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Sample records for conducting molecular epidemiological

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Foodborne Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Brown, Eric; Knabel, Stephen J.

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the basic principles and advancements in the molecular epidemiology of foodborne pathogens. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of infectious diseases and/or the dynamics of disease transmission. The goals of epidemiology include the identification of physical sources, routes of transmission of infectious agents, and distribution and relationships of different subgroups. Molecular epidemiology is the study of epidemiology at the molecular level. It has been defined as "a science that focuses on the contribution of potential genetic and environmental risk factors, identified at the molecular level, to the etiology, distribution and prevention of diseases within families and across populations".

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Amebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Clark, C. Graham; Petri, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of human amebiasis, remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and is responsible for up to 100,000 deaths worldwide each year. Entamoeba dispar, morphologically indistinguishable from E. histolytica, is more common in humans in many parts of the world. Similarly Entamoeba moshkovskii, which was long considered to be a free-living ameba, is also morphologically identical to E. histolytica and E. dispar, and is highly prevalent in some E. histolytica endemic countries. However, the only species to cause disease in humans is E. histolytica. Most old epidemiological data on E. histolytica are unusable as the techniques employed do not differentiate between the above three Entamoeba species. Molecular tools are now available not only to diagnose these species accurately but also to study intra-species genetic diversity. Recent studies suggest that only a minority of all E. histolytica infections progress to development of clinical symptoms in the host and there exist population level differences between the E. histolytica strains isolated from the asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals. Nevertheless the underlying factors responsible for variable clinical outcome of infection by E. histolytica remain largely unknown. We anticipate that the recently completed E. histolytica genome sequence and new molecular techniques will rapidly advance our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenicity of amebiasis. PMID:18571478

  3. [Molecular epidemiology in the epidemiological transition].

    PubMed

    Tapia-Conyer, R

    1997-01-01

    The epidemiological transition describes the changes in the health profile of populations where infectious diseases are substituted by chronic or non-communicable diseases. Even in industrialized countries, infectious diseases emerge as important public health problems and with a very important association with several type of neoplasm. Molecular epidemiology brings in new tools for the study of the epidemiological transition by discovering infectious agents as etiology of diseases, neither of both new. Much has been advanced in the understanding of the virulence and resistance mechanism of different strains, or improving the knowledge on transmission dynamics and dissemination pathways of infectious diseases. As to the non-communicable diseases, molecular epidemiology has enhanced the identification of endogenous risk factors link to alterations, molecular changes in genetic material, that will allow a more detail definition of risk and the identification of individual and groups at risk of several diseases. The potential impact of molecular epidemiology in other areas as environmental, lifestyles and nutritional areas are illustrated with several examples.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Glanders, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Hornstra, Heidie; Pearson, Talima; Georgia, Shalamar; Liguori, Andrew; Dale, Julia; Price, Erin; O’Neill, Matthew; DeShazer, David; Muhammad, Ghulam; Saqib, Muhammad; Naureen, Abeera

    2009-01-01

    We collected epidemiologic and molecular data from Burkholderia mallei isolates from equines in Punjab, Pakistan from 1999 through 2007. We show that recent outbreaks are genetically distinct from available whole genome sequences and that these genotypes are persistent and ubiquitous in Punjab, probably due to human-mediated movement of equines. PMID:19961695

  5. Use of molecular epidemiology in veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Zadoks, Ruth N; Schukken, Ynte H

    2006-03-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a relatively new branch of epidemiology that uses molecular biology methods to study health and disease in populations. This article gives an introduction to molecular epidemiologic terminology and methodology and its usefulness in large animal medicine and veterinary public health. Applications in source tracing and vaccine studies and insights into transmission dynamics, host specificity, and niche adaptation of infectious organisms are presented. Examples are drawn from a variety of diseases, organisms, and host species and range from the global level to the individual-animal level.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis: Current Insights

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia E.; Bifani, Pablo J.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis (TB) have focused largely on utilizing molecular techniques to address short- and long-term epidemiologic questions, such as in outbreak investigations and in assessing the global dissemination of strains, respectively. This is done primarily by examining the extent of genetic diversity of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When molecular methods are used in conjunction with classical epidemiology, their utility for TB control has been realized. For instance, molecular epidemiologic studies have added much-needed accuracy and precision in describing transmission dynamics, and they have facilitated investigation of previously unresolved issues, such as estimates of recent-versus-reactive disease and the extent of exogenous reinfection. In addition, there is mounting evidence to suggest that specific strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to discrete phylogenetic clusters (lineages) may differ in virulence, pathogenesis, and epidemiologic characteristics, all of which may significantly impact TB control and vaccine development strategies. Here, we review the current methods, concepts, and applications of molecular approaches used to better understand the epidemiology of TB. PMID:17041139

  7. Epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and evolution of bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Silva, Rosa Elena; Nakamura-Lopez, Yuko; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2012-11-30

    The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an enveloped, negative sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the pneumovirus genus within the family Paramyxoviridae. BRSV has been recognized as a major cause of respiratory disease in young calves since the early 1970s. The analysis of BRSV infection was originally hampered by its characteristic lability and poor growth in vitro. However, the advent of numerous immunological and molecular methods has facilitated the study of BRSV enormously. The knowledge gained from these studies has also provided the opportunity to develop safe, stable, attenuated virus vaccine candidates. Nonetheless, many aspects of the epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and evolution of the virus are still not fully understood. The natural course of infection is rather complex and further complicates diagnosis, treatment and the implementation of preventive measures aimed to control the disease. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which BRSV is able to establish infection is needed to prevent viral and disease spread. This review discusses important information regarding the epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of BRSV worldwide, and it highlights the importance of viral evolution in virus transmission.

  8. Web tools for molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shabbeer, Amina; Ozcaglar, Cagri; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

    2012-06-01

    In this study we explore publicly available web tools designed to use molecular epidemiological data to extract information that can be employed for the effective tracking and control of tuberculosis (TB). The application of molecular methods for the epidemiology of TB complement traditional approaches used in public health. DNA fingerprinting methods are now routinely employed in TB surveillance programs and are primarily used to detect recent transmissions and in outbreak investigations. Here we present web tools that facilitate systematic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotype information and provide a view of the genetic diversity in the MTBC population. These tools help answer questions about the characteristics of MTBC strains, such as their pathogenicity, virulence, immunogenicity, transmissibility, drug-resistance profiles and host-pathogen associativity. They provide an integrated platform for researchers to use molecular epidemiological data to address current challenges in the understanding of TB dynamics and the characteristics of MTBC.

  9. Using mobile technology to conduct epidemiological investigations.

    PubMed

    Leal Neto, Onicio Batista; Loyo, Rodrigo; Albuquerque, Jones; Perazzo, Juliana; Barbosa, Verônica; Barbosa, Constança Simões

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the experience of an epidemiological field survey for which data were collected and analyzed using tablets. The devices used Epi Info 7 (Android version), which has been modeled a database with variables of the traditional form. Twenty-one households were randomly selected in the study area; 75 residents were registered and completed household interviews with socioeconomic and environmental risk variables. This new technology is a valuable tool for collecting and analyzing data from the field, with advantageous benefits to epidemiological surveys.

  10. The application of HIV molecular epidemiology to public health.

    PubMed

    Paraskevis, D; Nikolopoulos, G K; Magiorkinis, G; Hodges-Mameletzis, I; Hatzakis, A

    2016-12-01

    HIV is responsible for one of the largest viral pandemics in human history. Despite a concerted global response for prevention and treatment, the virus persists. Thus, urgent public health action, utilizing novel interventions, is needed to prevent future transmission events, critical to eliminating HIV. For public health planning to prove effective and successful, we need to understand the dynamics of regional epidemics and to intervene appropriately. HIV molecular epidemiology tools as implemented in phylogenetic, phylodynamic and phylogeographic analyses have proven to be powerful tools in public health planning across many studies. Numerous applications with HIV suggest that molecular methods alone or in combination with mathematical modelling can provide inferences about the transmission dynamics, critical epidemiological parameters (prevalence, incidence, effective number of infections, Re, generation times, time between infection and diagnosis), or the spatiotemporal characteristics of epidemics. Molecular tools have been used to assess the impact of an intervention and outbreak investigation which are of great public health relevance. In some settings, molecular sequence data may be more readily available than HIV surveillance data, and can therefore allow for molecular analyses to be conducted more easily. Nonetheless, classic methods have an integral role in monitoring and evaluation of public health programmes, and should supplement emerging techniques from the field of molecular epidemiology. Importantly, molecular epidemiology remains a promising approach in responding to viral diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of HIV: tracking AIDS pandemic.

    PubMed

    TakebE, Yutaka; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Motomura, Kazushi

    2004-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is a global threat to maternal and child health, especially in developing countries. It is estimated that 800 000 children are infected and 580 000 children die of AIDS-related illnesses every year. Molecular epidemiology has been a useful tool in analyzing the origin of HIV and tracking the course of global HIV spread. This article provides an overview of recent advances in the field of molecular epidemiology of HIV across the world, and discuss the biological implications. Based on the near full-length or partial nucleotide sequence information, the phylogeny and recombinant structure of HIV strains are analyzed. Using genotype classification of HIV as a molecular marker, the origin and the genesis of HIV epidemic are investigated. The HIV-1 group M, a major HIV group responsible for current AIDS pandemic, began its expansion in human population approximately 70 years ago and diversified rapidly over time, now comprising a number of different subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRF). Of note, recent studies revealed that new recombinant strains are arising continually, becoming a powerful force in the spread of HIV-1 across the globe. Global dissemination of HIV is a dramatic and deadly example of recent genome emergence and expansion. Molecular epidemiological investigation is expected to provide information critical for prevention and future vaccine strategies.

  12. Dengue in Latin America: Systematic Review of Molecular Epidemiological Trends

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Castañeda, José; Barreto dos Santos, Flavia; Martínez-Vega, Ruth; Galvão de Araujo, Josélio Maria; Joint, Graham; Sarti, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    Dengue, the predominant arthropod-borne viral disease affecting humans, is caused by one of four distinct serotypes (DENV-1, -2, -3 or -4). A literature analysis and review was undertaken to describe the molecular epidemiological trends in dengue disease and the knowledge generated in specific molecular topics in Latin America, including the Caribbean islands, from 2000 to 2013 in the context of regional trends in order to identify gaps in molecular epidemiological knowledge and future research needs. Searches of literature published between 1 January 2000 and 30 November 2013 were conducted using specific search strategies for each electronic database that was reviewed. A total of 396 relevant citations were identified, 57 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All four dengue virus serotypes were present and co-circulated in many countries over the review period (with the predominance of individual serotypes varying by country and year). The number of countries in which more than one serotype circulated steadily increased during the period under review. Molecular epidemiology data were found for Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, the Caribbean region, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico and Central America, Paraguay, Peru and Venezuela. Distinct lineages with different dynamics were found in each country, with co-existence, extinction and replacement of lineages occurring over the review period. Despite some gaps in the literature limiting the possibility for comparison, our review has described the molecular epidemiological trends of dengue infection. However, several gaps in molecular epidemiological information across Latin America and the Caribbean were identified that provide avenues for future research; in particular, sequence determination of the dengue virus genome is important for more precise phylogenetic classification and correlation with clinical outcome and disease severity. PMID:28068335

  13. Dengue in Latin America: Systematic Review of Molecular Epidemiological Trends.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Castañeda, José; Barreto Dos Santos, Flavia; Martínez-Vega, Ruth; Galvão de Araujo, Josélio Maria; Joint, Graham; Sarti, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    Dengue, the predominant arthropod-borne viral disease affecting humans, is caused by one of four distinct serotypes (DENV-1, -2, -3 or -4). A literature analysis and review was undertaken to describe the molecular epidemiological trends in dengue disease and the knowledge generated in specific molecular topics in Latin America, including the Caribbean islands, from 2000 to 2013 in the context of regional trends in order to identify gaps in molecular epidemiological knowledge and future research needs. Searches of literature published between 1 January 2000 and 30 November 2013 were conducted using specific search strategies for each electronic database that was reviewed. A total of 396 relevant citations were identified, 57 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All four dengue virus serotypes were present and co-circulated in many countries over the review period (with the predominance of individual serotypes varying by country and year). The number of countries in which more than one serotype circulated steadily increased during the period under review. Molecular epidemiology data were found for Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, the Caribbean region, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico and Central America, Paraguay, Peru and Venezuela. Distinct lineages with different dynamics were found in each country, with co-existence, extinction and replacement of lineages occurring over the review period. Despite some gaps in the literature limiting the possibility for comparison, our review has described the molecular epidemiological trends of dengue infection. However, several gaps in molecular epidemiological information across Latin America and the Caribbean were identified that provide avenues for future research; in particular, sequence determination of the dengue virus genome is important for more precise phylogenetic classification and correlation with clinical outcome and disease severity.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease in Israel.

    PubMed

    Moran-Gilad, J; Mentasti, M; Lazarovitch, T; Huberman, Z; Stocki, T; Sadik, C; Shahar, T; Anis, E; Valinsky, L; Harrison, T G; Grotto, I

    2014-07-01

    National surveillance of Legionnaires' disease (LD) is important to inform control measures and facilitate international networking for timely reporting. This study is the first to describe the molecular epidemiology of LD in Israel. Case notifications for 2006-2011, collated through mandatory reporting, were identified and demographic, clinical and laboratory data were extracted. Unrelated clinical and environmental Legionella pneumophila strains were characterized using standard procedures, Dresden panel of monoclonal antibodies and the ESCMID Study Group for Legionella Infections (ESGLI) Sequence-Based Typing scheme. In all, 294 cases were reported (crude incidence 0.67 cases/100 000; age-standardized incidence 1/100 000). LD epidemiological trends and features largely resembled those of the EU, except for a larger proportion of nosocomial cases. Of 28 clinical and 23 environmental strains analysed, 71.4% and 21.7% were serogroup (sg) 1 and the most common immunological subgroup was OLDA/Oxford (64%). Of the clinical strains, OLDA/Oxford, ST1 was the most common (43%) followed by Allentown/France, ST40 (14%). The unusual sg 3 ST338 was found in 17.4% of environmental strains. Novel STs were detected amongst 23.5% of strains. These findings warrant further molecular investigation. Molecular epidemiology data generated from neighbouring countries newly adopting the ESGLI typing scheme for L. pneumophila contribute to understanding of regional strain diversity.

  15. Molecular markers in the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Martínez-Herrera, Erick; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of coccidioidomycosis in endemic areas has been observed to increase daily. To understand the causes of the spread of the disease and design strategies for fungal detection in clinical and environmental samples, scientists have resorted to molecular tools that allow fungal detection in a natural environment, reliable identification in clinical cases and the study of biological characteristics, such as reproductive and genetic structure, demographic history and diversification. We conducted a review of the most important molecular markers in the epidemiology of Coccidioides spp. and the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. A literature search was performed for scientific publications concerning the application of molecular tools for the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. The use of molecular markers in the epidemiological study and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis has allowed for the typing of Coccidioides spp. isolates, improved understanding of their mode of reproduction, genetic variation and speciation and resulted in the development specific, rapid and sensitive strategies for detecting the fungus in environmental and clinical samples. Molecular markers have revealed genetic variability in Coccidioides spp. This finding influences changes in the epidemiology of coccidioidomycosis, such as the emergence of more virulent or antifungal resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the molecular markers currently used to identify Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are specific and sensitive. However, they must be validated to determine their application in diagnosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lihua

    2010-01-01

    Molecular tools have been developed to detect and differentiate Cryptosporidium at the species/genotype and subtype levels. These tools have been increasingly used in characterizing the transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. in humans and animals. Results of these molecular epidemiologic studies have led to better appreciation of the public health importance of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes in various animals and improved understanding of infection sources in humans. Geographic, seasonal and socioeconomic differences in the distribution of Cryptosporidium spp. in humans have been identified, and have been attributed to differences in infection sources and transmission routes. The transmission of C. parvum in humans is mostly anthroponotic in developing countries, with zoonotic infections play an important role in developed countries. Species of Cryptosporidium and subtype families of C. hominis have been shown to induce different clinical manifestations and have different potential to cause outbreaks. The wide use of a new generation of genotyping and subtyping tools in well designed epidemiologic studies should lead to a more in-depth understanding of the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in humans and animals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY: POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON THE ASSESSMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    The term "molecular epidemiology" has been used to cover a broad range of scientific activities, often without specific reference to epidemiology. In fact, as noted by Foxman and Riley [1],molecular epidemiology has often been described almost exclusively in...

  18. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY: POTENTIAL IMPACTS ON THE ASSESSMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    The term "molecular epidemiology" has been used to cover a broad range of scientific activities, often without specific reference to epidemiology. In fact, as noted by Foxman and Riley [1],molecular epidemiology has often been described almost exclusively in...

  19. Molecular Epidemiology for Vector Research on Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hirotomo; Gomez, Eduardo A; Cáceres, Abraham G; Uezato, Hiroshi; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a protozoan disease caused by the genus Leishmania transmitted by female phlebotomine sand flies. Surveillance of the prevalence of Leishmania and responsive vector species in endemic and surrounding areas is important for predicting the risk and expansion of the disease. Molecular biological methods are now widely applied to epidemiological studies of infectious diseases including leishmaniasis. These techniques are used to detect natural infections of sand fly vectors with Leishmania protozoa and are becoming powerful tools due to their sensitivity and specificity. Recently, genetic analyses have been performed on sand fly species and genotyping using PCR-RFLP has been applied to the sand fly taxonomy. In addition, a molecular mass screening method has been established that enables both sand fly species and natural leishmanial infections to be identified simultaneously in hundreds of sand flies with limited effort. This paper reviews recent advances in the study of sand flies, vectors of leishmaniasis, using molecular biological approaches. PMID:20617005

  20. Fish rhabdoviruses: molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Beer, M; Schütze, H; Mettenleiter, T C

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses may cause serious diseases in wild and farmed fish. Within the Rhabdoviridae six genera have been established: Ephemerovirus, Cytorhabdovirus, Nucleorhabdovirus, Lyssavirus, Vesiculovirus, and Novirhabdovirus. Viruses that infect fish are official or tentative members of the genera Vesiculovirus and Novirhabdovirus, or are listed as unassigned rhabdoviruses. In this report, we summarize and discuss published and our own unpublished data on the molecular epidemiology and phylogeography of fish rhabdoviruses including intrapopulational differences and subgrouping of fish rhabdoviruses, in particular the species spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV), infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    During the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), transmissions between humans and primates resulted in multiple HIV lineages in humans. This evolution has been rapid, giving rise to a complex classification and allowing for worldwide spread and intermixing of subtypes, which has consequently led to dozens of circulating recombinant forms. In the Republic of Korea, 12,522 cases of HIV infection have been reported between 1985, when AIDS was first identified, and 2015. This review focuses on the evolution of HIV infection worldwide and the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of HIV in Korea. PMID:28332348

  2. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  3. Α molecular epidemiological analysis of adenoviruses from excess conjunctivitis cases.

    PubMed

    Balasopoulou, A; Κokkinos, P; Pagoulatos, D; Plotas, P; Makri, O E; Georgakopoulos, C D; Vantarakis, A

    2017-04-24

    Τo perform a molecular epidemiological analysis of viral conjunctivitis among excess conjunctivitis cases recorded at the University Hospital of Patras, Greece, for the period March to June 2012. A structured questionnaire containing demographic and clinical data was developed in order to collect retrospective data on the cases. Eye swab specimens were collected and molecular detection of adenoviruses was performed by nested PCR. Positive results were confirmed by sequencing. To determine the relatedness between the isolated sequences, a phylogenetic analysis was conducted. The epidemiological analysis (including retrospective data) included 231 conjunctivitis cases (47.1% male, and 52.8% female). Based on clinical features 205 of the cases were diagnosed of viral origin (46.3% male and 53.7% female), 4 of bacterial origin (50% male and 50% female) while 22 were undefined conjunctivitis. The outbreak excess cases (included 156 cases) affected all age groups regardless gender predilection. For the positive samples indicated that 29 samples (72.5%) were AdV17, and 5 (12.5%) as AdV54. Molecular analysis could define the cause of viral conjunctivitis, while epidemiological data contributed to the assessment of the risk factors and underlined possible preventive measures. This study is one of the very few on viral conjunctivitis in Greece. This outbreak underscores the need for a national surveillance system for acute infectious conjunctivitis outbreaks. The epidemiological as well as molecular investigation on HAdV ocular infections is rather absent in Greece, which has no surveillance system for viral conjunctivitis.

  4. Evolution, phylogeny, and molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Alexandra; Gomes, João P

    2014-04-01

    The Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular bacteria characterized by a unique biphasic developmental cycle. It encompasses the single genus Chlamydia, which involves nine species that affect a wide range of vertebral hosts, causing infections with serious impact on human health (mainly due to Chlamydia trachomatis infections) and on farming and veterinary industries. It is believed that Chlamydiales originated ∼700mya, whereas C. trachomatis likely split from the other Chlamydiaceae during the last 6mya. This corresponds to the emergence of modern human lineages, with the first descriptions of chlamydial infections as ancient as four millennia. Chlamydiaceae have undergone a massive genome reduction, on behalf of the deletional bias "use it or lose it", stabilizing at 1-1.2Mb and keeping a striking genome synteny. Their phylogeny reveals species segregation according to biological properties, with huge differences in terms of host range, tissue tropism, and disease outcomes. Genome differences rely on the occurrence of mutations in the >700 orthologous genes, as well as on events of recombination, gene loss, inversion, and paralogous expansion, affecting both a hypervariable region named the plasticity zone, and genes essentially encoding polymorphic and transmembrane head membrane proteins, type III secretion effectors and some metabolic pathways. Procedures for molecular typing are still not consensual but have allowed the knowledge of molecular epidemiology patterns for some species as well as the identification of outbreaks and emergence of successful clones for C. trachomatis. This manuscript intends to provide a comprehensive review on the evolution, phylogeny, and molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Update on molecular epidemiology of Shigella infection.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ila F N; Havt, Alexandre; Lima, Aldo A M

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are important etiologic agents of diarrhea worldwide. This review summarizes the recent findings on the epidemiology, diagnosis, virulence genes, and pathobiology of Shigella infection. Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei have been identified as the main serogroups circulating in developing and developed countries, respectively. However, a shift in the dominant species from S. flexneri to S. sonnei has been observed in countries that have experienced recent improvements in socioeconomic conditions. Despite the increasing usage of molecular methods in the diagnosis and virulence characterization of Shigella strains, researchers have been unsuccessful in finding a specific target gene for this bacillus. New research has demonstrated the role of proteins whose expressions are temperature-regulated, as well as genes involved in the processes of adhesion, invasion, dissemination, and inflammation, aiding in the clarification of the complex pathobiology of shigellosis. Knowledge about the epidemiologic profile of circulating serogroups of Shigella and an understanding of its pathobiology as well as of the virulence genes is important for the development of preventive measures and interventions to reduce the worldwide spread of shigellosis.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-02-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Oropouche Virus, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Helena Baldez; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Casseb, Lívia M.N.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Pinto da Silva, Eliana V.; Silva, Mayra; Casseb, Samir M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is the causative agent of Oropouche fever, an urban febrile arboviral disease widespread in South America, with >30 epidemics reported in Brazil and other Latin American countries during 1960–2009. To describe the molecular epidemiology of OROV, we analyzed the entire N gene sequences (small RNA) of 66 strains and 35 partial Gn (medium RNA) and large RNA gene sequences. Distinct patterns of OROV strain clustered according to N, Gn, and large gene sequences, which suggests that each RNA segment had a different evolutionary history and that the classification in genotypes must consider the genetic information for all genetic segments. Finally, time-scale analysis based on the N gene showed that OROV emerged in Brazil ≈223 years ago and that genotype I (based on N gene data) was responsible for the emergence of all other genotypes and for virus dispersal. PMID:21529387

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Oropouche virus, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Helena Baldez; Nunes, Márcio R T; Casseb, Lívia M N; Carvalho, Valéria L; Pinto da Silva, Eliana V; Silva, Mayra; Casseb, Samir M M; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C

    2011-05-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is the causative agent of Oropouche fever, an urban febrile arboviral disease widespread in South America, with >30 epidemics reported in Brazil and other Latin American countries during 1960-2009. To describe the molecular epidemiology of OROV, we analyzed the entire N gene sequences (small RNA) of 66 strains and 35 partial Gn (medium RNA) and large RNA gene sequences. Distinct patterns of OROV strain clustered according to N, Gn, and large gene sequences, which suggests that each RNA segment had a different evolutionary history and that the classification in genotypes must consider the genetic information for all genetic segments. Finally, time-scale analysis based on the N gene showed that OROV emerged in Brazil ≈223 years ago and that genotype I (based on N gene data) was responsible for the emergence of all other genotypes and for virus dispersal.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis is an active research area in China. The use of genotyping and subtyping tools in prevalence studies has led to the identification of unique characteristics of Cryptosporidium infections in humans and animals. Human cryptosporidiosis in China is exemplified by the high diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. at species and subtype levels, with dominant C. hominis and C. parvum subtypes being rarely detected in other countries. Similarly, preweaned dairy calves, lambs, and goat kids are mostly infected with non-pathogenic Cryptosporidium species (C. bovis in calves and C. xiaoi in lambs and goat kids), with C. parvum starting to appear in dairy calves as a consequence of concentrated animal feeding operations. The latter Cryptosporidium species is dominated by IId subtypes, with IIa subtypes largely absent from the country. Unlike elsewhere, rodents in China appear to be commonly infected with C. parvum IId subtypes, with identical subtypes being found in these animals, calves, other livestock, and humans. In addition to cattle, pigs and chickens appear to be significant contributors to Cryptosporidium contamination in drinking water sources, as reflected by the frequent detection of C. suis, C. baileyi, and C. meleagridis in water samples. Chinese scientists have also made significant contributions to the development of new molecular epidemiological tools for Cryptosporidium spp. and improvements in our understanding of the mechanism involved in the emergence of hyper-transmissible and virulent C. hominis and C. parvum subtypes. Despite this progress, coordinated research efforts should be made to address changes in Cryptosporidium transmission because of rapid economic development in China and to prevent the introduction and spread of virulent and zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in farm animals. PMID:28932217

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis is an active research area in China. The use of genotyping and subtyping tools in prevalence studies has led to the identification of unique characteristics of Cryptosporidium infections in humans and animals. Human cryptosporidiosis in China is exemplified by the high diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. at species and subtype levels, with dominant C. hominis and C. parvum subtypes being rarely detected in other countries. Similarly, preweaned dairy calves, lambs, and goat kids are mostly infected with non-pathogenic Cryptosporidium species (C. bovis in calves and C. xiaoi in lambs and goat kids), with C. parvum starting to appear in dairy calves as a consequence of concentrated animal feeding operations. The latter Cryptosporidium species is dominated by IId subtypes, with IIa subtypes largely absent from the country. Unlike elsewhere, rodents in China appear to be commonly infected with C. parvum IId subtypes, with identical subtypes being found in these animals, calves, other livestock, and humans. In addition to cattle, pigs and chickens appear to be significant contributors to Cryptosporidium contamination in drinking water sources, as reflected by the frequent detection of C. suis, C. baileyi, and C. meleagridis in water samples. Chinese scientists have also made significant contributions to the development of new molecular epidemiological tools for Cryptosporidium spp. and improvements in our understanding of the mechanism involved in the emergence of hyper-transmissible and virulent C. hominis and C. parvum subtypes. Despite this progress, coordinated research efforts should be made to address changes in Cryptosporidium transmission because of rapid economic development in China and to prevent the introduction and spread of virulent and zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in farm animals.

  11. The integration of molecular tools into veterinary and spatial epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Muellner, Petra; Zadoks, Ruth N; Perez, Andres M; Spencer, Simon E F; Schukken, Ynte H; French, Nigel P

    2011-09-01

    At the interface of molecular biology and epidemiology, the emerging discipline of molecular epidemiology offers unique opportunities to advance the study of diseases through the investigation of infectious agents at the molecular level. Molecular tools can increase our understanding of the factors that shape the spatial and temporal distribution of pathogens and disease. Both spatial and molecular aspects have always been important to the field of infectious disease epidemiology, but recently news tools have been developed which increase our ability to consider both elements within a common framework. This enables the epidemiologist to make inferences about disease patterns in space and time. This paper introduces some basic concepts of molecular epidemiology in a veterinary context and illustrates the application of molecular tools at a range of spatio-temporal scales. Case studies - a multi-state outbreak of Serratia mastitis, a national control program for campylobacteriosis, and evolution of foot-and-mouth-disease viruses - are used to demonstrate the importance of considering molecular aspects in modern epidemiological studies. The discipline of molecular epidemiology is in its infancy and our contribution aims to promote awareness, understanding and uptake of molecular epidemiology in veterinary science. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular epidemiology and evolution of fish Novirhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    The genus Novirhabdoviridae contains several of the important rhabdoviruses that infect fish hosts. There are four established virus species: Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), Hirame rhabdovirus(HIRRV), and Snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV). Viruses of these species vary in host and geographic range, and they have all been studied at the molecular and genomic level. As globally significant pathogens of cultured fish, IHNV and VHSV have been particularly well studied in terms of molecular epidemiology and evolution. Phylogenic analyses of hundreds of field isolates have defined five major genogroups of IHNV and four major genotypes of VHSV worldwide. These phylogenies are informed by the known histories of IHNV and VHSV, each involving a series of viral emergence events that are sometimes associated with host switches, most often into cultured rainbow trout. In general, IHNV has relatively low genetic diversity and a narrow host range, and has been spread from its endemic source in North American to Europe and Asia due to aquaculture activities. In contrast, VHSV has broad host range and high genetic diversity, and the source of emergence events is virus in widespread marine fish reservoirs in the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Common mechanisms of emergence and host switch events include use of raw feed, proximity to wild fish reservoirs of virus, and geographic translocations of virus or naive fish hosts associated with aquaculture.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Usher syndrome in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Vozzi, Diego; Aaspõllu, Anu; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Berto, Anna; Fabretto, Antonella; Licastro, Danilo; Külm, Maigi; Testa, Francesco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Vahter, Marju; Ziviello, Carmela; Martini, Alessandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing and vision loss. Usher syndrome is divided into three clinical subclasses (type 1, type 2, and type 3), which differ in terms of the severity and progression of hearing loss and the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms. Usher syndrome is defined by significant genetic heterogeneity, with at least 12 distinct loci described and 9 genes identified. This study aims to provide a molecular epidemiology report of Usher syndrome in Italy. Methods Molecular data have been obtained on 75 unrelated Italian patients using the most up-to date technology available for the screening of Usher syndrome gene mutations, i.e., the genotyping microarray developed by Asper Biotech (Tartu, Estonia), which simultaneously investigates 612 different marker positions using the well established arrayed primer extension methodology (APEX). Results Using this method, we found that 12% of cases (9 out of 75) harbored homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene positions analyzed, whereas 20% (15 out of 75) of the patients were characterized by the presence of only one mutated allele based on the positions analyzed. One patient was found to be compound heterozygous for mutations in two different genes and this represents an example of possible digenic inheritance in Usher syndrome. A total of 66.6% of cases (50 out of 75) were found to be completely negative for the presence of Usher syndrome gene mutations in the detected positions. Mutations detected by the array were confirmed by direct sequencing. Conclusions These findings highlight the efficacy of the APEX-based genotyping approach in the molecular assessment of Usher patients, suggesting the presence of alleles not yet identified and/or the involvement of additional putative genes that may account for the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome. PMID:21738395

  14. [Precision medicine: new opportunities and challenges for molecular epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Song, Jing; Hu, Yonghua

    2016-04-01

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the announcement of the Precision Medicine Initiative by U.S. President Barack Obama in January 2015, human beings have initially completed the " three steps" of " genomics to biology, genomics to health as well as genomics to society". As a new inter-discipline, the emergence and development of precision medicine have relied on the support and promotion from biological science, basic medicine, clinical medicine, epidemiology, statistics, sociology and information science, etc. Meanwhile, molecular epidemiology is considered to be the core power to promote precision medical as a cross discipline of epidemiology and molecular biology. This article is based on the characteristics and research progress of medicine and molecular epidemiology respectively, focusing on the contribution and significance of molecular epidemiology to precision medicine, and exploring the possible opportunities and challenges in the future.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(2): 61-67] PMID:25441425

  16. Epidemiology and molecular biology of Barrett esophagus.

    PubMed

    Casson, Alan G; Williams, Lara; Guernsey, Duane L

    2005-01-01

    Over the past three decades, there has been a marked change in the epidemiology of esophageal malignancy, with an increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The reasons for this are largely unknown and remain controversial, but several lifestyle risk factors have been proposed, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is hypothesized that chronic GERD results in acute mucosal injury, promotes cellular proliferation, and induces specialized columnar metaplasia (Barrett esophagus). Progression of Barrett esophagus to invasive adenocarcinoma is reflected histologically by the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. Dysplasia is widely regarded as the precursor of invasive cancer, and high-grade dysplasia in Barrett epithelium is frequently associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Although several molecular alterations have been described in Barrett esophagus, it is anticipated that relatively few will prove to be clinically useful. To date, biomarkers which currently appear to predict the progression of Barrett esophagus to invasive malignancy include aneuploidy, loss of heterozygosity of 17p (implicating the p53 tumor suppressor gene), and cyclin D1 protein overexpression, and with further validation, will most likely be incorporated into routine clinical practice. It is anticipated that models incorporating objective scores of sociodemographic and lifestyle risk factors (ie, age, gender, body mass index), severity of reflux symptoms, endoscopic and histologic findings, and an assessment of a panel of biomarkers will be developed to further define subsets of patients with Barrett esophagus at increased risk for malignant progression, thereby permitting the development of more rational endoscopic surveillance and screening programs.

  17. [TP53 mutations and molecular epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kazunori; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-05-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by a variety of cellular stresses through several pathways and transactivates its downstream genes, including regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. The loss of p53 function by TP53 gene mutations therefore fails to activate these genes and is thought to be a critical cause of carcinogenesis and/or tumor progression. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. TP53 mutations are found in about 50% of human cancers, although the frequency of TP53 mutations differs among tumor types. However, the degree of functional disorder of mutant p53 varies according to the type of TP53 mutation. And the effects of p53 on cancer formation and/or progression are influenced by the degree of p53 dysfunction. So it is important to analyze the effects of TP53 mutations carefully according to the oncogenicity of each mutation from the molecular epidemiological point of view. Here, together with some cautions needed for analyzing and interpreting the significance of TP53 gene mutations, we present some examples of the identified specific mutation spectrum and the correlation between the prognosis and TP53 mutation in some cancers.

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Oral Chagas Disease Outbreaks in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Montilla, Marleny; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Floréz, Astrid Carolina; Zambrano, Pilar; Guhl, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI). In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. Methodology and Principal Findings High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing) and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing) strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. Conclusions These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed. PMID:23437405

  19. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    PubMed

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  20. Colorectal Cancer in Iran: Molecular Epidemiology and Screening Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Mortaza Jabbarpour; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Farassati, Faris; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the past three decades in Iran has made it a major public health burden. This study aimed to report its epidemiologic features, molecular genetic aspects, survival, heredity, and screening pattern in Iran. Methods. A comprehensive literature review was conducted to identify the relevant published articles. We used medical subject headings, including colorectal cancer, molecular genetics, KRAS and BRAF mutations, screening, survival, epidemiologic study, and Iran. Results. Age standardized incidence rate of Iranian CRCs was 11.6 and 10.5 for men and women, respectively. Overall five-year survival rate was 41%, and the proportion of CRC among the younger age group was higher than that of western countries. Depending on ethnicity, geographical region, dietary, and genetic predisposition, mutation genes were considerably diverse and distinct among CRCs across Iran. The high occurrence of CRC in records of relatives of CRC patients showed that family history of CRC was more common among young CRCs. Conclusion. Appropriate screening strategies for CRC which is amenable to early detection through screening, especially in relatives of CRCs, should be considered as the first step in CRC screening programs. PMID:25685149

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Hemoglobinopathies in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Munkongdee, Thongperm; Tanakulmas, Jatuporn; Butthep, Punnee; Winichagoon, Pranee; Main, Barbara; Yiannakis, Miriam; George, Joby; Devenish, Robyn; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2016-06-01

    Determining the magnitude of the thalassemia problem in a country is important for implementing a national prevention and control program. In order to acquire accurate thalassemia prevalence data, the gene frequency of α- and β-thalassemia (α- and β-thal) in different regions of a country should be determined. The molecular basis of thalassemia in Cambodia was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques in a community-based cross-sectional survey of 1631 unrelated individuals from three regions, Battambang, Preah Vihear and Phnom Penh. Thalassemia mutations were detected in 62.7% of the three studied population of Cambodia. Hb E (HBB: c.79G > A) was the most common β-globin gene mutation with a frequency ranging from 0.139 to 0.331, while the most frequent α-globin gene mutation was the -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion (0.098-0.255). The other frequencies were 0.001-0.003 for β-thal, 0.008-0.011 for α-thal-1 (- -(SEA)), 0.003-0.008 for α-thal-2 [-α(4.2) (leftward deletion)], 0.021-0.044 for Hb Constant Spring (Hb CS, HBA2: c.427T > C) and 0.009-0.036 for Hb Paksé (HBA2: c.429A > T). A regional specific thalassemia gene frequency was observed. Preah Vihear had the highest prevalence of Hb E (55.9%), α-thal-2 (24.0%) and nondeletional α-thal (15.1%), whereas Phnom Penh had the lowest frequency of thalassemia genes. Interestingly, in Preah Vihear, the frequency of Hb Paksé was extremely high (0.036), almost equivalent to that of Hb CS (0.044). Our results indicate the importance of micromapping and epidemiology studies of thalassemia, which will assist in establishing the national prevention and control program in Cambodia.

  2. Electrical Conductance and Reversible Conductance Switching in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Bert

    2009-03-01

    A technology is demonstrated to fabricate reliable molecular metal-molecule-metal junctions with unprecedented device diameters up to 100 μm. The yield of these molecular junctions is close to unity. Stability investigations have shown a shelf life of years and no deterioration upon cycling. Key ingredients are the use of a conducting polymer layer (PEDOT:PSS) sandwiched between the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the top electrode to prevent electrical shorts, and processing in lithographically defined vertical interconnects (vias) to prevent both parasitic currents and interaction between the environment and the SAM [1--3]. Furthermore, a fully functional solid-state molecular electronic switch is manufactured by conventional processing techniques. The molecular switch is based on a monolayer of photochromic diarylethene molecules sandwiched between two electrodes. The monolayer reversibly switches the conductance by more than one order of magnitude between the two conductance states via optical addressing. This bidirectional conductance switch operates as an electronic ON/OFF switch and as a reprogrammable data storage unit that can be optically written and electronically read [4]. [4pt] [1] Nature, 441, 69--72 (2006). [0pt] [2] Proc. Natl Acad. Sci USA, 104, 11161-11167 (2007). [0pt] [3] Nature Nanotechn., 3, December issue (2008) [0pt] [4] Adv. Mater. 20, 1467--1473.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Germany.

