significantly less effective at reducing the WMD in AHI and improving lowest SpO2 and SF-36 than CPAP, (favouring OA, AHI: 6.11 events h(-1) ; 95% CI, 3.24 to 8.98; P = 0.0001, lowest SpO2 : -2.52%; 95% CI, -4.81 to -0.23; P = 0.03, SF-36: -1.80; 95% CI, -3.17 to -042; P = 0.01). Apnea Hypopnea Index and arousal index were significantly improved by OA relative to the untreated disease. Apnea Hypopnea Index, lowest SpO2 and SF-36 were significantly better with CPAP than with OA. The results of this study suggested that OAs improve OSA compared with untreated. CPAP appears to be more effective in improving OSA than OAs.

  17. Apport maternel chez la balane tropicale : Plasticite de l'allocation de la ressource trophique pour la production larvaire en conditions de limitation nutritionnelle et de stress environnemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freuchet, Florian

    Dans le milieu marin, l'abondance du recrutement depend des processus qui vont affecter les adultes et le stock de larves. Sous l'influence de signaux fiables de la qualite de l'habitat, la mere peut augmenter (effet maternel anticipatoire, 'anticipatory mother effects', AME) ou reduire (effet maternel egoiste, 'selfish maternai effects', SME) la condition physiologique de la progeniture. Dans les zones tropicales, generalement plus oligotrophes, la ressource nutritive et la temperature sont deux composantes importantes pouvant limiter le recrutement. Les effets de l'apport nutritionnel et du stress thermique sur la production de larves et sur la stategie maternelle adoptee ont ete testes dans cette etude. Nous avons cible la balane Chthamalus bisinuatus (Pilsbry) comme modele biologique car el1e domine les zones intertidales superieures le long des cotes rocheuses du Sud-Est du Bresil (region tropicale). Les hypotheses de depart stipulaient que l'apport nutritionnel permet aux adultes de produire des larves de qualite elevee et que le stress thermique genere une ponte precoce, produisant des larves de faible qualite. Afin de tester ces hypotheses, des populations de C. bisinuatus ont ete elevees selon quatre groupes experimentaux differents, en combinant des niveaux d'apport nutritionnel (eleve et faible) et de stress thermique (stresse et non stresse). Des mesures de survie et de conditions physiologiques des adultes et des larves ont permis d'identifier les reponses parentales pouvant etre avantageuses dans un environnement tropical hostile. L'analyse des profils en acides gras a ete la methode utilisee pour evaluer la qualite physiologique des adultes et de larves. Les resultats du traitement alimentaire (fort ou faible apport nutritif), ne montrent aucune difference dans l'accumulation de lipides neutres, la taille des nauplii, l'effort de reproduction ou le temps de survie des nauplii en condition de jeune. Il semble que la faible ressource nutritive est

  18. Quantitative proteomic view on secreted, cell surface-associated, and cytoplasmic proteins of the methicillin-resistant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Kristina; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Moche, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of colonizing and infecting humans by its arsenal of surface-exposed and secreted proteins. Iron-limited conditions in mammalian body fluids serve as a major environmental signal to bacteria to express virulence determinants. Here we present a comprehensive, gel-free, and GeLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteome profiling of S. aureus under this infection-relevant situation. (14)N(15)N metabolic labeling and three complementing approaches were combined for relative quantitative analyses of surface-associated proteins. The surface-exposed and secreted proteome profiling approaches comprise trypsin shaving, biotinylation, and precipitation of the supernatant. By analysis of the outer subproteomic and cytoplasmic protein fraction, 1210 proteins could be identified including 221 surface-associated proteins. Thus, access was enabled to 70% of the predicted cell wall-associated proteins, 80% of the predicted sortase substrates, two/thirds of lipoproteins and more than 50% of secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. For iron-deficiency, 158 surface-associated proteins were quantified. Twenty-nine proteins were found in altered amounts showing particularly surface-exposed proteins strongly induced, such as the iron-regulated surface determinant proteins IsdA, IsdB, IsdC and IsdD as well as lipid-anchored iron compound-binding proteins. The work presents a crucial subject for understanding S. aureus pathophysiology by the use of methods that allow quantitative surface proteome profiling.

  19. A New Methodology for Open Pit Slope Design in Karst-Prone Ground Conditions Based on Integrated Stochastic-Limit Equilibrium Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Cao, Ping; Ma, Guowei; Fan, Wenchen; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Kaihui

    2016-07-01

    Using the Chengmenshan Copper Mine as a case study, a new methodology for open pit slope design in karst-prone ground conditions is presented based on integrated stochastic-limit equilibrium analysis. The numerical modeling and optimization design procedure contain a collection of drill core data, karst cave stochastic model generation, SLIDE simulation and bisection method optimization. Borehole investigations are performed, and the statistical result shows that the length of the karst cave fits a negative exponential distribution model, but the length of carbonatite does not exactly follow any standard distribution. The inverse transform method and acceptance-rejection method are used to reproduce the length of the karst cave and carbonatite, respectively. A code for karst cave stochastic model generation, named KCSMG, is developed. The stability of the rock slope with the karst cave stochastic model is analyzed by combining the KCSMG code and the SLIDE program. This approach is then applied to study the effect of the karst cave on the stability of the open pit slope, and a procedure to optimize the open pit slope angle is presented.

  20. Acclimation conditions modify physiological response of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to elevated CO2 concentrations in a nitrate-limited chemostat.

    PubMed

    Hennon, Gwenn M M; Quay, Paul; Morales, Rhonda L; Swanson, Lyndsey M; Virginia Armbrust, E

    2014-04-01

    Diatoms are responsible for a large proportion of global carbon fixation, with the possibility that they may fix more carbon under future levels of high CO2 . To determine how increased CO2 concentrations impact the physiology of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana Hasle et Heimdal, nitrate-limited chemostats were used to acclimate cells to a recent past (333 ± 6 μatm) and two projected future concentrations (476 ± 18 μatm, 816 ± 35 μatm) of CO2 . Samples were harvested under steady-state growth conditions after either an abrupt (15-16 generations) or a longer acclimation process (33-57 generations) to increased CO2 concentrations. The use of un-bubbled chemostat cultures allowed us to calculate the uptake ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon relative to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIC:DIN), which was strongly correlated with fCO2 in the shorter acclimations but not in the longer acclimations. Both CO2 treatment and acclimation time significantly affected the DIC:DIN uptake ratio. Chlorophyll a per cell decreased under elevated CO2 and the rates of photosynthesis and respiration decreased significantly under higher levels of CO2 . These results suggest that T. pseudonana shifts carbon and energy fluxes in response to high CO2 and that acclimation time has a strong effect on the physiological response.

  1. Initial Piloted Simulation Evaluation of the Reference-H High-Speed Civil Transport Design During Takeoff and Recovery From Limit Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.

    1999-01-01

    An initial assessment of a proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) was conducted in the fall of 1995 at the NASA Langley Research Center. This configuration, known as the Industry Reference-H (Ref.-H), was designed by the Boeing Aircraft Company as part of their work in the High Speed Research program. It included a conventional tail, a cranked-arrow wing, four mixed-flow turbofan engines, and capacity for transporting approximately 300 passengers. The purpose of this assessment was to evaluate and quantify operational aspects of the Reference-H configuration from a pilot's perspective with the additional goal of identifying design strengths as well as any potential configuration deficiencies. This study was aimed at evaluating the Ref.-H configuration at many points of the aircraft's envelope to determine the suitability of the vehicle to accomplish typical mission profiles as well as emergency or envelope-limit conditions. Pilot-provided Cooper-Harper ratings and comments constituted the primary vehicle evaluation metric. The analysis included simulated real-time piloted evaluations, performed in a 6 degree of freedom motion base NASA Langley Visual-Motion Simulator, combined with extensive bath analysis. The assessment was performed using the third major release of the simulation data base (known as Ref.-H cycle 2B).

