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Sample records for conditioned reflexes

  1. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology.

  2. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology. PMID:11618531

  3. Pavlov on the conditioned reflex method and its limitations.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1995-01-01

    Pavlov's aim was to use the salivary conditioning method to investigate the function of the brain of higher animals in their adaptation to the external environment. The salivary reflex, according to Pavlov, was of minor biological significance but a good indicator of the subtle changes in the brain under different experimental conditions. To account for conditioned reflex phenomena, Pavlov faced two alternatives: to offer an objective (physiological) or a subjective (psychological) explanation. In 1901, after a bitter conflict with his disciple A. T. Snarskiy, Pavlov chose the first alternative. During the next decades, Pavlov provided reasons for this decision: The physiological approach (a) avoids anthropomorphizing or speculations about the dogs' subjective experiences, and (b) permits the explanation of observed phenomena which the subjective method is not capable of doing. Pavlov realized that the conditioned reflex method has a limitation; it cannot be used in the study of human subjects because their thinking interferes with experimental results.

  4. Conditioning the middle ear reflex at sensation levels below reflex threshold: air jet and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    McDaniel-Bacon, L; Fulton, R T; Laskowski, R P

    1980-01-01

    An ABAB functional analysis, conditioning and generalization, design was used in 3 experiments (2 were formal studies and 1 was empirical in nature) to investigate the conditionability of the middle ear reflex. The conditioned stimuli were subreflex threshold pure tones of various frequencies and intensities. The unconditioned stimulus (UCS) was an auricular air jet to the contralateral ear in the first experiment and cutaneous electrical stimulation to the ipsolateral, probe ear in the last 2 experiments. Reflexes were monitored by an otoadmittance meter, storage oscilloscope, and strip chart recorder. In the first experiment (air jet UCS), no subjects met the conditioning criterion within the maximum presentation of 400 paired trials, despite pilot evidence which indicated conditioning was feasible. In the second experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), 2 subjects met conditioning criterion; however, only one subject reconditioned and demonstrated partial generalization to other conditioned stimuli. In the third experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), one of 3 subjects who had previously been unconditionable with the air jet UCS met conditioning and reconditioning criterion and demonstrated partial generalization. Results indicate that the middle ear reflex can be conditioned to be elicited by subreflex threshold pure tones, however, results are limited.

  5. Associative Mechanosensory Conditioning of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giurfa, Martin; Malun, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    The present work introduces a form of associative mechanosensory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) in honeybees. In our paradigm, harnessed honeybees learn the elemental association between mechanosensory, antennal stimulation and a reward of sucrose solution delivered to the proboscis. Thereafter, bees extend their proboscis to…

  6. Persistent beneficial impact of H-reflex conditioning in spinal cord-injured rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Chen, Lu; Wang, Yu; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2014-11-15

    Operant conditioning of a spinal cord reflex can improve locomotion in rats and humans with incomplete spinal cord injury. This study examined the persistence of its beneficial effects. In rats in which a right lateral column contusion injury had produced asymmetric locomotion, up-conditioning of the right soleus H-reflex eliminated the asymmetry while down-conditioning had no effect. After the 50-day conditioning period ended, the H-reflex was monitored for 100 [±9 (SD)] (range 79-108) more days and locomotion was then reevaluated. After conditioning ended in up-conditioned rats, the H-reflex continued to increase, and locomotion continued to improve. In down-conditioned rats, the H-reflex decrease gradually disappeared after conditioning ended, and locomotion at the end of data collection remained as impaired as it had been before and immediately after down-conditioning. The persistence (and further progression) of H-reflex increase but not H-reflex decrease in these spinal cord-injured rats is consistent with the fact that up-conditioning improved their locomotion while down-conditioning did not. That is, even after up-conditioning ended, the up-conditioned H-reflex pathway remained adaptive because it improved locomotion. The persistence and further enhancement of the locomotor improvement indicates that spinal reflex conditioning protocols might supplement current therapies and enhance neurorehabilitation. They may be especially useful when significant spinal cord regeneration becomes possible and precise methods for retraining the regenerated spinal cord are needed.

  7. The second modern condition? Compressed modernity as internalized reflexive cosmopolitization.

    PubMed

    Kyung-Sup, Chang

    2010-09-01

    Compressed modernity is a civilizational condition in which economic, political, social and/or cultural changes occur in an extremely condensed manner in respect to both time and space, and in which the dynamic coexistence of mutually disparate historical and social elements leads to the construction and reconstruction of a highly complex and fluid social system. During what Beck considers the second modern stage of humanity, every society reflexively internalizes cosmopolitanized risks. Societies (or their civilizational conditions) are thereby being internalized into each other, making compressed modernity a universal feature of contemporary societies. This paper theoretically discusses compressed modernity as nationally ramified from reflexive cosmopolitization, and, then, comparatively illustrates varying instances of compressed modernity in advanced capitalist societies, un(der)developed capitalist societies, and system transition societies. In lieu of a conclusion, I point out the declining status of national societies as the dominant unit of (compressed) modernity and the interactive acceleration of compressed modernity among different levels of human life ranging from individuals to the global community.

  8. Induced specific immunological unresponsiveness & conditioned behavioral reflexes, in functional isomorphism-meditation and conditioned specific unresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Freed, S

    1989-02-01

    Detailed functional isomorphism had been observed (Freed, 1984) between induced (conditioned) immunogenicity and classical conditioned defensive reflexes, possibly as evolutionary adaptation against danger at micro and macro levels respectively. Similarly, functional isomorphism is postulated between conditioned specific tolerogenicity of the immunotolerance system and behavioral reflexes. Isomorphism requires that sensory signals elaborated with intrinsic (unconditioned) behavioral tolerogens as carriers do not subsequently combine classically with unconditioned aversive stimuli and evoke conditioned defensive responses. Unconditioned behavioral tolerogenic carriers were identified with behavioral (physiological) activities of Oriental meditation. Confirmation of conditioned behavioral tolerogenicity appeared in the unresponsiveness of Yogi mediators to sensory stimuli as reflected in unchanged alpha rhythms of their encephalograms. Conditioned behavioral specific unresponsiveness maintains the "quiet" of meditation and mediates the experience of Zen mediators, namely, sharpened, clearer perceptions and unresponsiveness to aversive components of current conditioned signals ordinarily reactivating residues of affect. Conditioned behavioral specific unresponsiveness has survival value.

  9. Interaction of dominant focus and conditional reflex as a functional unit of behavior organization.

    PubMed

    Simonov, P V

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of two fundamental phenomena--the dominant focus and the conditional reflex--discovered and introduced by A. A. Ukhtomsky and I. P. Pavlov lay at the basis of behavior. According to E. A. Asratyan, the backward conditioned connection is a specialized dominant focus in the functional structure of the consolidated conditional reflex. It makes the behavior goal-directed and active. The dominant focus and conditioned reflex play the same role in the adaptive behavior of the individual as does variability and selection in the process of evolutional adaptation. That is why it is impossible to agree with Popper and Eccles that hypothesis theory has to replace Pavlov's theory of the conditional reflex. Imprinting and psychonervous activity by images (I. S. Beritashvili) are two special exemplars of conditional reflexes after one coincidence. The so-called "elementary reasoning activity of animals" (according to L. V. Krushinsky) is a kind of the instinctive inherited behavior.

  10. [Influence of transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation on development of conditioned reflex in rats].

    PubMed

    Samoilov, V O; Shadrin, E B; Filippova, E B; Katsnelson, Ya; Backhoff, H; Eventov, M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of transcranial electromagnetic stimulation on the development of an active avoidance reflex with painful reinforcement in laboratory rats is investigated. It is shown, that an exposure of the rats' brain to electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter range ((λ = 5,6 and 7,1 mm), modulated as a series of low-frequency pulses, leads to a suppression of the development of the conditioned avoidance reflex occurred in 50% of cases. In other 25% of cases irradiation leads to inhibition of reflex development. Transcranial electromagnetic stimulation after intraperitoneal injection of the blocking agent of serotonergic receptors (kitryl) has no influence on reflex development. Electromagnetic brain stimulation does not influence reflex retention in the case when it has been acquired. Based on the data obtained it is assumed that transcranial electromagnetic stimulation promotes the development of serotonin, exerting an inhibiting effect on the formation of temporal bindings of the studied conditioned reflex.

  11. Measuring various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring the stimulus condition.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Koichi

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a new technique that measured various sizes of the soleus H-reflex, while monitoring the stimulus condition. Eight healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. In the new technique, an above-motor-threshold conditioning stimulus was given to the tibial nerve 10-12 ms after a below-motor-threshold test stimulus. The conditioning stimulus evoked a direct M-wave, which was followed by a test-stimulus-evoked H-reflex. This reflex was followed by a conditioning stimulus-evoked H-reflex. The amount of the voluntary-contraction-induced facilitation of the H-reflex was similar for both the new technique and conventional technique, in which an above-motor-threshold test stimulus was given without a conditioning stimulus. Using the new technique, we found that the amount of facilitation increased linearly with the size of the test H-reflex. This technique allows us to evoke various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring a stimulus condition, and is useful for measuring H-reflexes during voluntary movement.

  12. [Characteristics of the interaction of image and conditioned reflex memory during the ontogeny of chimpanzees].

    PubMed

    Firsov, L A; Bogacheva, I N; Kuz'min, S K

    1984-01-01

    Interaction of a stable conditioned reflex and trace visual image of a natural alimentary stimulus was studied in two groups of chimpanzee youngs. A. higher stability of visual imaginative memory was observed in animals of the elder group.

  13. [General functional state (tonus) of the brain and conditioned reflexes as the mechanisms of it's regulation].

    PubMed

    Khananashvili, M M

    2008-01-01

    The article is dedicated to P.S. Kupalov, due to his 120 Anniversary. P.S. Kupalov was the disciple of I.P. Pavlov and his nearest collaborator. Right after I.P. Pavlov, he was at the head of the Institute of Experimental Medicine in St-Petersburg, where he developed a number of new ideas, concerning conditioned reflexes. Thus, he discovered shortened conditioned reflexes--central mechanisms of regulation of general functional state of the brain, and he created, on the base of the studies of unlimited motor activity in animals using his own method of situational conditioned reflexes, the conception of situational conditioned reflexes. P.S. Kupalov found out a number of new explanations for development of experimental neuroses and determined their mechanisms, as well. He was the one among the first disciples of I.P. Pavlov, who indicated at the complex structural-functional organization of conditioned reflexes, and he played the great part for the creation of modern theory about the nature of behavior, based on conditioned reflexes. The most important theses of P.S. Kupalov's conception, which is of great cognitive significance at the moment, as well as some results of the studies by his disciples and followers, developing the ideas of P.S. Kupalov, are presented in the article. PMID:19178077

  14. Restoring walking after spinal cord injury: operant conditioning of spinal reflexes can help.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiko K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    People with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently suffer motor disabilities due to spasticity and poor muscle control, even after conventional therapy. Abnormal spinal reflex activity often contributes to these problems. Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes, which can target plasticity to specific reflex pathways, can enhance recovery. In rats in which a right lateral column lesion had weakened right stance and produced an asymmetrical gait, up-conditioning of the right soleus H-reflex, which increased muscle spindle afferent excitation of soleus, strengthened right stance and eliminated the asymmetry. In people with hyperreflexia due to incomplete SCI, down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex improved walking speed and symmetry. Furthermore, modulation of electromyographic activity during walking improved bilaterally, indicating that a protocol that targets plasticity to a specific pathway can trigger widespread plasticity that improves recovery far beyond that attributable to the change in the targeted pathway. These improvements were apparent to people in their daily lives. They reported walking faster and farther, and noted less spasticity and better balance. Operant conditioning protocols could be developed to modify other spinal reflexes or corticospinal connections; and could be combined with other therapies to enhance recovery in people with SCI or other neuromuscular disorders.

  15. Operant conditioning to increase ankle control or decrease reflex excitability improves reflex modulation and walking function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Manella, Kathleen J; Roach, Kathryn E; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2013-06-01

    Ankle clonus is common after spinal cord injury (SCI) and is attributed to loss of supraspinally mediated inhibition of soleus stretch reflexes and maladaptive reorganization of spinal reflex pathways. The maladaptive reorganization underlying ankle clonus is associated with other abnormalities, such as coactivation and reciprocal facilitation of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL), which contribute to impaired walking ability in individuals with motor-incomplete SCI. Operant conditioning can increase muscle activation and decrease stretch reflexes in individuals with SCI. We compared two operant conditioning-based interventions in individuals with ankle clonus and impaired walking ability due to SCI. Training included either voluntary TA activation (TA↑) to enhance supraspinal drive or SOL H-reflex suppression (SOL↓) to modulate reflex pathways at the spinal cord level. We measured clonus duration, plantar flexor reflex threshold angle, timed toe tapping, dorsiflexion (DF) active range of motion, lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), walking foot clearance, speed and distance, SOL H-reflex amplitude modulation as an index of reciprocal inhibition, presynaptic inhibition, low-frequency depression, and SOL-to-TA clonus coactivation ratio. TA↑ decreased plantar flexor reflex threshold angle (-4.33°) and DF active range-of-motion angle (-4.32°) and increased LEMS of DF (+0.8 points), total LEMS of the training leg (+2.2 points), and nontraining leg (+0.8 points), and increased walking foot clearance (+ 4.8 mm) and distance (+12.09 m). SOL↓ decreased SOL-to-TA coactivation ratio (-0.21), increased nontraining leg LEMS (+1.8 points), walking speed (+0.02 m/s), and distance (+6.25 m). In sum, we found increased voluntary control associated with TA↑ outcomes and decreased reflex excitability associated with SOL↓ outcomes.

  16. Plasticity in the Central Nervous System: Operant Conditioning of the Spinal Stretch Reflex.

    PubMed

    Segal, R L

    1997-01-01

    Studies in monkey models have demonstrated that spinal stretch reflexes (SSRs) can be conditioned to be smaller or larger. Results of H-reflex conditioning studies further support the concept that operant conditioning alters the anatomical and biophysical properties of targeted alpha motoneurons. Results from able-bodied human subjects are strikingly similar to results from monkey models. Conditioning paradigms appear successful in downtraining the SSR of spinal-cord-injured patients who present with some residual control of a hyperactive biceps brachii. The conditioning may also affect movement control of spinal-cord-injured patients. Initial attempts at conditioning hyperactive SSRs of stroke patients have been equivocal. The site of lesion probably influences whether a stroke patient can successfully condition the SSR. PMID:27620376

  17. Ultrasonographic examination of the oesophageal groove reflex in young calves under various feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    The oesophageal groove reflex was examined in 6 milk-fed Holstein Friesian calves once weekly during the first 17 weeks of life. Additionally, the effect of different feeding methods (bucket, different nipple positions and openings), different milk temperatures (20, 30, 39, 45°C) and milk replacer concentrations (100, 125, 150 grams/litre of water) on oesophageal groove closure was investigated. The reticulum and abomasum were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0-MHz convex transducer before, during and after feeding, and the oesophageal groove reflex was considered to be functional when milk was seen entering the abomasum during feeding. The reflex was consistently induced throughout the study period in all calves at all examinations and under all experimental conditions. However, it should not be assumed that feeding technique can be neglected in unweaned calves because suboptimal feeding management has been linked to various digestive disorders. PMID:26753366

  18. Ultrasonographic examination of the oesophageal groove reflex in young calves under various feeding conditions.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    The oesophageal groove reflex was examined in 6 milk-fed Holstein Friesian calves once weekly during the first 17 weeks of life. Additionally, the effect of different feeding methods (bucket, different nipple positions and openings), different milk temperatures (20, 30, 39, 45°C) and milk replacer concentrations (100, 125, 150 grams/litre of water) on oesophageal groove closure was investigated. The reticulum and abomasum were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0-MHz convex transducer before, during and after feeding, and the oesophageal groove reflex was considered to be functional when milk was seen entering the abomasum during feeding. The reflex was consistently induced throughout the study period in all calves at all examinations and under all experimental conditions. However, it should not be assumed that feeding technique can be neglected in unweaned calves because suboptimal feeding management has been linked to various digestive disorders.

  19. The simplest motor skill: mechanisms and applications of reflex operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiko K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2014-04-01

    Operant conditioning protocols can change spinal reflexes gradually, which are the simplest behaviors. This article summarizes the evidence supporting two propositions: that these protocols provide excellent models for defining the substrates of learning and that they can induce and guide plasticity to help restore skills, such as locomotion, that have been impaired by spinal cord injury or other disorders.

  20. Effects of Extinction on Classical Conditioning and Conditioning-Specific Reflex Modification of Rabbit Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Burhans, Lauren B.; Smith-Bell, Carrie; Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of fear extinction has become increasingly important for treating a number of disorders, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder. Conditioning of rabbit heart rate (HR) is an established model for studying fear, yet little is known about procedures for extinguishing it other than repeated presentations of cue(s) associated with the fear-inducing event. The following study examined the effects of conditioned stimulus (CS) alone, unconditioned stimulus (US) alone, unpaired CS/US presentations, continued CS-US pairings, or no further stimulation on rabbit HR following HR conditioning. We have previously shown the rabbit HR response to the US can change as a function of learning when measured in the absence of the CS, a phenomenon referred to as conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM). More specifically, the HR exhibits a deceleration in response to the US reminiscent of the conditioned bradycardia that develops to the CS. Consequently, the following study also examined the effects of extinction treatments on HR CRM. For HR conditioned responses (CRs), CS-alone and unpaired CS/US presentations were the most successful extinction treatments. For HR CRM, all conditions led to a reduction in CRM except for a subset of rabbits that maintained high levels following unpaired extinction, indicating a dissociation between extinction of HR CRs and CRM. The findings highlight the parameters of HR extinction, the transient nature of HR CRM, vagal involvement in both acquisition and extinction of HR CRM, and suggest that HR CRM cannot be fully explained as a CR that has generalized from the CS to the US. PMID:19747508

  1. Operant conditioning of the soleus H-reflex does not induce long-term changes in the gastrocnemius H-reflexes and does not disturb normal locomotion in humans.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Thompson, Aiko K

    2014-09-15

    In normal animals, operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or the H-reflex has lesser effects on synergist muscle reflexes. In rats and people with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), soleus H-reflex operant conditioning can improve locomotion. We studied in normal humans the impact of soleus H-reflex down-conditioning on medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) H-reflexes and on locomotion. Subjects completed 6 baseline and 30 conditioning sessions. During conditioning trials, the subject was encouraged to decrease soleus H-reflex size with the aid of visual feedback. Every sixth session, MG and LG H-reflexes were measured. Locomotion was assessed before and after conditioning. In successfully conditioned subjects, the soleus H-reflex decreased 27.2%. This was the sum of within-session (task dependent) adaptation (13.2%) and across-session (long term) change (14%). The MG H-reflex decreased 14.5%, due mainly to task-dependent adaptation (13.4%). The LG H-reflex showed no task-dependent adaptation or long-term change. No consistent changes were detected across subjects in locomotor H-reflexes, EMG activity, joint angles, or step symmetry. Thus, in normal humans, soleus H-reflex down-conditioning does not induce long-term changes in MG/LG H-reflexes and does not change locomotion. In these subjects, task-dependent adaptation of the soleus H-reflex is greater than it is in people with SCI, whereas long-term change is less. This difference from results in people with SCI is consistent with the fact that long-term change is beneficial in people with SCI, since it improves locomotion. In contrast, in normal subjects, long-term change is not beneficial and may necessitate compensatory plasticity to preserve satisfactory locomotion.

  2. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck reflex; Galant reflex; Truncal incurvation; Rooting reflex; Parachute reflex; Grasp reflex ... was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly older infants ...

  3. Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes: from basic science to clinical therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiko K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    New appreciation of the adaptive capabilities of the nervous system, recent recognition that most spinal cord injuries are incomplete, and progress in enabling regeneration are generating growing interest in novel rehabilitation therapies. Here we review the 35-year evolution of one promising new approach, operant conditioning of spinal reflexes. This work began in the late 1970's as basic science; its purpose was to develop and exploit a uniquely accessible model for studying the acquisition and maintenance of a simple behavior in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The model was developed first in monkeys and then in rats, mice, and humans. Studies with it showed that the ostensibly simple behavior (i.e., a larger or smaller reflex) rests on a complex hierarchy of brain and spinal cord plasticity; and current investigations are delineating this plasticity and its interactions with the plasticity that supports other behaviors. In the last decade, the possible therapeutic uses of reflex conditioning have come under study, first in rats and then in humans. The initial results are very exciting, and they are spurring further studies. At the same time, the original basic science purpose and the new clinical purpose are enabling and illuminating each other in unexpected ways. The long course and current state of this work illustrate the practical importance of basic research and the valuable synergy that can develop between basic science questions and clinical needs. PMID:24672441

  4. The Cerebellum in Maintenance of a Motor Skill: A Hierarchy of Brain and Spinal Cord Plasticity Underlies H-Reflex Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Chen, Xiang Yang

    2006-01-01

    Operant conditioning of the H-reflex, the electrical analog of the spinal stretch reflex, is a simple model of skill acquisition and involves plasticity in the spinal cord. Previous work showed that the cerebellum is essential for down-conditioning the H-reflex. This study asks whether the cerebellum is also essential for maintaining…

  5. Classical conditioning of the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex exhibits response specificity.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R D; Lalevic, N; Clark, G A; Kandel, E R

    1989-10-01

    The gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia undergoes classical conditioning of its amplitude and duration when siphon stimulation (the conditioned stimulus, CS) is paired with tail or mantle shock (the unconditioned stimulus, US). This conditioning of a preexisting response exhibits both temporal and stimulus specificities, which can be accounted for by activity-dependent enhancement of presynaptic facilitation of the siphon sensory neurons. To test whether conditioning of the reflex also exhibits response specificity (development of a new type of response to the CS that often resembles the response to the US), we measured the direction of siphon withdrawal in response to siphon stimulation (the CS) with tail or mantle shock as the US. The unlearned response to siphon stimulation is straight contraction, the response to tail shock is backward bending, and the response to mantle shock is forward bending. In the first experiment, we trained different animals with the tail or mantle US paired or unpaired with the CS; in a second experiment, we trained each animal with two CSs, one of which was paired with the US; in a third experiment, we varied US intensity; and in a fourth experiment, we trained each animal with two USs, one of which was paired with the CS. There was a significant, pairing-specific tendency for the direction of the response to the CS to resemble the response to the US after training in each experiment, demonstrating response specificity in conditioning of the withdrawal reflex. This feature of conditioning could in principle be accounted for by an elaboration of activity-dependent facilitation.

  6. Light conditions affect the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Yamany, Nabil A.

    2008-12-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, effects of asymmetrical light conditions on the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were tested for the developmental period between stage 47 and 49. For comparison, the rVOR was tested in dim- and high-symmetrical light environments. Test parameters were the rVOR gain and rVOR amplitude. Under all light conditions, the rVOR increased from tadpole stage 47 to 49. For all stages, the asymmetrical light field induced the strongest response, the dim light field the weakest one. The response for the left and right eye was identical, even if the tadpoles were tested under asymmetrical light conditions. The experiments can be considered as hints (1) for an age-dependent light sensitivity of vestibular neurons, and (2) for the existence of control systems for coordinated eye movements that has its origin in the proprioceptors of the extraocular eye muscles.

  7. Acquisition of conditioned facial reflexes in the cat: cortical control of different facial movements.

    PubMed

    Woody, C D

    1982-04-01

    The motor cortex plays a role in determining which of three different facial movements is acquired in Pavlovian conditioning experiments. Three separate facial reflexes can be distinguished by recording electromyographic activity from the orbicularis oculi (eye blink) and levator orii (nose twitch) muscles. One in a pure eye blink; a second is a nose twitch; the third is a compound eye blink and nose twitch. Which of these movements is elicited by a click (conditioned stimulus) following associative conditioning is reflected by the pattern of unit activity elicited by the click at the motor cortex. Activity is enhanced, after conditioning, in those units that project polysynaptically to the specific muscles performing the learned movement. This enhancement of activity is, in turn, relatable to an enhanced electrical excitability of the involved neurons. Analogous changes in the excitability of neurons of the motor cortex to applied currents can be produced by local application of cholinergic agents. Iontophoresis of acetylcholine, aceclidine (a cholinomimetic drug), or intracellularly applied cyclic GMP produces changes in single neuron membrane resistance that increase neuronal excitability. The units of the motor cortex that respond preferentially to these agents and to the click conditioned stimuli with short latencies have been identified as pyramidal cells of layer V. The axons of these neurons form the pyramidal tract, a pathway characterized as serving voluntary movement. It appears that this system supports rapid transmission and processing of auditory-motor information used to perform learned movements adaptively, selectively, and discriminatively.

  8. Amplification of interlimb reflexes evoked by stimulating the hand simultaneously with conditioning from the foot during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread interlimb reflexes evoked in leg muscles by cutaneous stimulation of the hand are phase-modulated and behaviorally relevant to produce functional changes in ankle trajectory during walking. These reflexes are complementary to the segmental responses evoked by stimulation at the ankle. Despite differences in the expression of reflex amplitude based upon site of nerve stimulation, there are some common features as well, suggesting the possibility of shared interneuronal pathways. Currently little is known about integration or shared reflex systems from interlimb cutaneous networks during human locomotion. Here we investigated convergent reflex effects following cutaneous stimulation of the hand and foot during arm and leg cycling (AL) by using spatial facilitation. Participants performed AL cycling and static activation of the target muscle knee extensor vastus lateralis (VL) in 3 different randomly ordered nerve stimulation conditions: 1) superficial radial nerve (SR; input from hand); 2) superficial peroneal nerve (SP; input from foot); and, 3) combined stimulation (SR + SP). Stimuli were applied around the onset of rhythmic EMG bursts in VL corresponding to the onset of the power or leg extension phase. Results During AL cycling, small inhibitory (~80 ms) and large facilitatory reflexes (~100 ~ 150 ms) were seen in VL. The amplitudes of the facilitatory responses with SR + SP stimulation were significantly larger than those for SP or SR stimulation alone. The facilitation was also significantly larger than the simple mathematical summation of amplitudes from SP and SR trials. This indicates extra facilitation beyond what would be accounted for by serial neuronal processing and was not observed during static activation. Conclusions We conclude that AL cycling activates shared interneurons in convergent reflex pathways from cutaneous inputs innervating the hand and leg. This enhanced activity has functional implications for corrective

  9. Repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to sensitisation in subsequent avoidance behaviour and induces fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autonomous reflexes enable animals to respond quickly to potential threats, prevent injury and mediate fight or flight responses. Intense acoustic stimuli with sudden onsets elicit a startle reflex while stimuli of similar intensity but with longer rise times only cause a cardiac defence response. In laboratory settings, habituation appears to affect all of these reflexes so that the response amplitude generally decreases with repeated exposure to the stimulus. The startle reflex has become a model system for the study of the neural basis of simple learning processes and emotional processing and is often used as a diagnostic tool in medical applications. However, previous studies did not allow animals to avoid the stimulus and the evolutionary function and long-term behavioural consequences of repeated startling remain speculative. In this study we investigate the follow-up behaviour associated with the startle reflex in wild-captured animals using an experimental setup that allows individuals to exhibit avoidance behaviour. Results We present evidence that repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to rapid and pronounced sensitisation of sustained spatial avoidance behaviour in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Animals developed rapid flight responses, left the exposure pool and showed clear signs of fear conditioning. Once sensitised, seals even avoided a known food source that was close to the sound source. In contrast, animals exposed to non-startling (long rise time) stimuli of the same maximum sound pressure habituated and flight responses waned or were absent from the beginning. The startle threshold of grey seals expressed in units of sensation levels was comparable to thresholds reported for other mammals (93 dB). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the acoustic startle reflex plays a crucial role in mediating flight responses and strongly influences the motivational state of an animal beyond a short-term muscular response by

  10. [Principle of least action, physiology of vision, and conditioned reflexes theory].

    PubMed

    Shelepin, Iu E; Krasil'nikov, N N

    2003-06-01

    The variation principles such as principle of least action by Maupertuis (1740) and Fermat principle (1660) are fundamental for physics. They permit to establish a property by which the actual state is differing from all possible states of the system. The variation approach permits to establish equation of motion and equilibrium of a material system on the basis of one common rule which reduces to the search of the function extremes, describes this property of the system. So for the optical systems, crucial is the time and not the length of the way. According to Fermat principles, the light "choosen" from all possible ways connects two dots in the way which needs the least time. Generality of the variation principles guarantees success of their use in brain function investigations. Between different attempts to apply the variation principles to psychology and linguistics, the Zipf principle of least effort must be distinguished. Zipf (1949) demonstrated that languages and some artificial codes satisfied the least principle. For the brain physiology, classical conditioned reflex theory is the ideal area of variation principles application. According to this approach, conditioning leads to finding the extreme during fixation of the temporal link. In vision, physiological investigations are difficult because the signal has many dimensions. For example, during perception of spatial properties of surrounding world, in vision is realized minimization (reduction) of spatial-frequency spectrum of the scene. The receptive fields provide optimal accumulation of the signal. In ontogenesis, signal--noise ratio becomes optimal as receptive fields minimized the internal noise spectrum. According to the theory of match filtration, in the visual system recognition is carryied out by minimal differences between the image description in the visual system and storage in the human memory template of that image. The variation principles help to discover the physical property of

  11. [Principle of least action, physiology of vision, and conditioned reflexes theory].

    PubMed

    Shelepin, Iu E; Krasil'nikov, N N

    2003-06-01

    The variation principles such as principle of least action by Maupertuis (1740) and Fermat principle (1660) are fundamental for physics. They permit to establish a property by which the actual state is differing from all possible states of the system. The variation approach permits to establish equation of motion and equilibrium of a material system on the basis of one common rule which reduces to the search of the function extremes, describes this property of the system. So for the optical systems, crucial is the time and not the length of the way. According to Fermat principles, the light "choosen" from all possible ways connects two dots in the way which needs the least time. Generality of the variation principles guarantees success of their use in brain function investigations. Between different attempts to apply the variation principles to psychology and linguistics, the Zipf principle of least effort must be distinguished. Zipf (1949) demonstrated that languages and some artificial codes satisfied the least principle. For the brain physiology, classical conditioned reflex theory is the ideal area of variation principles application. According to this approach, conditioning leads to finding the extreme during fixation of the temporal link. In vision, physiological investigations are difficult because the signal has many dimensions. For example, during perception of spatial properties of surrounding world, in vision is realized minimization (reduction) of spatial-frequency spectrum of the scene. The receptive fields provide optimal accumulation of the signal. In ontogenesis, signal--noise ratio becomes optimal as receptive fields minimized the internal noise spectrum. According to the theory of match filtration, in the visual system recognition is carryied out by minimal differences between the image description in the visual system and storage in the human memory template of that image. The variation principles help to discover the physical property of

  12. Aversive Learning in Honeybees Revealed by the Olfactory Conditioning of the Sting Extension Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Vergoz, Vanina; Roussel, Edith; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Giurfa, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Invertebrates have contributed greatly to our understanding of associative learning because they allow learning protocols to be combined with experimental access to the nervous system. The honeybee Apis mellifera constitutes a standard model for the study of appetitive learning and memory since it was shown, almost a century ago, that bees learn to associate different sensory cues with a reward of sugar solution. However, up to now, no study has explored aversive learning in bees in such a way that simultaneous access to its neural bases is granted. Using odorants paired with electric shocks, we conditioned the sting extension reflex, which is exhibited by harnessed bees when subjected to a noxious stimulation. We show that this response can be conditioned so that bees learn to extend their sting in response to the odorant previously punished. Bees also learn to extend the proboscis to one odorant paired with sugar solution and the sting to a different odorant paired with electric shock, thus showing that they can master both appetitive and aversive associations simultaneously. Responding to the appropriate odorant with the appropriate response is possible because two different biogenic amines, octopamine and dopamine subserve appetitive and aversive reinforcement, respectively. While octopamine has been previously shown to substitute for appetitive reinforcement, we demonstrate that blocking of dopaminergic, but not octopaminergic, receptors suppresses aversive learning. Therefore, aversive learning in honeybees can now be accessed both at the behavioral and neural levels, thus opening new research avenues for understanding basic mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:17372627

  13. The discovery of the principles of reinforcement, extinction, generalization, and differentiation of conditional reflexes in Pavlov's laboratories.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of reinforcement, extinction, generalization, and differentiation with the conditional reflex method in Pavlov's laboratories is described. Modern American introductory texts show that contemporary understanding of the experimental work on conditioning in Pavlov's laboratories is derived from a 1927 English translation of Pavlov's lectures on the conditional reflexes. The lectures present the discoveries topically, not chronologically. In contrast, this article presents a chronological account of the contributions of S.G. Vul'fson, I.F. Tolochinov, and B.P. Babkin, which led to the conceptualization of reinforcement and extinction, and the work of V.N. Boldyrev and N.A. Kashereninova, which led to the formulation of the concepts of generalization and differentiation. This historical approach avoids giving the impression that the development of the Pavlovian paradigm was a highly systematic pursuit.

  14. The Grasp Reflex and Moro Reflex in Infants: Hierarchy of Primitive Reflex Responses

    PubMed Central

    Futagi, Yasuyuki; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The plantar grasp reflex is of great clinical significance, especially in terms of the detection of spasticity. The palmar grasp reflex also has diagnostic significance. This grasp reflex of the hands and feet is mediated by a spinal reflex mechanism, which appears to be under the regulatory control of nonprimary motor areas through the spinal interneurons. This reflex in human infants can be regarded as a rudiment of phylogenetic function. The absence of the Moro reflex during the neonatal period and early infancy is highly diagnostic, indicating a variety of compromised conditions. The center of the reflex is probably in the lower region of the pons to the medulla. The phylogenetic meaning of the reflex remains unclear. However, the hierarchical interrelation among these primitive reflexes seems to be essential for the arboreal life of monkey newborns, and the possible role of the Moro reflex in these newborns was discussed in relation to the interrelationship. PMID:22778756

  15. The effect of operant-conditioning balance training on the down-regulation of spinal H-reflexes in a spastic patient.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Najmeh; Koceja, David M; Riley, Zachary A

    2011-10-24

    Spasticity in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients has primarily been treated pharmacologically. However, there is increasing evidence that physical rehabilitation can help manage hyper-excitability of reflexes (hyperreflexia), which is a primary contributor to spasticity. In the present study, one chronic hemiparetic stroke patient operantly conditioned the soleus H-reflex while training on a balance board for two weeks. The results showed a minimal decrease in the Hmax-Mmax ratio for both the affected and unaffected limb, indicating that the H-reflex was not significantly altered with training. Alternatively, paired-reflex depression (PRD), a measure of history-dependent changes in reflex excitability, could be conditioned. This was evident by the rightward shift and decreased slope of reflex excitability in the affected limb. The non-affected limb decreased as well, although the non-affected limb was very sensitive to PRD initially, whereas the affected limb was not. Based on these results, it was concluded that PRD is a better index of hyperreflexia, and this measurement could be more informative of synapse function than simple H-reflexes. This study presents a novel and non-pharmacological means of managing spasticity that warrants further investigation with the potential of being translated to the clinic.

  16. Inactivation of the central nucleus of the amygdala blocks classical conditioning but not conditioning-specific reflex modification of rabbit heart rate.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Lauren B; Schreurs, Bernard G

    2013-02-01

    Heart rate (HR) conditioning in rabbits is a widely used model of classical conditioning of autonomic responding that is noted for being similar to the development of conditioned heart rate slowing (bradycardia) in humans. We have shown previously that in addition to HR changes to a tone conditioned stimulus (CS), the HR reflex itself can undergo associative change called conditioning-specific reflex modification (CRM) that manifests when tested in the absence of the CS. Because CRM resembles the conditioned bradycardic response to the CS, we sought to determine if HR conditioning and CRM share a common neural substrate. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a critical part of the pathway through which conditioned bradycardia is established. To test whether the CeA is also involved in the acquisition and/or expression of CRM, we inactivated the CeA with muscimol during HR conditioning or CRM testing. CeA inactivation blocked HR conditioning without completely preventing CRM acquisition or expression. These results suggest that the CeA may therefore only play a modulatory role in CRM. Theories on the biological significance of conditioned bradycardia suggest that it may represent a state of hypervigilance that facilitates the detection of new and changing contingencies in the environment. We relate these ideas to our results and discuss how they may be relevant to the hypersensitivity observed in fear conditioning disorders like post-traumatic stress.

  17. Caring Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the seven articles in this special issue through the lens of the concept of "caring reflexivity". In joining "caring" and "reflexivity", we deepen the conversation about what constitutes reflexivity, encouraging an explicit focus on the relational. Revisiting the first article, we argue that…

  18. [Forming of the visual cognitive structures in the monkey conditioned-reflex behaviour: the dependence on the sensory information].

    PubMed

    Dudkin, K N; Chueva, I V

    2008-01-01

    In monkeys, changes in size and shape of figures led to a significant decrease of correct solutions in training and a considerable increase of refusals from solution of tasks as well as the time of their motor response. The invariance of differentiation in this case was achieved after additional training. The data obtained show that, based on the stimulus sensory processing in conditioned-reflex training, in the long-term memory some differentiating signs are formed: the cognitive structures (the functional neurophysiological mechanisms) maintaining the classification of visual images. With these structures, temporary conditioned connection will be established. Their formation will be determined by the type of sensory information and provided for by existence in the long-term memory of separate subsystems for spatial as well as non-spatial information.

  19. Fear conditioning of SCR but not the startle reflex requires conscious discrimination of threat and safety.

    PubMed

    Sevenster, Dieuwke; Beckers, Tom; Kindt, Merel

    2014-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence as to whether awareness is required for conditioning of the skin conductance response (SCR). Recently, Schultz and Helmstetter (2010) reported SCR conditioning in contingency unaware participants by using difficult to discriminate stimuli. These findings are in stark contrast with other observations in human fear conditioning research, showing that SCR predominantly reflects contingency learning. Therefore, we repeated the study by Schultz and Helmstetter and additionally measured conditioning of the startle response, which seems to be less sensitive to declarative knowledge than SCR. While we solely observed SCR conditioning in participants who reported awareness of the contingencies (n = 16) and not in the unaware participants (n = 18), we observed startle conditioning irrespective of awareness. We conclude that SCR but not startle conditioning depends on conscious discriminative fear learning.

  20. Honey bees (Apis mellifera) as explosives detectors: exploring proboscis extension reflex conditioned response to trinitrotolulene (TNT)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-mccabe, Kirsten J; Wingo, Robert M; Haarmann, Timothy K

    2008-01-01

    We examined honey bee's associative learning response to conditioning with trinitrotolulene (TNT) vapor concentrations generated at three temperatures and their ability to be reconditioned after a 24 h period. We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension (PER) in honey bees using TNT vapors as the conditioned stimulus and sucrose as the unconditioned stimulus. We conducted fifteen experimental trials with an explosives vapor generator set at 43 C, 25 C and 5 C, producing three concentrations of explosives (1070 ppt, 57 ppt, and 11 ppt). Our objective was to test the honey bee's ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT vapors at all three concentrations by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees successfully exhibiting a conditioned response within each temperature group. Furthermore, we conducted eight experimental trials to test the honey bee's ability to retain their ability to exhibit a conditioned response to TNT after 24h period by comparing the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response TNT on the first day compared to the percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT on the second day. Results indicate that there was no significant difference between the mean percentage of honey bees with a conditioned response to TNT vapors between three temperature groups. There was a significant difference between the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response on the first day of training compared to the percentage of honey bees exhibiting conditioned response 24 h after training. Our experimental results indicate that honey bees can be trained to exhibit a conditioned response to a range of TNT concentrations via PER However, it appears that the honey bee's ability to retain the conditioned response to TNT vapors after 24h significantly decreases.

  1. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  2. [Analysis of the informational and activating components of reinforcement in a conditioned reflex experiment].

    PubMed

    Menitskiĭ, D N

    1983-01-01

    The reinforcement in adaptive behaviour performs at least two functions: satisfaction of specific need (activational component) and estimation of signal significance of the conditioned stimulus while comparing the nervous model of the stimulus with current afferentation (informational component). In usual conditioning experiments with permanent reinforcement these components concide and therefore do not differ. However, they may be separated in the case of probabilistic reinforcement by changing stimuli contingency and shifting motivational level. With this aim the diagrams of probabilistic stimuli and reactions space, semantic and pragmatic matrices are worked out, allowing to estimate correlations of these parameters of conditioning experiments. Comparative psychophysiological investigations showed the possibility of determination of species peculiarities in behavioural choice strategies among various animals under above mentioned conditions.

  3. [Conditioned reflex behavior of dogs during stereotypical reinforcement in a choice situation].

    PubMed

    Poltyreva, T E; Petrov, E S

    1981-01-01

    A study of dogs' behavior in conditions of choice with stereotype reinforcement showed that in experiments without punishment for errors, the conditioned activity did not reach its optimal level, while in experiments with punishment most of the dogs formed an optimal behavior. Formation of stereotype choice of reinforcement place proceeded in two stages. At the first stage the strategy of repeating the previous reaction prevailed after the erroneous one. At the second stage, alternation reactions prevailed after erroneous choices.

  4. [A comparison of the effects of single and chronic microinjections of GABA and picrotoxin into the caudate nucleus on the conditioned reflexes of dogs].

    PubMed

    Iakimovskiĭ, A F

    1990-01-01

    The effects on Pavlovian alimentary conditioned reflexes realization of two methods of intrastriatal microinjections--acute (separate) and long-term (chronic) one--are compared in experiments on dogs. Bilateral acute administration and the first week of chronic injection of 45 mcg of GABA into the caudate nuclei produced in dogs a manifest improvement of parameters of the conditioned differentiation inhibition, but only in the next period of chronic treatment an improvement of the positive Pavlovian alimentary conditioned reflex was obtained. The both ways of picrotoxin treatment impaired conditioned behaviour, and this effect was observed after the end of injection. No withdrawal effects were recorded. The data obtained give ground for discussion of the role of striatal GABAergic system in the positive modulation of adaptive alimentary behaviour. The application of novel psychopharmacological method in experimental and clinical fields of investigation is discussed.

  5. [Neurons of the rabbit midbrain reticular formation during a defensive conditioned reflex].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, D G

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of unit activity of the midbrain reticular formation was carried out on alert rabbits during defensive conditioning. Most of the examined neurones exhibited phasic responses corresponding in time to the components of the evoked potential (EP) recorded in the cortical visual area in response to the "indifferent" stimulus, and to the conditioned stimulus and electric cutaneous reinforcement. The data obtained are considered from the standpoint of the Anokhin functional systems theory. A conclusion has been made regarding the participation of reticular units in providing all the basic mechanisms of the functional system of the behavioral act. Discharges of one and the same neurone may correspond to different components of the EPs to conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. In different behavioral acts a neurone may apparently participate in different systemic mechanisms.

  6. Formation of cognitive structures in conditioned-reflex behavior in monkeys: Relationship with type of visual information.

    PubMed

    Dudkin, K N; Chueva, I V

    2009-02-01

    The characteristics of learning processes and long-term memory (LTM) were studied in rhesus macaques discriminating visual stimuli (geometrical figures of different shapes, sizes, and orientations, and with different spatial relationships between image components). Trained monkeys were tested for the ability to perform invariant recognition after stimulus transformation, i.e., changes in size, shape, number of objects, and spatial relationships. Analysis of behavioral characteristics (correct solutions, refusals to decide, motor response times) revealed differences associated with the type of visual information. When monkeys discriminated between black and white geometrical figures of different shapes and orientations, as well as black-and-white figures with different shapes or orientations, the learning time was short and transformation of the stimuli had no effect on correct solutions: there was complete transfer of learning. When monkeys discriminated figures of different sizes or complex images with different spatial relationships, the learning time was significantly greater. Changes in the size and shape of figures led to significant reductions in correct solutions and significant increases in refusals to solve the task and in motor reaction times. Invariance of discrimination in this case appeared after additional training. The results obtained here showed that in conditioned reflex learning, the sensory processing of stimuli has the result that discriminatory features are formed in LTM, i.e., cognitive structures (functional neurophysiological mechanisms), these supporting the classification of visual images. The temporal conditioned link of the executive reaction is established with these. Their formation is determined by the type of sensory information and the existence in LTM of separate subsystems for spatial and non-spatial information.

  7. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  8. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... infants. Absence of the Moro reflex in an infant is abnormal. Absence on both sides suggests damage to the brain or spinal cord. Absence on only one side suggests either a broken shoulder bone or an injury to the group of nerves that run from ...

  9. EEG correlation and impulse activity of neuronal populations of individual structures of the cat brain during elaboration and reproduction of motor and alimentary reactions in instrumental conditioned reflexes.

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, N N; Katinas, V Ia; Popova, L A; Ur'iash, V V

    1976-01-01

    Stable changes in EEG and spike activity of neuronal populations in different brain formations were studied on models of instrumental conditioned reflexes: motor and motor alimentary. A depencence has been established of the EEG amplitude-frequency parameters in the motor and striate cortical zones and the hippocampus on definite changes of unit spike activity in these areas. Simultaneous recording of the EEG and the spike activity of neuronal populations helps to elucidate the neurophysiological nature of individual rhythms of bio-electrical activity. Learned animals exhibit a stable reproduction of the spatial-temporal EEG patterns and motor alimentary reactions when automatic presentation of reinforcement is changed over to an arbitrary one.