    PubMed

    Horn, Nicole Nari; Kresken, Michael; Körber-Irrgang, Barbara; Göttig, Stephan; Wichelhaus, Cornelia; Wichelhaus, Thomas A

    2014-07-01

    Antimicrobial drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae has become an increasing public health problem. Hence, surveillance of resistance development is of crucial importance to implement adequate treatment guidelines. Data on the spread of antibiotic resistance among gonococcal isolates in Germany, however, is scarce. In a resistance surveillance study conducted by the Paul Ehrlich Society for Chemotherapy between October 2010 and December 2011, 23 laboratories all over Germany were requested to send N. gonorrhoeae isolates to the study laboratory in Frankfurt am Main. Species verification was performed biochemically using ApiNH and with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Etest method. For molecular epidemiological analysis, N. gonorrhoeae strains were genotyped by means of N. gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing. A total of 213 consecutive gonococcal isolates were analyzed in this nationwide study. Applying EUCAST breakpoints, high resistance rates were found for ciprofloxacin (74%) and tetracycline (41%). Penicillin non-susceptibility was detected in 80% of isolates. The rate of azithromycin resistance was 6%, while all strains were susceptible to spectinomycin, cefixime, and ceftriaxone. Molecular typing of gonococcal isolates revealed a great heterogeneity of 99 different sequence types (ST), but ST1407 predominated (n=39). This is the first comprehensive German multi-centre surveillance study on antibiotic susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of N. gonorrhoeae with implications for antibiotic choice for treatment of gonorrhoea. The World Health Organization supports the concept that an efficacious treatment of gonorrhoea results in at least 95% of infections being cured. Accordingly, as spectinomycin is not available on the German market, only the third generation cephalosporins cefixime and ceftriaxone are regarded as valuable drugs

  4. Molecular epidemiology of HIV transmission in a dental practice.

    PubMed

    Ou, C Y; Ciesielski, C A; Myers, G; Bandea, C I; Luo, C C; Korber, B T; Mullins, J I; Schochetman, G; Berkelman, R L; Economou, A N

    1992-05-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission from infected patients to health-care workers has been well documented, but transmission from an infected health-care worker to a patient has not been reported. After identification of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient who had no known risk factors for HIV infection but who had undergone an invasive procedure performed by a dentist with AIDS, six other patients of this dentist were found to be HIV-infected. Molecular biologic studies were conducted to complement the epidemiologic investigation. Portions of the HIV proviral envelope gene from each of the seven patients, the dentist, and 35 HIV-infected persons from the local geographic area were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Three separate comparative genetic analyses--genetic distance measurements, phylogenetic tree analysis, and amino acid signature pattern analysis--showed that the viruses from the dentist and five dental patients were closely related. These data, together with the epidemiologic investigation, indicated that these patients became infected with HIV while receiving care from a dentist with AIDS.

  5. Enhancing the conductivity of molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuyver, Thijs; Fias, Stijn; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul; Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald

    2017-03-01

    We show in this work that conjugated π -electron molecular chains can, in quite specific and understood circumstances, become more conductive the longer they get, in contradiction to what would be expected intuitively. The analysis, done in the framework of the source and sink potential method, and supported by detailed transmission calculations, begins by defining "relative transmission," an inherent measure of molecular conduction. This, in turn, for conjugated hydrocarbons, is related to a simple molecular orbital expression—the ratio of secular determinants of a molecule and one where the electrode contacts are deleted—and a valence bond idea, since these secular determinants can alternatively be expressed in terms of Kekulé structures. A plausible argument is given for relating the relative transmission to the weight of the diradical resonance structures in the resonance hybrid for a molecule. Chemical intuition can then be used to tune the conductivity of molecules by "pushing" them towards more or less diradical character. The relationship between relative transmission (which can rise indefinitely) and molecular transmission is carefully analyzed—there is a sweet spot here for engineering molecular devices. These new insights enable the rationalization of a wide variety of experimental and theoretical results for π-conjugated alternant hydrocarbons, especially the striking difference between extended oligophenylenes and related quinoid chains. In this context, oligo-p-phenylene macrocycles emerge as a potential molecular switch.

  6. Molecular epidemiology: issues in study design and statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chia, K S; Shi, C Y; Lee, J; Seow, A; Lee, H P

    1996-01-01

    Traditional analytical epidemiology is directed at identifying the association between risk factors and occurrence of disease by using crude exposure data derived from questionnaires or clinical measures, and taking clinical disease as the end point. With the rapid development in molecular biology and laboratory methods, it is now possible to use biomarkers which are capable of identifying molecular events for epidemiologic research. This improved sensitivity enables us to develop a mechanistic understanding of disease causation: a step closer to the unravelling of the "black box" of traditional epidemiology. Biomarkers may be classified as internal indicators of exposure (biomarkers of exposure), indicators of preclinical adverse effect (biomarkers of effect) or indicators of an intrinsic or acquired susceptibility to disease (biomarkers of susceptibility). Biomarkers provide a better definition of exposure and disease status and consequently they could help to reduce misclassification bias in both exposure and disease, reduce the follow-up time in prospective studies, as well as identify possible interactions between risk factors on disease occurrence. However, a biomarker needs to be validated and its distribution in large populations described before it can be used profitably for aetiologic research. Also, the use of biomarkers in epidemiologic research raises other interesting epidemiological and statistical issues like confounding, effect modification and the analysis of repeated measurements. Molecular epidemiology is a multidisciplinary endeavour which comprises molecular biology, epidemiology and biostatistics. Clearly then, to carry out research in this field profitably, the molecular biologist, epidemiologist and biostatistician must acquire not only expertise in their respective fields, but also an integrated understanding of all three fields. The molecular biologist is not merely a laboratory bench worker; the epidemiologist, a field data-collector and

  7. The molecular epidemiology of parasite infections: tools and applications.

    PubMed

    Lymbery, A J; Thompson, R C A

    2012-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology, broadly defined, is the application of molecular genetic techniques to the dynamics of disease in a population. In this review, we briefly describe molecular and analytical tools available for molecular epidemiological studies and then provide an overview of how they can be applied to better understand parasitic disease. A range of new molecular tools have been developed in recent years, allowing for the direct examination of parasites from clinical or environmental samples, and providing access to relatively cheap, rapid, high throughput molecular assays. At the same time, new analytical approaches, in particular those derived from coalescent theory, have been developed to provide more robust estimates of evolutionary processes and demographic parameters from multilocus, genotypic data. To date, the primary application of molecular epidemiology has been to provide specific and sensitive identification of parasites and to resolve taxonomic issues, particularly at the species level and below. Population genetic studies have also been used to determine the extent of genetic diversity among populations of parasites and the degree to which this diversity is associated with different host cycles or epidemiologically important phenotypes. Many of these studies have also shed new light on transmission cycles of parasites, particularly the extent to which zoonotic transmission occurs, and on the prevalence and importance of mixed infections with different parasite species or intraspecific variants (polyparasitism). A major challenge, and one which is now being addressed by an increasing number of studies, is to find and utilize genetic markers for complex traits of epidemiological significance, such as drug resistance, zoonotic potential and virulence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1.

    PubMed Central

    van Ketel, R J; ter Schegget, J; Zanen, H C

    1984-01-01

    The DNA of patient and environmental isolates of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was analyzed by restriction endonuclease cleavage. The electrophoretic patterns of the DNA digests of isolates from a group of patients with Legionnaires disease acquired in a hospital were indistinguishable from one another and were identical to the DNA pattern of a strain isolated from the hot water supply of the hospital. On the other hand, they were easily differentiated from strains isolated from patients and hot water supplies in other hospitals in the same city. The homogeneity of populations of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 colonizing plumbing systems was also investigated by DNA restriction endonuclease analysis in three hospitals. We distinguished two subtypes in one hospital; the two other hospitals had homogeneous populations. Restriction endonuclease digest analysis of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 DNA enables subtyping and appears to be a useful method for examining the epidemiology of outbreaks of Legionnaires disease. Images PMID:6092423

  9. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Cafarchia, Claudia; Iatta, Roberta; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Gräser, Yvonne; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-12-01

    Dermatophytes are fungi that invade and propagate in the keratinized skin of mammals, including humans, often causing contagious infections. The species of medical concern belong to the genera Microsporum, Trichophyton, Epidermophyton (in their anamorphic state) and Arthroderma (in their telomorphic state), which were traditionally identified based on their morphology and biochemical characters. Nonetheless, limitations linked to the differentiation of closely related agents at species and strains level have been recently overcome by molecular studies. Indeed, an accurate identification of dermatophytes is pivotal for the establishment of effective control and prevention programs as well as for determining the most appropriate and effective antifungal therapies to be applied. This article reviews the DNA techniques and the molecular markers used to identify and to characterize dermatophyte species, as well as aspects of their phylogeny and evolution. The applications of typing molecular strain to both basic and applied research (e.g., taxonomy, ecology, typing of infection, antifungal susceptibility) have also been discussed.

  10. A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    AD__ _ _ _ Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8471 TITLE: A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sara S. Strom...Molecular Epidmeiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate DAMD17-98-1-8471 Cancer Susceptibility 6. AUTHOR(S) Sara S. Strom, Ph.D. Sue-Hwa Lin 7. PERFORMING...DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Although prostate cancer is the most common cancer in

  11. The use of genetic markers in the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, L S; Leitão, T M J S; Taylor, M L; Muniz, M M; Zancopé-Oliveira, R M

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungal pathogen that can infect both humans and animals. This disease has worldwide distribution and affects mainly immunocompromised individuals. In the environment, H. capsulatum grows as mold but undergoes a morphologic transition to the yeast morphotype under special conditions. Molecular techniques are important tools to conduct epidemiologic investigations for fungal detection, identification of infection sources, and determination of different fungal genotypes associated to a particular disease symptom. In this study, we performed a systematic review in the PubMed database to improve the understanding about the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis. This search was restricted to English and Spanish articles. We included a combination of specific keywords: molecular typing [OR] genetic diversity [OR] polymorphism [AND] H. capsulatum; molecular epidemiology [AND] histoplasmosis; and molecular epidemiology [AND] Histoplasma. In addition, we used the specific terms: histoplasmosis [AND] outbreaks. Non-English or non-Spanish articles, dead links, and duplicate results were excluded from the review. The results reached show that the main methods used for molecular typing of H. capsulatum were: restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellites polymorphism, sequencing of internal transcribed spacers region, and multilocus sequence typing. Different genetic profiles were identified among H. capsulatum isolates, which can be grouped according to their source, geographical origin, and clinical manifestations.

  12. Cystic echinococcosis: Future perspectives of molecular epidemiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) has been conceived to be caused predominantly by Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (the dog-sheep strain). Recent molecular approaches on CE, however, have revealed that human cases are also commonly caused by another species, Echinococcus canadensis. All indices...

  13. The molecular epidemiology of variant CJD

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Graham A; Knight, Richard SG; Ironside, James W

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of the novel prion diseases bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and, subsequently, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in epidemic forms has attracted much scientific attention. The oral transmission of these disorders, the causative relationship of vCJD to BSE and the resistance of the transmissible agents in both disorders to conventional forms of decontamination has caused great public health concern. The size of the still emerging vCJD epidemic is thankfully much lower than some early published estimates. This paper reviews current knowledge of the factors that influence the development of vCJD: the properties of the infectious agent; the route of inoculation and individual susceptibility factors. The current epidemiological data are reviewed, along with relevant animal transmission studies. In terms of genetic susceptibility, the best characterised is the common single nucleotide polymorphism at codon 129 of prion protein gene. Current biomarkers and future areas of research will be discussed. These issues are important in informing precautionary measures and the ongoing monitoring of vCJD. PMID:21915360

  14. Molecular epidemiology of canine parvovirus in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Nadia; Desario, Costantina; Kadiri, Ahlam; Cavalli, Alessandra; Berrada, Jaouad; Zro, Khalil; Sebbar, Ghizlane; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Parisi, Antonio; Elia, Gabriella; Buonavoglia, Canio; Malik, Jamal; Decaro, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Since it first emergence in the mid-1970's, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has evolved giving rise to new antigenic variants termed CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c, which have completely replaced the original strain and had been variously distributed worldwide. In Africa limited data are available on epidemiological prevalence of these new types. Hence, the aim of the present study was to determine circulating variants in Morocco. Through TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay, 91 samples, collected from symptomatic dogs originating from various cities between 2011 and 2015, were diagnosed. Positive specimens were characterised by means of minor groove binder (MGB) probe PCR. The results showed that all samples but one (98.9%) were CPV positive, of which 1 (1.1%) was characterised as CPV-2a, 43 (47.7%) as CPV-2b and 39 (43.3%) as CPV-2c. Interestingly, a co-infection with CPV-2b and CPV-2c was detected in 4 (4.4%) samples and 3 (3.3%) samples were not characterised. Sequencing of the full VP2 gene revealed these 3 uncharacterised strains as CPV-2c, displaying a change G4068A responsible for the replacement of aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 427, impacting the MGB probe binding. In this work we provide a better understanding of the current status of prevailing CPV strains in northern Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis in Humans and Cattle.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, A; El-Shannat, S; Kamel, M; Castañeda-Vazquez, M A; Castañeda-Vazquez, H

    2016-06-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), is a serious re-emerging disease in both animals and humans. The evolution of the Multi- and Extensively drug-resistant M. bovis strains (MDR-TB and XDR-TB) represents a global threat to public health. Worldwide, the disease is responsible for great economic losses in the veterinary field, serious threat to the ecosystem, and about 3.1% of human TB cases, up to 16% in Tanzania. Only thorough investigation to understand the pathogen's epidemiology can help in controlling the disease and minimizing its threat. For this purpose, various tools have been developed for use in advanced molecular epidemiological studies of bTB, either alone or in combination with standard conventional epidemiological approaches. These techniques enable the analysis of the intra- and inter-species transmission dynamics of bTB. The delivered data can reveal detailed insights into the source of infection, correlations among human and bovine isolates, strain diversity and evolution, spread, geographical localization, host preference, tracing of certain virulence factors such as antibiotic resistance genes, and finally the risk factors for the maintenance and spread of M. bovis. They also allow for the determination of epidemic and endemic strains. This, in turn, has a significant diagnostic impact and helps in vaccine development for bTB eradication programs. The present review discusses many topics including the aetiology, epidemiology and importance of M. bovis, the prevalence of bTB in humans and animals in various countries, the molecular epidemiology of M. bovis, and finally applied molecular epidemiological techniques. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in Greece.

    PubMed

    Karampatakis, Theodoros; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Iosifidis, Elias; Tsakris, Athanassios; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Hospital infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) constitute a worldwide problem associated with high rates of treatment failure and mortality. In Greece, CRKP have emerged in 2002 due to VIM carbapenemase production and later due to KPC, NDM and OXA-48-like carbapenemases that have become endemic. The molecular epidemiology of CRKP strains is dynamic, as antibiotic consumption and worldwide traveling are strongly associated with global spread of CRKP isolates. Lately, porin defects, such as disruption of OmpK35 and production of OmpK36 variant, have also contributed to carbapenem resistance. In the coming years, the high prevalence of CRKP will require intense infection control measures, while novel molecular patterns may appear. To our knowledge, this is the first review analyzing the molecular epidemiology of CRKP strains in Greece.

  17. Molecular biology, epidemiology, and the elusive nature of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tenner, Scott

    2015-03-05

    The myriad of presentations of pancreatitis can cause confusion and controversy among clinicians affecting the diagnosis, treatment, and research of patients with these disorders. Although the disease is best thought of as a spectrum with classic presentations, the underlying pathophysiologic reasons for the differences in manifestations remains unknown. In this issue of the Journal, LaRusch and colleagues provide an elegant study combining epidemiology and molecular biology to explain why some patients with pancreatitis develop fibrosis chronic pancreatitis. The implications of the findings add to the growing request to support large multidisciplinary, combined genetic, and epidemiologic studies in pancreatic disease.

  18. Stress and breast cancer: from epidemiology to molecular biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stress exposure has been proposed to contribute to the etiology of breast cancer. However, the validity of this assertion and the possible mechanisms involved are not well established. Epidemiologic studies differ in their assessment of the relative contribution of stress to breast cancer risk, while physiological studies propose a clear connection but lack the knowledge of intracellular pathways involved. The present review aims to consolidate the findings from different fields of research (including epidemiology, physiology, and molecular biology) in order to present a comprehensive picture of what we know to date about the role of stress in breast cancer development. PMID:21575279

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Seon-Hee; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differences compared with that in men, in terms of histologic types and susceptibility to environmental risk factors. This suggests that female lung cancer can be derived by carcinogenic mechanisms different from those involved in male lung cancer. Among female lung cancer patients, many are non-smokers, which could be studied to identify alternative carcinogenic mechanisms independent from smoking-related ones. In this paper, we reviewed molecular susceptibility markers and genetic changes in lung cancer tissues observed in female lung cancer patients, which have been validated by various studies and will be helpful to understand the tumorigenesis of lung cancer. PMID:24212786

  20. Conductance of a Freestanding Conjugated Molecular Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper-Tönnies, Torben; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Frederiksen, Thomas; Ulrich, Sandra; Herges, Rainer; Berndt, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A freestanding molecular wire is placed vertically on Au(111) using a platform molecule and contacted by a scanning tunneling microscope. Despite the simplicity of the single-molecule junction, its conductance G reproducibly varies in a complex manner with the electrode separation. Transport calculations show that G is controlled by a deformation of the molecule, a symmetry mismatch between the tip and molecule orbitals, and the breaking of a C ≡C triple in favor of a Au - C - C bond. This tip-controlled reversible bond formation or rupture alters the electronic spectrum of the junction and the states accessible for transport, resulting in an order of magnitude variation of the conductance.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in Brussels, 2010-2013.

    PubMed

    Vluggen, Christelle; Soetaert, Karine; Groenen, Guido; Wanlin, Maryse; Spitaels, Martine; Arrazola de Oñate, Wouter; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Saegerman, Claude; Mathys, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate in Brussels-Capital Region is 3-fold higher than in Belgium as a whole. Eight years after the realization of initial prospective population-based molecular epidemiology investigations in this Region, a similar study over the period 2010-2013 was conducted. TB strains isolated from 945 patients were submitted to genotyping by standardized 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR typing and spoligotyping. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the LAM (16.7%) and Haarlem (15.7%) branches are the two most prevalent TB lineages circulating in Brussels. Analysis of the MDR subgroup showed an association with Beijing strains (39.9%) and patients native of Eastern Europe (40.7%). Genotyping detected 113 clusters involving 321 patients, giving a recent transmission index of 22.9%. Molecular-guided epidemiological investigations and routine surveillance activities revealed family transmission or social contact for patients distributed over 34 clusters. Most of the patients were foreign-born (75.7%). However, cluster analysis revealed only limited trans-national transmission. Comparison with the previous study shows a stable epidemiological situation except for the mean age difference between Belgian-born and foreign-born patients which has disappeared. This study confirms that molecular epidemiology has become an important determinant for TB control programs. However, sufficient financial means need to be available to perform all required epidemiological investigations.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in Brussels, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Vluggen, Christelle; Soetaert, Karine; Groenen, Guido; Wanlin, Maryse; Spitaels, Martine; Arrazola de Oñate, Wouter; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Saegerman, Claude

    2017-01-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) incidence rate in Brussels-Capital Region is 3-fold higher than in Belgium as a whole. Eight years after the realization of initial prospective population-based molecular epidemiology investigations in this Region, a similar study over the period 2010–2013 was conducted. TB strains isolated from 945 patients were submitted to genotyping by standardized 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR typing and spoligotyping. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the LAM (16.7%) and Haarlem (15.7%) branches are the two most prevalent TB lineages circulating in Brussels. Analysis of the MDR subgroup showed an association with Beijing strains (39.9%) and patients native of Eastern Europe (40.7%). Genotyping detected 113 clusters involving 321 patients, giving a recent transmission index of 22.9%. Molecular-guided epidemiological investigations and routine surveillance activities revealed family transmission or social contact for patients distributed over 34 clusters. Most of the patients were foreign-born (75.7%). However, cluster analysis revealed only limited trans-national transmission. Comparison with the previous study shows a stable epidemiological situation except for the mean age difference between Belgian-born and foreign-born patients which has disappeared. This study confirms that molecular epidemiology has become an important determinant for TB control programs. However, sufficient financial means need to be available to perform all required epidemiological investigations. PMID:28222189

  3. Molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis: achievements and challenges to current knowledge.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Megan; Nardell, Edward

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, molecular methods have become available with which to strain-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis. They have allowed researchers to study certain important but previously unresolved issues in the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB). For example, some unsuspected microepidemics have been revealed and it has been shown that the relative contribution of recently acquired disease to the TB burden in many settings is far greater than had been thought. These findings have led to the strengthening of TB control. Other research has demonstrated the existence and described the frequency of exogenous reinfection in areas of high incidence. Much recent work has focused on the phenotypic variation among strains and has evaluated the relative transmissibility, virulence, and immunogenicity of different lineages of the organism. We summarize the recent achievements in TB epidemiology associated with the introduction of DNA fingerprinting techniques, and consider the implications of this technology for the design and analysis of epidemiological studies. PMID:12132006

  4. Molecular epidemiology of rotaviruses in India.

    PubMed

    Broor, Shobha; Ghosh, Dhrubaa; Mathur, Purva

    2003-08-01

    ] was reported from Bangalore. G10P[11] strains also have a high prevalence in calves with diarrhoea, in India. The occurrence of these unusual rotavirus strains which are natural reassortants of human and bovine rotaviruses, suggests that reassortment may be an important mechanism for generation of rotavirus strains of newborns. This is catalyzed by the age old traditions of calves and humans living in the same household and socio-economic conditions in India. The diversity of rotavirus strains and the high prevalence of mixed infections in India are unique features of rotavirus epidemiology in India and emphasizes that vaccines should be formulated against a broad range of strains. Another important aspect is that vaccines in India should also target G9 strains. Since neonates acquiring rotavirus infection are protected against severe diarrhoea, neonatal rotavirus strains can be effective potential vaccine candidates and vaccines based on these neonatal strains are being indigenously developed in India.

  5. [Molecular epidemiology studies on the immigrant population in Spain].

    PubMed

    González-Candelas, Fernando; Alma Bracho, María; Comas, Iñaki; d'Auria, Giuseppe; D Unková, Mária; García, Rodrigo; Gosalbes, María José; Isaac, Sandrine; Latorre, Amparo; López-Labrador, Francisco Xavier; Patiño Galindo, Juan Ángel; Palero, Ferran; Pérez-Brocal, Vicente; Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Silva, Francisco J; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F; Moya, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new scientific discipline which allows to integrate information on the genetic variation of infectious pathogens with their diffusion in a population and its subgroups including, for instance, resistance mutations to antibiotics and antiretrovirals. We present the results of an analysis of scientific publications that analyze the health status of the immigrant population in Spain from a molecular epidemiology perspective. We reviewed original articles published in 1998-2014 with the keywords "molecular epidemiology", "molecular typing", "sequencing", "immigrant", and "Spain". From a total of 267 articles identified initially, only 50 passed through the established filters. Most of them (36) analyzed infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (3) and HIV (3), followed at a large distance by Staphylococcus aureus and hepatitis B virus. The main goal of these works was the typing of the pathogen and to determine the frequency of resistance mutations. Is difficult to generalize the conclusions from the analyzed articles because most of them have a purely descriptive and quite restricted scope, considering the type and size of the samples studied. Several studies are focused on the most likely origin for the strains or variants of the pathogen but others also reveal transmissions from the local to the immigrant populations.

  6. Zoonotic potential and molecular epidemiology of Giardia species and giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination.

  7. Zoonotic Potential and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia Species and Giardiasis†

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination. PMID:21233509

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Intestinal Amoebas in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hooshyar, H; Rostamkhani, P; Rezaian, M

    2012-01-01

    Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran. PMID:23193500

  9. Carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae: types and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Luis; González-López, Juan José

    2014-12-01

    The most important mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae is the production of carbapenemases, although resistance can also result from the synergistic activity between AmpC-type or (to a lesser extent) extended-spectrum beta-lactamases combined with decreased outer membrane permeability. Three major molecular classes of carbapenemases are recognized: A, B and D. Classes A and D are serine-beta-lactamases, whereas class B are metallo-beta-lactamases (their hydrolytic activity depends on the presence of zinc). In addition to carbapenems, carbapenemases also hydrolyze other beta-lactams, but the concrete substrate profile depends on the enzyme type. In general terms, class A enzymes are to some extent inhibited by clavulanic acid, and class B enzymes do not affect monobactams and are inhibited by zinc chelators. Given Enterobacteriaceae producing carbapenemases usually also contain gene coding for other mechanisms of resistance to beta-lactams, it is not unusual for the organisms to present complex beta-lactam resistance phenotypes. Additionally, these organisms frequently contain other genes that confer resistance to quinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, sulphonamides and other families of antimicrobial agents, which cause multiresistance or even panresistance. Currently, the most important type of class A carbapenemases are KPC enzymes, whereas VIM, IMP and (particularly) NDM in class B and OXA-48 (and related) in class D are the more relevant enzymes. Whereas some enzymes are encoded by chromosomal genes, most carbapenemases are plasmid-mediated (with genes frequently located in integrons), which favors the dissemination of the enzymes. Detailed information of the genetic platforms and the context of the genes coding for the most relevant enzymes will be presented in this review.

  10. Gallbladder cancer epidemiology, pathogenesis and molecular genetics: Recent update.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aarti; Sharma, Kiran Lata; Gupta, Annapurna; Yadav, Alka; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-14

    Gallbladder cancer is a malignancy of biliary tract which is infrequent in developed countries but common in some specific geographical regions of developing countries. Late diagnosis and deprived prognosis are major problems for treatment of gallbladder carcinoma. The dramatic associations of this orphan cancer with various genetic and environmental factors are responsible for its poorly defined pathogenesis. An understanding to the relationship between epidemiology, molecular genetics and pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer can add new insights to its undetermined pathophysiology. Present review article provides a recent update regarding epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics of gallbladder cancer. We systematically reviewed published literature on gallbladder cancer from online search engine PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). Various keywords used for retrieval of articles were Gallbladder, cancer Epidemiology, molecular genetics and bullion operators like AND, OR, NOT. Cross references were manually searched from various online search engines (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed,https://scholar.google.co.in/, http://www.medline.com/home.jsp). Most of the articles published from 1982 to 2015 in peer reviewed journals have been included in this review.

  11. Gallbladder cancer epidemiology, pathogenesis and molecular genetics: Recent update

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Sharma, Kiran Lata; Gupta, Annapurna; Yadav, Alka; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Gallbladder cancer is a malignancy of biliary tract which is infrequent in developed countries but common in some specific geographical regions of developing countries. Late diagnosis and deprived prognosis are major problems for treatment of gallbladder carcinoma. The dramatic associations of this orphan cancer with various genetic and environmental factors are responsible for its poorly defined pathogenesis. An understanding to the relationship between epidemiology, molecular genetics and pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer can add new insights to its undetermined pathophysiology. Present review article provides a recent update regarding epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular genetics of gallbladder cancer. We systematically reviewed published literature on gallbladder cancer from online search engine PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). Various keywords used for retrieval of articles were Gallbladder, cancer Epidemiology, molecular genetics and bullion operators like AND, OR, NOT. Cross references were manually searched from various online search engines (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed,https://scholar.google.co.in/, http://www.medline.com/home.jsp). Most of the articles published from 1982 to 2015 in peer reviewed journals have been included in this review. PMID:28652652

  12. Epidemiological bases and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salmerón, María; Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, José Manuel; de la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2017-02-01

    The association between diabetes and cancer was hypothesized almost one century ago. Today, a vast number of epidemiological studies support that obese and diabetic populations are more likely to experience tissue-specific cancers, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Obesity, diabetes, and cancer share many hormonal, immune, and metabolic changes that may account for the relationship between diabetes and cancer. In addition, antidiabetic treatments may have an impact on the occurrence and course of some cancers. Moreover, some anticancer treatments may induce diabetes. These observations aroused a great controversy because of the ethical implications and the associated commercial interests. We report an epidemiological update from a mechanistic perspective that suggests the existence of many common and differential individual mechanisms linking obesity and type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus to certain cancers. The challenge today is to identify the molecular links responsible for this association. Classification of cancers by their molecular signatures may facilitate future mechanistic and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2016 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology and Genomics of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, Debra E.; McShan, W. Michael; Nguyen, Scott V.; Shetty, Amol; Agrawal, Sonia; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) is a strict human pathogen with a very high prevalence worldwide. This review highlights the genetic organization of the species and the important ecological considerations that impact its evolution. Recent advances are presented on the topics of molecular epidemiology, population biology, molecular basis for genetic change, genome structure and genetic flux, phylogenomics and closely related streptococcal species, and the long- and short-term evolution of GAS. The application of whole genome sequence data to addressing key biological questions is discussed. PMID:25460818

  14. Molecular epidemiology of mycobacteriosis in wildlife and pet animals.

    PubMed

    Schrenzel, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    The ecology of mycobacteria is shifting in accordance with environmental change and new patterns of interaction between wildlife, humans, and nondomestic animals. Infection of vertebrate hosts throughout the world is greater now than ever and includes a growing prevalence in free ranging and captive wild animals. Molecular epidemiologic studies using standardized methods with high discriminatory power are useful for tracking individual cases and outbreaks, identifying reservoirs, and describing patterns of transmission and are used with increasing frequency to characterize disease wildlife. This review describes current features of mycobacteriosis in wildlife species based on traditional descriptive studies and recent molecular applications.

  15. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  16. Progress of epidemiological and molecular epidemiological studies on benzene in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilan; Yin, Songnian

    2006-09-01

    Benzene is an organic solvent that has been used in industry for about 100 years throughout the world. Since 1973, a series of toxicological and molecular epidemiological studies on benzene were conducted by researchers at the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine (CAPM) (1973-1986) and subsequently by a collaboration between the CAPM and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the United States that began in 1986, which was joined by investigators from the University of California at Berkeley, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and New York University. The findings demonstrated that the risk of leukemia and lymphoma among benzene-exposed workers was significantly increased, with elevated risks for leukemia present not only at higher exposure but also among workers exposed to under 10 ppm. Therefore, the benzene permissible level was decreased to 1.8 ppm (6 mg/m(3)) and benzene-induced leukemia is treated as an occupational cancer in China. The benzene permissible level is 1.0 in the United States and in several other developed countries and it has been suggested to be decreased to 0.5 ppm (ACGIH). A number of potential biomarkers are related to benzene exposure and poisoning. Some of these are benzene oxide-protein adducts, chromosome aberration of lymphocytes, and GPA mutations in erythrocytes, a decrease in B cell and CD4(-)T cell counts in peripheral blood, and altered expression of CXCL16, ZNF331, JUN, and PF4 in lymphocytes. Variation in multiple benzene metabolizing genes may be associated with risk of benzene hematotoxicity, including CYP2E1, MPO, NQO1, and GSTT1.

  17. Report of the Integrative Molecular Cancer Epidemiology International Symposium, Lyon, France.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, S

    2008-01-01

    An International Symposium on Integrative Molecular Cancer Epidemiology took place in Lyon, France, on 3-5 July 2008. The Symposium focused on aetiological and mechanistic aspects of molecular and genetic cancer epidemiology research and was divided into the following three sections: Molecular epidemiology-application of novel molecular markers to cancer epidemiology.Genomic epidemiology in the era of whole genome scan.INTEGRATIVE MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY: visions for the future.Participants included epidemiologists, geneticists, biochemical and molecular biologists, pharmacologists, pathologists and all researchers interested in this field. The Symposium provided a complete and clear overview of the present and future programmes in molecular cancer epidemiology. It also served to encourage international scientific collaboration between investigators working in this specific research field, and to stimulate transdisciplinary research with experts of other research areas. Highlights of each of the scientific presentations are summarized below.

  18. Analysis of the transcriptome in molecular epidemiology studies

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Thomas, Reuben; smith, Martyn T.

    2016-01-01

    The human transcriptome is complex, comprising multiple transcript types, mostly in the form of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). The majority of ncRNA is of the long form (lncRNA, ≥200bp), which plays an important role in gene regulation through multiple mechanisms including epigenetics, chromatin modification, control of transcription factor binding, and regulation of alternative splicing. Both mRNA and ncRNA exhibit additional variability in the form of alternative splicing and RNA editing. All aspects of the human transcriptome can potentially be dysregulated by environmental exposures. Next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is the best available methodology to measure this although it has limitations, including experimental bias. The third phase of the MicroArray Quality Control Consortium project (MAQC-III), also called Sequencing Quality Control (SeQC), aims to address these limitations through standardization of experimental and bioinformatic methodologies. A limited number of toxicogenomic studies have been conducted to date using RNA-Seq. This review describes the complexity of the human transcriptome, the application of transcriptomics by RNA-Seq or microarray in molecular epidemiology studies, and limitations of these approaches including the type of cell or tissue analyzed, experimental variation, and confounding. By using good study designs with precise, individual exposure measurements, sufficient power and incorporation of phenotypic anchors, studies in human populations can identify biomarkers of exposure and/or early effect and elucidate mechanisms of action underlying associated diseases, even at low doses. Analysis of datasets at the pathway level can compensate for some of the limitations of RNA-Seq and, as more datasets become available, will increasingly elucidate the exposure-disease continuum. PMID:23907930

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among South African Gold Miners

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James J.; Connors, Jeremy; Chihota, Violet N.; Shashkina, Elena; van der Meulen, Minty; Graviss, Edward A.; Ha, Ngan P.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Grant, Alison D.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Dorman, Susan E.; Churchyard, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: HIV-associated tuberculosis remains a major health problem among the gold-mining workforce in South Africa. We postulate that high levels of recent transmission, indicated by strain clustering, are fueling the tuberculosis epidemic among gold miners. Objectives: To combine molecular and epidemiologic data to describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity, estimate levels of transmission, and examine risk factors for clustering. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates in 15 gold mine shafts across three provinces in South Africa. All isolates were subject IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and we performed spoligotyping analysis and combined it with basic demographic and clinical information. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 1,602 M. tuberculosis patient isolates, 1,240 (78%) had genotyping data available for analysis. A highly diverse bacillary population was identified, comprising a total of 730 discrete genotypes. Four genotypic families (Latin American Mediterranean spoligotype family; W-Beijing; AH or X; and T1–T4) accounted for over 50% of all strains. Overall, 45% (560/1,240) of strains were genotypically clustered. The minimum estimate for recent transmission (n − 1 method) was 32% (range, 27–34%). There were no individual-level risk factors for clustering, apart from borderline evidence for being non–South African and having self-reported HIV infection. Conclusions: The high M. tuberculosis genetic diversity and lack of risk factors for clustering are indicative of a universal risk for disease among gold miners and likely mixing with nonmining populations. Our results underscore the urgent need to intensify interventions to interrupt transmission across the entire gold-mining workforce in South Africa. PMID:25419914

  20. Molecular pathological epidemiology gives clues to paradoxical findings.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Reiko; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Shibuya, Kenji; Mittleman, Murray A; Wang, Molin; Field, Alison E; Giovannucci, Edward; Lochhead, Paul; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have described what appear to be paradoxical associations, where an incongruous relationship is observed between a certain well-established risk factor for disease incidence and favorable clinical outcome among patients with that disease. For example, the "obesity paradox" represents the association between obesity and better survival among patients with a certain disease such as coronary heart disease. Paradoxical observations cause vexing clinical and public health problems as they raise questions on causal relationships and hinder the development of effective interventions. Compelling evidence indicates that pathogenic processes encompass molecular alterations within cells and the microenvironment, influenced by various exogenous and endogenous exposures, and that interpersonal heterogeneity in molecular pathology and pathophysiology exists among patients with any given disease. In this article, we introduce methods of the emerging integrative interdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE), which is founded on the unique disease principle and disease continuum theory. We analyze and decipher apparent paradoxical findings, utilizing the MPE approach and available literature data on tumor somatic genetic and epigenetic characteristics. Through our analyses in colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and glioblastoma (malignant brain tumor), we can readily explain paradoxical associations between disease risk factors and better prognosis among disease patients. The MPE paradigm and approach can be applied to not only neoplasms but also various non-neoplastic diseases where there exists indisputable ubiquitous heterogeneity of pathogenesis and molecular pathology. The MPE paradigm including consideration of disease heterogeneity plays an essential role in advancements of precision medicine and public health.

  1. Proceedings of the second international molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) meeting.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Campbell, Peter T; Nishihara, Reiko; Phipps, Amanda I; Beck, Andrew H; Sherman, Mark E; Chan, Andrew T; Troester, Melissa A; Bass, Adam J; Fitzgerald, Kathryn C; Irizarry, Rafael A; Kelsey, Karl T; Nan, Hongmei; Peters, Ulrike; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qian, Zhi Rong; Tamimi, Rulla M; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Tworoger, Shelley S; Zhang, Xuehong; Giovannucci, Edward L; van den Brandt, Piet A; Rosner, Bernard A; Wang, Molin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Begg, Colin B

    2015-07-01

    Disease classification system increasingly incorporates information on pathogenic mechanisms to predict clinical outcomes and response to therapy and intervention. Technological advancements to interrogate omics (genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, interactomics, etc.) provide widely open opportunities in population-based research. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) represents integrative science of molecular pathology and epidemiology. This unified paradigm requires multidisciplinary collaboration between pathology, epidemiology, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and computational biology. Integration of these fields enables better understanding of etiologic heterogeneity, disease continuum, causal inference, and the impact of environment, diet, lifestyle, host factors (including genetics and immunity), and their interactions on disease evolution. Hence, the Second International MPE Meeting was held in Boston in December 2014, with aims to: (1) develop conceptual and practical frameworks; (2) cultivate and expand opportunities; (3) address challenges; and (4) initiate the effort of specifying guidelines for MPE. The meeting mainly consisted of presentations of method developments and recent data in various malignant neoplasms and tumors (breast, prostate, ovarian and colorectal cancers, renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and leukemia), followed by open discussion sessions on challenges and future plans. In particular, we recognized need for efforts to further develop statistical methodologies. This meeting provided an unprecedented opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration, consistent with the purposes of the Big Data to Knowledge, Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology, and Precision Medicine Initiative of the US National Institute of Health. The MPE meeting series can help advance transdisciplinary population science and optimize training and education systems for twenty-first century medicine and

  2. A molecular epidemiological study of rabies in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Velez, Jafet; Malaga, Carlos; Wandeler, Alexander I

    2008-01-01

    The mongoose is the principal reservoir for rabies on the island of Puerto Rico. This report describes a molecular epidemiological study of representative rabies viruses recovered from the island in 1997. Two closely related but distinct variants circulating in regionally localised parts of the island were identified. The lack of a monophyletic relationship of these viruses suggests that two independent incursions of rabies onto the island have occurred. Both of these Puerto Rican variants were closely related to a variant, known as the north central skunk strain, currently circulating in North American skunk populations and all are members of the cosmopolitan rabies lineage spread during the colonial period. However, the Puerto Rican viruses are clearly distinct from those presently circulating in mongooses in Cuba and which are epidemiologically closely linked to the Mexican dog rabies virus. This study clearly establishes the distinct origins of the rabies viruses now circulating on these two Caribbean islands.