  2. Footprint area analysis of binary imaged Cupriavidus necator cells to study PHB production at balanced, transient, and limited growth conditions in a cascade process.

    PubMed

    Vadlja, Denis; Koller, Martin; Novak, Mario; Braunegg, Gerhart; Horvat, Predrag

    2016-12-01

    Statistical distribution of cell and poly[3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) granule size and number of granules per cell are investigated for PHB production in a five-stage cascade (5CSTR). Electron microscopic pictures of cells from individual cascade stages (R1-R5) were converted to binary pictures to visualize footprint areas for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and non-PHA biomass. Results for each stage were correlated to the corresponding experimentally determined kinetics (specific growth rate μ and specific productivity π). Log-normal distribution describes PHA granule size dissimilarity, whereas for R1 and R4, gamma distribution best reflects the situation. R1, devoted to balanced biomass synthesis, predominately contains cells with rather small granules, whereas with increasing residence time τ, maximum and average granule sizes by trend increase, approaching an upper limit determined by the cell's geometry. Generally, an increase of intracellular PHA content and ratio of granule to cell area slow down along the cascade. Further, the number of granules per cell decreases with increasing τ. Data for μ and π obtained by binary picture analysis correlate well with the experimental results. The work describes long-term continuous PHA production under balanced, transient, and nutrient-deficient conditions, as well as their reflection on the granules size, granule number, and cell structure on the microscopic level.

  3. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations.

  4. Oral Manifestations of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Anitha; Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Sankar, Leena Sankari; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu; Elumalai, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is one of the disorder that has social impact. Both skin and mucous membrane show depigmentation in vitiligo. Depigmentation in oral cavity can be more easily observed and the patient can be given awareness regarding the condition if they are unaware of vitiligo elsewhere in their body and can be guided for treatment. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of occurrence of oral mucosal vitiligo in vitiligo patients and to determine the most commonly involved oral mucosal site. Materials and methods: The study sample included 100 vitiligo patients. The patients of all age groups and both genders were included. Vitiligo patients associated with systemic conditions such as thyroid disorders, juvenile diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, Addison's disease were excluded in this study. Results: Out of 100 vitiligo patients 44 % male and 56% were female. The oral presentation of vitiligo in this study showed depigmentation of buccal mucosa in 5% of patients, labial mucosa in 5% of patients, palate in 8% of patients, gingiva in 2% of patients and alveolar mucosa 1%. Depigmentation of lip was seen in 42% of patients. Lip involvement refers to depigmentation of both the lips or either lip. Also vermilion border involvement was noted in majority of cases. In some cases, the depigmentation of lip extended to the facial skin also. Conclusion: In this study 55 patients out of 100 patients showed depigmentation in the oral cavity. Lip involvement was most common in this study showing about 42% of patients. Intraoral mucosal involvement was found in 21% of patients. Among intraoral mucosal site palate was common followed by buccal and labial mucosa, gingiva. Two patients had lip pigmentation as the only manifestation without any depigmentation in the skin. PMID:25657420

  5. Designing an oral health module for the Bachelor of Midwifery program at an Australian University.

    PubMed

    Duff, Margaret; Dahlen, Hannah G; Burns, Elaine; Priddis, Holly; Schmied, Virginia; George, Ajesh

    2017-03-01

    Maternal oral health is important yet many pregnant women are unaware of its significance. Midwives are advised to promote oral health during pregnancy and are supported to do this in Australia through the Midwifery Initiated Oral Health training program. However, limited undergraduate education is being provided to midwifery students in this area. The objective of this paper is to describe how an innovative oral health education module for an undergraduate midwifery course in Australia was designed using a multidisciplinary approach. Midwives experienced in curriculum development and key investigators from the Midwifery Initiated Oral Health program designed the module using existing literature. Constructive alignment, blended learning and scaffolding were used in the design process. The draft module was then reviewed by midwifery academics and their feedback incorporated. The final module involves 4 h of teaching and learning and contains three components incorporated into first year course units. Each component is aligned with existing learning outcomes and incorporates blended learning approaches and tutorials/class activities as well as online quizzes and personal reflection. The module details key information (current evidence; basic anatomy/physiology; common oral conditions; and guidelines during pregnancy) that could better prepare students to promote oral health in clinical practice. This is the first time such an innovative, multidisciplinary approach has been undertaken embedding oral health in an undergraduate midwifery program in Australia.

  6. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  7. Strain localization in brittle-ductile shear zones: fluid-abundant vs. fluid-limited conditions (an example from Wyangala area, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruzeniece, L.; Piazolo, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on physiochemical processes occurring in a brittle-ductile shear zone at both fluid-present and fluid-limited conditions. In the studied shear zone (Wyangala, SE Australia), a coarse-grained two-feldspar-quartz-biotite granite is transformed into a medium-grained orthogneiss at the shear zone margins and a fine-grained quartz-muscovite phyllonite in the central parts. The orthogneiss displays cataclasis of feldspar and crystal-plastic deformation of quartz. Quartz accommodates most of the deformation and is extensively recrystallized, showing distinct crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Feldspar-to-muscovite, biotite-to-muscovite and albitization reactions occur locally at porphyroclasts' fracture surfaces and margins. However, the bulk rock composition shows very little change in respect to the wall rock composition. In contrast, in the shear zone centre quartz occurs as large, weakly deformed porphyroclasts in sizes similar to that in the wall rock, suggesting that it has undergone little deformation. Feldspars and biotite are almost completely reacted to muscovite, which is arranged in a fine-grained interconnected matrix. Muscovite-rich layers contain significant amounts of fine-grained intermixed quartz with random CPO. These domains are interpreted to have accommodated most of the strain. Bulk rock chemistry data show a significant increase in SiO2 and depletion in NaO content compared to the wall rock composition. We suggest that the high- and low-strain microstructures in the shear zone represent markedly different scenarios and cannot be interpreted as a simple sequential development with respect to strain. Instead, we propose that the microstructural and mineralogical changes in the shear zone centre arise from a local metasomatic alteration around a brittle precursor. When the weaker fine-grained microstructure is established, the further flow is controlled by transient porosity created at (i) grain boundaries in fine

  8. Increased belowground C release during initial plant development of Populus deltoides x nigra grown under light and C reserve limited conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Plants might be a key factor for the long-term stabilisation of carbon (C) in the soil, e.g. through enhanced physical protection of root-derived C against microbial decomposition in soil aggregates. On the other hand C released by the plants into the soil might promote the decomposition of native soil organic matter (SOM) through the stimulation of microbial activity. We measured the C budget of developing plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. In order to distinguish plant-derived from native C in the SOM and the soil CO2 efflux, we labelled the poplar shoots continuously with 13C-CO2 from first emergence of leaves (sprouting from stem cuttings). Throughout the experiment the CO2 fluxes (photosynthetic assimilation, dark respiratory loss, soil CO2 efflux) were measured frequently (every 30 min) and the 13C was traced in the soil CO2 efflux (1-2 times a week). After 10 weeks the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested and the distribution of the 13C distribution was analysed. The plants developed slowly (compared to previous experiments), most likely due to limitation in C reserves (long term cutting storage) and C supply (low light intensities). The amount of 13C recovered in the roots, microbial biomass and soil CO2 efflux was directly correlated with the leaf area of the different plant individuals. After 3-4 weeks of plant development we observed a high peak in the total soil CO2 efflux. During this time the relative belowground C release was increased massively over the basal rate of 17 % of net C assimilated, whereby the variability between the plant individuals was large. The smallest plants, i.e. the plants that were most resource limited, obtained the highest belowground C release accounting at the peak time for up to 57 % of net assimilated C. We hypothesize that the plants released specific compounds, which either directly (enzymatically) or indirectly (priming

  9. Group Oral Exams: Exploring Assessment Techniques for New Instructional Paradigms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Thomas F.; Menchaca, Velma

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a group oral final exam was designed and administered in a block of two teacher education courses taught within the social constructivist perspective. Advocates such group oral exam practices as consistent with valid assessment guidelines. Discusses limitations. (HB)

  10. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient. PMID:26015713

  11. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis. PMID:26416861

  12. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Rozental, Sonia; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-12-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis.