  10. Reflexives in Mohawk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonvillain, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the meanings and uses of two reflexive morphemes in the Mohawk language. Reflexive "atat" is shown to have both reflexive and reciprocal meanings. It is also realized in kinship terms and in the transitive pronominal prefix "yutat." Semi-reflexive "at" has some reflexive functions, and can mark middle voice and…

  11. [Oculorespiratory reflex].

    PubMed

    Thirion, B; Marchal, F; Pétry, L; George, J L; Crance, J P; Haberer, J P

    1990-01-01

    The lack of interest about oculorespiratory reflex (ORR) in surgery and experimental studies is obvious. However the authors insist on the importance of its clinical traduction. The purpose of this study is to determinate an experimental model with titration of stimulus (pressure or traction) and therapeutic test. Our first Results prove the clinic entity of O.R.R. In first conclusion, we can insist on the importance of ventilatory assistance during squint surgery and on the monitoring of PE CO2 and Sa O2.

  12. Wireless quantified reflex device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoyne, Robert Charles

    The deep tendon reflex is a fundamental aspect of a neurological examination. The two major parameters of the tendon reflex are response and latency, which are presently evaluated qualitatively during a neurological examination. The reflex loop is capable of providing insight for the status and therapy response of both upper and lower motor neuron syndromes. Attempts have been made to ascertain reflex response and latency, however these systems are relatively complex, resource intensive, with issues of consistent and reliable accuracy. The solution presented is a wireless quantified reflex device using tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometers to obtain response based on acceleration waveform amplitude and latency derived from temporal acceleration waveform disparity. Three specific aims have been established for the proposed wireless quantified reflex device: 1. Demonstrate the wireless quantified reflex device is reliably capable of ascertaining quantified reflex response and latency using a quantified input. 2. Evaluate the precision of the device using an artificial reflex system. 3.Conduct a longitudinal study respective of subjects with healthy patellar tendon reflexes, using the wireless quantified reflex evaluation device to obtain quantified reflex response and latency. Aim 1 has led to the steady evolution of the wireless quantified reflex device from a singular two dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of measuring reflex response to a tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of reliably measuring reflex response and latency. The hypothesis for aim 1 is that a reflex quantification device can be established for reliably measuring reflex response and latency for the patellar tendon reflex, comprised of an integrated system of wireless three dimensional MEMS accelerometers. Aim 2 further emphasized the reliability of the wireless quantified reflex device by evaluating an artificial reflex system. The hypothesis for aim 2 is that

  13. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  14. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  15. Instructions and the Orienting Reflex in "Semantic Conditioning" of the Galvanic Skin Response in an Innocuous Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendery, Mary; Maltzman, Irving

    1977-01-01

    Concerns the effects of instructions on classical conditioning of the GSR (galvanic skin response). It demonstrates that verbal conditioning of the GSR can be obtained using an innocuous unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Discusses implications for theories of human classical conditioning. (Editor/RK)

  16. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  17. Acquisition and extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance reflex in mice with genetic knockout of monoamine oxidase A.

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I; Popova, N K; Gilinskii, M A; Tomilenko, R A; Seif, I

    2006-05-01

    We report here the results obtained from comparative analysis of learning and the dynamics of extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance response in mice with genetic knockout of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) and the progenitor line C3H. Mice of both lines acquired the conditioned passive avoidance reaction efficiently. Mice with genetic knockout of MAO A were characterized by prolonged retention of reproduction of the memory trace, as compared with rapid extinction in C3H mice. Smaller numbers of transfers, and vertical rearings on days 7-13 and the numbers of glances into and rom the dark sector on days 11-13 of extinction in MAO A-knockout mice appear to reflect their more marked fear reactions when confronted with the "dangerous" sector, along with increased anxiety, these facilitating longer-lasting retention of the memory trace. PMID:16583159

  18. Readaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex to 1g-Condition in immature lower vertebrates ( Xenopus laevis) after micro- or hypergravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.; Eβeling, K.; Neubert, J.

    The effects of altered gravitational conditions (AGC) on the development of the static vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and readaptation to 1g were investigated in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Tadpoles were exposed to microgravity (μg) during the German Space Mission D-2 for 10 days, using the STATEX closed survival system, or to 3g for 9 days during earth-bound experiments. At the beginning of AGC, the tadpoles had not yet developed the static VOR. The main results were: (i) Tadpoles with ug- or 3g-experience had a lower gain of the static VOR than the 1g-controls during the 2nd and 5th post-AGC days, (ii) Readaptation to response levels of 1g-reared controls usually occurred during the following weeks, except in slowly developing tadpoles with 3g-experience. Readaptation was less pronounced if, during the acute VOR test, tadpoles were rolled from the inclined to the normal posture than in the opposite test situation. It is postulated that (i) gravity is necessarily involved in the development of the static VOR, but only during a period including the time before onset of the first behavioural response; and (ii) readaptation which is superimposed by the processes of VOR development depends on many factors including the velocity of development, the actual excitation level of the vestibular systems and the neuroplastic properties of its specific pathways.

  19. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit.

  20. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit. PMID:25670870

  1. Classical Conditioning Components of the Orienting Reflex to Words Using Innocuous and Noxious Unconditioned Stimuli Under Different Conditioned Stimulus-Unconditioned Stimulus Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltzman, Irving; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Concerns the examination of conditioned stimulus--unconditioned stimulus (CS--UCS) intervals of different lengths. Demonstrates the feasibility of using a forewarned reaction time procedure with an innocuous imperative stimulus for the investigation of classical conditioning. (Editor/RK)

  2. Comparison of the sensitivity of prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and operant conditioning in an auditory intensity difference limen paradigm.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Derik; Klump, Georg M

    2015-03-01

    Reward-based operant conditioning (OC) procedures and reflex-based prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedures are used in mouse psychoacoustics. Therefore it is important to know whether both procedures provide comparable results for perceptual measurements. Here we evaluate the sensitivity of the C57BL/6N mouse in both procedures by testing the same individuals in the same Intensity Difference Limen (IDL) task. Level increments of a 10 kHz tone were presented in a train of 10 kHz reference tones. Objective analysis based on signal-detection theory was applied to compare the results of OC and PPI procedures. In both procedures the sensitivity increased with level increment. In agreement with the near miss to Weber's law, sensitivity increased with sound level of the reference stimuli. The sensitivity observed in the OC procedure was considerably larger than the sensitivity in the PPI procedure. Applying a sensitivity of 1.0 as the threshold criterion, mean IDLs in the OC procedure were 5.0, 4.0 and 3.5 dB at reference levels of 30, 50 and 75 dB SPL respectively. In the PPI procedure, mean IDLs of 18.9 and 17.0 dB at reference levels of 50 and 75 dB SPL respectively were observed. Due to the low sensitivity, IDLs could not be determined in the PPI procedure at a reference level of 30 dB SPL. Possible causes for the low sensitivity in the PPI procedure are discussed. These results challenge the idea that both procedures can be used as simple substitutes of one another and the experimenter must be aware of the limitations of the respective procedure.

  3. Comparison of the sensitivity of prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and operant conditioning in an auditory intensity difference limen paradigm.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Derik; Klump, Georg M

    2015-03-01

    Reward-based operant conditioning (OC) procedures and reflex-based prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedures are used in mouse psychoacoustics. Therefore it is important to know whether both procedures provide comparable results for perceptual measurements. Here we evaluate the sensitivity of the C57BL/6N mouse in both procedures by testing the same individuals in the same Intensity Difference Limen (IDL) task. Level increments of a 10 kHz tone were presented in a train of 10 kHz reference tones. Objective analysis based on signal-detection theory was applied to compare the results of OC and PPI procedures. In both procedures the sensitivity increased with level increment. In agreement with the near miss to Weber's law, sensitivity increased with sound level of the reference stimuli. The sensitivity observed in the OC procedure was considerably larger than the sensitivity in the PPI procedure. Applying a sensitivity of 1.0 as the threshold criterion, mean IDLs in the OC procedure were 5.0, 4.0 and 3.5 dB at reference levels of 30, 50 and 75 dB SPL respectively. In the PPI procedure, mean IDLs of 18.9 and 17.0 dB at reference levels of 50 and 75 dB SPL respectively were observed. Due to the low sensitivity, IDLs could not be determined in the PPI procedure at a reference level of 30 dB SPL. Possible causes for the low sensitivity in the PPI procedure are discussed. These results challenge the idea that both procedures can be used as simple substitutes of one another and the experimenter must be aware of the limitations of the respective procedure. PMID:25580004

  4. Astronomical Data Reduction Workflows with Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Bramich, D.; Forchi, V.; Freudling, W.; Garcia-Dabó, C. E.; klein Gebbinck, M.; Modigliani, A.; Moehler, S.; Romaniello, M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflex (http://www.eso.org/reflex) is an environment that provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO. Its top-level functionalities are: (1) Reflex allows to graphically specify the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches, (2) Reflex makes it easy to inspect the intermediate and final data products and to repeat selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction, (3) the data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic, (4) advanced users can plug-in their own Python or IDL modules and steps into the data reduction sequence, and (5) Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so that users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system (http://www.eso.org/pipelines). In this demo, we present the latest version of Reflex and its applications for astronomical data reduction processes.

  5. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  6. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  7. Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) and gamma valerolactone (GVL): similarities and differences in their effects on the acoustic startle reflex and the conditioned enhancement of startle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marinetti, Laureen J; Leavell, Bonita J; Jones, Calleen M; Hepler, Bradford R; Isenschmid, Daniel S; Commissaris, Randall L

    2012-06-01

    Gamma butyrolactone (GBL) is metabolized to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the body. GHB is a DEA Schedule 1 compound; GBL is a DEA List 1 chemical. Gamma valerolactone (GVL) is the 4-methyl analog of GBL; GVL is metabolized to 4-methyl-GHB; GVL is NOT metabolized to GBL or GHB. The effects of GBL (18.75-150 mg/kg), GVL (200-1600 mg/kg) or vehicle on the acoustic startle reflex (ASR), and the classically-conditioned enhancement of startle, the Startle Anticipated Potentiation of Startle (SAPS) response were studied in male rats. Both compounds produced a dose-dependent reduction of ASR, with GBL 5-7 times more potent than GVL. In contrast, GBL treatment significantly reduced SAPS at doses that exerted only moderate effects on ASR, whereas GVL exerted little or no effect on the SAPS, except at doses that produced pronounced reductions in Noise Alone ASR. In a second experiment, rats were tested for Noise Alone ASR behavior following treatment with a single mid-range dose of GBL (75 mg/kg), GVL (400mg/kg) or vehicle; immediately following startle testing the animals were sacrificed and their brains and blood were collected for determination of GHB, 4-methyl-GHB, GBL and GVL. GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood specimens and 6 (of 8) of the brain specimens from the GBL-treated subjects. 4-Methyl-GHB was found in measurable concentrations in all of the blood and brain specimens of the GVL-treated subjects; the change in startle amplitude was inversely correlated to the brain concentrations of these compounds. These findings confirm the differences in the metabolic fate of GBL and GVL as pro-drugs for the formation of GHB and 4-methyl-GHB, respectively. Moreover, the dissimilarity in effect profile for GBL and GVL on ASR versus SAPS behaviors suggests that different receptor(s) may be involved in mediating these behavioral effects. PMID:22349589

  8. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  9. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  10. The role of motivation in the performance of conditioned reflex switching of a maze skill in response to substitution of food reward quality in ants of the species Myrmica rubra.

    PubMed

    Udalova, G P; Karas', A Ya

    2006-11-01

    The characteristics of learning in ants - active Myrmica rubra foragers - were studied in a maze at different levels of colony carbohydrate food need with reinforcement consisting of carbohydrate (sugar syrup) or protein (pupae of Lasius niger ants). Measures of the maze skill during learning reinforced with syrup were somewhat worse than those during learning reinforced with pupae, especially in terms of time-based measures. Ants were able to modify the acquired conditioned reflex reaction when the quality of reinforcement changed. At high levels of food need (" hungry" colony), substitution of syrup with larvae and vice versa was followed by transformation of the previously formed skill; this occurred at both experimental periods (training and testing). At low levels of motivation ("sated colony"), the optimized maze habit formed with protein reinforcement was replaced in the test with carbohydrate reinforcement by a "stochastic," unoptimized behavior with a dominance of investigative activity. These experiments demonstrated that conditioned reflex switching can occur in higher social insects - ants - in which the different forms depend on the level of colony need for food and, respectively, on the level of social food-related motivation of forager ants. The special importance of using the switch activating the corresponding motivational system before changing the reinforcement food quality is emphasized.

  11. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  12. Reflex: Graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESO Reflex development Team

    2014-01-01

    Reflex provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO pipelines. It allows graphically specifying the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches. It eases inspection of the intermediate and final data products and allows repetition of selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction. The data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic; advanced users can plug their own modules and steps into the data reduction sequence. Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system.

  13. Model simulation studies to clarify the effect on saccadic eye movements of initial condition velocities set by the Vestibular Ocular Reflex (VOR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, M. H.; Winters, J. M.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Voluntary active head rotations produced vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements (VOR) with the subject viewing a fixation target. When this target jumped, the size of the refixation saccades were a function of the ongoing initial velocity of the eye. Saccades made against the VOR were larger in magnitude. Simulation of a reciprocally innervated model eye movement provided results comparable to the experimental data. Most of the experimental effect appeared to be due to linear summation for saccades of 5 and 10 degree magnitude. For small saccades of 2.5 degrees, peripheral nonlinear interaction of state variables in the neuromuscular plant also played a role as proven by comparable behavior in the simulated model with known controller signals.

  14. Hyperekplexia and stiff-man syndrome: abnormal brainstem reflexes suggest a physiological relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khasani, S; Becker, K; Meinck, H

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperekplexia and the stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are both conditions with exaggerated startle suggesting abnormal brainstem function. Investigation of brainstem reflexes may provide insight into disturbed reflex excitation and inhibition underlying these movement disorders. Patients and methods: Using four-channel EMG, we examined four trigeminal brainstem reflexes (monosynaptic masseter, masseter inhibitory, glabella, and orbicularis oculi blink reflexes) and their spread into pericranial muscles in five patients with familial hyperekplexia (FH), two with acquired hyperekplexia (AH), 10 with SMS, and 15 healthy control subjects. Results: Both FH/AH and SMS patients had abnormal propagation of brainstem reflexes into pericranial muscles. All patients with hyperekplexia showed an abnormal short-latency (15–20 ms) reflex in the trapezius muscle with a characteristic clinical appearance ("head retraction jerk") evoked by tactile or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, but normal monosynaptic masseter reflexes. Inhibitory brainstem reflexes were attenuated in some FH/AH patients. Four of 10 patients with SMS had similar short-latency reflexes in the neck muscles and frequently showed widespread enhancement of other excitatory reflexes, reflex spasms, and attenuation of inhibitory brainstem reflexes. Conclusion: Reflex excitation is exaggerated and inhibition is attenuated in both stiff-man syndrome and familial or acquired hyperekplexia, indicating a physiological relationship. Reflex transmission in the brainstem appears biased towards excitation which may imply dysfunction of inhibitory glycinergic or GABAergic interneurons, or both. PMID:15314112

  15. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    PubMed Central

    Pistacchi, Michele; Gioulis, Manuela; Mazzon, Davide; Marsala, Sandro Zambito

    2015-01-01

    Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment. PMID:26752910

  16. Reflex control of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation can cause damage and even death. What controls this primitive and potentially lethal innate immune response to injury and infection? Molecular and neurophysiological studies during the past decade have revealed a pivotal answer: immunity is coordinated by neural circuits that operate reflexively The afferent arc of the reflex consists of nerves that sense injury and infection. This activates efferent neural circuits, including the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that modulate immune responses and the progression of inflammatory diseases. It might be possible to develop therapeutics that target neural networks for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:19461672

  17. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  18. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  19. Superposition of H reflexes on steady contractions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, D G; Krauer, R; Drews, H

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of the investigation was to study the influence of steady isometric contractions on H reflexes of human soleus muscle. 2. Stimulating and recording conditions were hardly affected by plantar flexions which subjects maintained in a force matching task. 3. If the interval between a preceding control and the test stimulus was less than 8 s the test H reflex was depressed in the relaxed subject. The depression was diminished or removed if the test reflex was superimposed on a background activity. The interval between control and test H reflex was at least 8 s in the following experiments. 4. H reflexes were nearly independent of steady plantar flexions on which they were superimposed. In some subjects, there was a slight increase with increasing torque. During dorsal flexions, H reflexes in all subjects were inhibited with increasing torque. 5. The relationship between test H reflexes, control H reflexes and background activity was evaluated by varying pseudo-randomly stimulus intensity and steady flexion torque. The surface defined by this three-dimensional relation approximated a plane suggesting linear properties of the H reflex. In some subjects threshold intensity decreased slightly with torque, in others it was constant. 6. In response to a warning signal, human subjects initiated steady plantar or dorsal flexions in both feet and, at the same time, they started to concentrate on a light at the onset of which they performed a unilateral ballistic plantar contraction as fast as possible. The relations between H reflex and maintained flexion force during the warning period of the reaction time task were identical to those during force matching, showing that the behavioural context did not modulate the relations. 7. The relations were also the same if reflexes were evoked bi- or unilaterally, illustrating the absence of a mutual modification of simultaneously evoked H reflexes. 8. The relation was the same with ipsilateral matching and relaxed

  20. Parametric exploration of the fear-inhibited light reflex.

    PubMed

    Hourdaki, Eugenia; Giakoumaki, Stella G; Grinakis, Vangelis; Theou, Katerina; Karataraki, Maria; Bitsios, Panos

    2005-07-01

    The effect of various parameters on the mediation of the fear-inhibited light reflex was examined. The light reflexes of 16 healthy men were measured across four light probe intensities, either in the presence of white noise alone or when the white noise was associated with the threat of either an electric shock or an acoustic sound blast. The white noise alone did not affect the light reflex amplitude. Both types of threat were subjectively anxiogenic and inhibited the light reflex across all light probe intensities, the threat of shock being more potent than the threat of sound blast. Importantly, the effect of either type of threat on the light reflex amplitude was found to increase with increasing light probe intensity, suggesting that brighter light probes may become more relevant motivationally in the threat condition, thus attracting greater allocation of attentional/cognitive resources.

  1. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change.

  2. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. PMID:26434655

  3. Reflexivity in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Urcuioli, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was trained in this fashion; a second group was trained similarly but with successive oddity (rather than identity). Subsequently, comparison-response rates on novel matching versus mismatching sequences with the remaining symbolic matching stimuli were measured on nonreinforced probe trials. Higher rates were observed on matching than on mismatching probes in the former group. The opposite effect--higher rates on mismatching than matching probes--was mostly absent in the latter group, despite being predicted by the theory. Nevertheless, the ostensible reflexivity effect observed in former group may be the first time this phenomenon has been demonstrated in any animal.

  4. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  5. [Characteristics of the functional coupling of cerebral cortical neurons in cats and the signal meaning of the stimulus (the hypothesis of the information switching of conditioned reflex activity)].

    PubMed

    Komissarov, V I

    1988-01-01

    In chronic experiments on cats interrelations were studied between impulse activity of neurones of various auditory cortical zones and associative area under the action of defensive, alimentary or differential acoustic signals. It was found that shifts of the impulse activity of neurones in the studied cortical zones and correlation dependence between them appearing in the given conditions, were of a selective character and were connected with signal meaning of acoustic signals. Neurophysiological mechanisms are discussed of the revealed reorganization of the composition of functional relations of neurones of the cortical representation of the conditioned stimulus analyzer.

  6. Teaching Reflexivity in Qualitative Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Ping-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Reflexivity has gained paramount status in qualitative inquiry. It is central to debates on subjectivity, objectivity, and, ultimately, the scientific foundation of social science knowledge and research. Although much work on doing reflexivity by researchers and practitioners has been published, scholars have only recently begun to explore how one…

  7. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  8. Reflex myoclonus in olivopontocerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M E; Artieda, J; Zubieta, J L; Obeso, J A

    1994-01-01

    The presence of reflex myoclonus in response to touching and pin-pricking the wrist or stretching the fingers and to photic stimulation was assessed in 24 patients with a presumed diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and in 30 age matched control subjects. Reflex myoclonus to soma-esthetic stimulation was found in 23 patients and in none of the controls. Photic myoclonus was present in 12 patients and in none of the controls. Electrophysiological study of the reflex myoclonus showed enhanced (> 10 microV) somatosensory evoked potentials and an associated reflex electromyographic discharge (C-wave) in 15 patients. These findings indicate that reflex myoclonus is common in OPCA and probably of cortical origin. Images PMID:8158179

  9. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  10. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  11. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  12. An experimental psychophysiological approach to human bradycardiac reflexes.

    PubMed

    Furedy, J J

    1985-01-01

    Bradycardic reflexes in man are both of scientific and clinical interest. Using the methods of experimental psychophysiology, control over relevant independent variables permits the study of fine-grained temporal physiologic response topographies, and of psychological factors that may modify the reflex. In addition, information can also be sought through interdisciplinary collaborations with experimental physiologists in order to shed light on the mechanism of the reflexes. These general features of the approach are illustrated by presenting data on two bradycardic reflex preparations: the laboratory dive analog, and the 90-degree negative tilt. The dive-analog studies have shown that a) the dive-reflex proper is a late-occurring bradycardia accompanied by a late-occurring vasoconstriction; and b) for the elicitation of this reflex, both breath-holding and face immersion are necessary. In addition, the physiologic manipulation of temperature affects the reflex in an inverse way over the range of 10 degrees to 40 degrees C, while the sense of control (a psychological variable) attenuates the reflex. The negative-tilt preparation produces a bradycardic response that is ideal as a Pavlovian unconditional response. Some Pavlovian conditioning arrangements, especially an "imaginational" form, do produce significant conditional bradycardic responding, and this has both potential clinical (e.g., biofeedback-related) and theoretical (e.g., S-R vs. S-S accounts of Pavlovian conditioning) applications. The paper ends with a comment on the cognitive paradigm shift in psychology. Although this shift is of importance, it is suggested that it is also important to "remember the response."

  13. Changes in nociceptive reflex facilitation during carrageenan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, J F; Cervero, F

    1996-04-22

    Facilitation of neuronal responses induced by repetitive electrical stimulation of C-fibres (wind-up) is thought to be a substrate of hyperalgesia. There is little information on how these responses are in turn modified during hyperalgesia, and the extent to which hyperalgesic states also induce a facilitation of the neuronal responses mediated by A-fibres. The current study was undertaken in order to evaluate the effects of peripheral inflammation and stimulus presentation on the facilitation of nociceptive reflexes. Flexor reflexes, recorded as single motor units, were evoked in rats by cycles of low and high frequency electrical stimulation with pulse durations of 0.2, 0.5 and 2 ms. Responses were studied in control and inflammatory conditions, using the carrageenan-induced mono-arthritis model. The results show that the facilitation of late (C-fibre mediated) responses was proportional to the pulse duration of stimulation, as well as to the stimulation frequency. Facilitation was always higher when animals were subjected to inflammation. In inflammatory conditions, facilitation of reflexes was observed not only for late (C-fibre mediated) but also for early (A-fibre mediated) reflex responses. However, the facilitation of these early responses was not proportional to the intensity of stimulation. Thus, in arthritic animals, late (C-fibre mediated) flexion reflexes elicited from the skin, are facilitated and early (A-fibre mediated) reflexes are not only facilitated but, in addition, show a novel wind-up phenomenon.

  14. [Reflexes, instincts, emotions and passions].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alberto Portera

    2008-01-01

    In animals of the same species, the reflexes, having evolved similarly, in a few milliseconds, automatically activate the corresponding reflex arch and without the intervention of the animal generate the adequate response: medullary, mesencephalic or trans-hemispheric. These neurophysiological functions have allowed the animals to be free from predators and increasy their longevity and, as a consequence, the appearance of numerous species during millions of years. A further step in the reflexes evolution, the instincts emerged and their activity, a result of neuro-hormonal functions, stimulates the male's sexual appetite when the females are receptive for their copulation and fecundation. PMID:18924359

  15. Differential effects of plantar cutaneous afferent excitation on soleus stretch and H-reflex.

    PubMed

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Vette, Albert H; Obata, Hiroki; Alekhina, Maria I; Akai, Masami; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that plantar cutaneous afferents can adjust motoneuron excitability, which may contribute significantly to the control of human posture and locomotion. However, the role of plantar cutaneous afferents in modulating the excitability of stretch and H-reflex with respect to the location of their excitation remains unclear. In the present study, it was hypothesized that electrical stimulation delivered to the sole of the foot might be followed by modulation of spinal excitability that depends on: (1) the stimulation location and (2) the reflex studied. In these experiments, conditioned and unconditioned stretch and H-reflexes were evoked in 16 healthy subjects in a seated position. Both reflexes were conditioned by non-noxious electrical plantar cutaneous afferent stimulation at two different sites, the heel and metatarsal regions, at four different conditioning-test (CT) intervals. The conditioning stimulation delivered to the heel caused a significant facilitation of the soleus stretch reflex for all CT intervals, whereas the soleus H-reflex had significant facilitation only at CT interval of 50 ms and significant inhibition at longer CT intervals. Stimulation delivered to the metatarsal region, however, resulted mainly in reduced stretch and H-reflex sizes. This study extends the reported findings on the contribution of plantar cutaneous afferents within spinal interneuron reflex circuits as a function of their location and the reflex studied. PMID:19260052

  16. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  17. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control.

  18. Academic achievement and the paired Hoffman reflex in students practicing meditation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R K; Orme-Johnson, D W; Mills, P J; Dillbeck, M C

    1984-11-01

    The paired H reflex, considered to be the electrically evoked counterpart of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, provides a measure of motoneuron excitability under a variety of experimental and clinical conditions. It also offers a potentially useful tool in examining the neurophysiologic basis of alterations in reflex response in different states of awareness. This study investigated the relationship between the paired H reflex and academic achievement in students practicing the Transcendental Meditation program. The paired H reflex correlated significantly with grade point average, but not with SAT scores or any of three IQ measurements. These results suggest that the facilitation period of the paired H-reflex recovery curve may be a useful indicator of academic achievement, perhaps as a result of its relationship to awareness or wakefulness level.

  19. Reflex Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy: Seizures Induced by Tactile Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Turco, Emanuela Claudia; Pavlidis, Elena; Facini, Carlotta; Spagnoli, Carlotta; Andreolli, Anna; Geraci, Rosalia; Pisani, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Myoclonic epilepsy with reflex seizures in infancy is an extremely rare condition, in which seizures are provoked mainly by auditory or auditory-tactile stimuli. To increase the awareness of pediatricians regarding this underrecognized condition, we describe a child with seizures provoked only by the tactile stimulation of specific areas of the head and face.

  20. Taking control of reflexive social attention.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the case that top-down factors may modulate the activation of IT cells. Here we examined behaviorally whether reflexive social orienting is purely automatic or sensitive to top-down modulation. Participants were shown an ambiguous stimulus that could be perceived either as representing EYES or a CAR. In we demonstrated between groups that an automatic shift of attention, equivalent to that triggered by a schematic FACE, occurred only when the stimulus was referred to as possessing EYES. In all participants received the EYES and CAR conditions. When the stimulus was first referred to as a CAR and then as EYES, an attentional shift was only present for the EYES condition. However, when the stimulus was first referred to as possessing EYES, and then later as a CAR, attentional shifts were observed for both conditions. These data indicate that the emergence of a reflexive social attention effect is influenced by top-down mechanisms but in an asymmetrical manner. Top-down processes appear to be effective for triggering IT involvement, that is, for perceiving a stimulus as a face, which produces the social attention effect. But top-down mechanisms are ineffective once IT involvement has been triggered. That is, once a stimulus has been seen as having eyes, it continues to be seen that way, and accordingly, the social attention effect persists. PMID:15617667

  1. Dysphoric milk ejection reflex: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex (D-MER) is an abrupt emotional "drop" that occurs in some women just before milk release and continues for not more than a few minutes. The brief negative feelings range in severity from wistfulness to self-loathing, and appear to have a physiological cause. The authors suggest that an abrupt drop in dopamine may occur when milk release is triggered, resulting in a real or relative brief dopamine deficit for affected women. Clinicians can support women with D-MER in several ways; often, simply knowing that it is a recognized phenomenon makes the condition tolerable. Further study is needed. PMID:21645333

  2. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (<1 min) after respiratory arrest and brain death (isoelectric EEG). The results confirm that the nictitating membrane reflex is a conservative measure of death in poultry. Using spectral analyses of the EEG waveforms it was possible to readily distinguish between the different states of clinical consciousness. In all cases, when birds progressed from a conscious to unconscious state; total spectral power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity.

  3. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  4. Spanish Reflexives: A Critique of Pedagogical Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses pedagogical descriptions in high school textbooks covering Spanish reflexive verb constructions. Points out that these textbooks rarely contain the full reflexive construction displayed with all the grammatical persons and complete English glosses. (17 references) (Author/CK)

  5. Graphic Sequences of Spanish Nominals and Reflexives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of graphics for clarifying paradigmatic and syntagmatic relationships of nominals is described. This approach improves student understanding of reflexive, pseudo-reflexive, and nonreflexive sequences. (Contains seven references.) (Author/LB)

  6. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  7. Effect of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on the spinal reflex apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarotskiy, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    In view of the fact that the convergence effect of vestibular impulsation may both stimulate and inhibit intra and intersystemic coordination of physiological processes, an attempt was made to define the physiological effect on the spinal reflex apparatus of the convergence of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on a model of the unconditioned motor reflex as a mechanism of the common final pathway conditioning the formation and realization of a focused beneficial result of human motor activities. More than 100 persons subjected to rolling effect and angular acceleration during complexly coordinated muscular loading were divided according to typical variants of the functional structure of the patella reflex in an experiment requiring 30 rapid counterclockwise head revolutions at 2/sec with synchronous recording of a 20 item series of patella reflex acts. A knee jerk coefficient was used in calculations. In 85 percent of the cases 2 patellar reflexograms show typical braking and release of knee reflex and 1 shows an extreme local variant. The diagnostic and prognostic value of these tests is suggested for determining adaptive possibilities of functional systems in respect to acceleration and proprioceptive stimuli.

  8. Reflexive and Reciprocal Elements in Ixil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Reflexives and reciprocals in Ixil, a Mayan language of Guatemala, appear to have features that distinguish them from reflexives surveyed in typological studies such as Faltz (1985) and Geniusiene (1987). Third person reflexives and reciprocals seem to have the form of a possessed noun optionally followed by a possessor NP. Moreover, reflexives…

  9. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  10. [A new method for deep reflex muscular massage].

    PubMed

    Aksenova, A M

    1997-01-01

    The idea of deep reflex muscular massage rests on the existence of a strong relationship between structural and functional changes in the skeletal muscles and visceral condition. The massage can be used for management of acute states in combination with herbs, food additives, reduced drug dosages, exercises, thermotherapy.

  11. Spinal reflex adaptation in dancers changes with body orientation and role of pre-synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Rachel; Kitano, Koichi; Koceja, David M

    2010-01-01

    Dancers undergo specific activity-dependent neuromuscular adaptations following long-term training that allow them to develop the refined motor skills required for success in dance. The spinal stretch reflex circuit has demonstrated specific adaptations following prolonged dance training. Adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex can be studied using H-reflex methodology, first described by Paul Hoffmann in 1910. This article discusses H-reflex methodology and presents data that examine the neural mechanisms that contribute to adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex with dance training. Two groups of subjects, modern dancers (N = 5) and untrained controls (N = 5), were tested. On one-half of the trials common peronal nerve (CPN) conditioning of the soleus H-reflex was used to assess one spinal mechanism, pre-synaptic inhibition; the other half tested the soleus H-reflex only (unconditioned). The dependent variables were the H(max)/M(max) ratios, unconditioned and with CPN conditioning, expressed as percent values. The results revealed three main findings: 1. Modern dancers had smaller H(max)/M(max) ratios than control subjects; 2. The H(max)/M(max) ratio was smaller in standing posture than in prone among both dancers and controls; and 3. Pre-synaptic inhibition was not different between dancers and controls in standing. In conclusion, modern dancers have smaller H-reflexes than untrained controls, but pre-synaptic inhibition does not appear to explain this difference. PMID:21703086

  12. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. PMID:23791780

  13. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing.

  14. Role of vision and task complexity on soleus H-reflex gain.

    PubMed

    Pinar, Salih; Kitano, Koichi; Koceja, David M

    2010-04-01

    There exists extensive evidence supporting the presence of reflex modulation in humans during a variety of motor tasks. The soleus H-reflex has been shown to be modulated during static and dynamic balance conditions as well as during various motor tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two different stance positions and visual conditions on soleus H-reflex gain in 15 apparently healthy adults (mean age=30.27+/-6.92 yrs). The soleus H-reflexes were examined in two experimental stance conditions: two-legged (stable) and one-leg (unstable), and two visual conditions: eyes open and eyes closed. To assess the reflex gain, subjects performed ten trials under each of the four conditions and a soleus H-reflex was elicited during the performance of each trial. For each condition the peak-to-peak amplitude of the H-reflex and the EMG activity 50 ms prior to the stimulus was recorded. Differences in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of the soleus H-reflex for the experimental conditions were compared with a 2x2 (Stance x Vision) repeated measures ANOVA. The level of significance was p<0.05. Results demonstrated significant differences in reflex gain for both the vision (F(l,15)=4.87, p<0.05) and the stance condition (F(l,15)=14.86, p<0.05). Although both the stance condition and vision significantly affected the H-reflex gain, there was no interaction between these two variables (F(l,15)=0.17). From these results, we conclude that H-reflex gain was decreased both as stance complexity increased and as visual inputs were removed. Consistent with previous reports, it may be speculated that changes in presynaptic inhibition to the soleus Ia fibers regulate these gain changes. We propose that vision and stability of stance affect soleus H-reflex gain, but do so without any interactive effects.

  15. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  16. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (±5 mA, 0–75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P < 0.05) were observed during head-free and head-fixed trials. Response magnitude and timing were similar between head-free and head-fixed trials for sternocleidomastoid, but splenius capitis magnitudes decreased with the head fixed by ∼25% (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, this indicates that vestibulocollic responses are evoked independent of the requirement to maintain postural control of the head on the torso. Response magnitude and timing were similar across focal muscle contractions (i.e., axial rotation/flexion/extension) provided the muscle was active. In contrast, when subjects cocontracted neck muscles, vestibular-evoked responses decreased in sternocleidomastoid by ∼30–45% (P < 0.05) compared with focal muscle contractions but remained unchanged in splenius capitis. These results indicate robust vestibulocollic reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization. PMID:25008409

  17. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (± 5 mA, 0-75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P < 0.05) were observed during head-free and head-fixed trials. Response magnitude and timing were similar between head-free and head-fixed trials for sternocleidomastoid, but splenius capitis magnitudes decreased with the head fixed by ∼ 25% (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, this indicates that vestibulocollic responses are evoked independent of the requirement to maintain postural control of the head on the torso. Response magnitude and timing were similar across focal muscle contractions (i.e., axial rotation/flexion/extension) provided the muscle was active. In contrast, when subjects cocontracted neck muscles, vestibular-evoked responses decreased in sternocleidomastoid by ∼ 30-45% (P < 0.05) compared with focal muscle contractions but remained unchanged in splenius capitis. These results indicate robust vestibulocollic reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization.

  18. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

  19. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    DOE PAGES

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this newmore » ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.« less

  20. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  1. The posture-related interaction between Ia-afferent and descending input on the spinal reflex excitability in humans.

    PubMed

    Bove, Marco; Trompetto, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Schieppati, Marco

    2006-04-24

    The separate and combined depressive effects induced by vibration and standing on the soleus H-reflex have been studied by administering Achilles' tendon vibration in prone position and during stance. Without vibration, H-reflex amplitude was larger under prone than standing condition. Vibration reduced the reflex both in prone position and even more during stance. When vibration was superimposed to inclined stance (greater EMG background), the reflex was reduced of the same absolute amount as when it was superimposed to normal stance. When vibration was superimposed on stance with minimal or no background EMG, the reflex disappeared. These results confirm that both upright posture and vibration have a strong depressive effect on the H-reflex. They also show that muscle activity during stance is enough for overcoming the reflex depression. These findings provide information about the origin of the disfacilitatory effects on the monosynaptic reflex pathway, contribute to the understanding of the posture-related mechanisms responsible for the modulation of the spinal reflex excitability, and allow arguing in favour of a minor but adaptable role for the short latency stretch reflex in the control of quiet unperturbed stance.

  2. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  3. The relationship between dynamic balancing ability and posture-related modulation of the soleus H-reflex.

    PubMed

    Kawaishi, Yu; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Soleus H-reflex reveals down modulation with increased postural difficulty. Role of this posture-related reflex modulation is thought to shift movement control toward higher motor centers in order to facilitate more precise postural control. Present study hypothesized that the ability to modulate H-reflex is related to one's ability to dynamically balance while in an unstable posture. This study examined the relationship between dynamic balancing ability and soleus H-reflex posture-related modulation. Thirty healthy adults participated. The soleus maximal H-reflex (Hmax), motor response (Mmax), and background EMG activity (bEMG) were obtained during three postural conditions: prone, open-legged standing, and closed-legged standing. Hmax/Mmax ratios were normalized via the corresponding bEMG in order to remove the effects of background muscle activity from the obtained H-reflex. Reflex modulation was calculated as the ratio of the normalized Hmax/Mmax ratios in one postural condition to another posture in a more difficult condition. Dynamic balancing ability was assessed by testing stability while standing on a wobble board. A significant negative correlation was observed between balancing scores and reflex modulation from open-legged standing to closed-legged standing. This suggests that the ability to modulate monosynaptic stretch reflex excitability in response to a changing posture is a significant factor for dynamic balancing.

  4. Changes in spinal reflex excitability associated with motor sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Ovidiu; Frigon, Alain; Piché, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre; Rossignol, Serge; Doyon, Julien

    2010-05-01

    There is ample evidence that motor sequence learning is mediated by changes in brain activity. Yet the question of whether this form of learning elicits changes detectable at the spinal cord level has not been addressed. To date, studies in humans have revealed that spinal reflex activity may be altered during the acquisition of various motor skills, but a link between motor sequence learning and changes in spinal excitability has not been demonstrated. To address this issue, we studied the modulation of H-reflex amplitude evoked in the flexor carpi radialis muscle of 14 healthy individuals between blocks of movements that involved the implicit acquisition of a sequence versus other movements that did not require learning. Each participant performed the task in three conditions: "sequence"-externally triggered, repeating and sequential movements, "random"-similar movements, but performed in an arbitrary order, and "simple"- involving alternating movements in a left-right or up-down direction only. When controlling for background muscular activity, H-reflex amplitude was significantly more reduced in the sequence (43.8 +/- 1.47%. mean +/- SE) compared with the random (38.2 +/- 1.60%) and simple (31.5 +/- 1.82%) conditions, while the M-response was not different across conditions. Furthermore, H-reflex changes were observed from the beginning of the learning process up to when subjects reached asymptotic performance on the motor task. Changes also persisted for >60 s after motor activity ceased. Such findings suggest that the excitability in some spinal reflex circuits is altered during the implicit learning process of a new motor sequence.

  5. Transient reversal of the stretch reflex in human arm muscles.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, F; Borghese, N A; Carrozzo, M

    1991-09-01

    1. Load perturbation responses can violate the law of reciprocal innervation between antagonist muscles under particular conditions. Thus flexor and extensor muscles of wrist and elbow joints are reflexly coactivated by the impact of a ball on the hand during a catching task. The aim of this study was to determine whether reflex coactivation can be preset within the central nervous system (CNS) or whether it is entirely due to the peripheral stimulus. To this end, we studied the behavior of stretch reflex responses of arm muscles evoked by torque motor perturbations applied before and during the catching task. 2. Subjects were instructed to catch a ball dropped from 1.6 m. A torque motor delivered perturbations to the elbow joint, resulting in angular motion at both elbow and wrist joints because of their dynamic mechanical coupling. Two series of experiments were performed that differed in the perturbation waveform. In the first series, a single torque pulse could be randomly applied at different times during the task. The corresponding responses were recovered by subtracting the average of the unperturbed trials from the averages of perturbed trials. In the second series of experiments, a train of pseudorandom pulses was applied continuously during each trial. The time-varying impulse responses were computed at 20-ms intervals by cross-correlation methods. 3. The pattern of the short-latency electromyographic responses evoked by either single pulses or pseudorandom perturbations obeyed the law of reciprocal innervation of antagonist muscles under basal conditions. However, the pattern of the responses evoked by the same perturbations around the time of ball impact on the hand consisted of a substantial coactivation of both stretched and shortening muscles. Reflex coactivation resulted from response patterns that differed at different joints. At the elbow, reflex coactivation resulted from a transient reversal of the direction of the short-latency responses of

  6. [Reflexivity: a critical issue in qualitative research].

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta-Benjumea, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is an English term that Spanish speaking people have to assign a technical meaning. Reflexivity expresses the conscience of researchers conscience and refers to their connection with the study's situation. It is a process by which researchers step back to critically exam the effect they have on the study and the impact of their interactions with participants. The reflexive process is embedded in all research levels and is present in all the research phases, from the research question to fieldwork, from data analysis to writing the final report. Nevertheless, the question is not so much to engage in reflective activities but to be a reflexive researcher. Reflexivity is a human ability that is present during social interactions. For this reason it is present in qualitative research. A self inquirer can be addressed as it is constructed by the relationships and interactions that are established with study participants. Reflexivity has an educational character that continues after the study is completed. PMID:21531602

  7. Cultural Reflexivity in Health Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This “misrecognition,” which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice. PMID:25905833

  8. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    PubMed

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  9. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project.

  10. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  11. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. PMID:26935721

  12. The Pupillary Light Reflex in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason C.; Moss, Heather E.; McAnany, J. Jason

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) on rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-mediated pupillary light reflexes (PLRs). Methods Pupillary light reflexes elicited by full-field, brief-flash stimuli were recorded in 13 IIH patients and 13 normal controls. Subjects were dark-adapted for 10 minutes and the PLR was recorded in response to short-wavelength flashes (0.001 cd/m2: rod condition; 450 cd/m2: melanopsin condition). Subjects were then exposed to a rod-suppressing field and 10 cd/m2 long-wavelength flashes were presented (cone condition). Pupillary light reflexes were quantified as the maximum transient constriction (rod and cone conditions) and the post-illumination pupil constriction (melanopsin condition), relative to the baseline pupil size. Diagnostic power was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results The IIH patients had significantly smaller PLRs under the melanopsin (P < 0.001) and rod (P = 0.04) paradigms; a trend for reduced cone-mediated PLRs was also found (P = 0.08). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated areas under the curves (AUC) of 0.83 (melanopsin-meditated; P = 0.001), 0.71 (rod-mediated; P = 0.07), and 0.77 (cone-mediated; P = 0.02). The AUC (0.90, P < 0.001), sensitivity (85%), and specificity (85%) were high for ROC analysis performed on the mean of the rod, cone, and melanopsin PLRs. Conclusions Pupillary light reflex reductions in IIH patients indicate compromised RGC function. PLR measurement, particularly under rod- and melanopsin-mediated conditions, may be a useful adjunct to standard clinical measures of visual function in IIH. PMID:26746015

  13. Development of the Stretch Reflex in the Newborn: Reciprocal Excitation and Reflex Irradiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Barbara M.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    When tendon jerk reflexes were tested in seven newborns from one- to three-days old, stretch reflex responses in all major muscle groups of the lower limb were elicited. This "irradiation of reflexes" is a normal phenomenon in newborns, with the pathway becoming suppressed during normal maturation. In individuals with cerebral palsy, however, the…

  14. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine. PMID:12031298

  15. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  16. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters

  17. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced.

  18. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  19. Reflexive Practice: To Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of reflexive practice activities designed to enhance learning for first year law students at James Cook University, Australia. The paper considers various aspects of student learning and explores connections between reflexive practice and concepts such as deep learning, understanding, motivation and engagement, and…

  20. [Non-reflex activity of the CNS].

    PubMed

    Brozek, G

    1995-06-01

    Recent studies of biological rhythms have modified Sherrington's concept of nervous system as exclusively reflexive to include the fact that some neural activity is also endogenously rhythmic. Reflexes are undoubtedly the most important components of animal's and human behavior. But are reflexes the basic units of all complex movements and acts? Rhythmical movements such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as licking, mastication, and the peristaltic propulsion of nutrients and waste are examples of acts controlled by intrinsic oscillators, so called central pattern generators. Information from the periphery is, however, essential for controlling the extent and rate of movements. Between reflex and non-reflex activity it is possible to place complex species-specific responses called by ethologists fixed-action patterns. Recent investigators have shown that many complex sequences of behavior like speech or piano playing are determined by an internal plan, rather than being generated by a "chain" of reflexes. Non-reflexive activity appears earlier in ontogeny, and is probably phylogenetically older than reflexes.

  1. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement.

  2. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  3. [Urinary urgency and reflex incontinence].