  3. Molecular and epidemiological studies of Porcine rubulavirus infection - an overview.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus-La Piedad-Michoacan-Mexico virus (PorPV-LPMV) was identified as the causative agent of a viral disease that emerged spontaneously in Mexican swine in the 1980s. Since the report of the initial outbreak of the disease, only one full-length genome from a strain isolated in 1984 (PorPV-LPMV/1984) has been sequenced; sequence data are scarce from other isolates. The genetic variation of this virus that has spread throughout the main endemic region of Mexico is almost a complete mystery. The development of molecular techniques for improved diagnostics and to investigate the persistence, molecular epidemiology, and the possible reservoirs of PorPV are needed. Together, this will provide greater knowledge regarding the molecular genetic changes and useful data to establish new strategies in the control of this virus in Mexico.

  4. Standardised PCR-based molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Allix-Béguec, C; Supply, P; Wanlin, M; Bifani, P; Fauville-Dufaux, M

    2008-05-01

    A population-based molecular epidemiology investigation has been undertaken to evaluate tuberculosis transmission and control in the Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium). All tuberculosis cases reported from January 2003 to December 2004 were investigated. In total, 536 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates (89% of culture-positive samples) were genotyped by the newly standardised 24 loci-based mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem-repeat typing, spoligotyping and IS6110 fingerprinting. Of all the patients, 30% were grouped based on strain clusters, suggesting a transmission index of 20%. An unsuspected outbreak entailing > or = 23 patients was evidenced by molecular typing analysis and confirmed by contact tracing. Foreign-born status accounted for 79% of the studied patients, including 37.9% illegal immigrants and asylum seekers. Among foreign-born patients, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants were significantly less abundant in strain clusters than settled residents. Tuberculosis in the Brussels-Capital Region is a bi-faceted problem, comprising both persisting recent transmission and "imported diseases". Molecular epidemiology based on real-time genotyping techniques has proven invaluable in better understanding tuberculosis transmission. However, it will most efficiently contribute to tuberculosis control when implemented in an integrated public health system.

  5. First molecular epidemiological study of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Libya.

    PubMed

    Amro, Ahmad; Gashout, Aisha; Al-Dwibe, Hamida; Zahangir Alam, Mohammad; Annajar, Badereddin; Hamarsheh, Omar; Shubar, Hend; Schönian, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major public health problem in Libya. The objective of this study was to investigate, for the first time, epidemiological features of CL outbreaks in Libya including molecular identification of parasites, the geographical distribution of cases and possible scenarios of parasite transmission. We studied 450 patients that came from 49 areas distributed in 12 districts in north-west Libya. The patients' ages ranged from 9 months to 87 years (median age 25 years); 54% of the cases were males. Skin scrapings spotted on glass slides were collected for molecular identification of causative agent. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was amplified and subsequently characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. In total, 195 samples were successfully identified of which 148 (75.9%) were Leishmania major, and 47 (24.1%) Leishmania tropica. CL cases infected with L. major were found in all CL areas whereas L. tropica cases came mainly from Al Jabal Al Gharbi (46.4%), Misrata (17.8%) and Tarhuna districts (10.7%). A trend of seasonality was noticed for the infections with L. major which showed a clear peak between November and January, but was less pronounced for infections by L. tropica. The first molecular study on CL in Libya revealed that the disease is caused by L. major and L. tropica and the epidemiological patterns in the different foci were the same as in other Mediterranean foci of CL.

  6. Hepatitis A virus: host interactions, molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Goncalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Forbi, Joseph C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Purdy, Michael A; Xia, Guoliang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the commonest viral cause of liver disease and presents an important public health problem worldwide. Several unique HAV properties and molecular mechanisms of its interaction with host were recently discovered and should aid in clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatitis A. Genetic characterization of HAV strains have resulted in the identification of different genotypes and subtypes, which exhibit a characteristic worldwide distribution. Shifts in HAV endemicity occurring in different parts of the world, introduction of genetically diverse strains from geographically distant regions, genotype displacement observed in some countries and population expansion detected in the last decades of the 20th century using phylogenetic analysis are important factors contributing to the complex dynamics of HAV infections worldwide. Strong selection pressures, some of which, like usage of deoptimized codons, are unique to HAV, limit genetic variability of the virus. Analysis of subgenomic regions has been proven useful for outbreak investigations. However, sharing short sequences among epidemiologically unrelated strains indicates that specific identification of HAV strains for molecular surveillance can be achieved only using whole-genome sequences. Here, we present up-to-date information on the HAV molecular epidemiology and evolution, and highlight the most relevant features of the HAV-host interactions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. First Molecular Epidemiological Study of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Libya

    PubMed Central

    Amro, Ahmad; Gashout, Aisha; Al-Dwibe, Hamida; Zahangir Alam, Mohammad; Annajar, Badereddin; Hamarsheh, Omar; Shubar, Hend; Schönian, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major public health problem in Libya. The objective of this study was to investigate, for the first time, epidemiological features of CL outbreaks in Libya including molecular identification of parasites, the geographical distribution of cases and possible scenarios of parasite transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 450 patients that came from 49 areas distributed in 12 districts in north-west Libya. The patients' ages ranged from 9 months to 87 years (median age 25 years); 54% of the cases were males. Skin scrapings spotted on glass slides were collected for molecular identification of causative agent. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was amplified and subsequently characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. In total, 195 samples were successfully identified of which 148 (75.9%) were Leishmania major, and 47 (24.1%) Leishmania tropica. CL cases infected with L. major were found in all CL areas whereas L. tropica cases came mainly from Al Jabal Al Gharbi (46.4%), Misrata (17.8%) and Tarhuna districts (10.7%). A trend of seasonality was noticed for the infections with L. major which showed a clear peak between November and January, but was less pronounced for infections by L. tropica. Conclusion The first molecular study on CL in Libya revealed that the disease is caused by L. major and L. tropica and the epidemiological patterns in the different foci were the same as in other Mediterranean foci of CL. PMID:22724036

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Outbreak, Tumbes, Peru, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Baldeviano, G Christian; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Arrospide, Nancy; Gonzalez, Rommell V; Sánchez, Juan F; Macedo, Silvia; Conde, Silvia; Tapia, L Lorena; Salas, Carola; Gamboa, Dionicia; Herrera, Yeni; Edgel, Kimberly A; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Lescano, Andrés G

    2015-05-01

    During 2010-2012, an outbreak of 210 cases of malaria occurred in Tumbes, in the northern coast of Peru, where no Plasmodium falciparum malaria case had been reported since 2006. To identify the source of the parasite causing this outbreak, we conducted a molecular epidemiology investigation. Microsatellite typing showed an identical genotype in all 54 available isolates. This genotype was also identical to that of parasites isolated in 2010 in the Loreto region of the Peruvian Amazon and closely related to clonet B, a parasite lineage previously reported in the Amazon during 1998-2000. These findings are consistent with travel history of index case-patients. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in the Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pfcrt, and Pfmdr1 loci, which are strongly associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and deletion of the Pfhrp2 gene. These results highlight the need for timely molecular epidemiology investigations to trace the parasite source during malaria reintroduction events.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Outbreak, Tumbes, Peru, 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Arrospide, Nancy; Gonzalez, Rommell V.; Sánchez, Juan F.; Macedo, Silvia; Conde, Silvia; Tapia, L. Lorena; Salas, Carola; Gamboa, Dionicia; Herrera, Yeni; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Lescano, Andrés G.

    2015-01-01

    During 2010–2012, an outbreak of 210 cases of malaria occurred in Tumbes, in the northern coast of Peru, where no Plasmodium falciparum malaria case had been reported since 2006. To identify the source of the parasite causing this outbreak, we conducted a molecular epidemiology investigation. Microsatellite typing showed an identical genotype in all 54 available isolates. This genotype was also identical to that of parasites isolated in 2010 in the Loreto region of the Peruvian Amazon and closely related to clonet B, a parasite lineage previously reported in the Amazon during 1998–2000. These findings are consistent with travel history of index case-patients. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in the Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pfcrt, and Pfmdr1 loci, which are strongly associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and deletion of the Pfhrp2 gene. These results highlight the need for timely molecular epidemiology investigations to trace the parasite source during malaria reintroduction events. PMID:25897626

  10. Molecular epidemiological approaches to study the epidemiology of tuberculosis in low-incidence settings receiving immigrants.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, Carlo; Rindi, Laura

    2012-06-01

    Although in most wealthy western countries the total incidence of tuberculosis (TB) steadily decreased in the last decades, the proportion of cases in immigrants from high-burden TB countries generally increased and to date a large proportion of all new active cases, often exceeding 50%, occurs among foreign-born individuals. In this context, molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates has significantly contributed to understand the epidemiology of TB, allowing an objective evaluation of the dynamics and the risk of TB importation and transmission within low-incidence host countries. Many molecular studies have shown that a large part of active TB cases in immigrants yield unique, unclustered DNA fingerprints; this finding reflects reactivation of remote latent infections, rather than recent TB infections, and, at the same time, indicates a low rate of disease transmission within the host country. Some studies however express more concern on the basis of higher rates of transmission within the host country with foreign-born index cases. Molecular analysis of isolates also showed that TB infections in migrants may be acquired after arrival in the host country and that TB transmission between foreign-born and autochthonous individuals may occur in both directions. Molecular typing of isolates has been also profitably used to evaluate the diffusion of M. tuberculosis strain families across different geographic areas and human populations and to monitor the diffusion of threatening strains, such as Beijing and/or (multi)drug-resistant strains. To date, based on the contribution of molecular epidemiology, it is possible to adapt or design appropriate strategies for a rational control of TB in low-incidence countries.

  11. Sampling Bias in the Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Among the goals of the molecular epidemiology of infectious disease are to quantify the extent of ongoing transmission of infectious agents and to identify host- and strain-specific risk factors for disease spread. I demonstrate the potential bias in estimates of recent transmission and the impact of risk factors for clustering by using computer simulations to reconstruct populations of tuberculosis patients and sample from them. The bias consistently results in underestimating recent transmission and the impact of risk factors for recent transmission. PMID:11971768

  12. Malignant Catarrhal Fever: Understanding Molecular Diagnostics in Context of Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Cunha, Cristina W.; Taus, Naomi S.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal disease, primarily of ruminants, caused by a group of gammaherpesviruses. Due to complexities of pathogenesis and epidemiology in various species, which are either clinically-susceptible or reservoir hosts, veterinary clinicians face significant challenges in laboratory diagnostics. The recent development of specific assays for viral DNA and antibodies has expanded and improved the inventory of laboratory tests and opened new opportunities for use of MCF diagnostics. Issues related to understanding and implementing appropriate assays for specific diagnostic needs must be addressed in order to take advantage of molecular diagnostics in the laboratory. PMID:22072925

  13. Clostridium difficile infection: Evolution, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Briony; Androga, Grace O; Knight, Daniel R; Riley, Thomas V

    2017-04-01

    Over the recent decades, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has emerged as a global public health threat. Despite growing attention, C. difficile remains a poorly understood pathogen, however, the exquisite sensitivity offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has enabled analysis of the genome of C. difficile, giving us access to massive genomic data on factors such as virulence, evolution, and genetic relatedness within C. difficile groups. NGS has also demonstrated excellence in investigations of outbreaks and disease transmission, in both small and large-scale applications. This review summarizes the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and phylogeny of C. difficile, one of the most important pathogens worldwide in the current antibiotic resistance era.

  14. Molecular approaches to epidemiology and clinical aspects of malaria.

    PubMed

    Brown, G V; Beck, H P; Molyneux, M; Marsh, K

    2000-10-01

    Malaria is a problem of global importance, responsible for 1-2 million deaths per year, mainly in African children, as well as considerable morbidity manifested as severe anaemia and encephalopathy in young children. Fundamental to the development of new tools for malaria control in humans is an increased understanding of key features of malaria infection, such as the diversity of outcome in different individuals, the understanding of different manifestations of the disease and of the mechanisms of immunity that allow clinical protection in the face of ongoing low-grade infection (concomitant immunity or premunition). Here, Graham Brown and colleagues review some of the ways in which molecular approaches might be used to increase our understanding of the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of malaria, as discussed at the Molecular Approaches to Malaria conference (MAM2000), Lorne, Australia, 2-5 February 2000.

  15. Molecular Pathological Epidemiology Gives Clues to Paradoxical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Reiko; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Shibuya, Kenji; Mittleman, Murray A.; Wang, Molin; Field, Alison E.; Giovannucci, Edward; Lochhead, Paul; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have described what appear to be paradoxical associations, where an incongruous relationship is observed between a certain well-established risk factor for disease incidence and favorable clinical outcome among patients with that disease. For example, the “obesity paradox” represents the association between obesity and better survival among patients with a certain disease such as coronary heart disease. Paradoxical observations cause vexing clinical and public health problems as they raise questions on causal relationships and hinder the development of effective interventions. Compelling evidence indicates that pathogenic processes encompass molecular alterations within cells and the microenvironment, influenced by various exogenous and endogenous exposures, and that interpersonal heterogeneity in molecular pathology and pathophysiology exists among patients with any given disease. In this article, we introduce methods of the emerging integrative interdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE), which is founded on the unique disease principle and disease continuum theory. We analyze and decipher apparent paradoxical findings, utilizing the MPE approach and available literature data on tumor somatic genetic and epigenetic characteristics. Through our analyses in colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and glioblastoma (malignant brain tumor), we can readily explain paradoxical associations between disease risk factors and better prognosis among disease patients. The MPE paradigm and approach can be applied to not only neoplasms but also various non-neoplastic diseases where there exists indisputable ubiquitous heterogeneity of pathogenesis and molecular pathology. The MPE paradigm including consideration of disease heterogeneity plays an essential role in advancements of precision medicine and public health. PMID:26445996

  16. Proceedings of The Second International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE) Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Campbell, Peter T.; Nishihara, Reiko; Phipps, Amanda I.; Beck, Andrew H.; Sherman, Mark E.; Chan, Andrew T.; Troester, Melissa A.; Bass, Adam J.; Fitzgerald, Kathryn C.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Nan, Hongmei; Peters, Ulrike; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Zhang, Xuehong; Giovannucci, Edward L.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wang, Molin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Begg, Colin B.

    2015-01-01

    Disease classification system increasingly incorporates information on pathogenic mechanisms to predict clinical outcomes and response to therapy and intervention. Technological advancements to interrogate omics (genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, interactomics, etc.) provide widely-open opportunities in population-based research. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) represents integrative science of molecular pathology and epidemiology. This unified paradigm requires multidisciplinary collaboration between pathology, epidemiology, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and computational biology. Integration of these fields enables better understanding of etiologic heterogeneity, disease continuum, causal inference, and the impact of environment, diet, lifestyle, host factors (including genetics and immunity), and their interactions on disease evolution. Hence, the Second International MPE Meeting was held in Boston in December 2014, with aims to: (1) develop conceptual and practical frameworks; (2) cultivate and expand opportunities; (3) address challenges; and (4) initiate the effort of specifying guidelines for MPE. The meeting mainly consisted of presentations of method developments and recent data in various malignant neoplasms and tumors (breast, prostate, ovarian and colorectal cancers, renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and leukemia), followed by open discussion sessions on challenges and future plans. In particular, we recognized need for efforts to further develop statistical methodologies. This meeting provided an unprecedented opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration, consistent with the purposes of the BD2K (Big Data to Knowledge), GAME-ON (Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology), and Precision Medicine Initiatives of the U.S.A. National Institute of Health. The MPE Meeting Series can help advance transdisciplinary population science, and optimize training and education systems for 21st century

  17. [Surveillance of hepatitis A by molecular epidemiologic studies].

    PubMed

    Stene-Johansen, K; Skaug, K; Blystad, H

    1999-10-20

    Hepatitis A virus was studied by molecular epidemiology in connection with an outbreak of hepatitis A associated with intravenous drug users (IVDU) in Norway. Hepatitis A virus was characterised by sequencing 114 of 1,242 notified cases of hepatitis A from January 1995 to July 1998. One hepatitis A variant (IVDU variant I) was detected among IVDU during an outbreak of hepatitis A, as well as among 19 out of 49 cases with no apparent association to this outbreak. During the autumn of 1997, a new variant (IVDU variant II) was detected in the IVDU communities. Genotyping of virus from imported cases associated with travel to endemic regions, revealed that they were distinct from the two other IVDU variants. Hepatitis A has disseminated among IVDU over years; this indicates that hepatitis A is endemic in these communities. At the turn of the year 1997/98, there was a smaller outbreak of hepatitis A among homosexual men in Oslo, distinguished by genotyping from the outbreaks in the IVDU communities. By molecular epidemiology we have been able to identify individual outbreaks of hepatitis A and distinguish them from the IVDU outbreak.

  18. Vitamin D and Colorectal Cancer: Molecular, Epidemiological, and Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Ruoxu; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    In many cells throughout the body, vitamin D is converted into its active form calcitriol, and binds to vitamin D receptor (VDR), which functions as a transcription factor to regulate various biological processes including cellular differentiation and immune response. Vitamin D metabolizing enzymes (including CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) and VDR play major roles in exerting and regulating effects of vitamin D. Preclinical and epidemiological studies provide evidence for anticancer effects of vitamin D (in particular, against colorectal cancer), though clinical trials have yet to prove its benefit. Additionally, molecular pathological epidemiology research can provide insights into the interaction of vitamin D with tumour molecular and immunity status. Other future research directions include genome-wide research on VDR transcriptional targets, gene-environment interaction analyses, and clinical trials on vitamin D efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. Here we review the literature on vitamin D and colorectal cancer from both mechanistic and population studies, and discuss the links and controversies within and between the two parts of evidence. PMID:27245104

  19. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis: usefulness in international trade.

    PubMed

    Milian-Suazo, Feliciano; Harris, Beth; Arriaga Díaz, Camila; Romero Torres, Cecilia; Stuber, Tod; Alvarez Ojeda, Genoveva; Morales Loredo, Alberto; Perez Soria, Martina; Payeur, Janet B

    2008-11-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) represents a barrier for free trade of livestock between Mexico and the United States of America (US). In spite of efforts from Mexico to export TB-free animals, some of those found with TB lesions in slaughterhouses in the US are traced back to that country. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine, through molecular epidemiology, the most probable source of infection for cattle found with TB lesions in the US. Ninety M. bovis isolates, 50 from Mexico obtained from cattle in 8 different states, and 40 from the US from cattle, deer, elk and feral pigs from 7 different states were included in the study. All samples were analyzed in both laboratories, Mexico and the US, following the same protocol for molecular analysis by spoligotyping. Twenty-seven clusters, ranging from 1 to 18 genetically similar strains were found. Some clustering by country was observed, strains from cattle and deer in Michigan in the US fell into the same cluster, suggesting transmission between species. These results, combined with epidemiological information suggest that despite of the possibility that some animals with lesions in the US come from Mexico as false negatives, the US has its own source of infection, must probably in dairy cattle and wildlife. Genetic diversity of isolates from Mexico was larger than that in the US, which could be a consequence of the endemic status of the disease and the indiscriminate movement of animals between regions.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Gastric Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhibin; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wei, Qingyi

    2007-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction appears to contribute to the etiology of gastric cancer, as suggested by the varying geographic patterns of gastric cancer incidence. Even in areas with a high rate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, only a small proportion of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. It is likely that genetic factors, particularly relatively common genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), may modulate the effects of environmental risk factors by regulating multiple biologic pathways involved in gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, common genetic variants can pose a substantial influence on the population attributable risk, even though the absolute risk associated with each of these variants may be low. Remarkable progress has been made in the field of molecular epidemiology, but it appears that an initial view on the magnitude of the effects of inherited variants was overestimated. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that genetic variants may contribute to the etiology of gastric cancer, particularly those SNPs in genes that are involved in inflammatory response, metabolism of chemical carcinogens, DNA repair, and tumor suppression. Although previous molecular epidemiologic studies of potentially functional polymorphisms in candidate genes and gastric cancer susceptibility lack consistency, they have advanced our knowledge of the role of genetic susceptibility in the etiology of gastric cancer. Future, welldesigned large population-based studies will validate current findings and provide the rationale for identifying at-risk subpopulations for primary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:19262698

  1. Vitamin D and colorectal cancer: molecular, epidemiological and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Dou, Ruoxu; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward L; Manson, JoAnn E; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    In many cells throughout the body, vitamin D is converted into its active form calcitriol and binds to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which functions as a transcription factor to regulate various biological processes including cellular differentiation and immune response. Vitamin D-metabolising enzymes (including CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) and VDR play major roles in exerting and regulating the effects of vitamin D. Preclinical and epidemiological studies have provided evidence for anti-cancer effects of vitamin D (particularly against colorectal cancer), although clinical trials have yet to prove its benefit. In addition, molecular pathological epidemiology research can provide insights into the interaction of vitamin D with tumour molecular and immunity status. Other future research directions include genome-wide research on VDR transcriptional targets, gene-environment interaction analyses and clinical trials on vitamin D efficacy in colorectal cancer patients. In this study, we review the literature on vitamin D and colorectal cancer from both mechanistic and population studies and discuss the links and controversies within and between the two parts of evidence.

  2. The role of epidemiology in the era of molecular epidemiology and genomics: Summary of the 2013 AJE-sponsored Society of Epidemiologic Research Symposium.

    PubMed

    Kuller, Lewis H; Bracken, Michael B; Ogino, Shuji; Prentice, Ross L; Tracy, Russell P

    2013-11-01

    On June 20, 2013, the American Journal of Epidemiology sponsored a symposium at the Society for Epidemiologic Research's 46th Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, entitled, "What Is the Role of Epidemiology in the Era of Molecular Biology and Genomics?" The future of epidemiology depends on innovation in generating interesting and important testable hypotheses that are relevant to population health. These new strategies will depend on new technology, both in measurement of agents and environment and in the fields of pathophysiology and outcomes, such as cellular epidemiology and molecular pathology. The populations to be studied, sample sizes, and study designs should be selected based on the hypotheses to be tested and include case-control, cohort, and clinical trials. Developing large mega cohorts without attention to specific hypotheses is inefficient, will fail to address many associations with high-quality data, and may well produce spurious results.

  3. Concordance and discordance of sequence survey methods for molecular epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nur A.; Cebula, Thomas A.; Colwell, Rita R.; Robison, Richard A.; Johnson, W. Evan; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    The post-genomic era is characterized by the direct acquisition and analysis of genomic data with many applications, including the enhancement of the understanding of microbial epidemiology and pathology. However, there are a number of molecular approaches to survey pathogen diversity, and the impact of these different approaches on parameter estimation and inference are not entirely clear. We sequenced whole genomes of bacterial pathogens, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. (60 new genomes), and combined them with 55 genomes from GenBank to address how different molecular survey approaches (whole genomes, SNPs, and MLST) impact downstream inferences on molecular evolutionary parameters, evolutionary relationships, and trait character associations. We selected isolates for sequencing to represent temporal, geographic origin, and host range variability. We found that substitution rate estimates vary widely among approaches, and that SNP and genomic datasets yielded different but strongly supported phylogenies. MLST yielded poorly supported phylogenies, especially in our low diversity dataset, i.e., Y. pestis. Trait associations showed that B. pseudomallei and Y. pestis phylogenies are significantly associated with geography, irrespective of the molecular survey approach used, while Brucella spp. phylogeny appears to be strongly associated with geography and host origin. We contrast inferences made among monomorphic (clonal) and non-monomorphic bacteria, and between intra- and inter-specific datasets. We also discuss our results in light of underlying assumptions of different approaches. PMID:25737810

  4. Concordance and discordance of sequence survey methods for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Hasan, Nur A; Cebula, Thomas A; Colwell, Rita R; Robison, Richard A; Johnson, W Evan; Crandall, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    The post-genomic era is characterized by the direct acquisition and analysis of genomic data with many applications, including the enhancement of the understanding of microbial epidemiology and pathology. However, there are a number of molecular approaches to survey pathogen diversity, and the impact of these different approaches on parameter estimation and inference are not entirely clear. We sequenced whole genomes of bacterial pathogens, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. (60 new genomes), and combined them with 55 genomes from GenBank to address how different molecular survey approaches (whole genomes, SNPs, and MLST) impact downstream inferences on molecular evolutionary parameters, evolutionary relationships, and trait character associations. We selected isolates for sequencing to represent temporal, geographic origin, and host range variability. We found that substitution rate estimates vary widely among approaches, and that SNP and genomic datasets yielded different but strongly supported phylogenies. MLST yielded poorly supported phylogenies, especially in our low diversity dataset, i.e., Y. pestis. Trait associations showed that B. pseudomallei and Y. pestis phylogenies are significantly associated with geography, irrespective of the molecular survey approach used, while Brucella spp. phylogeny appears to be strongly associated with geography and host origin. We contrast inferences made among monomorphic (clonal) and non-monomorphic bacteria, and between intra- and inter-specific datasets. We also discuss our results in light of underlying assumptions of different approaches.

  5. Molecular conductance measurements through printed Au nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Garfunkel, E.; Zhitenev, N.; Abusch-Magder, D.; Tennant, D.; Bao, Z.

    2006-09-01

    Gold pads with ˜100nm diameter are imprinted on self-assembled monolayers of alkane dithiols of different lengths using nanotransfer printing. The pads are contacted by conductive atomic force microscope tips, and electron transport was measured as a function of force. Atomic scale topography at the metal-molecule interface is essential to describe the conductance-stress relationship. A finite force (1-10nN) deforms devices resulting in two competing effects: (a) a larger contact area and (b) deformation of the interfacial bonds and/or tilting of the molecules. The estimated conductance of molecules is significantly smaller than results suggested in previous experiments and calculations.

  6. Conductive Nanowires Templated by Molecular Brushes.

    PubMed

    Raguzin, Ivan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of conductive nanowires using polymer bottle brushes as templates. In our approach, we synthesized poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate methyl iodide quaternary salt brushes by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization, loaded them with palladium salt, and reduced them in order to form metallic nanowires with average lengths and widths of 300 and 20 nm, respectively. The obtained nanowires were deposited between conductive gold pads and were connected to them by sputtering of additional pads to form an electric circuit. We connected the nanowires in an electric circuit and demonstrated that the conductivity of these nanowires is around 100 S·m(-1).

  7. Lung cancer molecular epidemiology in China: recent trends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is both the most common diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in China. During the past three decades, the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China are increasing rapidly. According to data from National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) in 2010, the crude incidence of lung cancer in China was 46.08 per 100,000 population (61.86 per 100,000 men and 29.54 per 100,000 women), with an estimated over 600,000 new diagnosed lung cancer patients (416,333 males and 189,613 females). Meanwhile, the crude mortality of lung cancer in China was 37.00 per 100,000 population (50.04 per 100,000 men and 23.33 per 100,000 women). Consistent with the change in developed countries, adenocarcinoma has become the most predominant histological subtype of lung cancer in China. For the majority advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, especially patients with adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy became increasing important in the treatment. Chinese researcher have done a lot work in terms of lung cancer molecular epidemiology, therefore, in this review, we further summarized the epidemiology of driver genes in NSCLC, hoping to help clinicians to better screen certain driver genes in China for treatment decisions. PMID:25806311

  8. Seroepidemiology and Molecular Epidemiology of Enterovirus 71 in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Akhmadishina, Ludmila V.; Eremeeva, Tatiana P.; Trotsenko, Olga E.; Ivanova, Olga E.; Mikhailov, Mikhail I.; Lukashev, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an emerging human pathogen causing massive epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications in Asia. EV71 also circulates in Europe, however it does not cause large outbreaks. The reason for distinct epidemiological patterns of EV71 infection in Europe and Asia and the risk of EV71 epidemic in Europe and Russia remain unknown. Seroepidemiology of EV71 and molecular epidemiology of occasional EV71 isolates were studied to explore circulation of EV71 in Russia. In six regions of Russian Federation, seroprevalence of EV71 in sera collected in 2008 ranged from 5% to 20% in children aged 1–2 years and from 19% to 83% in children aged 3–5 years. The seroprevalence among elder children was significantly higher (41–83% vs. 19–27%) in Asian regions of Russia. EV71 strains identified in Russia in 2001–2011 belonged to subtypes C1 and C2, while genotype C4 that was causing epidemics in Asia since 1998 emerged in 2009 and became dominant in 2013. PMID:24819617

  9. Seroepidemiology and molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71 in Russia.

    PubMed

    Akhmadishina, Ludmila V; Eremeeva, Tatiana P; Trotsenko, Olga E; Ivanova, Olga E; Mikhailov, Mikhail I; Lukashev, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is an emerging human pathogen causing massive epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications in Asia. EV71 also circulates in Europe, however it does not cause large outbreaks. The reason for distinct epidemiological patterns of EV71 infection in Europe and Asia and the risk of EV71 epidemic in Europe and Russia remain unknown. Seroepidemiology of EV71 and molecular epidemiology of occasional EV71 isolates were studied to explore circulation of EV71 in Russia. In six regions of Russian Federation, seroprevalence of EV71 in sera collected in 2008 ranged from 5% to 20% in children aged 1-2 years and from 19% to 83% in children aged 3-5 years. The seroprevalence among elder children was significantly higher (41-83% vs. 19-27%) in Asian regions of Russia. EV71 strains identified in Russia in 2001-2011 belonged to subtypes C1 and C2, while genotype C4 that was causing epidemics in Asia since 1998 emerged in 2009 and became dominant in 2013.

  10. Initial Data on the Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Marwan; El Safadi, Dima; Benamrouz, Sadia; Guyot, Karine; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Creusy, Colette; Mallat, Hassan; Hamze, Monzer; Dabboussi, Fouad; Viscogliosi, Eric; Certad, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. represent a major public health problem worldwide and infect the gastrointestinal tract of both immunocompetent and immunocompromised persons. The prevalence of these parasites varies by geographic region, and no data are currently available in Lebanon. To promote an understanding of the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosisin this country, the main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence Cryptosporidium in symptomatic hospitalized patients, and to analyze the genetic diversity of the corresponding isolates. Fecal specimens were collected in four hospitals in North Lebanon from 163 patients (77 males and 86 females, ranging in age from 1 to 88 years, with a mean age of 22 years) presenting gastrointestinal disorders during the period July to December 2013. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection obtained by modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining and/or nested PCR was 11%, and children <5 years old showed a higher rate of Cryptosporidium spp. The PCR products of the 15 positive samples were successfully sequenced. Among them, 10 isolates (66.7%) were identified as C. hominis, while the remaining 5 (33.3%) were identified as C. parvum. After analysis of the gp60 locus, C. hominis IdA19, a rare subtype, was found to be predominant. Two C. parvum subtypes were found: IIaA15G1R1 and IIaA15G2R1. The molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates is an important step in improving our understanding of the epidemiology and transmission of the infection. PMID:25950832

  11. Proceedings of the third international molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) meeting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter T; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Nishihara, Reiko; Beck, Andrew H; Begg, Colin B; Bogdanov, Alexei A; Cao, Yin; Coleman, Helen G; Freeman, Gordon J; Heng, Yujing J; Huttenhower, Curtis; Irizarry, Rafael A; Kip, N Sertac; Michor, Franziska; Nevo, Daniel; Peters, Ulrike; Phipps, Amanda I; Poole, Elizabeth M; Qian, Zhi Rong; Quackenbush, John; Robins, Harlan; Rogan, Peter K; Slattery, Martha L; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Song, Mingyang; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Xia, Daniel; Zabor, Emily C; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Molin; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-02-01

    Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is a transdisciplinary and relatively new scientific discipline that integrates theory, methods, and resources from epidemiology, pathology, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and computational biology. The underlying objective of MPE research is to better understand the etiology and progression of complex and heterogeneous human diseases with the goal of informing prevention and treatment efforts in population health and clinical medicine. Although MPE research has been commonly applied to investigating breast, lung, and colorectal cancers, its methodology can be used to study most diseases. Recent successes in MPE studies include: (1) the development of new statistical methods to address etiologic heterogeneity; (2) the enhancement of causal inference; (3) the identification of previously unknown exposure-subtype disease associations; and (4) better understanding of the role of lifestyle/behavioral factors on modifying prognosis according to disease subtype. Central challenges to MPE include the relative lack of transdisciplinary experts, educational programs, and forums to discuss issues related to the advancement of the field. To address these challenges, highlight recent successes in the field, and identify new opportunities, a series of MPE meetings have been held at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, MA. Herein, we share the proceedings of the Third International MPE Meeting, held in May 2016 and attended by 150 scientists from 17 countries. Special topics included integration of MPE with immunology and health disparity research. This meeting series will continue to provide an impetus to foster further transdisciplinary integration of divergent scientific fields.

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Conductance of Molecular Junctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-31

    time - dependent Schr ~ dinger equation . A first demonstration of our TDDFT-based scheme is to analyze the transmission and reflection of an...codes to solve the time - dependent Kohn-Sham equations , (1, 2) with an appropriate interaction potential representing the characteristics of the molecular...Highlights Fermi electron propagation via time - dependent density functional theory A new computational scheme based on first-principles time - dependent

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis on Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Katani, Robab; Schilling, Megan; Kapur, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of severe chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants, termed Johne's disease, and can infect many other animal species, including humans. MAP has a long incubation period prior to manifestation of clinical signs including diarrhea, weight loss, and loss of production. MAP has a high prevalence in dairy herds and results in considerable adverse impacts on animal health and productivity throughout the world. Recent investigations have leveraged the characterization of the MAP genome for the development of powerful new molecular techniques for MAP strain differentiation. These approaches are providing key insights into the epidemiology and transmission of MAP on and between dairy herds. We summarize the state of the art for MAP diagnostics and strain differentiation and our current knowledge of mechanisms of within- and between-herd transmission of MAP, along with future needs for the development of rational MAP infection control programs.

  14. Molecular and epidemiologic analysis of dengue virus isolates from Somalia.

    PubMed

    Kanesa-thasan, N; Chang, G J; Smoak, B L; Magill, A; Burrous, M J; Hoke, C H

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis was performed on 14 dengue virus isolates (13 dengue-2 viruses and 1 dengue-3 virus) recovered from febrile soldiers in Somalia in 1993. The dengue-2 viruses were most closely related to dengue-2 virus recovered in Somalia in 1984. However, differences in nucleotide sequence (0.35% to 1.35%) were evident among the 1993 isolates. These differences were closely associated with the geographic location of the infection as well as with different times of infection at the same location. Genetic difference between strains was not associated with differences in clinical features. Molecular analysis of dengue viruses is a useful adjunct to epidemiologic investigation of their distribution over distance and time.

  15. [Molecular epidemiology of cattle and human tuberculosis in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Guerrero, Laura; Milián-Suazo, Feliciano; Arriaga-Díaz, Camila; Romero-Torres, Cecilia; Escartín-Chávez, Minerva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the role of bovine TB in cases of human TB. Two-hundred and fifty-five samples from symptomatic patients were included in the study. All samples were cultured in Stonebrink and Lowënstein-Jensen media and analyzed using a nested PCRMPB70. The molecular analysis was performed by spoligotyping. From 255 samples, 74 were PCR-positive and 20 were culture-positive. From 94 samples positive to PCR or to isolation, 66 (70%) showed a spoligotype compatible with M. tuberculosis, and 13 (13.8%) with M. bovis. Four fingerprints of M. bovis from humans were identical to the fingerprints of M. bovis from cattle in the same region. Our study shows that M. bovis plays an important role in the epidemiology of TB in humans and that TB in cattle represents a risk to public health.

  16. Biliary Tract Cancer: Epidemiology, Radiotherapy, and Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Bridgewater, John A; Goodman, Karyn A; Kalyan, Aparna; Mulcahy, Mary F

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer, or cholangiocarcinoma, arises from the biliary epithelium of the small ducts in the periphery of the liver (intrahepatic) and the main ducts of the hilum (extrahepatic), extending into the gallbladder. The incidence and epidemiology of biliary tract cancer are fluid and complex. It is shown that intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is on the rise in the Western world, and gallbladder cancer is on the decline. Radiation therapy has emerged as an important component of adjuvant therapy for resected disease and definitive therapy for locally advanced disease. The emerging sophisticated techniques of imaging tumors and conformal dose delivery are expanding the indications for radiotherapy in the management of bile duct tumors. As we understand more about the molecular pathways driving biliary tract cancers, targeted therapies are at the forefront of new therapeutic combinations. Understanding the gene expression profile and mutational burden in biliary tract cancer allows us to better discern the pathogenesis and identify promising new developmental therapeutic targets.