  13. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  14. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  15. Oral chemotherapy in tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Kay, N J

    1981-05-01

    A double-blind triple cross-over trial was designed for 21 patients suffering from tinnitus; mexiletine, diazapam, betahistine and placebo were taken each for a month sequentially during which time the patients recorded their tinnitus loudness subjectively on a visual analogue scale. The results showed that these medications did not influence the tinnitus loudness. Since mexiletine is an oral analogue of lignocaine and a cardiovascular drug, any untoward cardiovascular history and clinical finding disqualified such patients from the trial. Twenty-one such patients were rejected from an original group of 42 patients. In a volunteer trial mexiletine unrelated to this, it was reported that a vasovagal attack was suffered by someone who had just consumed 400 mg mexiletine orally. After ethical considerations the tinnitus trial was stopped. Eleven patients completed the cycle of medications, 10 did not. The dangers of using a cardiovascular drug for a non-cardiovascular condition is thus exposed.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of desmopressin administered as tablet and oral lyophilisate formulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Pauline; De Guchtenaere, Ann; Van Herzeele, Charlotte; Raes, Ann; Dehoorne, Jo; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Laecke, Erik; Vande Walle, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Desmopressin 120 μg oral lyophilisate and 200 μg tablet are considered bioequivalent, based on extrapolation of studies in a limited number of adults and on one dose-finding study of desmopressin oral lyophilisate in children. However, no comparative pharmacokinetic study in children was executed confirming this statement. No data are available on the influence of food intake on the bioavailability of desmopressin tablet in a pediatric setting, although studies in adults have documented that food intake results in a significantly lower desmopressin plasma concentration. In this study, we analyzed plasma concentrations of desmopressin oral lyophilisate and tablet with concomitant food intake. Twenty-three children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (mean age, 12.7 years) were recruited. Two tests were performed on two separate days in identical conditions with a standardized food and fluid intake. Desmopressin was administered as desmopressin tablet or desmopressin oral lyophilisate immediately after a meal. Desmopressin plasma concentration was measured at 1 h, 2 h, and 6 h postdosing. No significant difference in plasma concentration of 120 μg desmopressin oral lyophilisate and 200 μg tablet was demonstrated, even with concomitant food intake. A significant difference in variability was found, identifying a smaller variance for desmopressin oral lyophilisate plasma concentrations at all time points. This study demonstrates comparable plasma levels for desmopressin oral lyophilisate, despite the lower dose. The dosage for desmopressin oral lyophilisate is more predictable due to the significantly smaller variance. Therefore, desmopressin oral lyophilisate seems more suitable, especially in the younger age group for which time interval between dinner and drug administration is limited.

  17. Moral and professional responsibility of oral physician toward geriatric patient with interdisciplinary management - The time to act is now!

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Shalu; Kaur, Mandeep; Goel, Sumit; Bhatnagar, Puneet

    2011-01-01

    Mouth is the mirror of overall health. With advancements in oral health promotion and preventive measures instituted in developed countries, more people retain their natural teeth into their old age as compared to half a century ago. The effect of aging on oral health includes effect on oral mucosa, lips, teeth and other associated structures, and their functional activity leading to impairment of speech, mastication, swallowing and pain leading to anxiety and depression. Oral tissues are not limited to the teeth and supporting structures (periodontium) but also include salivary glands, temporomandibular joint, orofacial/mastication muscles, oropharyngeal mucosa, and oral sensory/motor nerve systems. In India, the second most populous country in the world, there is a rapidly growing population of older adults and there are 70 million elderly people over 60 years of age. Geriatric health problems with respect to the quality of life often remain neglected. Oral health care for an increasingly large segment of elderly people will be a fact of life for dentists everywhere. Oral health can be both a benchmark for and a determinant of the quality of life rather than the length of life span. Older adults are more susceptible to oral conditions or diseases due to an increase in chronic conditions and physical/mental disabilities. Thus, a careful initial interview ensuring that the dentist is familiar with the patient's health history, followed by a thorough oral examination plays a very important role. In this paper, we briefly review the age-related oral changes occurring in geriatric patients and the role of oral physician in imparting a healthy life to the elderly. PMID:21897734

  18. Oral Lichen Planus

    MedlinePlus

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Oral Health Practices of School Children in Davangere

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and behavior of school children towards oral health. Settings and design: Descriptive study. Materials and methods: School children (n=700) aged between 10 to 14 years in a Davangere school were recruited into this study. The subjects completed a questionnaire that aimed to evaluate young school children’s behavior, knowledge, and perception of their oral health and dental treatment. Statistical analysis: The results were statistically analysed and percentage was calculated. Results and conclusion: The participant oral hygiene habits (such as tooth brushing) were found to be irregular, and parent role in the oral hygiene habits of their children was limited. The study population showed higher awareness of caries than periodontal conditions. The children in this study also recognized the importance of oral health. The results of this study indicate that Comprehensive oral health educational programs for both children and their parents are required to achieve this goal. How to cite this article: Vishwanathaiah S. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Oral Health Practices of School Children in Davangere. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):172-176. PMID:27365943

  20. An Assessment of Global Oral Health Education in U.S. Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Sung, Janet; Gluch, Joan I

    2017-02-01

    Dental schools need to produce graduates who are adequately prepared to respond to the complex needs and challenges of the increasingly diverse and interconnected world in which they will practice dentistry. To enhance discussions about the coverage of global oral health competencies in dental education, the aims of this study were to assess how global health education is currently incorporated into predoctoral dental training in the U.S. and which global oral health competencies are being covered. Surveys were emailed to all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools during the 2015-16 academic year. Respondents from 52 schools completed the survey (response rate 81%). The results showed that social determinants of oral diseases and conditions, how to identify barriers to use of oral health services, and how to work with patients who have limited dental health literacy were covered in the greatest number of responding schools' curricula. Key areas of global health curricula that were covered rarely included global dental infrastructure, data collection design, and horizontal and vertical programming approaches to health improvement. Despite current dialogue on the addition of global oral health competencies to dental curricula, only 41% of the responding schools were currently planning to expand their global oral health education. Based on these results, the authors conclude that it may be most feasible for dental schools to add recommended global oral health competencies to their curricula by incorporating didactic content into already established courses.

  1. Oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical outcomes in a context of specialized oral care using low-level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Eduardo, Fernanda de Paula; Bezinelli, Leticia Mello; de Carvalho, Danielle Lima Corrêa; Lopes, Roberta Marques da Graça; Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Brumatti, Melina; Vince, Carolina Sgaroni Camargo; de Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini; Vogel, Cristina; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Correa, Luciana

    2015-05-01

    OM is a painful inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, derived from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. High OM severity is frequently present in HSCT pediatric patients, who exhibit multiple painful ulcers that limit their mastication and swallowing, leading to poor nutritional status. Few studies have demonstrated OM clinical outcomes in young patients undergoing HSCT. Feasibility of oral care and LLLT on OM prophylaxis and treatment is also poorly discussed. The aim of this study was to describe a specialized oral care protocol that included LLLT for pediatric patients undergoing transplantation and to demonstrate the clinical outcomes after OM prevention and treatment. Data from OM-related morbidity were collected from 51 HSCT pediatric patients treated daily with LLLT, followed by standard oral care protocols. All the patients, even infants and young children, accepted the daily oral care and LLLT well. The majority (80.0%) only exhibited erythema in the oral mucosa, and the maximum OM degree was WHO II. Patients who had undergone autologous and HLA-haploidentical transplants showed OM with the lowest severity. The frequency of total body irradiation and methotrexate prescriptions was higher in adolescents when compared with infants (p = 0.044), and adolescents also exhibited OM more severely than infants and young children. We found that good clinical outcomes were obtained using this therapy, mainly in regard to the control of OM severity and pain reduction in the oral cavity. Specialized oral care, including LLLT, is feasible and affordable for HSCT pediatric patients, although some adaptation in the patient's oral hygiene routine must be adopted with help from parents/companions and clinical staff.