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    1991-07-01

    Urge and reflex incontinence are caused by detrusor dysfunction:urgency may be due to hyperactivity or hypersensitivity of the bladder. Neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor is called detrusor hyperreflexia: the neurogenic uninhibited bladder is caused by incomplete, and the so-called reflex bladder by complete, suprasacral lesions. The pathophysiology of symptomatic and idiopathic detrusor hyperactivity and the therapeutic armentarium are described. Bladder drill together with biofeedback and pharmacotherapy with spasmolytic drugs - several potent spasmolytic drugs with different modes of action are available - are the basis of treatment for hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of the detrusor. An alternative is electrostimulation: stimulation of the afferents of the pudendal nerve, via the pelvic floor (anal, vaginal), percutaneously (dorsal nerve of the penis, clitoric nerve) or by the implantation of electrodes results in inhibition of the detrusor. Most (80-90%) patients can be treated successfully by conservative means. Operative measurements comprise bladder denervation and bladder augmentation. The results of bladder denervation by transtrigonal phenolization of the pelvic plexus are highly controversial. In patients with uncontrollable hyperactivity of the detrusor, augmentation of the bladder (e.g. clam ileocystoplasty) is the method of choice, while for those with uncontrollable hypersensitivity of the detrusor, cystectomy followed by bladder substitution should be performed as a last resort. Treatment for urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia must be selected bearing in mind that bladder emptying is inadequate, in most cases because of dyssynergia between detrusor and external sphincter. Therapy is basically aimed at transforming hyperreflexia of the detrusor into hyporeflexia, primarily by potent spasmolytic drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Studies of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Tom; Pool, Sam

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during space flight have been suspected of contributing to space motion sickness. The horizontal VOR was studied in nine subjects on two space shuttle missions. Active unpaced head oscillation at 0.3 Hz was used as the stimulus to examine the gain and phase of the VOR with and without visual input, as well as the visual suppression of the reflex. No statistically significant changes were noted inflight in the gains or phase shifts of the VOR during any test condition, or between space motion sickness susceptible and nonsusceptible populations. Although VOR suppression was unaffected by spaceflight, the space motion sickness-susceptible group tended to exhibit greater error in the suppression than the nonsusceptible group. It is concluded that at this stimulus frequency, VOR gain is unaffected by space-flight, and any minor individual changes do not seem to contribute to space motion sickness.

  5. Reversal of Motor Learning in the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in the Absence of Visual Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marlene R.; Meissner, Geoffrey W.; Schafer, Robert J.; Raymond, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and eyeblink conditioning use similar neural circuitry, and they may use similar cellular plasticity mechanisms. Classically conditioned eyeblink responses undergo extinction after prolonged exposure to the conditioned stimulus in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus. We investigated the…

  6. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article.

  7. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  8. The legacy of care as reflexive learning

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. Method: a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. Results: the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. Conclusions: reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. PMID:27305180

  9. Hamstrings stretch reflex in human spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Gillies, J. D.; Lance, James W.

    1971-01-01

    In 16 patients with spastic paralysis the hamstrings stretch reflex was found to increase as the velocity of stretch increased, and generally to subside after movement ceased. These effects are attributable to the dynamic property of the primary spindle ending. The stretch reflex commonly appeared in only the last third of the stretching movement and was maximal as the knee became fully extended. This is consistent with the static properties of the primary and secondary spindle endings, and accounts for the absence of the clasp-knife phenomenon in the spastic hamstrings. The difference in the nature of the stretch reflex in spastic flexor and extensor muscles is best explained by the differential reflex effects of group II afferent fibres which facilitate flexor motoneurones and inhibit extensor motoneurones. PMID:4255176

  10. Pavlov's conceptualization of unconditional reflexes, or instincts, within the framework of the theory of higher nervous activity.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1987-01-01

    According to I. P. Pavlov's theory of higher nervous activity, the establishment and dissolution of conditional reflexes enhances the higher organism's adaptation to the external environment. Pavlov asserted that, ontogenetically, conditional reflexes are based upon innate, unconditional reflexes (UR) or instincts. Pavlov did not distinguish between URs and instincts, but he preferred the former term. Phylogenetically the URs emerged out of well-established conditional reflexes during the development of higher organisms. An outgrowth of the experimental conditioning procedure, developed during the second decade of this century, was the observation and delineation of new URs. While studying human nervous and psychiatric disorders in the 1930s, Pavlov elucidated other URs. Pavlov identified 13 major URs, but he failed to formulate an exhaustive classification scheme of URs.

  11. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  12. The pupillary light reflex in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1981-01-01

    In 19 normal subjects the pupillary reflex to light was studied over a range of stimulus intensities by infrared electronic pupillography and analysed by a computer technique. Increasing stimulus intensity was associated with an increase in direct light reflex amplitude and maximum rate of constriction and redilatation. Latency from stimulus to onset of response-decreased with increasing stimulus intensity. The normal range for each of these parameters is given and the significance of these results in clinical pupillary assessment discussed. PMID:7326222

  13. Brainstem and spinal reflex studies in patients with primary progressive freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Kızıltan, Meral E; Gunduz, Aysegul; Kızıltan, Gunes; Tekeoğlu, Anıl; Sohtaoğlu, Melis

    2014-08-15

    Our aim was to investigate the extent and pattern of involved pathways using brainstem and spinal reflexes by comparing primary progressive freezing of gait (PPFOG) progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) with FOG. Seven patients with PPFOG and age and sex matched seven PSP patients and 16 healthy subjects were included in the study. All subjects underwent blink reflex (BR), trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR), auditory startle reflex (ASR) and long latency flexor reflex (LLFR) investigations under the same conditions. All three groups had normal BR latencies. ASR probability was lowest in the PSP group and was highest in PPFOG (p=0.005). The presence rate of TCR was lowest in PSP and it was highest in PPFOG (p=0.007 for SC and p=0.023 for SCM). The presence rate and amplitude of LLFR (R II) were decreased in the PSP group (p=0.010 and p=0.031, respectively) whereas it was in a continuous pattern in some of PPFOG patients. ASR, TCR and LLFR were all inhibited in PSP and we suggest that suppression of all three reflexes is probably related to degeneration of brainstem reticular formation and basal ganglia connections. However, interestingly, in PPFOG, excitabilities of ASR and TCR circuits are increased suggesting loss of pathways mediating suprasegmental control.

  14. Perception of spectrally degraded reflexives and pronouns by children.

    PubMed

    Başkent, Deniz; van Rij, Jacolien; Ng, Zheng Yen; Free, Rolien; Hendriks, Petra

    2013-11-01

    Speech perception skills in cochlear-implant users are often measured with simple speech materials. In children, it is crucial to fully characterize linguistic development, and this requires linguistically more meaningful materials. The authors propose using the comprehension of reflexives and pronouns, as these specific skills are acquired at different ages. According to the literature, normal-hearing children show adult-like comprehension of reflexives at age 5, while their comprehension of pronouns only reaches adult-like levels around age 10. To provide normative data, a group of younger children (5 to 8 yrs old), older children (10 and 11 yrs old), and adults were tested under conditions without or with spectral degradation, which simulated cochlear-implant speech transmission with four and eight channels. The results without degradation confirmed the different ages of acquisition of reflexives and pronouns. Adding spectral degradation reduced overall performance; however, it did not change the general pattern observed with non-degraded speech. This finding confirms that these linguistic milestones can also be measured with cochlear-implanted children, despite the reduced quality of sound transmission. Thus, the results of the study have implications for clinical practice, as they could contribute to setting realistic expectations and therapeutic goals for children who receive a cochlear implant.

  15. Reflex modulation of airflow dynamics through the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Seelagy, M M; Schwartz, A R; Russ, D B; King, E D; Wise, R A; Smith, P L

    1994-06-01

    We studied the effect of respiratory reflexes on maximal inspiratory flow (VImax) and its mechanical determinants, pharyngeal critical pressure (Pcrit) and nasal resistance, in an isolated feline upper airway preparation. Chemoreceptor reflexes were evaluated by varying inspired oxygen and end-tidal CO2 concentrations. At each gas concentration, we found that changes in VImax were related to changes in Pcrit. As CO2 increased, Pcrit became increasingly subatmospheric (P < 0.02), indicating reductions in pharyngeal collapsibility. In contrast, progressive hypoxia had no effect on Pcrit. We then examined the effects of vagal afferents and upper airway mucosal receptors on airflow dynamics at three levels of CO2. We confirmed that CO2 increased VImax (P < 0.01) and decreased Pcrit to more subatmospheric levels (P < 0.05) in both the presence and absence of vagal and airway mucosal afferent activity. Moreover, airway mucosal afferents led to smaller reductions in Pcrit (a less collapsible airway) (P < 0.05), whereas vagal afferents led to a larger increase in Pcrit (a more collapsible pharynx) under hypercapnic conditions (P < 0.01). We conclude that CO2 had a major effect on pharyngeal collapsability and that its effect was modulated by vagal and mucosal afferents. We speculate that the sensitivity and threshold to reflex CO2 responses play a major role in the maintenance of airway patency.

  16. [The oculocardiac reflex during vitrectomy under neuroleptanalgesia].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, I; Quast, D; Velhagen, K H; Bellach, J; Guckler, A

    1991-01-01

    Oculocardiac reflex (OCR) is a frequently occurring complication in eye operations. It is a trigemino-vagal reflex characterised by the clinical occurrence of bradycardia and other cardiac rhythm disturbances following manipulations on the eye and its surroundings especially after traction of the external eye muscles. In this paper based on an analysis of 402 anaesthesia records, a bradycardia frequency (f = less than 60/min) of 31.8% was noted while other rhythm disturbances occurred in 5.7%. Predisposition facts were identified as age over 50, hypertension and cardiac diseases requiring medication with cardiac drugs. The frequency of OCR is considerably lowered by diabetes mellitus. Examination of 159 traction measurements made at the lateral rectus muscle revealed that the first manipulation made at the rectus bulbi superior muscle resulted in a statistically significantly stronger reflex activity than at the other muscles. In a further series of investigations in which rectus bulbi superior muscle was tested last, this muscle again showed the biggest frequency deviation. Only determination of the percentage heart rate decrease is suitable for characterising reflex activity. The frequency of the reflex occurring in our study was 71.7%, the result being reduced by the high proportion of diabetics, who are relatively reflex insensitive.

  17. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  18. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  19. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  20. Soleus and vastus medialis H-reflexes: similarities and differences while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Alrowayeh, Hesham N; Sabbahi, Mohamed A; Etnyre, Bruce

    2005-06-15

    The H-reflex may be a useful measure to examine the lower extremity muscles activation and inhibition following an injury. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes in healthy subjects while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles may establish a reference for comparison for patients with ACL injury. Vastus medialis and soleus H-reflexes were recorded from 14 healthy subjects while lying and standing during 0, 30, 45, and 60 degrees knee flexion. EMG unit was used to electrically stimulate the tibial and femoral nerves (using 0.5 ms pulses at 0.2 pps of H-maximum amplitude) and to record four traces of the soleus and vastus medialis H-wave and one trace of the M-wave peak-to-peak amplitudes. Repeated measures three-way ANOVAs were calculated with the global alpha=0.05. Results showed that (1) the average soleus H-reflex amplitude was significantly less during standing than lying across all knee flexion conditions, (2) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes showed no measurable significant differences between neutral standing compared with lying, (3) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes were significantly greater during standing knee flexion conditions (30, 45, and 60 degrees ) than lying or neutral standing, and (4) there were no differences between soleus and vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes during lying across all knee flexion conditions. Data from H/M ratio follow the same pattern of H-amplitude. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitude during standing and knee flexion may be a reflective of the knee function. It is more specific than the soleus H-reflex because it reflects the changes in the excitability of the quadriceps motoneurons acting directly around the knee joint.

  1. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  2. Relating plastic changes of short latency human soleus stretch reflex to changes in task performance induced by training.

    PubMed

    Kundert, Robinson; Yagi, Tohru

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings in the field of neurophysiology showed that operant conditioning on the human H-Reflex is possible. This leads to many possible clinical applications as well as possible sophisticated training methods for athletes. Although stretch reflexes have been subject to extensive literature, knowledge about the influence of short latency stretch reflexes on task performance is lacking. Within this study an ankle control task was designed where perturbations in the magnitude of functional relevance were applied. Results analyzing angle over time after perturbation confirm previous findings which used to analyze the EMG and force response to ankle perturbations. Further it was found that after training the response to perturbations shifted from initially containing latencies which indicate conscious support by transcortical pathways to latencies which could only origin from unconscious stretch reflex responses. The trend of the short latency response to shift towards the long latency response and to diminish, while pre-defined performance criteria improved, denote a functional relevance of the short latency stretch reflex to task performance. Whereas short latency reflexes have any importance at all or if improvements emerge only out of enhancements in the long latency response future work making use of operant conditioning on the short latency H-Reflex will have to unravel. PMID:23366715

  3. The trigeminocardiac reflex – a comparison with the diving reflex in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has previously been described in the literature as a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension, and gastric hypermotility seen upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. The diving reflex (DR) in humans is characterized by breath-holding, slowing of the heart rate, reduction of limb blood flow and a gradual rise in the mean arterial blood pressure. Although the two reflexes share many similarities, their relationship and especially their functional purpose in humans have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we have tried to integrate and elaborate these two phenomena into a unified physiological concept. Assuming that the TCR and the DR are closely linked functionally and phylogenetically, we have also highlighted the significance of these reflexes in humans. PMID:25995761

  4. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  5. Studies of the vestibulo-ocular reflex on STS 4, 5 and 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Pool, Sam L.; Moore, Thomas P.; Uri, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) may be altered by weightlessness. Since this reflex plays a large role in visual stabilization, it was important to document any changes caused by space flight. This is a report on findings on STS-4 through 6 and is part of a larger study of neurosensory adaptation done on STS-4 through 8. Voluntary horizontal head oscillations at 1/3 Hz with amplitude of 30 deg right and left of center were recorded by a potentiometer and compared to eye position recorded by electroculography under the following conditions: eyes open, head fixed, tracking horizontal targets switched 0, 15, and 30 degrees right and left (optokinetic reflex - OKR - and calibration); eyes open and fixed on static external target with oscillation, (vestibulo ocular reflex, eyes closed - VOR EC); eyes open and wearing opaque goggles with target fixed in imagination (vestibulo-ocular reflex, eyes shaded - VOR ES); and eyes open and fixed on a head synchronized target with head oscillation (VOR suppression). No significant changes were found in voluntary head oscillation frequency or amplitude in those with (n=5), and without (n=3), space motion sickness (SMS), with phase of flight or test condition. Variations in head oscillation were too small to have produced detectable changes in test results.

  6. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: an enigmatic improvement with spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, James

    2000-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) or complex regional pain syndrome, is an extremely painful and disabling condition commonly seen following trauma. Its early recognition and treatment is most critical for a favorable prognosis. Although its diagnosis and treatments vary, neuroblockade is the treatment of choice. Very little has been reported in the literature in regards to manipulation as an early treatment modality to improve joint mobility and reduce pain and future disability. This case report reviews one case presentation of RSD where dramatic results followed cervical spine manipulation.

  7. Modulation of the soleus H-reflex following galvanic vestibular stimulation and cutaneous stimulation in prone human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Catherine R; Bent, Leah R

    2009-08-01

    There is evidence to suggest that vestibular and somatosensory inputs may interact when they are processed by the central nervous system, although the nature of the individual sensory contributions to this interaction is unknown. We examined the effects of a combined vestibular and cutaneous conditioning stimulus on the motoneuron pool that supplies the soleus muscle via the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). We applied galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS; bipolar, binaural, 500 ms, 2.5-mA square-wave pulse) and cutaneous stimulation (medial plantar nerve; 11 ms, three-pulse train, 200 HZ) to prone human subjects and examined changes in the amplitude of the H-reflex. GVS alone caused facilitation (approximately 20%) of the H-reflex, whereas ipsilateral cutaneous stimulation alone caused a 26% inhibition. Paired GVS and cutaneous stimulation resulted in a linear summation of the individual conditioning effects. H-reflex amplitudes observed after paired conditioning with GVS and cutaneous stimulation could be predicted from the amplitudes observed with individual conditioning. These results suggest that in the prone position, when the muscles are not posturally engaged, vestibular and somatosensory information appear to sum in a linear fashion to influence the reflex response of lower limb motoneurons. Muscle Nerve 40: 213-220, 2009.

  8. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of infection and sterile injury. Knowledge of homeostatic mechanisms by which the nervous system controls organ function was originally applied to the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and other body systems. Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals. Such reflexes are evolutionarily ancient, dating back to invertebrate nematode worms that possess primitive immune and nervous systems. Failure of these reflex mechanisms in mammals contributes to nonresolving inflammation and disease. It is also possible to target these neural pathways using electrical nerve stimulators and pharmacological agents to hasten the resolution of inflammation and provide therapeutic benefit. PMID:22665702

  9. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  10. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo R; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form. PMID:12051447

  11. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo R.; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form.

  12. Reflexive composites: self-healing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W., Jr.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Havens, Ernie; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.

    2008-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. has developed reflexive composites achieving increased vehicle survivability through integrated structural awareness and responsiveness to damage. Reflexive composites can sense damage through integrated piezoelectric sensing networks and respond to damage by heating discrete locations to activate the healable polymer matrix in areas of damage. The polymer matrix is a modified thermoset shape memory polymer that heals based on phenomena known as reptation. In theory, the reptation healing phenomena should occur in microseconds; however, during experimentation, it has been observed that to maximize healing and restore up to 85 % of mechanical properties a healing cycle of at least three minutes is required. This paper will focus on work conducted to determine the healing mechanisms at work in CRG's reflexive composites, the optimal healing cycles, and an explanation of the difference between the reptation model and actual healing times.

  13. Reflex transmission to lumbar α-motoneurones in the mouse similar and different to those in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Eike D; Kalezic, Ivana; Dibaj, Payam; Steffens, Heinz

    2013-07-01

    Investigation and interpretation of defective motor circuitries in transgenic mice required further basic results from wild-type mice. Therefore, we investigated the lumbar motor reflex pattern in anaesthetised mice using intracellular motoneuronal recording and monosynaptic reflex testing. Thresholds and latencies in mice were similar to those in cats: thresholds for monosynaptic (group I) EPSPs were slightly above 1T (T=threshold for the lowest threshold fibres), around 1.5T for group II EPSPs and above 10T for group III EPSPs; group I EPSPs were maximal with a stimulus strength around 2T, group II EPSPs were maximal with 5-8T; latencies to the group I incoming volley were below 1ms for monosynaptic group I EPSPs, around 3ms for polysynaptic group II EPSPs and above 4ms for polysynaptic group III EPSPs. In contrast to reflex actions in the cat, monosynaptic gastrocnemius-soleus reflexes were facilitated by conditioning stimulation of the peroneal, sural and tibial nerves, i.e. by a variety of different, probably flexor reflex afferents. This facilitation persisted after high lumbar spinalisation indicating an independency to supraspinal influences. Nociceptive muscle afferents facilitated the peroneal monosynaptic reflex while nociceptive cutaneous afferents from the foot sole inhibited the ipsilateral but facilitated the contralateral peroneal reflex.

  14. Physiopharmacology of the peristaltic reflex: an update.

    PubMed

    De Ponti, F; Cosentino, M; Lecchini, S; Frigo, G M; Crema, A

    1991-06-01

    The peristaltic reflex is one of the simplest models which can be used to study the function of enteric neurons by recording intestinal motor activity. Peristalsis consists of a coordinated, aborally propagating motor activity which requires the functional integrity of receptor pathways, excitatory and inhibitory neural pathways and neuromuscular junctions. Luminal distension elicits polarized responses: an ascending excitatory response (ascending contraction) and a descending inhibitory response (descending relaxation). The present paper reviews the most recent acquisitions on the neural pathways and neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of the peristaltic reflex.

  15. Modulation of Stretch Reflexes of the Finger Flexors by Sensory Feedback From the Proximal Upper Limb Poststroke

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Gilles; Kamper, Derek G.; Kahn, Jennifer H.; Rymer, William Z.; Schmit, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural coupling of proximal and distal upper limb segments may have functional implications in the recovery of hemiparesis after stroke. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the stretch reflex response magnitude of spastic finger flexor muscles poststroke is influenced by sensory input from the shoulder and the elbow and whether reflex coupling of muscles throughout the upper limb is altered in spastic stroke survivors. Through imposed extension of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, stretch of the relaxed finger flexors of the four fingers was imposed in 10 relaxed stroke subjects under different conditions of proximal sensory input, namely static arm posture (3 different shoulder/elbow postures) and electrical stimulation (surface stimulation of biceps brachii or triceps brachii, or none). Fast (300°/s) imposed stretch elicited stretch reflex flexion torque at the MCP joints and reflex electromyographic (EMG) activity in flexor digitorum superficialis. Both measures were greatest in an arm posture of 90° of elbow flexion and neutral shoulder position. Biceps stimulation resulted in greater MCP stretch reflex flexion torque. Fast imposed stretch also elicited reflex EMG activity in nonstretched heteronymous upper limb muscles, both proximal and distal. These results suggest that in the spastic hemiparetic upper limb poststroke, sensorimotor coupling of proximal and distal upper limb segments is involved in both the increased stretch reflex response of the finger flexors and an increased reflex coupling of heteronymous muscles. Both phenomena may be mediated through changes poststroke in the spinal reflex circuits and/or in the descending influence of supraspinal pathways. PMID:19571191

  16. Modification of the paired H reflex through the transcendental meditation and TM-Sidhi program.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R K; Mills, P J; Orme-Johnson, D W; Dillbeck, M C; Jacobe, E

    1983-01-01

    The paired H reflex, considered to be the electrically evoked counterpart of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, provides a measure of motoneuron excitability under a variety of experimental and clinical conditions. This study investigated the longitudinal effects of an advanced meditation program (the TM-Sidhi program) on the paired H reflex at nine delay intervals (50, 70, 100, 150, 200, 250, 333, 500, and 1000 ms). An experimental group of 14 subjects with no mental or motor disorders was instructed in an advanced TM program known as the TM-Sidhi program and the control group (N = 8) practiced the TM technique only. The amplitude of the paired H reflex was significantly facilitated in the experimental male subjects at intervals 100 through 250 ms, whereas the experimental female subjects and controls showed no significant change. These results extend previous studies showing distinct physiologic differences between subjects practicing these two programs and are of additional interest because they show that the H reflex can be modified in normal subjects.

  17. Evaluating the Reflexive Practices in a Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Andreina; Galuppo, Laura; Gilardi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is a primary requirement for professional work. Our aim was to describe a methodology suitable for detecting the development of reflexive practice through the analysis of 59 Master's degree students' journals. We explore the use and changes of reflexive practice in relation to the settings and activities of the course using analysis of…

  18. On Reflection: Is Reflexivity Necessarily Beneficial in Intercultural Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how…

  19. Comparison of the depression of H-reflexes following previous activation in upper and lower limb muscles in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C; Jones, K E; Adams, S; Bawa, P

    1999-05-01

    When conditioning-testing (C-T) stimuli are applied to Ia afferents to elicit H-reflexes, the test reflex is abolished immediately following the conditioning reflex. As the C-T interval is increased, the test response slowly begins to recover, taking several hundred milliseconds to attain control values. The time course of this recovery is known as the H-reflex recovery curve. H-reflex recovery curves were compared using surface EMG and single motor unit activities in lower limb soleus and upper limb flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles in seven healthy human subjects. Under rest conditions, the recovery of H-reflexes and single motor unit activity was slow for soleus; the recovery was not complete even in 1 s. In comparison, the recovery was very fast for FCR motor units, occurring in 200-300 ms. The effects of rate of stimulation (0.1-10.0 imp/s) were also examined on the magnitude of H-reflex responses. The reflex response declined with increasing rate of stimulation, the decline being slightly greater in soleus than in FCR. When these phenomena were examined with voluntary facilitation of the spinal cord, the time of recovery shortened and the effect of stimulus rate also diminished. Changes with background facilitation were greater in FCR than in soleus. The differences between the two muscles are attributed mainly to differences in presynaptic inhibition in the two spinal segments, and/or to the differences in dynamics of the transmitter release in terminals of Ia afferents synapsing with slow soleus motoneurons and those synapsing with the fast FCR motoneurons.

  20. Comparison of the depression of H-reflexes following previous activation in upper and lower limb muscles in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C; Jones, K E; Adams, S; Bawa, P

    1999-05-01

    When conditioning-testing (C-T) stimuli are applied to Ia afferents to elicit H-reflexes, the test reflex is abolished immediately following the conditioning reflex. As the C-T interval is increased, the test response slowly begins to recover, taking several hundred milliseconds to attain control values. The time course of this recovery is known as the H-reflex recovery curve. H-reflex recovery curves were compared using surface EMG and single motor unit activities in lower limb soleus and upper limb flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles in seven healthy human subjects. Under rest conditions, the recovery of H-reflexes and single motor unit activity was slow for soleus; the recovery was not complete even in 1 s. In comparison, the recovery was very fast for FCR motor units, occurring in 200-300 ms. The effects of rate of stimulation (0.1-10.0 imp/s) were also examined on the magnitude of H-reflex responses. The reflex response declined with increasing rate of stimulation, the decline being slightly greater in soleus than in FCR. When these phenomena were examined with voluntary facilitation of the spinal cord, the time of recovery shortened and the effect of stimulus rate also diminished. Changes with background facilitation were greater in FCR than in soleus. The differences between the two muscles are attributed mainly to differences in presynaptic inhibition in the two spinal segments, and/or to the differences in dynamics of the transmitter release in terminals of Ia afferents synapsing with slow soleus motoneurons and those synapsing with the fast FCR motoneurons. PMID:10333012

  1. [Reflex-dystrophic pseudo-arthritis or Sudeck syndrome (author's transl) ].

    PubMed

    Pohl, W; Hinz, G

    1976-02-01

    Local bone- and tissue dystrophies identical with Sudeck's syndrome and progressing in 3 stages are called reflex dystrophies. In the 1st and 2nd stages complete recovery is possible, in the 3rd stage only irreversible dysptrophic-ankylosing defect-healing. Etiologic significance of causal factors discussed is not certain. In, initially similar, inflammatory and rheumatic arthritis often only the further course and radiologic appearance provide a diagnosis. So far we have no desirable clear definition of reflex dystrophic conditions. PMID:57675

  2. Impaired reflexive orienting to social cues in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Andrea; Casagrande, Maria; Rosa, Caterina; Maccari, Lisa; Berloco, Bianca; Pasini, Augusto

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigated whether another person's social attention, specifically the direction of their eye gaze, and non-social directional cues triggered reflexive orienting in individuals with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and age-matched controls. A choice reaction time and a detection tasks were used in which eye gaze, arrow and peripheral cues correctly (congruent) or incorrectly (incongruent) signalled target location. Independently of the type of the task, differences between groups were specific to the cue condition. Typically developing individuals shifted attention to the location cued by both social and non-social cues, whereas ADHD group showed evidence of reflexive orienting only to locations previously cued by non-social stimuli (arrow and peripheral cues) but failed to show such orienting effect in response to social eye gaze cues. The absence of reflexive orienting effect for eye gaze cues observed in the participants with ADHD may reflect an attentional impairment in responding to socially relevant information.

  3. Perspective on the human cough reflex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This review dissects the complex human cough reflex and suggests hypotheses about the evolutionary basis for the reflex. A mechanosensory-induced cough reflex conveys through branches of myelinated Aδ nerve fibers is not chemically reactive (i.e., capsaicin, bradykinin); possibly, its evolution is to prevent the harmful effects of aspiration of gastric or particulate contents into the lungs. This became necessary as the larynx moves closer to the opening of the esophagus as human ancestors adapt phonation over olfaction beginning less than 10 million years ago. The second type of cough reflex, a chemosensory type, is carried by unmyelinated C fibers. Supposedly, its origin dates back when prehistoric humans began living in close proximity to each other and were at risk for infectious respiratory diseases or irritant-induced lung injury. The mechanism for the latter type of cough is analogous to induced pain after tissue injury; and, it is controlled by the identical transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channel (TRPV1). The airways do not normally manifest nociceptive pain from a stimulus but the only consistent response that capsaicin and lung inflammation provoke in healthy human airways is cough. TRPA1, another excitatory ion channel, has been referred to as the "irritant receptor" and its activation also induces cough. For both types of cough, the motor responses are identical and via coordinated, precisely-timed and sequential respiratory events orchestrated by complex neuromuscular networking of the diaphragm, chest and abdominal respiratory muscles, the glottis and parts of the brain. PMID:22074326

  4. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  5. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  6. Taking Control of Reflexive Social Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the…

  7. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  8. Plasma quiescence in a reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, L.; Friedman, S.; Carr, W.; Seidl, M.

    1980-02-01

    A thermionic cathode reflex discharge and the plasma it produces are studied. It is found that extremely quiescent plasmas can be produced when the electron-loss rate due to classical diffusion is equal to the ion-loss rate. Particle and power balances for the quiescent plasma are obtained, and the average electron energy loss per ion produced is determined.

  9. Doing Reflexivity: Moments of Unbecoming and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an account of a reflexive "trip" undertaken by a professional doctoral student and her supervisor. It presents a series of vignettes which offer an account of unbecomings and becomings encountered by the student. Making use of a dialogic approach in which the supervisor responds to the student, we suggest this method of…

  10. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  11. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  12. Reflexive Learning: Stages towards Wisdom with Dreyfus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The Dreyfus (2001) account of seven stages of learning is considered in the context of the Dreyfus (1980s) account of five stages of skill development. The two new stages, Mastery and Practical Wisdom, make more explicit certain themes implicit in the five-stage account. In this way Dreyfus (2001) encourages a more reflexive approach. The themes…

  13. Changes in H-reflex amplitude to muscle stretch and lengthening in humans.

    PubMed

    Budini, Francesco; Tilp, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Spinal reflex excitability is traditionally assessed to investigate neural adjustments that occur during human movement. Different experimental procedures are known to condition spinal reflex excitability. Among these, lengthening movements and static stretching the human triceps have been investigated over the last 50 years. The purpose of this review is to shed light on several apparent incongruities in terms of magnitude and duration of the reported results. In the present review dissimilarities in neuro-spinal changes are examined in relation to the methodologies applied to condition and measure them. Literature that investigated three different conditioning procedures was reviewed: passive dorsiflexion, active dorsiflexion through antagonists shortening and eccentric plantar-flexors contractions. Measurements were obtained before, during and after lengthening or stretching. Stimulation intensities and time delays between conditioning procedures and stimuli varied considerably. H-reflex decreases immediately as static stretching is applied and in proportion to the stretch degree. During dorsiflexions the inhibition is stronger with greater dorsiflexion angular velocity and at lower nerve stimulation intensities, while it is weaker if any concomitant muscle contraction is performed. Within 2 s after a single passive dorsiflexion movement, H-reflex is strongly inhibited, and this effect disappears within 15 s. Dorsiflexions repeated over 1 h and prolonged static stretching training induce long-lasting inhibition. This review highlights that the apparent disagreement between studies is ascribable to small methodological differences. Lengthening movements and stretching can strongly influence spinal neural pathways. Results interpretation, however, needs careful consideration of the methodology applied. PMID:27089411

  14. Prediction of Hearing Sensitivity from Acoustic Reflexes in Mentally Retarded Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niswander, Paul S.; Ruth, Roger A.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of the sensitivity prediction from acoustic reflex (SPAR) technique to estimate hearing loss in 32 trainable mentally retarded Ss (adults and young adults with normal to profound hearing loss) was investigated by comparing measured pure-tone thresholds determined through tangible-reinforcement operant-conditioning audiometry with…

  15. Monosynaptic reflexes in the superficial forearm flexors in man and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Deschuytere, J; Rosselle, N; De Keyser, C

    1976-06-01

    Indirect motor responses with the characteristics of the H wave were recorded from the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus muscles in normal adults. A series of experiments has been performed, constituting circumstantial arguments for the monosynaptic nature of these reflex responses. The findings in pathological conditions, which corroborated this point of view, are documented briefly.

  16. Incontinence of urine due to instability of micturition reflexes: Part I. Detrusor reflex instability.

    PubMed

    Mahony, D T; Laferte, R O; Blais, D J

    1980-03-01

    Micturition reflex instability may result from malfunction of the detrusor reflex or instability of the pudendal nucleus which innervates the pelvic floor muscles and external sphincter. Detrusor instability is the result of sacral micturition reflex center (SMRC) hyperexcitability. This may be caused by underinhibition or overfacilitation of the SMRC, and there are both central and peripheral causes of each. Detrusor hypertrophy may invoke chronic overactivity of the detrusodetrusor facilitative reflex causing SMRC overfacilitation. Similarly, distal urethral stricture and/or chronic urethritis causing chronic overactivity of the urethrodetrusor facilitative reflex is a common cause of SMRC overfacilitation. Pathologic relaxation and weakness of the striated muscles of the pelvic floor and perineum resulting in underactivity of the perineodetrusor inhibitory reflex, is a common cause of SMRC underinhibition. In adult women these factors often coexist. Each may predispose to stress-induced detrusor instability and are often seen in association with, or are confused with, true stress incontinence. The distinguishing characteristics of detrusor hypertonicity and detrusor hyperreflexia are reviewed, and the various mechanisms of pseudostress incontinence and of urgency incontinence are discussed in detail.

  17. Effects of hypoxia on respiratory defence reflexes. Effects of thirty hours' oxygen deficiency on cough, the expiration reflex and sneezing in awake cats.

    PubMed

    Tatár, M; Korpás, J; Polácek, H; Záhradný, V

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied, in 11 awake adult cats, the parameters of the expiration reflex (ER), tracheobronchial (TB) and laryngopharyngeal (LPh) cough, the respiratory rate (f), tidal volume (VT), the end tidal fractional CO2 concentration (FETCO2), the pH, the blood gases and the heart rate during 30 hours' isobaric hypoxic hypoxia (FO2 = 0.11). During the whole 30 hours the cats developed hypocapnic hypoxemia, f remained unchanged and VT was markedly elevated. In the acute phase (15 min) of hypoxic hypoxia of the same intensity, changes in respiratory parameters were the same and the intensity of respiratory reflexes increased significantly (Tatár et al. 1984). During prolonged hypoxic hypoxia there were no statistically significant changes in the intensity of the ER and of TB and LPh cough. The authors assume that some adaptation of the central mechanisms regulating the defence reflexes of the airways took place; this hypothesis is warranted, because an increase in the susceptibility of the cough centre during constant conditions of the stimulation of cough receptors would not be biologically expedient. The different changes in the intensity of respiratory defense reflexes in the acute and the prolonged phase of hypoxic hypoxia in the presence of identical changes in respiratory parameters are further indirect evidence pointing to the existence of functional differences between the respiratory centre and the cough centre. PMID:3158012

  18. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes.

  19. Yaw sensory rearrangement alters pitch vestibulo-ocular reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, A. E.; Wall, C. 3rd; Oman, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten male subjects underwent two types of adaptation paradigm designed either to enhance or to attenuate the gain of the canal-ocular reflex (COR), before undergoing otolith-ocular reflex (OOR) testing with constant velocity, earth horizontal axis and pitch rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about an earth vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stimulus that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity or phase and was designed to produce short-term changes in the COR. Preadaptation and postadaptation OOR tests occurred at a constant velocity of 60 degrees/sec in the dark and produced a modulation component of the slow phase velocity with a frequency of 0.16 Hz due to otolithic stimulation by the sinusoidally changing gravity vector. Of the seven subjects who showed enhancement of the COR gain, six also showed enhancement of the OOR modulation component. Of the seven subjects who showed attenuation of the COR gain, five also showed attenuation of the OOR modulation component. The probability that these two cross-axis adaptation effects would occur by chance is less than 0.02. This suggests that visual-vestibular conditioning of the yaw axis COR also induced changes in the pitch axis OOR. We thus postulate that the central nervous system pathways that process horizontal canal yaw stimuli have elements in common with those processing otolithic stimuli about the pitch axis.

  20. Effects of exercise pressor reflex activation on carotid baroreflex function during exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, K. M.; Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Smith, S. A.; Querry, R. G.; Raven, P. B.; Secher, N. H.

    2001-01-01

    1. This investigation was designed to determine the contribution of the exercise pressor reflex to the resetting of the carotid baroreflex during exercise. 2. Ten subjects performed 3.5 min of static one-legged exercise (20 % maximal voluntary contraction) and 7 min dynamic cycling (20 % maximal oxygen uptake) under two conditions: control (no intervention) and with the application of medical anti-shock (MAS) trousers inflated to 100 mmHg (to activate the exercise pressor reflex). Carotid baroreflex function was determined at rest and during exercise using a rapid neck pressure/neck suction technique. 3. During exercise, the application of MAS trousers (MAS condition) increased mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma noradrenaline concentration (dynamic exercise only) and perceived exertion (dynamic exercise only) when compared to control (P < 0.05). No effect of the MAS condition was evident at rest. The MAS condition had no effect on heart rate (HR), plasma lactate and adrenaline concentrations or oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise. The carotid baroreflex stimulus-response curve was reset upward on the response arm and rightward to a higher operating pressure by control exercise without alterations in gain. Activation of the exercise pressor reflex by MAS trousers further reset carotid baroreflex control of MAP, as indicated by the upward and rightward relocation of the curve. However, carotid baroreflex control of HR was only shifted rightward to higher operating pressures by MAS trousers. The sensitivity of the carotid baroreflex was unaltered by exercise pressor reflex activation. 4. These findings suggest that during dynamic and static exercise the exercise pressor reflex is capable of actively resetting carotid baroreflex control of mean arterial pressure; however, it would appear only to modulate carotid baroreflex control of heart rate.

  1. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy associated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Falasca, G F; Toly, T M; Reginato, A J; Schraeder, P L; O'Connor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) complicating antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is not well acknowledged in the neurologic literature. We report 4 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy that occurred while they were receiving AEDs. All patients had shoulder and hand involvement, which in 2 was bilateral, and 1 had ipsilateral foot involvement. Two patients did not respond to a change in AEDs, but all improved with a course of prednisone. One patient with phenobarbital (PB)-associated RSDS relapsed on inadvertent rechallenge with secobarbital. A review of the literature showed that several other fibrosing disorders are associated with AED administration, including Dupuytren's contractures, frozen shoulder, plantar and hand nodules, and Peyronie's disease. RSD associated with AEDs is important to recognize because it may result in permanent disability if treatment is delayed.

  2. Acceleration dependence and task-specific modulation of short- and medium-latency reflexes in the ankle extensors

    PubMed Central

    Finley, James M; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Perreault, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary responses to muscle stretch are often composed of a short-latency reflex (SLR) and more variable responses at longer latencies such as the medium-latency (MLR) and long-latency stretch reflex (LLR). Although longer latency reflexes are enhanced in the upper limb during stabilization of external loads, it remains unknown if they have a similar role in the lower limb. This uncertainty results in part from the inconsistency with which longer latency reflexes have been observed in the lower limb. A review of the literature suggests that studies that only observe SLRs have used perturbations with large accelerations, possibly causing a synchronization of motoneuron refractory periods or an activation of force-dependent inhibition. We therefore hypothesized that the amplitude of longer latency reflexes would vary with perturbation acceleration. We further hypothesized that if longer latency reflexes were elicited, they would increase in amplitude during control of an unstable load, as has been observed in the upper limb. These hypotheses were tested at the ankle while subjects performed a torque or position control task. SLR and MLR reflex components were elicited by ankle flexion perturbations with a fixed peak velocity and variable acceleration. Both reflex components initially scaled with acceleration, however, while the SLR continued to increase at high accelerations, the MLR weakened. At accelerations that reliably elicited MLRs, both the SLR and MLR were reduced during control of the unstable load. These findings clarify the conditions required to elicit MLRs in the ankle extensors and provide additional evidence that rapid feedback pathways are downregulated when stability is compromised in the lower limb. PMID:24303134

  3. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis.

  4. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-01-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  5. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  6. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses (NSBRI Neurovestibular Project 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Goldberg, Jefim; Minor, Lloyd B.; Paloski, William H.; Young, Laurence R.; Zee, David S.

    1999-01-01

    Impairment of gaze and head stabilization reflexes can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force (gif) environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive capabilities of these mechanisms. We wish to determine to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others, and to what extent gravity serves as a context cue for inhibiting such transfer. We use the general approach of adapting a response (saccades, vestibuloocular reflex: VOR, or vestibulocollic reflex: VCR) to a particular change in gain or phase in one gif condition, adapting to a different gain or phase in a second gif condition, and then seeing if gif itself - the context cue - can recall the previously-learned adapted responses. Previous evidence indicates that unless there is specific training to induce context-specificity, reflex adaptation is sequential rather than simultaneous. Various experiments in this project investigate the behavioral properties, neurophysiological basis, and anatomical substrate of context-specific learning, using otolith (gravity) signals as a context cue. In the following, we outline the methods for all experiments in this project, and provide details and results on selected experiments.

  7. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  8. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  9. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  10. Gating of trigemino-facial reflex from low-threshold trigeminal and extratrigeminal cutaneous fibres in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A; Scarpini, C

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the size of the test components (R1 and R2) of the trigemino-facial reflex were studied after electrical subliminal conditioning stimulation were applied to the trigeminal, median and sural nerves. After conditioning activation of the trigeminal nerve (below the reflex threshold), the early R1 reflex component showed phasic facilitation, peaking at about 50 ms of interstimulus delay, followed by a long-lasting inhibition recovering at 300-400 ms. The same conditioning stimulation resulted in a monotonic inhibition of the late R2, starting at 15-20 ms, with a maximum at 100-150 ms and lasting 300-400 ms. Intensity threshold for both the R1 and R2 changes ranged from 0.90 to 0.95 times the perception threshold. A similar longlasting inhibition of the R2 reflex response was also seen after conditioning stimulation applied to low-threshold cutaneous afferents of the median and sural nerves. The minimum effective conditioning-test interval was 25-30 ms and 40-45 ms respectively and lasted 600-700 ms. By contrast the early R1 reflex response exhibited a slight long-lasting facilitation with a time course similar to that of the R2 inhibition. The threshold intensity to obtain facilitation of the R1 and inhibition of the R2 test responses after conditioning volley in the median and sural nerves was similar and ranged from 0.9 to 1.2 times the perception threshold. These results demonstrate that low-threshold cutaneous afferents from trigeminal and limb nerves exert powerful control on trigeminal reflex pathways, probably via a common neural substrate. There is evidence that, in addition to any post-synaptic mechanism which might be operating, presynaptic control is a primary factor contributing to these changes. Images PMID:1328539

  11. The "where is it?" reflex: autoshaping the orienting response.

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, G

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this review is to compare two divergent lines of research on signal-centered behavior: the orienting reflex (OR) and autoshaping. A review of conditioning experiments in animals and humans suggests that the novelty hypothesis of the OR is no longer tenable. Only stimuli that represent biological "relevance" elicit ORs. A stimulus may be relevant a priori (i.e., unconditioned) or as a result of conditioning. Exposure to a conditioned stimulus (CS) that predicts a positive reinforcer causes the animal to orient to it throughout conditioning. Within the CS-US interval, the initial CS-directed orienting response is followed by US-directed tendencies. Experimental evidence is shown that the development and maintenance of the conditioned OR occur in a similar fashion both in response-independent (classical) and response-dependent (instrumental) paradigms. It is proposed that the conditioned OR and the signal-directed autoshaped response are identical. Signals predicting aversive events repel the subject from the source of the CS. It is suggested that the function of the CS is not only to signal the probability of US occurrence, but also to serve as a spatial cue to guide the animal in the environment. PMID:7097153

  12. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Diaper Change in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subki, Ahmed H; Alasmari, Aishah S; Jan, Fadi M; Moria, Feras A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2016-07-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by early onset of multiple types of seizures. We report the first case of reflex seizures triggered by diaper change in a girl at 9 months old and 2 years old with a mutation in the SCN1A gene causing DS. Reflex seizures have been reported in patients with DS provoked by increased body temperature or visual stimulation. The case we report widens the spectrum of triggers causing reflex seizures in children with DS. Cortical hyperexcitability resulting from the genetic defect explains the tendency to experience such reflex seizures.

  13. Re-examination of the role of the human acoustic stapedius reflex.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Dennis P; Stuart, Andrew; Carpenter, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The "rollover" seen in the word recognition performance scores of patients with Bell's palsy (facial nerve paralysis) has historically been taken as an indicator of the role of the stapedius reflex in the protection from upward spread of masking. Bell's palsy, however, may be a polyneuropathy, so it is not clear that the poor word recognition performance at high levels is necessarily attributable specifically to impaired facial nerve function. The present article reports two new experiments that probe whether an isolated impairment of the stapedius reflex can produce rollover in word recognition performance-intensity functions. In experiment 1, performance-intensity functions for monosyllabic speech materials were obtained from ten normal listeners under two listening conditions: normal and low-frequency augmented to offset the effects of the stapedius reflex on the transmission of low-frequency vibrations to the cochlea. There was no effect of the spectral augmentation on word recognition for stimulus levels up to 107 dB SPL. In experiment 2, six patients who had undergone stapedectomy were tested for rollover using performance-intensity functions. None of the patients showed rollover in their performance-intensity functions, even at stimulus levels in excess of 100 dB HL. These data suggest that if the stapedius reflex has a role in protection from upward spread of masking, then this role is inconsequential for word recognition in quiet.