  17. Sampling designs for HIV molecular epidemiology with application to Honduras.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Bryan E; Rossini, Anthony J; Soto, Ramon Jeremias; De Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Mullins, James I

    2005-11-01

    Proper sampling is essential to characterize the molecular epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV sampling frames are difficult to identify, so most studies use convenience samples. We discuss statistically valid and feasible sampling techniques that overcome some of the potential for bias due to convenience sampling and ensure better representation of the study population. We employ a sampling design called stratified cluster sampling. This first divides the population into geographical and/or social strata. Within each stratum, a population of clusters is chosen from groups, locations, or facilities where HIV-positive individuals might be found. Some clusters are randomly selected within strata and individuals are randomly selected within clusters. Variation and cost help determine the number of clusters and the number of individuals within clusters that are to be sampled. We illustrate the approach through a study designed to survey the heterogeneity of subtype B strains in Honduras.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in Vietnam (2006-2009).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh K T; Nguyen, Dong V; Ngo, Giang C; Nguyen, Thu T; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamada, Akio; Dinh, Xuyen K; Nguyen, Dung V; Phan, Thao X; Pham, Bao Q; Nguyen, Hien T; Nguyen, Hanh T H

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus (RABV) circulating in Vietnam. Intra vitam samples (saliva and cerebrospinal fluid) were collected from 31 patients who were believed to have rabies and were admitted to hospitals in northern provinces of Vietnam. Brain samples were collected from 176 sick or furious rabid dogs from all over the country. The human and canine samples were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The findings showed that 23 patients tested positive for RABV. Interestingly, 5 rabies patients did not have any history of dog or cat bites, but they had an experience of butchering dogs or cats, or consuming their meat. RABV was also detected in 2 of the 100 sick dogs from slaughterhouses. Molecular epidemiological analysis of 27 RABV strains showed that these viruses could be classified into two groups. The RABVs classified into Group 1 were distributed throughout Vietnam and had sequence similarity with the strains from China, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines. However, the RABVs classified into Group 2 were only found in the northern provinces of Vietnam and showed high sequence similarity with the strain from southern China. This finding suggested the recent influx of Group 2 RABVs between Vietnam and China across the border. Although the incidence of rabies due to circulating RABVs in slaughterhouses is less common than that due to dog bite, the national program for rabies control and prevention in Vietnam should include monitoring of the health of dogs meant for human consumption and vaccination for workers at dog slaughterhouses. Further, monitoring of and research on the circulating RABVs in dog markets may help to determine the cause of rabies and control the spread of rabies in slaughterhouses in Vietnam.

  19. A bibliometric analysis of scientific production in cancer molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Donatella; Puntoni, Riccardo; Perera, Frederica P; Schulte, Paul A; Bonassi, Stefano

    2007-08-01

    The main purpose of this research was to compare the scientific production in the field of cancer molecular epidemiology among countries and to evaluate the publication trend between 1995 and 2004. A bibliometric study was carried out searching the PubMed database with a combined search strategy based on the keywords listed in the medical subject headings and a free text search. Only articles from a representative subset of 92 journals--accounting for 80% of papers identified--were selected for the analysis, and the resulting 13,240 abstracts were manually checked according to a list of basic inclusion criteria. The study evaluated the number of publications and the impact factor (mean and sum), absolute and normalized by country population and gross domestic product. A total of 3,842 citations were finally selected for the analysis. Thirty-seven percent came from the European Union (UK, Germany, Italy, France and Sweden ranking at the top), 31.6% from USA and 9.7% from Japan. The highest mean impact factor was reported for Canada (6.3), USA (5.9), Finland (5.8) and UK (5.2). Finland, Sweden and Israel had the best ratio between scientific production and available resources. 'Genetic polymorphism, glutathione transferase, breast neoplasm, risk factors, case-control studies and polymerase chain reaction' were the most used keywords in each of the subgroups evaluated, although inclusion criteria may have privileged studies dealing with exogenous carcinogens. Cancer molecular epidemiology is an expanding area attracting an increasing interest. The identification of an operative definition is a necessary condition to give to this discipline a unique scientific identity.

  20. Malaria Molecular Epidemiology: Lessons from the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Ananias A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Cui, Liwang; Gamboa, Dionicia; Krogstad, Donald J.; Barry, Alyssa E.; Carlton, Jane M.; van Eijk, Anna Maria; Pradhan, Khageswar; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhouse, Bryan; Andreina Pacheco, M.; Vallejo, Andres F.; Herrera, Socrates; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology leverages genetic information to study the risk factors that affect the frequency and distribution of malaria cases. This article describes molecular epidemiologic investigations currently being carried out by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) network in a variety of malaria-endemic settings. First, we discuss various novel approaches to understand malaria incidence and gametocytemia, focusing on Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Second, we describe and compare different parasite genotyping methods commonly used in malaria epidemiology and population genetics. Finally, we discuss potential applications of molecular epidemiological tools and methods toward malaria control and elimination efforts. PMID:26259945

  1. Malaria Molecular Epidemiology: Lessons from the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research Network.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Ananias A; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Vinetz, Joseph M; Volkman, Sarah K; Cui, Liwang; Gamboa, Dionicia; Krogstad, Donald J; Barry, Alyssa E; Carlton, Jane M; van Eijk, Anna Maria; Pradhan, Khageswar; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhouse, Bryan; Pacheco, M Andreina; Vallejo, Andres F; Herrera, Socrates; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-09-01

    Molecular epidemiology leverages genetic information to study the risk factors that affect the frequency and distribution of malaria cases. This article describes molecular epidemiologic investigations currently being carried out by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) network in a variety of malaria-endemic settings. First, we discuss various novel approaches to understand malaria incidence and gametocytemia, focusing on Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Second, we describe and compare different parasite genotyping methods commonly used in malaria epidemiology and population genetics. Finally, we discuss potential applications of molecular epidemiological tools and methods toward malaria control and elimination efforts. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. 77 FR 2072 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prevalence, Incidence, Epidemiology and Molecular Variants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ..., Epidemiology and Molecular Variants of HIV in Blood Donors in Brazil SUMMARY: In compliance with the..., Epidemiology and Molecular Variants of HIV in Blood Donors in Brazil. Type of Information Collection Request... prevalence and incidence rates, and identifying behavioral risk behaviors for HIV infection among donors...

  3. Molecular scale conductance photoswitching in engineered bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Berthoumieu, Olivia; Patil, Amol V; Xi, Wang; Aslimovska, Lubica; Davis, Jason J; Watts, Anthony

    2012-02-08

    Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is a robust light-driven proton pump embedded in the purple membrane of the extremophilic archae Halobacterium salinarium . Its photoactivity remains in the dry state, making BR of significant interest for nanotechnological use. Here, in a novel configuration, BR was depleted from most of its endogenous lipids and covalently and asymmetrically anchored onto a gold electrode through a strategically located and highly responsive cysteine mutation; BR has no indigenous cysteines. Chemisorption on gold was characterized by surface plasmon resonance, reductive striping voltammetry, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the first time, the conductance of isolated protein trimers, intimately probed by conducting AFM, was reproducibly and reversibly switched under wavelength-specific conditions (mean resistance of 39 ± 12 MΩ under illumination, 137 ± 18 MΩ in the dark), demonstrating a surface stability that is relevant to potential nanodevice applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis transmission: Contextualizing the evidence through social network theory.

    PubMed

    Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela

    2009-09-01

    Despite a long-standing recognition that factors such as age, gender, and socioeconomic status play a fundamental role in tuberculosis transmission and susceptibility, few molecular epidemiological studies have fully elucidated the etiological mechanisms by which each of these social factors may influence transmission of the disease. In this paper, we propose that in order to achieve this goal, molecular epidemiology must move towards a more holistic approach for disease transmission, thus enabling social theory to be integrated into molecular epidemiological studies on tuberculosis. We then present a social network model to illustrate how molecular and social epidemiology can be combined to study disease transmission patterns, and provide preliminary molecular epidemiological evidence to support the role of social networks in tuberculosis transmission.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Streptococcus agalactiae recovered from significant bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Schuab, Rôde B B; Arêas, Glauber P; Souza, Viviane C; Barros, Rosana R

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has been implicated in urinary tract infections, but the molecular epidemiology of such infections is poorly characterized. In this study, 194 isolates recovered from significant bacteriuria of non-pregnant individuals were submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular characterization of macrolide resistance, PCR-based capsular typing and analysis of genetic diversity by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By disk diffusion, all isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, penicillin G and vancomycin; 87.6% and 9.3% of isolates were non-susceptible to tetracycline and clindamycin, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) confirmed that 11.3% of isolates were resistant to erythromycin. Macrolide resistance determinants were iMLSB (n = 9), cMLSB (n = 9) and M (n = 4), associated with ermA, ermB and mefA/E. Predominant capsular types were V, Ia, II and III. No significant association was observed between any capsular type and the occurrence of pyuria. However, type III was associated with erythromycin resistance, while type II was associated with erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Distinct PFGE profiles were observed among different types, but identical profiles were found among erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant isolates of the same type. A variety of capsular and PFGE types are involved in significant bacteriuria. Although capsular types found here are prevalent in different infections, the frequency of each type seems to be unique. Erythromycin resistance is due to polyclonal origin instead of the expansion of few clones of S. agalactiae.

  6. Molecular epidemiology and phylogeography of Schistosoma mansoni around Lake Victoria.

    PubMed

    Standley, C J; Kabatereine, N B; Lange, C N; Lwambo, N J S; Stothard, J R

    2010-11-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis continues to be a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, and is endemic in communities around Lake Victoria. Interest is growing in the molecular evolution and population genetic structure of Schistosoma mansoni and we describe a detailed analysis of the molecular epidemiology and phylogeography of S. mansoni from Lake Victoria. In total, 388 cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI) sequences were obtained from 25 sites along the Ugandan, Tanzanian and Kenyan shorelines of Lake Victoria, and 122 unique barcodes were identified; 9 corresponded to previously discovered barcodes from Lakes Victoria and Albert. A subset of the data, composed of COI sequences from miracidia from 10 individual children, was used for population genetics analyses; these results were corroborated by microsatellite analysis of 4 isolates of lab-passaged adult worms. Overall, 12 barcodes were found to be shared across all 3 countries, whereas the majority occurred singly and were locally restricted. The population genetics analyses were in agreement in revealing high diversity at the level of the human host and negligible population structuring by location. The lack of correlation between genetic distance and geographical distance in these data may be attributed to the confounding influence of high intra-individual diversity as well as human migration between communities.

  7. Global Molecular Epidemiology of IMP-Producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Yasufumi; Peirano, Gisele; Motyl, Mary R; Adams, Mark D; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry; DeVinney, Rebekah; Pitout, Johann D D

    2017-04-01

    International data on the molecular epidemiology of Enterobacteriaceae with IMP carbapenemases are lacking. We performed short-read (Illumina) whole-genome sequencing on a global collection of 38 IMP-producing clinical Enterobacteriaceae (2008 to 2014). IMP-producing Enterobacteriaceae (7 varieties within 11 class 1 integrons) were mainly present in the South Pacific and Asia. Specific blaIMP-containing integrons (In809 with blaIMP-4, In722 with blaIMP-6, and In687 with blaIMP-14) were circulating among different bacteria in countries such as Australia, Japan, and Thailand. In1312 with blaIMP-1 was present in Klebsiella pneumoniae from Japan and Citrobacter freundii from Brazil. Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 22) was the most common species; clonal complex 14 (CC14) from Philippines and Japan was the most common clone and contained In1310 with blaIMP-26 and In1321 with blaIMP-6 The Enterobacter cloacae complex (n = 9) consisted of Enterobacter hormaechei and E. cloacae cluster III. CC78 (from Taiwan) containing In73 with blaIMP-8 was the most common clone among the E. cloacae complex. This study highlights the importance of surveillance programs using the latest molecular techniques for providing insight into the characteristics and global distribution of Enterobacteriaceae with blaIMP genes.

  8. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; Coleman, David C

    2014-01-01

    A small number of Candida species form part of the normal microbial flora of mucosal surfaces in humans and may give rise to opportunistic infections when host defences are impaired. Candida albicans is by far the most prevalent commensal and pathogenic Candida species. Several different molecular typing approaches including multilocus sequence typing, multilocus microsatellite typing and DNA fingerprinting using C. albicans-specific repetitive sequence-containing DNA probes have yielded a wealth of information regarding the epidemiology and population structure of this species. Such studies revealed that the C. albicans population structure consists of multiple major and minor clades, some of which exhibit geographical or phenotypic enrichment and that C. albicans reproduction is predominantly clonal. Despite this, losses of heterozygosity by recombination, the existence of a parasexual cycle, toleration of a wide range of aneuploidies and the recent description of viable haploid strains have all demonstrated the extensive plasticity of the C. albicans genome. Recombination and gross chromosomal rearrangements are more common under stressful environmental conditions, and have played a significant role in the evolution of this opportunistic pathogen. Surprisingly, Candida dubliniensis, the closest relative of C. albicans exhibits more karyotype variability than C. albicans, but is significantly less adaptable to unfavourable environments. This disparity most likely reflects the evolutionary processes that occurred during or soon after the divergence of both species from their common ancestor. Whilst C. dubliniensis underwent significant gene loss and pseudogenisation, C. albicans expanded gene families considered to be important in virulence. It is likely that technological developments in whole genome sequencing and data analysis in coming years will facilitate its routine use for population structure, epidemiological investigations, and phylogenetic analyses of

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis isolated from horses in California.

    PubMed

    Haas, Dionei J; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Spier, Sharon J; Carroll, Scott P; Edman, Judy; Azevedo, Vasco A; Heinemann, Marcos B; Lage, Andrey P

    2017-04-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis biovar Equi is an important pathogen of horses. It is increasing in frequency in the United States, and is responsible for various clinical forms of infection, including external abscesses, internal abscesses of the abdominal or thoracic cavities, and ulcerative lymphangitis. The host/pathogen factors dictating the form or severity of infection are currently unknown. Our recent investigations have shown that genotyping C. pseudotuberculosis isolates using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR is useful for understanding the evolutionary genetics of the species as well for molecular epidemiology studies. The aims of the present study were to assess (i) the genetic diversity of C. pseudotuberculosis strains isolated from horses in California, United States and (ii) the epidemiologic relationships among isolates. One hundred and seven C. pseudotuberculosis biovar Equi isolates from ninety-five horses, and two C. pseudotuberculosis biovar Ovis strains, C. pseudotuberculosis ATCC 19410(T) type strain and C. pseudotuberculosis 1002 vaccine strain, were fingerprinted using the ERIC 1+2-PCR. C. pseudotuberculosis isolated from horses showed a high genetic diversity, clustering in twenty-seven genotypes with a diversity index of 0.91. Minimal spanning tree showed four major clonal complexes with a pattern of temporal clustering. Strains isolated from the same horse showed identical ERIC 1+2-PCR genotype, with the exception of two strains isolated from the same animal that showed distinct genotypes, suggesting a co-infection. We found no strong genetic signals related to clinical form (including internal versus external infections). However, temporal clustering of genotypes was observed.

  10. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus in France: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Chandeysson, C; Lê Van, A; Fabre, F; Desbiez, C

    2009-05-01

    Cucurbit viruses are involved in complex and changing pathosystems in France, with new virus strains or species regularly reported. Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an archetypal emerging virus that was reported in France in 1979. It has since caused sporadic but occasionally very severe economic losses and its epidemiology still remains poorly understood. Partial sequencing of the viral genome has been used to characterize ZYMV isolates that occurred over a 29-year period in experimental plots at Montfavet, France (n=227), or that were received through a national survey for cucurbit viruses conducted in France from 2004 to 2007 (n=198). A total of 34 haplotypes were differentiated belonging to five molecular groups, three including isolates already described in France and two corresponding to isolates that emerged in France within the last 5 years. Comparison of haplotypes found at one location during successive years revealed contrasting situations. When they were either the same or closely related haplotypes, this suggested the availability of overwintering hosts, whereas when they belonged to different molecular groups this indicated shifts in viral populations with possible new introductions. The contribution of molecular epidemiology in tracing the origin of ZYMV in the French West Indies is also reviewed.

  12. Genetic characterization, molecular epidemiology, and phylogenetic relationships of insect-specific viruses in the taxon Negevirus.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Marcio R T; Contreras-Gutierrez, María Angélica; Guzman, Hilda; Martins, Livia C; Barbirato, Mayla Feitoza; Savit, Chelsea; Balta, Victoria; Uribe, Sandra; Vivero, Rafael; Suaza, Juan David; Oliveira, Hamilton; Nunes Neto, Joaquin P; Carvalho, Valeria L; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; Cardoso, Jedson F; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Santo; da Silva Lemos, Poliana; Wood, Thomas G; Widen, Steven G; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Fish, Durland; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B

    2017-04-01

    The recently described taxon Negevirus is comprised of a diverse group of insect-specific viruses isolated from mosquitoes and phlebotomine sandflies. In this study, a comprehensive genetic characterization, molecular, epidemiological and evolutionary analyses were conducted on nearly full-length sequences of 91 new negevirus isolates obtained in Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Panama, USA and Nepal. We demonstrated that these arthropod restricted viruses are clustered in two major phylogenetic groups with origins related to three plant virus genera (Cilevirus, Higrevirus and Blunevirus). Molecular analyses demonstrated that specific host correlations are not present with most negeviruses; instead, high genetic variability, wide host-range, and cross-species transmission were noted. The data presented here also revealed the existence of five novel insect-specific viruses falling into two arthropod-restrictive virus taxa, previously proposed as distinct genera, designated Nelorpivirus and Sandewavirus. Our results provide a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology, evolution, taxonomy and stability of this group of insect-restricted viruses.

  13. Global Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii: An Atlas of the Molecular Types.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease affecting more than one million people per year worldwide. The main etiological agents of cryptococcosis are the two sibling species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii that present numerous differences in geographical distribution, ecological niches, epidemiology, pathobiology, clinical presentation and molecular characters. Genotyping of the two Cryptococcus species at subspecies level supplies relevant information to understand how this fungus has spread worldwide, the nature of its population structure, and how it evolved to be a deadly pathogen. At present, nine major molecular types have been recognized: VNI, VNII, VNB, VNIII, and VNIV among C. neoformans isolates, and VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV among C. gattii isolates. In this paper all the information available in the literature concerning the isolation of the two Cryptococcus species has been collected and analyzed on the basis of their geographical origin, source of isolation, level of identification, species, and molecular type. A detailed analysis of the geographical distribution of the major molecular types in each continent has been described and represented on thematic maps. This study represents a useful tool to start new epidemiological surveys on the basis of the present knowledge.

  14. Global Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii: An Atlas of the Molecular Types

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease affecting more than one million people per year worldwide. The main etiological agents of cryptococcosis are the two sibling species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii that present numerous differences in geographical distribution, ecological niches, epidemiology, pathobiology, clinical presentation and molecular characters. Genotyping of the two Cryptococcus species at subspecies level supplies relevant information to understand how this fungus has spread worldwide, the nature of its population structure, and how it evolved to be a deadly pathogen. At present, nine major molecular types have been recognized: VNI, VNII, VNB, VNIII, and VNIV among C. neoformans isolates, and VGI, VGII, VGIII, and VGIV among C. gattii isolates. In this paper all the information available in the literature concerning the isolation of the two Cryptococcus species has been collected and analyzed on the basis of their geographical origin, source of isolation, level of identification, species, and molecular type. A detailed analysis of the geographical distribution of the major molecular types in each continent has been described and represented on thematic maps. This study represents a useful tool to start new epidemiological surveys on the basis of the present knowledge. PMID:24278784

  15. Molecular pathological epidemiology in diabetes mellitus and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary study field, which has emerged as an integrated approach of molecular pathology and epidemiology, and investigates the relationship between exogenous and endogenous exposure factors, tumor molecular signatures, and tumor initiation, progression, and response to treatment. Molecular epidemiology broadly encompasses MPE and conventional-type molecular epidemiology. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer-associated death worldwide and remains as a major public health challenge. Over the past few decades, a number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus (DM) is an established independent risk factor for HCC. However, how DM affects the occurrence and development of HCC remains as yet unclearly understood. MPE may be a promising approach to investigate the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis of DM in HCC, and provide some useful insights for this pathological process, although a few challenges must be overcome. This review highlights the recent advances in this field, including: (1) introduction of MPE; (2) HCC, risk factors, and DM as an established independent risk factor for HCC; (3) molecular pathology, molecular epidemiology, and MPE in DM and HCC; and (4) MPE studies in DM and risk of HCC. More MPE studies are expected to be performed in future and I believe that this field can provide some very important insights on the molecular mechanisms, diagnosis, personalized prevention and treatment for DM and risk of HCC. PMID:27721917

  16. Nationwide Trends in Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshan; Li, Wei; Zhong, Ping; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Kexin; Musa, Taha Hussein; Song, Yue; Du, Guoping; Gao, Rong; Guo, Yan; Yan, Wenjuan; Xuan, Yang; Wei, Pingmin

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the nationwide and regional distribution of HIV-1 genotypes in China in the past three decades, province-specific HIV-1 molecular epidemiology data were derived from 260 independent studies of HIV molecular prevalence through searching PubMed, VIP Chinese Journal Database (VIP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Data from January 1981 to December 2015. The nationwide and regional distribution of HIV-1 genotypes was estimated by weighting the genotype distribution from each province- and risk-specific subpopulation with the number of reported cases in the corresponding subgroups in the relevant periods. A sharp transition of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant distribution was observed in various risk groups and regions over time. CRF01_AE has rapidly surged among almost all risk groups and in all areas, and it has become dominant among men who have sex with men and heterosexuals. A wide variety of new circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs) were rapidly appearing in several risk groups and regions. After 2007, CRF01_AE was the most prevalent strain, accounting for 42.5% of all national infections, followed by CRF07_BC (28.9%), subtype B'/B (10.9%), CRF08_BC (10.0%), and subtype C (2.8%). URFs and other CRFs were responsible for 2.6% and fewer than 1% of infections nationwide, respectively. The nationwide and regional distributions of HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants were sharply shifting in China. CRF01_AE and new CRFs played an increasing role in the nationwide or regional HIV pandemic. The nationwide diversity of HIV-1 poses a formidable challenge to HIV vaccine development and disease prevention.

  17. Norovirus infection in Belarus: occurrence and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Paklonskayal, Natallia Uladzimirauna; Amvrosieva, Tamara Vasil'evna; Dziadziulia, Kanstantsin Leanidavich; Baranouskaya, Natallia Mikalaeuna; Kishkurno, Elena Petrovna; Kluiko, Nina Leonidovna

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study is to analyze molecular epidemiologic surveillance for norovirus infection in Belarus over the past five years (2009-2013). Laboratory diagnostics was carried out by RT-PCR in 684 patients. Two regions of norovirus genome, localized in RNA-polymerase and capsid protein genes, were used for phylogenetic analysis. Noroviruses were predominant causative agents in adults and second only to rotaviruses in children, they also prevailed among aetiological agents of outbreaks (66.7% of outbreaks). In 2009-2013, the major norovirus genotype was GII.4 (58.3% of all genotyped isolates). Genovariant GII.4 2006b circulated in 2009 and 2010, genovariant GII.4 2009 New Orleans - in 2010 and 2012. In addition to GII.4, genotypes GII.6 (16.6%), GII.2 (4.1%), GII.3 (2.2%), and recombinant genotypes GII.g-GII.12 and GII.g-GII.1 (10.4% and 8.3%, respectively) circulated in Belarus. The findings indicate a significant contribution of noroviruses in development of sporadic morbidity and outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in Belarus. Outbreaks or prominent increases of sporadic morbidity were mostly due to the emergence of a new genotype, or an epidemic genovariant.

  18. Scotomas in molecular virology and epidemiology of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue

    2013-11-28

    In the 1970s, scientists learned of a new pathogen causing non-A, non-B hepatitis. Classical approaches were used to isolate and characterize this new pathogen, but it could be transmitted experimentally only to chimpanzees and progress was slow until the pathogen was identified as hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989. Since then, research and treatment of HCV have expanded with the development of modern biological medicine: HCV genome organization and polyprotein processing were delineated in 1993; the first three-dimensional structure of HCV nonstructural protein (NS3 serine protease) was revealed in 1996; an infectious clone of HCV complementary DNA was first constructed in 1997; interferon and ribavirin combination therapy was established in 1998 and the therapeutic strategy gradually optimized; the HCV replicon system was produced in 1999; functional HCV pseudotyped viral particles were described in 2003; and recombinant infectious HCV in tissue culture was produced successfully in 2005. Recently, tremendous advances in HCV receptor discovery, understanding the HCV lifecycle, decryption of the HCV genome and proteins, as well as new anti-HCV compounds have been reported. Because HCV is difficult to isolate and culture, researchers have had to avail themselves to the best of modern biomedical technology; some of the major achievements in HCV research have not only advanced the understanding of HCV but also promoted knowledge of virology and cellular physiology. In this review, we summarize the advancements and remaining scotomas in the molecular virology and epidemiology of HCV.

  19. Molecular epidemiology, cancer-related symptoms, and cytokines pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret; Kurzrock, Razelle; Fisch, Michael; Bruera, Eduardo; Shete, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The Human Genome Project and HapMap have led to a better appreciation of the importance of common genetic variation in determining cancer risk, created potential for predicting response to therapy, and made possible the development of targeted prevention and therapeutic interventions. Advances in molecular epidemiology can be used to explore the role of genetic variation in modulating the risk for severe and persistent symptoms, such as pain, depression, and fatigue, in patients with cancer. The same genes that are implicated in cancer risk might also be involved in the modulation of therapeutic outcomes. For example, polymorphisms in several cytokine genes are potential markers for genetic susceptibility both for cancer risk and for cancer-related symptoms. These genetic polymorphisms are stable markers and easily and reliably assayed to explore the extent to which genetic variation might prove useful in identifying patients with cancer at high-risk of symptom development. Likewise, they could identify subgroups who might benefit most from symptom intervention, and contribute to developing personalised and more effective therapies for persistent symptoms. PMID:18672213

  20. Molecular epidemiology of human coxsackievirus A16 strains

    PubMed Central

    YU, WENMIN; XU, HUANXIN; YIN, CHANGCHANG

    2016-01-01

    The hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) epidemics have mainly been caused by human enterovirus 71 and human coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), which circulated alternatively or together in the epidemic area. The aim of the present study was to provide guidance in the prevention and control of HFMD from CA16 infection. The molecular epidemiology of the human CA16 strains was investigated. Overall, 1,151 specimens (throat swabs) were collected from 1,151 patients with HFMD symptoms. The results of the homology comparison in the VP1 of CA16 strains showed that the CA16 strains belonged to the B1b subgenotype. The difference of the 6 CA16 strains analyzed showed that the most prominent strain was the A genotype, and the most close strains were the B1 gene subtype, particularly the B1b gene subtype. With regards to the amino acids, in addition to the A genotype, the differences of amino acids with other gene subtype was not significant. The present data suggest that more effective and highly targeted intervention mechanisms could be developed for the prevention and control of HFMD. PMID:27284420

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Aspergillus collected from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Ferreira, Jose A G; Moss, Richard B; Valente, Joana; Veríssimo, Cristina; Carolino, Elisabete; Clemons, Karl V; Everson, Cassie; Banaei, Niaz; Penner, John; Stevens, David A

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus respiratory infection is a common complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with loss of pulmonary function and allergic disease. Fifty-three Aspergillus isolates recovered from CF patients were identified to species by Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS), β-tubulin, and calmodulin sequencing. Three species complexes (Terrei, Nigri, and Fumigati) were found. Identification to species level gave a single Aspergillus terreus sensu stricto, one Aspergillus niger sensu stricto and 51 Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto isolates. No cryptic species were found. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study of Aspergillus species in CF using molecular methods. The paucity of non-A. fumigatus and of cryptic species of A. fumigatus suggests a special association of A. fumigatus sensu stricto with CF airways, indicating it likely displays unique characteristics making it suitable for chronic residence in that milieu. These findings could refine an epidemiologic and therapeutic approach geared to this pathogen. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Delta hepatitis: molecular biology and clinical and epidemiological features.

    PubMed Central

    Polish, L B; Gallagher, M; Fields, H A; Hadler, S C

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus, discovered in 1977, requires the help of hepatitis B virus to replicate in hepatocytes and is an important cause of acute, fulminant, and chronic liver disease in many regions of the world. Because of the helper function of hepatitis delta virus, infection with it occurs either as a coinfection with hepatitis B or as a superinfection of a carrier of hepatitis B surface antigen. Although the mechanisms of transmission are similar to those of hepatitis B virus, the patterns of transmission of delta virus vary widely around the world. In regions of the world in which hepatitis delta virus infection is not endemic, the disease is confined to groups at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection and high-risk hepatitis B carriers. Because of the propensity of this viral infection to cause fulminant as well as chronic liver disease, continued incursion of hepatitis delta virus into areas of the world where persistent hepatitis B infection is endemic will have serious implications. Prevention depends on the widespread use of hepatitis B vaccine. This review focuses on the molecular biology and the clinical and epidemiologic features of this important viral infection. PMID:8358704

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis in neonatal intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Soeorg, Hiie; Huik, Kristi; Parm, Ülle; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Lutsar, Irja

    2017-01-01

    Late-onset sepsis (LOS) in preterm neonates is increasingly reported to be associated with gut-colonizing Staphylococcus epidermidis. We aimed to describe the molecular epidemiology of S. epidermidis colonizing the gut of neonates hospitalized in two neonatal intensive care units. S. epidermidis from rectal swabs were typed by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), randomly chosen isolates of predominant MLVA types additionally by multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility, the presence of icaA, IS256, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), agr type, and SCCmec type were determined. Of 276 neonates (38.4%), 106 were colonized with S. epidermidis, yielding a total of 139 isolates (62 in one unit and 77 in another unit). Of the 55 MLVA types identified, the five predominant detected in both units corresponded to sequence type (ST) 2, ST5, and ST59 or its single locus variant ST81 and formed three major MLVA clonal complexes accounting for 74.8% of all isolates. Overall, the prevalence of mecA, icaA, IS256, and ACME was 91.4%, 28.1%, 64%, and 77%, respectively. Of the mecA-positive isolates (n = 127), 43.9% carried SCCmec type IV. Of eight episodes of LOS, four were caused by ST2 and two by ST5. Preventing gut colonization with nosocomial epidemic S. epidermidis in hospitalized neonates could contribute to the prevention of LOS.

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Entamoeba: First Description of Entamoeba moshkovskii in a Rural Area from Central Colombia.

    PubMed

    López, Myriam Consuelo; León, Cielo M; Fonseca, Jairo; Reyes, Patricia; Moncada, Ligia; Olivera, Mario J; Ramírez, Juan David

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii are the most frequent species described in human infection where E. histolytica is the only true pathogen. The epidemiology of this infection is complex due to the absence of a routine exam that allows a correct discrimination of the Entamoeba species complex. Therefore, molecular methods appear as the unique epidemiological tool to accomplish the species discrimination. Herein, we conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the frequency of Entamoeba species infections in a group of asymptomatic individuals from a rural area in central Colombia. A total of 181 fecal samples from asymptomatic children under 16 years old from the hamlet La Vírgen, Cundinamarca (Colombia) that voluntarily accepted to participate in the study were collected. The fecal samples were examined by light microscopy and DNA-extracted, subsequently submitted to molecular discrimination of E. dispar/E. histolytica/E. moshkovskii infection based on a multiplex PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA fragment. To confirm the species description, twenty samples were randomly submitted to DNA sequencing of the aforementioned fragment. By direct microscopic examination, frequency of the complex E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii was 18.8% (34/181). PCR showed a frequency of 49.1% (89/181), discriminated as 23.2% (42/181) that were positive for E. dispar, 25.4% (46/181) for E. moshkovskii and 0.55% (1/ 181) for E. histolytica. Also, mixed infections were detected between E. dispar and E. moshkovskii at 4.42% (8/181) of the samples. Molecular barcoding confirmed the diagnosis depicted by the multiplex PCR assay. This is the first description of E. moshkovskii in Colombia and the second report in South-America to our knowledge. Our results suggest the need to unravel the true epidemiology of Entamoeba infections around the world, including the real pathogenic role that E. moshkovskii may have.

  5. Clinical, Epidemiologic, Histopathologic and Molecular Features of an Unexplained Dermopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Michele L.; Selby, Joseph V.; Katz, Kenneth A.; Cantrell, Virginia; Braden, Christopher R.; Parise, Monica E.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Lewin-Smith, Michael R.; Kalasinsky, Victor F.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Hightower, Allen W.; Papier, Arthur; Lewis, Brian; Motipara, Sarita; Eberhard, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. Methods A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) during 2006–2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. Results We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40) cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113). Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17–93) and were primarily female (77%) and Caucasian (77%). Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9) and 35.45 (SD = 12.89), respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies); skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. Conclusions This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health-related quality of

  6. Clinical, epidemiologic, histopathologic and molecular features of an unexplained dermopathy.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Michele L; Selby, Joseph V; Katz, Kenneth A; Cantrell, Virginia; Braden, Christopher R; Parise, Monica E; Paddock, Christopher D; Lewin-Smith, Michael R; Kalasinsky, Victor F; Goldstein, Felicia C; Hightower, Allen W; Papier, Arthur; Lewis, Brian; Motipara, Sarita; Eberhard, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) during 2006-2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40) cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113). Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17-93) and were primarily female (77%) and Caucasian (77%). Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9) and 35.45 (SD = 12.89), respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies); skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health-related quality of life. No common underlying medical

  7. The Current Status of the Disease Caused by Enterovirus 71 Infections: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Molecular Epidemiology, and Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2016-09-09

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections have a major public health impact in the Asia-Pacific region. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular epidemiology of EV71 infection as well as EV71 vaccine development. Previous studies were found using the search terms "enterovirus 71" and "epidemiology" or "pathogenesis" or "molecular epidemiology" or "vaccine" in Medline and PubMed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. The reported epidemiology of cases caused by EV71 infection varied from country to country; seasonal variations in incidence were observed. Most cases of EV71 infection that resulted in hospitalization for complications occurred in children less than five years old. The brainstem was the most likely major target of EV71 infection. The emergence of the EV71 epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region has been associated with the circulation of different genetic lineages (genotypes B3, B4, C1, C2, and C4) that appear to be undergoing rapid evolutionary changes. The relationship between the gene structure of the EV71 virus and the factors that ensure its survival, circulation, and evasion of immunity is still unknown. EV71 infection has emerged as an important global public health problem. Vaccine development, including the development of inactivated whole-virus live attenuated, subviral particles, and DNA vaccines, has been progressing.

  8. Establishment and operation of a biorepository for molecular epidemiologic studies in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Bernal; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Jiménez, Silvia; Shea, Katheryn; González, Paula; Porras, Carolina; Fallas, Greivin; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia

    2010-04-01

    The Proyecto Epidemiológico Guanacaste (PEG) has conducted several large studies related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in Guanacaste, Costa Rica in a long-standing collaboration with the U.S. National Cancer Institute. To improve molecular epidemiology efforts and save costs, we have gradually transferred technology to Costa Rica, culminating in state-of-the-art laboratories and a biorepository to support a phase III clinical trial investigating the efficacy of HPV 16/18 vaccine. Here, we describe the rationale and lessons learned in transferring molecular epidemiologic and biorepository technology to a developing country. At the outset of the PEG in the early 1990s, we shipped all specimens to repositories and laboratories in the United States, which created multiple problems. Since then, by intensive personal interactions between experts from the United States and Costa Rica, we have successfully transferred liquid-based cytology, HPV DNA testing and serology, chlamydia and gonorrhea testing, PCR-safe tissue processing, and viable cryopreservation. To accommodate the vaccine trial, a state-of-the-art repository opened in mid-2004. Approximately 15,000 to 50,000 samples are housed in the repository on any given day, and >500,000 specimens have been shipped, many using a custom-made dry shipper that permits exporting >20,000 specimens at a time. Quality control of shipments received by the NCI biorepository has revealed an error rate of <0.2%. Recently, the PEG repository has incorporated other activities; for example, large-scale aliquotting and long-term, cost-efficient storage of frozen specimens returned from the United States. Using Internet-based specimen tracking software has proven to be efficient even across borders. For long-standing collaborations, it makes sense to transfer the molecular epidemiology expertise toward the source of specimens. The successes of the PEG molecular epidemiology laboratories and biorepository prove that

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  10. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA PCR in the Teaching of Molecular Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinoso, Elina B.; Bettera, Susana G.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe a basic practical laboratory designed for fifth-year undergraduate students of Microbiology as part of the Epidemiology course. This practice provides the students with the tools for molecular epidemiological analysis of pathogenic microorganisms using a rapid and simple PCR technique. The aim of this work was to assay…

  11. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA PCR in the Teaching of Molecular Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinoso, Elina B.; Bettera, Susana G.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe a basic practical laboratory designed for fifth-year undergraduate students of Microbiology as part of the Epidemiology course. This practice provides the students with the tools for molecular epidemiological analysis of pathogenic microorganisms using a rapid and simple PCR technique. The aim of this work was to assay…

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  13. The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Snow, Michael

    2011-04-05

    Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include:Improved taxonomic classification of viruses. A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses. An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture. An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range. An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks. Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools. An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function. While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Echovirus 30 in Taiwan, 1988-2008.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guan-Ming; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Lu, Po-Liang; Tung, Yi-Chin; Wang, Chu-Feng; Ke, Liang-Yin; Lee, Min-Sheng; Lin, Pei-Chin; Su, Hui-Ju; Lin, Yi-Ying; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Jen-Ren; Wang, Sheng-Yu; Hsu, Li-Ching; Chu, Pei-Yu

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology of Taiwanese Echovirus 30 (E-30) strains, we analyzed the 876 bp sequence of the VP1 gene from 32 Taiwanese strains isolated in 1988-2008, 498 reference sequences, and one Echovirus 21 strain as the out-group. Phylogenetic analysis detected six E-30 genotypes (designated GI-GVI) that had circulated globally during the past five decades. The genotypes varied widely in geographic distribution and circulation half-life. The GI, GII, and GV were ancient genotypes in which the first strains emerged in the 1950s. The GIII was a reemerging genotype, in which strains had first appeared in Colombia in 1995 before reemerging in the New Independent States (NIS) in 2003. The GIV, an emerging genotype that recently appeared in Asia in 2003, was closely related to the ancient genotypes. The GVI was the circulating genotype, which included eight clusters (A-H) that had circulated since 1967. No GVI-A, C, D, or E strains have been identified during the past 10 years. The GVI-B first appeared in China in 1984 and later in Russia and Asia in the 2000s. The GVI-F, G, and H strains, which comprised the prevalent clusters, had been dominant in Asia Pacific area, globally, and Europe, respectively. Taiwanese strains were classified into GVI-D (1988-1989), GVI-F (1993-2004), and GVI-G (1993-2008). The quiescence period of E-30 is longer in Taiwan (5-8 years) than in other countries (3-5 years).