  2. Oral Health and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Renata S.; Marlow, Nicole M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been described as a new epidemic. Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, and this number is predicted to increase by about 50% by year 2030.This article will review oral health manifestations of diabetes, and discuss associations between periodontal disease and diabetes. Although there is a strong body of evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and T2DM, oral health awareness is lacking among patients with diabetes and other health professionals. There is a need for the treating physician to be educated about the various oral manifestations of diabetes so that they can be diagnosed early and timely referrals to oral health specialists can be made. The established link between periodontitis and diabetes calls for an increased need to study ways to control both diseases, particularly among populations with health disparities and limited access to oral and health care. PMID:23531957

  3. Fluoride-sensitivity of growth and acid production of oral Actinomyces: comparison with oral Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Junko; Nakajo, Kazuko; Washio, Jumpei; Mayanagi, Gen; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Actinomyces are predominant oral bacteria; however, their cariogenic potential in terms of acid production and fluoride sensitivity has not been elucidated in detail and compared with that of other caries-associated oral bacteria, such as Streptococcus. Therefore, this study aimed to elucidate and compare the acid production and growth of Actinomyces and Streptococcus in the presence of bicarbonate and fluoride to mimic conditions in the oral cavity. Acid production from glucose was measured by pH-stat at pH 5.5 and 7.0 under anaerobic conditions. Growth rate was assessed by optical density in anaerobic culture. Although Actinomyces produced acid at a lower rate than did Streptococcus, their acid production was more tolerant of fluoride (IDacid production 50 = 110-170 ppm at pH 7.0 and 10-13 ppm at pH 5.5) than that of Streptococcus (IDacid production 50 = 36-53 ppm at pH 7.0 and 6.3-6.5 ppm at pH 5.5). Bicarbonate increased acid production by Actinomyces with prominent succinate production and enhanced their fluoride tolerance (IDacid production 50 = 220-320 ppm at pH 7.0 and 33-52 ppm at pH 5.5). Bicarbonate had no effect on these variables in Streptococcus. In addition, although the growth rate of Actinomyces was lower than that of Streptococcus, Actinomyces growth was more tolerant of fluoride (IDgrowth 50 = 130-160 ppm) than was that of Streptococcus (IDgrowth 50 = 27-36 ppm). These results indicate that oral Actinomyces are more tolerant of fluoride than oral Streptococcus, and bicarbonate enhances the fluoride tolerance of oral Actinomyces. Because of the limited number of species tested here, further study is needed to generalize these findings to the genus level.

  4. Oral Language and Reading in Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon F.; Heilmann, John; Nockerts, Ann; Iglesias, Aquiles; Fabiano, Leah; Francis, David J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the question: Do lexical, syntactic, fluency, and discourse measures of oral language collected under narrative conditions predict reading achievement both within and across languages for bilingual children? More than 1,500 Spanish-English bilingual children attending kindergarten-third grade participated. Oral narratives…

  5. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  6. Oral Health in Women During Preconception and Pregnancy: Implications for Birth Outcomes and Infant Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Burton L.

    2006-01-01

    The mouth is an obvious portal of entry to the body, and oral health reflects and influences general health and well being. Maternal oral health has significant implications for birth outcomes and infant oral health. Maternal periodontal disease, that is, a chronic infection of the gingiva and supporting tooth structures, has been associated with preterm birth, development of preeclampsia, and delivery of a small-for-gestational age infant. Maternal oral flora is transmitted to the newborn infant, and increased cariogenic flora in the mother predisposes the infant to the development of caries. It is intriguing to consider preconception, pregnancy, or intrapartum treatment of oral health conditions as a mechanism to improve women's oral and general health, pregnancy outcomes, and their children's dental health. However, given the relationship between oral health and general health, oral health care should be a goal in its own right for all individuals. Regardless of the potential for improved oral health to improve pregnancy outcomes, public policies that support comprehensive dental services for vulnerable women of childbearing age should be expanded so that their own oral and general health is safeguarded and their children's risk of caries is reduced. Oral health promotion should include education of women and their health care providers ways to prevent oral disease from occurring, and referral for dental services when disease is present. PMID:16816998

  7. Update on oral herpes virus infections.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Kuperstein, Arthur S; Stoopler, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    Oral herpes virus infections (OHVIs) are among the most common mucosal disorders encountered by oral health care providers. These infections can affect individuals at any age, from infants to the elderly, and may cause significant pain and dysfunction. Immunosuppressed patients may be at increased risk for serious and potential life-threatening complications caused by OHVIs. Clinicians may have difficulty in diagnosing these infections because they can mimic other conditions of the oral mucosa. This article provides oral health care providers with clinically relevant information regarding etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of OHVIs.

  8. Torsemide Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... high blood pressure. Torsemide is used to treat edema (fluid retention; excess fluid held in body tissues) ... your doctor.Torsemide controls high blood pressure and edema but does not cure these conditions. Continue to ...

  9. The Bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Is Reduced by Flavodoxin and Ferredoxin and Is Essential under Mixotrophic, Nitrate-limiting Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Gutekunst, Kirstin; Chen, Xi; Schreiber, Karoline; Kaspar, Ursula; Makam, Srinivas; Appel, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are able to use solar energy for the production of hydrogen. It is generally accepted that cyanobacterial NiFe-hydrogenases are reduced by NAD(P)H. This is in conflict with thermodynamic considerations, as the midpoint potentials of NAD(P)H do not suffice to support the measured hydrogen production under physiological conditions. We show that flavodoxin and ferredoxin directly reduce the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in vitro. A merodiploid ferredoxin-NADP reductase mutant produced correspondingly more photohydrogen. We furthermore found that the hydrogenase receives its electrons via pyruvate:flavodoxin/ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR)-flavodoxin/ferredoxin under fermentative conditions, enabling the cells to gain ATP. These results strongly support that the bidirectional NiFe-hydrogenases in cyanobacteria function as electron sinks for low potential electrons from photosystem I and as a redox balancing device under fermentative conditions. However, the selective advantage of this enzyme is not known. No strong phenotype of mutants lacking the hydrogenase has been found. Because bidirectional hydrogenases are widespread in aquatic nutrient-rich environments that are capable of triggering phytoplankton blooms, we mimicked those conditions by growing cells in the presence of increased amounts of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved organic nitrogen. Under these conditions the hydrogenase was found to be essential. As these conditions close the two most important sinks for reduced flavodoxin/ferredoxin (CO2-fixation and nitrate reduction), this discovery further substantiates the connection between flavodoxin/ferredoxin and the NiFe-hydrogenase. PMID:24311779

  10. Perspectives of Parents and Tutors on a Self-Management Program for Parents/Guardians of Children with Long-Term and Life-Limiting Conditions: "A Life Raft We Can Sail along with"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Julie; Swaby, Laura; Turner, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The lay-led, community-based Supporting Parents Programme (SPP) aims to assist parents caring for children with long-term or life-limiting conditions through support and cognitive behavioral techniques. The value of the SPP from the perspectives of parent participants and tutors was examined in focus groups and telephone interviews. Data were…

  11. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RELIEF OR REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General § 203.42 What conditions and... has produced gas or oil from a well with a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000 feet TVD...

  12. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... RELIEF OR REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General § 203.42 What conditions and... has produced gas or oil from a well with a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000 feet TVD...