  14. Re-examination of the role of the human acoustic stapedius reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Dennis P.; Stuart, Andrew; Carpenter, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The ``rollover'' seen in the word recognition performance scores of patients with Bell's palsy (facial nerve paralysis) has historically been taken as an indicator of the role of the stapedius reflex in the protection from upward spread of masking. Bell's palsy, however, may be a polyneuropathy, so it is not clear that the poor word recognition performance at high levels is necessarily attributable specifically to impaired facial nerve function. The present article reports two new experiments that probe whether an isolated impairment of the stapedius reflex can produce rollover in word recognition performance-intensity functions. In experiment 1, performance-intensity functions for monosyllabic speech materials were obtained from ten normal listeners under two listening conditions: normal and low-frequency augmented to offset the effects of the stapedius reflex on the transmission of low-frequency vibrations to the cochlea. There was no effect of the spectral augmentation on word recognition for stimulus levels up to 107 dB SPL. In experiment 2, six patients who had undergone stapedectomy were tested for rollover using performance-intensity functions. None of the patients showed rollover in their performance-intensity functions, even at stimulus levels in excess of 100 dB HL. These data suggest that if the stapedius reflex has a role in protection from upward spread of masking, then this role is inconsequential for word recognition in quiet.

  15. Context-Specific Adaptation of Gravity-Dependent Vestibular Reflex Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelhamer, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Stabilization of the eyes and head during body movements is important for maintaining balance and keeping the images of objects stationary on our retinas. Impairment of this ability can lead to disorientation and reduced performance in sensorimotor tasks such as piloting of spacecraft. In the absence of a normal earth gravity field, the dynamics of head stabilization, and the interpretation of vestibular signals that sense gravity and linear acceleration, are subject to change. Transitions between different gravitoinertial force environments - as during different phases of space flight - provide an extreme test of the adaptive mechanisms that maintain these reflexive abilities. It is vitally important to determine human adaptive capabilities in such a circumstance, so that we can know to what extent the sensorimotor skills acquired in one gravity environment will transfer to others. Our work lays the foundation for understanding these capabilities, and for determining how we can aid the processes of adaptation and readaptation. An integrated set of experiments addresses this issue. We use the general approach of adapting some type of reflexive eye movement (saccades, the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR), the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex (LVOR)), or the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR), to a particular change in gain or phase in one condition of gravitoiner-tial force, and adapting to a different gain or phase (or asking for no change) in a second gravitoinertial force condition, and then seeing if the gravitoinertial force itself - the context cue - can recall the previously learned adapted responses. The majority of the experiments in the laboratory use the direction of vertical gaze or the direction of gravity (head tilt) as the context cue. This allows us to study context-specificity in a ground-based setting. One set of experiments, to be performed in parabolic flight, specifically uses the magnitude of gravitoinertial force as a context cue. This is a

  16. Methodological Reflexivity: Towards Evolving Methodological Frameworks through Critical and Reflexive Deliberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Glenda

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author argues for a central and critical role for "reflexivity in research" with the aim of developing and strengthening not only everyone's understanding of what everyone does in environmental education research, but also how, and why everyone does it. In a narrative account of methodological issues that occurred within, and…

  17. Multi-MA reflex triode research.

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Riordan, John C.; Allen, Raymond J.; Goyer, John R.; Murphy, Donald P.; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef

    2010-08-01

    The Reflex Triode can efficiently produce and transmit medium energy (10-100 keV) x-rays. Perfect reflexing through thin converter can increase transmission of 10-100 keV x-rays. Gamble II experiment at 1 MV, 1 MA, 60 ns - maximum dose with 25 micron tantalum. Electron orbits depend on the foil thickness. Electron orbits from LSP used to calculate path length inside tantalum. A simple formula predicts the optimum foil thickness for reflexing converters. The I(V) characteristics of the diode can be understood using simple models. Critical current dominates high voltage triodes, bipolar current is more important at low voltage. Higher current (2.5 MA), lower voltage (250 kV) triodes are being tested on Saturn at Sandia. Small, precise, anode-cathode gaps enable low impedance operation. Sample Saturn results at 2.5 MA, 250 kV. Saturn dose rate could be about two times greater. Cylindrical triode may improve x-ray transmission. Cylindrical triode design will be tested at 1/2 scale on Gamble II. For higher current on Saturn, could use two cylindrical triodes in parallel. 3 triodes in parallel require positive polarity operation. 'Triodes in series' would improve matching low impedance triodes to generator. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Physics of reflex triodes from Gamble II experiments (1 MA, 1 MV) - (a) Converter thickness 1/20 of CSDA range optimizes x-ray dose; (b) Simple model based on electron orbits predicts optimum thickness from LSP/ITS calculations and experiment; (c) I(V) analysis: beam dynamics different between 1 MV and 250 kV; (2) Multi-MA triode experiments on Saturn (2.5 MA, 250 kV) - (a) Polarity inversion in vacuum, (b) No-convolute configuration, accurate gap settings, (c) About half of current produces useful x-rays, (d) Cylindrical triode one option to increase x-ray transmission; and (3) Potential to increase Saturn current toward 10 MA, maintaining voltage and outer diameter - (a) 2 (or 3) cylindrical triodes in parallel, (b) Triodes

  18. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  19. Disturbed Paraspinal Reflex Following Prolonged Flexion-Relaxation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Ellen L.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures experimental study of the effect of flexion-relaxation, recovery, and gender on paraspinal reflex dynamics. Objective. To determine the effect of prolonged flexion-relaxation and recovery time on reflex behavior in human subjects. Summary of Background Data. Prolonged spinal flexion has been shown to disturb the paraspinal reflex activity in both animals and human beings. Laxity in passive tissues of the spine from flexion strain may contribute to desensitization of mechanoreceptors. Animal studies indicate that recovery of reflexes may take up to several hours. Little is known about human paraspinal reflex behavior following flexion tasks or the recovery of reflex behavior following the flexion tasks. Methods. A total of 25 subjects performed static flexionrelaxation tasks. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were recorded before and immediately after flexion-relaxation and after a recovery period. Reflexes were quantified from systems identification analyses of electromyographic response in relation to pseudorandom force disturbances applied to the trunk. Results. Trunk angle measured during flexion-relaxation postures was significantly higher following static flexion-relaxation tasks (P < 0.001), indicating creep deformation of passive supporting structures in the trunk. Reflex response was diminished following flexion-relaxation (P < 0.029) and failed to recover to baseline levels during 16 minutes of recovery. Conclusion. Reduced reflex may indicate that the spine is less stable following prolonged flexion-relaxation and, therefore, susceptible to injury. The absence of recovery in reflex after a substantial time indicates that increased low back pain risk from flexion-relaxation may persist after the end of the flexion task. PMID:16582860

  20. Impaired H-Reflex Gain during Postural Loaded Locomotion in Individuals Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing Nong; Brown, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Successful execution of upright locomotion requires coordinated interaction between controllers for locomotion and posture. Our earlier research supported this model in the non-impaired and found impaired interaction in the post-stroke nervous system during locomotion. In this study, we sought to examine the role of the Ia afferent spinal loop, via the H-reflex response, under postural influence during a locomotor task. We tested the hypothesis that the ability to increase stretch reflex gain in response to postural loads during locomotion would be reduced post-stroke. Methods Fifteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis and 13 non-impaired controls pedaled on a motorized cycle ergometer with specialized backboard support system under (1) seated supported, and (2) non-seated postural-loaded conditions, generating matched pedal force outputs of two levels. H-reflexes were elicited at 90°crank angle. Results We observed increased H-reflex gain with postural influence in non-impaired individuals, but a lack of increase in individuals post-stroke. Furthermore, we observed decreased H-reflex gain at higher postural loads in the stroke-impaired group. Conclusion These findings suggest an impaired Ia afferent pathway potentially underlies the defects in the interaction between postural and locomotor control post-stroke and may explain reduced ability of paretic limb support during locomotor weight-bearing in individuals post-stroke. Significance These results support the judicious use of bodyweight support training when first helping individuals post-stroke to regain locomotor pattern generation and weight-bearing capability. PMID:26629996

  1. Pupil Light Reflex Produced by Glare under Mesopic Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Elisa; Comastri, Silvia Ana; Issolio, Luis; Echarri, Rodolfo

    The amount of light captured by the eye depends on pupil size. Moreover, one of the factors determining the steady-state pupil size is ambient illumination and sudden increments of light reaching the retina cause a brisk and transient pupil constriction described as the dynamic Pupil Light Reflex response. In experiments where a glare source acts as transient conditioning field, a methodology to measure pupil diameter is required. In the present paper pupil diameter, in steady (0.5 cd/m2) and dynamic adaptation conditions, is measured. The dynamic state is originated by a transient peripheral glare source with three different illuminance levels (15, 30 and 60 lx). Ten eyes of 5 subjects (19, 36, 50, 53 and 52 years old) are considered. The measurements are made by means of a video of the pupil captured with a CCD while the sight is fixated in a chart. In the steady condition, the average pupil diameter for each subject varies between 4.8 and 7.2 mm from one subject to another. In the dynamic condition, latency time results to be independent both of the subject and of the glare level, adding evidence to the robustness of this parameter when radiation is not incident centrally.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex.

    PubMed

    Wider, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  3. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  4. Airway reflexes, autonomic function, and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J; Lee, L Y

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we review the cardiovascular responses to the inhalation of irritants and pollutants. Many sensory receptors in the respiratory system, from nose to alveoli, respond to these irritants and set up powerful reflex changes, including those in the cardiovascular system. Systemic hypotension or hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and dysrhythmias have all been described previously. Most of the experiments have been acute and have been performed on anesthetized experimental animals. Experiments on humans suggest we have similar sensory systems and reflex responses. However, we must use caution when applying the animal results to humans. Most animal experiments, unlike those with humans, have been performed using general anesthesia, with irritants administered in high concentrations, and often to a restricted part of the respiratory tract. Species differences in the response to irritants are well established. We must be even more careful when applying the results of acute experiments in animals to the pathophysiologic changes observed in prolonged exposure to environmental pollution in humans. PMID:11544167

  5. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose.

    PubMed

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pH < 5), esophageal C-fibers also express receptors for activation by weakly acidic reflux such as receptors highly sensitive to acid and receptors for bile acids. The nature of sensory pathways from the nose and their activators relevant for cough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction.

  7. Reflex control of the circulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fadel, P J

    2015-12-01

    Appropriate cardiovascular and hemodynamic adjustments are necessary to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle during exercise. Alterations in the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system are fundamental in ensuring these adjustments are adequately made. Several neural mechanisms are responsible for the changes in autonomic activity with exercise and through complex interactions, contribute to the cardiovascular and hemodynamic changes in an intensity-dependent manner. This short review is from a presentation made at the Saltin Symposium June 2-4, 2015 in Copenhagen, Denmark. As such, the focus will be on reflex control of the circulation with an emphasis on the work of the late Dr. Bengt Saltin. Moreover, a concerted effort is made to highlight the novel and insightful concepts put forth by Dr. Saltin in his last published review article on the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in humans. Thus, the multiple roles played by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) including its ability to induce vasodilatation, override sympathetic vasoconstriction and stimulate skeletal muscle afferents (exercise pressor reflex) are discussed and a conceptual framework is set suggesting a major role of ATP in blood flow regulation during exercise.

  8. Soleus Hoffmann reflex amplitudes are specifically modulated by cutaneous inputs from the arms and opposite leg during walking but not standing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Yukari; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation of cutaneous nerves innervating heteronymous limbs (the arms or contralateral leg) modifies the excitability of soleus Hoffmann (H-) reflexes. The differences in the sensitivities of the H-reflex pathway to cutaneous afferents from different limbs and their modulation during the performance of motor tasks (i.e., standing and walking) are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated changes in soleus H-reflex amplitudes induced by electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. Selected targets for conditioning stimulation included the superficial peroneal nerve, which innervates the foot dorsum in the contralateral ankle (cSP), and the superficial radial nerve, which innervates the dorsum of the hand in the ipsilateral (iSR) or contralateral wrist (cSR). Stimulation and subsequent reflex assessment took place during the standing and early-stance phase of treadmill walking in ten healthy subjects. Cutaneous stimulation produced long-latency inhibition (conditioning-test interval of ~100 ms) of the H-reflex during the early-stance phase of walking, and the inhibition was stronger following cSP stimulation compared with iSR or cSR stimulation. In contrast, although similar conditioning stimulation significantly facilitated the H-reflex during standing, this effect remained constant irrespective of the different conditioning sites. These findings suggest that cutaneous inputs from the arms and contralateral leg had reversible effects on the H-reflex amplitudes, including inhibitions with different sensitivities during the early-stance phase of walking and facilitation during standing. Furthermore, the differential sensitivities of the H-reflex modulations were expressed only during walking when the locations of the afferent inputs were functionally relevant. PMID:27030502

  9. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams. PMID:26457836

  10. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies. PMID:27485766

  11. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  12. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  13. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  14. The proboscis extension reflex not elicited in Magachilid bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) will reflexively extend their proboscis in response to antennal stimulation with sucrose solution. For decades, the proboscis extension reflex (PER) of honey bees has been used as a tool to further the understanding of their cognitive processes, such as learning and m...

  15. A Movement Account of Long-Distance Reflexives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rebecca Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines reflexive pronouns, such as Icelandic "sig" (Cf. Thrainsson 2007), which may be bound from outside of an infinitive clause (which I call MD "medium distance" binding) in addition to being bound locally. I propose that such reflexives are linked to their antecedents via sisterhood followed by movement: the…

  16. Reflexivity of Discomfort in Insider-Outsider Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Amani K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses my position as an Arab Muslim woman researcher who is affiliated with a Western university, researching Arab Muslim Canadian women. I discuss how reflexivity has emerged as an element of my research endeavours. Various notions of reflexivity in educational research have been expressed in the literature, yet I focus on what it…

  17. Cardiovascular regulation by skeletal muscle reflexes in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Megan N.; Mizuno, Masaki; Mitchell, Jere H.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate and blood pressure are elevated at the onset and throughout the duration of dynamic or static exercise. These neurally mediated cardiovascular adjustments to physical activity are regulated, in part, by a peripheral reflex originating in contracting skeletal muscle termed the exercise pressor reflex. Mechanically sensitive and metabolically sensitive receptors activating the exercise pressor reflex are located on the unencapsulated nerve terminals of group III and group IV afferent sensory neurons, respectively. Mechanoreceptors are stimulated by the physical distortion of their receptive fields during muscle contraction and can be sensitized by the production of metabolites generated by working skeletal myocytes. The chemical by-products of muscle contraction also stimulate metaboreceptors. Once activated, group III and IV sensory impulses are transmitted to cardiovascular control centers within the brain stem where they are integrated and processed. Activation of the reflex results in an increase in efferent sympathetic nerve activity and a withdrawal of parasympathetic nerve activity. These actions result in the precise alterations in cardiovascular hemodynamics requisite to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle. Coordinated activity by this reflex is altered after the development of cardiovascular disease, generating exaggerated increases in sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance. The basic components and operational characteristics of the reflex, the techniques used in human and animals to study the reflex, and the emerging evidence describing the dysfunction of the reflex with the advent of cardiovascular disease are highlighted in this review. PMID:21841019

  18. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams.

  19. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies.

  20. Approaches to Reflexivity: Navigating Educational and Career Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin; Johnston, Brenda; Fuller, Alison

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a critical appraisal of approaches to reflexivity in sociology. It uses data from social network research to argue that Archer's approach to reflexivity provides a valuable lens with which to understand how people navigate their education and career pathways. The paper is also critical of Archer's methodology and typology of…

  1. Reflexive Management Learning: An Integrative Review and a Conceptual Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Richard J.; Cullen, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The scale and reach of the recent global financial has created a fresh wave of interest in exploring more sustainable forms of management. A central thrust behind this trend in the practice of management development and education has been the accentuation of reflexivity. There are many variations in how reflexivity is understood, and this article…

  2. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  3. Convergence in reflex pathways from multiple cutaneous nerves innervating the foot depends upon the number of rhythmically active limbs during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  4. Reflex receptive fields are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal low back and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Neziri, Alban Y; Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Andersen, Ole K

    2013-08-01

    Pain hypersensitivity has been consistently detected in chronic pain conditions, but the underlying mechanisms are difficult to investigate in humans and thus poorly understood. Patients with endometriosis pain display enlarged reflex receptive fields (RRF), providing a new perspective in the identification of possible mechanisms behind hypersensitivity states in humans. The primary hypothesis of this study was that RRF are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal pain. Secondary study end points were subjective pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) thresholds after single and repeated (temporal summation) electrical stimulation. Forty chronic neck pain patients, 40 chronic low back pain patients, and 24 acute low back pain patients were tested. Electrical stimuli were applied to 10 sites on the sole of the foot to quantify the RRF, defined as the area of the foot from where a reflex was evoked. For the secondary end points, electrical stimuli were applied to the cutaneous innervation area of the sural nerve. All patient groups presented enlarged RRF areas compared to pain-free volunteers (P<.001). Moreover, they also displayed lower NWR and pain thresholds to single and repeated electrical stimulation (P<.001). These results demonstrate that musculoskeletal pain conditions are characterized by enlarged RRF, lowered NWR and pain thresholds, and facilitated temporal summation, most likely caused by widespread spinal hyperexcitability. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these pain conditions, and it supports the use of the RRF and NWR as objective biomarkers for pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental pain research. PMID:23707309

  5. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  6. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  7. REFLEX, a social-cognitive group treatment to improve insight in schizophrenia: study protocol of a multi-center RCT

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Insight is impaired in a majority of people with schizophrenia. Impaired insight is associated with poorer outcomes of the disorder. Based on existing literature, we developed a model that explains which processes may possibly play a role in impaired insight. This model was the starting point of the development of REFLEX: a brief psychosocial intervention to improve insight in schizophrenia. REFLEX is a 12-sessions group training, consisting of three modules of four sessions each. Modules in this intervention are: "coping with stigma", "you and your personal narrative", and "you in the present". Methods/Design REFLEX is currently evaluated in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Eight mental health institutions in the Netherlands participate in this evaluation. Patients are randomly assigned to either REFLEX or an active control condition, existing of cognitive remediation exercises in a group. In a subgroup of patients, fMRI scans are made before and after training in order to assess potential haemodynamic changes associated with the effects of the training. Discussion REFLEX is one of the few interventions aiming specifically to improving insight in schizophrenia and has potential value for improving insight. Targeting insight in schizophrenia is a complex task, that comes with several methodological issues. These issues are addressed in the discussion of this paper. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN50247539 PMID:21975132

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy--a complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Turner-Stokes, L

    2002-12-15

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a complex and poorly-understood condition characterized by: (a) pain and altered sensation; (b) motor disturbance and soft tissue change; (c) vasomotor and autonomic changes; and (d) psychosocial disturbance. Neurological symptoms typically do not conform to any particular pattern of nerve damage. Many different names have been ascribed to this condition and most recently the term 'complex regional pain syndrome' has been coined to emphasize the complex interaction of somatic, psychological and behavioural factors. Diagnostic criteria have been proposed by the International Association for the Study of Pain, but are still subject to debate. This review article describes the clinical features which may present as part of the condition, and the patho-physiology and pre-disposing factors so far identified. The evidence for effectiveness of different interventions is presented and a treatment approach outlined for inter-disciplinary management. While RSD is traditionally associated with pain in the extremities, the possibility is raised that the same process may underlie chronic pain syndromes affecting more central structures, such as testicular or pelvic pain.

  9. Vibration paradox and H-reflex suppression: is H-reflex suppression results from distorting effect of vibration?

    PubMed

    Cakar, H I; Cidem, M; Kara, S; Karacan, I

    2014-09-01

    Vibration paradox is that an increase in muscles activity coexists with the inhibition of H-reflex during vibration. The H-reflex suppression may be due to the movement of stimulating electrode during vibration. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. Fifteen healthy young adult males participated in this study. The soleus myoelectrical activities were evaluated by surface electromyography (SEMG). The vibration was applied only to the left leg and the H-reflex of soleus muscle was measured in the right leg to prevent the probable measurement errors caused by the movement of stimulating electrode. The Hmax/Mmax ratio of the right soleus isolated from vibration effects significantly decreased during the left leg vibration. As a result, this study shows that the H-reflex is suppressed during the vibration and the movement of the stimulating electrode has no role on the suppression of H-reflex.

  10. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  11. The Chinchilla's vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merwin, W. H., Jr.; Wall, Conrad, III; Tomko, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was measured and characterized in seven adult chinchillas using 0.01 to 1.0 Hz angular velocity sinusoids. Gains were less than compensatory, and were variable from day to day, but phases were highly repeatable both within and between animals. The best fitting transfer function to the average data of all animals had a dominant time constant of 7.5 sec, and an adaptation operator with a time constant of 24.0 sec. There were certain nonlinearities in the horizontal VOR of this animal, and it was difficult to elicit a robust optokinetic response. Results are discussed in relation to similar measurements in other species.

  12. Vestibulospinal reflexes as a function of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Homick, J. L.; Anderson, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from previous manned space flights suggest that an exposure to microgravity produces significant alterations in vestibular, neuromuscular, and related sensory system functions. It is possible that the observed changes are a function of adaptation induced by altered otolith input. An experiment in Spacelab 1 was conducted with the aim to study this adaptation as it occurred in flight and after flight, and to relate the observed changes to mechanisms underlying space motion sickness. The concept was explored by making use of the anatomic pathway which links the otolith organs and spinal motoneurons. The overall sensitivity of the spinal motoneurons was tested by two related methods. One method involves the electrical excitation of neural tissue and the recording of vestibulospinal reflexes in conjunction with a brief linear acceleration. The second method is concerned with measurements of dynamic postural ataxia. Results suggest that more than a single time constant may be involved in man's ability to return to baseline values.

  13. Bremsstrahlung target optimization for reflex triodes

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Mosher, D.; Commisso, R. J.

    2008-08-15

    The anode (tantalum) foil thickness in a reflex triode was varied from 2.5 to 250 {mu}m to maximize the dose from bremsstrahlung produced by a 1 MV, 1 MA, 100 ns electron beam. Experiments and computer simulations show that the dose is maximized for a foil thickness of about 25 {mu}m, 1/18th of the electron range computed from the continuous slowing down approximation. For foils thicker than optimum, self-absorption in the foil attenuates 10-100 keV photons, reducing the dose. For foils thinner than optimum, the dose decreases as a result of electron migration to large radius. A simple formula that predicts the optimum thickness as a function of the beam current and voltage is derived that should be applicable to a large range of experimental parameters.

  14. Static ocular counterroll reflex in skew deviation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakumar, M.; Blakeman, A.; Goltz, H.C.; Sharpe, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The static ocular counterroll (OCR) reflex generates partially compensatory torsional eye movements during head roll. It is mediated by the utricle in the inner ear. Skew deviation is a vertical strabismus thought to be caused by imbalance in the utriculo-ocular pathway. We hypothesized that if skew deviation is indeed caused by damage to this reflex pathway, patients with skew deviation would show abnormal OCR. Methods: Eighteen patients with skew deviation caused by brainstem or cerebellar lesions and 18 normal participants viewed a target at 1 m. Ocular responses to static passive head roll-tilts of approximately 20° were recorded using search coils. Static OCR gain was calculated as the change in torsional eye position divided by the change in head position during sustained head roll. Perception of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) was also measured. Results: Group mean OCR gain was reduced by 45% in patients. At an individual level, OCR gains were asymmetric between eyes and between torsional directions in 90% of patients. In addition, the hypotropic eye incyclotorting gain was lower than the hypertropic eye excyclotorting gain during head roll toward the hypotropic eye in 94% of patients. No consistent pattern of gain asymmetry was found during head roll toward the hypertropic eye. The SVV was tilted toward the hypotropic eye. Conclusion: Static OCR gain is significantly reduced in skew deviation. Interocular and directional gain asymmetries are also prevalent. The asymmetries provide further evidence that disruption of the utriculo-ocular pathway is a mechanism for skew deviation. PMID:21813791

  15. Perceptual rivalry: reflexes reveal the gradual nature of visual awareness.

    PubMed

    Naber, Marnix; Frässle, Stefan; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Rivalry is a common tool to probe visual awareness: a constant physical stimulus evokes multiple, distinct perceptual interpretations ("percepts") that alternate over time. Percepts are typically described as mutually exclusive, suggesting that a discrete (all-or-none) process underlies changes in visual awareness. Here we follow two strategies to address whether rivalry is an all-or-none process: first, we introduce two reflexes as objective measures of rivalry, pupil dilation and optokinetic nystagmus (OKN); second, we use a continuous input device (analog joystick) to allow observers a gradual subjective report. We find that the "reflexes" reflect the percept rather than the physical stimulus. Both reflexes show a gradual dependence on the time relative to perceptual transitions. Similarly, observers' joystick deflections, which are highly correlated with the reflex measures, indicate gradual transitions. Physically simulating wave-like transitions between percepts suggest piece-meal rivalry (i.e., different regions of space belonging to distinct percepts) as one possible explanation for the gradual transitions. Furthermore, the reflexes show that dominance durations depend on whether or not the percept is actively reported. In addition, reflexes respond to transitions with shorter latencies than the subjective report and show an abundance of short dominance durations. This failure to report fast changes in dominance may result from limited access of introspection to rivalry dynamics. In sum, reflexes reveal that rivalry is a gradual process, rivalry's dynamics is modulated by the required action (response mode), and that rapid transitions in perceptual dominance can slip away from awareness. PMID:21677786

  16. Cardiorespiratory parameters and respiratory reflexes in rabbits during hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Javorka, K; Calkovská, A; Petrásková, M; Gecelovská, V

    1996-01-01

    The effects of different body temperature (BT) on the respiratory and cardiovascular parameters and respiratory reflexes were studied in 33 anaesthetized adult rabbits. Hyperthermia elicited panting with mean panting respiratory rate 199 +/- 14 x min-1 in all anaesthetized rabbits. Significant correlations between BT and frequency of breathing (positive), heart rate (positive) or tidal volume (negative) were found. Cooling was accompanied by considerable arterial hypotension. Duration of the Hering-Breuer reflex (HB) was reduced by the rise of BT. Intensity of the reflex (assessed as the ratio of the apnoeic pause to the mean duration of the previous 5 breaths) was unchanged up to the body temperature eliciting panting (41.15 +/- 0.08 degrees C) when it was greatly diminished. Defensive airway reflexes were also changed in hyperthermia. The duration as well as the intensity of nasal apnoea (Kratschmer's reflex) and laryngeal chemoreflex apnoea were decreased. The intensities of respiratory efforts in sneezing and laryngeal coughing were reduced. The expulsive reactions evoked by mechanical stimulation of the larynx were replaced by very shortlasting inhibition of breathing during panting. The results indicate that reflex control of breathing via the Hering-Breuer reflex and the ability to eliminate irritants from the airways are diminished during hyperthermia and panting in anaesthetized rabbits. PMID:9085374

  17. Effects of horizontal body casting on the baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, G. E.; Dickey, D. T.; Sandler, H.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term horizontal body position on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate. Six male rhesus monkeys (6.2-9.4 kg) were given bolus injections of 4.0 microgram/kg, phenylephrine during each of the following conditions: awake, anesthetized (10 mg/kg ketamine HCl), and after beta-blockade (1 mg/kg propranolol HCl) before, 7, 14, and 28 days after being placed in a horizontal body cast. R-R interval vs. systolic arterial pressure was plotted, and the slope was determined by least-squares-fit linear regression. Baroreceptor slope was significantly reduced by 7 days of horizontal body position and remained attenuated throughout the 28-day restraint period both before and after beta-receptor blockade. These data are consistent with the thesis that prolonged exposure to a zero-gravity environment impairs autonomic reflex regulation of the cardiovascular system.

  18. Potential enhancement of warm x-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-07-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of war x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions. The calculation are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggest Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung which accompanies the warm x rays is a concern, then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately} 400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately} 5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  19. Potential enhancement of warm X-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.

    1995-08-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of warm x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions, for a Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) class accelerator. The calculations are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggested Jupiter diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung, which accompanies the warm x rays, is a concern then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately}400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately}5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  20. Ivane S. Beritashvili (1884-1974): from spinal cord reflexes to image-driven behavior.

    PubMed

    Tsagareli, M G; Doty, R W

    2009-10-20

    Ivane Beritashvili ("Beritoff" in Russian, and often in Western languages) was a major figure in 20th-century neuroscience. Mastering the string galvanometer, he founded the electrophysiology of spinal cord reflexes, showing that inhibition is a distinctly different process from excitation, contrary to the concepts of his famous mentor, Wedensky. Work on postural reflexes with Magnus was cut short by World War I, but he later demonstrated that navigation in two-dimensional space without vision is a function solely of the vestibular system rather than of muscle proprioception. Persevering in his experiments despite postwar turmoil he founded an enduring Physiology Institute in Tbilisi, where he pursued an ingenious and extensive investigation of comparative memory in vertebrates. This revealed the unique nature of mammalian memory processes, which he forthrightly called "image driven," and distinguished them unequivocally from those underlying conditional reflexes. For some 30 years the Stalinist terror confined his publications to the Russian language. Work with his colleague, Chichinadze, discovering that memory confined to one cerebral hemisphere could be accessed by the other via a specific forebrain commissure, did reach the West, and ultimately led to recognition of the fascinating "split brain" condition. In the 1950s he was removed from his professorial position for 5 years as being "anti-Pavlovian." Restored to favor, he was honorary president of the "Moscow Colloquium" that saw the foundation of the International Brain Research Organization. PMID:19589370

  1. Reflex anuria: an old concept with new evidence.

    PubMed

    Hou, Weibin; Wen, Jin; Ji, Zhigang; Chen, Jian; Li, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Reflex anuria (RA) was defined by Hull as cessation of urine output from both kidneys due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or its ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other organs. This is not a common concept among urologists or nephrologists even though it has been proposed for more than half a century. The phenomenon has not been thoroughly understood. But intrarenal arteriolar spasm and ureteral spasm have gained wide acceptance as the mechanisms of RA. The present review summarized papers published up to now on RA, in order to depict the general profile of the disease and to further elucidate the pathogenesis of RA. A classification system of RA was proposed as neurovascular reflex, ureterorenal reflex, radiated renovascular reflex, renoureteral reflex, ureteroureteral reflex and radiated ureteral reflex, based on the two assumed mechanisms and the stimulus' origins. All these types except renoureteral reflex had gained supporting evidence from animal experiments and/or clinical case reports. RA is a diagnosis of exclusion, only being considered after ruling out common and tangible etiologies such as ureteral calculi, acute tubular necrosis, renal vascular occlusion, hypovolemia, infection, etc. If the diagnosis has been established, treatment plan should be directed toward the mechanisms more than the causative factors. Abnormalities of the autonomic nerve system and congenital urogenital malformations incline people to RA. In summary, RA is a cessation of urine production caused by stimuli on kidney, ureter or other organs, through a mechanism of reflex spasm of intrarenal arterioles or ureters, leading to acute renal failure. It is a functional rather than parenchymal disease.

  2. [Human physiology: images and practices of the reflex].

    PubMed

    Wübben, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The essay examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the essay argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

  3. Reversible abnormalities of the Hering Breuer reflex in acrylamide neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Satchell, P

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex was compared in anaesthetised rabbits before, during and after the induction of acrylamide neuropathy, and was measured as the tracheal pressure which produced 30 seconds of apnoea. After four weeks of acrylamide (400 mg/kg total dose) there was ataxia and the conduction velocity of hindlimb motor nerves was significantly reduced. At this time there was a marked and reproducible reduction in the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex. The ataxia resolved within a month of stopping acrylamide administration. Three months after the cessation of acrylamide the sensitivity of the Hering Breuer reflex had increased significantly but had not returned to normal. PMID:2993526

  4. Primitive Reflexes and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Developmental Origins of Classroom Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Myra; Houghton, Stephen; Chapman, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The present research studied the symptomatologic overlap of AD/HD behaviours and retention of four primitive reflexes (Moro, Tonic Labyrinthine Reflex [TLR], Asymmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [ATNR], Symmetrical Tonic Neck Reflex [STNR]) in 109 boys aged 7-10 years. Of these, 54 were diagnosed with AD/HD, 34 manifested sub-syndromal coordination,…

  5. Reflexive Research Ethics in Fetal Tissue Xenotransplantation Research

    PubMed Central

    Panikkar, Bindu; Smith, Natasha; Brown, Phil

    2013-01-01

    For biomedical research in which the only involvement of the human subject is the provision of tissue or organ samples, a blanket consent, i.e. consent to use the tissue for anything researchers wish to do, is considered by many to be adequate for legal and IRB requirements. Alternatively, a detailed informed consent provides patients or study participants with more thorough information about the research topic. We document here the beliefs and opinions of the research staff on informed consent and the discussion-based reflexive research ethics process that we employed in our fetal tissue xenotransplantion research on the impact of environmental exposures on fetal development. Reflexive research ethics entails the continued adjustment of research practice according to relational and reflexive understandings of what might be beneficent or harmful. Such reflexivity is not solely an individual endeavor, but rather a collective relationship between all actors in the research process. PMID:23074992

  6. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  7. Speech Performance, Dysphagia and Oral Reflexes in Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Russell J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The adequacy of biting, sucking, swallowing, and chewing as well as the presence or absence of nine infantile oral reflexes were assessed in 60 cerebral palsied individuals (ages 3 to 23). (Author/PHR)

  8. [Red reflex: prevention way to blindness in childhood].

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Adriana Sousa Carvalho; Cardoso, Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão; Lúcio, Ingrid Martins Leite

    2007-01-01

    This study had as objective to investigate the result and the colour gradation of red reflex test in newborns (NB). It is a exploratory, quantitative study and the sample was 180 NB from maternity ward in Fortaleza-CE. From this, 156 showed result "no altered" and 24 "suspect". About the aspect of red reflex, 144 NB showed the same coloration in the two eyes, in 35 of this, the colour was red, in 33, orange reddish, in 46 orange colour, in 24 light yellow, in 6 yellow with whitish stains central. Of the suspect cases, the reflex was light yellow with whitish stains with lines. The nurse trained to accomplish the red reflex test can have important role at Neonatal Unit with actions about the prevention of ocular alterations in the childhood.

  9. Nasocardiac reflex during aspiration and injection through a nasogastric tube: An infrequent occurrence.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Kaur, Jasleen; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2015-04-01

    Nasocardiac reflex is a relatively less discussed variant of trigeminovagal reflex where the afferent arc of the reflex is represented by any of the branches of the trigeminal nerves, and the efferent arc is via the vagus nerve. Elicitation of this reflex is commonly seen during surgical manipulation and is manifested as bradycardia or even asystole. We report a case where nasocardiac reflex was unusually observed in a patient when aspiration and injection were done through a nasogastric tube.

  10. Mechanical Characteristics of Reflex Durign Upright Posture in Paralyzed Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongchul; Youm, Youngil; Lee, Bumsuk; Kim, Youngho; Choi, Hyeonki

    The characteristics of flexor reflexes have been investigated in the previous studies with human subjects who were seated or supine position. However, researchers did not describe how the spinal circuits are used in different hip angles for paralyzed subjects, such as the standing position with walker or cane. In upright posture the compatibility between a flexor reflex of leg and body balance is a special problem for lower limb injured subjects. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hip angle change on the flexor reflex evoked in standing paralyzed subjects supported by walker. In this study, six spinal cord injured and four stroke subjects were recruited through the inpatient physical therapy clinics of Korea national rehabilitation hospital. A single axis electronic goniometer was mounted on the lateral side of the hip joint of the impaired limb to record movements in the sagittal plane at this joint. The electronic goniometer was connected to a data acquisition system, through amplifiers to a computer. Since subject' posture influenced characteristics of the flexion reflex response, the subjects were supported in an upright posture by the help of parallelogram walder. Two series of tests were performed on each leg. The first series of the tests investigated the influence of hip angle during stationary standing posture on flexion reflex response. The hip angle was adjusted by the foot plate. The second examined the effect of the voluntary action of subject on swing motion during the gait. The electrically induced flexion reflex simultaneously produced the flexion of the hip, knee and dorsiflexion of the ankle enabling the swing phase of walking. Form the experimental results we observed that the reflex response of hip joint was largerwith the hip in the extended position than in the flexed position during standing posture. Under voluntary movement on flexion reflex during gaint, the peak hip angle induced by stimulation was

  11. Cardiovascular Reflexes Activity and Their Interaction during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac output and arterial blood pressure increase during dynamic exercise notwithstanding the exercise-induced vasodilation due to functional sympatholysis. These cardiovascular adjustments are regulated in part by neural reflexes which operate to guarantee adequate oxygen supply and by-products washout of the exercising muscles. Moreover, they maintain adequate perfusion of the vital organs and prevent excessive increments in blood pressure. In this review, we briefly summarize neural reflexes operating during dynamic exercise with particular emphasis on their interaction. PMID:26557662

  12. An electronic device to record consensual reflex in human pupil.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, H M; Costa, R M; Camilo, E N R; Gang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the pupil offers an objective evaluation of visual function as well as the vegetative pathways to the eye. This work proposes the development of an effective method and a portable device to test the consensual pupillary reflex. The first results demonstrate the success of a new device construction and methodology to record the consensual reflex with different stimulus, in a situation of complete blockage of light.

  13. Motor neurone responses during a postural reflex in solitarious and gregarious desert locusts.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Laura M; Ott, Swidbert R; Matheson, Tom; Burrows, Malcolm; Rogers, Stephen M

    2010-08-01

    Desert locusts show extreme phenotypic plasticity and can change reversibly between two phases that differ radically in morphology, physiology and behaviour. Solitarious locusts are cryptic in appearance and behaviour, walking slowly with the body held close to the ground. Gregarious locusts are conspicuous in appearance and much more active, walking rapidly with the body held well above the ground. During walking, the excursion of the femoro-tibial (F-T) joint of the hind leg is smaller in solitarious locusts, and the joint is kept more flexed throughout an entire step. Under open loop conditions, the slow extensor tibiae (SETi) motor neurone of solitarious locusts shows strong tonic activity that increases at more extended F-T angles. SETi of gregarious locusts by contrast showed little tonic activity. Simulated flexion of the F-T joint elicits resistance reflexes in SETi in both phases, but regardless of the initial and final position of the leg, the spiking rate of SETi during these reflexes was twice as great in solitarious compared to gregarious locusts. This increased sensory-motor gain in the neuronal networks controlling postural reflexes in solitarious locusts may be linked to the occurrence of pronounced behavioural catalepsy in this phase similar to other cryptic insects such as stick insects.

  14. Ligament-muscle reflex arc after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Biedert, R M; Zwick, E B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a ligament-muscle reflex arc exists between the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the hamstring muscle group. We studied four patients, average age 34.2 years (range 32-36 years). The mean time between the ACL reconstruction and the study examination was 56.2 months (range 5-108 months). All patients underwent a second-look arthroscopy for meniscal injuries, cyclops lesions, or adhesions. Five patients with a normal ACL served as a control group before we performed an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured using fine wire electrodes under two different testing conditions. No unequivocal EMG activity could be detected in the ACL-reconstructed knees when we pulled on the graft or in the controls. Three of four patients and all controls felt pain when we touched the graft or normal ACL or applied strain on it with the hook. In conclusion, the ACL autograft presents a noxious sensory innervation, the Lachman test maneuver stimulates a reflex arc with hamstrings activation, and an unequivocal ligament-muscle reflex arc from the graft to the hamstring muscle group could not be demonstrated. PMID:9833113

  15. The past, present, and future of health development campaigns: reflexivity and the critical-cultural approach.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mohan Jyoti; de Souza, Rebecca

    2008-07-01

    In contemporary society, health issues have gained increasing urgency in both political and academic spheres. Looking back at the failure of the modernist development initiatives, there is the need to realize that we live in a time of increasing sociopolitical complexity. The present moment is perhaps best understood in terms of a complex tension and linkage between the past and present, global and local, modern and postmodern. The critical-cultural approach to health campaigns is an approach that, through the reflexive interrogation of modernist assumptions underlying health communication campaigns, attempts to foreground the tensions inherent in the practice of health campaigns. This essay discusses the manner in which the critical-cultural approach interrogates modernist assumptions and provides an alternative paradigm for approaching the theory and practice of health campaigns by suggesting the necessity for reflexivity. Specifically, we discuss how the perspective interrogates the role of the media in development, the significance of culture, the locus of health responsibility, the impact of structural conditions, and the politics of knowledge, providing examples of campaigns that illustrate this reflexivity. PMID:18701997

  16. Modulation of bradykinin-induced gastric-cardiovascular reflexes by histamine.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, C L; Stahl, G L; Theodossy, S J; Longhurst, J C

    1992-01-01

    Both histamine and bradykinin induce gastric-cardiovascular reflexes and are released during several pathophysiological conditions. This study examined the possibility that histamine modulates the magnitude of the reflex response to stimulation by bradykinin. Thus in chloralose anesthetized cats, the cardiovascular response to stimulation of the gastric serosa with 1 microgram/ml bradykinin was monitored before and after topical application of 100 micrograms/ml histamine (n = 6) or 1 mg/ml diphenhydramine (H1-receptor antagonist) and histamine (n = 5). After application of histamine, bradykinin-induced increases in mean arterial pressure and left ventricular pressure were attenuated by 23 and 27%, respectively. Conversely, when the H1-receptors on the serosal surface of the stomach were blocked (n = 5) before application of histamine, the pressor response to bradykinin was augmented by 26%. To determine the afferents that might contribute to the attenuating effect of histamine, we recorded single unit activity in 14 A delta and 21 C visceral afferent fibers in response to bradykinin stimulation before and after histamine stimulation. We observed that the impulse activity of 10 of the A delta and 14 of the C fibers to bradykinin stimulation was reduced after treatment with histamine. These results suggest that histamine induces an inhibitory effect on the nerve endings of visceral A delta and C fibers to the action of bradykinin through an H1-receptor mechanism. This inhibitory effect attenuates the magnitude of the consequent cardiovascular reflex response.

  17. Loudness changes resulting from an electrically induced middle-ear reflex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the changes in loudness brought about by electro-cutaneous elicitation of the middle-ear reflex. Subjects were required to judge the relative loudness of the second of three consecutive 30-msec bursts of tone, the second tone being accompanied by an electrical shock to the external auditory meatus, capable of eliciting a contraction of the middle-ear muscles. The difference between these judgments and those of the control condition (shock on the arm) was taken to represent a measure of the attenuation provided by contraction of the middle-ear muscles. Test tones were 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 Hz at levels of 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 dB. The results indicate that the middle-ear reflex decreases the middle-ear's transmission mainly for low-frequency sounds. The results fail to lend support to the Loeb-Riopelle hypothesis that the middle-ear reflex acts as a limiter, rather than a linear attenuator.

  18. Motor neurone responses during a postural reflex in solitarious and gregarious desert locusts.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Laura M; Ott, Swidbert R; Matheson, Tom; Burrows, Malcolm; Rogers, Stephen M

    2010-08-01

    Desert locusts show extreme phenotypic plasticity and can change reversibly between two phases that differ radically in morphology, physiology and behaviour. Solitarious locusts are cryptic in appearance and behaviour, walking slowly with the body held close to the ground. Gregarious locusts are conspicuous in appearance and much more active, walking rapidly with the body held well above the ground. During walking, the excursion of the femoro-tibial (F-T) joint of the hind leg is smaller in solitarious locusts, and the joint is kept more flexed throughout an entire step. Under open loop conditions, the slow extensor tibiae (SETi) motor neurone of solitarious locusts shows strong tonic activity that increases at more extended F-T angles. SETi of gregarious locusts by contrast showed little tonic activity. Simulated flexion of the F-T joint elicits resistance reflexes in SETi in both phases, but regardless of the initial and final position of the leg, the spiking rate of SETi during these reflexes was twice as great in solitarious compared to gregarious locusts. This increased sensory-motor gain in the neuronal networks controlling postural reflexes in solitarious locusts may be linked to the occurrence of pronounced behavioural catalepsy in this phase similar to other cryptic insects such as stick insects. PMID:20416321

  19. Interaction of Baroreceptor and Chemoreceptor Reflexes MODULATION OF THE CHEMORECEPTOR REFLEX BY CHANGES IN BARORECEPTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.; Abboud, Francois M.; Mark, Allyn L.; Schmid, Phillip G.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the level of arterial pressure and degree of baroreceptor activation affect responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors. Chemoreceptors were stimulated by injecting nicotine into the common carotid artery of anesthetized and paralyzed dogs. Responses were observed in the innervated gracilis muscle, perfused at constant flow while perfusion pressure was measured. Arterial pressure was lowered by bleeding the animals and raised by transient occlusion of the descending aorta. Vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors were enhanced by hypotension and inhibited by elevation of arterial pressure. Potentiation of the chemoreceptor reflex by hemorrhagic hypotension was not the result of altered vascular resistance in the gracilis muscle, sensitization of chemoreceptors by catecholamines or acidosis, or changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. Additional studies were done in which we excluded the possibility that the changes resulted from direct effects of changes in arterial pressure on chemoreceptors. Both carotid bifurcations were isolated and perfused. On one side, pressure was raised to stimulate the carotid sinus baroreceptors. On the other side, the carotid body chemoreceptors were stimulated by nicotine or by hypoxic and hypercapnic blood. Activation of baroreceptors on one side attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to chemoreceptor stimulation on the other side. This excludes a direct effect of changes in arterial pressure on the chemoreceptors and suggests a central interaction of these reflexes. We conclude that vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors are potentiated by hypotension and inhibited by transient hypertension. These effects appear to result at least in part from a central interaction of chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:4825222

  20. Auditory Brainstem Circuits That Mediate the Middle Ear Muscle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Sudeep; Windsor, Alanna Marie; Lee, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear muscle (MEM) reflex is one of two major descending systems to the auditory periphery. There are two middle ear muscles (MEMs): the stapedius and the tensor tympani. In man, the stapedius contracts in response to intense low frequency acoustic stimuli, exerting forces perpendicular to the stapes superstructure, increasing middle ear impedance and attenuating the intensity of sound energy reaching the inner ear (cochlea). The tensor tympani is believed to contract in response to self-generated noise (chewing, swallowing) and nonauditory stimuli. The MEM reflex pathways begin with sound presented to the ear. Transduction of sound occurs in the cochlea, resulting in an action potential that is transmitted along the auditory nerve to the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem (the first relay station for all ascending sound information originating in the ear). Unknown interneurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus project either directly or indirectly to MEM motoneurons located elsewhere in the brainstem. Motoneurons provide efferent innervation to the MEMs. Although the ascending and descending limbs of these reflex pathways have been well characterized, the identity of the reflex interneurons is not known, as are the source of modulatory inputs to these pathways. The aim of this article is to (a) provide an overview of MEM reflex anatomy and physiology, (b) present new data on MEM reflex anatomy and physiology from our laboratory and others, and (c) describe the clinical implications of our research. PMID:20870664

  1. ["Reflex--in a strict sense". Ivan Michajlovic Secenov and the founding myths of the 'Russian reflex empire'].