  15. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus in Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; Badano, Inés; Malan, Richard; Flichman, Diego Martin; Liotta, Domingo Javier; Campos, Rodolfo Hector

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. The aims of this study were to describe the molecular epidemiology of HBV in the Province of Misiones, Argentina and estimate the phylodynamic of the main groups in a Bayesian coalescent framework. To this end, partial or complete genome sequences were obtained from 52 blood donor candidates. The phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of S/P region showed a predominance of genotype D (65.4%), followed by genotype F (30.8%) and genotype A as a minority (3.8%). At subgenotype level, the circulation of subgenotypes D3 (42.3%), D2 (13.5%), F1b (11.5%) and F4 (9.6%) was mainly identified. The Bayesian coalescent analysis of 29 complete genome sequences for the main groups revealed that the subgenotypes D2 and D3 had several introductions to the region, with ancestors dating back from 1921 to 1969 and diversification events until the late '70s. The genotype F in Misiones has a more recent history; subgenotype F4 isolates were intermixed with sequences from Argentina and neighboring countries and only one significant cluster dated back in 1994 was observed. Subgenotype F1b isolates exhibited low genetic distance and formed a closely related monophyletic cluster, suggesting a very recent introduction. In conclusion, the phylogenetic and coalescent analyses showed that the European genotype D has a higher circulation, a longer history of diversification and may be responsible for the largest proportion of chronic HBV infections in the Province of Misiones. Genotype F, especially subgenotype F1b, had a more recent introduction and its diversification in the last 20years might be related to its involvement in new transmission events.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infection in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Moumita; Bose, Sujoy; Saikia, Anjan; Medhi, Subhash; Deka, Manab

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to screen the molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Northeast India (NEI) who are ethnically distinct, tribal dominated and of lower socio-economic status with almost no information available from NEI on these aspects. Briefly, 3 ml blood was collected from 324 random liver disease cases with jaundice, receiving care at Central Hospital, N.F. Railway, Guwahati, Assam with informed consent. The patients detected with HAV-IgM positive status were included and were stratified as acute viral hepatitis (AVH) and fulminant hepatitis (FHF) based on clinical profile. Viral RNA was isolated and HAV-RNA was detected by Real-time PCR using primers for the VP3-VP1 region. HAV genotyping was studied by PCR-direct sequencing-phylogenetic analysis approach using the VP1/2A region of HAV isolates. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS13.0 software. A total of 69 cases were HAV infected with two HBV co-infected cases (n = 69 + 2 = 71), 62 cases and two co-infected cases were AVH and others were FHF cases. HAV infection was predominant in especially in the young and adult age group. HAV-RNA was detected in 28 cases, out of which 19 cases could be genotyped (12 AVH, 7 FHF); which showed the prevalence of genotype IIIA or IA only. Although HAV genotype IIIA was the major genotype in both the AVH (10/12, 83.33%) and FHF (5/7, 71.43%) group, but the difference in distribution of genotypes in AVH and FHF cases was statistically non-significant (P = 0.550). HAV genotype IIIA is associated with the majority of HAV infected cases and severity in NEI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Phylogeography and molecular epidemiology of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Amy J; Chan, Fabien; Wagner, David M; Roumagnac, Philippe; Lee, Judy; Nera, Roxanne; Eppinger, Mark; Ravel, Jacques; Rahalison, Lila; Rasoamanana, Bruno W; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Achtman, Mark; Chanteau, Suzanne; Keim, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Plague was introduced to Madagascar in 1898 and continues to be a significant human health problem. It exists mainly in the central highlands, but in the 1990s was reintroduced to the port city of Mahajanga, where it caused extensive human outbreaks. Despite its prevalence, the phylogeography and molecular epidemiology of Y. pestis in Madagascar has been difficult to study due to the great genetic similarity among isolates. We examine island-wide geographic-genetic patterns based upon whole-genome discovery of SNPs, SNP genotyping and hypervariable variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci to gain insight into the maintenance and spread of Y. pestis in Madagascar. We analyzed a set of 262 Malagasy isolates using a set of 56 SNPs and a 43-locus multi-locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) system. We then analyzed the geographic distribution of the subclades and identified patterns related to the maintenance and spread of plague in Madagascar. We find relatively high levels of VNTR diversity in addition to several SNP differences. We identify two major groups, Groups I and II, which are subsequently divided into 11 and 4 subclades, respectively. Y. pestis appears to be maintained in several geographically separate subpopulations. There is also evidence for multiple long distance transfers of Y. pestis, likely human mediated. Such transfers have resulted in the reintroduction and establishment of plague in the port city of Mahajanga, where there is evidence for multiple transfers both from and to the central highlands. The maintenance and spread of Y. pestis in Madagascar is a dynamic and highly active process that relies on the natural cycle between the primary host, the black rat, and its flea vectors as well as human activity.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in veterinary medicine: where do we go?

    PubMed

    Boerlin, Patrick

    2004-06-01

    Molecular epidemiology allows us to trace specific microorganisms and mobile genetic elements and to assess their epidemiological and evolutionary relationships. Examples of molecular epidemiology investigations in veterinary hospitals are discussed. They demonstrate the great similarities with the situation in human medicine and the potential usefulness of molecular epidemiology in our fight against antimicrobial resistance and nosocomial infections in veterinary hospitals. A broad knowledge of the diversity of antimicrobial resistance determinants in some major groups of pathogens and commensals from animals such as Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, enterococci and staphylococci is emerging. However, there are important gaps in this knowledge, which are discussed here. Many more molecular epidemiology studies will be necessary to understand and follow the evolution of the problem in veterinary medicine and agriculture on a global scale. To be able to build useful surveillance programs and reliable epidemiological models, and to identify critical intervention points, we need to improve our understanding of antimicrobial resistance at the animal and farm levels. Studies assessing the dynamics of bacterial populations and of resistance determinants at these levels are desperately needed. Understanding the relationships between antimicrobial resistance, colonization factors, and virulence also represents a major issue for which molecular epidemiology investigations will be needed.

  19. Recent transmission of tuberculosis in Madrid: application of capture-recapture analysis to conventional and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Iñigo, J; Arce, A; Martín-Moreno, J M; Herruzo, R; Palenque, E; Chaves, F

    2003-10-01

    Population-based studies using a combination of molecular techniques and conventional epidemiological methods have been used to study the dynamics of tuberculosis (TB) transmission but the relative utility of each technique has not yet been established. A prospective population-based molecular and epidemiological study of patients diagnosed with TB was conducted in three urban districts of Madrid (Spain) during 1997-1999. Analysis was performed using the capture-recapture method including covariates in which conventional epidemiological data and the information on clustered cases obtained by DNA fingerprinting were regarded as independent and complementary procedures. The estimate obtained by molecular analysis alone, that 31.6% of TB cases were due to recent transmission, was revised to 44.8% (95% CI: 31.4-58.2) using the capture-recapture method. The estimated completeness of the combined databases for identification of recent transmission was 59.2%. Underestimation of the true prevalence of recent transmission was higher with conventional epidemiology than molecular analysis, particularly for patients <35 years old and those with a history of imprisonment. In this study, use of the capture-recapture technique allowed us to combine epidemiological information obtained by conventional and molecular methods to quantify the number of cases of recently transmitted TB in the community and identify specific populations at high risk of disease. This information is clearly important because such groups are a prime target for improved TB control measures. In the long term, this combination of techniques may contribute significantly to control the spread of TB.

  20. Highly conductive single naphthalene and anthracene molecular junction with well-defined conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenyang; Kaneko, Satoshi; Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-03-09

    We performed electronic investigation on single acene molecular junctions bridging Au-electrodes in ultra-high vacuum conditions using mechanically controllable break junction technique. While the molecular junctions displayed various conductance values at 100 K, they exhibited well-defined high conductance values (∼0.3 G{sub 0}) at 300 K, which is close to that of metal atomic contact. Direct π-binding of the molecules to the Au-electrodes leads to the high conductivities at the metal-molecule interface. At the elevated temperature, single molecular junctions trapped in local metastable structures can be fallen into energetically preferential more stable state and thus we fabricated structurally well-defined molecular junctions.

  1. Molecular typing of Salmonella from Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil, showing the epidemiological relationship between poultry and human infection.

    PubMed

    Góis, P B P; Carneiro, M R P; Jain, S; Santos, M I S; Batista, M V A; Cândido, A L

    2015-09-25

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) has been widely used for epidemiological and phylogenetic purposes ow-ing to its rapidity and efficiency. The aim of this study was to perform genome typing of Salmonella samples isolated from different sources by RAPD profiling. Thirty-three Salmonella samples from the bacterial collection of the Laboratório de Virologia Comparada, Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Brazil, and two standard samples were used. RAPD profiling was conducted using six primers of the Ready-To-Go RAPD system. The amplified products were electro-phoresed on 5% polyacrylamide gel and silver-stained. RAPD analysis resulted in reproducible and stable banding patterns and showed high genetic diversity among the isolated strains. The Primer P1-generated dendrogram showed an epidemiologic relationship between the human and poultry isolated samples, highlighting the usefulness of RAPD for molecular typing and epidemiological studies.

  2. Electrical conductivity of condensed molecular hydrogen in the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical interpretation of several phenomena concerning Jupiter and Saturn depends upon the electrical conductivity of molecular hydrogen which, according to present models, forms the outermost layer of both planets. The layer starts at the transition pressure between the metallic and the molecular form of hydrogen, that is around 1 Mbar, and extends to the outside limits of the atmosphere. Whether at the highest pressures (and temperatures) this layer is a solid or a dense fluid is not certain. In any case, the fluid is in supercritical condition so that there is only a gradual transition from dense liquid to a gaseous form. The two theories which require specific values of the conductivity of the condensed molecular hydrogen are those pertaining to the generation of a magnetic field in the liquid hydrogen rather than in the deep metallic interior (HIDE, 1967), and those concerned with the electromagnetic coupling and exchange of angular momentum between the liquid core and the solid molecular hydrogen mantle.

  3. Electronic conduction in a model three-terminal molecular transistor.

    PubMed

    He, Haiying; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2008-12-17

    The electronic conduction of a novel, three-terminal molecular architecture, analogous to a heterojunction bipolar transistor, is studied. In this architecture, two diode arms consisting of donor-acceptor molecular wires fuse through a ring, while a gate modulating wire is a pi-conjugated wire. The calculated results show the enhancement or depletion mode of a transistor on applying a gate field along the positive or negative direction. A small gate field is required to switch on the current in the proposed architecture. The changes in the electronic conduction can be attributed to the intrinsic dipolar molecular architecture in terms of the evolution of molecular wavefunctions, specifically the one associated with the terphenyl group of the modulating wire in the presence of the gate field.

  4. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  5. Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in cattle and other food animals [Spanish][Epidemiología molecular de cryptosporidiosis en el ganado vacuno y en otros animales de abasto

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in cattle and other food animals Cryptosporidium is an enteric protozoan parasite that infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts. Cryptosporidial infection is known now as one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and livestock. Worldwide prevale...

  6. Combining Radiation Epidemiology With Molecular Biology-Changing From Health Risk Estimates to Therapeutic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The authors herein summarize six presentations dedicated to the key session "molecular radiation epidemiology" of the ConRad meeting 2015. These presentations were chosen in order to highlight the promise when combining conventional radiation epidemiology with molecular biology. Conventional radiation epidemiology uses dose estimates for risk predictions on health. However, combined with molecular biology, dose-dependent bioindicators of effect hold the promise to improve clinical diagnostics and to provide target molecules for potential therapeutic intervention. One out of the six presentations exemplified the use of radiation-induced molecular changes as biomarkers of exposure by measuring stabile chromosomal translocations. The remaining five presentations focused on molecular changes used as bioindicators of the effect. These bioindicators of the effect could be used for diagnostic purposes on colon cancers (genomic instability), thyroid cancer (CLIP2), or head and neck squamous cell cancers. Therapeutic implications of gene expression changes were examined in Chernobyl thyroid cancer victims and Mayak workers.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Cats in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Iturriza-Gómara, M.; Dove, W.; Sandrasegaram, M.; Nakagomi, T.; Nakagomi, O.; Cunliffe, N.; Radford, A. D.; Morgan, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  8. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in cats in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    German, A C; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Dove, W; Sandrasegaram, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Cunliffe, N; Radford, A D; Morgan, K L

    2015-02-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan-Juan; Zhao, Guang-Lu; Wang, Feng; Hong, Fu-Chang; Luo, Zhen-Zhou; Lan, Li-Na; Zhang, Chun-Lai; Peng, Yi; Liu, Xiao-Li; Feng, Tie-Jian; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2012-06-01

    To investigate molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis infection among patients recruited from different clinic settings in Shenzhen, China. A total of 2534 patients from the sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics, obstetrics and gynaecology (OBGYN) clinics and genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in 34 hospitals participated in the study. The C trachomatis infection was determined using COBAS Amplicor system. DNA extracted in C trachomatis-positive samples was amplified using a nested PCR based on ompA gene and then genotyped using a microsphere suspension array. The overall prevalence of genital C trachomatis infection was 17.7%. The prevalence in patients at STD or GUM clinics was significantly higher than that in patients at OBGYN clinics. Being male (adjusted OR (AOR) 2.5, 95% CI 1.8 to 3.4), having no consistent use of a condom with casual partners in the past 3 months (AOR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.8) and having any STD symptoms (AOR 3.3, 95% CI 2.0 to 5.4) were independently associated with C trachomatis infection. Eight genotypes were identified. The most prevalent genotypes were F (22.3%), E (22.0%) and D/Da (12.7%). Other genotypes were G/Ga (8.0%), J (7.3%), K (2.7%), H (2.7%) and I/Ia (0.4%). Eighty-two samples (18.3%) were infected with multiple genotypes. Genotype D/Da among patients from GUM clinics was more common than those from STD or OBGYN clinics. Infections with genotypes G and F were statistically associated with abnormal vaginal discharge (p=0.001) and being married (p=0.014), respectively. Infection with multiple genotypes was more common among patients with a higher income (p=0.011). A substantial prevalence of genital C trachomatis infection in Shenzhen suggests the importance of detection and treatment of the infection in high-risk groups.

  10. Controlling the conductance of molecular wires by defect engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, D.; Pastawski, H. M.; Cuniberti, G.

    2010-06-01

    Understanding the charge transport mechanisms in nanoscale structures is essential for the development of molecular electronic devices. Charge transport through one-dimensional (1D) molecular systems connected between two contacts is influenced by several parameters, such as the electronic structure of the molecule and the presence of disorder and defects. In this work, we have modeled 1D molecular wires connected between electrodes and systematically investigated the influence of both soliton formation and the presence of defects on properties such as conductance and the density of states. Our numerical calculations have shown that the transport properties are highly sensitive to the positions of both the solitons and the defects. Interestingly, the introduction of a single defect in the molecular wire that divides it into two fragments, both consisting of an odd number of sites, creates a new conduction channel at the center of the band gap, resulting in higher zero-bias conductance than for defect-free systems. This phenomenon suggests alternative routes for the engineering of molecular wires with enhanced conductance.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Brucella abortus in Northern Ireland—1991 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Andrew; Mallon, Thomas; Skuce, Robin; Groussaud, Pauline; Dainty, Amanda; Graham, Judith; Jones, Kerri; Pollock, Lorraine; Whatmore, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses worldwide. Bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus has far reaching animal health and economic impacts at both the local and national levels. Alongside traditional veterinary epidemiology, the use of molecular typing has recently been applied to inform on bacterial population structure and identify epidemiologically-linked cases of infection. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat VNTR analysis (MLVA) was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of a well-characterised Brucella abortus epidemic in Northern Ireland involving 387 herds between 1991 and 2012. Results MLVA identified 98 unique B. abortus genotypes from disclosing isolates in the 387 herds involved in the epidemic. Clustering algorithms revealed the relatedness of many of these genotypes. Combined with epidemiological information on chronology of infection and geographic location, these genotype data helped to identify 7 clonal complexes which underpinned the outbreak over the defined period. Hyper-variability of some VNTR loci both within herds and individual animals led to detection of multiple genotypes associated with single outbreaks. However with dense sampling, these genotypes could still be associated with specific clonal complexes thereby permitting inference of epidemiological links. MLVA- based epidemiological monitoring data were congruent with an independent classical veterinary epidemiology study carried out in the same territory. Conclusions MLVA is a useful tool in ongoing disease surveillance of B. abortus outbreaks, especially when combined with accurate epidemiological information on disease tracings, geographical clustering of cases and chronology of infection. PMID:26325586

  12. A Molecular Epidemiology Survey of Respiratory Adenoviruses Circulating in Children Residing in Southern Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Qurei, Lina; Seto, Donald; Salah, Zaidoun; Azzeh, Maysa

    2012-01-01

    A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005–2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections. PMID:22880092

  13. A molecular epidemiology survey of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in children residing in Southern Palestine.

    PubMed

    Qurei, Lina; Seto, Donald; Salah, Zaidoun; Azzeh, Maysa

    2012-01-01

    A molecular epidemiology survey was performed in order to establish and document the respiratory adenovirus pathogen profiles among children in Southern Palestine. Three hundred and thirty-eight hospitalized pediatric cases with adenovirus-associated respiratory tract infections were analyzed. Forty four cases out of the 338 were evaluated in more detail for the adenoviruses types present. All of the children resided in Southern Palestine, that is, in city, village and refugee camp environments within the districts of Hebron and Bethlehem. Human adenoviruses circulated throughout 2005-2010, with major outbreaks occurring in the spring months. A larger percent of the children diagnosed with adenoviral infections were male infants. DNA sequence analysis of the hexon genes from 44 samples revealed that several distinct adenovirus types circulated in the region; these were HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-B3 and HAdV-C5. However, not all of these types were detected within each year. This is the first study ever conducted in Palestine of the genetic epidemiology of respiratory adenovirus infections.

  14. Tracking the molecular epidemiology of Brazilian Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda M F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Myrrha, Luciana W; Fietto, Juliana L R; Silva, Abelardo; Almeida, Márcia R

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease of young chickens caused by Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Genome segment A encodes the capsid protein (VP2), while segment B encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In the present study, we trace the molecular epidemiology of IBDV in Brazil by analyzing 29 isolates collected in the major regions of poultry production. To genetically characterize the isolates, phylogenetic and population dynamic analyses were conducted using 68 VP1 (2634 nt) and 102 VP2 (1356 nt) coding sequences from IBDV isolates from different regions of the world. Furthermore, the evolution of IBDV was analyzed by characterizing the selective forces that operated during the diversification of viral isolates. We show that IBDV isolates were introduced into Brazil mainly from the Netherlands and the USA. These introductions were associated with all Brazilian poultry production regions analyzed in this work. In addition, we show that the evolution of IBDV has been shaped by a combination of very low recombination rates and relatively high rates of nucleotide substitution (2.988×10(-4) for VP1 and 3.2937×10(-4) for VP2), which themselves are a function of purifying selection operating on VP1 and VP2. Furthermore, our extended Bayesian skyline plot suggests that the increase in the effective population size of isolates of IBDV is consistent with its epidemiological history, with a large increase during the emergence of acute outbreaks of IBD in the 1980s.

  15. 77 FR 21785 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Prevalence, Incidence, Epidemiology and Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ..., Incidence, Epidemiology and Molecular Variants of HIV in Blood Donors in Brazil Summary: Under the... Molecular Variants of HIV in Blood Donors in Brazil. Type of Information Collection Request: Reinstatement... prevalence and incidence rates, and identifying behavioral risk behaviors for HIV infection among donors...

  16. Malignant catarrhal fever: understanding molecular diagnostics in context of epidemiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal disease, primarily of ruminants, caused by a group of gammaherpesviruses. Due to complexities of pathogenesis and epidemiology in various species which are either clinically-susceptible or reservoir hosts, veterinary clinicians face significant ...

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Laguna Negra Virus, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S.; Medeiros, Daniele B.A.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Simith, Darlene B.; Pereira, Armando de S.; Elkhoury, Mauro R.; Santos, Elizabeth Davi; Lavocat, Marília; Marques, Aparecido A.; Via, Alba V.G.; Kohl, Vânia A.; Terças, Ana C.P.; D`Andrea, Paulo; Bonvícino, Cibele R.; Sampaio de Lemos, Elba R.

    2012-01-01

    We associated Laguna Negra virus with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Mato Grosso State, Brazil, and a previously unidentified potential host, the Calomys callidus rodent. Genetic testing revealed homologous sequencing in specimens from 20 humans and 8 mice. Further epidemiologic studies may lead to control of HPS in Mato Grosso State. PMID:22607717

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis are enteric protozoan parasites that infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts including humans. Infections with both parasites are known as one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and livestock. The epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis and giardias...

  19. Mechanical tuning of conductance and thermopower in helicene molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Jaroslav; Chocholoušová, Jana Vacek; Stará, Irena G.; Starý, Ivo; Dubi, Yonatan

    2015-05-01

    Helicenes are inherently chiral polyaromatic molecules composed of all-ortho fused benzene rings possessing a spring-like structure. Here, using a combination of density functional theory and tight-binding calculations, it is demonstrated that controlling the length of the helicene molecule by mechanically stretching or compressing the molecular junction can dramatically change the electronic properties of the helicene, leading to a tunable switching behavior of the conductance and thermopower of the junction with on/off ratios of several orders of magnitude. Furthermore, control over the helicene length and number of rings is shown to lead to more than an order of magnitude increase in the thermopower and thermoelectric figure-of-merit over typical molecular junctions, presenting new possibilities of making efficient thermoelectric molecular devices. The physical origin of the strong dependence of the transport properties of the junction is investigated, and found to be related to a shift in the position of the molecular orbitals.

  20. Charging effects, forces, and conduction in molecular wire systems.

    PubMed

    Emberly, Eldon G; Kirczenow, George

    2002-04-01

    Recently, experiments have shown that effects arising from charging and conformational changes in a molecular wire due to an applied voltage bias can have a significant influence on the transport characteristics of the system. We introduce a tractable theoretical approach based on Landauer theory and total energy methods that treats transport nonlinearities, conformational changes, and charging effects in molecular wires in a unified way. We apply this approach to molecular wires consisting of short chain molecules with different electronic and structural properties bonded to metal contacts. We find that the nonlinear conductance characteristics of these systems are remarkably similar and can be understood in terms of a single physical mechanism. We predict that negative differential resistance should occur at high bias in such molecular wires due to the combined effects of charging and conformational changes on their electronic structure.

  1. Molecular design of conducting polymer for electrochromic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sze C.; Clark, R. L.; Liao, H.; Sun, L.

    1995-09-01

    The electrochromism of polyaniline in the near infrared spectral range is studied. Spectroelectrochemical data are used to construct optically monitored cyclic voltamograms (o- CV). Details of the electrochromic effects are clarified by comparing o-CV with the ordinary current monitored cyclic voltamograms (i-CV). Components of Faradaic currents to the cyclic voltamogram can be resolved by comparing o-CV with i-CV. We discuss molecular designs for modifying the properties of polyaniline. By a template-guided polymerization scheme, we synthesize the double strand polymeric complex of polyaniline. The first strand is a conducting polymer and the second strand is a polyelectrolyte. This molecular complex has the advantage of being more stable, more processable than the conventional polyaniline. The double strand molecular complex offers increased flexibility in molecular design of electrochromic and electroactive polymers.

  2. The Current Status of the Disease Caused by Enterovirus 71 Infections: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Molecular Epidemiology, and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections have a major public health impact in the Asia-Pacific region. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular epidemiology of EV71 infection as well as EV71 vaccine development. Previous studies were found using the search terms “enterovirus 71” and “epidemiology” or “pathogenesis” or “molecular epidemiology” or “vaccine” in Medline and PubMed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. The reported epidemiology of cases caused by EV71 infection varied from country to country; seasonal variations in incidence were observed. Most cases of EV71 infection that resulted in hospitalization for complications occurred in children less than five years old. The brainstem was the most likely major target of EV71 infection. The emergence of the EV71 epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region has been associated with the circulation of different genetic lineages (genotypes B3, B4, C1, C2, and C4) that appear to be undergoing rapid evolutionary changes. The relationship between the gene structure of the EV71 virus and the factors that ensure its survival, circulation, and evasion of immunity is still unknown. EV71 infection has emerged as an important global public health problem. Vaccine development, including the development of inactivated whole-virus live attenuated, subviral particles, and DNA vaccines, has been progressing. PMID:27618078

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Entamoeba: First Description of Entamoeba moshkovskii in a Rural Area from Central Colombia

    PubMed Central

    León, Cielo M.; Fonseca, Jairo; Reyes, Patricia; Moncada, Ligia; Olivera, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii are the most frequent species described in human infection where E. histolytica is the only true pathogen. The epidemiology of this infection is complex due to the absence of a routine exam that allows a correct discrimination of the Entamoeba species complex. Therefore, molecular methods appear as the unique epidemiological tool to accomplish the species discrimination. Herein, we conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the frequency of Entamoeba species infections in a group of asymptomatic individuals from a rural area in central Colombia. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 181 fecal samples from asymptomatic children under 16 years old from the hamlet La Vírgen, Cundinamarca (Colombia) that voluntarily accepted to participate in the study were collected. The fecal samples were examined by light microscopy and DNA-extracted, subsequently submitted to molecular discrimination of E. dispar/E. histolytica/E. moshkovskii infection based on a multiplex PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA fragment. To confirm the species description, twenty samples were randomly submitted to DNA sequencing of the aforementioned fragment. By direct microscopic examination, frequency of the complex E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii was 18.8% (34/181). PCR showed a frequency of 49.1% (89/181), discriminated as 23.2% (42/181) that were positive for E. dispar, 25.4% (46/181) for E. moshkovskii and 0.55% (1/ 181) for E. histolytica. Also, mixed infections were detected between E. dispar and E. moshkovskii at 4.42% (8/181) of the samples. Molecular barcoding confirmed the diagnosis depicted by the multiplex PCR assay. Conclusions/Significance This is the first description of E. moshkovskii in Colombia and the second report in South-America to our knowledge. Our results suggest the need to unravel the true epidemiology of Entamoeba infections around the world, including the real pathogenic role that E

  4. Theory of molecular conductance using a modular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-12-01

    This study probes the correlation between the conductance of a molecular wire (the property of a whole system) and its constituent backbone units (modules). By using a tight-binding Hamiltonian combined with single-particle Green's functions, we develop an approach that enables an estimate of a conductance decay constant in terms of the Hamiltonians of molecular backbone units and the couplings between two nearest-neighbor units in the off-resonant tunneling regime. For demonstration, we examine several representative molecular systems in a framework of the Hückel model (the simplest atomistic-level model). The Hückel model can be reduced to a single-orbital-per-site formulation [A. Nitzan, Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 52, 681 (2001)], and each energy level in the single-orbital-per-site picture can be expressed in an explicit form including the synergistic effect of all molecular orbitals of a molecular backbone unit. Based on the proposed approach, we show the correspondence between the complete destructive quantum interference and an infinite injection gap and derive the preconditions of the modified Simmons equation and the rule of intramolecular series circuits.

  5. [Progress of the micronucleus test in the field of molecular cancer epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Xu, Huadong; Jia, Guang

    2015-01-01

    The micronucleus test (MNT) can be used to detect multiple genetic end points simultaneously, including chromosome aberration, mis-repaired DNA damage, apoptosis, parts of mutation and so on, which MNT has been an important part of the study of cancer epidemiology.Here, we reviewed the progress of MNT in the field of molecular cancer epidemiology in recent years, including early detection and diagnosis of cancer, evaluation of carcinogenic substances, genetic susceptibility biomarkers, micronutrient and cohort studies.

  6. Atomic force microscopy observation of insulated molecular wire formed by conducting polymer and molecular nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Takeshi; Akai, Tomonori; Abe, Takumi; Ito, Kohzo

    2002-02-01

    Inclusion complex formation between a conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI) with emeraldine base, and a molecular nanotube synthesized from α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) has been studied by atomic force microscopy. We observed a rodlike inclusion complex of PANI and the molecular nanotube on mica substrate at room temperature. The height of this structure is nearly equal to the outside diameter of α-CD and almost uniform along the whole length of the structure, which indicates that a conducting wire of PANI is fully covered by molecular nanotubes as insulator. Accordingly, this inclusion complex can be regarded as insulated molecular wire.

  7. Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Polymers and its Molecular Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto Simavilla, David; Venerus, David; Schieber, Jay; uCoSm Team

    2014-03-01

    Anisotropy in thermal conductivity has a significant impact on both processing and final properties of materials. Simple molecular arguments suggest that Fourier?s law must be generalized to allow for anisotropic thermal conductivity. We present two complementary experimental methods to obtain quantitative measurements of the thermal diffusivity (conductivity) tensor. We report anisotropic thermal diffusivity and stress in molten, cross-linked and solid polymers under several types of flows. Our results support the validity of a linear relationship between stress and anisotropy in thermal conductivity. When the proportionality constant, the stress-thermal coefficient, is made dimensionless by the plateau modulus of the polymer melt, a universal value of approximately 0.03 is observed for all chemistries. Such a universality is surprising, since phonon transport mechanisms are sensitive to chemical structure. For instance, the analogous stress-optic coefficient depends strongly on chemistry, and can even change sign. Connecting these measurements with current theories for thermal transport in amorphous materials, such as Minimum Thermal Conductivity (MTC) model, is crucial to understand the molecular origins of anisotropic thermal conduction in polymers.

  8. Frontier orbital control of molecular conductance and its switching.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-04-14

    For transmission of electrons through a π system, when the Landauer theory of molecular conductance is viewed from a molecular orbital (MO) perspective, there obtains a simple perturbation theoretic dependence, due to Yoshizawa and Tada, on a) the product of the orbital coefficients at the sites of electrode attachment, and b) the MO energies. The frontier orbitals consistently and simply indicate high or low transmission, even if other orbitals may contribute. This formalism, with its consequent reinforcement and/or interference of conductance, accounts for the (previously explained) difference in direct vs. cross conjugated transmission across an ethylene, as well as the comparative ON/OFF ratios in the experimentally investigated dimethyldihydropyrene and dithienylethene-type single-molecule switches. A strong dependence of the conductance on the site of attachment of the electrodes in a π system is an immediate extrapolation; the theory then predicts that for some specified sites the switching behavior will be inverted; i.e. the "open" molecular form of the switch will be more conductive.

  9. The role of molecular epidemiology in contact investigations: a US perspective.

    PubMed

    Daley, C L; Kawamura, L M

    2003-12-01

    Preventing tuberculosis (TB) transmission through treatment of active cases and contact investigation is the highest priority of TB control programs in the United States. The role of contact investigation is becoming increasingly important as the number of TB cases declines nationally. However, the effectiveness of contact investigation has been difficult to assess because, prior to the availability of molecular genotyping techniques, levels of transmission were crudely measurable. Epidemiological links within and outside the traditional concentric circle approach are limited by the quality of the contact investigation, the skill and knowledge of the investigator and the information provided by the patient. Molecular epidemiology has added a new dimension by enabling the recognition of unsuspected transmission, likely locations of transmission, and quantification of the extent of transmission that is occurring within a given population. In the future, as real-time genotyping becomes more available, the role of molecular epidemiology is likely to expand.

  10. Molecular Dynamics study of the mixed oxide fuel thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichenko, S.; Staicu, D.

    2013-08-01

    There is still no clear understanding of the plutonium content influence on the thermal conductivity behaviour of the (U,Pu) O2 MOX fuels. In this work Classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) was used to investigate the (U,Pu) O2 thermal conductivity in the whole concentration range and in the temperature range from 400 K to 1600 K. The Green-Kubo approach was used for the thermal conductivity calculation and an algorithm was proposed to improve the accuracy of the calculation. The obtained results are in good agreement with the literature experimental data and results of modelling of other authors. On the basis of the obtained results we give recommendations for the MOX thermal conductivity evaluation in the concentration range from pure UO2 up to pure PuO2.

  11. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-21

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  12. Integration of molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science for global precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Akihiro; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Nishihara, Reiko; Tan, Andy S; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine concept and the unique disease principle imply that each patient has unique pathogenic processes resulting from heterogeneous cellular genetic and epigenetic alterations and interactions between cells (including immune cells) and exposures, including dietary, environmental, microbial and lifestyle factors. As a core method field in population health science and medicine, epidemiology is a growing scientific discipline that can analyze disease risk factors and develop statistical methodologies to maximize utilization of big data on populations and disease pathology. The evolving transdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) can advance biomedical and health research by linking exposures to molecular pathologic signatures, enhancing causal inference and identifying potential biomarkers for clinical impact. The MPE approach can be applied to any diseases, although it has been most commonly used in neoplastic diseases (including breast, lung and colorectal cancers) because of availability of various molecular diagnostic tests. However, use of state-of-the-art genomic, epigenomic and other omic technologies and expensive drugs in modern healthcare systems increases racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. To address this, we propose to integrate molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science. Social epidemiology integrates the latter two fields. The integrative social MPE model can embrace sociology, economics and precision medicine, address global health disparities and inequalities, and elucidate biological effects of social environments, behaviors and networks. We foresee advancements of molecular medicine, including molecular diagnostics, biomedical imaging and targeted therapeutics, which should benefit individuals in a global population, by means of an interdisciplinary approach of integrative MPE and social health science.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  14. Molecular design of electron transport with orbital rule: toward conductance-decay free molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Tada, Tomofumi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we report our viewpoint of single molecular conductance in terms of frontier orbitals. The orbital rule derived from orbital phase and amplitude is a powerful guideline for the qualitative understanding of molecular conductance in both theoretical and experimental studies. The essence of the orbital rule is the phase-related quantum interference, and on the basis of this rule a constructive or destructive pathway for electron transport is easily predicted. We have worked on the construction of the orbital rule for more than ten years and recently found from its application that π-stacked molecular junctions fabricated experimentally are in line with the concept for conductance-decay free junctions. We explain the orbital rule using benzene molecular junctions with the para-, meta- and ortho-connections and discuss linear π-conjugated chains and π-stacked molecular junctions with respect to their small decay factors in this manuscript.

  15. On the dielectric conductivity of molecular ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian; Steinhauser, Othmar

    2009-09-21

    The contribution of the conductivity to the spectrum of the generalized dielectric constant or susceptibility of molecular ionic liquids is analyzed, both in theoretical terms and computationally by means of molecular dynamics simulation of the concrete system 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium dicyanoamide at 300 K. As a central quantity the simulated current autocorrelation function is modeled by a carefully designed fit function. This not only gives a satisfactory numerical representation but yields the correct conductivity upon integration. In addition the fit function can be Fourier-Laplace transformed analytically. Both, the real and imaginary parts of the transform show expected behavior, in particular, the right limits for zero frequency. This altogether demonstrates that the components of the fit function are of physical relevance.

  16. Anisotropic Thermal Conduction in Polymers and its Molecular Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Jay; Venerus, David; Gupta, Sahil

    2013-03-01

    The strong coupling of mechanical and thermal effects in polymer flows have a significant impact on both the processing and final properties of the material. Simple molecular arguments suggest that Fourier's law must be generalized to allow for anisotropic thermal conductivity in polymers subjected to deformation. In our laboratory we have developed a novel application of the optical technique known as Forced Rayleigh Scattering to obtain quantitative measurements of components of the thermal diffusivity (conductivity) tensor in polymers subjected to deformations. We report measurements of anisotropic thermal diffusivity and stress in molten, cross-linked and solid polymers subjected to several types of flows. The deformed samples have significant anisotropy in polymer chain orientation that results in significant anisotropy in thermal conductivity. Stress and thermal conductivity data support the validity of the stress-thermal rule, which is analogous to the well-known stress-optic rule. We also report measurements on solid polymers with isotropic polymer chain orientation that are under stress, which display rather unexpected behavior. These measurements are used to develop an understanding of the molecular origins of anisotropic thermal conduction in polymeric material NSF-DMR-706582

  17. Molecular Conductance: Effects of Contact Atomic Structure and Anchoring Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, S.-H.; Baranger, H. U.; Yang, Weitao

    2004-03-01

    The nature of the molecule-lead contact is of crucial importance in molecular transport. As an example, we study the molecular conductance of benzene connected to two Au leads through three different anchoring groups (S, Se, and Te). Our calculations proceed from first-principles by using a density functional theory calculation for the electronic structure and a Green function method for the electron transport. We analyze systematically the effects of contact atomic relaxation, lead orientation, absorption site, chemical trends in the anchoring group, and atomic structure around the contact. Different lead orientations, absorption sites, and anchoring groups can cause a change of several times in conductance. Most significantly, adding an additional Au atom at each contact can increase the conductance by two orders of magnitude because of a LUMO-like resonance peak around the Fermi energy. This also leads to a large negative differential conductance. Finally, the equilibrium conductance decreases with increasing atomic number of the anchoring group. This is opposite to the conclusion of previous work using the jellium model for the leads in which the contact atomic structure cannot be taken into account. Supported in part by the NSF (DMR-0103003).

  18. Molecular-dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Hee; Biswas, R.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Chan, C. T.; Ho, K. M.

    1991-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity κ(T) of amorphous silicon has been calculated from equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations using the time correlations of the heat flux operator in which anharmonicity is explicitly incorporated. The Stillinger-Weber two- and three-body Si potential and the Wooten-Weaire-Winer a-Si model were utilized. The calculations correctly predict an increasing thermal conductivity at low temperatures (below 400 K). The κ(T), for T>400 K, is affected by the thermally generated coordination-defect states. Comparisons to both experiment and previous calculations will be described.

  19. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  20. Calculating Conductance of Ion Channels - Linking Molecular Dynamics and Electrophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations were combined with an electrodiffusion model to compute conduction of simple ion channels. The main assumptions of the model, and the consistency, efficiency and accuracy of the ion current calculations were tested and found satisfactory. The calculated current-voltage dependence for a synthetic peptide channel is in agreement with experiments and correctly captures the asymmetry of current with respect to applied field.

  1. Oropouche Virus: Clinical, Epidemiological, and Molecular Aspects of a Neglected Orthobunyavirus

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Jorge Fernando; de Souza, William Marciel; Pinheiro, Francisco de Paula; Figueiredo, Mário Luiz; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is an important cause of arboviral illness in Latin American countries, more specifically in the Amazon region of Brazil, Venezuela and Peru, as well as in other countries such as Panama. In the past decades, the clinical, epidemiological, pathological, and molecular aspects of OROV have been published and provide the basis for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. Here, we describe the milestones in a comprehensive review of OROV epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular biology, including a description of the first isolation of the virus, the outbreaks during the past six decades, clinical aspects of OROV infection, diagnostic methods, genome and genetic traits, evolution, and viral dispersal. PMID:28167595

  2. Oropouche Virus: Clinical, Epidemiological, and Molecular Aspects of a Neglected Orthobunyavirus.

    PubMed

    Travassos da Rosa, Jorge Fernando; de Souza, William Marciel; Pinheiro, Francisco de Paula; Figueiredo, Mário Luiz; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Acrani, Gustavo Olszanski; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira

    2017-05-01

    AbstractOropouche virus (OROV) is an important cause of arboviral illness in Latin American countries, more specifically in the Amazon region of Brazil, Venezuela and Peru, as well as in other countries such as Panama. In the past decades, the clinical, epidemiological, pathological, and molecular aspects of OROV have been published and provide the basis for a better understanding of this important human pathogen. Here, we describe the milestones in a comprehensive review of OROV epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular biology, including a description of the first isolation of the virus, the outbreaks during the past six decades, clinical aspects of OROV infection, diagnostic methods, genome and genetic traits, evolution, and viral dispersal.