  13. 30 CFR 203.42 - What conditions and limitations apply to royalty relief for deep wells and phase 1 ultra-deep wells?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... RELIEF OR REDUCTION IN ROYALTY RATES OCS Oil, Gas, and Sulfur General § 203.42 What conditions and... has produced gas or oil from a well with a perforated interval the top of which is 18,000 feet TVD...

  14. [Prevention of oral diseases].

    PubMed

    Vodanović, Marin

    2013-06-01

    Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. Ever more people are affected with oral diseases. Dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are the most common oral diseases and they can be prevented. Oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programs should be incorporated in national health strategies. Inability to understand health information can be a profound disadvantage to patients when asked to take responsibility for their health. Increasing the level of oral health literacy and improvement of communication between patients and dentists by avoiding the usage of professional dental terminology should be included in each oral prevention program.

  15. Efficacy of light based detection systems for early detection of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy-Kantharaj, Yashoda-Bhoomi; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Janardhan-Reddy, Sujatha; Sahu, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) is essential for dental professionals to improve patient survival rates. The aim of this systematic review is to to evaluate the effectiveness of devices that utilise the principles of chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence as adjuncts in the detection of OSCC and OPMD. Material and Methods The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE] and Science direct. The search was for limited articles published in English or with an English abstract and articles published during the period from January 2005 to April 2014. Clinical trials utilized ViziLite, Microlux TM/DL and Visual Enhanced Light scope (VELscope) for early detection of OPMD and OSCC. Results Twenty primary studies published satisfied our criteria for selection - 10 utilised chemiluminescence and 10 tissue autofluorescence. Senstivity of Vizilite for detecting OSCC nad OPMD ranged from 77.1 % to 100% and specificity was low that ranged from 0% to 27.8%.Most have shown that chemiluminescence increases the brightness and margins of oral mucosal white lesions and thus assist in identification of mucosal lesions not considered under Conventional visual examination. However, it preferentially detects leukoplakia and may fail to spot red patches. Clinical trials demonstrated that sensitivity of VELscope in detecting malignancy and OPMD ranged from 22 % to 100 % and specificity ranged from 16 % to 100%. Most studies concluded that VELscope can help the experienced clinician to find oral precursor malignant lesions. But it couldnot differentiate between dysplasia and benign inflammatory conditions. Conclusions Both devices are simple, non-invasive test of the oral mucosa but are suited for clinicians with sufficient experience and training. More clinical trials in future should be conducted to establish optical imaging as an efficacious adjunct

  16. Oral geotrichosis: report of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Macías, Berenice; Paredes-Farrera, Fernando; Hernández, Marco A; Araiza, Javier; Ponce, Rosa M

    2010-09-01

    Oral geotrichosis is an uncommon opportunistic infection caused by Geotrichum candidum, a habitual contaminant and component of the flora of various parts of the body. This communication reports both a 20-year retrospective study of clinically and mycologically proven cases of oral geotrichosis, and a prospective study of fungal oral flora in 200 individuals divided into two groups: normal individuals and individuals with associated conditions. Twelve patients with proven oral geotrichosis were included: 9 females and 3 males, with a mean age of 48.5 years; the associated conditions were diabetes mellitus (66.6%), leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma and HIV/AIDS infection. The oral geotrichoses showed three clinical varieties: pseudomembranous (75%), hyperplastic, and palatine ulcer. G. candidum was isolated in 11 cases and G. capitatum in one. Positive fungal cultures were obtained from the two groups, and 48% and 78% of cultures were positive, respectively, for Candida spp. In 2.8% and 6.33% of the cases, G. candidum was isolated, respectively, together with one strain of G. capitatum. Oral geotrichosis is an exceptional infection that clinically presents, and is treated, as oral candidiasis. G. candidum may be isolated from the oral flora of a small proportion of patients, either normal individuals or those with associated conditions.

  17. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  18. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  19. Review of the Evidence for Oral Health Promotion Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satur, Julie G.; Gussy, Mark G.; Morgan, Michael V.; Calache, Hanny; Wright, Clive

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and oral cancers have significant burden of disease effects, quality of life and cost implications for the Australian community. Oral health promotion is a key approach to addressing these conditions endorsed as part of the National Oral Health Plan. Understanding the evidence for effectiveness of…

  20. Sustained enhancement of photosynthesis in coffee trees grown under free-air CO2 enrichment conditions: disentangling the contributions of stomatal, mesophyll, and biochemical limitations

    PubMed Central

    DaMatta, Fábio M.; Godoy, Alice G.; Menezes-Silva, Paulo E.; Martins, Samuel C.V.; Sanglard, Lílian M.V.P.; Morais, Leandro E.; Torre-Neto, André; Ghini, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea spp.), a globally traded commodity, is a slow-growing tropical tree species that displays an improved photosynthetic performance when grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). To investigate the mechanisms underlying this response, two commercial coffee cultivars (Catuaí and Obatã) were grown using the first free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) facility in Latin America. Measurements were conducted in two contrasting growth seasons, which were characterized by the high (February) and low (August) sink demand. Elevated [CO2] led to increases in net photosynthetic rates (A) in parallel with decreased photorespiration rates, with no photochemical limitations to A. The stimulation of A by elevated CO2 supply was more prominent in August (56% on average) than in February (40% on average). Overall, the stomatal and mesophyll conductances, as well as the leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, were unresponsive to the treatments. Photosynthesis was strongly limited by diffusional constraints, particularly at the stomata level, and this pattern was little, if at all, affected by elevated [CO2]. Relative to February, starch pools (but not soluble sugars) increased remarkably (>500%) in August, with no detectable alteration in the maximum carboxylation capacity estimated on a chloroplast [CO2] basis. Upregulation of A by elevated [CO2] took place with no signs of photosynthetic downregulation, even during the period of low sink demand, when acclimation would be expected to be greatest. PMID:26503540

  1. Preferential incorporation of coloured-carotenoids occurs in the LH2 complexes from non-sulphur purple bacteria under carotenoid-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Gall, Andrew; Henry, Sarah; Takaichi, Shinichi; Robert, Bruno; Cogdell, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    The effect of growing Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) acidophila and Rps. palustris in the presence of different concentrations of the carotenoid (Car) biosynthetic inhibitor diphenylamine (DPA) has been investigated. Growth with sub-maximal concentrations of DPA induces Car limitation. The exact response to DPA is species dependent. However, both Rps. acidophila and Rps. palustris respond by preferentially incorporating the limiting amount of coloured Cars into their LH2 complexes at the expense of the RC-LH1 complexes. As inhibition by DPA becomes more severe there is an increase in the percentage of Cars with reduced numbers of conjugated C=C bonds. The effect of this changed Car composition on the structure and function of the antenna complexes has been investigated using absorption, fluorescence, CD and Raman spectroscopies. The results show that although the presence of Car molecules is important for the stability of the LH2 complexes that the overall native structure can be maintained by the presence of many different Cars.