    PubMed

    Wurm, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Ivan Michajlovik Secenov's impact on reflex theory by looking at the different narratives which constitute his specific position in the history of science, where he is considered the Russian founder of a purely materialist framing of consciousness and behaviour, the father figure of objective psychology, and the predecessor of the 'great' Ivan Pavlov. I argue that Secenov himself was very much aware of the symbolic significance of the term "reflex" and that the rhetorical strategies in his opus magnum, The Reflexes of the Brain (1863), deliberately enforce the precarious twofold potential of reflexological conceptions as psycho-physiological structures as well as social programs. Also within the cultural and political settings of the 19th and 20th century, Secenov's comprehensive and multifaceted research work in the field of nerve physiology was gradually reduced to a strong, ideologically interpretable message: "All movements bearing the name of voluntary in physiology are reflex in a strict sense".

  2. ["Reflex--in a strict sense". Ivan Michajlovic Secenov and the founding myths of the 'Russian reflex empire'].

    PubMed

    Wurm, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    This paper aims to reconstruct Ivan Michajlovik Secenov's impact on reflex theory by looking at the different narratives which constitute his specific position in the history of science, where he is considered the Russian founder of a purely materialist framing of consciousness and behaviour, the father figure of objective psychology, and the predecessor of the 'great' Ivan Pavlov. I argue that Secenov himself was very much aware of the symbolic significance of the term "reflex" and that the rhetorical strategies in his opus magnum, The Reflexes of the Brain (1863), deliberately enforce the precarious twofold potential of reflexological conceptions as psycho-physiological structures as well as social programs. Also within the cultural and political settings of the 19th and 20th century, Secenov's comprehensive and multifaceted research work in the field of nerve physiology was gradually reduced to a strong, ideologically interpretable message: "All movements bearing the name of voluntary in physiology are reflex in a strict sense". PMID:19824305

  3. Crossed reflex reversal during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gervasio, Sabata; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-05-01

    During human walking, precise coordination between the two legs is required in order to react promptly to any sudden hazard that could threaten stability. The networks involved in this coordination are not yet completely known, but a direct spinal connection between soleus (SOL) muscles has recently been revealed. For this response to be functional, as previously suggested, we hypothesize that it will be accompanied by a reaction in synergistic muscles, such as gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and that a reversal of the response would occur when an opposite reaction is required. In the present study, surface EMGs of contralateral SOL and GL were analyzed after tibial nerve (TN), sural nerve (SuN), and medial plantar nerve (MpN) stimulation during two tasks in which opposite reactions are functionally expected: normal walking (NW), just before ipsilateral heel strike, and hybrid walking (HW) (legs walking in opposite directions), at ipsilateral push off and contralateral touchdown. Early crossed facilitations were observed in the contralateral GL after TN stimulation during NW, and a reversal of such responses occurred during HW. These results underline the functional significance of short-latency crossed responses and represent the first evidence for short-latency reflex reversal in the contralateral limb for humans. Muscle afferents seem to mediate the response during NW, while during HW cutaneous afferents are likely involved. It is thus possible that different afferents mediate the crossed response during different tasks.

  4. Reflex anuria affecting both kidneys following hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gholyaf, Mahmoud; Afzali, Saeed; Babolhavaegi, Hoshang; Rahimi, Abolfazl; Wagharseyedayn, Seyed A

    2009-01-01

    In situations when there is unilateral ureteral obstruction, the contralateral kidney retains its normal function. In rare instances however, it has been reported that unilateral ureteral obstruction can lead to reflex anuria (RA) and acute renal failure (ARF). Even more unusually, RA with ARF can occur without organic obstruction due to ureteric manipulation during pelvic surgery. We report a 78- year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy because of endometrial carcinoma. She developed ARF evidenced by anuria of 120-hours duration, and gradual rise of serum creatinine levels to 11.8 mg/dL on the fifth day after hysterectomy. Ultrasound study of the urinary tract revealed bilateral moderate hydronephrosis. Detailed evaluation did not reveal any organic obstruction. She was managed with hemodialysis, control of hypertension and correction of fluid and electrolyte imbalances. By the sixth day, diuresis was established, and the blood urea and serum creatinine levels decreased to normal by the sixteenth day. The patient was finally discharged on the eighteenth day. Our case suggests that urologists and nephrologists should consider RA as one of the causes of anuria and ARF.

  5. Impaired Sacculocollic Reflex in Lateral Medullary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonhye; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine saccular dysfunction by measuring cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) and to correlate abnormality of cVEMP with results of other vestibular function tests in lateral medullary infarction (LMI). Methods: We recorded cVEMP in 21 patients with LMI documented on MRI. cVEMP was induced by a short tone burst and was recorded in contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle while patients turned their heads forcefully to the contralateral side against resistance. Patients also underwent video-oculographic recording of spontaneous, gaze-evoked and head shaking nystagmus (HSN), evaluation of ocular tilt reaction (OTR), measurement of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) tilt, bithermal caloric tests, and audiometry. Results: Nine patients (43%) showed abnormal cVEMP, unilateral in seven and bilateral in two. The cVEMP abnormalities included decreased p13–n23 amplitude in four, delayed p13/n23 responses in five, and both decreased and delayed responses in two. The abnormal cVEMP was ipsilesional in five, contralesional in two, and bilateral in two. The prevalence of OTR/SVV tilt, spontaneous nystagmus, and HSN did not differ between the patients with normal and abnormal cVEMP. Conclusion: cVEMP was abnormal in approximately half of the patients with LMI. The abnormal cVEMP indicates damage to the descending sacculocollic reflex pathway or disruption of commissural modulation between the vestibular nuclei. PMID:21415908

  6. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  7. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  8. Artificial balancer - supporting device for postural reflex.

    PubMed

    Wojtara, Tytus; Sasaki, Makoto; Konosu, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masashi; Shimoda, Shingo; Alnajjar, Fady; Kimura, Hidenori

    2012-02-01

    The evolutionarily novel ability to keep ones body upright while standing or walking, the human balance, deteriorates in old age or can be compromised after accidents or brain surgeries. With the aged society, age related balance problems are on the rise. Persons with balance problems are more likely to fall during their everyday life routines. Especially in elderly, falls can lead to bone fractures making the patient bedridden, weakening the body and making it more prone to other diseases. Health care expenses for a fall patient are often very high. There is a great deal of research being done on exoskeletons and power assists. However, these technologies concentrate mainly on the amplifications of human muscle power while balance has to be provided by the human themself. Our research has been focused on supporting human balance in harmony with the human's own posture control mechanisms such as postural reflexes. This paper proposes an artificial balancer that supports human balance through acceleration of a flywheel attached to the body. Appropriate correcting torques are generated through our device based on the measurements of body deflections. We have carried out experiments with test persons standing on a platform subject to lateral perturbations and ambulatory experiments while walking on a balance beam. These experiments have demonstrated the effectiveness of our device in supporting balance and the possibility of enhancing balance-keeping capability in human beings through the application of external torque. PMID:22169384

  9. Vergence-dependent adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Richard F.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Zee, David S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) normally depends on the distance between the subject and the visual target, but it remains uncertain whether vergence angle can be linked to changes in VOR gain through a process of context-dependent adaptation. In this study, we examined this question with an adaptation paradigm that modified the normal relationship between vergence angle and retinal image motion. Subjects were rotated sinusoidally while they viewed an optokinetic (OKN) stimulus through either diverging or converging prisms. In three subjects the diverging prisms were worn while the OKN stimulus moved out of phase with the head, and the converging prisms were worn when the OKN stimulus moved in-phase with the head. The relationship between the vergence angle and OKN stimulus was reversed in the fourth subject. After 2 h of training, the VOR gain at the two vergence angles changed significantly in all of the subjects, evidenced by the two different VOR gains that could be immediately accessed by switching between the diverged and converged conditions. The results demonstrate that subjects can learn to use vergence angle as the contextual cue that retrieves adaptive changes in the angular VOR.

  10. Trigeminocardiac reflex and haemodynamic changes during Le Fort I osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Kiani, M T; Tajik, G; Ajami, M; Fazli, H; Kharazifard, M J; Mesgarzadeh, A

    2016-05-01

    The Le Fort I osteotomy is performed under general anaesthesia and specific haemodynamic conditions, i.e. hypotensive general anaesthesia. This study assessed the incidence of the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) during the different stages of the Le Fort I osteotomy. Forty-seven patients requiring a Le Fort I osteotomy were included. General anaesthesia was induced. In terms of haemodynamic changes, each patient's oxygen saturation (SpO2), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and electrocardiogram (ECG) were monitored by SADAAT Monitoring System and recorded during the different stages of osteotomy: before the induction of anaesthesia, before osteotomy cuts, after finishing the right pterygoid plate osteotomy, after finishing the left pterygoid plate osteotomy, and after performing down-fracture of the maxilla. No significant alteration in haemodynamic values was seen at the different stages of Le Fort I osteotomy. One patient showed arrhythmia with non-sinus junction rhythm after sinus bradycardia and two premature atrial contractions in the down-fracture stage, which led to the abrupt cessation of the procedure by the surgeon. This study showed no significant alterations in haemodynamic values during the different stages of Le Fort I osteotomy. Halting the procedure momentarily was sufficient to allow spontaneous normalization of the HR, blood pressure, and dysrhythmia.

  11. Pharmacological Isolation of Cognitive Components Influencing the Pupillary Light Reflex.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, Stuart R; Condray, Ruth; Pless, Misha L

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive operations can be detected by reduction of the pupillary light response. Neurophysiological pathways mediating this reduction have not been distinguished. We utilized selective blockade of pupillary sphincter or dilator muscles to isolate parasympathetic or sympathetic activity during cognition, without modifying central processes. Pupil diameter was measured during the light reaction in 29 normal adults under three processing levels: No Task, during an easy task (Add 1), or a difficult task (Subtract 7). At three separate sessions, the pupil was treated with placebo, tropicamide (blocking the muscarinic sphincter receptor), or dapiprazole (blocking the adrenergic dilator receptor). With placebo, pupil diameter increased with increasing task difficulty. The light reaction was reduced only in the Subtract 7 condition. Dapiprazole (which decreased overall diameter) showed similar task-related changes in diameter and light reflex as for placebo. Following tropicamide (which increased overall diameter), there was a further increase in diameter only in the difficult task. Findings suggest two separate inhibitory components at the parasympathetic oculomotor center. Changes in baseline diameter are likely related to reticular activation. Inhibition of the light reaction in the difficult task is likely associated with cortical afferents. Sustained sympathetic activity also was present during the difficult task.

  12. H-reflex excitability is inhibited in soleus, but not gastrocnemius, at the short-latency response of a horizontal jump-landing task.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cassandra S; Schabrun, Siobhan; Marshall, Paul W

    2016-06-01

    Impaired spinal-level neuromuscular control is suggested to contribute to instability and injury during dynamic landing tasks. Despite this suggestion, spinal-level neuromuscular control is yet to be examined during a horizontal jump-landing task. The aim of the current study was to assess changes in H-reflexes and its reliability at the short-latency response of landings from short and long distances. Eight healthy individuals (five male, three female; age, 22±1.2yrs; height, 178±8.1cm; weight, 72±15.7kg) participated in the study. H-reflexes were evoked at the SLR in the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles, during two landing conditions: 25% and 50% of maximal broad jump distance. H-reflexes were expressed relative to the background electromyography (EMG) and maximal M-wave responses (M-max). Soleus H-reflexes were inhibited when landing from shorter distance (25%, 13.9±7.6%; 50%, 8.3±6.5%; p<0.01). No change in H-reflex excitability was observed in medial gastrocnemius. Background EMG was unaltered across landing conditions. Inhibition of soleus H-reflex excitability from 25% to 50% landing condition indicates a reduced contribution of Ia-afferent feedback to the alpha-motor neuron during landings from greater distances, which may contribute to stiffness regulation at the ankle joint. Unaltered H-reflex excitability of medial gastrocnemius is most likely attributed to its functional role during the landing task.

  13. Hippocampal State-Dependent Behavioral Reflex to an Identical Sensory Input in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Keita; Nishikawa, Michimasa; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2014-01-01

    We examined the local field potential of the hippocampus to monitor brain states during a conditional discrimination task, in order to elucidate the relationship between ongoing brain states and a conditioned motor reflex. Five 10-week-old Wistar/ST male rats underwent a serial feature positive conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning using a preceding light stimulus as a conditional cue for reinforced trials. In this task, a 2-s light stimulus signaled that the following 350-ms tone (conditioned stimulus) was reinforced with a co-terminating 100-ms periorbital electrical shock. The interval between the end of conditional cue and the onset of the conditioned stimulus was 4±1 s. The conditioned stimulus was not reinforced when the light was not presented. Animals successfully utilized the light stimulus as a conditional cue to drive differential responses to the identical conditioned stimulus. We found that presentation of the conditional cue elicited hippocampal theta oscillations, which persisted during the interval of conditional cue and the conditioned stimulus. Moreover, expression of the conditioned response to the tone (conditioned stimulus) was correlated with the appearance of theta oscillations immediately before the conditioned stimulus. These data support hippocampal involvement in the network underlying a conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning. They also suggest that the preceding hippocampal activity can determine information processing of the tone stimulus in the cerebellum and its associated circuits. PMID:25397873

  14. Hippocampal state-dependent behavioral reflex to an identical sensory input in rats.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Keita; Nishikawa, Michimasa; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2014-01-01

    We examined the local field potential of the hippocampus to monitor brain states during a conditional discrimination task, in order to elucidate the relationship between ongoing brain states and a conditioned motor reflex. Five 10-week-old Wistar/ST male rats underwent a serial feature positive conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning using a preceding light stimulus as a conditional cue for reinforced trials. In this task, a 2-s light stimulus signaled that the following 350-ms tone (conditioned stimulus) was reinforced with a co-terminating 100-ms periorbital electrical shock. The interval between the end of conditional cue and the onset of the conditioned stimulus was 4±1 s. The conditioned stimulus was not reinforced when the light was not presented. Animals successfully utilized the light stimulus as a conditional cue to drive differential responses to the identical conditioned stimulus. We found that presentation of the conditional cue elicited hippocampal theta oscillations, which persisted during the interval of conditional cue and the conditioned stimulus. Moreover, expression of the conditioned response to the tone (conditioned stimulus) was correlated with the appearance of theta oscillations immediately before the conditioned stimulus. These data support hippocampal involvement in the network underlying a conditional discrimination task in eyeblink conditioning. They also suggest that the preceding hippocampal activity can determine information processing of the tone stimulus in the cerebellum and its associated circuits. PMID:25397873

  15. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many.

  16. A method of reflexive balancing in a pragmatic, interdisciplinary and reflexive bioethics.

    PubMed

    Ives, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an 'abstract' philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of 'empirical' (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but can perhaps best be understood as a substantive attempt to engage with the nature of that interdisciplinarity and to articulate the relationship between the many different disciplines (some of them empirical) that contribute to the field. It can also be described as an endeavour to explain how different disciplinary approaches can be integrated to effectively answer normative questions in bioethics, and fundamental to that endeavour is the need to think about how a robust methodology can be articulated that successfully marries apparently divergent epistemological and metaethical perspectives with method. This paper proposes 'Reflexive Bioethics' (RB) as a methodology for interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics, which utilizes a method of 'Reflexive Balancing' (RBL). RBL has been developed in response to criticisms of various forms of reflective equilibrium, and is built upon a pragmatic characterization of Bioethics and a 'quasi-moral foundationalism', which allows RBL to avoid some of the difficulties associated with RE and yet retain the flexible egalitarianism that makes it intuitively appealing to many. PMID:23444909

  17. ESO Reflex: a graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Richard; Ullgrén, Marko; Romaniello, Martino; Maisala, Sami; Oittinen, Tero; Solin, Otto; Savolainen, Ville; Järveläinen, Pekka; Tyynelä, Jani; Péron, Michèle; Ballester, Pascal; Gabasch, Armin; Izzo, Carlo

    ESO Reflex is a prototype software tool that provides a novel approach to astronomical data reduction by integrating a modern graphical workflow system (Taverna) with existing legacy data reduction algorithms. Most of the raw data produced by instruments at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile are reduced using recipes. These are compiled C applications following an ESO standard and utilising routines provided by the Common Pipeline Library (CPL). Currently these are run in batch mode as part of the data flow system to generate the input to the ESO/VLT quality control process and are also exported for use offline. ESO Reflex can invoke CPL-based recipes in a flexible way through a general purpose graphical interface. ESO Reflex is based on the Taverna system that was originally developed within the UK life-sciences community. Workflows have been created so far for three VLT/VLTI instruments, and the GUI allows the user to make changes to these or create workflows of their own. Python scripts or IDL procedures can be easily brought into workflows and a variety of visualisation and display options, including custom product inspection and validation steps, are available. Taverna is intended for use with web services and experiments using ESO Reflex to access Virtual Observatory web services have been successfully performed. ESO Reflex is the main product developed by Sampo, a project led by ESO and conducted by a software development team from Finland as an in-kind contribution to joining ESO. The goal was to look into the needs of the ESO community in the area of data reduction environments and to create pilot software products that illustrate critical steps along the road to a new system. Sampo concluded early in 2008. This contribution will describe ESO Reflex and show several examples of its use both locally and using Virtual Observatory remote web services. ESO Reflex is expected to be released to the community in early 2009.

  18. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  19. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed

    Sloot, Lizeth H; van den Noort, Josien C; van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  20. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex and Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Dominga; Scuri, Rossana; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals). During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart, and brain and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is sequestered within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing. The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min) by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral levels, reducing the arterial blood pressure, and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activate the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension. Opposite effects, such as hypotension, and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone, were observed, when these responses were compared to those elicited by the diving reflex. PMID:27812317

  1. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 [mu]sec, and therefore, making control of reflex-type'' of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver's aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver's aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  2. Driving a car using reflexive fuzzy behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Watanabe, Y.

    1992-10-01

    Vehicle control in a-priori unknown, unpredictable, and dynamic environments requires many calculational and reasoning schemes to operate on the basis of very imprecise, incomplete, or unreliable data. For such systems, in which all the uncertainties can not be engineered away, approximate reasoning may provide an alternative to the complexity and computational requirements of conventional uncertainty analysis and propagation techniques. Two types of computer boards including custom-designed VLSI chips have been developed to add a fuzzy inferencing capability to real-time control systems. All inferencing rules on a chip are processed in parallel, allowing execution of the entire rule base in about 30 {mu}sec, and therefore, making control of ``reflex-type`` of motions envisionable. The use of these boards and the approach using superposition of elemental sensor-based behaviors for the development of qualitative reasoning schemes emulating human-like navigation in a-prioii unknown environments are discussed. We describe how the human-like navigation scheme implemented on one of the qualitative inferencing boards was installed on a test-bed platform to investigate two control modes for driving a car in a-priori unknown environments on the basis of sparse and imprecise sensor data. In the first mode, the car navigates autonomously, while in the second mode, the system acts as a driver`s aid providing the driver with linguistic (fuzzy) commands to turn left or right and speed up or slow down depending on the obstacles perceived by the sensors. Experiments with both modes of control are described in which the system uses only three acoustic range (sonar) sensor charmers to perceive the environment. Simulation results as well as indoor and outdoor experiments are discussed to illustrate the feasibility and robustness of autonomous navigation and/or safety enhancing driver`s aid using the new fuzzy inferencing hardware system and some human-like reasoning schemes.

  3. Aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vestibular system contributes to sympathetic activation by engagement of the otolith organs. However, there is a significant loss of vestibular function with aging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if young and older individuals differ in their cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to otolithic stimulation (ie, head-down rotation, HDR). We hypothesized that responses to otolithic stimulation would be attenuated in older adults because of morphological and physiological alterations that occur in the vestibular system with aging. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and head rotation were measured during HDR in 11 young (26 +/- 1 years) and 11 older (64 +/- 1 years) subjects in the prone posture. Five older subjects performed head rotation (chin to chest) in the lateral decubitus position, which simulates HDR but does not alter afferent inputs from the vestibular system. MSNA responses to HDR were significantly attenuated in older as compared with young subjects (P<0.01). MSNA increased in the older subjects by only 12 +/- 5% as compared with 85 +/- 16% in the young. Furthermore, HDR elicited significant reductions in mean arterial blood pressure in older (Delta-6 +/- 1 mm Hg; P<0.01) but not young subjects (Delta1 +/- 1 mm Hg). In contrast to HDR, head rotation performed in the lateral decubitus position did not elicit hypotension. MSNA responses to baroreceptor unloading and the cold pressor test were not different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans and may contribute to the increased prevalence of orthostatic hypotension with age.

  4. Somatosympathetic reflex and acupuncture-related analgesia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Shin; Tsai, Yuan-Feen

    2009-11-30

    Both acute and chronic pains correspond to nociceptive substances (NSs), which are naturally produced and metabolized by the organism experiencing the pains. The accumulation of NSs in regional tissues triggers a series of pathophysiological reactions and initiates certain threats to the health and the quality of human life. Pharmacological intervention is the most popular treatment for pain relief, which is achieved by either reducing the production of NSs or blocking the transmission of nociceptive signals through the nervous system, but no drug has been developed for the elimination of NSs. Therefore, improving blood circulation to eliminate NSs in painful tissues is an alternative strategy for pain relief. Acupuncture has been proved to be effective for the treatment of certain kinds of pain, but the mechanisms therein remain unclear. The effectiveness of acupuncture analgesia is also variable owing to the uncertainty surrounding the mechanism and the poor standardization of the technique. There is some evidence that acupuncture may induce pain relief by changing the regional blood flow through somatosympathetic reflex (SSR). Therefore, when exploring the mechanisms of SSR in detail, it is helpful to clarify the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and to develop a more standardized and effective protocol for acupuncture analgesia. Increasing evidence has suggested that both sympathetic activity and stimulation-induced SSR are differentially controlled in an organ-specific and activity-dependent manner. Vasomotor outflow, which involves the regulation of impaired regional blood circulation, is also differentially controlled in response to specific somatic stimulation. Therefore, we vigorously review the relations between SSR and acupuncture-related analgesia so that we can develop a targeted pain therapy where in certain areas of the body undergo site-specific somatic stimulation, which in turn, can adjust the impaired regional blood circulation. PMID:20359125

  5. Gravity and Development of Cardiopulmonary Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Shunji; Eno, Yuko; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    Cardio-pulmonary reflex, which our cardiac activity is synchronized to the respiration by autonomic nervous system regulation, is called as "respiratory sinus arrhythmia" and commonly found in adult. The physiological function of the espiratory sinus arrhythmia is considered to maximize the gas exchange during respiration cycle. This respiration induced heart rate variability (RHRV) is only found in mammals and avian showing a remarkable postnatal development, whereas no RHRV in aquatic species such as fish or amphibian. To elucidate our hypothesis that gravity exposure may plays a key role in the postnatal development of RHRV as well as its evolutional origin in these ground animals, we have studied effects of hypergravity (2G) on the postnatal development of RHRV using rat. Pregnant Wister rats were kept in centrifugal cages system for 38 days from 6th days of pregnant mother to have neonates until 23 days old. Electrocardiograph was recorded from the neonates in 2 to 23 days old in 2G group with simultaneous control (1G) group. The RHRV analysis was performed by calculating a component of Fourier power spectral coincide with the respiration frequency. In both groups, averaged resting heart rate gradually increase from 2 to 23 days old. When comparing the heart rate between the two groups, the 2G group indicated significantly lower (240± 8 bpm) than 1G control (326±21 bpm, p¡0.001) in 2 days old, where as no significance in 23 days old. The RHRV of 2 days old neonates in both groups indicated very small magnitude but significantly lower in 2G group than 1G control (p¡0.01). The RHRV gradually increase during the first 2 weeks and then rapid increased to reached 45 fold of magnitude in 1G control, whereas 69 fold in 2G group. The results strongly suggested that the postnatal innervation from respiration to cardiovascular centers was gravity dependent.

  6. Long lasting activity of nociceptive muscular afferents facilitates bilateral flexion reflex pattern in the feline spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, E D; Steffens, H; Pilyavskii, A I; Maisky, V A; Brück, W; Dibaj, P; Sears, T A

    2015-06-01

    Chronic muscular limb pain requires the adoption of motor patterns distinct from the classic ipsilateral flexion, crossed extension and corresponding reciprocal inhibitions to acute exteroceptive stimulation. Using selective chemical activation of group III/IV afferents in gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) muscles we investigated bilaterally their reflex responses conditioned by (a) acute 'myositis' induced by intramuscular carrageenan; and (b) sub-acute 'myositis' induced by infusion of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Reflex transmission was detected by monosynaptic testing and c-fos staining used to identify increased neuronal activity. In all control experiments with chemical stimulation of group III/IV afferents, ipsilateral responses conformed to the flexor reflex pattern. However, the expected contralateral facilitation of GS motoneurones occurred in fewer than 50% trials while only 9% of trials induced contralateral inhibition of flexor posterior-biceps-semitendinosus (PBSt) motoneurones. During carrageenan acute myositis contralateral PBSt was transiently facilitated by selective activation of group III/IV afferents. During CFA-induced myositis, contralateral only inhibition of GS motoneurones occurred instead of any facilitation, while bidirectionally a crossed facilitation of PBST dominated. These reflex changes were mirrored in an enhanced number of neurones with enhanced c-fos expression. Muscle pain, particularly if chronically persistent, requires another behavioural response pattern than acute exteroceptive pain.

  7. Processing the Chinese Reflexive “ziji”: Effects of Featural Constraints on Anaphor Resolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao; Kaiser, Elsi

    2016-01-01

    We present three self-paced reading experiments that investigate the reflexive ziji “self” in Chinese—in particular, we tested whether and how person-feature-based blocking guides comprehenders' real-time processing and final interpretation of ziji. Prior work claims that in Chinese sentences like “John thought that {I/you/Bill} did not like ZIJI,” (i) the reflexive ziji can refer to the matrix subject John if the intervening subject is also a third person entity (e.g., Bill), but that (ii) an intervening first or second person pronoun blocks reference to the matrix subject, causing ziji to refer to the first or second person pronoun. However, native speakers' judgments regarding the accessibility of long-distance antecedents are rather unstable, and researchers also disagree on what the exact configurations are that allow blocking. In addition, many open questions persist regarding the real-time processing of reflexives more generally, in particular regarding the accessibility (or lack thereof) of structurally unlicensed antecedents. We conducted three self-paced reading studies where we recorded people's word-by-word reading times and also asked questions that probed their off-line interpretation of the reflexive ziji. People's answers to the off-line questions show that blocking is not absolute: Comprehenders do allow significant numbers of non-local choices in both the first and the second person blocking conditions, albeit in small numbers. At the same time, the reading time data, particularly those from Experiments 2 and 3, show that comprehenders use person feature cues to quickly filter out inaccessible long-distance referents. The difference between on-line and off-line patterns points to the possibility that the interpretation of ziji unfolds over time: it seems that initially, during real-time processing, person-feature cues weigh more heavily and constrain what antecedent candidates get considered, but that at some later point, other kinds of

  8. The influence of stretching and warm-up exercises on Achilles tendon reflex activity.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, D; Hennig, E M

    1995-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of prior exercise (warm-up and stretching) on the electromyographic and force output of mechanically elicited triceps surae reflexes. Fifty male subjects performed eight reflex experiments under each of three successive conditions in one session: (1) no prior exercise, (2) after static stretching of the passive triceps surae (3 min) and (3) after a 10-min warm-up run on a treadmill. Tendon tap reflex force was elicited in the triceps surae of the right leg by means of a standardized reflex hammer and measured in a custom-built fixture. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded with surface electrodes over the medial head of the gastrocnemius (G) and the soleus (S). Low coefficients of variation within subjects contrasted with high between-subject variations, indicating highly individual reflex characteristics. After stretching, reductions in the peak force (-5%; P < 0.05), the force rise rate (-8%; P < 0.01), the half relaxation rate (-5%; N.S.), the EMG amplitudes (G, -16%; S, -17%; P < 0.01) and integrals (G, -15%; S, -18%; P < 0.01), and an increase in EMG latencies (G, +3%; S, +1%; P < 0.01), were found compared with the values obtained without prior exercise. After running, the peak force reached the values obtained without prior exercise (-2%; N.S.), the force rise rate and half relaxation rate increased by 8 and 12%, respectively (P < 0.01), and the impulse (force-time integral; -12%), EMG amplitudes (G, -20%; S, -23%; P < 0.01), integrals (G, -18%; S, -23%; P < 0.01) and latencies (G, -1%; S, -2%; P < 0.01) decreased significantly. The changes in the force characteristics observed after the stretching treatment indicate improved muscle compliance that might reduce the risk of injury. On the other hand, the changes after the additional warm-up run had a more pronounced influence with regard to improved force development and a decreased EMG activity, which can be viewed as a performance

  9. Processing the Chinese Reflexive "ziji": Effects of Featural Constraints on Anaphor Resolution.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao; Kaiser, Elsi

    2016-01-01

    We present three self-paced reading experiments that investigate the reflexive ziji "self" in Chinese-in particular, we tested whether and how person-feature-based blocking guides comprehenders' real-time processing and final interpretation of ziji. Prior work claims that in Chinese sentences like "John thought that {I/you/Bill} did not like ZIJI," (i) the reflexive ziji can refer to the matrix subject John if the intervening subject is also a third person entity (e.g., Bill), but that (ii) an intervening first or second person pronoun blocks reference to the matrix subject, causing ziji to refer to the first or second person pronoun. However, native speakers' judgments regarding the accessibility of long-distance antecedents are rather unstable, and researchers also disagree on what the exact configurations are that allow blocking. In addition, many open questions persist regarding the real-time processing of reflexives more generally, in particular regarding the accessibility (or lack thereof) of structurally unlicensed antecedents. We conducted three self-paced reading studies where we recorded people's word-by-word reading times and also asked questions that probed their off-line interpretation of the reflexive ziji. People's answers to the off-line questions show that blocking is not absolute: Comprehenders do allow significant numbers of non-local choices in both the first and the second person blocking conditions, albeit in small numbers. At the same time, the reading time data, particularly those from Experiments 2 and 3, show that comprehenders use person feature cues to quickly filter out inaccessible long-distance referents. The difference between on-line and off-line patterns points to the possibility that the interpretation of ziji unfolds over time: it seems that initially, during real-time processing, person-feature cues weigh more heavily and constrain what antecedent candidates get considered, but that at some later point, other kinds of

  10. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  11. The expiration reflex from the trachea and bronchi.

    PubMed

    Tatar, M; Hanacek, J; Widdicombe, J

    2008-02-01

    The expiration reflex (ER) is a forced expiratory effort against a closed glottis that subsequently opens to eject laryngeal debris and prevent aspiration of material. It is distinct from the cough reflex. Its source is usually assumed to be restricted to the larynx and vocal folds, and its possible origin from the tracheobronchial (TB) tree has been suggested but never studied. The current authors re-analysed previous records with mechanical or chemical stimulation of the TB tree to see if an ER can consistently be elicited, and to see whether it has properties similar to that from the larynx and vocal folds. A random review was made of some of the extensive literature on TB "cough" to see if it confirmed the authors' conclusions. The TBER was consistently seen in cats and rabbits, either alone or followed by cough. These results are consistent with many studies in other species, including humans. It was enhanced, relative to cough, by inflation of the lungs and by general anaesthesia. Tracheobronchial expiration reflex occurs frequently with mechanical stimulation of the tracheobronchial tree. It differs fundamentally from many of the properties of "true" cough. Its features similar to the laryngeal expiration reflex suggest that both should be labelled "expiration reflexes" and not cough. Its existence should be taken into account in experimental, and possibly clinical, studies on tracheobronchial cough. PMID:17959638

  12. Evidence for a pyloro-cholecystic reflex for gallbladder contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Debas, H T; Yamagishi, T

    1979-01-01

    We studied the effect of graded antral distension on gallbladder contraction both when gastrin release was promoted (alkaline distension) and when gastrin release was blocked (acid distension) in five dogs provided with innervated antral pouch, chronic bile fistula and gastric fistula. Graded distension of the antrum caused graded gallbladder contraction as evidenced by bilirubin output even when gastrin release was completely suppressed. This nongastrin mechanism of gallbladder contraction is abolished by parenteral atropine and by transthoracic truncal vagotomy. These observations provide evidence for a cholinergic, pyloro-cholecystic reflex for gallbladder contraction that is dependent on intact long vagal pathways. Similar reflex mechanisms have been shown to be initiated by antral distension and to cause pancreatic enzyme secretion (pyloro-pancreatic reflex) or acid secretion from the oxyntic gland area of the stomach (pyloro-oxyntic reflex). It would appear, therefore, that the antrum plays a central role in the integration of upper gastrointestinal function not only through the hormone gastrin but also through neural reflex mechanisms. PMID:464689

  13. Death caused by cardioinhibitory reflex: what experts believe.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Bettina; Mangin, Patrice; Vaucher, Paul; Bollmann, Marc D

    2012-03-01

    The danger of neck compression without restriction of the arterial flow remains unresolved in forensic medicine. There is an ongoing debate concerning life endangerment due to the cardioinhibitory reflex. The aim of this study was to determine what forensic medical experts believe and how they deal with this reflex. An anonymous electronic questionnaire was sent to 1429 forensic medical experts all over the world. We asked them about their opinion on the cardioinhibitory reflex, its role in causing death, and what their diagnostic criteria were.A total of 182 questionnaires were returned. The experts who answered were from 32 different countries. Our survey showed that 80.2% of experts believe that the cardioinhibitory reflex can theoretically cause death. In the practical application opinions diverge though. Apparently, the practical application mainly depends on the habit of the individual expert. We observed no consensus on the diagnostic criteria to be used. Given the potentially frequent use of the concept of the cardioinhibitory reflex in forensic practice and its judicial impact it would be important to reach a consensus. PMID:22442830

  14. Comparison of operant escape and reflex tests of nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Yezierski, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Testing of reflexes such as flexion/withdrawal or licking/guarding is well established as the standard for evaluating nociceptive sensitivity and its modulation in preclinical investigations of laboratory animals. Concerns about this approach have been dismissed for practical reasons - reflex testing requires no training of the animals; it is simple to instrument; and responses are characterized by observers as latencies or thresholds for evocation. In order to evaluate this method, the present review summarizes a series of experiments in which reflex and operant escape responding are compared in normal animals and following surgical models of neuropathic pain or pharmacological intervention for pain. Particular attention is paid to relationships between reflex and escape responding and information on the pain sensitivity of normal human subjects or patients with pain. Numerous disparities between results for reflex and operant escape measures are described, but the results of operant testing are consistent with evidence from humans. Objective reasons are given for experimenters to choose between these and other methods of evaluating the nociceptive sensitivity of laboratory animals.

  15. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus.

    PubMed

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-04-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge - the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg(-1)), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases.

  16. Reflex control of inflammation by sympathetic nerves, not the vagus

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, D; Yao, S T; McKinley, M J; McAllen, R M

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a neural reflex that controls the strength of inflammatory responses to immune challenge – the inflammatory reflex. In anaesthetized rats challenged with intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 60 μg kg−1), we found strong increases in plasma levels of the key inflammatory mediator tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) 90 min later. Those levels were unaffected by previous bilateral cervical vagotomy, but were enhanced approximately 5-fold if the greater splanchnic sympathetic nerves had been cut. Sham surgery had no effect, and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected by nerve sections, so could not explain this result. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that efferent neural activity in the splanchnic nerve and its splenic branch was strongly increased by LPS treatment. Splenic nerve activity was dependent on inputs from the splanchnic nerves: vagotomy had no effect on the activity in either nerve. Together, these data demonstrate that immune challenge with this dose of LPS activates a neural reflex that is powerful enough to cause an 80% suppression of the acute systemic inflammatory response. The efferent arm of this reflex is in the splanchnic sympathetic nerves, not the vagi as previously proposed. As with other physiological responses to immune challenge, the afferent pathway is presumptively humoral: the present data show that vagal afferents play no measurable part. Because inflammation sits at the gateway to immune responses, this reflex could play an important role in immune function as well as inflammatory diseases. PMID:24421357

  17. Reflexivity: a methodological tool in the knowledge translation process?

    PubMed

    Alley, Sarah; Jackson, Suzanne F; Shakya, Yogendra B

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge translation is a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and application of knowledge. It is considered the bridge that closes the gap between research and practice. Yet it appears that in all areas of practice, a significant gap remains in translating research knowledge into practical application. Recently, researchers and practitioners in the field of health care have begun to recognize reflection and reflexive exercises as a fundamental component to the knowledge translation process. As a practical tool, reflexivity can go beyond simply looking at what practitioners are doing; when approached in a systematic manner, it has the potential to enable practitioners from a wide variety of backgrounds to identify, understand, and act in relation to the personal, professional, and political challenges they face in practice. This article focuses on how reflexive practice as a methodological tool can provide researchers and practitioners with new insights and increased self-awareness, as they are able to critically examine the nature of their work and acknowledge biases, which may affect the knowledge translation process. Through the use of structured journal entries, the nature of the relationship between reflexivity and knowledge translation was examined, specifically exploring if reflexivity can improve the knowledge translation process, leading to increased utilization and application of research findings into everyday practice.

  18. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-01

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers. PMID:11524152

  19. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-01

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen and the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Peach, G

    1995-12-01

    A patient suffering from acute smoke inhalation also had a long medical history that included reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome of the left foot and ankle. The entire foot and ankle were tender and cool to palpation; range of motion was severely reduced. She was referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and 15 min into the the first treatment (46 min at 60 fsw) she reported a lessening of the pain in her foot; moreover, the foot was less cyanotic and warmer to the touch. Subsequent treatments continued to improve her conditions and for longer periods of time.

  1. ESO Reflex: A Graphical Workflow Engine for Astronomical Data Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Richard; Romaniello, Martino; Ullgrén, Marko; Maisala, Sami; Solin, Otto; Oittinen, Tero; Savolainen, Villa; Järveläinen, Pekka; Tyynelä, Jani; Péron, Michèle; Izzo, Carlo; Ballester, Pascal; Gabasch, Armin

    2008-03-01

    ESO Reflex is a software tool that provides a novel approach to astronomical data reduction. The reduction sequence is rendered and controlled as a graphical workflow. Users can follow and interact with the processing in an intuitive manner, without the need for complex scripting. The graphical interface also allows the modification of existing workflows and the creation of new ones. ESO Reflex can invoke standard ESO data reduction recipes in a flexible way. Python scripts, IDL procedures and shell commands can also be easily brought into workflows and a variety of visualisation and display options, including custom product inspection and validation steps, are available. ESO Reflex was developed in the context of the Sampo project, a three-year effort led by ESO and conducted by a software development team from Finland as an in-kind contribution to joining ESO. It is planned that the software will be released to the community in late 2008.

  2. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Adediran, Samuel; Dhakarwal, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Case Presentation Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Conclusion Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries. PMID:24765255

  3. Dynamic iso-resistive trunk extension simulation: contributions of the intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to spinal stability.

    PubMed

    Davarani, S Zeinali; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hemami, H; Mousavi, S J; Parnianpour, M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of external resistance on the recruitment of trunk muscles and the role of intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to ensure the spinal stability are significant issues in spinal biomechanics. A computational model of spine under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was used to simulate iso-resistive trunk movements. Neural excitation of muscles was attained based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. In this study, the trunk extension movement at various resistance levels while extending from 60 degrees flexion to the upright posture was investigated. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization algorithm increased antagonistic activities for all resistance levels demonstrating that the co-activation caused an increase in the intrinsic stiffness of the spine and its stability in a feed-forward manner. During the acceleration phase of the movement, extensors activity increased while flexors activity decreased in response to the higher resistance. The co-activation ratio noticed in the braking phase of the movement increased with higher resistance. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, reflexive feed-back noticeably decreased the induced deviation of the velocity and position profiles from the desired ones at all resistance levels. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that both intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms contribute to the trunk stability. The rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  4. Assessment of pupillary light reflex using a smartphone application

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Duck; Bae, Jin Ho; Kwon, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyeon Tae; Lee, Tae-Soo; Choi, Young Jin

    2016-01-01

    In unconscious patients, pupillary light reflex is an indicator of brain damage. In the current study, a smartphone application was developed for the purpose of measuring pupillary light reflex with an aim to determine the agreement between pupillary light reflex measurements using a smartphone application (APP) and a penlight (PEN). The APP acquires five sequential photographs using the camera flash in order to stimulate the pupil. The initial image is captured prior to the flash, and the subsequent image is obtained while the flash is on. The remaining three images are captured whilst the flash is off. Pupillary right reflex was assessed in 30 healthy subjects using a PEN. After 10 min, the examiners inspected the images of light reflex acquired from the same subjects using the APP, and completed the corresponding questionnaire containing details of pupil size and degree of response. Agreement between the two assessment methods was determined by calculating bias, limits of agreement, and the intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficient. A statistically significant difference was not observed between the two methods regarding pupil size and degree of response. Bias was 0.1 mm and limits of agreement were ±1.5 mm, as compared with PEN. ICC was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89–0.96). Therefore, it may be concluded that the results of pupillary light reflex assessed by PEN and APP display no significant difference. Furthermore, the APP provides advantages such as portability, objectivity and the possibility of being used as objective medical evidence. PMID:27446266

  5. Group I fibers: pressor reflex and cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Decandia, G F; Decandia, M; Orani, G P

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were performed on cats to see whether stimulation of group I afferent fibers from gastrocnemius-soleus muscles induced changes in cardiac activity, in addition to the increase in systemic arterial pressure already established. The results show that the increase in arterial pressure is accompanied by an increase in systolic left ventricular pressure, without any significant changes in cardiac inotropism and chronotropism. It is concluded that the cardiac innervation is not an important efferent pathway of the pressor reflex evoked by stimulating group I afferent fibers, and that the reflex increase in arterial pressure depends mainly on an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:1742468

  6. Recovery cycle of the masseter inhibitory reflex in man.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, G; Agostino, R; Fornarelli, M; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M

    1984-08-24

    The masseter inhibitory reflex from stimulation of the mental nerve has been recorded electromyographically in 10 healthy subjects. The recovery cycle of the two silent periods interrupting the tonic contraction of the masseter muscles have been studied with the paired shock technique. There was a clear dissociation between the recovery of early and late inhibition, the latter being far more affected by a preceding impulse. It is concluded that the two silent periods are mediated by separate neural nets. The differences with the recovery curves of the two components of the blink reflex are discussed.

  7. Acupuncture - An effective tool in the management of gag reflex

    PubMed Central

    Anand, M. Vijay; Rai, Rathika; Bettie, Nirmal F.; Ramachandiran, Hari; Solomon; Praveena, Subramaniyam

    2015-01-01

    Gagging is of great concern to the dentist as it is a serious impediment during the execution of various dental procedures. The etiology of gagging is multifactorial, and several suggestions have been offered to arrest this reflex, some of which are nonsustainable and does not show the immediate result. Acupuncture has been successfully employed as an adjunct to local anesthesia in dental extractions, pain management and also in the symptomatic management of temporomandibular joint disorders. The author highlights the application of acupuncture in the management of patients with gag reflex during dental procedures and its benefits are reported. PMID:26538942

  8. Reflexivity: The Creation of Liminal Spaces--Researchers, Participants, and Research Encounters.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Guy; Ben-Ari, Adital

    2016-03-01

    Reflexivity is defined as the constant movement between being in the phenomenon and stepping outside of it. In this article, we specify three foci of reflexivity--the researcher, the participant, and the encounter--for exploring the interview process as a dialogic liminal space of mutual reflection between researcher and participant. Whereas researchers' reflexivity has been discussed extensively in the professional discourse, participants' reflexivity has not received adequate scholarly attention, nor has the promise inherent in reflective processes occurring within the encounter.