  3. Molecular epidemiological study of enteroviruses associated with encephalitis in children from Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li; Qiong, Zhang; Xiao-Ting, Shen; Yu-Jie, Liu; Jian-Hua, Mao; Qiang, Shu; Shi-Qiang, Shang

    2016-10-01

    Enterovirus (EV) has over 100 serotypes of species A-D, which can cause various symptoms in infants. Enterovirus encephalitis (EVE) is serve disease with high morbidity and mortality in children. To well define the epidemiology of EVE, we wanted to know more about EV and EV molecular typing by conducting this study in Hangzhou.Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from children with diagnosis of encephalitis. Meanwhile, one-step real-time RT-PCR was used for the detection of EV, and we also identified the serotypes of EV by using gene sequencing of VP1 or 5'UTR region.A total of 126 CSF specimens were tested and EV was detected in 26 specimens (20.6%). The molecular typing results showed different types of EV strains including Coxsackievirus B2, Coxsackievirus B3, Echovirus 5, Echovirus 16, Echovirus 18, Echovirus 30, and all EV isolates belonging to the human EV species B.According to the sequence of VP1 and 5'UTR region, E30 may be major cause of children's EVE in Hangzhou, China.

  4. Molecular epidemiological study of enteroviruses associated with encephalitis in children from Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Qiong, Zhang; Xiao-ting, Shen; Yu-jie, Liu; Jian-hua, Mao; Qiang, Shu; Shi-qiang, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enterovirus (EV) has over 100 serotypes of species A–D, which can cause various symptoms in infants. Enterovirus encephalitis (EVE) is serve disease with high morbidity and mortality in children. To well define the epidemiology of EVE, we wanted to know more about EV and EV molecular typing by conducting this study in Hangzhou. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from children with diagnosis of encephalitis. Meanwhile, one-step real-time RT-PCR was used for the detection of EV, and we also identified the serotypes of EV by using gene sequencing of VP1 or 5′UTR region. A total of 126 CSF specimens were tested and EV was detected in 26 specimens (20.6%). The molecular typing results showed different types of EV strains including Coxsackievirus B2, Coxsackievirus B3, Echovirus 5, Echovirus 16, Echovirus 18, Echovirus 30, and all EV isolates belonging to the human EV species B. According to the sequence of VP1 and 5′UTR region, E30 may be major cause of children's EVE in Hangzhou, China. PMID:27749541

  5. Epidemiological and molecular characterization of dengue viruses imported into Guangzhou during 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongxia; Li, Shufen; Li, Xiaobo; Zheng, Kui; Yuan, Shuai; Huang, Jicheng

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus causes one of the most significant infectious diseases in tropical and subtropical regions, notable number of which is imported into China every year. In this study, the molecular epidemiologic and phylogenetic analyses of dengue cases imported into Guangzhou in South China during 2009-2013 were conducted. During that period, 46 imported dengue cases were identified, including four serotypes. Most of the dengue patients were travelling from Southeast Asia, South Asia and Africa. The envelope (E) genes of 20 imported dengue viruses introduced from 13 countries and regions, were sequenced and used for phylogenetic analyses. The results indicated that the DENV-1 genotype I and DENV-2 Asian genotype I were the most predominant DENV strains, which were circulating in Southeast Asia and imported into South China. In addition, the new introduction of DENV-3 genotype III from West Asia was observed. This study provided an overview on the genetic diversity of DENV strains imported into South China, and also gave information about the geographic distribution, dynamic transmission and molecular evolution of epidemic DENV strains.

  6. Blastocystis in Côte d'Ivoire: molecular identification and epidemiological data.

    PubMed

    D'Alfonso, R; Santoro, M; Essi, D; Monsia, A; Kaboré, Y; Glé, C; Di Cave, D; Sorge, R P; Di Cristanziano, V; Berrilli, F

    2017-07-04

    Blastocystis is an enteric protozoan infecting humans and animals in both developed and developing countries at all latitudes. Despite this, data on Blastocystis infection are not available for several geographical areas, including many African countries. In this study, a survey was conducted on Blastocystis among humans and domestic animals in rural and urban localities in Côte d'Ivoire, in order to investigate the prevalence, the subtype distribution, and the zoonotic potential in association with sociodemographic factors, seasonality, symptoms, and co-infections. A total of 110 fecal samples were collected from patients living in four localities. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses were conducted for Blastocystis detection and subtyping. Positive samples from symptomatic patients were tested by Luminex xTAG® Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP) to evidence the presence of other common intestinal pathogens. Overall, a prevalence of 58.2% was observed in humans and subtypes ST1(50.0%), ST2 (22.0%) and ST3 (28.1%) were identified. The prevalence values varied significantly among the sites but not in relation to the subtype. The seasonal rains significantly increase the infection rate in all localities. No significant differences in the ST distribution between asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects were observed. As regard the zoonotic transmission, an additional sampling was conducted in another village where fecal samples were simultaneously collected from humans and animals. Blastocystis STs 1-3 and ST7 were identified in eight humans and four chickens, respectively. This study provides the first exhaustive data on the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis in Côte d'Ivoire.

  7. An exercise in molecular epidemiology: human rhinovirus prevalence and genetics.

    PubMed

    Albright, Catherine J; Hall, David J

    2011-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) is one of the most common human respiratory pathogens and is responsible for the majority of upper respiratory illnesses. Recently, a phylogeny was constructed from all known American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) HRV sequences. From this study, three HRV classifications (HRVA, HRVB, and HRVC) were determined and techniques for classifying new isolates of HRV were reported. The genetic change of this virus in specific populations over time is of great interest to understand the evolution and epidemiology of viruses. To facilitate the collections of HRV sequences over a number of years, a virology experiment was designed in which students test nasal lavage samples to look for HRV infection. Students will learn a variety of techniques including RNA isolation, cDNA synthesis, qPCR, and agarose gel electrophoresis as well as bioinformatic skills though examination of sequences from the HRV-field isolates. Furthermore, students can look at symptom data from subjects to investigate correlations between symptom severity and factors such as stress and sleep patterns. Such information can be used to examine hypotheses regarding HRV mutation, symptom severity and epidemiology. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Coffee and cancer risk, epidemiological evidence, and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2014-05-01

    Although early studies suggested that coffee consumption might increase risk of some cancers, more comprehensive epidemiological and experimental data now generally indicate either neutral or beneficial effects. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for associations between breast, prostate, colorectal, and liver cancers and the consumption of coffee, and discuss the experimental evidence for potential chemopreventive mechanisms of coffee and coffee constituents. The epidemiological evidence consistently indicates that coffee protects against liver cancer, and also point toward protective effects for risk of colorectal cancers (with relative risks of 0.50 (95% CI: 0.42-0.59) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75-0.92), respectively, in the most recent meta-analyses). There seems to be no association between the overall risk of breast and prostate cancer and coffee intake. However, for subgroups such as postmenopausal breast cancers, advanced prostate cancers, and breast and prostate cancer survivors, an inverse association with coffee intake is indicated. Potential mechanisms for chemopreventive effects of coffee phytochemicals includes inhibition of oxidative stress and oxidative damage, regulation of DNA repair, phase II enzymatic activity, apoptosis, inflammation, as well as having antiproliferative, antiangiogenetic effects and antimetastatic effects. The experimental evidence for effects of coffee and coffee constituents on each of these processes is discussed.

  9. Understanding Molecular Conduction: Old Wine in a New Bottle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avik

    2007-03-01

    Molecules provide an opportunity to test our understanding of fundamental non-equilibrium transport processes, as well as explore new device possibilities. We have developed a unified approach to nanoscale conduction, coupling bandstructure and electrostatics of the channel and contacts with a quantum kinetic theory of current flow. This allows us to describe molecular conduction at various levels of detail, -- from quantum corrected compact models, to semi-empirical models for quick physical insights, and `first-principles' calculations of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with no adjustable parameters. Using this suite of tools, we can quantitatively explain various experimental I-Vs, including complex reconstructed silicon substrates. We find that conduction in most molecules is contact dominated, and limited by fundamental electrostatic and thermodynamic restrictions quite analogous to those faced by the silicon industry, barring a few interesting exceptions. The distinction between molecular and silicon electronics must therefore be probed at a more fundamental level. Ultra-short molecules are unique in that they possess large Coulomb energies as well as anomalous vibronic couplings with current flow -- in other words, strong non-equilibrium electron-electron and electron-phonon correlations. These effects yield prominent experimental signatures, but require a completely different modeling approach -- in fact, popular approaches to include correlation typically do not work for non-equilibrium. Molecules exhibit rich physics, including the ability to function both as weakly interacting current conduits (quantum wires) as well as strongly correlated charge storage centers (quantum dots). Theoretical treatment of the intermediate coupling regime is particularly challenging, with a large `fine structure constant' for transport that negates orthodox theories of Coulomb Blockade and phonon-assisted tunneling. It is in this regime that the scientific and

  10. Orbital views of molecular conductance perturbed by anchor units.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Staykov, Aleksandar; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2011-04-20

    Site-specific electron transport phenomena through benzene and benzenedithiol derivatives are discussed on the basis of a qualitative Hückel molecular orbital analysis for better understanding of the effect of anchoring sulfur atoms. A recent work for the orbital control of electron transport through aromatic hydrocarbons provided an important concept for the design of high-conductance connections of a molecule with anchoring atoms. In this work the origin of the frontier orbitals of benzenedithiol derivatives, the effect of the sulfur atoms on the orbitals and on the electron transport properties, and the applicability of the theoretical concept on aromatic hydrocarbons with the anchoring units are studied. The results demonstrate that the orbital view predictions are applicable to molecules perturbed by the anchoring units. The electron transport properties of benzene are found to be qualitatively consistent with those of benzenedithiol with respect to the site dependence. To verify the result of the Hückel molecular orbital calculations, fragment molecular orbital analyses with the extended Hückel molecular orbital theory and electron transport calculations with density functional theory are performed. Calculated results are in good agreement with the orbital interaction analysis. The phase, amplitude, and spatial distribution of the frontier orbitals play an essential role in the design of the electron transport properties through aromatic hydrocarbons.

  11. Molecular epidemiology, and possible real-world applications in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction, a key idea in molecular epidemiology, has enabled the development of personalized medicine. This concept includes personalized prevention. While genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic susceptibility loci in breast cancer risk, however, the application of this knowledge to practical prevention is still underway. Here, we briefly review the history of molecular epidemiology and its progress in breast cancer epidemiology. We then introduce our experience with the trial combination of GWAS-identified loci and well-established lifestyle and reproductive risk factors in the risk prediction of breast cancer. Finally, we report our exploration of the cumulative risk of breast cancer based on this risk prediction model as a potential tool for individual risk communication, including genetic risk factors and gene-environment interaction with obesity.

  12. Deciphering the Origin of the 2012 Cholera Epidemic in Guinea by Integrating Epidemiological and Molecular Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Mengel, Martin A.; Koivogui, Lamine; Moore, Sandra; Mutreja, Ankur; Kande, Yacouba; Yattara, Ousmane; Sarr Keita, Véronique; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Garnotel, Eric; Keita, Sakoba; Piarroux, Renaud

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is typically considered endemic in West Africa, especially in the Republic of Guinea. However, a three-year lull period was observed from 2009 to 2011, before a new epidemic struck the country in 2012, which was officially responsible for 7,350 suspected cases and 133 deaths. To determine whether cholera re-emerged from the aquatic environment or was rather imported due to human migration, a comprehensive epidemiological and molecular survey was conducted. A spatiotemporal analysis of the national case databases established Kaback Island, located off the southern coast of Guinea, as the initial focus of the epidemic in early February. According to the field investigations, the index case was found to be a fisherman who had recently arrived from a coastal district of neighboring Sierra Leone, where a cholera outbreak had recently occurred. MLVA-based genotype mapping of 38 clinical Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates sampled throughout the epidemic demonstrated a progressive genetic diversification of the strains from a single genotype isolated on Kaback Island in February, which correlated with spatial epidemic spread. Whole-genome sequencing characterized this strain as an “atypical” El Tor variant. Furthermore, genome-wide SNP-based phylogeny analysis grouped the Guinean strain into a new clade of the third wave of the seventh pandemic, distinct from previously analyzed African strains and directly related to a Bangladeshi isolate. Overall, these results highly suggest that the Guinean 2012 epidemic was caused by a V. cholerae clone that was likely imported from Sierra Leone by an infected individual. These results indicate the importance of promoting the cross-border identification and surveillance of mobile and vulnerable populations, including fishermen, to prevent, detect and control future epidemics in the region. Comprehensive epidemiological investigations should be expanded to better understand cholera dynamics and improve disease control

  13. Deciphering the origin of the 2012 cholera epidemic in Guinea by integrating epidemiological and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Mengel, Martin A; Koivogui, Lamine; Moore, Sandra; Mutreja, Ankur; Kande, Yacouba; Yattara, Ousmane; Sarr Keita, Véronique; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Garnotel, Eric; Keita, Sakoba; Piarroux, Renaud

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is typically considered endemic in West Africa, especially in the Republic of Guinea. However, a three-year lull period was observed from 2009 to 2011, before a new epidemic struck the country in 2012, which was officially responsible for 7,350 suspected cases and 133 deaths. To determine whether cholera re-emerged from the aquatic environment or was rather imported due to human migration, a comprehensive epidemiological and molecular survey was conducted. A spatiotemporal analysis of the national case databases established Kaback Island, located off the southern coast of Guinea, as the initial focus of the epidemic in early February. According to the field investigations, the index case was found to be a fisherman who had recently arrived from a coastal district of neighboring Sierra Leone, where a cholera outbreak had recently occurred. MLVA-based genotype mapping of 38 clinical Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates sampled throughout the epidemic demonstrated a progressive genetic diversification of the strains from a single genotype isolated on Kaback Island in February, which correlated with spatial epidemic spread. Whole-genome sequencing characterized this strain as an "atypical" El Tor variant. Furthermore, genome-wide SNP-based phylogeny analysis grouped the Guinean strain into a new clade of the third wave of the seventh pandemic, distinct from previously analyzed African strains and directly related to a Bangladeshi isolate. Overall, these results highly suggest that the Guinean 2012 epidemic was caused by a V. cholerae clone that was likely imported from Sierra Leone by an infected individual. These results indicate the importance of promoting the cross-border identification and surveillance of mobile and vulnerable populations, including fishermen, to prevent, detect and control future epidemics in the region. Comprehensive epidemiological investigations should be expanded to better understand cholera dynamics and improve disease control

  14. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  15. Molecular epidemiology of malaria in Cameroon. XII. In vitro drug assays and molecular surveillance of chloroquine and proguanil resistance.

    PubMed

    Basco, Leonardo K

    2002-10-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil combination is one of the options for chemoprophylaxis. The rapid evolution of drug resistance status requires a constant upgrade of epidemiologic data. Due to various difficulties in conducting prospective clinical studies on the prophylactic efficacy of the drug combination, especially in highly chloroquine-resistant zones, in vitro drug sensitivity assays and specific molecular markers for chloroquine (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter, pfcrt) and cycloguanil (a biologically active metabolite of proguanil; dihydrofolate reductase, dhfr) resistance were evaluated as an alternative approach in this study. Of 116 isolates, 62 (53.4%) were doubly resistant in vitro to chloroquine (IC50 > or = 100 nM) and cycloguanil (IC50 > or = 15 nM). Likewise, 62 of 118 isolates (52.5%) carried both the mutant Thr-76 pfcrt allele and at least one dhfr mutant allele (1 with a single Asn-108 allele, 8 with double Arg-59 and Asn-108 mutations, and 53 with triple Ile-51, Arg-59, and Asn-108 mutations). The in vitro drug response corresponded with the presence or absence of key mutation(s) in the pfcrt and dhfr genes. These results suggest the high proportion of P. falciparum isolates in southern Cameroon that may not respond to chloroquine-proguanil combination.

  16. Molecular-based surveillance of campylobacteriosis in New Zealand--from source attribution to genomic epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Muellner, P; Pleydell, E; Pirie, R; Baker, M G; Campbell, D; Carter, P E; French, N P

    2013-01-17

    Molecular-based surveillance of campylobacteriosis in New Zealand contributed to the implementation of interventions that led to a 50% reduction in notified and hospitalised cases of the country's most important zoonosis. From a pre-intervention high of 384 per 100,000 population in 2006, incidence dropped by 50% in 2008; a reduction that has been sustained since. This article illustrates many aspects of the successful use of molecular-based surveillance, including the distinction between control-focused and strategy-focused surveillance and advances in source attribution. We discuss how microbial genetic data can enhance the understanding of epidemiological explanatory and response variables and thereby enrich the epidemiological analysis. Sequence data can be fitted to evolutionary and epidemiological models to gain new insights into pathogen evolution, the nature of associations between strains of pathogens and host species, and aspects of between-host transmission. With the advent of newer sequencing technologies and the availability of rapid, high-coverage genome sequence data, such techniques may be extended and refined within the emerging discipline of genomic epidemiology. The aim of this article is to summarise the experience gained in New Zealand with molecular-based surveillance of campylobacteriosis and to discuss how this experience could be used to further advance the use of molecular tools in surveillance.

  17. Overview of molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sabat, A J; Budimir, A; Nashev, D; Sá-Leão, R; van Dijl, J m; Laurent, F; Grundmann, H; Friedrich, A W

    2013-01-24

    Typing methods for discriminating different bacterial isolates of the same species are essential epidemiological tools in infection prevention and control. Traditional typing systems based on phenotypes, such as serotype, biotype, phage-type, or antibiogram, have been used for many years. However, more recent methods that examine the relatedness of isolates at a molecular level have revolutionised our ability to differentiate among bacterial types and subtypes. Importantly, the development of molecular methods has provided new tools for enhanced surveillance and outbreak detection. This has resulted in better implementation of rational infection control programmes and efficient allocation of resources across Europe. The emergence of benchtop sequencers using next generation sequencing technology makes bacterial whole genome sequencing (WGS) feasible even in small research and clinical laboratories. WGS has already been used for the characterisation of bacterial isolates in several large outbreaks in Europe and, in the near future, is likely to replace currently used typing methodologies due to its ultimate resolution. However, WGS is still too laborious and time-consuming to obtain useful data in routine surveillance. Also, a largely unresolved question is how genome sequences must be examined for epidemiological characterisation. In the coming years, the lessons learnt from currently used molecular methods will allow us to condense the WGS data into epidemiologically useful information. On this basis, we have reviewed current and new molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance of bacterial pathogens in clinical practice, aiming to give an overview of their specific advantages and disadvantages.

  18. Molecular epidemiology tools in the management of healthcare-associated infections: towards the definition of recommendations.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Stefania; Pasquarella, Cesira; Colotto, Marco; Barchitta, Martina; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Agodi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and have a significant economic impact for health systems. Molecular epidemiology tools have a central role in HAI prevention programs. In order to give an overview of their specific advantages and disadvantages we reported current and new molecular typing methods for HAI outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance. The current review was drafted as a short version of a longer document written by the Public Health Genomics (GSP) working group, and the Italian Study Group of Hospital Hygiene (GISIO), entitled Molecular epidemiology of Healthcare Associated Infections: recommendations from the Italian Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health (SItI). This text considers various aspects related to HAIs: the role of genotyping and bioinformatics, the organizational levels of laboratories, as well as ethical and economic aspects. The use of molecular epidemiology represents a key tool in the management of HAIs, to be used as a complement to conventional control measures. The present contribution aims to increase knowledge on the proper use of such methods, given the major challenge HAI represents for National Health systems.

  19. The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Environment of Carbapenemases Detected in Africa.

    PubMed

    Sekyere, John Osei; Govinden, Usha; Essack, Sabiha

    2016-01-01

    Research articles describing carbapenemases and their genetic environments in Gram-negative bacteria were reviewed to determine the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa. The emergence of resistance to the carbapenems, the last resort antibiotic for difficult to treat bacterial infections, affords clinicians few therapeutic options, with a resulting increase in morbidities, mortalities, and healthcare costs. However, the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases throughout Africa is less described. Research articles and conference proceedings describing the genetic environment and molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa were retrieved from Google Scholar, Scifinder, Pubmed, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases. Predominant carbapenemase genes so far described in Africa include the blaOXA-48 type, blaIMP, blaVIM, and blaNDM in Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and Escherichia coli carried on various plasmid types and sizes, transposons, and integrons. Class D and class B carbapenemases, mainly prevalent in A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and E. coli were the commonest carbapenemases. Carbapenemases are mainly reported in North and South Africa as under-resourced laboratories, lack of awareness and funding preclude the detection and reporting of carbapenemase-mediated resistance. Consequently, the true molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases and their genetic environment in Africa is still unknown.

  20. Molecular Epidemiological Interpretation of the Epidemic of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Streicher, E M; Sampson, S L; Dheda, K; Dolby, T; Simpson, J A; Victor, T C; Gey van Pittius, N C; van Helden, P D; Warren, R M

    2015-11-01

    We show that the interpretation of molecular epidemiological data for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is dependent on the number of different markers used to define transmission. Using spoligotyping, IS6110 DNA fingerprinting, and DNA sequence data, we show that XDR-TB in South Africa (2006 to 2008) was predominantly driven by the acquisition of second-line drug resistance.

  1. Whole genome sequencing: the future for molecular epidemiological studies on aquatic pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed our ability to analyze the genomic content of isolated strains and communities of microorganisms. An important application of the new technology is for molecular epidemiology, as single sequencing reactions can generate nearly complete ...

  2. Molecular modelling approaches for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator studies.

    PubMed

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic disorders, caused by loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CFTR is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily and functions as an ATP-gated anion channel. This review summarises the vast majority of the efforts which utilised molecular modelling approaches to gain insight into the various aspects of CFTR protein, related to its structure, dynamic properties, function and interactions with other protein partners, or drug-like compounds, with emphasis to its relation to CF disease.

  3. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus argenteus Infections in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Amornchai, Premjit; Nickerson, Emma K.; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular typing of 246 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from unselected patients in Thailand showed that 10 (4.1%) were actually Staphylococcus argenteus. Contrary to the suggestion that S. argenteus is less virulent than S. aureus, we demonstrated comparable rates of morbidity, death, and health care-associated infection in patients infected with either of these two species. PMID:25568440

  4. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of veterinary blastomycosis in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that Blastomyces dermatitidis, the etiologic agent of blastomycosis, is a genetically diverse pathogen. Blastomycosis is a significant health issue in humans and other mammals. Veterinary and human isolates matched with epidemiological case data from the same geographic area and time period were used to determine: (i) if differences in genetic diversity and structure exist between clinical veterinary and human isolates of B. dermatitidis and (ii) if comparable epidemiologic features differ among veterinary and human blastomycosis cases. Results Genetic typing of 301 clinical B. dermatitidis isolates produced 196 haplotypes (59 unique to veterinary isolates, 134 unique to human isolates, and 3 shared between canine and human isolates). Private allelic richness was higher in veterinary (median 2.27) compared to human isolates (median 1.14) (p = 0.005). Concordant with previous studies, two distinct genetic groups were identified among all isolates. Genetic group assignment was different between human and veterinary isolates (p < 0.001), with more veterinary isolates assigned to Group 2. The mean age of dogs diagnosed with blastomycosis was 6 years. Thirty cases were in male dogs (52%) and 24 were females (41%). The breed of dog was able to be retrieved in 38 of 58 cases with 19 (50%) being sporting breeds. Three of four felines infected with blastomycosis were domestic shorthair males between ages 6–12, and presented with disseminated disease. The other was a lynx with pulmonary disease. The equine isolate was from an 11-year-old male Halflinger with disseminated disease. Disseminated disease was reported more often in veterinary (62%) than human cases (19%) (p < 0.001). Conclusions Isolates from all hosts clustered largely into previously identified genetic groups, with 3 haplotypes being shared between human and canine isolates confirming that B. dermatitidis isolates capable of infecting both species occur in nature. Allelic

  5. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of veterinary blastomycosis in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jennifer L; Sloss, Brian L; Meece, Jennifer K

    2013-04-22

    Several studies have shown that Blastomyces dermatitidis, the etiologic agent of blastomycosis, is a genetically diverse pathogen. Blastomycosis is a significant health issue in humans and other mammals. Veterinary and human isolates matched with epidemiological case data from the same geographic area and time period were used to determine: (i) if differences in genetic diversity and structure exist between clinical veterinary and human isolates of B. dermatitidis and (ii) if comparable epidemiologic features differ among veterinary and human blastomycosis cases. Genetic typing of 301 clinical B. dermatitidis isolates produced 196 haplotypes (59 unique to veterinary isolates, 134 unique to human isolates, and 3 shared between canine and human isolates). Private allelic richness was higher in veterinary (median 2.27) compared to human isolates (median 1.14) (p = 0.005). Concordant with previous studies, two distinct genetic groups were identified among all isolates. Genetic group assignment was different between human and veterinary isolates (p < 0.001), with more veterinary isolates assigned to Group 2. The mean age of dogs diagnosed with blastomycosis was 6 years. Thirty cases were in male dogs (52%) and 24 were females (41%). The breed of dog was able to be retrieved in 38 of 58 cases with 19 (50%) being sporting breeds. Three of four felines infected with blastomycosis were domestic shorthair males between ages 6-12, and presented with disseminated disease. The other was a lynx with pulmonary disease. The equine isolate was from an 11-year-old male Halflinger with disseminated disease. Disseminated disease was reported more often in veterinary (62%) than human cases (19%) (p < 0.001). Isolates from all hosts clustered largely into previously identified genetic groups, with 3 haplotypes being shared between human and canine isolates confirming that B. dermatitidis isolates capable of infecting both species occur in nature. Allelic diversity measures trended

  6. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  7. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  8. Molecular epidemiology and genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Baghdad.

    PubMed

    Mustafa Ali, Ruqaya; Trovato, Alberto; Couvin, David; Al-Thwani, Amina N; Borroni, Emanuele; Dhaer, Fahim H; Rastogi, Nalin; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem in Iraq but the strains responsible for the epidemic have been poorly characterized. Our aim was to characterize the TB strains circulating in Bagdad (Iraq). A total of 270 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains isolated between 2010 and 2011 from TB patients attending the Center of Chest and Respiratory diseases in Baghdad were analyzed by Spoligotyping. The analysis indicated that 94.1% of the isolates belong to known genotype clades: CAS 39.6%, ill-defined T clade 29.6%, Manu 7.4%, Haarlem 7%, Ural 4.1%, LAM 3.3%, X 0.7%, LAM7-TUR 0.7%, EAI 0.7%, S 0.7%, and unknown 5.9%. Comparison with the international multimarker database SITVIT2 showed that SIT 309 (CAS1-Delhi) and SIT1144 (T1) were the most common types. In addition, 44 strains were included in SITVIT2 database under 16 new Spoligotype International Types (SITs); of these, 6 SITs (SIT3346, SIT3497, SIT3708, SIT3790, SIT3791, and SIT3800) (n = 32 strains) were created within the present study and 10 were created after a match with an orphan in the database. By using 24-loci MIRU-VNTR-typing on a subset of 110 samples we found a high recent transmission index (RTI) of 33.6%. In conclusion, we present the first unifying framework for both epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis in Iraq.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology and Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated in Baghdad

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa Ali, Ruqaya; Trovato, Alberto; Al-Thwani, Amina N.; Dhaer, Fahim H.; Cirillo, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health problem in Iraq but the strains responsible for the epidemic have been poorly characterized. Our aim was to characterize the TB strains circulating in Bagdad (Iraq). A total of 270 Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains isolated between 2010 and 2011 from TB patients attending the Center of Chest and Respiratory diseases in Baghdad were analyzed by Spoligotyping. The analysis indicated that 94.1% of the isolates belong to known genotype clades: CAS 39.6%, ill-defined T clade 29.6%, Manu 7.4%, Haarlem 7%, Ural 4.1%, LAM 3.3%, X 0.7%, LAM7-TUR 0.7%, EAI 0.7%, S 0.7%, and unknown 5.9%. Comparison with the international multimarker database SITVIT2 showed that SIT 309 (CAS1-Delhi) and SIT1144 (T1) were the most common types. In addition, 44 strains were included in SITVIT2 database under 16 new Spoligotype International Types (SITs); of these, 6 SITs (SIT3346, SIT3497, SIT3708, SIT3790, SIT3791, and SIT3800) (n = 32 strains) were created within the present study and 10 were created after a match with an orphan in the database. By using 24-loci MIRU-VNTR-typing on a subset of 110 samples we found a high recent transmission index (RTI) of 33.6%. In conclusion, we present the first unifying framework for both epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis in Iraq. PMID:24719873

  10. The Molecular Epidemiology of Chronic Aflatoxin Driven Impaired Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul Craig

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary fungal metabolites that contaminate dietary staples in tropical regions; chronic high levels of exposure are common for many of the poorest populations. Observations in animals indicate that growth and/or food utilization are adversely affected by aflatoxins. This review highlights the development of validated exposure biomarkers and their use here to assess the role of aflatoxins in early life growth retardation. Aflatoxin exposure occurs in utero and continues in early infancy as weaning foods are introduced. Using aflatoxin-albumin exposure biomarkers, five major studies clearly demonstrate strong dose response relationships between exposure in utero and/or early infancy and growth retardation, identified by reduced birth weight and/or low HAZ and WAZ scores. The epidemiological studies include cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys, though aflatoxin reduction intervention studies are now required to further support these data and guide sustainable options to reduce the burden of exposure. The use of aflatoxin exposure biomarkers was essential in understanding the observational data reviewed and will likely be a critical monitor of the effectiveness of interventions to restrict aflatoxin exposure. Given that an estimated 4.5 billion individuals live in regions at risk of dietary contamination the public health concern cannot be over stated. PMID:24455429

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis in Texas and Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Perumaalla, V S; Adams, L G; Payeur, J B; Jarnagin, J L; Baca, D R; Suárez Güemes, F; Ficht, T A

    1996-01-01

    Seventy-nine Mycobacterium bovis isolates recovered from Mexican and Texas cattle were categorized into 16 and 25 distinct types on the basis of IS6110 and direct-repeat fingerprint patterns, respectively. By using a combination of both fingerprint patterns, 30 distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism types were defined. Fifty-eight of 79 isolates (73%) were distributed among nine clusters. Clustered isolates were identified within herds, as well as in geographically disperse herds in Texas and Mexico. This observation is consistent with active transmission within herds and among herds, presumably as a result of active or historical cattle movements. The majority of bovine isolates (64 of 79) exhibited a single copy of IS6110. Interestingly, in contrast to previous studies, a high percentage of bovine isolates (15 of 79) exhibited multiple IS6110 copies (two to five) distributed among 11 different restriction fragment length polymorphism types. It is speculated that transmission from noncattle sources may be responsible. Continued fingerprinting of isolates originating from nonbovine sources and herd surveys is expected to provide useful information regarding the epidemiology of tuberculosis in this region. PMID:8862559

  12. Molecular epidemiology of adrenocortical tumors in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Gislaine; Komechen, Heloisa; Figueiredo, Francisco R O; Fachin, Natasha D; Pianovski, Mara A D; Figueiredo, Bonald C

    2012-03-31

    The high frequency of TP53 R337H carriers in southern Brazil is responsible for the highest known incidence of childhood adrenocortical tumor (ACT). Our aims were to examine other contributing mutations, age-related risk factors, epidemiological differences in ACT and to shed light on a method for increasing the survival rate of children. The fetal zone of the adrenal cortex is believed to be one of the tissues most susceptible to adenoma or carcinoma formation due to loss of p53 function. The founder germline R337H mutation is found in 95% of ACTs of young children, a much greater proportion than in adults. Despite intense educational campaigns about the high incidence of ACT in Paraná State, advanced cases remain common. Four advanced ACT cases (4/5) were admitted to a single institution in the first 6months of 2011 in Paraná State, none of the families knew about ACT, and 2 reported no familial cancer syndrome. Curative resection is possible when a small ACT is detected early. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Prevalence of tuberculosis in prisons: risk factors and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Valença, M S; Scaini, J L R; Abileira, F S; Gonçalves, C V; von Groll, A; Silva, P E A

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in prisons is a challenge for the public health system. Active and passive case screening are important tools for TB case detection. To characterise TB in a southern Brazil prison in terms of epidemiological variables, diagnostic approaches and clinical isolate genotypes. Inmates of a southern Brazilian prison were assessed using active and passive TB case screening. Sputum microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility testing and genotyping were performed. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression. TB prevalence was 4712 per 100 000 inmates, and was associated with low educational level, time incarcerated, productive cough, previous TB history, smoking and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Overall, 27.8% of TB cases were detected by culture only; the prevalence of drug-resistant strains was 7.8%; 58.3% of clinical isolates had an identical genotypic profile. The study showed extensive circulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in a highly endemic prison. It is recommended that priority be given to the evaluation of prison inmates with longer jail times, those who are HIV-positive, those with symptoms and those with a previous history of tuberculosis. We observed that active case finding induced passive case detection.

  14. Leptospira species molecular epidemiology in the genomic era.

    PubMed

    Caimi, K; Repetto, S A; Varni, V; Ruybal, P

    2017-10-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease which global burden is increasing often related to climatic change. Hundreds of whole genome sequences from worldwide isolates of Leptospira spp. are available nowadays, together with online tools that permit to assign MLST sequence types (STs) directly from raw sequence data. In this work we have applied R7L-MLST to near 500 genomes and strains collection globally distributed. All 10 pathogenic species as well as intermediate were typed using this MLST scheme. The correlation observed between STs and serogroups in our previous work, is still satisfied with this higher dataset sustaining the implementation of MLST to assist serological classification as a complementary approach. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of concatenated sequences from R7-MLST loci allowed us to resolve taxonomic inconsistencies but also showed that events such as recombination, gene conversion or lateral gene transfer played an important role in the evolution of Leptospira genus. Whole genome sequencing allows us to contribute with suitable epidemiologic information useful to apply in the design of control strategies and also in diagnostic methods for this illness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The promise of molecular epidemiology in defining the association between radiation and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, R.

    2000-07-01

    Molecular epidemiology involves the inclusion in epidemiologic studies of biologic measurements made at a genetic and molecular level and aims to improve the current knowledge of disease etiology and risk. One of the goals of molecular epidemiology studies of cancer is to determine the role of environmental and genetic factors in initiation and progression of malignancies and to use this knowledge to develop preventive strategies. This approach promises extraordinary opportunities for revolutionizing the practice of medicine and reducing risk. However, this will be accompanied by the need to address and resolve many challenges, such as ensuring the appropriate interpretation of molecular testing and resolving associated ethical, legal, and social issues. Traditional epidemiologic approaches determined that exposure to ionizing radiation poses significantly increased risk of leukemia and several other types of cancer. Such studies provided the basis for setting exposure standards to protect the public and the workforce from potentially adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These standards were set by using modeling approaches to extrapolate from the biological effects observed in high-dose radiation studies to predicted, but mostly immeasurable, effects at low radiation doses. It is anticipated that the addition of the molecular parameters to the population-based studies will help identify the genes and pathways characteristic of cancers due to radiation exposure of individuals, as well as identify susceptible or resistant subpopulations. In turn, the information about the molecular mechanisms should aid to improve risk assessment. While studies on radiogenic concerns are currently limited to only a few candidate genes, the exponential growth of scientific knowledge and technology promises expansion of knowledge about identity of participating genes and pathways in the future. This article is meant to provide an introductory overview of recent advances in

  16. Molecular diffusion and dc conductivity perfectly correlated with molecular rotational dynamics in a plastic crystalline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, M; Romanini, M; Tripathi, P; Tamarit, J Ll; Macovez, R

    2015-06-28

    We probe the ionic conduction and the molecular dynamics in a pure and lithium-salt doped dinitrile molecular plastic crystal. While the diffusion of the Li(+) ions is decoupled from the molecular reorientational dynamics, in the undoped plastic crystal the temperature dependence of the mobility of dinitrile ions and thus of the conductivity is virtually identical to that of on-site molecular rotations. The undoped material is found to obey the Walden and Stokes-Einstein rules typical of ideal liquid electrolytes, implying that an effective viscosity against diffusion can be defined even for a plastic crystalline phase. These surprising results, never reported before in a translationally ordered solid, indicate that in this dinitrile plastic crystalline material the timescale of translational diffusion is perfectly correlated with that of the purely reorientational on-site dynamics.

  17. A First-principles Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Superionic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brandon; Marzari, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    Superionic materials---solids with liquid-like transport properties---have found widespread use in a variety of applications in fuel cells, switches, sensors, and batteries. However, reasons for fast-ion conduction in such materials, as well as the specific atomistic mechanisms involved, remain ill understood. Our work uses first-principles molecular dynamics to illuminate the mechanisms, pathways, and motivations for superionic conductivity in two materials representing different classes of ion conductors: α-AgI, an archetypal Type-I superionic; and CsHSO4, an anhydrous solid-state electrolyte candidate for hydrogen fuel cells. For α-AgI, we trace common pathways for silver ion conduction and discuss how a chemical signature in the electronic structure relates to enhanced silver ion mobility. We also characterize the dynamical lattice structure in the superionic phase and present the likely motivations for its existence. For CsHSO4, we isolate the dominant atomistic mechanisms involved in superprotonic conduction and discuss the effect of correlated diffusive events in enhancing proton transport. We also offer a detailed description of the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network topology in the course of proton diffusion and discuss the relevance of atomistic processes with competing timescales in facilitating proton transport.

  18. Molecular disorder effects in the thermal conductivity of solid thiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovichenko, G. A.; Krivchikov, A. I.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Romantsova, O. O.

    2014-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity κ(T) of solid thiophene is measured in a sequence of stable orientationally disordered phases with different degrees of orientational ordering of the molecules: in orientational glass (Vg); in phase V with large angular librational molecular vibrations; in incommensurate phase IV with a static orientational disorder; and in orientationally disordered crystalline phase III with dynamic orientational disorder of the molecules. Measurements are made at the saturated vapor pressure in a temperature range of 2-180 K. It is found that the thermal conductivity of thiophene is practically independent of temperature in phases III and V with dynamic orientational disorder of the molecules. In the orientational glass state and in the incommensurate state, the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of thiophene has a form typical of crystals with a long-range orientational order. A distinct hysteresis of the thermal conductivity is found at temperatures slightly below the temperature of the transition from phase IV into phase V.