  2. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  3. Adjusting the light in the limit conditions of consciousness by the means of ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) and of subordinated systems

    PubMed Central

    Aliu, Octavian Florin

    2014-01-01

    Background: In our activity in the Ambulance Service of Bucharest Municipality during March 2002 – March 2003 we studied a casuistry of patients who had fallen in a coma of varying degrees. To aid better understanding of coma, the concept of “pre-coma stage” or “diencephalic 0 stage” was introduced. This concept complements the Arseni classification already used in medical practice, because some doctors alternatively use the term of “inaugural coma” for the same condition that we call diencephalic “0 stage”. In the median hypothalamus and on the retino-hypothalamic path (SCN - AN) optical waves are transmitted, probably in the near infrared spectral range (800–1000 nm) in what we term the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS). These waves would constitute a means of transmitting information via the ARAS about the infradian biorhythm of coordination (frequencies below 1 cycle/28 hours), essential for the modulation and pre-processing of the consciousness and wakefulness, a fact which has already been demonstrated in animals. Methods: The current work is based on observations made on a group of 51 patients with the precoma and coma conditions, and on a thorough study of the specialized (especially Romanian) literature. Also, we used validated scientific proof of torture in conditions of lack of light. Results: We found a perfect interpenetration between the ARAS and the following two complementary subsystems: 1. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, that has the role of coordinating the periodicity of some biological functions depending on the circadian rhythm; and 2. The main photoperiodic organ, the pineal gland (epiphysis), which together with the ARAS has a role in the photoperiodicity modulation of some biological functions during the state of vigilance. PMID:25071308

  4. Adjusting the light in the limit conditions of consciousness by the means of ascending reticular activating system (ARAS*) and of subordinated systems Part 1: Introduction and Aims

    PubMed Central

    Siposan, Dan Georgel; Aliu, Octavian Florin

    2014-01-01

    Background: In our activity in the Ambulance Service of Bucharest Municipality during March 2002 – March 2003 we studied a casuistry of patients who had fallen in a coma of varying degrees. To aid better understanding of coma, the concept of “pre-coma stage” or diencephalic “0 stage” was introduced. This concept complements the Arseni classification already used in medical practice, because some doctors alternatively use the term of “inaugural coma” for the same condition that we call diencephalic “0 stage”. In the median hypothalamus and on the retino-hypothalamic path (SCN - AN) optical waves are transmitted, probably in the near infrared spectral range (800–1000 nm). These waves would constitute a means of transmitting information about the infradian biorhythm of coordination (frequencies below 1 cycle/28 hours), essential for the modulation and pre-processing of the consciousness and wakefulness, a fact which has already been demonstrated in animals. Methods: The current work is based on observations made on a group of 51 patients with the precoma and coma conditions, and on a thorough study of the specialized (especially Romanian) literature. Also, we used validated scientific proof of torture in conditions of lack of light. Results: We found a perfect interpenetration between the ARAS and the following two complementary subsystems: 1. The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus, that has the role of coordinating the periodicity of some biological functions depending on the circadian rhythm; and 2. The main photoperiodic organ, the pineal gland (epiphysis), which together with the ARAS has a role in the photoperiodicity modulation of some biological functions during the state of vigilance. Conclusion: From the above mentioned one may conclude that the consciousness condition is the unitary result of action of all human brain systems and especially sub-systems, which are controlled and led by a psycho-neurological process of integration at the

  5. Analysis of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil in shallot (Allium ascalonicum) grown under greenhouse conditions using tandem mass spectrometry: establishment of pre-harvest residue limits.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hyouk; Park, Joon-Seong; Abd El-Aty, A M; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Na, Tae-Woong; Shim, Jae-Han

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the original Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe method was used for the extraction of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil followed by a rapid clean-up through dispersive solid-phase extraction technique with primary secondary amine sorbent and magnesium sulfate in shallot. Residues were analyzed using LC-tandem mass spectrometry in positive-ion electrospray ionization mode. The limits of detection and quantification were estimated to be 0.006 and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively. The samples were fortified at two different concentration levels (0.2 and 1.0 mg/kg), and the recoveries ranged between 79.7 and 83.9% with relative standard deviation values < 6%. The method was successfully applied for the establishment of the pre-harvest residue limits (PHRL). The rate of disappearance of imidacloprid and pyrimethanil on shallot was described with first-order kinetics (imidacloprid, y(2)  = 0.9670; pyrimethanil, y(2)  = 0.9841), with half-lives of 2.87 and 2.08 days, respectively. Based on the dissipation patterns of the pesticide residues, the PHRL was recommended at 7.86 mg/kg for 14 days (PHRL14 ) and 1.98 mg/kg for 7 days (PHRL7 ) before harvest for imidacloprid, and 21.64 mg/kg for 7 days (PHRL7 ) and 9.28 mg/kg for 4 days (PHRL4 ) before harvest for pyrimethanil in shallot.

  6. [Applying toothpaste and mouthwash BLUEM in complex oral care in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Makeeva, I M; Tambovtseva, N V

    2014-01-01

    For patients with coronary heart disease oral hygiene and treatment of oral mucosa inflammatory changes and periodontal disease are of vital importance. Dental status assessment in 110 patients hospitalized in cardiology department revealed that they all suffered from periodontal disease, diseases of teeth and oral mucosa. In 100% of cases it was necessary to improve oral hygiene. Inclusion in everyday hygienic oral care of toothpaste and mouthwash Bluem reduced the severity of inflammatory changes and improved the hygienic condition of the oral cavity.

  7. Poverty does not limit tobacco consumption in Cambodia: quantitative estimate of tobacco use under conditions of no income and adult malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pramil N; Washburn, Dawn; Yel, Daravuth; Kheam, They; Job, Jayakaran S

    2013-09-01

    Current data indicate that under conditions of poverty, tobacco is consumed at the expense of basic needs. In a large national sample from Cambodia, we sought to determine whether tobacco consumption declines under extreme conditions of no income and malnutrition. Our major findings are as follows: (1) Among men, there was no significant difference in the number of cigarettes smoked for no income (425, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 395-456) versus >US$2 per day (442, 95% CI = 407-477); (2) among women, there was no significant difference in the amount of loose tobacco (ie, betel quid) consumed for no income (539 g, 95% CI = 441-637) versus >US$2 per day (558 g, 95% CI = 143-973); (3) for the contrast of no income + malnutrition versus >US$2 per day + no malnutrition in a linear model, there was no significant difference for men who smoked (462 vs 517 cigarettes/month, P = .82) or women who chewed (316 vs 404 g tobacco/month, P = .34), adjusting for confounders. Among the poorest and malnourished Cambodian adults, lack of resources did not appear to prevent them from obtaining smoked or smokeless tobacco.

  8. Non-Markovian reduced propagator, multiple-time correlation functions, and master equations with general initial conditions in the weak-coupling limit

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Ines de; Alonso, Daniel

    2006-02-15

    In this paper we derive the evolution equation for the reduced propagator, an object that evolves vectors of the Hilbert space of a system S interacting with an environment B in a non-Markovian way. This evolution is conditioned to certain initial and final states of the environment. Once an average over these environmental states is made, reduced propagators permit the evaluation of multiple-time correlation functions of system observables. When this average is done stochastically the reduced propagator evolves according to a stochastic Schroedinger equation. In addition, it is possible to obtain the evolution equations of the multiple-time correlation functions which generalize the well-known quantum regression theorem to the non-Markovian case. Here, both methods, stochastic and evolution equations, are described by assuming a weak coupling between system and environment. Finally, we show that reduced propagators can be used to obtain a master equation with general initial conditions, and not necessarily an initial vacuum state for the environment. We illustrate the theory with several examples.

  9. Poverty Does Not Limit Tobacco Consumption in Cambodia: Quantitative Estimate of Tobacco Use Under Conditions of No Income and Adult Malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramil N.; Washburn, Dawn; Yel, Daravuth; Kheam, They; Job, Jayakaran S.