  9. On Being a Nice Country Girl and an Academic Feminist: Using Reflexivity in Rural Social Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pini, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a study of women's participation in the Australian sugar industry to illustrate and critique the process and usefulness of reflexivity in rural research. I begin by situating the use of reflexivity within the feminist literature. Following this, I describe the way in which I used reflexivity to examine different identities I…

  10. Reflex Modification by Acoustic Signals in Newborn Infants and in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Howard S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Five experiments using identical reflex modification procedures on neonates and adults suggest developmental differences in processing auditory stimuli. Neonates failed to exhibit reflex inhibition by either prior acoustic or tactile stimuli. Adults exhibited robust reflex inhibition to these same stimuli. Developmental processes implied by these…

  11. Affective Modulation of the Startle Eyeblink and Postauricular Reflexes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Benning, Stephen D.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Eyeblink and postauricular reflexes to standardized affective images were examined in individuals without (n = 37) and with (n = 20) autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affective reflex modulation in control participants replicated previous findings. The ASD group, however, showed anomalous reflex modulation patterns, despite similar self-report…

  12. Reconceptualising Learning as a Form of Relational Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The paper makes a connection between transmission modes and constructivism in sociology and education, respectively. There are parallels between Archer's criticism of upward and downward conflation in social theory, and approaches to learning in education. In her 2012 book, Archer seeks to reconceptualise socialisation as relational reflexivity.…

  13. Vestibulo-ocular reflex and the head impulse test.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana T; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles

    2012-12-01

    The authors highlights the importance of the vestibulo-ocular reflex examination through the head impulse test as a diagnostic method for vestibular dysfunction as well as, and primarily, a bedside semiotic resource capable of differentiating between acute peripheral vestibulopathy and a cerebellar or brainstem infarction in emergency rooms.

  14. Reconceptualizing reflexivity and dissonance in professional and personal domains.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Ann

    2008-09-01

    Debates around 'reflexivity' and the construction of the gendered self within late modernity have occupied the attention of both 'reflexive modernization' theorists (Beck, Giddens and Lash 1994; Beck and Beck-Gernsheim 1996; Giddens 1991, 1992) as well as gender and feminist theorists. While theorists such as Beck and Giddens have been preoccupied with establishing the connection between reflexivity and the construction of the 'non-gendered' self, gender and feminist theorists have sought to amplify the debate by exploring the intersecting nexus of contemporary theorizing, more fully within this context. This paper explores the theoretical underpinnings of these debates and their application to specific professional and personal domains. I consider three case studies to assess these issues as outlined in my own work, Brooks 2006, and in the work of Wajcman and Martin 2002, and McDowell 1997, which draw on empirical research and explore changes to gender identity within professional and personal domains. I conclude that there is little evidence in the research presented here of any systematic reconfiguring of gender identities leading to a detraditionalization of gender as suggested by the 'reflexive modernization' theorists. PMID:18782154

  15. Opening to Possibility: Reflectivity and Reflexivity in Our Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeff, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This commentary explores how teachers can create a culture of tolerance by promoting reflectivity and reflexivity, and considers classroom processes and activities for doing so. "Reflectivity" is considered to be the use of personal values, experiences, and habits to make meaning and is a central tenet of inquiry approaches: to build…

  16. Sympathetic control of reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in human aging.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2015-10-01

    This Synthesis highlights a series of recent studies that has systematically interrogated age-related deficits in cold-induced skin vasoconstriction. In response to cold stress, a reflex increase in sympathetic nervous system activity mediates reductions in skin blood flow. Reflex vasoconstriction during cold exposure is markedly impaired in aged skin, contributing to the relative inability of healthy older adults to maintain core temperature during mild cold stress in the absence of appropriate behavioral thermoregulation. This compromised reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in healthy aging can occur as a result of functional deficits at multiple points along the efferent sympathetic reflex axis, including blunted sympathetic outflow directed to the skin vasculature, reduced presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis and/or release, and altered end-organ responsiveness at several loci, in addition to potential alterations in afferent thermoreceptor function. Arguments have been made that the relative inability of aged skin to appropriately constrict is due to the aging cutaneous arterioles themselves, whereas other data point to the neural circuitry controlling those vessels. The argument presented herein provides strong evidence for impaired efferent sympathetic control of the peripheral cutaneous vasculature during whole body cold exposure as the primary mechanism responsible for attenuated vasoconstriction.

  17. Evaluation of Reflex (fomesafen) herbicide for watermelon in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective preemergence herbicides are needed for weed control in watermelon grown from transplants. Reflex (fomesafen) was found to be effective and to exhibit crop safety in southeast USA. Trials were conducted during 2011 and 2012 in southeast Oklahoma to determine if this product would be useful...

  18. Electrical middle ear muscle reflex: use in cochlear implant programming.

    PubMed

    Hodges, A V; Balkany, T J; Ruth, R A; Lambert, P R; Dolan-Ash, S; Schloffman, J J

    1997-09-01

    Programming of multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) requires subjective responses to a series of sophisticated psychophysical percepts. It is often difficult for young prelinguistically deaf children to provide adequate responses for device fitting. This is especially true in setting levels of maximum comfortable loudness, whereby failure to indicate growth of loudness may result in elevation of stimulus levels to the threshold of pain. The acoustic or stapedial muscle reflex has been used previously to provide objective confirmation of acoustic stimulation, and there have been attempts to use the reflex in hearing aid fitting. It has also been suggested that electrically elicited middle ear muscle reflexes (eMEMR) may have applicability in confirming and quantifying electrical stimulation through a CI. To assess the relationship between eMEMR characteristics and levels of loudness perception with CIs, determine reliability of the response, and investigate potential use of eMEMR in CI programming, 25 postlinguistically deafened adult CI users were evaluated. Reflexes have also been attempted on 40 children, with responses present in 31 (71%). Comfort levels predicted by eMEMR were highly correlated with those obtained through subjective judgments in the adult subjects. The eMEMR provides an objective, accurate, and rapid method of estimating maximum comfortable loudness levels, which may be useful in the initial programming of young implant recipients.

  19. Transference, Counter-Transference, and Reflexivity in Intercultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Jenna Min

    2015-01-01

    The article addresses the contributions psychoanalytic theory, particularly its concepts of "transference and counter-transference," can make to our understanding of reflexivity in intercultural education (IE). After the introduction, the article is organized into three parts. The first part is a psychoanalytic discussion that focuses on…

  20. Caught in Uncertain Futures, Now: A Reflexive Moment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Reynaldo, III

    2016-01-01

    This reflexive vignette reveals the emotional risks of ethnographic work by a Chicano researcher, educator, and advocate doing work in the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, caught at the intersection of vulnerable Latina/o youth and their possible futures. Data in this creative piece are derived from field notes of one classroom observation from an…

  1. Enhancing the Reflexivity of System Innovation Projects with System Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mierlo, Barbara; Arkesteijn, Marlen; Leeuwis, Cees

    2010-01-01

    Networks aiming for fundamental changes bring together a variety of actors who are part and parcel of a problematic context. These system innovation projects need to be accompanied by a monitoring and evaluation approach that supports and maintains reflexivity to be able to deal with uncertainties and conflicts while challenging current practices…

  2. Approaching Reflexivity through Reflection: Issues for Critical Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibbert, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This conceptual article seeks to develop insights for teaching reflexivity in undergraduate management classes through developing processes of critical reflection. Theoretical inferences to support this aim are developed and organized in relation to four principles. They are as follows: first, preparing and making space for reflection in the…

  3. Practicing Reflexivity in the Study of Italian Migrants in London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seganti, Francesca Romana

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the centrality of reflexivity in qualitative research through examples from my study on the role new media play in the lives of Italians in London. My hypothesis was that Italians were "in transit" in London and they were using new media to build "temporary" communities. I conducted in-depth interviews with members of the…

  4. Muscle reflex in heart failure: the role of exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H.; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Exercise evokes sympathetic activation and increases blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Two neural mechanisms that cause the exercise-induced increase in sympathetic discharge are central command and the exercise pressor reflex (EPR). The former suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. The latter is a reflex originating in skeletal muscle which contributes significantly to the regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during exercise. The afferent arm of this reflex is composed of metabolically sensitive (predominantly group IV, C-fibers) and mechanically sensitive (predominately group III, A-delta fibers) afferent fibers. Activation of these receptors and their associated afferent fibers reflexively adjusts sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity during exercise. In heart failure, the sympathetic activation during exercise is exaggerated, which potentially increases cardiovascular risk and contributes to exercise intolerance during physical activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. A therapeutic strategy for preventing or slowing the progression of the exaggerated EPR may be of benefit in CHF patients. Long-term exercise training (ExT), as a non-pharmacological treatment for CHF increases exercise capacity, reduces sympatho-excitation and improves cardiovascular function in CHF animals and patients. In this review, we will discuss the effects of ExT and the mechanisms that contribute to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state. PMID:23060821

  5. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  6. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  7. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  8. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  9. 21 CFR 890.1450 - Powered reflex hammer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered reflex hammer. 890.1450 Section 890.1450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Diagnostic Devices § 890.1450 Powered...

  10. Sympathetic control of reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in human aging

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Lacy M.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2015-01-01

    This Synthesis highlights a series of recent studies that has systematically interrogated age-related deficits in cold-induced skin vasoconstriction. In response to cold stress, a reflex increase in sympathetic nervous system activity mediates reductions in skin blood flow. Reflex vasoconstriction during cold exposure is markedly impaired in aged skin, contributing to the relative inability of healthy older adults to maintain core temperature during mild cold stress in the absence of appropriate behavioral thermoregulation. This compromised reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in healthy aging can occur as a result of functional deficits at multiple points along the efferent sympathetic reflex axis, including blunted sympathetic outflow directed to the skin vasculature, reduced presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis and/or release, and altered end-organ responsiveness at several loci, in addition to potential alterations in afferent thermoreceptor function. Arguments have been made that the relative inability of aged skin to appropriately constrict is due to the aging cutaneous arterioles themselves, whereas other data point to the neural circuitry controlling those vessels. The argument presented herein provides strong evidence for impaired efferent sympathetic control of the peripheral cutaneous vasculature during whole body cold exposure as the primary mechanism responsible for attenuated vasoconstriction. PMID:26272321

  11. Emotions and Reflexivity in Feminised Education Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burman, Erica

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses contemporary relations between emotions, gender and feminist action research. Starting from analysis of the increasing emotionalisation of everyday life, it explores the quasi-feminist--or what the author calls "feminised"--forms of incitement to reflexive confession that are increasingly gaining favour within professional and…

  12. The human vertical translational vestibulo-ocular reflex. Normal and abnormal responses.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ke; Walker, Mark F; Joshi, Anand; Reschke, Millard; Strupp, Michael; Leigh, R John

    2009-05-01

    Geometric considerations indicate that the human translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR) should have substantially different properties than the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR). Specifically, tVOR cannot simultaneously stabilize images of distant and near objects on the retina. Most studies make the tacit assumption that tVOR acts to stabilize foveal images even though, in humans, tVOR is reported to compensate for less than 60% of foveal image motion. We have determined that the compensation gain (eye rotational velocity/required eye rotational velocity to maintain foveal target fixation) of tVOR is held steady at approximately 0.6 during viewing of either near or distant targets during vertical (bob) translations in ambient illumination. We postulate that tVOR evolved not to stabilize the image of the target on the fovea, but rather to minimize retinal image motion between objects lying in different depth planes, in order to optimize motion parallax information. Such behavior is optimized when binocular visual cues of both near and distant targets are available in ambient light. Patients with progressive supranuclear palsy or cerebellar ataxia show impaired ability to increase tVOR responses appropriately when they view near targets. In cerebellar patients, impaired ability to adjust tVOR responses to viewing conditions occurs despite intact ability to converge at near. Loss of the ability to adjust tVOR according to viewing conditions appears to represent a distinct disorder of vestibular function.

  13. Studies of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex on STS 7 and 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Unpaced voluntary horizontal head oscillation was used to study the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR) on Shuttle flights STS 7 and 8. Ten subjects performed head oscillations at 0.33 Hz + or - 30 deg amplitude under the followng conditions: VVOR (visual VOR), eyes open and fixed on a stationary target; VOR-EC, with eyes closed and fixed on the same target in imagination; and VOR-S (VOR suppression), with eyes open and fixed on a head-synchronized target. Effects of weightlessness, flight phase, and Space Motion Sickness (SMS) on head oscillation characteristics were examined. A significant increase in head oscillation frequency was noted inflight in subjects free from SMS. In subjects susceptible to SMS, frequency was reduced during their Symptomatic period. The data also suggest that the amplitude and peak velocity of head oscillation were reduced early inflight. No significant changes were noted in reflex gain or phase in any of the test conditions; however, there was a suggestion of an increase in VVOR and VOR-ES gain early inflight in asymptomatic subjects. A significant difference in VOR-S was found between SMS susceptible and non-susceptible subjects. There is no evidence that any changes in VOR characteristics contributed to SMS.

  14. Understanding the pathophysiology of reflex epilepsy using simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, Manglore; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Panda, Rajanikant; Chandra, S R; Kumar, Naveen; George, Lija; Thamodharan, A; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Satishchandra, P

    2014-03-01

    Measuring neuro-haemodynamic correlates in the brain of epilepsy patients using EEG-fMRI has opened new avenues in clinical neuroscience, as these are two complementary methods for understanding brain function. In this study, we investigated three patients with drug-resistant reflex epilepsy using EEG-fMRI. Different types of reflex epilepsy such as eating, startle myoclonus, and hot water epilepsy were included in the study. The analysis of EEG-fMRI data was based on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges on scalp EEG. The convolution of onset time and duration of these epilepsy spikes was estimated, and using these condition-specific effects in a general linear model approach, we evaluated activation of fMRI. Patients with startle myoclonus epilepsy experienced epilepsy in response to sudden sound or touch, in association with increased delta and theta activity with a spike-and-slow-wave pattern of interictal epileptiform discharges on EEG and fronto-parietal network activation pattern on SPECT and EEG-fMRI. Eating epilepsy was triggered by sight or smell of food and fronto-temporal discharges were noted on video-EEG (VEEG). Similarly, fronto-temporo-parietal involvement was noted on SPECT and EEG-fMRI. Hot water epilepsy was triggered by contact with hot water either in the bath or by hand immersion, and VEEG showed fronto-parietal involvement. SPECT and EEG fMRI revealed a similar fronto-parietal-occipital involvement. From these results, we conclude that continuous EEG recording can improve the modelling of BOLD changes related to interictal epileptic activity and this can thus be used to understand the neuro-haemodynamic substrates involved in reflex epilepsy. PMID:24691294

  15. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P < 0.001). At all levels of EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  16. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  17. A reflexive neural network for dynamic biped walking control.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Porr, Bernd; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2006-05-01

    Biped walking remains a difficult problem, and robot models can greatly facilitate our understanding of the underlying biomechanical principles as well as their neuronal control. The goal of this study is to specifically demonstrate that stable biped walking can be achieved by combining the physical properties of the walking robot with a small, reflex-based neuronal network governed mainly by local sensor signals. Building on earlier work (Taga, 1995; Cruse, Kindermann, Schumm, Dean, & Schmitz, 1998), this study shows that human-like gaits emerge without specific position or trajectory control and that the walker is able to compensate small disturbances through its own dynamical properties. The reflexive controller used here has the following characteristics, which are different from earlier approaches: (1) Control is mainly local. Hence, it uses only two signals (anterior extreme angle and ground contact), which operate at the interjoint level. All other signals operate only at single joints. (2) Neither position control nor trajectory tracking control is used. Instead, the approximate nature of the local reflexes on each joint allows the robot mechanics itself (e.g., its passive dynamics) to contribute substantially to the overall gait trajectory computation. (3) The motor control scheme used in the local reflexes of our robot is more straightforward and has more biological plausibility than that of other robots, because the outputs of the motor neurons in our reflexive controller are directly driving the motors of the joints rather than working as references for position or velocity control. As a consequence, the neural controller and the robot mechanics are closely coupled as a neuromechanical system, and this study emphasizes that dynamically stable biped walking gaits emerge from the coupling between neural computation and physical computation. This is demonstrated by different walking experiments using a real robot as well as by a Poincaré map analysis

  18. Trigeminal high-frequency stimulation produces short- and long-term modification of reflex blink gain

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael; Kaminer, Jaime; Enmore, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Reflex blinks provide a model system for investigating motor learning in normal and pathological states. We investigated whether high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the supraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve before the R2 blink component (HFS-B) decreases reflex blink gain in alert rats. As with humans (Mao JB, Evinger C. J Neurosci 21: RC151, 2001), HFS-B significantly reduced blink size in the first hour after treatment for rats. Repeated days of HFS-B treatment produced long-term depression of blink circuits. Blink gain decreased exponentially across days, indicating a long-term depression of blink circuits. Additionally, the HFS-B protocol became more effective at depressing blink amplitude across days of treatment. This depression was not habituation, because neither long- nor short-term blink changes occurred when HFS was presented after the R2. To investigate whether gain modifications produced by HFS-B involved cerebellar networks, we trained rats in a delay eyelid conditioning paradigm using HFS-B as the unconditioned stimulus and a tone as the conditioned stimulus. As HFS-B depresses blink circuits and delay conditioning enhances blink circuit activity, occlusion should occur if they share neural networks. Rats acquiring robust eyelid conditioning did not exhibit decreases in blink gain, whereas rats developing low levels of eyelid conditioning exhibited weak, short-term reductions in blink gain. These results suggested that delay eyelid conditioning and long-term HFS-B utilize some of the same cerebellar circuits. The ability of repeated HFS-B treatment to depress trigeminal blink circuit activity long term implied that it may be a useful protocol to reduce hyperexcitable blink circuits that underlie diseases like benign essential blepharospasm. PMID:24285868

  19. Postinduction Paced Pulseless Electrical Activity in a Patient With a History of Oropharyngeal Instrumentation–Induced Reflex Circulatory Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Ryan J.; Pham, Ky; Labrie-Brown, Carmen L.; Mancuso, Ken; LeLorier, Paul; Riopelle, James; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reflex hypotension and bradycardia have been reported to occur following administration of several drugs associated with administration of anesthesia and also following a variety of procedural stimuli. Case Report: A 54-year-old postmenopausal female with a history of asystole associated with sedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and post–anesthetic-induction tracheal intubation received advanced cardiac resuscitation after insertion of a temporary transvenous pacemaker failed to prevent pulseless electrical activity. The patient's condition stabilized, and she underwent successful cataract extraction, intraocular lens implantation, and pars plana vitrectomy. Conclusion: Cardiac pacemaker insertion prior to performance of a procedure historically associated with reflex circulatory collapse can be expected to protect a patient from bradycardia but not necessarily hypotension.

  20. Postinduction Paced Pulseless Electrical Activity in a Patient With a History of Oropharyngeal Instrumentation–Induced Reflex Circulatory Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Ryan J.; Pham, Ky; Labrie-Brown, Carmen L.; Mancuso, Ken; LeLorier, Paul; Riopelle, James; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reflex hypotension and bradycardia have been reported to occur following administration of several drugs associated with administration of anesthesia and also following a variety of procedural stimuli. Case Report: A 54-year-old postmenopausal female with a history of asystole associated with sedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and post–anesthetic-induction tracheal intubation received advanced cardiac resuscitation after insertion of a temporary transvenous pacemaker failed to prevent pulseless electrical activity. The patient's condition stabilized, and she underwent successful cataract extraction, intraocular lens implantation, and pars plana vitrectomy. Conclusion: Cardiac pacemaker insertion prior to performance of a procedure historically associated with reflex circulatory collapse can be expected to protect a patient from bradycardia but not necessarily hypotension. PMID:27660584

  1. Stretched, jumped, and fell: an fMRI investigation of reflexive verbs and other intransitives.

    PubMed

    Shetreet, Einat; Friedmann, Naama

    2012-04-15

    This study used fMRI to inform a debate between two theories concerning the representation of reflexive verbs. Reflexives are verbs that denote an action that the subject applies on herself (e.g., The woman stretched). These verbs are derived by a lexical operation that creates a reflexive from its transitive counterpart. Theories differ with respect to which thematic role is reduced by the lexical operation: the agent or the theme, and, consequently, whether the construction of sentences with reflexives in subject-verb order includes movement of the object to the subject position. To test this, we compared reflexive verbs with unaccusative verbs (e.g., The woman fell), and with unergative verbs (e.g., The woman jumped). Unaccusatives are derived by reduction of the role of the agent, and thus SV sentences with unaccusatives include movement to subject position. Unergatives do not undergo lexical operations and do not involve movement in SV sentences. The reflexives behaved like unergatives, and differently from unaccusatives: the activation pattern of unaccusatives compared with reflexives showed similar cortical pattern to that of unaccusatives compared with unergatives, with activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG). Comparing reflexives and unergatives revealed activation in the right MTG. These results indicate that reflexives differ from unaccusatives in their derivation. That is, reflexives do not involve the reduction of the agent of the parallel transitive, and hence no syntactic movement is involved in sentences in which the subject precedes the reflexive verb.

  2. Interlimb coupling from the arms to legs is differentially specified for populations of motor units comprising the compound H-reflex during "reduced" human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Klimstra, Marc; Lewis, Allen; Hundza, Sandra R; Zehr, E Paul

    2011-01-01

    Recent experiments have identified neuromechanical interactions between the arms and legs during human locomotor movement. Previous work reported that during the rhythmic movement of all four limbs, the influence of the arms on reflex expression in the legs was superimposed on the dominant effect of the legs. This evidence was based upon studies using cutaneous and H-reflex modulation as indices of neuronal activity related to locomotion. The earlier H-reflex study was restricted to one phase of movement and to only a fixed H-reflex amplitude. Also, all four limbs were actively engaged in locomotor movement, and this led to the speculation that the effect from the arms could be underestimated by "swamping" of the conditioning during movement of the test limb. Work from the cat suggests that descending locomotor drive may be differentially specified for different motor unit populations in the hindlimb. Accordingly, details of interlimb coordination between the arms and legs in humans require further characterization and an examination of different populations of motor units as can be obtained from H-reflex recruitment curve (RC) parameters. Using modulation of H-reflex amplitudes across the entire ascending limb as neural probes for interlimb coupling, the present study evaluated the separated influences of rhythmic activity of the arms and leg on neuronal excitability of a stationary "test leg". This three-limb "reduced" locomotion approach was applied using a stepping ergometer during the performance of three rhythmic movement tasks: arms (A); contralateral leg (L); and arms and contralateral leg (AL). Data were sampled at four different phases of the stepping cycle (using the moving leg as reference): start power (SP); end power (EP); start recovery (SR); and end recovery (ER). The main result was a large and significant influence of rhythmic AL activity on RC parameters of the H-reflex at EP and SP phases. However, the parameters (and thus motor unit populations

  3. Healthy and pathological cerebellar Spiking Neural Networks in Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex.

    PubMed

    Antonietti, Alberto; Casellato, Claudia; Geminiani, Alice; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Since the Marr-Albus model, computational neuroscientists have been developing a variety of models of the cerebellum, with different approaches and features. In this work, we developed and tested realistic artificial Spiking Neural Networks inspired to this brain region. We tested in computational simulations of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex protocol three different models: a network equipped with a single plasticity site, at the cortical level; a network equipped with a distributed plasticity, at both cortical and nuclear levels; a network with a pathological plasticity mechanism at the cortical level. We analyzed the learning performance of the three different models, highlighting the behavioral differences among them. We proved that the model with a distributed plasticity produces a faster and more accurate cerebellar response, especially during a second session of acquisition, compared with the single plasticity model. Furthermore, the pathological model shows an impaired learning capability in Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex acquisition, as found in neurophysiological studies. The effect of the different plasticity conditions, which change fast and slow dynamics, memory consolidation and, in general, learning capabilities of the cerebellar network, explains differences in the behavioral outcome.

  4. Effect of viral upper respiratory tract infection on cough reflex sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI; common cold) is among the most common medical conditions affecting man, with cough being a typical feature of the associated syndrome. Studies employing capsaicin inhalation challenge to measure cough reflex sensitivity have demonstrated a transient tussive hyperresponsiveness induced by URI that reverts to normal by 4-8 weeks post infection. Mechanisms proposed to explain the induction of cough by URI include a number of infection-associated airway effects, such as enhanced release of cytokines, neurotransmitters, and leukotrienes; increased neural receptor levels; reduced activity of neutral endopeptidases; transient modulation of afferent neural activity; mucus hypersecretion; and, possibly, effects on cholinergic motor pathways. Recent studies evaluating urge-to-cough (UTC), the sensation of irritation preceding the motor act of coughing, have demonstrated that URI induces a transient enhancement of UTC analogous to the effect observed on cough reflex sensitivity. The recently introduced concept of the Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome may provide an explanation for the commonly observed clinical phenomenon of acute viral URI triggering what will develop into chronic, refractory cough in a subgroup of patients. PMID:25383204

  5. Dynamic stability of spine using stability-based optimization and muscle spindle reflex.

    PubMed

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Hemami, Hooshang; Barin, Kamran; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2008-02-01

    A computational method for simulation of 3-D movement of the trunk under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was developed. Neural excitation of muscles was set based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. The method was used to simulate the trunk movement from the upright standing to 60 degrees of flexion. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization resulted in an increase in antagonistic activities demonstrating that the antagonistic co-activation acts to increase the trunk stability in response to self-induced postural internal perturbation. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, muscle spindles decreased the induced deviation of the position and velocity profiles from the desired ones. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that the rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  6. Effects of Visual Cortex Activation on the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Simona L.; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  7. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona L; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  8. 'Diving reflex' in man - Its relation to isometric and dynamic exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, S. A., Jr.; Campbell, J. K.; Wildenthal, K.

    1972-01-01

    To test the influence of physical activity on the diving reflex, 10 normal men held their breath with their faces immersed in 15 C water during rest, bicycle exercise, and sustained isometric handgrip contraction. At all conditions, a slight but statistically significant elevation of blood pressure and a marked decrease in heart rate occurred during each dive. During moderate bicycle exercise heart rate fell more rapidly than at rest and the final level of bradycardia approached that achieved at rest, despite the fact that predive heart rates were much higher during exercise. When diving occurred in combination with isometric exercise, bradycardia was less severe than during resting dives and final heart rates could be represented as the sum of the expected responses to each intervention alone. In all conditions apnea without face immersion caused bradycardia that was less severe than during wet dives.

  9. Early Modern ET, Reflexive Telescopics, and Their Relevance Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Dennis

    The period from the discovery of Tycho's New Star in 1572 to Galileo's "geometrization of astronomical space" in 1610 (and the years following) saw the disintegration of the boundary between the sublunary and superlunary spheres—between the "lower storey" and "upper storey" of the Aristotelian Universe. This establishment of a strong physical affinity between the universe "up there" and the earthly realm "down here" was also complemented by the rise of Copernicanism: for once the Earth was seen as a planet, the other planets could readily be imagined as other Earths. This analogy suggested not only physical but also biological affinities and supported the plausibility of humans' capacity to travel to the Moon and beyond. Robert Burton—given the demise of Aristotle's physics—declared in 1621 that "If the heavens be penetrable … it were not amiss in this aerial progress to make wings and fly up." John Wilkins and Francis Godwin in the 1630s actively imagined creatures in the Moon and human journeys thither. The epic poet John Milton in 1667 hinted that "every star [is] perhaps a world / Of destined habitation." Moreover, space travel was no one-way street: Thomas Traherne in the 1670s imagined a dweller among the stars visiting Earth and remarking on what must be the condition of its inhabitants. In these and other ways, seventeenth-century writers offered serious and impressive speculation about extraterrestrial life and its possible perceptions of Earth. Such speculations remain pertinent to astrobiological theory today. What Hans Blumenberg in the 1970s called "reflexive telescopics"—the examination of Earth from an imagined extraterrestrial viewpoint—is an important counterpart to the search for life "out there." It serves as a reminder of the obvious but profound premise that Earth is part of the cosmos. At a popular level we often continue to speak of "outer space" as if the old "two-storey" picture of the universe still had some residual legitimacy

  10. Stabilizing skateboard speed-wobble with reflex delay.

    PubMed

    Varszegi, Balazs; Takacs, Denes; Stepan, Gabor; Hogan, S John

    2016-08-01

    A simple mechanical model of the skateboard-skater system is analysed, in which the effect of human control is considered by means of a linear proportional-derivative (PD) controller with delay. The equations of motion of this non-holonomic system are neutral delay-differential equations. A linear stability analysis of the rectilinear motion is carried out analytically. It is shown how to vary the control gains with respect to the speed of the skateboard to stabilize the uniform motion. The critical reflex delay of the skater is determined as the function of the speed. Based on this analysis, we present an explanation for the linear instability of the skateboard-skater system at high speed. Moreover, the advantages of standing ahead of the centre of the board are demonstrated from the viewpoint of reflex delay and control gain sensitivity.

  11. Reflex myoclonic epilepsy in infancy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Matricardi, Sara; Pavone, Piero; Marino, Raffaella; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Benign myoclonic epilepsy in infancy, classified among the generalised idiopathic epilepsies, is characterised by the occurrence of myoclonic seizures in the first three years of life in otherwise normal infants. Some authors have described cases of myoclonic seizures as a reflex response to sudden unexpected tactile or acoustic stimuli and this clinical entity has been proposed as a separate nosographic syndrome, referred to as "reflex myoclonic epilepsy in infancy" (RMEI). We reviewed all published articles and case reports on RMEI in order to clarify clinical and electroencephalographic findings, with particular attention to outcome and treatment. RMEI appears to be a benign variant of idiopathic myoclonic epilepsy in infancy with specific features that occur in neurologically and developmentally normal children. This rare clinical entity is often under-described and under-diagnosed, and for this reason should be brought to the attention of paediatricians in order to avoid extensive investigations and reassure parents of the lack of long-term complications.

  12. Creating safety by strengthening clinicians' capacity for reflexivity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This commentary explores the nature of creating safety in the here-and-now. Creating safety encompasses two dimensions: revisiting specific behaviours by focusing on substandard performance (reflection), and a more broad-ranging attention to everyday behaviours that are taken as given (reflexivity). The piece pays particular attention to this second dimension of creating safety. Two techniques that promote reflexivity are discussed: video-filming real-time, everyday clinical practice and inviting clinicians' feedback about their own footage, and reflecting on the knowledge and questions that patients and families have about their care, and about unexpected outcomes and clinical incidents. The piece concludes that feedback about everyday practice using these methods is critical to enhancing the safety of everyday activity. PMID:21450780

  13. Blink reflex latency after exposure to trichloroethylene in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.G.; Chirico-Post, J.; Proctor, S.P.

    1988-03-01

    The electrophysiological measurement of the blink reflex (BR) can quantify the conduction latency in the reflex arc involving the Vth (trigeminal) and VIIth (facial) cranial nerves. We measured the electrophysiological BR in a population (N = 21), which had alleged chronic exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) through the public drinking water at levels 30-80 times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contamination Level (MCL). A highly significant difference was observed in the conduction latency means of the BR components (p less than .0001), when the study population was compared with laboratory controls (N = 27). This difference suggests a subclinical alteration of the Vth cranial nerve function due to chronic, environmental exposure to TCE.

  14. Results of the REFLEX (Return Flux Experiment) Flight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Mauersberger, Konrad; Johnson, Bradford W.; Manning, Heidi K.

    1997-01-01

    The numerous problems occurring in this first flight of the REFLEX experiment, both in the spacecraft and with the instrument package, seriously constrained the acquisition and analysis of data and severely limited the interpretation of the data that were obtained. Of these, the ambient helium measurements appear to be the most promising. They are summarized and discussed in Appendix A. Further analyses could be attempted to establish the correct values for the energy centers as they varied during the mission. In addition, an extensive laboratory recalibration on a high-speed beam system could in principle provide corrections to be used in analyzing and interpreting the returned data set. The unknown malfunction which generated the energy drift needs to be understood and corrected before the REFLEX experiment is reflown; some hardware modification, or at least retuning, is likely to be required.

  15. Stabilizing skateboard speed-wobble with reflex delay.

    PubMed

    Varszegi, Balazs; Takacs, Denes; Stepan, Gabor; Hogan, S John

    2016-08-01

    A simple mechanical model of the skateboard-skater system is analysed, in which the effect of human control is considered by means of a linear proportional-derivative (PD) controller with delay. The equations of motion of this non-holonomic system are neutral delay-differential equations. A linear stability analysis of the rectilinear motion is carried out analytically. It is shown how to vary the control gains with respect to the speed of the skateboard to stabilize the uniform motion. The critical reflex delay of the skater is determined as the function of the speed. Based on this analysis, we present an explanation for the linear instability of the skateboard-skater system at high speed. Moreover, the advantages of standing ahead of the centre of the board are demonstrated from the viewpoint of reflex delay and control gain sensitivity. PMID:27534701

  16. Cough reflex sensitivity in various phenotypes of childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Jesenak, M; Babusikova, E; Petrikova, M; Turcan, T; Rennerova, Z; Michnova, Z; Havlicekova, Z; Villa, M P; Banovcin, P

    2009-11-01

    Cough is a major symptom in some children with asthma, but the relationship between cough and the severity of asthma is defined insufficiently. As cough represents common problem of pediatrics, several objective methods for its assessment were developed. Cough reflex sensitivity (CRS) test with capsaicin is one of the most important tools for studying cough. In the present study, we aimed to study the CRS in various phenotypes of childhood asthma. We found that, in general, CRS was increased in asthmatic children compared with controls. The most evident increase of CRS was observed during acute asthma exacerbation, in children suffering from asthma with concomitant allergic rhinitis, and in atopic asthmatics. Interestingly, we noted a significant decline in lung function after capsaicin CRS. Various laboratory and clinical characteristics of asthmatic children influence cough sensitivity to a different extent. Cough reflex sensitivity measurement can add valuable information beside the commonly used spirometric and inflammometric methods in the management of asthmatic children.

  17. Origin of ventricular reflexes caused by coronary arteriography.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Gomez, F; Garcia-Aguado, A

    1977-01-01

    Left ventricular reflexes have in the past been investigated in anaesthetised animals, generally using an open chest technique. We have studied the degree of bradycardia occurring during coronary arteriography in 200 patients with a view to localising the origin of the ventricular reflexes. We have correlated the decrease of sinus rate with the anatomical distribution and integrity of the coronary tree. The degree of bradycardia was not influenced by the origin of the sinus node or the AV node arteries, while there was a good correlation with the injection of contrast medium into the artery which supplied the inferior wall of the left ventricle. The occurrence of transient sinus arrest was also correlated with the injection into the same artery. The results suggest that the parasympathetic receptors are located mainly in the inferior wall of the left ventricle. This may well be the explanation for the clinical picture of bradycardia, hypotension, and peripheral vasodilatation often seen in acute inferior myocardial infarction. PMID:907775

  18. Adipose afferent reflex: sympathetic activation and obesity hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xiong, X-Q; Chen, W-W; Zhu, G-Q

    2014-03-01

    Excessive sympathetic activity contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and the progression of the related organ damage. Adipose afferent reflex (AAR) is a sympatho-excitatory reflex that the afferent activity from white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN or PVH) is one of the central sites in the control of the AAR, and ionotropic glutamate receptors in the nucleus mediate the AAR. The AAR is enhanced in obesity and obesity hypertension. Enhanced WAT afferent activity and AAR contribute to the excessive sympathetic activation and hypertension in obesity. Blockage of the AAR attenuates the excessive sympathetic activity and hypertension. Leptin may be one of sensors in the WAT for the AAR, and is involved in the enhanced AAR in obesity and hypertension. This review focuses on the neuroanatomical basis and physiological functions of the AAR, and the important role of the enhanced AAR in the pathogenesis of obesity hypertension.

  19. Hybrid nonlinear model of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) is presented in this paper. The model relies on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during slow and fast phase intervals. A viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events is proposed. Simulations show that this hybrid model replicates AVOR nystagmus patterns that are observed in experimentally recorded data.

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hands: clinical and scintigraphic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, L.E.; Mackinnon, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    In an attempt to establish specific scintigraphic criteria for the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) as defined by a group of specialized hand surgeons, 145 consecutive patients, 23 of whom had clinical RSD, underwent three phase radionuclide bone scanning (TPBS). Specific patterns for positive radionuclide angiogram, blood pool, and delayed images were established. The delayed images were sensitive (96%), specific (97%), and had a valuable negative predictive value (99%). It was concluded that TPBS could provide an objective marker for RSD.

  1. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-15

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in "ligated" rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex.

  2. Multiple scattering of electrons in the reflex triode

    SciTech Connect

    Creedon, J.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Analytical theories and Monte Carlo calculations are used to treat the scattering and energy loss of electrons in the anode of a reflex triode. The solution of this scattering problem is combined with the equations for particle flow in vacuum to give a quantitative theory of triode operation. It is now possible to calculate several important properties of this device. These include the operating voltage in the constant voltage mode, the ratio of ion-to-electron current and the ion transit time.

  3. Reflex sympathetic dystrophies and algodystrophies: historical and pathogenic considerations.

    PubMed

    Procacci, P; Maresca, M

    1987-11-01

    This paper reviews the historical development of the concepts of 'sympathy' of organs and of the sympathetic nervous system. In particular, the afferent function of the sympathetic system is discussed. The attention is focussed on sympathetic reflex dystrophies, known in some European schools as 'algodystrophies'. The pathogenic mechanisms of these affections, especially of causalgia, are discussed, considering the importance of peripheral damage to nerves, lateralisation of pain, 'mirror phenomena', and the relationship between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain.

  4. Preload recruitable stroke work in the presence of intact cardiovascular reflexes in rats fed a diet high in unsaturated fats.

    PubMed

    Trifunovic, B; Woodiwiss, A J; Norton, G R

    1995-01-15

    A decreased inotropic effect of myocardial beta receptor agonists in animals receiving diets high in unsaturated fats (UNSAT) has been demonstrated. The effect of an UNSAT diet on myocardial systolic performance under different loading conditions, in the presence of intact cardiovascular reflexes, has not been examined. We investigated the effect of an UNSAT diet on preload recruitable stroke work (SW) in the anaesthetised, open chest, ventilated rat. A control (CONTROL, 11% by energy), a high saturated fat (SAT, 37% by energy) and a high UNSAT (37% by energy) diet were fed to three groups of rats. At three months, systolic myocardial performance (stroke work: SW) at increasing left ventricular end diastolic pressures (LVEDP) was measured within a physiological preload range. There were no significant differences in either the slope or the intercept of the LVEDP/SW relation were found between the three diet groups. Systemic vascular resistance and heart rate decreased to the same extent in the three diet groups over the range of preloads examined. This occurred as a consequence of intact baroreceptor reflexes. Hence dietary modulation of unsaturated fats does not influence myocardial contraction over a wide range of physiological preloads in the presence of intact baroreceptor reflexes.

  5. Development and testing of a prototype reflex measurement system employing artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Busch, A C; Scheffer, C; Basson, A H

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the development, testing and performance evaluation of a patellar tendon reflex measurement system to provide a quantitative reflex evaluation for use by medical practitioners and in a telemedicine or E-medicine environment. A prototype was developed that makes use of XSens MTx orientation sensors, force-sensitive resistors and an electromyogram to measure the reflex response. Suitable parameters from the sensors were identified for analysis, and clinical testing was performed on 20 subjects to collect data to evaluate the system's performance. Subjective reflex evaluations were conducted by three medical doctors according to a standard reflex grading scale using video recordings of the tests. Multi-layer feed-forward (MLFF) artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used to analyze the collected data with the aim of pattern identification and reflex grading prediction. It was found that the MLFF network delivered the corresponding reflex grading with an accuracy of 85%, which was of the same order as the rate of differences between the subjective reflex evaluations performed by the doctors (80%). The use of ANNs to analyze a reflex measurement offers a repeatable and concise representation of the reflex that is familiar to doctors and can be developed for use in a general clinical setting or for telemedicine purposes. PMID:18952315

  6. Stretch sensitive reflexes as an adaptive mechanism for maintaining limb stability.

    PubMed

    Shemmell, Jonathan; Krutky, Matthew A; Perreault, Eric J

    2010-10-01

    The often studied stretch reflex is fundamental to the involuntary control of posture and movement. Nevertheless, there remains controversy regarding its functional role. Many studies have demonstrated that stretch reflexes can be modulated in a task appropriate manner. This review focuses on modulation of the long-latency stretch reflex, thought to be mediated, at least in part, by supraspinal pathways. For example, this component of the stretch reflex increases in magnitude during interactions with compliant environments, relative to its sensitivity during interactions with rigid environments. This suggests that reflex sensitivity increases to augment limb stability when that stability is not provided by the environment. However, not all results support the stabilizing role of stretch reflexes. Some studies have demonstrated that involuntary responses within the time period corresponding to the long-latency reflex can destabilize limb posture. We propose that this debate stems from the fact that multiple perturbation-sensitive pathways can contribute to the long-latency stretch reflex and that these pathways have separate functional roles. The presented studies suggest that neural activity occurring within the period normally ascribed to the long-latency stretch reflex is highly adaptable to current task demands and possibly should be considered more intelligent than "reflexive". PMID:20434396

  7. Effects of Abnormal Oral Reflexes on Speech Articulation in Persian Speaking Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    DADGAR, Hooshang; HADIAN, Mohammad Reza; LIRA, Ortega Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of abnormal oral reflexes and speech sound production in children with severe cerebral palsy. Materials & Methods Seven oral reflexes such as, rooting, mouth-opening, biting, chewing, lip, tongue, and suckling were examined in 52Persian-speaking monolingual children with spastic cerebral palsy (ages 5-10 yr).Phonetic information tests were administered to investigate their ability for articulation of the speech sounds. Results A significant relationship between three (i.e. the chewing, lip, and biting reflexes) out of the seven abnormal oral reflexes and the speech articulation was noticed. The presence of the chewing reflex was associated with deficits in production of /s, z, š,č/ sounds. The lip reflex was associated with deficits in the production of /p, m, r, j, f, č/ sounds. The biting reflex was associated with deficits in the production of /z, l, y and š/ sounds. No significant relationship was found between the rooting, mouth-opening, tongue, and suckling reflexes and sound articulation. Conclusion The presence of abnormal reflexes in the children with spastic cerebral palsy would suggest a correlation between these reflexes and sound articulation in Iranian children with spastic cerebral palsy. Hence, these observations might suggest some disturbances in normal speech development. PMID:27375753

  8. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes.

  9. Continuous resetting of the human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Kasting, G A; Eckberg, D L; Fritsch, J M; Birkett, C L

    1987-04-01

    Although human baroreflex responses have been studied during night as well as day, there has been no attempt to distinguish circadian changes of baroreflex function from those related to sleep. We measured carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses serially during a 24-h period in 11 normotensive volunteers who were awake and cooperative during testing. We applied sequences of ramped R-wave-triggered neck chamber pressure changes from +40 to -65 mmHg, during held expiration, at 3-h intervals. Subjects maintained their usual sleep-wake cycles but were awakened for three 30-min periods for night testing. There was no systematic change of baroreflex slope during the 24-h period. There were, however, parallel shifts of the entire sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response relation along its R-R interval and arterial pressure axes associated with small, but significant, circadian changes of baseline R-R intervals and arterial pressures. Thus, although our data do not point toward major circadian variability of baro-reflex responsiveness, they provide evidence for an ongoing process of human baroreflex resetting.

  10. Adaptive plasticity in the otolith-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Koizuka, Izumi

    2003-02-01

    This review focuses on the plasticity in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), especially in the otolith-ocular reflex (OOR). The VOR is a mechanism for the production of rapid compensatory eye movements during head movements. The VOR is under adaptive control which corrects VOR performance when visual-vestibular mismatch arises during head movements. It has been demonstrated that chronic exposure to certain visual environments, those generated by magnifying lenses and reversing prisms, alter the gain and phase of VOR in the dark in numerous species. Most experiments concerning such modification of the VOR have used semicircular canal stimulation. The VOR consists of the semicircular-ocular reflex (ScOR) and the OOR. There are few results regarding the relationship between the gain of the ScOR and the OOR. This review summarizes the studies on plasticity in the OOR. In addition, the difficulty in evaluating the OOR using current conventional methods including earth horizontal axis (EHA) rotation, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and linear sled, is discussed. We believe that the ScOR and the OOR share common neural pathways in such a way that a change in the synaptic efficacy of one pathway is accompanied by a change in the other.

  11. Sweet Taste and Menthol Increase Cough Reflex Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Dalton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  12. Reflex Epilepsy Induced by Playing Oriental Card or Board Games

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Jung; Kang, Joong Koo

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are currently few studies on clinical profiles of reflex epilepsy induced by thinking and spatial tasks. We studied the clinical characteristics of reflex epilepsy induced by playing oriental card and board games. Methods This study included 17 patients who presented with seizures that occur predominantly while playing games. We collected clinical data via protocol-based interviews. EEGs and brain MRI were performed. Results All of the subjects were men, and all of them were older than 30 years at the onset of seizure. Thirteen patients (76%) experienced their seizures while playing the oriental card game "Go-stop" and the remaining four patients (24%) experienced them while playing the oriental board game "Baduk". Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were frequently preceded by prodromal symptoms, but myoclonus was not evident. Most patients had no spontaneous seizures and generalized epileptiform discharges on EEGs, and infrequent seizures that were well controlled. Conclusions Our patients exhibited some features that differ from those described previously in the literature, suggesting that the clinical spectrum of reflex epilepsy induced by thinking and spatial tasks is wide. PMID:20396530

  13. The articulo-cardiac sympathetic reflex in spinalized, anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Atsuko; Ito, Ryuzo

    2006-04-01

    Somatic afferent regulation of heart rate by noxious knee joint stimulation has been proven in anesthetized cats to be a reflex response whose reflex center is in the brain and whose efferent arc is a cardiac sympathetic nerve. In the present study we examined whether articular stimulation could influence heart rate by this efferent sympathetic pathway in spinalized rats. In central nervous system (CNS)-intact rats, noxious articular movement of either the knee or elbow joint resulted in an increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate. However, although in acutely spinalized rats a noxious movement of the elbow joint resulted in a significant increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate, a noxious movement of the knee joint had no such effect and resulted in only a marginal increase in heart rate. Because this marginal increase was abolished by adrenalectomy suggests that it was due to the release of adrenal catecholamines. In conclusion, the spinal cord appears to be capable of mediating, by way of cardiac sympathetic nerves, the propriospinally induced reflex increase in heart rate that follows noxious stimulation of the elbow joint, but not the knee joint.