  19. A Molecular Epidemiologic Case-Case Study of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Receptor Polymorphism and Prostate Cancer Risk 1 Sara S. Strom 2, Qiang Zhang, Yun Gu, Margaret R. Spitz, Peter T. Scardino 3, Christopher J. Logothetis...Taylor, J. A. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and prostate cancer. Molecular Carcinogenesis, 27: 18-23, 2000. 6. Ma, J., Stampfer , M. J., Gann, P. H...Margaret R. Spitz, Richard J. Babaian, Christopher Logothetis, Sara S. Strom, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; The University

  20. Effect of molecular models on viscosity and thermal conductivity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Andrew B.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of molecular models on viscosity and thermal conductivity calculations is investigated. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for rarefied gas flows is used to simulate Couette and Fourier flows as a means of obtaining the transport coefficients. Experimental measurements for argon (Ar) provide a baseline for comparison over a wide temperature range of 100-1,500 K. The variable hard sphere (VHS), variable soft sphere (VSS), and Lennard-Jones (L-J) molecular models have been implemented into a parallel version of Bird's one-dimensional DSMC code, DSMC1, and the model parameters have been recalibrated to the current experimental data set. While the VHS and VSS models only consider the short-range, repulsive forces, the L-J model also includes constributions from the long-range, dispersion forces. Theoretical results for viscosity and thermal conductivity indicate the L-J model is more accurate than the VSS model; with maximum errors of 1.4% and 3.0% in the range 300-1,500 K for L-J and VSS models, respectively. The range of validity of the VSS model is extended to 1,650 K through appropriate choices for the model parameters.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bijlmer, H A; van Alphen, L; Geelen-van den Broek, L; Greenwood, B M; Valkenburg, H A; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    One hundred two invasive and 64 noninvasive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were collected in the course of a 2-year prospective field study on the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis in The Gambia. The isolates were serotyped, biotyped, and subtyped by outer membrane protein (OMP) profile analysis (OMP subtyping). H. influenzae meningitis was found to be caused by serotype b (95%). In invasive disease, serotype a, although present in the throat of healthy children, caused only occasionally (5.9%) disease. The distribution of biotypes of H. influenzae appeared to be very similar to that found outside The Gambia. A distinct pattern of OMP subtypes, different from other parts of the world, is prevalent in H. influenzae type b (Hib) in The Gambia. OMP subtypes 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 were observed to be predominant. These subtypes, except subtype 2, have not been described. L subtypes (subtypes 2, 4, and 8) were associated with invasive disease, whereas non-L subtypes (subtypes 5 and 9) were found more often in healthy carriers (P less than 0.001). A significant difference in geographical distribution was found in subtypes of noninvasive Hib strains (P less than 0.05). We conclude that in The Gambia H. influenzae invasive disease is caused mainly by type b strains with a limited number of OMP subtypes, which are different from the subtypes found elsewhere in the world. These data are important for the surveillance of Hib disease in developing countries and are baseline data for a Hib polyribosyl-ribitolphosphate-conjugated vaccine trial in The Gambia. Alternative Hib OMP vaccines should include a set of representative OMPs. Images PMID:1537907

  2. Methodological and Clinical Aspects of the Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Minias, Alina; van Ingen, Jakko; Rastogi, Nalin; Brzostek, Anna; Żaczek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    Molecular typing has revolutionized epidemiological studies of infectious diseases, including those of a mycobacterial etiology. With the advent of fingerprinting techniques, many traditional concepts regarding transmission, infectivity, or pathogenicity of mycobacterial bacilli have been revisited, and their conventional interpretations have been challenged. Since the mid-1990s, when the first typing methods were introduced, a plethora of other modalities have been proposed. So-called molecular epidemiology has become an essential subdiscipline of modern mycobacteriology. It serves as a resource for understanding the key issues in the epidemiology of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases. Among these issues are disclosing sources of infection, quantifying recent transmission, identifying transmission links, discerning reinfection from relapse, tracking the geographic distribution and clonal expansion of specific strains, and exploring the genetic mechanisms underlying specific phenotypic traits, including virulence, organ tropism, transmissibility, or drug resistance. Since genotyping continues to unravel the biology of mycobacteria, it offers enormous promise in the fight against and prevention of the diseases caused by these pathogens. In this review, molecular typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria elaborated over the last 2 decades are summarized. The relevance of these methods to the epidemiological investigation, diagnosis, evolution, and control of mycobacterial diseases is discussed.

  3. Methodological and Clinical Aspects of the Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Minias, Alina; van Ingen, Jakko; Rastogi, Nalin; Brzostek, Anna; Żaczek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular typing has revolutionized epidemiological studies of infectious diseases, including those of a mycobacterial etiology. With the advent of fingerprinting techniques, many traditional concepts regarding transmission, infectivity, or pathogenicity of mycobacterial bacilli have been revisited, and their conventional interpretations have been challenged. Since the mid-1990s, when the first typing methods were introduced, a plethora of other modalities have been proposed. So-called molecular epidemiology has become an essential subdiscipline of modern mycobacteriology. It serves as a resource for understanding the key issues in the epidemiology of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases. Among these issues are disclosing sources of infection, quantifying recent transmission, identifying transmission links, discerning reinfection from relapse, tracking the geographic distribution and clonal expansion of specific strains, and exploring the genetic mechanisms underlying specific phenotypic traits, including virulence, organ tropism, transmissibility, or drug resistance. Since genotyping continues to unravel the biology of mycobacteria, it offers enormous promise in the fight against and prevention of the diseases caused by these pathogens. In this review, molecular typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria elaborated over the last 2 decades are summarized. The relevance of these methods to the epidemiological investigation, diagnosis, evolution, and control of mycobacterial diseases is discussed. PMID:26912567

  4. Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder in a National Sample: Developmental Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, Barbara; Rowe, Richard; Messer, Julie; Goodman, Robert; Meltzer, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Background: Despite an expanding epidemiological evidence base, uncertainties remain over key aspects of the epidemiology of the "antisocial" disorders in childhood and adolescence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data on a nationally representative sample of 10,438 5-15-year-olds drawn from the 1999 British Child Mental Health Survey…

  5. Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder in a National Sample: Developmental Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, Barbara; Rowe, Richard; Messer, Julie; Goodman, Robert; Meltzer, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Background: Despite an expanding epidemiological evidence base, uncertainties remain over key aspects of the epidemiology of the "antisocial" disorders in childhood and adolescence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data on a nationally representative sample of 10,438 5-15-year-olds drawn from the 1999 British Child Mental Health Survey…

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Italian clinical Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii isolates.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Massimo; Zamfirova, Ralika R; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans variety grubii is the major etiological agent of cryptococcal meningitis in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The current PCR-based molecular methods are not sufficient to discriminate among the different populations of this yeast. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the genotypes of the Italian clinical C. neoformans var. grubii isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). A total of 53 isolates, each representative of a single case, were studied. Genotyping was performed using the ISHAM Cryptococcus MLST consensus scheme and the results were compared to the publically available global C. neoformans var. grubii MLST dataset. A total of 16 genotypes were identified; 14 were new genotypes, one was identical to sequence type (ST) ST81, which had been previously reported from Thailand, and one to ST23 already identified in Uganda, the USA and Korea. Sequence type ST61 was the most numerous, including 16 isolates. Network phylogenetic analysis showed that the Italian isolates could be divided into at least three clusters with similarities with those recovered in Africa, Asia and Americas. Distribution of the STs among the isolates could not be correlated to the hospital in which they were recovered or to the HIV status of the patients. The majority of the isolates belonged to the molecular type VNI; three belonged to the rare molecular type VNII and one to the VNB group, which until now had not been described in Europe. The results reveal that the Italian C. neoformans var. grubii population presents a distinct variability, displaying a high number of new genotypes, and probably recombines sexually.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of domestic and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Marta V.; Lauricella, Marta A.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Lanati, Leonardo; Marcet, Paula L.; Levin, Mariano J.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and parasite transmission dynamics have been well documented throughout the Americas, but few studies have been conducted in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, one of the most highly endemic areas for Chagas disease, caused by T. cruzi. In this study we assessed the distribution of T. cruzi lineages (identified by PCR strategies) in Triatoma infestans, domestic dogs, cats, humans and sylvatic mammals from two neighboring rural areas with different histories of transmission and vector control in northern Argentina. Lineage II predominated among the 99 isolates characterized and lineage I among the six isolates obtained from sylvatic mammals. Trypanosoma cruzi lineage IIe predominated in domestic habitats; it was found in 87% of 54 isolates from Tr. infestans, in 82% of 33 isolates from dogs, and in the four cats found infected. Domestic and sylvatic cycles overlapped in the study area in the late 1980s, when intense domestic transmission occurred, and still overlap marginally. The introduction of T. cruzi from sylvatic into domestic habitats is likely to occur very rarely in the current epidemiological context. The household distribution of T. cruzi lineages showed that Tr. infestans, dogs and cats from a given house compound shared the same parasite lineage in most cases. Based on molecular evidence, this result lends further support to the importance of dogs and cats as domestic reservoir hosts of T. cruzi. We believe that in Argentina, this is the first time that lineage IIc has been isolated from naturally-infected domestic dogs and Tr. infestans. PMID:18585717

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis virus in mosquitoes during an outbreak in China, 2013.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zexin; Liu, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wang, Huanyu; Lin, Xiaojuan; Song, Lizhi; Wang, Suting; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Xiaodong; Cui, Ning; Song, Yanyan; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-05-09

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can cause serious encephalitis and Culex mosquitoes are the primary vector. In 2013, a JE outbreak occurred in Shandong Province, China with 407 confirmed cases, including 11 deaths. An investigation on JEV in mosquitoes during the outbreak was conducted. A total of 14,719 mosquitoes were collected at 3 sites. For the 12,695 Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes, 88/201 pooled samples were positive by RT-PCR for the presence of the pre-membrane or envelope protein coding genes. The maximum likelihood estimates of JEV positive individuals per 1,000 vectors were 12.0, 7.2, and 6.0 in the 3 sites respectively with an overall estimate of 9.1. Phylogenetic analysis on these pre-membrane (n = 72) and envelope (n = 26) sequences with those of reference strains revealed they belonged to genotype I. This study describes the molecular epidemiology of JEV and suggests the high infection rate in mosquitoes is an important factor for the outbreak.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Shigella flexneri in a diarrhoea-endemic area of Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Prada, C M; Venkatesan, M M; Franco, A A; Lanata, C F; Sack, R B; Hartman, A B; Spira, W

    2004-04-01

    A year-long community-based study of diarrhoeal diseases was conducted in Canto Grande, a periurban community in Lima, Peru. In 109 (34%) houses out of 323 that were visited, at least one individual was detected with shigellosis. The frequency of the 161 shigella isolates obtained was as follows: 117 S. flexneri (73%), 21 S. boydii (13%), 15 S. dysenteriae (9%), and 8 S. sonnei (5%). Using a non-radioactive ipaH gene probe as a molecular epidemiological tool, a total of 41 S. flexneri strains were shown to be distributed in 25 intra-family comparisons by pairs (icp). Further subdivision, based on a comparison of the serotype, plasmid profile, antibiotic resistances and ipaH hybridization patterns indicated that Group I, with 11 icp (44%), had strains that were identical. Group II with 8 icp (32%), had strains that were different and Group III with 6 icp (24%), had strains with the same serotype and identical ipaH profiles but with differences in other markers. This data indicates that a diversity of shigella clones circulated in this community resulting from both clonal spread and horizontal transfer of genetic elements. Furthermore, ipaH profiling of isolates can be used not only to differentiate between closely related shigella strains but also with other parameters, help to understand the dynamics of the generation of new clones of pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Shigella flexneri in a diarrhoea-endemic area of Lima, Peru.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Prada, C. M.; Venkatesan, M. M.; Franco, A. A.; Lanata, C. F.; Sack, R. B.; Hartman, A. B.; Spira, W.

    2004-01-01

    A year-long community-based study of diarrhoeal diseases was conducted in Canto Grande, a periurban community in Lima, Peru. In 109 (34%) houses out of 323 that were visited, at least one individual was detected with shigellosis. The frequency of the 161 shigella isolates obtained was as follows: 117 S. flexneri (73%), 21 S. boydii (13%), 15 S. dysenteriae (9%), and 8 S. sonnei (5%). Using a non-radioactive ipaH gene probe as a molecular epidemiological tool, a total of 41 S. flexneri strains were shown to be distributed in 25 intra-family comparisons by pairs (icp). Further subdivision, based on a comparison of the serotype, plasmid profile, antibiotic resistances and ipaH hybridization patterns indicated that Group I, with 11 icp (44%), had strains that were identical. Group II with 8 icp (32%), had strains that were different and Group III with 6 icp (24%), had strains with the same serotype and identical ipaH profiles but with differences in other markers. This data indicates that a diversity of shigella clones circulated in this community resulting from both clonal spread and horizontal transfer of genetic elements. Furthermore, ipaH profiling of isolates can be used not only to differentiate between closely related shigella strains but also with other parameters, help to understand the dynamics of the generation of new clones of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:15061506

  11. Molecular epidemiology of domestic and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Marta V; Lauricella, Marta A; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Lanati, Leonardo; Marcet, Paula L; Levin, Mariano J; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2008-11-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and parasite transmission dynamics have been well documented throughout the Americas, but few studies have been conducted in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, one of the most highly endemic areas for Chagas disease, caused by T. cruzi. In this study, we assessed the distribution of T. cruzi lineages (identified by PCR strategies) in Triatoma infestans, domestic dogs, cats, humans and sylvatic mammals from two neighbouring rural areas with different histories of transmission and vector control in northern Argentina. Lineage II predominated amongst the 99 isolates characterised and lineage I amongst the six isolates obtained from sylvatic mammals. T. cruzi lineage IIe predominated in domestic habitats; it was found in 87% of 54 isolates from Tr. infestans, in 82% of 33 isolates from dogs, and in the four cats found infected. Domestic and sylvatic cycles overlapped in the study area in the late 1980s, when intense domestic transmission occurred, and still overlap marginally. The introduction of T. cruzi from sylvatic into domestic habitats is likely to occur very rarely in the current epidemiological context. The household distribution of T. cruzi lineages showed that Tr. infestans, dogs and cats from a given house compound shared the same parasite lineage in most cases. Based on molecular evidence, this result lends further support to the importance of dogs and cats as domestic reservoir hosts of T. cruzi. We believe that in Argentina, this is the first time that lineage IIc has been isolated from naturally infected domestic dogs and Tr. infestans.

  12. [Molecular epidemiological study of measles viruses isolated in Qinghai Province during 2000-2011].

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Xia; Ba, Zhuo-Ma; Zhao, Sheng-Cang; Yi, Hu; Jiang, Shuang-Ying; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hui-Ling; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2013-08-01

    To carry out the molecular epidemiological study of the wild-type measles virus isolated in Qinghai Province during 2000-2011, and provide a scientific basis for the measles elimination. Measles viruses were isolated using B95a cell line or Vero/SLAM cell line from throat swabs collected from suspected measles cases during measles outbreak and sporadic in 6 prefectures during 2000-2011. The fragment of 696 nucleotides of N gene carboxy terminal was amplified by using RT-PCR methods. The PCR products were sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic tree was conducted with the viruses isolated in viruses from other province. Total 19 measles viruses were isolated during 2000-2011 in Qinghai province and all belong to genotype H1a. The results of phylogenetic tree showed that viruses in 2000-2005 and in 2009-2011 were distributed in two different lineages, and it revealed that these strains belonged to at least 2 viral transmission chains and the viruses circulated during 2000-2005 were not detected after 2005. Genotype H1a was the predominant genotype circulated in Qinghai province during 2000-2011. Qinghai measles virus strains had not evolved independently, but coevolved with the measles virus strains in other provinces in mainland China. The variation of important amino acid sites of measles virus should be continuous monitored and provide the scientific strategy for the measles elimination.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Mosquitoes during an Outbreak in China, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zexin; Liu, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wang, Huanyu; Lin, Xiaojuan; Song, Lizhi; Wang, Suting; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Xiaodong; Cui, Ning; Song, Yanyan; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can cause serious encephalitis and Culex mosquitoes are the primary vector. In 2013, a JE outbreak occurred in Shandong Province, China with 407 confirmed cases, including 11 deaths. An investigation on JEV in mosquitoes during the outbreak was conducted. A total of 14,719 mosquitoes were collected at 3 sites. For the 12,695 Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes, 88/201 pooled samples were positive by RT-PCR for the presence of the pre-membrane or envelope protein coding genes. The maximum likelihood estimates of JEV positive individuals per 1,000 vectors were 12.0, 7.2, and 6.0 in the 3 sites respectively with an overall estimate of 9.1. Phylogenetic analysis on these pre-membrane (n = 72) and envelope (n = 26) sequences with those of reference strains revealed they belonged to genotype I. This study describes the molecular epidemiology of JEV and suggests the high infection rate in mosquitoes is an important factor for the outbreak. PMID:24809635

  14. [Molecular epidemiological analysis of rubella virus isolates from 2001 to 2011 in Shanghai, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Chong-Shan; Yang, Yu-Ying; Wang, Jian-Guo; Zhu, Zhen; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhi; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2012-03-01

    Throat swabs collected from patients whose serum was measles IgM negative and rubella IgM positive during 2001-2011 were used to conduct cell culture for rubella virus. After identification of cell culture with RT-PCR, nucleotide of gene E1 of rubella virus was amplified and sequenced, followed by molecular epidemiological analysis. A total of 31 rubella viruses were isolated from 60 throat swabs. Compared 27 isolates with the WHO reference strains of all genotypes, phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the amplified 739 nucleotide fragment. These isolates belonged to two different genotypes respectively. Isolates 11009, 11052 and 11106 in 2011 belonged to genotype 2B, and others belonged to genotype 1E. Most of mutations were nonsense mutation, and sequence of amino acid was highly conserved. Amino acid sequence of most isolates of genotype 1E was identical, which suggested rubella viruses from same transmission chain might be transmitted continually since 2001. Rubella virus genotype 2B was found to be popular for the first time in Shanghai in 2011. The nucleotide sequences of these genotype 2B isolates showed 99% identity compared with that of isolates recently from Vietnam, Japan and Argentina. The resources of these strains were not confirmed due to the absence of rubella virus surveillance before.

  15. Molecular typing for epidemiological evaluation of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis isolated in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Il; Her, Moon; Heo, Eun Jeong; Nam, Hyang Mi; Jung, Suk Chan; Cho, Donghee

    2009-08-01

    To investigate genotype relationships among regional groups of Brucella isolates, variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was conducted according to previously reported methods. Field strains of Brucella abortus and Brucella canis were isolated from 9 provinces in the Republic of Korea during the years 1996-2006 and each of the isolates was classified by eight loci of HOOF-Prints. On the basis of the alleles, the 33 B. abortus and 21 B. canis field strains were divided into 22 and 18 distinct genotypes, respectively. Phylogenetic cluster analysis of Brucella isolates could be discriminated with geographical region in the Republic of Korea. Simpson's diversity index values of B. abortus and B. canis isolates ranged from 0 to 0.85. The stability of each locus was determined with in vivo and in vitro experiments. After twenty passages in blood agar, the VNTR numbers of loci 1 and 7 in B. abortus isolates and loci 5, 7, and 8 in B. canis isolates changed. The same change of the VNTR numbers at loci 1 and 7 was observed with B. abortus RB51 strains isolated from vaccinated cattle for the in vivo experiment. Although B. canis and B. abortus isolates were discriminated to herd levels by the HOOF-Prints, this method needs further improvement for the high variable locus. This study represents the first epidemiological data of molecular typing of B. abortus and B. canis reported in Korea.

  16. Molecular Epidemiological Study of Mumps Epidemics of 2015 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Yumani; Kyan, Hisako; Arakaki, Eri; Takara, Taketoshi; Kato, Takashi; Okano, Sho; Oshiro, Yuko; Kudaka, Jun; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2017-05-24

    Although major mumps epidemics occurred every 4-5 years in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan, no laboratory diagnoses were conducted. A mumps epidemic started in Okinawa in October 2014, and we collected clinical samples from 31 patients in 4 areas (Hokubu, Nanbu, Miyako, and Yaeyama) from July to December 2015, for virus isolation and RT-PCR, whose positive ratios were 52% and 87%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all isolates were classified into genotype G, and with one exception, consisted of 2 subgenotypes, Ge (55.6%) and Gw (40.7%), which have been prominent in Japan recently. One isolate was classified in another lineage, which was detected in Japan for the first time, and was similar to a Hong Kong isolate from 2014. Remarkably, the geographic distributions of the 2 major lineages were separated. The Ge viruses were isolated from the main island of Okinawa and the Yaeyama Islands, whereas the Gw isolates were mainly detected from the Miyako Islands. These results suggest that the Ge and Gw mumps viruses mainly caused the mumps epidemics of 2015 in Okinawa, and that they spread independently in separate regions. This is the first report describing the molecular epidemiology of mumps epidemics in Okinawa Prefecture.

  17. Integration of Molecular Pathology, Epidemiology, and Social Science for Global Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Akihiro; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Nishihara, Reiko; Tan, Andy S.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Summary The precision medicine concept and the unique disease principle imply that each patient has unique pathogenic processes resulting from heterogeneous cellular genetic and epigenetic alterations, and interactions between cells (including immune cells) and exposures, including dietary, environmental, microbial, and lifestyle factors. As a core method field in population health science and medicine, epidemiology is a growing scientific discipline that can analyze disease risk factors, and develop statistical methodologies to maximize utilization of big data on populations and disease pathology. The evolving transdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) can advance biomedical and health research by linking exposures to molecular pathologic signatures, enhancing causal inference, and identifying potential biomarkers for clinical impact. The MPE approach can be applied to any diseases, although it has been most commonly used in neoplastic diseases (including breast, lung and colorectal cancers) because of availability of various molecular diagnostic tests. However, use of state-of-the-art genomic, epigenomic and other omic technologies and expensive drugs in modern healthcare systems increases racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. To address this, we propose to integrate molecular pathology, epidemiology, and social science. Social epidemiology integrates the latter two fields. The integrative social MPE model can embrace sociology, economics and precision medicine, address global health disparities and inequalities, and elucidate biological effects of social environments, behaviors, and networks. We foresee advancements of molecular medicine, including molecular diagnostics, biomedical imaging, and targeted therapeutics, which should benefit individuals in a global population, by means of an interdisciplinary approach of integrative MPE and social health science. PMID:26636627

  18. Evolving Molecular Epidemiological Profile of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 in the Southwest Border of China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Guo, Weizhong; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fan, Jianhua; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported in Xishuangbanna (Banna) Dai Autonomous Prefecture, a well-developed tourist destination in the southwest border of China, that HIV-1 transmitted dominantly through heterosexual contact with less divergent genotypes and few drug resistant mutations [1]. Due to the rapid increase of newly diagnosed HIV-1 cases per year in Banna in recent years, it’s important to evaluate the evolution of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology for the better understanding of ongoing HIV-1 outbreak in this region. Methodology/Principal Findings By sequencing of HIV-1 pol genes and phylogenetic analysis, we conducted a molecular epidemiologic study in 352 HIV-1-seropositive highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART)-naïve individuals newly diagnosed at the Banna Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 2009 and 2011. Of 283 samples (84.1% taken from heterosexually acquired adults, 10.6% from needle-sharing drug users, 2.8% from men who have sex with men, 0.4% from children born from HIV-1-infected mothers, and 2.1% remained unknown) with successful sequencing for pol gene, we identified 108 (38.2%) HIV-1 subtype CRF08_BC, 101 (35.7%) CRF01_AE, 49 (17.3%) CRF07_BC, 5 (1.8%) C/CRF57_BC, 3 (1.1%) B’, 1 (0.4%) B/CRF51_01B, and 16 (5.7%) unique recombinants forms. Among these infected individuals, 104 (36.7%) cases showed drug resistant or resistance-relevant mutations, and 4 of them conferring high-level resistance to 3TC/FTC, EFV/NVP or NFV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 21 clusters (2–7 sequences) with only 21.2% (60/283) sequences involved. Conclusion/Significance In contrast to our previous findings, CRF08_BC, replaced CRF01_AE, became the dominant genotype of HIV-1 in Banna prefecture. The viral strains with drug resistance mutations were detected frequently in newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals in this region. PMID:25207977

  19. Evolving molecular epidemiological profile of human immunodeficiency virus 1 in the southwest border of China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Song; Kang, Jun; Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Guo, Weizhong; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fan, Jianhua; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported in Xishuangbanna (Banna) Dai Autonomous Prefecture, a well-developed tourist destination in the southwest border of China, that HIV-1 transmitted dominantly through heterosexual contact with less divergent genotypes and few drug resistant mutations. Due to the rapid increase of newly diagnosed HIV-1 cases per year in Banna in recent years, it's important to evaluate the evolution of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology for the better understanding of ongoing HIV-1 outbreak in this region. By sequencing of HIV-1 pol genes and phylogenetic analysis, we conducted a molecular epidemiologic study in 352 HIV-1-seropositive highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART)-naïve individuals newly diagnosed at the Banna Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 2009 and 2011. Of 283 samples (84.1% taken from heterosexually acquired adults, 10.6% from needle-sharing drug users, 2.8% from men who have sex with men, 0.4% from children born from HIV-1-infected mothers, and 2.1% remained unknown) with successful sequencing for pol gene, we identified 108 (38.2%) HIV-1 subtype CRF08_BC, 101 (35.7%) CRF01_AE, 49 (17.3%) CRF07_BC, 5 (1.8%) C/CRF57_BC, 3 (1.1%) B', 1 (0.4%) B/CRF51_01B, and 16 (5.7%) unique recombinants forms. Among these infected individuals, 104 (36.7%) cases showed drug resistant or resistance-relevant mutations, and 4 of them conferring high-level resistance to 3TC/FTC, EFV/NVP or NFV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 21 clusters (2-7 sequences) with only 21.2% (60/283) sequences involved. In contrast to our previous findings, CRF08_BC, replaced CRF01_AE, became the dominant genotype of HIV-1 in Banna prefecture. The viral strains with drug resistance mutations were detected frequently in newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals in this region.

  20. Molecular epidemiology study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its susceptibility to anti-tuberculosis drugs in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lisdawati, Vivi; Puspandari, Nelly; Rif'ati, Lutfah; Soekarno, Triyani; M, Melatiwati; K, Syamsidar; Ratnasari, Lies; Izzatun, Nur; Parwati, Ida

    2015-08-22

    Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis helps to understand the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to address evolutionary questions about the disease spread. Certain genotypes also have implications for the spread of infection and treatment. Indonesia is a very diverse country with a population with multiple ethnicities and cultures and a history of many trade and tourism routes. This study describes the first attempt to map the molecular epidemiology of TB in the Indonesian archipelago. From 2008 to 2011, 404 clinical specimens from sputum-smear (SS+) TB patients, age ≥15 years, were collected from 16 TB referral primary health centers (PHC) in 16 provincial capitals in Indonesia. Susceptibility testing to first line drugs was conducted for 262 samples using the agar proportion method as per WHO guidelines. Spoligotyping was done on all samples. Ninety-three of the 404 samples (23 %) were from the Beijing family, making it the predominant family in the country. However, the geographic distribution of the family varied by region with 86/294 (29.3 %) in the western region, 6/72 (8.3 %) in the central region, and 2/72 (2.8 %) in the eastern region (p < 0.001). The predominant genotype in the central and eastern regions was from the East-African-Indian (EAI) family, comprising 15.3 % (11/72), and 26.3 % (10/38) of the isolates, respectively. Drug susceptibility to first-line anti-TB drugs was tested in 262 isolates. 162 (61.8 %) isolates were susceptible to all TB drugs, 70 (26.7 %) were mono-resistant 16 (6.1 %) were poly-resistant, and 14 (5.4 %) were multi-drug resistant (MDR). The proportion of Beijing family isolates in the susceptible, mono-resistant, poly-resistant, and MDR groups was 33/162 (20.4 %), 28/70 (40.0 %), 6/16 (37.5 %), and 3/14 (21.4 %), respectively. Overall, resistance of the Beijing family isolates to any of the first line TB drugs was significantly higher than non-Beijing families [37/71 (52.1 %) vs. 63/191 (33.0 %) (p-value = 0

  1. Phonon-mediated negative differential conductance in molecular quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazunov, Alex; Feinberg, Denis; Martin, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Transport through a single-molecular conductor is considered, showing negative differential conductance behavior associated with phonon-mediated electron tunneling processes. This theoretical work is motivated by a recent experiment by Leroy using a carbon nanotube contacted by a scanning tunneling microscope tip [Nature 432, 371 (2004)], where negative differential conductance of the breathing-mode phonon side peaks could be observed. A peculiarity of this system is that the tunneling couplings which inject electrons and those which collect them on the substrate are highly asymmetrical. A quantum dot model is used, coupling a single electronic level to a local phonon, forming polaron levels. A “half-shuttle” mechanism is also introduced. A quantum kinetic formulation allows us to derive rate equations. Assuming asymmetric tunneling rates and in the absence of the half-shuttle coupling, negative differential conductance (NDC) is obtained for a wide range of parameters. A detailed explanation of this phenomenon is provided, showing that NDC is maximal for intermediate electron-phonon coupling. In addition, in the absence of a gate, the “floating” level results in two distinct lengths for the current plateaus, related to the capacitive couplings at the two junctions. It is shown that the half-shuttle mechanism tends to reinforce the negative differential regions, but it cannot trigger this behavior on its own.

  2. Nonmechanical Conductance Switching in a Molecular Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Baratz, Adva; Baer, Roi

    2012-02-16

    We present a molecular junction composed of a donor (polyacetylene strands) and an acceptor (malononitrile) connected together via a benzene ring and coupled weakly to source and drain electrodes on each side, for which a gate electrode induces intramolecular charge transfer, switching reversibly the character of conductance. Using a new brand of density functional theory, for which orbital energies are similar to the quasiparticle energies, we show that the junction displays a single, gate-tunable differential conductance channel in a wide energy range. The gate field must align parallel to the displacement vector between donors and acceptor to affect their potential difference; for strong enough fields, spontaneous intramolecular electron transfer occurs. This event radically affects conductance, reversing the charge of carriers, enabling a spin-polarized current channel. We discuss the physical principles controlling the operation of the junction and find interplay of quantum interference, charging, Coulomb blockade, and electron-hole binding energy effects. We expect that this switching behavior is a generic property for similar donor-acceptor systems of sufficient stability.

  3. Highly-conducting molecular circuits based on antiaromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Shintaro; Marqués-González, Santiago; Shin, Ji-Young; Shinokubo, Hiroshi; Masuda, Takuya; Nishino, Tomoaki; Arasu, Narendra P.; Vázquez, Héctor; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-07-01

    Aromaticity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. It is described by Hückel's rule that states that a cyclic planar π-system is aromatic when it shares 4n+2 π-electrons and antiaromatic when it possesses 4n π-electrons. Antiaromatic compounds are predicted to exhibit remarkable charge transport properties and high redox activities. However, it has so far only been possible to measure compounds with reduced aromaticity but not antiaromatic species due to their energetic instability. Here, we address these issues by investigating the single-molecule charge transport properties of a genuinely antiaromatic compound, showing that antiaromaticity results in an order of magnitude increase in conductance compared with the aromatic counterpart. Single-molecule current-voltage measurements and ab initio transport calculations reveal that this results from a reduced energy gap and a frontier molecular resonance closer to the Fermi level in the antiaromatic species. The conductance of the antiaromatic complex is further modulated electrochemically, demonstrating its potential as a high-conductance transistor.

  4. Epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydia psittaci from 8 human cases of psittacosis and 4 related birds in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cadario, María E; Frutos, María C; Arias, Maite B; Origlia, Javier A; Zelaya, Vanina; Madariaga, María J; Lara, Claudia S; Ré, Viviana; Cuffini, Cecilia G

    2017-07-19

    In Argentina, the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Chlamydia psittaci infections are still not sufficiently known. A total of 846 respiratory and 10 ocular samples from patients with suspected human psittacosis were tested for C. psittaci from January 2010 to March 2015. Four samples of birds related to these patients were also studied. Forty-eight samples were positive for C. psittaci by a nested PCR. The molecular characterization of twelve C. psittaci PCR-positive samples received in the National Reference Laboratory INEI-ANLIS "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán", Buenos Aires, Argentina was performed. Eight positive samples from humans and four from birds were genotyped by ompA gene sequencing. C. psittaci genotype A was found in all human samples and in the related birds. This report contributes to our increasing knowledge of the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of C. psittaci to conduct effective surveillance of its zoonotic infections. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The Epidemiological and Molecular Aspects of Influenza H5N1 Viruses at the Human-Animal Interface in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Ghazi; Webby, Richard J.; Ducatez, Mariette F.; El Shesheny, Rabeh A.; Kandeil, Ahmed M.; Govorkova, Elena A.; Mostafa, Ahmed; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2011-01-01

    With 119 confirmed cases between March 2006 and December 2010, Egypt ranks second among countries reporting human H5N1 influenza virus infections. In 2009–2010, Egypt reported 68 new human cases and became the new epicenter for H5N1 infections. We conducted an epidemiological and molecular analysis in order to better understand the situation in Egypt. The onset of new cases peaked annually during the winter and spring months, with majority of cases reported in the Nile Delta region. Most cases were less than 18 years old (62%) and females (60%). The overall case-fatality rate was 34% and significantly increased by age. There was a significant difference between the case-fatality rates among females and males. We observed a significant drop (p = 0.004) in case fatality rate in 2009 (10%) as compared to higher rates (36%–56%) in other years. Hospitalization within 2 or 3 days after onset of symptoms significantly decreased mortality. Molecular analysis showed that variations do occur among viruses isolated from birds as well as from humans in Egypt, and these mutations were especially noted in 2009 viruses. As the epidemiological profile of Egyptian cases differs from other countries, there is an urgent need to conduct prospective studies to enhance our understanding of incidence, prevalence, and determinants of virulence of human infections with avian H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:21445292

  6. Commonly used molecular epidemiology markers of Streptococcus agalactiae do not appear to predict virulence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank; Sintchenko, Vitali; Kong, Fanrong; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Coiera, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Several virulent clones of group B streptococcus (GBS) are known to be associated with certain serotypes and molecular epidemiological markers. It is unclear, however, whether the clinical significance of GBS can be predicted based solely on such molecular markers. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that GBS virulence can be predicted by using the molecular epidemiology markers. We examined 912 human GBS isolates in which 18 distinct molecular markers (including virulence-associated mobile genetic elements, polysaccharide capsule determinants, variants of a surface antigen and invasin, and antibiotic resistance-related genes) were characterised using multiplex PCR based reverse line blot assay. All strains were classified in clinically relevant invasive and colonising categories. Relationships between molecular markers and clinical phenotypes were tested using statistical and machine learning analyses. Classifier performance was evaluated by the area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). The distribution of serotypes was comparable with those in previous reports (Ia, 22.1%; III, 34.7%; V, 17.7%). From single marker analyses, only alp3 (which encodes a surface protein antigen, commonly associated with serotype V) showed an increased association with invasive diseases (OR = 2.93, p = 0.0003). Molecular serotype (MS) II (OR = 10.0, p = 0.0007) had a significant association with early-onset neonatal disease when compared with late-onset diseases. Predictive analysis with logistic regression and machine learning classifiers, however, only yielded weak predictive power (AUC 0.56-0.71, stratified 10-fold cross-validation) across all the subgroups. While some molecular epidemiological markers are important in defining GBS clusters, a definitive predictive relationship between the molecular markers and clinical outcomes may be lacking.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corso, Alejandra C; Gagetti, Paula S; Rodríguez, Marisa M; Melano, Roberto G; Ceriana, Paola G; Faccone, Diego F; Galas, Marcelo F

    2007-01-01

    To characterize the mechanism of glycopeptide resistance and to determine the genetic relatedness among strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium from Argentina. A total of 189 vancomycin-resistant single-patient isolates of Enterococcus faecium recovered between January 1997 and December 2000 from 30 hospitals in Argentina were studied. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by the agar dilution method and van genes were detected by PCR. PFGE was used for molecular typing. All isolates except three (vanB) were of genotype vanA. For 189 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, SmaI-PFGE indicated 35 clonal types. Most of the isolates (56%) belonged to the same clonal type 1, which was present in 19 hospitals and dominant in 17. The emergence of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in Argentina seems to be related to the intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of an epidemic clone carrying the vanA element.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular epidemiology of streptococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Rato, Márcia G; Bexiga, Ricardo; Florindo, Carlos; Cavaco, Lina M; Vilela, Cristina L; Santos-Sanches, Ilda

    2013-01-25

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS), Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (Group C Streptococcus, GCS) and Streptococcus uberis are relevant mastitis pathogens, a highly prevalent and costly disease in dairy industry due to antibiotherapy and loss in milk production. The aims of this study were the evaluation of antimicrobial drug resistance patterns, particularly important for streptococcal mastitis control and the identification of strain molecular features. Antimicrobial resistance was assessed by disk diffusion against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefazolin, cefoperazone, pirlimycin-PRL, rifaximin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin-ERY, gentamicin, tetracycline-TET and vancomycin. Genotypic relationships were identified using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), macrolide and/or tetracycline resistance gene profiling, GBS capsular typing, GBS virulence gene profiling and GBS and S. uberis multi locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of the isolates were susceptible to all drugs except to aminoglycoside, macrolide, lincosamide and tetracycline. Close to half of the TET resistant isolates have tetO and tetK and almost all ERY-PRL resistant isolates have ermB. A high degree of intra-species polymorphism was found for GCS. The GBS belonged to ST-2, -554, -61, -23 lineages and five new molecular serotypes and human GBS insertion sequences in the cpsE gene were found. Also, GBS of serotype V with scpB and lmb seem to be related with GBS isolates of human origin (same ST-2 and similar PFGE). Overall our results suggested that different therapeutic programs may have been implemented in the different farms and that in most cases clones were herd-specific.