    2014-01-01

    Current data indicate that under conditions of poverty, tobacco is consumed at the expense of basic needs. In a large national sample from Cambodia, we sought to determine whether tobacco consumption declines under extreme conditions of no income and malnutrition. Our major findings are as follows: (1) Among men, there was no significant difference in the number of cigarettes smoked for no income (425, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 395-456) versus >US$2 per day (442, 95% CI = 407-477); (2) among women, there was no significant difference in the amount of loose tobacco (ie, betel quid) consumed for no income (539 g, 95% CI = 441-637) versus >US$2 per day (558 g, 95% CI = 143-973); (3) for the contrast of no income + malnutrition versus >US$2 per day + no malnutrition in a linear model, there was no significant difference for men who smoked (462 vs 517 cigarettes/month, P = .82) or women who chewed (316 vs 404 g tobacco/month, P = .34), adjusting for confounders. Among the poorest and malnourished Cambodian adults, lack of resources did not appear to prevent them from obtaining smoked or smokeless tobacco. PMID:23666843

  10. From global to local genetic structuring in the red gorgonian Paramuricea clavata: the interplay between oceanographic conditions and limited larval dispersal.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar-Jamaï, K; Pascual, M; Ledoux, J-B; Coma, R; Féral, J-P; Garrabou, J; Aurelle, D

    2011-08-01

    Defining the scale of connectivity among marine populations and identifying the barriers to gene flow are tasks of fundamental importance for understanding the genetic structure of populations and for the design of marine reserves. Here, we investigated the population genetic structure at three spatial scales of the red gorgonian Paramuricea clavata (Cnidaria, Octocorallia), a key species dwelling in the coralligenous assemblages of the Mediterranean Sea. Colonies of P. clavata were collected from 39 locations across the Mediterranean Sea from Morocco to Turkey and analysed using microsatellite loci. Within three regions (Medes, Marseille and North Corsica), sampling was obtained from multiple locations and at different depths. Three different approaches (measures of genetic differentiation, Bayesian clustering and spatially explicit maximum-difference algorithm) were used to determine the pattern of genetic structure. We identified genetic breaks in the spatial distribution of genetic diversity, which were concordant with oceanographic conditions in the Mediterranean Sea. We revealed a high level of genetic differentiation among populations and a pattern of isolation by distance across the studied area and within the three regions, underlining short effective larval dispersal in this species. We observed genetic differentiation among populations in the same locality dwelling at different depths, which may be explained by local oceanographic conditions and which may allow a process of local adaptation of the populations to their environment. We discuss the implications of our results for the conservation of the species, which is exposed to various threats.

  11. Effects of CdTe growth conditions and techniques on the efficiency limiting defects and mechanisms in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Chou, H. C.; Jokerst, N. M.; Thomas, E. W.; Ferekides, C.; Kamra, S.; Feng, Z. C.; Dugan, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    CdTe solar cells were fabricated by depositing CdTe films on CdS/SnO2/glass substrates using close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Te/Cd mole ratio was varied in the range of 0.02 to 6 in the MOCVD growth ambient in an attempt to vary the native defect concentration. Polycrystalline CdTe layers grown by MOCVD and CSS both showed average grain size of about 2 μm. However, the CdTe films grown by CSS were found to be less faceted and more dense compared to the CdTe grown by MOCVD. CdTe growth techniques and conditions had a significant impact on the electrical characteristics of the cells. The CdTe solar cells grown by MOCVD in the Te-rich growth condition and by the CSS technique gave high cell efficiencies of 11.5% and 12.4%, respectively, compared to 6.6% efficient MOCVD cells grown in Cd-rich conditions. This large difference in efficiency is explained on the basis of (a) XRD measurements which showed a higher degree of atomic interdiffusion at the CdS/CdTe interface in high performance devices, (b) Raman measurements which endorsed more uniform and preferred grain orientation by revealing a sharp CdTe TO mode in the high efficiency cells, and (c) carrier transport mechanism which switched from tunneling/interface recombination to depletion region recombination in the high efficiency cells. In this study, Cu/Au layers were evaporated on CdTe for the back contact. Lower efficiency of the Te-rich MOCVD cells, compared to the CSS cells, was attributed to contact related additional loss mechanisms, such as Cd pile-up near Cu/CdTe interface which can give rise to Cd-vacancy defects in the bulk, and higher Cu concentration in the CdTe layer which can cause shunts in the device. Finally, SIMS measurements on the CdTe films of different crystallinity and grain size confirmed that grain boundaries are the main conduits for Cu migration into the CdTe film. Thus larger CdTe grain size or lower grain boundary area per unit volume

  12. Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis under H2-limited and H2-enriched conditions: implications for the origin of methane and its isotopic diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Tomoyo; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Saito, Yayoi; Matsui, Yohei; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics of H2O-H2-CO2-CH4 in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and their relation to H2 availability were investigated. Two H2-syntrophic cocultures of fermentatively hydrogenogenic bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of <102 Pa-H2 and two pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of 105 Pa-H2 were tested. Carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was correlated with pH2, as indicated in previous studies. The hydrogen isotope ratio of CH4 produced during rapid growth of the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermococcus okinawensis under high pH2 conditions ( 105 Pa) was affected by the isotopic composition of H2, as concluded in a previous study of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. This " {δ D}_{{H}_2} effect" is a possible cause of the diversity of previously reported values for hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O examined in H2-enriched culture experiments. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O, defined by (1000 + {δ D}_{{CH}_4} )/(1000 + {δ D}_{{H}_2O} ), during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis of the H2-syntrophic cocultures was in the range 0.67-0.69. The hydrogen isotope fractionation of our H2-syntrophic dataset overlaps with those obtained not only from low- pH2 experiments reported so far but also from natural samples of "young" methane reservoirs (0.66-0.74). Conversely, such hydrogen isotope fractionation is not consistent with that of "aged" methane in geological samples (≥0.79), which has been regarded as methane produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from the carbon isotope fractionation. As a possible process inducing the inconsistency in hydrogen isotope signatures between experiments and geological samples, we hypothesize that the hydrogen isotope signature of CH4 imprinted at the time of methanogenesis, as in the experiments and natural young methane, may be altered by diagenetic hydrogen

  13. Organic matter production response to CO2 increase in open subarctic plankton communities: Comparison of six microcosm experiments under iron-limited and -enriched bloom conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Takeshi; Sugie, Koji; Endo, Hisashi; Suzuki, Koji; Nishioka, Jun; Ono, Tsuneo

    2014-12-01

    Increase in seawater pCO2 and the corresponding decrease in pH caused by the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration (i.e., ocean acidification) may affect organic matter production by phytoplankton communities. Organic matter production forms the basis of marine food webs and plays a crucial role in oceanic CO2 uptake through the biological carbon pump, and hence will potentially affect future marine ecosystem dynamics. However, responses of organic matter production in open ocean plankton ecosystems to CO2 increase have not been fully examined. We conducted on-deck microcosm experiments using high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters in the western subarctic Pacific and oceanic Bering Sea basin in summer 2008 and 2009, respectively, to examine the impacts of elevated CO2 on particulate and dissolved organic matter (i.e., POM and DOM, respectively) production. Iron deficient natural plankton communities were incubated for 7-14 days under multiple CO2 levels with and without iron enrichments (hereafter +Fe and -Fe treatments, respectively). By combining with our previous experiments at two sites, we created a comprehensive dataset on responses of organic matter production to CO2 increase during macronutrient replete conditions in HNLC waters. Significant differences in net particulate organic carbon production among CO2 treatments were observed only in the -Fe treatments, whereas that in net dissolved organic carbon production were mainly observed in the +Fe treatments, suggesting that CO2 may affect different processes depending on the Fe nutritional status. However, impacts of CO2 were not consistent among experiments and were much smaller than the consistent positive effects of Fe enrichment. In contrast, no significant differences among the CO2 treatments were observed for organic carbon partitioning into POM and DOM, and carbon to nitrogen ratio of net produced POM. We conclude that CO2 does not play a primary role, but could have secondary effects on

  14. New oral anticoagulants and their implications for dental patients.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, John Edward; Stassen, Leo F A

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Over the last 40 years, warfarin has been the oral anticoagulant of choice and has been considered the mainstay of treatment. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and complex pharmacodynamics, necessitating regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, two new oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxiban (a factor Xa inhibitor)--have been approved for use in North America and Europe. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran and rivaroxiban are relatively small molecules that work as anticoagulants by targeting specific single steps of the coagulation cascade. Their advantages, relative to warfarin, include: predictable pharmacokinetics; limited food and drug interactions; rapid onset of action; and, short half-life. They require no monitoring. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. The number of patients taking dabigatran and rivaroxaban is increasing. Therefore, it is inevitable that dentists will be required to perform invasive procedures on this cohort of patients. This paper outlines the various properties of the new oral anticoagulants and the most recent guidelines regarding the management of these dental patients taking these medications.