  14. Sweet taste and menthol increase cough reflex thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S; Dalton, Pamela

    2012-06-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  15. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity.

  16. Stimulus-induced reflex epileptic spasms in 5p- syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kentaro; Saito, Yoshiaki; Yokoyama, Atushi; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe two patients with 5p- syndrome who suffered from epilepsy characterised by stimulus-induced epileptic spasms manifesting as head nodding. In patient 1, a series of spasms were exclusively triggered by eating, and were associated with diffuse high-voltage slow waves on ictal EEG, particularly presenting as a positive slow potential at the left mid-temporal area. Clusters of sharp waves with negative polarity emerged in the same area during the inter-spasm periods during eating. In patient 2, spasms were provoked by either eating or micturition. Ictal EEG of clustered spasms after micturition showed positive slow or triphasic waves, which correlated with each spasm, over the bifrontal and vertex areas. These findings suggest that the focal cortical areas act as trigger regions in reflex epilepsies, and that a spasm-generator responsible for the execution of reflex spasms exists either in other cortical areas or in the subcortical structures. Although epilepsy is an unusual complication of 5p- syndrome, this syndrome may have a propensity to develop reflex epilepsy, particularly epileptic spasms. However, identification of responsible genes and their roles in this phenotype requires further investigations.

  17. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity. PMID:26627365

  18. An overset grid method for the study of reflex tearing.

    PubMed

    Maki, K L; Braun, R J; Driscoll, T A; King-Smith, P E

    2008-09-01

    We present an overset grid method to simulate the evolution of human tear film thickness subject to reflex tearing. The free-surface evolution is governed by a single fourth-order non-linear equation derived from lubrication theory with specified film thickness and volume flux at each end. The model arises from considering the limiting case where the surfactant is strongly affecting the surface tension. In numerical simulations, the overset grid is composed of fine boundary grids near the upper and lower eyelids to capture localized capillary thinning referred to as 'black lines' and a Cartesian grid covers the remaining domain. Numerical studies are performed on a non-linear test problem to confirm the accuracy and convergence of the scheme. The computations on the tear film model show qualitative agreement with in vivo tear film thickness measurements. Furthermore, the role of the black lines in the presence of tear supply from the lid margins, reflex tearing, was found to be more subtle than a barrier to tear fluid flow between the anterior of the eye and the meniscus at the lid margin. During reflex tearing, tears may flow through the region normally containing the black line and drift down over the cornea under the influence of gravity.

  19. Exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate and anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2003-06-01

    I investigated whether muscular contraction evokes cardiorespiratory increases (exercise pressor reflex) in alpha-chloralose- and chloral hydrate-anesthetized and precollicular, midcollicular, and postcollicular decerebrated rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and minute ventilation (Ve) were recorded before and during 1-min sciatic nerve stimulation, which induced static contraction of the triceps surae muscles, and during 1-min stretch of the calcaneal tendon, which selectively stimulated mechanosensitive receptors in the muscles. Anesthetized rats showed various patterns of MAP response to both stimuli, i.e., biphasic, depressor, pressor, and no response. Sciatic nerve stimulation to muscle in precollicular decerebrated rats always evoked spontaneous running, so the exercise pressor reflex was not determined from these preparations. None of the postcollicular decerebrated rats showed a MAP response or spontaneous running. Midcollicular decerebrated rats consistently showed biphasic blood pressure response to both stimulations. The increases in MAP, HR, and Ve were related to the tension developed. The static contractions in midcollicular decerebrated rats (381 +/- 65 g developed tension) significantly increased MAP, HR, and Ve from 103 +/- 12 to 119 +/- 24 mmHg, from 386 +/- 30 to 406 +/- 83 beats/min, and from 122 +/- 7 to 133 +/- 25 ml/min, respectively. After paralysis, sciatic nerve stimulation had no effect on MAP, HR, or Ve. These results indicate that the midcollicular decerebrated rat can be a model for the study of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:12543631

  20. Trait Dominance Promotes Reflexive Staring at Masked Angry Body Postures

    PubMed Central

    Hortensius, Ruud; van Honk, Jack; de Gelder, Beatrice; Terburg, David

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that dominant individuals sustain eye-contact when non-consciously confronted with angry faces, suggesting reflexive mechanisms underlying dominance behaviors. However, dominance and submission can be conveyed and provoked by means of not only facial but also bodily features. So far few studies have investigated the interplay of body postures with personality traits and behavior, despite the biological relevance and ecological validity of these postures. Here we investigate whether non-conscious exposure to bodily expressions of anger evokes reflex-like dominance behavior. In an interactive eye-tracking experiment thirty-two participants completed three social dominance tasks with angry, happy and neutral facial, bodily and face and body compound expressions that were masked from consciousness. We confirmed our predictions of slower gaze-aversion from both non-conscious bodily and compound expressions of anger compared to happiness in high dominant individuals. Results from a follow-up experiment suggest that the dominance behavior triggered by exposure to bodily anger occurs with basic detection of the category, but not recognition of the emotional content. Together these results suggest that dominant staring behavior is reflexively driven by non-conscious perception of the emotional content and triggered by not only facial but also bodily expression of anger. PMID:25549321

  1. Cardioinhibitory reflex due to a karate kick: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Froidmont, Sébastien; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Michaud, Katarzyna; Palmiere, Cristian; Augsburger, Marc-Pierre; Mangin, Patrice; Grabherr, Silke

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the case of a 17-year-old adolescent boy who received a foot kick in the trunk area from an expert in karate. He presented with immediate cardiocirculatory arrest. After a prolonged resuscitation, he was transferred to a hospital where he died 5 days later without ever regaining consciousness. Postmortem investigations including autopsy, radiology, histology, toxicology, and postmortem chemistry were performed that showed signs of multiple organ failure, an acute hemorrhage in the region of the celiac plexus, and signs of medical resuscitation. No preexisting disease, particularly those concerning the heart, was objectified. The cause of death was attributed to multiple organ failure after a prolonged cardiocirculatory arrest. Concerning the origin of the cardiac arrest, 2 hypotheses were considered-a cardioinhibitory reflex and a cardiac contusion (commotio cordis). Because of the presence of traumatic lesions in the celiac plexus, the first hypothesis was finally submitted. This case is reported because rare cases of sudden death from celiac reflex are described in the literature where it is almost impossible to find references with accurate documentation. The presented case confirms the importance of detailed documentation of the circumstances and postmortem investigations to establish a diagnosis of death due to cardioinhibitory reflex.

  2. Vestibulo-spinal and vestibulo-ocular reflexes are modulated when standing with increased postural threat.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, E N; Cleworth, T W; Allum, J H J; Inglis, J T; Lea, J; Westerberg, B D; Carpenter, M G

    2016-02-01

    We investigated how vestibulo-spinal reflexes (VSRs) and vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) measured through vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and video head impulse test (vHIT) outcomes, respectively, are modulated during standing under conditions of increased postural threat. Twenty-five healthy young adults stood quietly at low (0.8 m from the ground) and high (3.2 m) surface height conditions in two experiments. For the first experiment (n = 25) VEMPs were recorded with surface EMG from inferior oblique (IO), sternocleidomastoid (SCM), trapezius (TRP), and soleus (SOL) muscles in response to 256 air-conducted short tone bursts (125 dB SPL, 500 Hz, 4 ms) delivered via headphones. A subset of subjects (n = 19) also received horizontal and vertical head thrusts (∼150°/s) at each height in a separate session, comparing eye and head velocities by using a vHIT system for calculating the functional VOR gains. VEMP amplitudes (IO, TRP, SOL) and horizontal and vertical vHIT gains all increased with high surface height conditions (P < 0.05). Changes in IO and SCM VEMP amplitudes as well as horizontal vHIT gains were correlated with changes in electrodermal activity (ρ = 0.44-0.59, P < 0.05). VEMP amplitude for the IO also positively correlated with fear (ρ = 0.43, P = 0.03). Threat-induced anxiety, fear, and arousal have significant effects on VSR and VOR gains that can be observed in both physiological and functional outcome measures. These findings provide support for a potential central modulation of the vestibular nucleus complex through excitatory inputs from neural centers involved in processing fear, anxiety, arousal, and vigilance. PMID:26631147

  3. Hypnotizability, Hypnosis and Prepulse Inhibition of the Startle Reflex in Healthy Women: An ERP Analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Russo, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    A working model of the neurophysiology of hypnosis suggests that highly hypnotizable individuals (HHs) have more effective frontal attentional systems implementing control, monitoring performance, and inhibiting unwanted stimuli from conscious awareness, than low hypnotizable individuals (LHs). Recent studies, using prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory startle reflex (ASR), suggest that HHs, in the waking condition, may show reduced sensory gating although they may selectively attend and disattend different stimuli. Using a within subject design and a strict subject selection procedure, in waking and hypnosis conditions we tested whether HHs compared to LHs showed a significantly lower inhibition of the ASR and startle-related brain activity in both time and intracerebral source localization domains. HHs, as compared to LH participants, exhibited (a) longer latency of the eyeblink startle reflex, (b) reduced N100 responses to startle stimuli, and (c) higher PPI of eyeblink startle and of the P200 and P300 waves. Hypnosis yielded smaller N100 waves to startle stimuli and greater PPI of this component than in the waking condition. sLORETA analysis revealed that, for the N100 (107 msec) elicited during startle trials, HHs had a smaller activation in the left parietal lobe (BA2/40) than LHs. Auditory pulses of pulse-with prepulse trials in HHs yielded less activity of the P300 (280 msec) wave than LHs, in the cingulate and posterior cingulate gyrus (BA23/31). The present results, on the whole, are in the opposite direction to PPI findings on hypnotizability previously reported in the literature. These results provide support to the neuropsychophysiological model that HHs have more effective sensory integration and gating (or filtering) of irrelevant stimuli than LHs. PMID:24278150

  4. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Mauro Henrique Chagas; Santos, Mariane Floriano Lopes; de Lima, Carolina Oliveira; Campos, Celso Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT). This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27547474

  5. Central trigeminocardiac reflex in pediatric neurosurgery: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Trigeminocardiac reflex is a well-known phenomenon in neurosurgery, craniofacial surgery, ophthalmology and interventional neuroradiology. Even though the trigeminocardiac reflex has become an important factor in skull base surgery and neurosurgery, the central form of trigeminocardiac reflex has only been described in adult subpopulations until now. Case presentation We present a clear form of repetitive trigeminocardiac reflex expressed during revision surgery of a giant (110×61mm) right temporoparietal meningioma in an 18-month-old male Caucasian patient. After cessation of the surgical stimulus, his heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure returned to normal physiological levels. The further follow-up was uneventful. Conclusion Our case demonstrates that the central trigeminocardiac reflex also exists in pediatric patients, especially if manipulating trigeminal innervated structures or around the nerve itself. Whether the incidence and the behavior of the trigeminocardiac reflex is similar in pediatric neurosurgery compared with adult patients has to be shown in further studies. PMID:23110862

  6. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex.

    PubMed

    E Silva, Mauro Henrique Chagas; Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Santos, Mariane Floriano Lopes; de Lima, Carolina Oliveira; Campos, Celso Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT). This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27547474

  7. Analysis and neuronal modeling of the nonlinear characteristics of a local cardiac reflex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vadigepalli, R; Doyle, F J; Schwaber, J S

    2001-10-01

    Previous experimental results have suggested the existence of a local cardiac reflex in the rat. In this study, the putative role of such a local reflex in cardiovascular regulation is quantitatively analyzed. A model for the local reflex is developed from anatomical experimental results and physiological data in the literature. Using this model, a systems-level analysis is conducted. Simulation results indicate that the neuromodulatory mechanism of the local reflex attenuates the nonlinearity of the relationship between cardiac vagal drive and arterial pressure. This behavior is characterized through coherence analysis. Furthermore, the modulation of phase-related characteristics of the cardiovascular system is suggested as a plausible mechanism for the nonlinear attenuation. Based on these results, it is plausible that the functional role of the local reflex is highly robust nonlinear compensation at the heart, which results in less complex dynamics in other parts of the reflex. PMID:11570998

  8. Signaled avoidance in the eye withdrawal reflex of the green crab

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Charles I.; Armstrong, Philip M.; Feinman, Robin A.; Feinman, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    Learning in a signaled avoidance procedure was studied in the eye withdrawal reflex of the green crab, Carcinus maenas. A puff of air to the eye, which causes eye retraction, was used as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A mild vibration on the carapace, which has no effect on untrained animals, was used as a warning (conditioned) stimulus (CS). Eye withdrawal during the CS led to the omission of the otherwise scheduled US. Acquisition was rapid, reaching about 75% avoidance after 30 trials. Extinction occurred slowly over the course of 40 CS-only trials. Yoked controls did not perform as well. The behavior of experimental animals in the avoidance procedure was found to be essentially identical to the performance of animals subjected to a classical conditioning paradigm in which CS responses had no effect on US presentation. Additional groups of animals were subjected to experiments in which (a) avoidance conditioning (60 trials) was followed by classical conditioning (40 trials) or (b) classical conditioning was followed by avoidance. The behavior of these groups was, again, essentially identical. The results suggest that there may be an underlying Pavlovian mechanism for the learned response, although the contribution of an operant process is not excluded. The results expand the range of invertebrate animals in which fundamental conditioning phenomena can be demonstrated, and may provide a neuronal model for learning in a signaled avoidance procedure. PMID:16812569

  9. Genetic and environmental influences on emotion-modulated startle reflex: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Anokhin, Andrey P; Golosheykin, Simon; Heath, Andrew C

    2007-01-01

    Emotion-modulated startle reflex is an important indicator of traitlike differences in affective processing implicated in the biological basis of personality and psychopathology. This study examined heritability of startle modulation by affective pictures in 66 pairs of monozygotic and 57 pairs of dizygotic female twins. Consistent with previous studies, startle magnitude was significantly influenced by emotional valence of the picture (positive < neutral < negative). Absolute response magnitude showed high heritability in all three valence conditions (59-61%); however, there were no significant genetic influences on the amount of startle modulation. Thus, our data do not support the hypothesis that emotion-modulated startle can serve as an indicator of genetically transmitted individual differences in affective processing.

  10. Feasibility analysis of digital single lens reflex applied in the field of aerospace measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xinghao; Li, Manliang; Tang, Xuehai

    2015-10-01

    The mainstrean digital single lens reflex (DSLR) image has the characteristics of true color and high quality, this paper proposes apply DSLR to probe spacecraft in order to obtain better quality Color images. Firstly, the performance parameters of mainstream DSLR and industrial-grade optical detector are analysed and compared detailedly; Secondly, the performance and positioning ways etc. of optical detector and DSLR system integrated special telephoto lens are analysed and compared. Furthermore, some experiments have been done in different conditions. The experiments indicate that the performances of DSLR and optical detector are similar. In addition, DSLR has the advantage of small size, low cost and Easy positioning, which can be used to obtain the scene of spacecraft in the takeoff phase and part of reentry phase.

  11. Methodological optimization of tinnitus assessment using prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Galazyuk, A V

    2012-11-16

    Recently prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR) became a popular technique for tinnitus assessment in laboratory animals. This method confers a significant advantage over the previously used time-consuming behavioral approaches utilizing basic mechanisms of conditioning. Although this technique has been successfully used to assess tinnitus in different laboratory animals, many of the finer details of this methodology have not been described enough to be replicated, but are critical for tinnitus assessment. Here we provide detail description of key procedures and methodological issues that provide guidance for newcomers with the process of learning to correctly apply gap detection techniques for tinnitus assessment in laboratory animals. The major categories of these issues include: refinement of hardware for best performance, optimization of stimulus parameters, behavioral considerations, and identification of optimal strategies for data analysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tinnitus Neuroscience.

  12. Somatization of dissociated traumatic memories in a case of reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gainer, M J

    1993-10-01

    In this single case report, I examine the treatment of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) with hypnosis and ego-state therapy in a subject with a dissociative disorder. RSD is an unusual, debilitating, chronic pain syndrome with a usually poor outcome. The subject achieved temporary symptomatic relief using hypnosis and auto-hypnotic pain-management techniques. Eventually, she achieved permanent relief of RSD symptoms that continued over a two-year follow-up period. She achieved this permanent relief through a process of psychologically integrating physical functions that she experienced as specific to several dissociated ego states. This case illustrates the role of metaphor and imaginative symbolism in constituting a physical condition. It also illustrates how imaginative transformation of the symbolic imagery can induce psychological and physical change.

  13. Electrical study of jaw and orbicularis oculi reflexes after trigeminal nerve surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, I T

    1978-01-01

    Trigeminal nerve ophthalmic and motor division function was assessed clinically and electrically in 32 patients who had undergone various surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia. Using known electrophysiological techniques, the orbicularis oculi and jaw reflexes were tested in all subjects. Abnormalities of the orbicularis oculi reflex were anticipated on the basis of ophthalmic division anaesthesia. However, jaw reflex abnormalities appeared in operated cases with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of masseter denervation. These results were unexpected, and imply that the proprioceptive fibres of the jaw reflex are mediated by a sensory and not a motor root as previously believed. Images PMID:690653

  14. Implementation of a smartphone as a wireless gyroscope application for the quantification of reflex response.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The patellar tendon reflex constitutes a fundamental aspect of the conventional neurological evaluation. Dysfunctional characteristics of the reflex response can augment the diagnostic acuity of a clinician for subsequent referral to more advanced medical resources. The capacity to quantify the reflex response while alleviating the growing strain on specialized medical resources is a topic of interest. The quantification of the tendon reflex response has been successfully demonstrated with considerable accuracy and consistency through using a potential energy impact pendulum attached to a reflex hammer for evoking the tendon reflex with a smartphone, such as an iPhone, application representing a wireless accelerometer platform to quantify reflex response. Another sensor integrated into the smartphone, such as an iPhone, is the gyroscope, which measures rate of angular rotation. A smartphone application enables wireless transmission through Internet connectivity of the gyroscope signal recording of the reflex response as an email attachment. The smartphone wireless gyroscope application demonstrates considerable accuracy and consistency for the quantification of the tendon reflex response.

  15. Implementation of an iPhone wireless accelerometer application for the quantification of reflex response.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren; Nishikawa, Kiisa

    2013-01-01

    The patellar tendon reflex represents an inherent aspect of the standard neurological evaluation. The features of the reflex response provide initial perspective regarding the status of the nervous system. An iPhone wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy impact pendulum attached to a reflex hammer has been successfully developed, tested, and evaluated for quantifying the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone functions as a wireless accelerometer platform. The wide coverage range of the iPhone enables the quantification of reflex response samples in rural and remote settings. The iPhone has the capacity to transmit the reflex response acceleration waveform by wireless transmission through email. Automated post-processing of the acceleration waveform provides feature extraction of the maximum acceleration of the reflex response ascertained after evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone wireless accelerometer application demonstrated the utility of the smartphone as a biomedical device, while providing accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response.

  16. Implementation of an iPhone wireless accelerometer application for the quantification of reflex response.

    PubMed

    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy; Grundfest, Warren; Nishikawa, Kiisa

    2013-01-01

    The patellar tendon reflex represents an inherent aspect of the standard neurological evaluation. The features of the reflex response provide initial perspective regarding the status of the nervous system. An iPhone wireless accelerometer application integrated with a potential energy impact pendulum attached to a reflex hammer has been successfully developed, tested, and evaluated for quantifying the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone functions as a wireless accelerometer platform. The wide coverage range of the iPhone enables the quantification of reflex response samples in rural and remote settings. The iPhone has the capacity to transmit the reflex response acceleration waveform by wireless transmission through email. Automated post-processing of the acceleration waveform provides feature extraction of the maximum acceleration of the reflex response ascertained after evoking the patellar tendon reflex. The iPhone wireless accelerometer application demonstrated the utility of the smartphone as a biomedical device, while providing accurate and consistent quantification of the reflex response. PMID:24110773

  17. Reduction of the linear reflex gain explained from the M1-M2 refractory period.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Asbjorn; de Vlugt, Erwin; Meskers, Carel G M; de Groot, Jurriaan H; Arendzen, J Hans; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2013-06-01

    Linear system identification methods combined with neuromechanical modeling enable the quantification of reflex gains from recorded joint angular perturbation, torque, and/or electromyography (EMG). However, the stretch reflex response as recorded by EMG consists of multiple consecutive activation volleys (M1 and M2 responses) separated by a period of reduced activity and is nonlinearly related to joint perturbation. The goal of this study is to assess to what extent linear assumptions hold when quantifying these reflexive responses. Series of ramp-and-hold angular perturbations with fixed velocity but different ramp durations (and, therefore, different amplitudes) were applied to the wrist joint of seven healthy volunteers. Evoked EMG responses were compared to the reflex response estimated from a common linear reflex model relating EMG to perturbation velocity. Model fits described the measured EMG responses best when the perturbation and M1 response durations were equivalent. With increasing perturbation duration, i.e., amplitude, EMG response increased but reflex gain decreased due to the inert period after M1, which is believed to be related to alignment of the refractory period of the motoneurons. For angular joint perturbations exceeding the M1 duration (coinciding with 2 (°) of wrist joint rotation in this study), reflex gain variation may be largely explained from a shortcoming of the linear model in describing the nonlinear reflex response, and in particular the period of low reflexive activity after M1.

  18. [Correlation between electrically-induced stapedius reflex and discomfort threshold in cochlear implant patients].

    PubMed

    Gattaz, G; Battmer, R D; Lehnhardt, E; Gnadeberg, D

    1992-12-01

    Electrically elicited stapedius reflex thresholds are an objective criteria for the fitting of speech processors in very young children. Reflex thresholds generally fit well within the upper third of a subject's individual dynamic range, the difference between electrical threshold of hearing, (T) and maximum comfort (C) levels and can be used to predict ultimate behavioral maximum comfort levels. In acoustically elicited stapedius reflexes a saturation of impedance amplitude can be registered at approximately 110 dB, which is 90% of the dynamic range. Assuming a similar relationship for the electrically elicited stapedius reflex there would be two values within the dynamic range which could be used for extrapolation of the threshold level. In the present study, the electrically elicited stapedius reflex was examined in 16 deaf patients who had received 22-channel Clark/NUCLEUS cochlear implants. Using an apical, a medial and a basal electrode pair, different stimulation positions within the cochlea were tested. The contralateral reflexes could be elicited in 11 patients (69%). A saturation of the reflex amplitude was recordable in 10 subjects, at least in one of the electrode pairs. The reflex saturation in all cases was located close to the uncomfortable loudness level within the subjects' dynamic ranges (at 95% dynamic). This finding is comparable to acoustic matter. As a result, these data together with reflex threshold data suggest a means for predicting to predict the threshold levels.

  19. Learning reflexively from a health promotion professional development program in Canada.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Beaudet, Nicole

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, reflexivity has received much attention in the professional education and training literature, especially in the public health and health promotion fields. Despite general agreement on the importance of reflexivity, there appears to be no consensus on how to assess reflexivity or to conceptualize the different forms developed among professionals and participants of training programs. This paper presents an analysis of the reflexivity outcomes of the Health Promotion Laboratory, an innovative professional development program aimed at supporting practice changes among health professionals by fostering competency development and reflexivity. More specifically, this paper explores the difference between two levels of reflexivity (formative and critical) and highlights some implications of each for practice. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with participants from two intervention sites. Results showed that involvement in the Health Promotion Laboratory prompted many participants to modify their vision of their practice and professional role, indicating an impact on reflexivity. In many cases, new understandings seem to have played a formative function in enabling participants to improve their practice and their role as health promoters. The reflective process also served a critical function culminating in a social and moral understanding of the impacts on society of the professionals' practices and roles. This type of outcome is greatly desired in health promotion, given the social justice and equity concerns of this field of practice. By redefining the theoretical concept of reflexivity on two levels and discussing their impacts on practice, this study supports the usefulness of both levels of reflexivity.

  20. Reduced postactivation depression of soleus H reflex and root evoked potential after transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jennifer C; Stein, Richard B; Roy, François D

    2015-07-01

    Postactivation depression of the Hoffmann (H) reflex is associated with a transient period of suppression following activation of the reflex pathway. In soleus, the depression lasts for 100-200 ms during voluntary contraction and up to 10 s at rest. A reflex root evoked potential (REP), elicited after a single pulse of transcutaneous stimulation to the thoracolumbar spine, has been shown to exhibit similar suppression. The present study systematically characterized the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on postactivation depression using double-pulse H reflexes and REPs. A TMS pulse reduced the period of depression to 10-15 ms for both reflexes. TMS could even produce postactivation facilitation of the H reflex, as the second reflex response was increased to 243 ± 51% of control values at the 75-ms interval. The time course was qualitatively similar for the REP, yet the overall increase was less. While recovery of the H reflex was slower in the relaxed muscle, the profile exhibited a distinct bimodal shape characterized by an early peak at the 25-ms interval, reaching 72 ± 23% of control values, followed by a trough at 50 ms, and then a gradual recovery at intervals > 50 ms. The rapid recovery of two successively depressed H reflexes, ∼ 25 ms apart, was also possible with double-pulse TMS. The effect of the TMS-induced corticospinal excitation on postactivation depression may be explained by a combination of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, although further investigation is required to distinguish between them.

  1. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  2. Modulation of high-frequency vestibuloocular reflex during visual tracking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, V. E.; Leigh, R. J.; Thomas, C. W.; Averbuch-Heller, L.; Zivotofsky, A. Z.; Discenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Humans may visually track a moving object either when they are stationary or in motion. To investigate visual-vestibular interaction during both conditions, we compared horizontal smooth pursuit (SP) and active combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving sinusoidally at 0.4 Hz in four normal subjects while the subjects were either stationary or vibrated in yaw at 2.8 Hz. We also measured the visually enhanced vestibuloocular reflex (VVOR) during vibration in yaw at 2.8 Hz over a peak head velocity range of 5-40 degrees/s. 2. We found that the gain of the VVOR at 2.8 Hz increased in all four subjects as peak head velocity increased (P < 0.001), with minimal phase changes, such that mean retinal image slip was held below 5 degrees/s. However, no corresponding modulation in vestibuloocular reflex gain occurred with increasing peak head velocity during a control condition when subjects were rotated in darkness. 3. During both horizontal SP and CEHT, tracking gains were similar, and the mean slip speed of the target's image on the retina was held below 5.5 degrees/s whether subjects were stationary or being vibrated at 2.8 Hz. During both horizontal SP and CEHT of target motion at 0.4 Hz, while subjects were vibrated in yaw, VVOR gain for the 2.8-Hz head rotations was similar to or higher than that achieved during fixation of a stationary target. This is in contrast to the decrease of VVOR gain that is reported while stationary subjects perform CEHT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Exploring the practice of patient centered care: The role of ethnography and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Gorli, Mara; Moja, Lorenzo; Galuppo, Laura; Ripamonti, Silvio; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Patient centered care (PCC) is an essential dimension of healthcare systems' mission worldwide and is recognized as an important condition for ensuring the quality of care. Nonetheless, it is also acknowledged that various care providers perceive patient centeredness differently and that there remain several unanswered questions about the aspects of healthcare delivery that are linked to an actual achievement of PCC. In the paper, we categorize the current research on PCC into two streams ("dyadic" and "organizational") and we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each. Despite their important contributions to healthcare services research, these approaches to PCC do not fully capture the network of practices and relationships constituting patients and providers' experiences within healthcare contexts. Therefore, we propose an alternative interpretation of PCC that integrates insights from "practice theories" and emphasizes the negotiated and local nature of patient centeredness, which is accomplished through the engagement of providers and patients in everyday care practices. To develop such interpretation, we propose a research approach combining ethnographic and reflexive methods. Ethnography can help achieve more nuanced descriptions of what PCC truly encapsulates in the care process by drawing attention to the social and material reality of healthcare contexts. Reflexivity can help disentangle and bring to surface the tacit knowledge spread in everyday care practices and transform it into actionable knowledge, a type of knowledge that may support services improvement toward PCC. We anticipate that such improvement is far from straightforward: an actual achievement of PCC may challenge the interests of different stakeholders and unsettle consolidated habits, hierarchies and power dynamics. This unsettlement, however, can also serve as a necessary condition for engaging in a participative process of internal development. We discuss the outcomes, limitations and

  4. Exploring the practice of patient centered care: The role of ethnography and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Gorli, Mara; Moja, Lorenzo; Galuppo, Laura; Ripamonti, Silvio; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Patient centered care (PCC) is an essential dimension of healthcare systems' mission worldwide and is recognized as an important condition for ensuring the quality of care. Nonetheless, it is also acknowledged that various care providers perceive patient centeredness differently and that there remain several unanswered questions about the aspects of healthcare delivery that are linked to an actual achievement of PCC. In the paper, we categorize the current research on PCC into two streams ("dyadic" and "organizational") and we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each. Despite their important contributions to healthcare services research, these approaches to PCC do not fully capture the network of practices and relationships constituting patients and providers' experiences within healthcare contexts. Therefore, we propose an alternative interpretation of PCC that integrates insights from "practice theories" and emphasizes the negotiated and local nature of patient centeredness, which is accomplished through the engagement of providers and patients in everyday care practices. To develop such interpretation, we propose a research approach combining ethnographic and reflexive methods. Ethnography can help achieve more nuanced descriptions of what PCC truly encapsulates in the care process by drawing attention to the social and material reality of healthcare contexts. Reflexivity can help disentangle and bring to surface the tacit knowledge spread in everyday care practices and transform it into actionable knowledge, a type of knowledge that may support services improvement toward PCC. We anticipate that such improvement is far from straightforward: an actual achievement of PCC may challenge the interests of different stakeholders and unsettle consolidated habits, hierarchies and power dynamics. This unsettlement, however, can also serve as a necessary condition for engaging in a participative process of internal development. We discuss the outcomes, limitations and

  5. [CO2-stunning of slaughter pigs: effects on EEG, catecholamines and clinical reflexes].

    PubMed

    Hartung, J; Nowak, B; Waldmann, K H; Ellerbrock, S

    2002-03-01

    Investigations were carried out on the response of slaughter pigs to CO2 stunning with two different gas concentrations (80 vol%, 90 vol%, 73 s) under practical conditions in a one gondola-dip-lift system. EEG measurements were performed and blood constituents such as catecholamines (adrenaline, nor-adrenaline) and lactate as well as clinical reactions (nasal septum and corneal reflex, heart beats) investigated. Special EEG-electrodes were adapted for the measurement on pigs and a mobile data logger was prepared for the use in the lairage of the slaughter house and in the stunning unit. The CO2 concentrations were measured continuously close to the head of the pigs when transported up and down in the stunning gondola. The results show that the technique is suited to monitor the effects of different CO2 gas concentrations on the EEG of the pigs under practical conditions. There is strong evidence that CO2 concentrations of 80 vol% applied over 70 s as required by law are not sufficient to stun pigs properly. A large part of the animals still showed typical reflexes when leaving the stunning pit. When an atmosphere of 90 vol% CO2 is applied, most animals are already dead before bleeding commences. This may create problems in respect to meat hygiene. The blood analysis revealed very high concentrations of catecholamines after stunning. The values for adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in the sticking blood rose by a factor of about 1000 as compared to the concentrations in blood samples taken in the lairage before stunning. It seems necessary to revise the current legislation on gas stunning and to look in greater detail in the effects of CO2 stunning on the welfare of slaughter pigs.

  6. Production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Verigin, A.A.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.; Podkatov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    An experimental study of the production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode is reported. The ions had various ratios Z/M. When the anode plasma is produced in a preliminary charging pulse of the accelerator, the plasma density is too low for operation under charge-limited emission conditions. In this case, an ion beam is observed to be produced from the plasma formed by the direct heating of the anode material by oscillating electrons. When an anode plasma resulting from the breakdown of a dielectric insert or of the vacuum gap of a composite andode by an external voltage source is used to produce an ion beam, the reflex triode operating conditions depend on delaying the operation of the accelerator with respect to the external source. The highest efficiency (approx. =20%) in the production of an ion beam is observed at t/sub d/ = 3--6 ..mu..s. In this case, the reflex triode operates under increasing or constant impedance conditions. It was shown in the course of the experiments that the ion beam which is produced is nonuniform. There are three groups of ions: H/sup +/, C/sup n//sup +/, and Cu/sup n//sup +/. The energy of the heavy ions depends on the applied anode potential. The different mass components of the ion beam do not appear at the same time. The macroscopic divergence of the beam is 4--6/sup 0/ at the periphery and drops off to approx. <1/sup 0/ at the center. The microscopic divergence of the beam is 3/sup 0/. The total energy of the ion beam which is produced is less than 120 J at an average current approx. =2.8 kA.

  7. The Central Nervous Connections Involved in the Vomiting Reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brizzee, K. R.; Mehler, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The vomiting reflex may be elicited by a number of different types or classes of stimuli involving many varieties of receptor structures and considerable diversity in afferent pathways and central connections. Central relay or mediating structures thus may vary widely according to the type of initial emetic stimulus. The emetic circuits which have been most completely delineated to date are probably those in which the Chemoreceptor Trigger Zone (CTZ) in the Area Postrema (AP) functions as a key mediating structure. Even in this system, however, there are large gaps in our knowledge of the nerve tracts and central nervous connections involved. Knowledge of most other emetic circuits subserving the emetic reflex resulting from many diverse types of stimuli such, for example, as emotional stress (e.g. psychogenic vomiting, Wruble et al. 1982), pain (e.g. testicular trauma), and chemical or mechanical irritation of the gastrointestinal tract or urinary tract is quite incomplete at this time, thus precluding any very adequate description of their central connections at present. One physiological system, however, which has received considerable attention recently in relation to the vomiting reflex elicited by motion stimuli is the vestibular system. Due to the paucity of data on central nervous connections of several or the non-vestibular types of emetic stimuli cited above, we will devote most of our attention in this brief review to the central connections of the vestibular system which seem likely to be involved in the vomiting response to motion stimuli. However, the latter part of the review will be concerned with the concept of the reticular vomiting centre in relation to the ParviCellular Reticular Formation (PCRF), and will thus probably pertain to all of the many classes of emetic stimuli since it will address the question of the final common emetic pathway.

  8. Rapid motor learning in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Wu; Weldon, Patrick; Tang, Bingfeng; King, W. M.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Motor learning was induced in the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (TVOR) when monkeys were repeatedly subjected to a brief (0.5 sec) head translation while they tried to maintain binocular fixation on a visual target for juice rewards. If the target was world-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually increased; if the target was head-fixed, the initial eye speed of the TVOR gradually decreased. The rate of learning acquisition was very rapid, with a time constant of approximately 100 trials, which was equivalent to <1 min of accumulated stimulation. These learned changes were consolidated over >or=1 d without any reinforcement, indicating induction of long-term synaptic plasticity. Although the learning generalized to targets with different viewing distances and to head translations with different accelerations, it was highly specific for the particular combination of head motion and evoked eye movement associated with the training. For example, it was specific to the modality of the stimulus (translation vs rotation) and the direction of the evoked eye movement in the training. Furthermore, when one eye was aligned with the heading direction so that it remained motionless during training, learning was not expressed in this eye, but only in the other nonaligned eye. These specificities show that the learning sites are neither in the sensory nor the motor limb of the reflex but in the sensory-motor transformation stage of the reflex. The dependence of the learning on both head motion and evoked eye movement suggests that Hebbian learning may be one of the underlying cellular mechanisms.

  9. Abnormalities of the blink reflex in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, S K; Forssell, H; Tenovuo, O

    1997-12-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report on pain-related abnormalities of the eye blink reflex (BR) in a clinical pain patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible neuropathic mechanisms underlying the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), by means of objective electrophysiological examination of the trigemino-facial system. We studied the BR with stimulation of the supraorbital nerve (SON) with particular emphasis on the occurrence of the pain-related ultralate R3 components, and the habituation response of the R2 components. The subjects consisted of eleven BMS patients and 10 healthy control subjects. All patients underwent thorough clinical oral and neurological examinations. The motor function of the trigeminal nerve was assessed with a jaw reflex recording, and a needle-EMG examination of the facial and masticatory muscles was performed in the patients with abnormalities in the BR recordings. The jaw reflexes, the latencies of the BR components, and the needle-EMG examinations were normal in all patients. As a group, the BMS patients had statistically significantly higher stimulus thresholds for the tactile R 1 components of the BR compared with the control subjects. With non-noxious stimulation, the BMS patients showed more frequently pain-related R3 components (11/22 SONs) compared with the controls (3/20 SONs). In addition, four BMS patients had abnormal habituation of the R2 components. In two of these patients, the findings were segmental (i.e., unilateral), coinciding with the side of the subjective BM symptoms. The abnormalities of the BR tests appeared to be related to longer disease duration. Our results suggest a possible pathologic involvement of the nervous system in chronic BMS.

  10. Modification of Otolith Reflex Asymmetries Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Andrew H.; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Wood, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesize that changes in otolith-mediated reflexes adapted for microgravity contribute to perceptual, gaze and postural disturbances upon return to Earth s gravity. Our goal was to determine pre- versus post-fight differences in unilateral otolith reflexes that reflect these adaptive changes. This study represents the first comprehensive examination of unilateral otolith function following space flight. Ten astronauts participated in unilateral otolith function tests three times pre-flight and up to four times after Shuttle flights from landing day through the subsequent 10 days. During unilateral centrifugation (UC, +/- 3.5cm at 400deg/s), utricular function was examined by the perceptual changes reflected by the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and by video-oculographic measurement of the otolith-mediated ocular counter-roll (OOR). Unilateral saccular reflexes were recorded by measurement of collic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (cVEMP). Although data from a few subjects were not obtained early post-flight, a general increase in asymmetry of otolith responses was observed on landing day relative to pre-flight baseline, with a subsequent reversal in asymmetry within 2-3 days. Recovery to baseline levels was achieved within 10 days. This fluctuation in the asymmetry measures appeared strongest for SVV, in a consistent direction for OOR, and in an opposite direction for cVEMP. These results are consistent with our hypothesis that space flight results in adaptive changes in central nervous system processing of otolith input. Adaptation to microgravity may reveal asymmetries in otolith function upon to return to Earth that were not detected prior to the flight due to compensatory mechanisms.

  11. A new (semantic) reflexive brain-computer interface: in search for a suitable classifier.

    PubMed

    Furdea, A; Ruf, C A; Halder, S; De Massari, D; Bogdan, M; Rosenstiel, W; Matuz, T; Birbaumer, N

    2012-01-15

    The goal of the current study is to find a suitable classifier for electroencephalogram (EEG) data derived from a new learning paradigm which aims at communication in paralysis. A reflexive semantic classical (Pavlovian) conditioning paradigm is explored as an alternative to the operant learning paradigms, currently used in most brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Comparable with a lie-detection experiment, subjects are presented with true and false statements. The EEG activity following true and false statements was classified with the aim to separate covert 'yes' from covert 'no' responses. Four classification algorithms are compared for classifying off-line data collected from a group of 14 healthy participants: (i) stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SWLDA), (ii) shrinkage linear discriminant analysis (SLDA), (iii) linear support vector machine (LIN-SVM) and (iv) radial basis function kernel support vector machine (RBF-SVM). The results indicate that all classifiers perform at chance level when separating conditioned 'yes' from conditioned 'no' responses. However, single conditioned reactions could be successfully classified on a single-trial basis (single conditioned reaction against a baseline interval). All of the four investigated classification methods achieve comparable performance, however results with RBF-SVM show the highest single-trial classification accuracy of 68.8%. The results suggest that the proposed paradigm may allow affirmative and negative (disapproving negative) communication in a BCI experiment.

  12. Central Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Acquisition of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Delay eyeblink conditioning is established by paired presentations of a conditioned stimulus (CS) such as a tone or light, and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits the blink reflex. Conditioned stimulus information is projected from the basilar pontine nuclei to the cerebellar interpositus nucleus and cortex. The cerebellar cortex,…

  13. Effects of the mas-related gene (Mrg) C receptor agonist BAM6-22 on nociceptive reflex activity in naive, monoarthritic and mononeuropathic rats after intraplantar and intrathecal administration.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Wolfgang; Alique, Matilde; Herrero, Juan Fernando

    2016-01-01

    MrgC receptors are selectively expressed on peripheral and central terminals of small calibre nociceptive fibres. Peptide agonists of the MrgC receptor were reported to modulate nociceptive transmission exerting either pro- or antinociceptive effects depending on site of action and pain model used. Here, we investigated the effect of intraplantar and intrathecal administration of the selective MrgC receptor agonist BAM6-22 on mechanically and electrically evoked nociceptive reflex activity as a uniform readout measure in naïve, monoarthritic and mononeuropathic rats. In naïve rats, intraplantar BAM6-22 enhanced, whereas intrathecal BAM6-22 did not modulate mechanically-evoked nociceptive reflex activity. In monoarthritic rats, intraplantar BAM6-22 had no effect, whereas intrathecal BAM6-22 inhibited mechanically evoked nociceptive reflex activity. In mononeuropathic rats, BAM6-22 reduced mechanically evoked nociceptive reflex activity after both intraplantar and intrathecal administration. BAM6-22 did not modulate electrically evoked nociceptive reflex activity in any condition. Thus, the results of the present investigation confirm and add to previous studies demonstrating that site of action, (patho)-physiological state and stimulus modality determine the effect quality of MrgC receptor agonists. It still needs to be explored how concurrent activation of peripheral and spinal MrgC receptors modulates nociceptive processing under conditions of both acute and chronic pain to evaluate the therapeutic potential of putative small molecule MrgC receptor agonists as innovative analgesics.

  14. Identification of the vestibulo-ocular reflex dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2014-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) plays an important role in our daily activities by enabling us to fixate on objects during head movements. Modeling and identification of the VOR improves our insight into the system behavior and helps in diagnosing various disorders. However, the switching nature of eye movements, including the VOR, makes the dynamic analysis challenging. In this work we are using integration of subspace and prediction error methods to analyze VOR dynamics. The performance of the method is evaluated using simulation studies and experimental data.

  15. [The reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome associated with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cobeta García, J C; López-Longo, F J; Monteagudo Sáez, I; Núñez Olarte, J M; Fernández García, J E; Rivera Redondo, J

    1990-05-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) is a rare entity of unknown etiopathogenesis, associated to different precipitating factors such as malignant tumors of several localizations. A new clinical variety has been recently described which has been denominated palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome. We present here two patients with RSDS associated to breast cancer: one case presenting fasciitis and polyarthritis and another case also associated to polymyalgia rheumatica. We emphasize the importance of reducing the tumor mass in the treatment of this syndrome, as well as including it in the gammagraphic differential diagnosis of bone metastasis.

  16. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  17. Abnormal Control of Orbicularis Oculi Reflex Excitability in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Christopher; Llufriu, Sara; Martinez-Heras, Eloy; Saiz, Albert; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis may lead to abnormal excitability of brainstem reflex circuits because of impairment of descending control pathways. We hypothesized that such abnormality should show in the analysis of blink reflex responses in the form of asymmetries in response size. The study was done in 20 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 12 matched healthy subjects. We identified first patients with latency abnormalities (AbLat). Then, we analyzed response size by calculating the R2c/R2 ratio to stimulation of either side and the mean area of the R2 responses obtained in the same side. Patients with significantly larger response size with respect to healthy subjects in at least one side were considered to have abnormal response excitability (AbEx). We also examined the blink reflex excitability recovery (BRER) and prepulse inhibition (BRIP) of either side in search for additional indices of asymmetry in response excitability. Neurophysiological data were correlated with MRI-determined brain lesion-load and volume. Eight patients were identified as AbLat (median Expanded Disability Status Scale–EDSS = 2.75) and 7 of them had ponto-medullary lesions. Nine patients were identified as AbEx (EDSS = 1.5) and only 2 of them, who also were AbLat, had ponto-medullary lesions. In AbEx patients, the abnormalities in response size were confined to one side, with a similar tendency in most variables (significantly asymmetric R1 amplitude, BRER index and BRIP percentage). AbEx patients had asymmetric distribution of hemispheral lesions, in contrast with the symmetric pattern observed in AbLat. The brainstem lesion load was significantly lower in AbEx than in AbLat patients (p = 0.04). Asymmetric abnormalities in blink reflex response excitability in patients with multiple sclerosis are associated with lesser disability and lower tissue loss than abnormalities in response latency. Testing response excitability could

  18. The reflex-diode HPM source on Aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Huttlin, G.A.; Bushell, M.S.; Conrad, D.B.; Davis, D.P.; Litz, M.S.; Ruth, B.G.; Agee, F.J. ); Ebersole, K.L.; Judy, D.C.; Lezcano, P.A.; Pereira, N.R.; Weidenheimer, D.M. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the most recent in a series of experiments to develop the reflex diode as a source of microwaves on the Aurora relativistic electron-beam pulser. The authors have achieved an overall output for radial extraction of {approximately} 400 J in microwave bursts from {approximately} 100 to 150 ns at frequencies below 1 GHz. The diagnostics for radial extraction have included directional couplers, card calorimeters, and free-field sensors. The authors have varied the anode/cathode spacing, downstream microwave reflector, and a second anode foil, but, within the range of variations, no strong trends have been noted.