  15. Feldspathic granulite 79215 - Limitations on T-fo2 conditions and time of metamorphism. [temperature-oxygen fugacity relationship in annealed lunar polymict beccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, J. J.; Bence, A. E.; Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1978-01-01

    Feldspathic granulite 79215, an annealed polymict breccia which has a bulk composition between anorthositic gabbro and gabbroic anorthosite, contains numerous oxide complexes in the matrix. An Ar-39-Ar-40 stepwise heating experiment gives a well-defined plateau corresponding to an age of 4.03 + or - 0.02 AE. The polmict character of this breccia and the variability of the complexes suggest that they formed as a consequence of reactions between spinel-rich clasts and matrix under the high-T low-P conditions of an ejecta blanket. The duration of annealing is estimated to have been less than 10 million yr; the absence of a KREEP component may indicate an inhomogeneous distribution of this component at the lunar surface at 4.0 AE.

  16. Perceived oral health status, oral function and related behaviour among the patients of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Isogai, E; Mizugai, H; Miura, K

    2000-01-01

    The majority of patients with Behçet's disease (BD) suffers from oral ulcers. The aim of the present study was to survey self-rated oral health status, oral function, and oral health behaviour of patients with BD in eastern Japan. Subjects were 33 BD patients and 101 healthy individuals ranging in age from 20 to 59 years. The survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. The items of oral health in the questionnaire included subjective symptoms, self-rated dental problems and oral health behaviour. We found that compared to the healthy subjects, BD patients experienced more severe physical limitations, mainly involving difficulty in pronouncing words (p < 0.01) and the pain of oral mucosa and gingival tissue caused by oral ulcers (p < 0.01). Based on the results of oral health behaviour, BD patients did not behave positively with regard to maintaining oral health including regular tooth brushing despite relatively higher risk of dental diseases that they face. The present results suggest that oral ulcers due to BD induced dental disorder such as the pain of gingiva, oral mucosa, and difficulty in the pronouncing of words. In spite of this, their oral health behaviour is not positive compared to the healthy subjects. Thus, the need to develop a more active pragramme for oral health education for patients with BD is indicated.

  17. High-yield production of aryl alcohol oxidase under limited growth conditions in small-scale systems using a mutant Aspergillus nidulans strain.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    Aryl alcohol oxidase (MtGloA) is an enzyme that belongs to the ligninolytic consortium and can play an important role in the bioenergy industry. This study investigated production of an MtGloA client enzyme by a mutant strain of Aspergillus nidulans unable to synthesize its own pyridoxine. Pyridoxine limitation can be used to control cell growth, diverting substrate to protein production. In agitated culture, enzyme production was similar when using media with 1 mg/L and without pyridoxine (26.64 ± 6.14 U/mg mycelia and 26.14 ± 8.39 U/mg mycelia using media with and without pyridoxine, respectively). However, the treatment lacking pyridoxine had to be supplemented with pyridoxine after 156 h of fermentation to sustain continued enzyme production. Use of extremely diluted pyridoxine levels allowed reduced fungal growth while maintaining steady enzyme production. Concentrations of 9 and 13.5 µg/L pyridoxine allowed MtGloA production with a growth rate of only 5% of that observed when using the standard 1 mg/L pyridoxine media.

  18. Oral health problems in elderly rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Andersson, P; Hallberg, I R; Lorefält, B; Unosson, M; Renvert, S

    2004-05-01

    A combination of poor oral hygiene and dry mouth may be hazardous to the oral health status. However, systematic assessments in order to detect oral health problems are seldom performed in the nursing care of the elderly. The aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of oral health problems measured using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide (ROAG) and to analyse associations between oral health problems and age, gender, living conditions, cohabitation, reason for admission, number of drugs, and functional and nutritional status. One registered nurse performed oral health assessments using ROAG in 161 newly admitted elderly patients in rehabilitation care. Oral health problems were found in 71% of the patients. Thirty per cent of these patients had between four and eight problems. Low saliva flow and problems related to lips were the most frequent oral health problems. Problems in oral health status were significantly associated with presence of respiratory diseases (problems with gums, lips, alterations on the tongue and mucous membranes), living in special accommodation (low saliva flow, problems with teeth/dentures and alterations on the tongue), being undernourished (alterations on the tongue and low saliva flow) and being a woman (low saliva flow). The highest Odds ratio (OR) was found in problems with gums in relation with prevalence of respiratory diseases (OR 8.9; confidence interval (CI) 2.8-27.8; P < 0.0005). This study indicates the importance of standardised oral health assessments in order to detect oral health problems which can otherwise be hidden when the patients are admitted to the hospital ward.

  19. Drug Testing in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade there have been considerable developments in the use of oral fluid (saliva) for drug testing. Oral fluid can provide a quick and non-invasive specimen for drug testing. However, its collection may be thwarted by lack of available fluid due to a range of physiological factors, including drug use itself. Food and techniques designed to stimulate production of oral fluid can also affect the concentration of drugs. Current applications are mainly focused on drugs of abuse testing in employees at workplaces where drug use has safety implications, in drivers of vehicles at the roadside and in other situations where drug impairment is suspected. Testing has included alcohol (ethanol) and a range of clinical tests eg antibodies to HIV, therapeutic drugs and steroids. Its main application has been for testing for drugs of abuse such as the amphetamines, cocaine and metabolites, opioids such as morphine, methadone and heroin, and for cannabis. Oral fluid concentrations of basic drugs such as the amphetamines, cocaine and some opioids are similar or higher than those in plasma. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major species present from cannabis use, displays similar concentrations in oral fluid compared to blood in the elimination phase. However, there is significant local absorption of the drug in the oral cavity which increases the concentrations for a period after use of drug. Depot effects occur for other drugs introduced into the body that allow local absorption, such as smoking of tobacco (nicotine), cocaine, amphetamines, or use of sub-lingual buprenorphine. Screening techniques are usually an adaptation of those used in other specimens, with an emphasis on the parent drug since this is usually the dominant species present in oral fluid. Confirmatory techniques are largely based on mass spectrometry (MS) with an emphasis on Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), due to low sample volumes and the low detection limits required. Drug testing

  20. Evaluating oral noncombustible potential-reduced exposure products for smokers

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Potential-reduced exposure products (PREPs) are marketed as a way for smokers to continue using tobacco while possibly lessening their tobacco toxicant intake. Some tobacco-based PREPs are combustible and intended to be smoked, while others are noncombustible and intended to be administered orally (e.g., Camel Snus [CS] tobacco sachets and Ariva tobacco tablets). The ability of these noncombustible PREPs to reduce smokers’ exposure to cigarette-delivered toxicants and suppress tobacco abstinence symptoms effectively is unclear. Clinical laboratory methods have been used to measure combustible PREP-associated toxicant exposure and abstinence symptom suppression and could be applied to evaluating the effects of orally administered noncombustible PREPs. Methods: In this study, 21 smokers (6 women) participated in four 5-day conditions that differed by product used: CS, Ariva, own brand cigarettes, or no tobacco. Measures included expired-air carbon monoxide (CO), the urinary metabolite of nicotine (cotinine), the urinary metabolite of the carcinogen NNK (NNAL-T), and subjective effect ratings. Results: Relative to own brand, all other conditions were associated with CO and cotinine levels that were lower and abstinence symptom ratings that were greater. Only no-tobacco use was associated with significantly lower NNAL levels. Acceptability ratings were also lower in all conditions relative to own brand. Discussion: Although these oral products reduce exposure to CO, their ineffective abstinence symptom suppression and low acceptability may limit their viability as PREPs. As with combustible PREPs, clinical laboratory study of orally administered noncombustible PREPs will be a valuable part of any comprehensive PREP evaluation strategy. PMID:20159791