  19. Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Colombant, D.G.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1983-10-24

    Anode-plasma expansion in pinch-reflex diodes is investigated with use of a one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. Early in time, the plasma undergoes thermal expansion and its front is slowed down as a result of j x B. After the current has reached its maximum and for small radius where j and B are larger, j x B may accelerate the bulk of the anode plasma to large velocities. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with observations of the time dependence of the plasma velocity as well as its radial profile. The maximum expansion velocities reach tens of centimeters per microsecond.

  20. Formation of H/sup -/ beams in reflex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.

    1986-11-01

    The formation of H/sup -/ beams in reflex systems has been studied. The use of charge-exchange method and suppression of the background from protons accelerated from the anode made it possible to determine the concentration of H/sup -/ ions in the plasma near the cathode at the level of 0.5--2%. The H/sup -/ current density lies in the range 0.25 +- 0.15 A/cm/sup 2/. A significant improvement in measurement accuracy can be achieved by using a deuterated coating on the cathode and by switching to a high accelerator current density.

  1. Bone scintigraphy in the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kozin, F.; Soin, J.S.; Ryan, L.M.; Carrera, G.F.; Wortmann, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients were studied for possible reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS). They were divided into five groups, based upon specific clinical criteria, and the radiographic and scintigraphic findings in each group were examined. Osteoporosis was the most common radiographic abnormality. Scintigraphic abnormalities were noted in 60% of RSDS patients but in only 7% of the others. These findings included increased blood flow and enhanced periarticular radionuclide activity in the affected extremity. The scan may reflect an active, potentially reversible disorder of local blood flow in RSDS. Furthermore, the scintigraphic patterns may be useful in the diagnosis and in predicting which patients are likely to respond to systemic steroid therapy.

  2. Health technology assessment: a sociological commentary on reflexive innovation.

    PubMed

    Webster, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study provides a sociological commentary on the current debates within health technology assessment (HTA), specifically in response to the approaches taken in France, The Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. It argues that HTA is part of a wider reflexive innovation system that seeks to order current and prospective technologies. The study discusses the socio-political process of HTA priority setting, the rhetorical role of HTA, the localised and contingent use of HTA, and the policy gap between guidelines and practice. It argues for the development of new types of methodologies for assessment and for a stronger social embedding of HTA practice.

  3. Chronic vestibulo-ocular reflexes evoked by a vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Merfeld, Daniel M; Haburcakova, Csilla; Gong, Wangsong; Lewis, Richard F

    2007-06-01

    We are developing prosthetics for patients suffering from peripheral vestibular dysfunction. We tested a sensory-replacement prosthesis that stimulates neurons innervating the vestibular system by providing chronic pulsatile stimulation to electrodes placed in monkeys' lateral semicircular canals, which were plugged bilaterally, and used head angular velocity to modulate the current pulse rate. As an encouraging finding, we observed vestibulo-ocular reflexes that continued to be evoked by the motion-modulated stimulation months after the nystagmus evoked by the constant-rate baseline stimulation had dissipated. This suggests that long-term functional replacement of absent vestibular function is feasible.

  4. The proprioceptive reflex control of the intercostal muscles during their voluntary activation.

    PubMed

    Davis, J N; Sears, T A

    1970-08-01

    external airway resistance.9. It is argued that the IR is due to autogenetic inhibition arising from tendon organs and that the ER is due to autogenetic excitation arising from intercostal muscle spindles.10. The initial dominance of inhibition in this dual proprioceptive reflex control was not predicted by the servo theory. It is proposed that the reflex pathways subserving autogenetic inhibition are under a centrifugal control which determines in relation to previous experience (learning) the conditions under which autogenetic facilitation is allowed.

  5. Estradiol alters the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex in female rats by augmenting sympathoinhibition and attenuating sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-06-01

    The chemosensitive cardiac vagal and sympathetic afferent reflexes are implicated in driving pathophysiological changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in cardiovascular disease states. This study investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex. Experiments were performed in anaesthetized, sinoaortic baroreceptor denervated male, female and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats with either intact cardiac innervation or bilateral vagotomy. To investigate the chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflexes renal SNA, heart rate (HR) and arterial pressure (AP) were recorded before and following application of capsaicin onto the epicardial surface of the left ventricle. Compared to males, ovary-intact females displayed similar cardiac afferent reflex mediated changes in renal SNA albeit with a reduced maximum sympathetic reflex driven increase in renal SNA. In females, ovariectomy significantly attenuated the cardiac vagal afferent reflex mediated inhibition of renal SNA (renal SNA decreased 2 ± 17% in OVX versus -50 ± 4% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) and augmented cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex mediated sympathoexcitation (renal SNA increased 91 ± 11% in OVX vs 62 ± 9% in ovary-intact females, P < 0.05) so that overall increases in reflex driven sympathoexcitation were significantly enhanced. Chronic estradiol replacement, but not progesterone replacement, begun at time of ovariectomy restored cardiac afferent reflex responses to be similar as ovary-intact females. Vagal denervation eliminated all group differences. The current findings show ovariectomy in female rats, mimicking menopause in women, results in greater chemosensitive cardiac afferent reflex driven sympathoexcitation and does so, at least partly, via the loss of estradiols actions on the cardiac vagal afferent reflex pathway.

  6. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  7. Researching Reflexively With Patients and Families: Two Studies Using Video-Reflexive Ethnography to Collaborate With Patients and Families in Patient Safety Research.

    PubMed

    Collier, Aileen; Wyer, Mary

    2016-06-01

    Patient safety research has to date offered few opportunities for patients and families to be actively involved in the research process. This article describes our collaboration with patients and families in two separate studies, involving end-of-life care and infection control in acute care. We used the collaborative methodology of video-reflexive ethnography, which has been primarily used with clinicians, to involve patients and families as active participants and collaborators in our research. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences and findings that iterative researcher reflexivity in the field was critical to the progress and success of each study. We present and analyze the complexities of reflexivity-in-the-field through a framework of multilayered reflexivity. We share our lessons here for other researchers seeking to actively involve patients and families in patient safety research using collaborative visual methods.

  8. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging.

  9. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1-2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075-0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable assessment

  10. Alfaxalone Anaesthesia Facilitates Electrophysiological Recordings of Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflexes in Dogs (Canis familiaris)

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, James; Murrell, Jo; Knazovicky, David; Harris, John; Kelly, Sara; Knowles, Toby G.; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring canine osteoarthritis represents a welfare issue for affected dogs (Canis familiaris), but is also considered very similar to human osteoarthritis and has therefore been proposed as a model of disease in humans. Central sensitisation is recognized in human osteoarthritis sufferers but identification in dogs is challenging. Electromyographic measurement of responses to nociceptive stimulation represents a potential means of investigating alterations in central nociceptive processing, and has been evaluated in conscious experimental dogs, but is likely to be aversive. Development of a suitable anaesthetic protocol in experimental dogs, which facilitated electrophysiological nociceptive withdrawal reflex assessment, may increase the acceptability of using the technique in owned dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis. Seven purpose bred male hound dogs underwent electromyographic recording sessions in each of three states: acepromazine sedation, alfaxalone sedation, and alfaxalone anaesthesia. Electromyographic responses to escalating mechanical and electrical, and repeated electrical, stimuli were recorded. Subsequently the integral of both early and late rectified responses was calculated. Natural logarithms of the integral values were analysed within and between the three states using multi level modeling. Alfaxalone increased nociceptive thresholds and decreased the magnitude of recorded responses, but characteristics of increasing responses with increasing stimulus magnitude were preserved. Behavioural signs of anxiety were noted in two out of seven dogs during recordings in the acepromazine sedated state. There were few significant differences in response magnitude or nociceptive threshold between the two alfaxalone states. Following acepromazine premedication, induction of anaesthesia with 1–2 mg kg-1 alfaxalone, followed by a continuous rate infusion in the range 0.075–0.1 mg kg-1 min-1 produced suitable conditions to enable

  11. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging. PMID:26386110

  12. Effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation on postural limb reflexes and neurons of spinal postural network.

    PubMed

    Hsu, L-J; Zelenin, P V; Orlovsky, G N; Deliagina, T G

    2012-07-01

    Quadrupeds maintain the dorsal side up body orientation due to the activity of the postural control system driven by limb mechanoreceptors. Binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) causes a lateral body sway toward the anode. Previously, we have shown that this new position is actively stabilized, suggesting that GVS changes a set point in the reflex mechanisms controlling body posture. The aim of the present study was to reveal the underlying neuronal mechanisms. Experiments were performed on decerebrate rabbits. The vertebral column was rigidly fixed, whereas hindlimbs were positioned on a platform. Periodic lateral tilts of the platform caused postural limb reflexes (PLRs): activation of extensors in the loaded and flexing limb and a decrease in extensor activity in the opposite (unloaded and extending) limb. Putative spinal interneurons were recorded in segments L4-L5 during PLRs, with and without GVS. We have found that GVS enhanced PLRs on the cathode side and reduced them on the anode side. This asymmetry in PLRs can account for changes in the stabilized body orientation observed in normal rabbits subjected to continuous GVS. Responses to platform tilts (frequency modulation) were observed in 106 spinal neurons, suggesting that they can contribute to PLR generation. Two neuron groups were active in opposite phases of the tilt cycle of the ipsi-limb: F-neurons in the flexion phase, and E-neurons in the extension phase. Neurons were driven mainly by afferent input from the ipsi-limb. If one supposes that F- and E-neurons contribute, respectively, to excitation and inhibition of extensor motoneurons, one can expect that the pattern of response to GVS in F-neurons will be similar to that in extensor muscles, whereas E-neurons will have an opposite pattern. We have found that ~40% of all modulated neurons meet this condition, suggesting that they contribute to the generation of PLRs and to the GVS-caused changes in PLRs.

  13. Forebrain neurocircuitry associated with human reflex cardiovascular control

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Goswami, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis depends upon adequate integration and responsiveness of sensory information with the autonomic nervous system to affect rapid and effective adjustments in end organ control. Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system leads to cardiovascular disability with consequences as severe as sudden death. The neural pathways involved in reflexive autonomic control are dependent upon brainstem nuclei but these receive modulatory inputs from higher centers in the midbrain and cortex. Neuroimaging technologies have allowed closer study of the cortical circuitry related to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments to many stressors in awake humans and have exposed many forebrain sites that associate strongly with cardiovascular arousal during stress including the medial prefrontal cortex, insula cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. Using a comparative approach, this review will consider the cortical autonomic circuitry in rodents and primates with a major emphasis on more recent neuroimaging studies in awake humans. A challenge with neuroimaging studies is their interpretation in view of multiple sensory, perceptual, emotive and/or reflexive components of autonomic responses. This review will focus on those responses related to non-volitional baroreflex control of blood pressure and also on the coordinated responses to non-fatiguing, non-painful volitional exercise with particular emphasis on the medial prefrontal cortex and the insula cortex. PMID:26388780

  14. Influence of gravity on cat vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomko, D. L.; Wall, C., III; Robinson, F. R.; Staab, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The vertical vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was recorded in cats using electro-oculography during sinusoidal angular pitch. Peak stimulus velocity was 50 deg/s over a frequency range from 0.01 to 4.0 Hz. To test the effect of gravity on the vertical VOR, the animal was pitched while sitting upright or lying on its side. Upright pitch changed the cat's orientation relative to gravity, while on-side pitch did not. The cumulative slow component position of the eye during on-side pitch was less symmetric than during upright pitch. Over the mid-frequency range (0.1 to 1.0 Hz), the average gain of the vertical VOR was 14.5 percent higher during upright pitch than during on-side pitch. At low frequencies (less than 0.05 Hz) changing head position relative to gravity raised the vertical VOR gain and kept the reflex in phase with stimulus velocity. These results indicate that gravity-sensitive mechanisms make the vertical VOR more compensatory.

  15. Forebrain neurocircuitry associated with human reflex cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, J Kevin; Goswami, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis depends upon adequate integration and responsiveness of sensory information with the autonomic nervous system to affect rapid and effective adjustments in end organ control. Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system leads to cardiovascular disability with consequences as severe as sudden death. The neural pathways involved in reflexive autonomic control are dependent upon brainstem nuclei but these receive modulatory inputs from higher centers in the midbrain and cortex. Neuroimaging technologies have allowed closer study of the cortical circuitry related to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments to many stressors in awake humans and have exposed many forebrain sites that associate strongly with cardiovascular arousal during stress including the medial prefrontal cortex, insula cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. Using a comparative approach, this review will consider the cortical autonomic circuitry in rodents and primates with a major emphasis on more recent neuroimaging studies in awake humans. A challenge with neuroimaging studies is their interpretation in view of multiple sensory, perceptual, emotive and/or reflexive components of autonomic responses. This review will focus on those responses related to non-volitional baroreflex control of blood pressure and also on the coordinated responses to non-fatiguing, non-painful volitional exercise with particular emphasis on the medial prefrontal cortex and the insula cortex. PMID:26388780

  16. Revisiting global body politics in Nepal: A reflexive analysis.

    PubMed

    Harcourt, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Using the example of a human rights training in Nepal, the author looks at global body politics in a reflexive piece on her engagement in development practices that translate western feminist ideas on gender inequality and empowerment via UN human rights policies into non-western contexts. It firsts look at postcolonial and critical literature on feminist engagement in gender and development processes including a discussion on the concept of global body politics before examining briefly the framing of gender-based violence in Nepal. The core of the paper is a reflexive analysis and interrogation of the training in Nepal in order to bring out the tensions and contradictions around western developmental, feminist and human rights discourses. The discussion looks at how difficult it is for feminist, human rights and developmental discourses and practices to unmoor themselves from the notion of the 'expert' and those who do the rights/work/righting rights training and those who are perennially seen as requiring training. The conclusion reflects on possibilities of other epistemic practices found in intercultural dialogues. PMID:26268778

  17. Vestibulospinal control of reflex and voluntary head movement.

    PubMed

    Boyle, R

    2001-10-01

    Secondary canal-related vestibulospinal neurons respond to an externally applied movement of the head in the form of a firing rate modulation that encodes the angular velocity of the movement, and reflects in large part the input "head velocity in space" signal carried by the semicircular canal afferents. In addition to the head velocity signal, the vestibulospinal neurons can carry a more processed signal that includes eye position or eye velocity, or both (see Boyle on ref. list). To understand the control signals used by the central vestibular pathways in the generation of reflex head stabilization, such as the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), and the maintenance of head posture, it is essential to record directly from identified vestibulospinal neurons projecting to the cervical spinal segments in the alert animal. The present report discusses two key features of the primate vestibulospinal system. First, the termination morphology of vestibulospinal axons in the cervical segments of the spinal cord is described to lay the structural basis of vestibulospinal control of head/neck posture and movement. And second, the head movement signal content carried by the same class of secondary vestibulospinal neurons during the actual execution of the VCR and during self-generated, or active, rapid head movements is presented.

  18. The emetic reflex in a reptile (Crocodylus porosus).

    PubMed

    Andrews, P L; Axelsson, M; Franklin, C; Holmgren, S

    2000-05-01

    The emetic (vomiting) reflex in a crocodilian, Crocodylus porosus, was characterised for the first time using the plant alkaloid veratrine (5 mg kg(-)(1) i.v. or i.p.) as an emetic stimulus. The latency to the onset of vomiting was 8.0+/-0.9 min (mean +/- s.e.m., N=5 animals). Vomiting was preceded by a clearly defined set of prodromal behaviours including, in temporal sequence, rhythmic contraction of the pharynx, sneezing and jaw snapping. Expulsion of vomitus was not particularly forceful and was accompanied by lateral shaking of the head. Physiological studies revealed that vomiting was accompanied by oscillatory (9.1+/-0.7 oscillations over 29.7+/-3. 6 s, N=9 episodes in three animals) increases in intraperitoneal pressure (7.0+/-0.9 kPa, cf. 0.7+/-0.1 kPa during respiration). The significance of these results is discussed in the context of the role(s) of vomiting as a protective reflex and as a mechanism for removal of indigestible food residues (e.g. fur, claws) from the gut. PMID:10769224

  19. Altered pupillary light reflex in PACAP receptor 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian; Luuk, Hendrik; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-05-01

    The pupillary light reflex (PLR) is regulated by the classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, and by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin. IpRGCs receive input from rods and cones and project to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), which is the primary visual center involved in PLR. Mice lacking either the classical photoreceptors or melanopsin exhibit some changes in PLR, whereas the reflex is completely lost in mice deficient of all three photoreceptors. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is co-stored with melanopsin in ipRGCs and mediates light signaling to the brain via the specific PACAP receptor 1 (PAC1R). Here, we examined the occurrence of PACAP and PAC1R in the mouse OPN, and studied if lack of PAC1R affected the PLR. PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were shown in the mouse OPN, and by in situ hybridization histochemistry, we demonstrated the presence of PAC1R mRNA. Mice lacking PAC1R exhibited a significantly attenuated PLR compared to wild type mice upon light stimulation, and the difference became more pronounced as light intensity was increased. Our findings accord well with observations of the PLR in the melanopsin-deficient mouse. We conclude that PACAP/PAC1R signaling is involved in the sustained phase of the PLR at high irradiances.

  20. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-01-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  1. Modulation of the startle reflex by pleasant and unpleasant music.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mathieu; Mailhot, Jean-Philippe; Gosselin, Nathalie; Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The issue of emotional feelings to music is the object of a classic debate in music psychology. Emotivists argue that emotions are really felt in response to music, whereas cognitivists believe that music is only representative of emotions. Psychophysiological recordings of emotional feelings to music might help to resolve the debate, but past studies have failed to show clear and consistent differences between musical excerpts of different emotional valence. Here, we compared the effects of pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts on the startle eye blink reflex and associated body markers (such as the corrugator and zygomatic activity, skin conductance level and heart rate). The startle eye blink amplitude was larger and its latency was shorter during unpleasant compared with pleasant music, suggesting that the defensive emotional system was indeed modulated by music. Corrugator activity was also enhanced during unpleasant music, whereas skin conductance level was higher for pleasant excerpts. The startle reflex was the response that contributed the most in distinguishing pleasant and unpleasant music. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that emotions were felt in response to music, supporting the emotivist stance. PMID:18725255

  2. Coronary Spasm in Neurosurgical Patients and Role of Trigeminocardiac Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, Nora; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Coronary artery spasm (CAS) is a rarely reported complication in neurosurgical patients and its main causative mechanism was attributed to vagal mediated responses. However, these may be the unusual manifestations of trigeminal cardiac reflex (TCR) which is a well established brain stem reflex observed in various neurosurgical patients. Methods and Results. In this review, we have searched for the case reports/papers related to intraoperative coronary spasm in neurosurgical patients and described the role of TCR in this regard. TCR is a possible mechanism in producing CAS in most of the cases in which stimulation occurred at or near the vicinity of trigeminal nerve. It is likely that TCR mediated coronary spasm may be a physiological mechanism and not related to actual myocardial insult apparent by cardiac enzymes or echocardiography studies in most of the cases. Some common risk factors may also exist related to occurrence of CAS as well as TCR. Conclusions. In conclusion, neurosurgical procedures occurring at the vicinity of trigeminal nerve may produce CAS even in previously healthy patients and may produce catastrophic consequences. There is a need for future reports and experimental studies on the interaction of TCR and pathophysiological mechanisms related to CAS. PMID:24587903

  3. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    PubMed

    Striemer, Christopher L; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D; Danckert, James A; Schweizer, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices-regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention.

  4. Primitive reflex evaluation in the clinical assessment of extrapyramidal syndromes.

    PubMed

    Borroni, B; Broli, M; Costanzi, C; Gipponi, S; Gilberti, N; Agosti, C; Padovani, A

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of primitive reflexes (PRs) as additional alert sign in routine clinical practice in patients with extrapyramidal syndrome. We considered glabellar, snout, palmomental and grasp reflexes in patients with mild stage of Lewy body dementia (LBD), corticobasal degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy or Parkinson disease (PD). We also enrolled mild Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, and healthy subjects, as controls. LBD patients showed the highest prevalence of PRs compared with the other groups. The odds ratio of the risk of LBD in PRs > or = 2 was 27.9 (95% CI 2.9-269.0) compared with control group, 14.6 (95% CI 2.7-79.6) compared with mild AD, and 19.7 (95% CI 3.7-104.3) compared with PD. These data suggest that the occurrence of combination of PRs might be an useful additional warning sign of possible diffuse Lewy body pathology more than other causes of extrapyramidal syndrome.

  5. [Cardiovascular autonomic reflexes on the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Ho; Benjelloun, Ha; Aboudrar, S; Coghlan, L; Benomar, M

    2009-02-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is an inadequately understood pathology because its diagnosis is not based on the conventional methods of investigation. The orthostatic test allows to make the diagnosis easily. The objective of this study is to determine cardiovascular autonomic reflexes of 70 patients having POTS. The tests of exploration of the autonomic nervous system practised are: deep breathing, hand grip, mental stress and orthostatic test. The analysis of orthostatic test showed that the increase of the cardiac frequency, relative to the state of "beta" peripheral sympathetic hyperactivity occurred before the 2nd minute in 80% of patients. The POTS was considered "florid" in 43% of patients and had complicated of a rough and severe fall of systolic blood pressure inferior to 70 mmHg in four patients, after the fifth minute of the test. The analysis of the different tests had shown vagal hyperactivity in 63% of patients on deep breathing, in 93% of patients on hand grip and in 100% on orthostatic test. The "alpha" central sympathetic activity was increased in 76% of the cases and "beta" central sympathetic activity was high in 83% of cases. The "alpha" peripheral hyperactivity was observed in 63% of patients on hand grip, and in 44% on orthostatic test. The analysis of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes in patients affected by POTS allowing the determination of their autonomic profile, will contribute probably to a better understanding of this pathology and to a better orientation of its care.

  6. Agency, reflexivity and risk: cosmopolitan, neurotic or prudential citizen?

    PubMed

    Walklate, Sandra; Mythen, Gabriel

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the turn to risk within sociology and to survey the relationship between structure and agency as conceived by popular strands of risk theorizing. To this end, we appraise the risk society, culture of fear and governmentality perspectives and we consider the different imaginings of the citizen constructed by each of these approaches. The paper goes on to explore what each of these visions of citizenship implies for understandings of the structure/agency dynamic as it pertains to the question of reflexivity. In order to transcend uni-dimensional notions of citizenship and to reinvigorate sociological debates about risk, we call for conceptual analyses that are contextually rooted. Exampling the importance of knowledge contests around contemporary security threats and warnings of the deleterious effects of pre-emptive modes of regulation that derive from the 'risk turn' within social science, we argue for a more nuanced embrace of reflexivity within risk theorising in order to facilitate a more dynamic critique of the images of citizenship that such theorizing promotes.

  7. Vestibulospinal control of reflex and voluntary head movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Secondary canal-related vestibulospinal neurons respond to an externally applied movement of the head in the form of a firing rate modulation that encodes the angular velocity of the movement, and reflects in large part the input "head velocity in space" signal carried by the semicircular canal afferents. In addition to the head velocity signal, the vestibulospinal neurons can carry a more processed signal that includes eye position or eye velocity, or both (see Boyle on ref. list). To understand the control signals used by the central vestibular pathways in the generation of reflex head stabilization, such as the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), and the maintenance of head posture, it is essential to record directly from identified vestibulospinal neurons projecting to the cervical spinal segments in the alert animal. The present report discusses two key features of the primate vestibulospinal system. First, the termination morphology of vestibulospinal axons in the cervical segments of the spinal cord is described to lay the structural basis of vestibulospinal control of head/neck posture and movement. And second, the head movement signal content carried by the same class of secondary vestibulospinal neurons during the actual execution of the VCR and during self-generated, or active, rapid head movements is presented.

  8. Vestibulosympathetic reflex during orthostatic challenge in aging humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    Aging attenuates the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and elicits hypotension during otolith organ engagement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to determine the neural and cardiovascular responses to otolithic engagement during orthostatic stress in older adults. We hypothesized that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex would persist during orthostatic challenge in older subjects and might compromise arterial blood pressure regulation. MSNA, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate responses to head-down rotation (HDR) performed with and without lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in prone subjects were measured. Ten young (27 +/- 1 yr) and 11 older subjects (64 +/- 1 yr) were studied prospectively. HDR performed alone elicited an attenuated increase in MSNA in older subjects (Delta106 +/- 28 vs. Delta20 +/- 7% for young and older subjects). HDR performed during simultaneous orthostatic stress increased total MSNA further in young (Delta53 +/- 15%; P < 0.05) but not older subjects (Delta-5 +/- 4%). Older subjects demonstrated consistent significant hypotension during HDR performed both alone (Delta-6 +/- 2 mmHg) and during LBNP (Delta-7 +/- 2 mmHg). These data provide experimental support for the concept that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex persist during orthostatic challenge in older adults. Furthermore, these findings are consistent with the concept that age-related alterations in vestibular function might contribute to altered orthostatic blood pressure regulation with age in humans.

  9. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury.

    PubMed

    Striemer, Christopher L; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D; Danckert, James A; Schweizer, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices-regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  10. Constructing mock catalogues for the REFLEX II galaxy cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.

    2012-09-01

    We describe the construction of a suite of galaxy cluster mock catalogues from N-body simulations, based on the properties of the new ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. Our procedure is based on the measurements of the cluster abundance, and involves the calibration of the underlying scaling relation linking the mass of dark matter haloes to the cluster X-ray luminosity determined in the ROSAT energy band 0.1-2.4 keV. In order to reproduce the observed abundance in the luminosity range probed by the REFLEX II X-ray luminosity function [0.01 < LX/(1044 erg s-1 h-2) < 10], a mass-X-ray luminosity relation deviating from a simple power law is required. We discuss the dependence of the calibration of this scaling relation on the X-ray luminosity and the definition of halo masses and analyse the one- and two-point statistical properties of the mock catalogues. Our set of mock catalogues provides samples with self-calibrated scaling relations of galaxy clusters together with inherent properties of flux-limited surveys. This makes them a useful tool to explore different systematic effects and statistical methods involved in constraining both astrophysical and cosmological information from present and future galaxy cluster surveys.

  11. Revisiting global body politics in Nepal: A reflexive analysis.

    PubMed

    Harcourt, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Using the example of a human rights training in Nepal, the author looks at global body politics in a reflexive piece on her engagement in development practices that translate western feminist ideas on gender inequality and empowerment via UN human rights policies into non-western contexts. It firsts look at postcolonial and critical literature on feminist engagement in gender and development processes including a discussion on the concept of global body politics before examining briefly the framing of gender-based violence in Nepal. The core of the paper is a reflexive analysis and interrogation of the training in Nepal in order to bring out the tensions and contradictions around western developmental, feminist and human rights discourses. The discussion looks at how difficult it is for feminist, human rights and developmental discourses and practices to unmoor themselves from the notion of the 'expert' and those who do the rights/work/righting rights training and those who are perennially seen as requiring training. The conclusion reflects on possibilities of other epistemic practices found in intercultural dialogues.

  12. Deficits in reflexive covert attention following cerebellar injury

    PubMed Central

    Striemer, Christopher L.; Cantelmi, David; Cusimano, Michael D.; Danckert, James A.; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally the cerebellum has been known for its important role in coordinating motor output. Over the past 15 years numerous studies have indicated that the cerebellum plays a role in a variety of cognitive functions including working memory, language, perceptual functions, and emotion. In addition, recent work suggests that regions of the cerebellum involved in eye movements also play a role in controlling covert visual attention. Here we investigated whether regions of the cerebellum that are not strictly tied to the control of eye movements might also contribute to covert attention. To address this question we examined the effects of circumscribed cerebellar lesions on reflexive covert attention in a group of patients (n = 11) without any gross motor or oculomotor deficits, and compared their performance to a group of age-matched controls (n = 11). Results indicated that the traditional RT advantage for validly cued targets was significantly smaller at the shortest (50 ms) SOA for cerebellar patients compared to controls. Critically, a lesion overlap analysis indicated that this deficit in the rapid deployment of attention was linked to damage in Crus I and Crus II of the lateral cerebellum. Importantly, both cerebellar regions have connections to non-motor regions of the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices—regions important for controlling visuospatial attention. Together, these data provide converging evidence that both lateral and midline regions of the cerebellum play an important role in the control of reflexive covert visual attention. PMID:26300756

  13. Modulation of the startle reflex by pleasant and unpleasant music.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mathieu; Mailhot, Jean-Philippe; Gosselin, Nathalie; Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The issue of emotional feelings to music is the object of a classic debate in music psychology. Emotivists argue that emotions are really felt in response to music, whereas cognitivists believe that music is only representative of emotions. Psychophysiological recordings of emotional feelings to music might help to resolve the debate, but past studies have failed to show clear and consistent differences between musical excerpts of different emotional valence. Here, we compared the effects of pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts on the startle eye blink reflex and associated body markers (such as the corrugator and zygomatic activity, skin conductance level and heart rate). The startle eye blink amplitude was larger and its latency was shorter during unpleasant compared with pleasant music, suggesting that the defensive emotional system was indeed modulated by music. Corrugator activity was also enhanced during unpleasant music, whereas skin conductance level was higher for pleasant excerpts. The startle reflex was the response that contributed the most in distinguishing pleasant and unpleasant music. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that emotions were felt in response to music, supporting the emotivist stance.

  14. Second Language Acquisition of Reflexive Verbs in Russian by L1 Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexieva, Petia Dimitrova

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the process of acquisition of semantic classes of reflexive verbs (RVs) in Russian by L2 learners with a native language English. The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap between current linguistic knowledge and the pedagogical literature existing in English on reflexives in Russian. RVs are taught partially and…

  15. Teaching Critical Reflexivity in Short-Term International Field Courses: Practices and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This study critiques the use of critical reflexivity in short-term international field courses. Critical reflexivity's benefits include preparing students for professional research, deepening their learning, and giving the chance to see how student perspectives on fieldwork sites are influenced by their own identity and positionality. I use an…

  16. Reflexivity and the Politics of Knowledge: Researchers as "Brokers" and "Translators" of Educational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriprakash, Arathi; Mukhopadhyay, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    This paper interrogates the ways in which "reflexivity" has proliferated as a normative methodological discourse in the field of international and comparative education. We argue that the dominant approach to reflexivity foregrounds the standpoints of researchers and their subjects in a way that does not attend to the situated,…

  17. On reflexivity and the conduct of the self in everyday life: reflections on Bourdieu and Archer.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sadiya; Hogan, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a critique of the concept of reflexivity in social theory today and argues against the tendency to define agency exclusively in terms of reflexivity. Margaret Archer, in particular, is highlighted as a key proponent of this thesis. Archer argues that late modernity is characterized by reflexivity but, in our view, this position neglects the impact of more enduring aspects of agency, such as the routinization of social life and the role of the taken-for-granted. These concepts were pivotal to Bourdieu and Giddens' theorization of everyday life and action and to Foucault's understanding of technologies of the self. We offer Bourdieu's habitus as a more nuanced approach to theorizing agency, and provide an alternative account of reflexivity. Whilst accepting that reflexivity is a core aspect of agency, we argue that it operates to a backdrop of the routinization of social life and operates from within and not outside of habitus. We highlight the role of the breach in reflexivity, suggesting that it opens up a critical window for agents to initiate change. The article suggests caution in over-ascribing reflexivity to agency, instead arguing that achieving reflexivity and change is a difficult and fraught process, which has emotional and moral consequences. The effect of this is that people often prefer the status quo, rather than to risk change and uncertainty.

  18. The ANA-reflex test as a model for improving clinical appropriateness in autoimmune diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola; Morozzi, Gabriella; Radice, Antonella; Cinquanta, Luigi; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Tampoia, Marilina; Porcelli, Brunetta; Fabris, Martina; Brusca, Ignazio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Barberio, Giuseppina; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Antico, Antonio; Bassetti, Danila; Fontana, Desré Ethel; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Visentini, Daniela; Pesce, Giampaola; Bagnasco, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Reflex tests are widely used in clinical laboratories, for example, to diagnose thyroid disorders or in the follow-up of prostate cancer. Reflex tests for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have recently gained attention as a way to improve appropriateness in the immunological diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and avoid waste of resources. However, the ANA-reflex test is not as simple as other consolidated reflex tests (the TSH-reflex tests or the PSA-reflex tests) because of the intrinsic complexity of the ANA test performed by the indirect immunofluorescence method on cellular substrates. The wide heterogeneity of the ANA patterns, which need correct interpretation, and the subsequent choice of the most appropriate confirmatory test (ANA subserology), which depend on the pattern feature and on clinical information, hinder any informatics automation, and require the pathologist's intervention. In this review, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases of the Italian Society of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine provides some indications on the configuration of the ANA-reflex test, using two different approaches depending on whether clinical information is available or not. We further give some suggestions on how to report results of the ANA-reflex test. PMID:27423928

  19. Prevalence of Persistent Primary Reflexes and Motor Problems in Children with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhillips, M.; Sheehy, N.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown that some children with reading difficulties have underlying developmental delay and that this may be related to the persistence of primary reflexes. This study investigated the prevalence of persistent primary reflexes in the ordinary primary school population and how this related to other cognitive and social factors. Three…

  20. On reflexivity and the conduct of the self in everyday life: reflections on Bourdieu and Archer.

    PubMed

    Akram, Sadiya; Hogan, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    This article provides a critique of the concept of reflexivity in social theory today and argues against the tendency to define agency exclusively in terms of reflexivity. Margaret Archer, in particular, is highlighted as a key proponent of this thesis. Archer argues that late modernity is characterized by reflexivity but, in our view, this position neglects the impact of more enduring aspects of agency, such as the routinization of social life and the role of the taken-for-granted. These concepts were pivotal to Bourdieu and Giddens' theorization of everyday life and action and to Foucault's understanding of technologies of the self. We offer Bourdieu's habitus as a more nuanced approach to theorizing agency, and provide an alternative account of reflexivity. Whilst accepting that reflexivity is a core aspect of agency, we argue that it operates to a backdrop of the routinization of social life and operates from within and not outside of habitus. We highlight the role of the breach in reflexivity, suggesting that it opens up a critical window for agents to initiate change. The article suggests caution in over-ascribing reflexivity to agency, instead arguing that achieving reflexivity and change is a difficult and fraught process, which has emotional and moral consequences. The effect of this is that people often prefer the status quo, rather than to risk change and uncertainty. PMID:26434736

  1. Reflexive Clitics in the Slavic and Romance Languages. A Comparative View from an Antipassive Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    In this work, I offer a unified analysis of all the constructions that involve a reflexive clitic SE in Slavic and Romance languages. Next to canonical constructions, in which the reflexive clitic semantically identifies the two arguments of a transitive verb, cf. "John" SE "wash" means "John washes himself," there are constructions in which it is…

  2. Sensory stimulation to improve swallowing reflex and prevent aspiration pneumonia in elderly dysphagic people.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Satoru; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Ebihara, Takae

    2011-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from aspiration pneumonia continues to be a major health problem in the elderly. A swallowing disorder, such as a delayed triggering of the swallowing reflex, exists in patients with aspiration pneumonia. We found that the swallowing reflex in elderly people was temperature-sensitive. The swallowing reflex was delayed when the temperature of the food was close to body temperature. The actual swallowing time shortened when the temperature difference increases. The improvement of swallowing reflex by temperature stimuli could be mediated by the temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channel. The administration of a pastille with capsaicin as an agonist stimulus of TRPV1, a warm-temperature receptor, decreased the delay in swallowing reflex. Food with menthol, an agonist of TRPM8, a cold-temperature receptor, also decreased the delay in swallowing reflex. Olfactory stimulation such as black pepper was useful to improve the swallowing reflex for people with low activity of daily living (ADL) levels or with decreased consciousness. Oral care also shortened the latent time of swallowing reflex presumably due to stimulating the nociception of the oral cavity. A combination of these sensory stimuli may improve the swallowing disorders and prevent aspiration pneumonia.

  3. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  4. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  5. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  6. A Comparison of Statistical Models for Calculating Reliability of the Hoffmann Reflex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, A.; Kamen, G.; Boucher, Jean P.; Inglis, J. Greig; Gabriel, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Hoffmann reflex is obtained through surface electromyographic recordings, and it is one of the most common neurophysiological techniques in exercise science. Measurement and evaluation of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the Hoffmann reflex has been guided by the observation that it is a variable response that requires multiple trials to obtain a…

  7. The Modified Blink Reflex and individual Differences in Speed of Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, Mary; Anderson, Mike; Hammond, Geoff

    1999-01-01

    Studied a new method of measuring speed of processing, the modified blink reflex (MBR), in 2 experiments involving 57 adults. Findings are consistent with the view that interconnecting pathways allow higher level processing of a tone to prime the lower-level reflex pathway. Discusses implications for MBR and measurement of speed of processing.…

  8. Changes in Soleus H-Reflex Modulation after Treadmill Training in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Maike; Vry, Julia; Mall, Volker; Faist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In healthy children, short latency leg muscle reflexes are profoundly modulated throughout the step cycle in a functionally meaningful way and contribute to the electromyographic (EMG) pattern observed during gait. With maturation of the corticospinal tract, the reflex amplitudes are depressed via supraspinal inhibitory mechanisms. In the soleus…

  9. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  10. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  11. 49 CFR 393.13 - Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in a red and white pattern (see Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 108 (49 CFR 571.108), S5.7... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors... sheeting and reflex reflectors, requirements for semitrailers and trailers manufactured before December...

  12. Intrapartum Synthetic Oxytocin Reduce the Expression of Primitive Reflexes Associated with Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Olza Fernández, Ibone; Malalana Martínez, Ana M.; González Armengod, Carmen; Costarelli, Valeria; Millán Santos, Isabel; Fernández-Cañadas Morillo, Aurora; Pérez Riveiro, Pilar; López Sánchez, Francisco; García Murillo, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Several synthetic peptide manipulations during the time surrounding birth can alter the specific neurohormonal status in the newborn brain. This study is aimed at assessing whether intrapartum oxytocin administration has any effect on primitive neonatal reflexes and determining whether such an effect is dose-dependent. Materials and Methods: A cohort prospective study was conducted at a tertiary hospital. Mother–infant dyads who received intrapartum oxytocin (n=53) were compared with mother–infant dyads who did not receive intrapartum oxytocin (n=45). Primitive neonatal reflexes (endogenous, antigravity, motor, and rhythmic reflexes) were quantified by analyzing videotaped breastfeeding sessions in a biological nurturing position. Two observers blind to the group assignment and the oxytocin dose analyzed the videotapes and assesed the newborn's state of consciousness according to the Brazelton scale. Results: The release of all rhythmic reflexes (p=0.01), the antigravity reflex (p=0.04), and total primitive neonatal reflexes (p=0.02) in the group exposed to oxytocin was lower than in the group not exposed to oxytocin. No correlations were observed between the dose of oxytocin administered and the percentage of primitive neonatal reflexes released (r=0.03; p=0.82). Conclusions: Intrapartum oxytocin administration might inhibit the expression of several primitive neonatal reflexes associated with breastfeeding. This correlation does not seem to be dose-dependent. PMID:25785487

  13. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and…

  14. Erecting Closets and Outing Ourselves: Uncomfortable Reflexivity and Community-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Nnawulezi, Nkiru; Valenti, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    Feminist scholars and community psychologists have argued that reflexivity is a necessary component to conducting socially conscious research. Reflexivity, however, is rarely evident in community psychology. In this article, we share the uncomfortable realities that surfaced during a community-based research project in which we adapted and…

  15. Effects of fixation and optokinetic stimulation on vestibulo-ocular reflex suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, B R; Gresty, M A

    1982-01-01

    Suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex was assessed in normal subjects and patients with neurological disorders to determine the relative effects on suppression of a single fixation target and an optokinetic field. Subjects were rotated sinusoidally in yaw at varying frequencies of up to 0.5 Hz whilst seated in a Barany chair. A comparison was made between eye movements in darkness, those produced during fixation on a central target mounted to the chair, and eye movements during fixation on the target plus an "earth-fixed" or "chair-fixed" visual background. Presentation of a background produced only minimal effects on the suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in normal subjects. In patients with impairment of fixation suppression, suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex was not improved after presentation of either form of optokinetic field. The results demonstrate that central fixation is the predominant requirement for suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. This correlates closely with the ability to pursue. Although the optokinetic reflex generates following eye movements similar to pursuit, it cannot be used to mediate suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in the absence of an intact pursuit system. The findings strengthen the view that the optokinetic reflex evolved to act in synergy with the vestibulo-ocular reflex in generating compensatory eye movements. Images PMID:7175543

  16. The ANA-reflex test as a model for improving clinical appropriateness in autoimmune diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tonutti, Elio; Bizzaro, Nicola; Morozzi, Gabriella; Radice, Antonella; Cinquanta, Luigi; Villalta, Danilo; Tozzoli, Renato; Tampoia, Marilina; Porcelli, Brunetta; Fabris, Martina; Brusca, Ignazio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Barberio, Giuseppina; Sorrentino, Maria Concetta; Antico, Antonio; Bassetti, Danila; Fontana, Desré Ethel; Imbastaro, Tiziana; Visentini, Daniela; Pesce, Giampaola; Bagnasco, Marcello

    2016-12-01

    Reflex tests are widely used in clinical laboratories, for example, to diagnose thyroid disorders or in the follow-up of prostate cancer. Reflex tests for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have recently gained attention as a way to improve appropriateness in the immunological diagnosis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and avoid waste of resources. However, the ANA-reflex test is not as simple as other consolidated reflex tests (the TSH-reflex tests or the PSA-reflex tests) because of the intrinsic complexity of the ANA test performed by the indirect immunofluorescence method on cellular substrates. The wide heterogeneity of the ANA patterns, which need correct interpretation, and the subsequent choice of the most appropriate confirmatory test (ANA subserology), which depend on the pattern feature and on clinical information, hinder any informatics automation, and require the pathologist's intervention. In this review, the Study Group on Autoimmune Diseases of the Italian Society of Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine provides some indications on the configuration of the ANA-reflex test, using two different approaches depending on whether clinical information is available or not. We further give some suggestions on how to report results of the ANA-reflex test.

  17. Review: Effect of drugs on human cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent extract of red peppers, has been used in clinical research for almost three decades. Capsaicin has gained favor as the provocative agent of choice to measure cough reflex sensitivity, as it induces cough in a safe, reproducible, and dose-dependent manner. One of the major uses of capsaicin cough challenge testing has been to evaluate the effect of a pharmacological intervention on the human cough reflex. The current review summarizes the published experience with capsaicin inhalation challenge in the evaluation of drug effects on cough reflex sensitivity. A notable contrast evident between studies demonstrating a drug effect (inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity) and those that do not, is the predominance of healthy volunteers as subjects in the latter. This observation suggests that subjects with pathological cough, rather than normal volunteers, comprise the optimal group in which to evaluate the effect of potential antitussive agents on human cough reflex sensitivity. PMID:23146824

  18. When planning results in loss of control: intention-based reflexivity and working-memory

    PubMed Central

    Meiran, Nachshon; Cole, Michael W.; Braver, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss the seemingly paradoxical loss of control associated with states of high readiness to execute a plan, termed “intention-based reflexivity.” The review suggests that the neuro-cognitive systems involved in the preparation of novel plans are different than those involved in preparation of practiced plans (i.e., those that have been executed beforehand). When the plans are practiced, intention-based reflexivity depends on the prior availability of response codes in long-term memory (LTM). When the plans are novel, reflexivity is observed when the plan is pending and the goal has not yet been achieved. Intention-based reflexivity also depends on the availability of working-memory (WM) limited resources and the motivation to prepare. Reflexivity is probably related to the fact that, unlike reactive control (once a plan is prepared), proactive control tends to be relatively rigid. PMID:22586382

  19. Is acupuncturing effective in controlling the gag reflex during dental procedures? A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid; Firouzabadi, Vahid Pourtalebi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional acupuncture has been introduced more than 2500 years ago which provides an alternative and complementary option during clinical practices. Its main mechanism is based on stimulating the nerves by altering the processes and perception of pain transmitters. It facilitates releasing natural pain relievers such as endorphins and serotonin. Its success for various dental procedures has been proved earlier. However, its effects on controlling the gag reflex seem to be overlooked. The gag reflex is recognized as a protective reaction for stopping the entrance of any foreign bodies into the oropharynx. Pronounced gag reflexes can have negative impacts on the quality of dental procedures. Many techniques have been suggested for managing this reflex and acupuncturing is one of those which seems to be overlooked recently. The aim of this paper is reviewing the published high-quality researches about the efficacy of this technique for eliminating the gag reflex during dental procedures. PMID:27212742

  20. Is acupuncturing effective in controlling the gag reflex during dental procedures? A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid; Firouzabadi, Vahid Pourtalebi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional acupuncture has been introduced more than 2500 years ago which provides an alternative and complementary option during clinical practices. Its main mechanism is based on stimulating the nerves by altering the processes and perception of pain transmitters. It facilitates releasing natural pain relievers such as endorphins and serotonin. Its success for various dental procedures has been proved earlier. However, its effects on controlling the gag reflex seem to be overlooked. The gag reflex is recognized as a protective reaction for stopping the entrance of any foreign bodies into the oropharynx. Pronounced gag reflexes can have negative impacts on the quality of dental procedures. Many techniques have been suggested for managing this reflex and acupuncturing is one of those which seems to be overlooked recently. The aim of this paper is reviewing the published high-quality researches about the efficacy of this technique for eliminating the gag reflex during dental procedures. PMID:27212742