  9. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Collins, D A; Gasem, M H; Habibie, T H; Arinton, I G; Hendriyanto, P; Hartana, A P; Riley, T V

    2017-07-01

    Clostridium difficile has not been studied in detail in Asia, particularly Southeast Asia. We thus performed a prevalence study across four hospitals in Central Java province, Indonesia. Stool samples were collected from patients with diarrhoea and tested by enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A/B (C DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE, TechLab). Specimens were cultured and molecular typing was performed. In total, 340 samples were tested, of which 70 (20.6%) were GDH positive, with toxin detected in 19 (5.6%). Toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 37 specimens (10.9%), while a further 36 (10.6%) nontoxigenic isolates were identified. The most common strain was ribotype 017 (24.3% of 74 isolates), followed by nontoxigenic types QX 224 (9.5%), and QX 238 and QX 108 (both 8.1%). The high prevalence of C. difficile highlights a need for ongoing surveillance of C. difficile infection in Indonesia.

  10. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of neonatal leukemia in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura, Suellen Valadares; Andrade, Francianne; Magalhães, Isis Q; Costa, Imaruí; Silva, Denise Bousfield; D'Andrea, Maria Lydia; Pinheiro, Vitória P; Lee, Maria Lucia M; Werneck, Fernando; Emerenciano, Mariana; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2015-04-01

    The clinical and molecular findings of 77 cases of neonatal leukemia (NL) and 380 of infant leukemia (IL) were selected to distinguish features between NL and IL. Somatic gene mutations associated with acute leukemia including FLT3, RAS and PTPN11 were revisited. There were 42 cases of congenital leukemia associated with Down syndrome (DS) and 39 of these cases presented features of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M7. Twenty-seven of the DS cases underwent spontaneous remission and were reclassified as a transient myeloproliferative disorder. GATA1 mutations were found in 70% of these cases. In non-DS, frequent abnormalities were MLL rearrangements, mainly MLL-AFF1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL-MLLT3 in AML. The FLT3 mutation was not found, while RAS (n = 4) and PTPN11 (n = 2) mutations were identified and reported for the first time in NL. There was substantial evidence to support that somatic abnormalities occur in utero. Thus, congenital leukemia is a good model for understanding leukemogenesis.

  11. High conductance values in π-folded molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Marco; Ruiz, Marta P.; Usabiaga, Imanol; Fernández, José A.; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio

    2017-05-01

    Folding processes play a crucial role in the development of function in biomacromolecules. Recreating this feature on synthetic systems would not only allow understanding and reproducing biological functions but also developing new functions. This has inspired the development of conformationally ordered synthetic oligomers known as foldamers. Herein, a new family of foldamers, consisting of an increasing number of anthracene units that adopt a folded sigmoidal conformation by a combination of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and aromatic interactions, is reported. Such folding process opens up an efficient through-space charge transport channel across the interacting anthracene moieties. In fact, single-molecule conductance measurements carried out on this series of foldamers, using the scanning tunnelling microscopy-based break-junction technique, reveal exceptionally high conductance values in the order of 10-1 G0 and a low length decay constant of 0.02 Å-1 that exceed the values observed in molecular junctions that make use of through-space charge transport pathways.

  12. High conductance values in π-folded molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Carini, Marco; Ruiz, Marta P; Usabiaga, Imanol; Fernández, José A; Cocinero, Emilio J; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio

    2017-05-18

    Folding processes play a crucial role in the development of function in biomacromolecules. Recreating this feature on synthetic systems would not only allow understanding and reproducing biological functions but also developing new functions. This has inspired the development of conformationally ordered synthetic oligomers known as foldamers. Herein, a new family of foldamers, consisting of an increasing number of anthracene units that adopt a folded sigmoidal conformation by a combination of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and aromatic interactions, is reported. Such folding process opens up an efficient through-space charge transport channel across the interacting anthracene moieties. In fact, single-molecule conductance measurements carried out on this series of foldamers, using the scanning tunnelling microscopy-based break-junction technique, reveal exceptionally high conductance values in the order of 10(-1) G0 and a low length decay constant of 0.02 Å(-1) that exceed the values observed in molecular junctions that make use of through-space charge transport pathways.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of terrestrial rabies in the former Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Ivan V; Botvinkin, Alexandr D; McElhinney, Lorraine M; Smith, Jean S; Orciari, Lillian A; Hughes, Gareth J; Fooks, Anthony R; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2004-10-01

    Fifty-five rabies virus isolates originating from different regions of the former Soviet Union (FSU) were compared with isolates originating from Eurasia, Africa, and North America according to complete or partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequences. The FSU isolates formed five distinct groups. Group A represented viruses originating from the Arctic, which were similar to viruses from Alaska and Canada. Group B consisted of "Arctic-like" viruses, originating from the south of East Siberia and the Far East. Group C consisted of viruses circulating in the steppe and forest-steppe territories from the European part of Russia to Tuva and in Kazakhstan. These three phylogenetic groups were clearly different from the European cluster. Viruses of group D circulate near the western border of Russia. Their phylogenetic position is intermediate between group C and the European cluster. Group E consisted of viruses originating from the northwestern part of Russia and comprised a "northeastern Europe" group described earlier from the Baltic region. According to surveillance data, a specific host can be defined clearly only for group A (arctic fox; Alopex lagopus) and for the Far Eastern part of the group B distribution area (raccoon dog; Nyctereutes procyonoides). For other territories and rabies virus variants, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is the main virus reservoir. However, the steppe fox (Vulpes corsac), wolf (Canis lupus), and raccoon dog are also involved in virus circulation, depending on host population density. These molecular data, joined with surveillance information, demonstrate that the current fox rabies epizootic in the territory of the FSU developed independently of central and western Europe. No evidence of positive selection was found in the N genes of the isolates. In the glycoprotein gene, evidence of positive selection was strongly suggested in codons 156, 160, and 183. At these sites, no link between amino acid substitutions and phylogenetic placement or

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Bamrah, Sapna; Desmond, Edward; Ghosh, Smita; France, Anne Marie; Kammerer, J Steve; Cowan, Lauren S; Heetderks, Andrew; Forbes, Alstead; Moonan, Patrick K

    2014-01-01

    The United States-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) are part of the US National Tuberculosis (TB) Surveillance System and use laboratory services contracted through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2004, the CDC established the National Tuberculosis Genotyping Service, a system to genotype 1 isolate from each culture-confirmed case of TB. To describe the molecular epidemiology of TB in the region, we examined all Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates submitted for genotyping from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008. Over this time period, the USAPI jurisdictions reported 1339 verified TB cases to the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System. Among 419 (31%) reported culture-confirmed TB cases, 352 (84%) had complete genotype results. Routine TB genotyping allowed, for the first time, an exploration of the molecular epidemiology of TB in the USAPI.

  15. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR TYPING OF BRUCELLA STRAINS CIRCULATING IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Sidamonidze, K; Ramishvili, M; Kalandadze, I; Tsereteli, D; Nikolich, M P

    2015-10-01

    In 2009-2013, 851 cases of brucellosis were registered in Georgia. Most cases of brucellosis were found in eastern Georgia (91.3% of cases). Mainly men were infected with brucellosis (81.0%).The age group with the most frequent cases of brucellosis is 30-59 years (48.5%). Brucellosis is rarely found among children(0-4 years - 2.0%, 5-14 years - 8.0%). Brucellosis cases were linked to professional activity; mainly by farmers (33.0% of those infected) and shepherds (27.0%). Biotyping Brucella by microbiological methods alone has limitations, so molecular typing was implemented in this study to confirm species. Isolates from human blood and ruminant milk or blood were identified by a bacteriological algorithm and confirmed by real-time PCR (Brucella T1, Idaho Technology). Species identity was confirmed using the AMOS conventional PCR assay, which differentiates four human pathogenic species but cannot recognize certain biovars within them. This gap was addressed by using more universal species-specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) assays. Real-time PCR was used to confirm 86 Brucella strains (48 human, 38 animal isolates) obtained 2009-2011. AMOS PCR supported the biochemical test results for 53 B. melitensis and four B. abortus strains, but not for 29 suspected B. abortus human and animal isolates. SNP typing of all 86 isolates supported the AMOS PCR results but also confirmed the species of the 29 strains not amplified by AMOS PCR. In 2009-2013 years the prevalence of brucellosis was still high. Nowadays cases of brucellosis are higher in the western part of Georgia than in the 1991-2005 period by a factor of 2.62. Brucellosis continues to be mainly an infection in males, because men are mostly engaged in sheep and cattle care. Combined AMOS PCR and SNP typing in this study provided the first genetic confirmation that both B. abortus and B. melitensis are actively circulating in humans and animals in Georgia.

  16. Development of search filters for retrieval of literature on the molecular epidemiology of cancer.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Donatella; Neri, Monica; Casilli, Cristina; Bonassi, Stefano

    2010-08-30

    The available tools for searching literature in the area of molecular epidemiology of cancer, a relatively novel discipline, are largely unsatisfactory. The aim of this project was to develop two search filters in MEDLINE that would facilitate the retrieval of studies on cancer molecular epidemiology and to compare their performance. Citations of all articles published in 2007 in three top journals in this area were hand-screened to establish a gold standard reference set of relevant papers. Two filters were created with this set: the first was based on the frequency of descriptors listed in the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Medical Subject Headings Thesaurus (MeSH terms) only, the second was based on the frequency of words in titles and abstracts (text-words), besides MeSH terms. The sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy rates of the two filters were calculated as performance measures. Out of all 1602 published articles, 344 were found to be pertinent to cancer molecular epidemiology; these formed the gold standard set. The first filter was the most specific (99%) and showed a good precision (93.2%), the second showed a higher sensitivity (78.2%) and accuracy (91.6%). The two filters proposed here represent a balance between sensitivity and specificity. Redefinition and elaboration of more appropriate NLM MeSH terms could greatly facilitate the retrieval of studies on the molecular epidemiology of cancer. Authors themselves could facilitate this by inserting adequate words in title or abstract of their articles. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Epidemiological Interpretation of the Epidemic of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, E. M.; Sampson, S. L.; Dheda, K.; Dolby, T.; Simpson, J. A.; Victor, T. C.; Gey van Pittius, N. C.; van Helden, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the interpretation of molecular epidemiological data for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is dependent on the number of different markers used to define transmission. Using spoligotyping, IS6110 DNA fingerprinting, and DNA sequence data, we show that XDR-TB in South Africa (2006 to 2008) was predominantly driven by the acquisition of second-line drug resistance. PMID:26338863

  18. Cutaneous Pythiosis in calves: An epidemiologic, pathologic, serologic and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Guilherme; Bassuino, Daniele Mariath; Bianchi, Matheus Viezzer; Castro, Lismara; Caprioli, Rafaela Albuquerque; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Santurio, Janio M; Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Jesus, Francielli P; Driemeier, David

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the epidemiological, pathological and mycological findings of cutaneous pythiosis in cattle in southern Brazil. 23 calves, that were kept next to a river with extensive marshy regions, presented ulcerated cutaneous lesions in thoracic and pelvic limbs, sometimes extending to the ventral thoracic region. Histopathological examination revealed multifocal pyogranulomas in the superficial and deep dermis. The Grocott-Methenamine silver, immunohistochemistry anti-Pythium insidiosum, ELISA serology and molecular characterization demonstrated the agent P. insidiosum in these cases.

  19. Impact of Laboratory Cross-Contamination on Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel; de Viedma, Darío García; Alonso, María; Andrés, Sandra; Bouza, Emilio; Cabezas, Teresa; Cabeza, Isabel; Reyes, Armando; Sánchez-Yebra, Waldo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Sánchez, M. Isabel; Rogado, M. Cruz; Fernández, Rosa; Peñafiel, Teresa; Martínez, Juan; Barroso, Pilar; Lucerna, M. Ángeles; Diez, L. Felipe; Gutiérrez, Carmelo

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory cross-contamination by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to be responsible for the misdiagnosis of tuberculosis, but its impact on other contexts has not been analyzed. We present the findings of a molecular epidemiology analysis in which the recent transmission events identified by a genotyping reference center were overestimated as a result of unnoticed laboratory cross-contamination in the original diagnostic laboratories. PMID:16891518

  20. The virulence phenotypes and molecular epidemiological characteristics of Vibrio fluvialis in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vibrio fluvialis is considered to be an emerging foodborne pathogen and has been becoming a high human public health hazard all over the world, especially in coastal areas of developing countries and regions with poor sanitation. The distribution of virulence factors, microbiological and molecular epidemiological features of V. fluvialis isolates in China remains to be examined. Methods and results PCR targeted at the virulence determinants and phenotype tests including metabolism, virulence and antibiotic susceptibility were performed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis was used to access the relatedness of isolates. A strain with deletion of the arginine dihydrolase system was first reported and proved in molecular level by PCR. Virulence genes vfh, hupO and vfpA were detected in all strains, the ability to produce hemolysin, cytotxin, protease and biofilm formation varied with strains. High resistance rate to β-lactams, azithromycin and sulfamethoxazole were observed. Twenty-seven percent of test strains showed resistant to two and three antibiotics. PFGE analysis demonstrated great genetic heterogeneity of test V. fluvialis strains. Conclusion This study evaluated firstly the biological characteristics and molecular epidemiological features of V. fluvialis in China. Some uncommon biochemical characteristics were found. Virulence genes were widely distributed in the isolates from patient and seafood sources, and the occurrence of virulence phenotypes varied with strains. Continued and enhanced laboratory based-surveillance is needed in the future together with systematically collection of the epidemiological information of the cases or the outbreaks. PMID:23522652

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinoviruses and Enteroviruses Highlights Their Diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Petty, Tom J; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Hongoa, Philipina; Vieille, Gaël; Turin, Lara; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-12-08

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and enteroviruses (HEVs) belong to the Enterovirus genus and are the most frequent cause of infection worldwide, but data on their molecular epidemiology in Africa are scarce. To understand HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in this setting, we enrolled febrile pediatric patients participating in a large prospective cohort assessing the causes of fever in Tanzanian children. Naso/oropharyngeal swabs were systematically collected and tested by real-time RT-PCR for HRV and HEV. Viruses from positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were then applied to highlight the HRV and HEV types as well as recombinant or divergent strains. Thirty-eight percent (378/1005) of the enrolled children harboured an HRV or HEV infection. Although some types were predominant, many distinct types were co-circulating, including a vaccinal poliovirus, HEV-A71 and HEV-D68. Three HRV-A recombinants were identified: HRV-A36/HRV-A67, HRV-A12/HRV-A67 and HRV-A96/HRV-A61. Four divergent HRV strains were also identified: one HRV-B strain and three HRV-C strains. This is the first prospective study focused on HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. This systematic and thorough large screening with careful clinical data management confirms the wide genomic diversity of these viruses, brings new insights about their evolution and provides data about associated symptoms.

  2. Mongoose rabies in southern Africa: a re-evaluation based on molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Nel, L H; Sabeta, C T; von Teichman, B; Jaftha, J B; Rupprecht, C E; Bingham, J

    2005-05-01

    Relative to the developed world, rabies has been poorly studied in the vast African continent. The southern African countries of Zimbabwe and South Africa, however, are known to sustain a great diversity of lyssaviruses, with large biological variations amongst genotype 1 (rabies viruses) at present more apparent here than elsewhere on the continent. One recognized biotype of rabies virus in the subcontinent appears to be specifically adapted to a variety of mongooses, belonging to the Viverrinae subfamily (family Herpestidae) and are commonly referred to as viverrid viruses, although the term mongoose rabies would be more correct, considering the taxonomic status of the host species involved. It was our objective to study the genetic relationships of 77 rabies virus isolates of this mongoose biotype, isolated in South Africa and Zimbabwe, towards elucidation of the molecular epidemiology of this interesting group of African viruses. In our study of a 592 nucleotide sequence encompassing the cytoplasmic domain of the glycoprotein and the G-L intergenic region of the viral genomes, we provide the first comprehensive data on the molecular epidemiology of these viruses and indicate a history of extended evolutionary adaptation in this geographical domain. The molecular epidemiological observations reported here are highly unlikely to be limited to the small geographical areas of South Africa and Zimbabwe and illustrate the need for lyssavirus surveillance in the rest of sub-Saharan Africa and throughout the entire continent.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of mastitis pathogens of dairy cattle and comparative relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Zadoks, Ruth N; Middleton, John R; McDougall, Scott; Katholm, Jorgen; Schukken, Ynte H

    2011-12-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, can be caused by a wide range of organisms, including gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, mycoplasmas and algae. Many microbial species that are common causes of bovine mastitis, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus also occur as commensals or pathogens of humans whereas other causative species, such as Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae or Staphylococcus chromogenes, are almost exclusively found in animals. A wide range of molecular typing methods have been used in the past two decades to investigate the epidemiology of bovine mastitis at the subspecies level. These include comparative typing methods that are based on electrophoretic banding patterns, library typing methods that are based on the sequence of selected genes, virulence gene arrays and whole genome sequencing projects. The strain distribution of mastitis pathogens has been investigated within individual animals and across animals, herds, countries and host species, with consideration of the mammary gland, other animal or human body sites, and environmental sources. Molecular epidemiological studies have contributed considerably to our understanding of sources, transmission routes, and prognosis for many bovine mastitis pathogens and to our understanding of mechanisms of host-adaptation and disease causation. In this review, we summarize knowledge gleaned from two decades of molecular epidemiological studies of mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle and discuss aspects of comparative relevance to human medicine.

  4. Transmission eigenvalue distributions in highly conductive molecular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Joshua D; Stafford, Charles A

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: The transport through a quantum-scale device may be uniquely characterized by its transmission eigenvalues τn. Recently, highly conductive single-molecule junctions (SMJ) with multiple transport channels (i.e., several τn > 0) have been formed from benzene molecules between Pt electrodes. Transport through these multichannel SMJs is a probe of both the bonding properties at the lead–molecule interface and of the molecular symmetry. Results: We use a many-body theory that properly describes the complementary wave–particle nature of the electron to investigate transport in an ensemble of Pt–benzene–Pt junctions. We utilize an effective-field theory of interacting π-electrons to accurately model the electrostatic influence of the leads, and we develop an ab initio tunneling model to describe the details of the lead–molecule bonding over an ensemble of junction geometries. We also develop a simple decomposition of transmission eigenchannels into molecular resonances based on the isolated resonance approximation, which helps to illustrate the workings of our many-body theory, and facilitates unambiguous interpretation of transmission spectra. Conclusion: We confirm that Pt–benzene–Pt junctions have two dominant transmission channels, with only a small contribution from a third channel with τn << 1. In addition, we demonstrate that the isolated resonance approximation is extremely accurate and determine that transport occurs predominantly via the HOMO orbital in Pt–benzene–Pt junctions. Finally, we show that the transport occurs in a lead–molecule coupling regime where the charge carriers are both particle-like and wave-like simultaneously, requiring a many-body description. PMID:22428095

  5. Molecular Pathologic Epidemiology of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Emerging Transdisciplinary and Interdisciplinary Field

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a complex disease resulting from somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations, including locus-specific CpG island methylation and global DNA or LINE-1 hypomethylation. Global molecular characteristics such as microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), global DNA hypomethylation, and chromosomal instability cause alterations of gene function in a genome-wide scale. Activation of oncogenes including KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA affects intracellular signaling pathways and has been associated with CIMP and MSI. Traditional epidemiology research has investigated various factors in relation to an overall risk of colon and/or rectal cancer. However, colorectal cancers comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases with different sets of genetic and epigenetic alterations. To better understand how a particular exposure influences the carcinogenic process, somatic molecular changes and tumor biomarkers have been studied in relation to the exposure of interest. Moreover, an investigation of interactive effects of tumor molecular changes and the exposures of interest on tumor behavior (prognosis or clinical outcome) can lead to a better understanding of tumor molecular changes, which may be prognostic or predictive tissue biomarkers. These new research efforts represent “Molecular Pathologic Epidemiology”, which is a multidisciplinary field of investigations of the interrelationship between exogenous and endogenous (e.g., genetic) factors, tumoral molecular signatures and tumor progression. Furthermore, integrating genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with molecular pathologic investigation is a promising area. Examining the relationship between susceptibility alleles identified by GWAS and specific molecular alterations can help elucidate the function of these alleles and provide insights into whether susceptibility alleles are truly causal. Although there are challenges, molecular pathologic epidemiology has unique strengths

  6. Investigation of mechanisms and molecular epidemiology of linezolid nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis isolated from a teaching hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Ma, Chuan-Ling; Yu, Xiao; Sun, Yao; Li, Mei-Mei; Ye, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Ya-Pei; Wu, Qing; Zhou, Tie-Li

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiological and molecular characteristics of eight linezolid nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis isolated from a teaching hospital in China (January to July 2014) were investigated. The target site modifications and cfr gene associated with linezolid resistance were not found. Results of the epidemiological investigation indicated that linezolid resistance possibly occurred on several independent occasions and was often not related to linezolid administration.

  7. A Large Cohort of Hemoglobin Variants in Thailand: Molecular Epidemiological Study and Diagnostic Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Srivorakun, Hataichanok; Singha, Kritsada; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2014-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin (Hb) variants are structurally inherited changes of globin chains. Accurate diagnoses of these variants are important for planning of appropriate management and genetic counseling. Since no epidemiological study has been conducted before, we have investigated frequencies, molecular and hematological features of Hb variants found in a large cohort of Thai subjects. Materials and Methods Study was conducted on 26,013 unrelated subjects, inhabiting in all geographical parts of Thailand over a period of 11 years from January 2002-December 2012. Hb analysis was done on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutations causing Hb variants were identified using PCR and related techniques. Results Among 26,013 subjects investigated, 636 (2.4%) were found to carry Hb variants. Of these 636 subjects, 142 (22.4%) carried α-chain variants with 13 different mutations. The remaining included 451 (70.9%) cases with 16 β-chain variants, 37 (5.8%) cases with Hb Lepore (δβ-hybrid Hb) and 6 (0.9%) cases with a single δ-chain variant. The most common α-globin chain variant was the Hb Q-Thailand (α74GAC-CAC, Asp-His) which was found in 101 cases (15.8%). For β-globin chain variants, Hb Hope (β136GGT-GAT, Gly-Asp) and Hb Tak (β146+AC, Ter-Thr) are the two most common ones, found in 121 (19.0%) and 90 (14.2%) cases, respectively. Seven Hb variants have never been found in Thai population. Hb analysis profiles on HPLC or CE of these variants were illustrated to guide presumptive diagnostics. Conclusions Hb variants are common and heterogeneous in Thai population. With varieties of thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies in the population, interactions between them leading to complex syndromes are common and render their diagnoses difficult in routine practices. Knowledge of the spectrum, molecular basis, genotype-phenotype correlation and diagnostic features should prove useful for prevention and control of the diseases

  8. Strengthening the Reporting of Molecular Epidemiology for Infectious Diseases (STROME-ID): an extension of the STROBE statement.

    PubMed

    Field, Nigel; Cohen, Ted; Struelens, Marc J; Palm, Daniel; Cookson, Barry; Glynn, Judith R; Gallo, Valentina; Ramsay, Mary; Sonnenberg, Pam; Maccannell, Duncan; Charlett, Andre; Egger, Matthias; Green, Jonathan; Vineis, Paolo; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2014-04-01

    Molecular data are now widely used in epidemiological studies to investigate the transmission, distribution, biology, and diversity of pathogens. Our objective was to establish recommendations to support good scientific reporting of molecular epidemiological studies to encourage authors to consider specific threats to valid inference. The statement Strengthening the Reporting of Molecular Epidemiology for Infectious Diseases (STROME-ID) builds upon the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative. The STROME-ID statement was developed by a working group of epidemiologists, statisticians, bioinformaticians, virologists, and microbiologists with expertise in control of infection and communicable diseases. The statement focuses on issues relating to the reporting of epidemiological studies of infectious diseases using molecular data that were not addressed by STROBE. STROME-ID addresses terminology, measures of genetic diversity within pathogen populations, laboratory methods, sample collection, use of molecular markers, molecular clocks, timeframe, multiple-strain infections, non-independence of infectious-disease data, missing data, ascertainment bias, consistency between molecular and epidemiological data, and ethical considerations with respect to infectious-disease research. In total, 20 items were added to the 22 item STROBE checklist. When used, the STROME-ID recommendations should advance the quality and transparency of scientific reporting, with clear benefits for evidence reviews and health-policy decision making.

  9. Overview of HIV molecular epidemiology among people who inject drugs in Europe and Asia.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Kostaki, Evangelia-Georgia; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    HIV strains continuously evolve, tend to recombine, and new circulating variants are being discovered. Novel strains complicate efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV and may exhibit higher transmission efficiency and virulence, and elevated resistance to antiretroviral agents. The United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) set an ambitious goal to end HIV as a public health threat by 2030 through comprehensive strategies that include epidemiological input as the first step of the process. In this context, molecular epidemiology becomes invaluable as it captures trends in HIV evolution rates that shape epidemiological pictures across several geographical areas. This review briefly summarizes the molecular epidemiology of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Europe and Asia. Following high transmission rates of subtype G and CRF14_BG among PWID in Portugal and Spain, two European countries, Greece and Romania, experienced recent HIV outbreaks in PWID that consisted of multiple transmission clusters including subtypes B, A, F1, and recombinants CRF14_BG and CRF35_AD. The latter was first identified in Afghanistan. Russia, Ukraine, and other Former Soviet Union (FSU) states are still facing the devastating effects of epidemics in PWID produced by AFSU (also known as IDU-A), BFSU (known as IDU-B), and CRF03_AB. In Asia, CRF01_AE and subtype B (Western B and Thai B) travelled from PWID in Thailand to neighboring countries. Recombination hotspots in South China, Northern Myanmar, and Malaysia have been generating several intersubtype and inter-CRF recombinants (e.g. CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, CRF33_01B etc.), increasing the complexity of HIV molecular patterns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Differential findings regarding molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis between two consecutive periods in the context of steady increase of immigration.

    PubMed

    Iñigo, J; García de Viedma, D; Arce, A; Palenque, E; Herranz, M; Rodríguez, E; Ruiz-Serrano, M J; Bouza, E; Chaves, F

    2013-03-01

    The demographic characteristics of the population of Madrid, with a steady increase in immigrants, from 4.7% in 1998 to 17.4% in 2007, provide an opportunity to study in depth the transmission of TB. Our aim was to compare two 3-year longitudinal molecular studies of TB to define transmission patterns and predictors of clustering. Two prospective population-based molecular and epidemiological studies (2002-2004 and 2005-2007) of TB patients were conducted in nine urban districts in Madrid using the same methodology. During the period 2002-2007, 2248 cases of TB were reported, and the incidence decreased from 23.5 per 100,000 in 2002 to 20.8 in 2007 (p <0.001). A total of 1269 isolates were molecularly characterized and included in the study. The comparison between the two periods showed that the percentage of foreign-born patients among TB cases increased from 36.2% to 45.7% (p <0.001). Furthermore, the percentage of clustered cases decreased (36.6% vs. 30.6%; p 0.028), and this decline was associated with a decrease of clustered cases among men and people under 35 years. We also observed a decrease in cases belonging to clusters containing ≥ 6 people (14.2% vs. 8.2%; p <0.001), and in cases belonging to mixed clusters containing Spanish-born and foreign-born patients (18.5% vs. 11.1%, p <0.001). Our molecular epidemiology study provides clues to interpret the decrease in the incidence of TB in a context of steady increase of immigration. In our region, the decrease in the incidence of TB can be explained predominantly as a result of a decline in recent transmission. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  11. [Genotyping and molecular marking of bacteria and viruses in epidemiological surveillance of actual infections].

    PubMed

    Zhebrun, A B; Mukomolov, S L; Narvskaia, O V

    2011-01-01

    Determination of genetic and molecular features of pathogens circulating in Russia, in the northwest of the country and in St. Petersburg to resolve the problems of spread of diseases caused by these pathogens. Complete and limited gene sequencing, DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, spoligotyping, VNTR-typing, resistotyping and other methods were used. Data on population structure and dominant genotypes of tuberculosis mycobacteria, corynebacteria, helicobacteria, hepatitis A, B, C, human papilloma viruses circulating in Russia, in the northwest of the country and in St. Petersburg were obtained. Genetic divergence of rubella virus and poliovirus vaccine strains under mass vaccination conditions was detected. Evidence of higher effectiveness of pathogen genotyping methods in epidemiologic diagnostics compared with traditional epidemiological investigation was obtained. Microorganism genotyping methods were helpful in resolving strategic problems of contemporary epidemiology. Perspectives of further development of these methods are related to obtaining data on circulating genotypes in all regions of the world, establishment of complete databases on circulating genotypes and integration of this methodology into daily diagnostics and epidemiological surveillance.

  12. Molecular pathological epidemiology of colorectal cancer in Chinese patients with KRAS and BRAF mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenbin; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Guo, Lei; Li, Lin; Ying, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    An investigation of interactive effects of exogenous and endogenous factors and tumor molecular changes can lead to a better understanding of tumor molecular signatures in colorectal cancer. We here report a molecular pathological epidemiology study in a large cohort of 945 colorectal cancer patients. Mutations of KRAS (36.6%) and BRAF (3.46%) were nearly mutually exclusive. KRAS-mutated tumors were more common in female patients (odds ratio [OR] = 1.68; P = 0.0001) and never smokers (OR = 1.60; P = 0.001). Whereas BRAF-mutated tumors demonstrated no discrepancy in aspects of gender and smoking status compared with wild-type tumors. In addition, tumors with BRAF or KRAS mutations were in correlation with elevated serum level of carbohydrate antigen (CA19-9) and carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA) and the combination of serum biomarkers and molecular mutation status may enhance the more precise risk stratification of CRC patients. Further studies are needed to define the mechanism brought about by the aforementioned epidemiologic and clinicopathologic characteristics that may help optimize cancer prevention and precision therapy. PMID:26530529

  13. [Molecular markers: an important tool in the diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Frías-de León, María Guadalupe; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Martínez-Rivera, María de Los Ángeles; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the incidence of invasive aspergillosis has represented a difficult problem for management of patients with this infection due to its high rate of mortality, limited knowledge concerning its diagnosis, and therapeutic practice. The difficulty in management of patients with aspergillosis initiates with detection of the fungus in the specimens of immunosuppressed patients infected with Aspergillus fumigatus; in addition, difficulty exists in terms of the development of resistance to antifungals as a consequence of their indiscriminate use in prophylactic and therapeutic practice and to ignorance concerning the epidemiological data of aspergillosis. With the aim of resolving these problems, molecular markers is employed at present with specific and accurate results. However, in Mexico, the use of molecular markers has not yet been implemented in the routine of intrahospital laboratories; despite the fact that these molecular markers has been widely referred in the literature, it is necessary for it to validated and standardized to ensure that the results obtained in any laboratory would be reliable and comparable. In the present review, we present an update on the usefulness of molecular markers in accurate identification of A. fumigatus, detection of resistance to antifugal triazoles, and epidemiological studies for establishing the necessary measures for prevention and control of aspergillosis.

  14. Molecular epidemiology and phylogeny of Nipah virus infection: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae, characterized by high pathogenicity and endemic in South Asia. It is classified as a Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) agent. The case-fatality varies from 40% to 70% depending on the severity of the disease and on the availability of adequate healthcare facilities. At present no antiviral drugs are available for NiV disease and the treatment is just supportive. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses can be used to help in understanding the epidemiology and the temporal origin of this virus. This review provides an overview of evolutionary studies performed on Nipah viruses circulating in different countries. Thirty phylogenetic studies have been published from 2000 to 2015 years, searching on pub-med using the key words 'Nipah virus AND phylogeny' and twenty-eight molecular epidemiological studies from 2006 to 2015 have been performed, typing the key words 'Nipah virus AND molecular epidemiology'. Overall data from the published study demonstrated as phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis represent promising tools to evidence NiV epidemics, to study their origin and evolution and finally to act with effective preventive measure. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular pathological epidemiology of epigenetics: emerging integrative science to analyze environment, host, and disease.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Lochhead, Paul; Chan, Andrew T; Nishihara, Reiko; Cho, Eunyoung; Wolpin, Brian M; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Meissner, Alexander; Schernhammer, Eva S; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Epigenetics acts as an interface between environmental/exogenous factors, cellular responses, and pathological processes. Aberrant epigenetic signatures are a hallmark of complex multifactorial diseases (including neoplasms and malignancies such as leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and breast, lung, prostate, liver, and colorectal cancers). Epigenetic signatures (DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression, etc) may serve as biomarkers for risk stratification, early detection, and disease classification, as well as targets for therapy and chemoprevention. In particular, DNA methylation assays are widely applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue specimens as clinical pathology tests. To better understand the interplay between etiological factors, cellular molecular characteristics, and disease evolution, the field of 'molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE)' has emerged as an interdisciplinary integration of 'molecular pathology' and 'epidemiology'. In contrast to traditional epidemiological research including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), MPE is founded on the unique disease principle, that is, each disease process results from unique profiles of exposomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, microbiomes, and interactomes in relation to the macroenvironment and tissue microenvironment. MPE may represent a logical evolution of GWAS, termed 'GWAS-MPE approach'. Although epigenome-wide association study attracts increasing attention, currently, it has a fundamental problem in that each cell within one individual has a unique, time-varying epigenome. Having a similar conceptual framework to systems biology, the holistic MPE approach enables us to link potential etiological factors to specific molecular pathology, and gain novel pathogenic insights on causality. The widespread application of epigenome (eg, methylome) analyses will enhance our understanding of disease heterogeneity, epigenotypes (CpG island methylator

  16. Biochemical and molecular epidemiology of human cancer: indicators of carcinogen exposure, DNA damage, and genetic predisposition.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C C; Weston, A; Willey, J C; Trivers, G E; Mann, D L

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal of biochemical and molecular epidemiology is to identify individuals at high cancer risk by obtaining evidence of high exposure to carcinogens, leading to pathobiological lesions in target cells, and/or increased oncogenic susceptibility due to either inherited or acquired host factors. This emerging and multidisciplinary area of cancer research combines epidemiological and laboratory approaches. Because DNA is considered to be an important target for modification by mutagens and carcinogens, damage to DNA can be used as an internal, molecular dosimeter of carcinogen exposure. The reactive species of these carcinogens may directly bind to DNA to form adducts and may indirectly cause secondary DNA lesions, e.g., via induction of free radicals and aldehydes. Highly sensitive and specific methods have been developed to measure the minute amounts of DNA lesions and DNA repair products found in biological specimens from humans exposed to carcinogens. For example, DNA adducts have been measured in cells and tissues from people occupationally exposed to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Antibodies recognizing carcinogen-DNA adducts have also been detected in human sera. Inherited predisposition to cancer has been revealed by recent advances in molecular genetics, including restriction-fragment-length polymorphism. For example, the hypothesis that rare alleles of the Ha-ras proto-oncogene are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer is currently being tested. These approaches afford the potential of biochemical and molecular epidemiology to predict disease risk for individual persons, instead of for populations, and before the onset of clinically evident disease. PMID:3319559

  17. Molecular epidemiologic research on the effects of environmental pollutants on the fetus.

    PubMed Central

    Perera, F P; Jedrychowski, W; Rauh, V; Whyatt, R M

    1999-01-01

    Evidence shows that fetuses and infants are more affected than adults by a variety of environmental toxicants because of differential exposure, physiologic immaturity, and a longer lifetime over which disease initiated in early life can develop. In this article we review data on the effects of in utero exposure to common environmental contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particulate matter and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). We then summarize results from our molecular epidemiologic study to assess risks from in utero exposures to ambient air pollution and ETS. This research study, conducted in Poland, used biomarkers to measure the internal and bioeffective dose of toxicants and individual susceptibility factors. The study included 160 mothers and 160 newborns. Ambient air pollution was significantly associated (p= 0.05) with the amount of PAH bound to DNA (PAH-DNA adducts) in both maternal and infant cord white blood cells (WBC). Newborns with elevated PAH-DNA adducts (greater than the median) had significantly decreased birth weight (p= 0.05), birth length (p= 0.02), and head circumference (p= 0.0005) compared to the newborns with lower adducts (n= 135). Maternal and infant cotinine levels were increased by active and passive cigarette smoke exposure of the mother (p= 0.01). An inverse correlation was seen between newborn plasma cotinine (nanograms per milliliter) and birth weight (p= 0.0001) and length (p= 0.003). Adducts were elevated in placental tissue and WBC of newborns who were heterozygous or homozygous for the cytochrome P4501A1 MspI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) compared to newborns without the RFLP. Levels of PAH-DNA and cotinine were higher in newborns than mothers. These results document that there is significant transplacental transfer of PAH and ETS constituents from mother to fetus; that PAH-DNA adduct levels in maternal and newborn WBC were increased with environmental exposure to PAH from ambient

  18. Sero-Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis in Zhejiang, an Eastern Province of China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jin-Ren; Yan, Ju-Ying; Zhou, Jia-Yue; Tang, Xue-Wen; He, Han-Qing; Xie, Rong-Hui; Mao, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yan-Jun; Xie, Shu-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Sporadic Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases still have been reported in Zhejiang Province in recent years, and concerns about vaccine cross-protection and population-level immunity have been raised off and on within the public health sphere. Genotype I (GI) has replaced GIII as the dominant genotype in Asian countries during the past few decades, which caused considerable concerns about the potential change of epidemiology characteristics and the vaccine effectiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of JE neutralizing antibody and its waning antibody trend after live attenuated JE vaccine immunization. Additionally, this study analyzed the molecular characteristics of the E gene of Zhejiang Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains, and established genetic relationships with other JEV strains. A total of 570 serum specimens were sampled from community population aged from 0 to 92 years old in Xianju county of Zhejiang Province in 2013-2014. Microseroneutralization test results were analyzed to estimate the population immunity and to observe antibody dynamics in vaccinated children. E genes of 28 JEV strains isolated in Zhejiang Province were sequenced for phylogenetic tree construction and molecular characteristics analysis with other selected strains. Positive JE neutralizing antibody rates were higher in residents ≥35 years old (81%~98%) and lower in residents <35 years old (0~57%). 7 or 8 years after the 2nd live attenuated vaccine dose, the antibodies against for 4 different strains with microseroneutralization test were decreased by 55%~73% on seropositive rates and by 25%~38% on GMTs respectively. JEV strains isolated in recent years were all grouped into GI, while those isolated in the 1980s belonged to GIII. On important amino acid sites related to antigenicity, there was no divergence between the Zhejiang JE virus strains and the vaccine strain (SA14-14-2). JE neutralizing antibody positive rates increase in age ≥10 years old

  19. Sero-Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis in Zhejiang, an Eastern Province of China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ju-ying; Zhou, Jia-yue; Tang, Xue-wen; He, Han-qing; Xie, Rong-hui; Mao, Hai-yan; Zhang, Yan-jun; Xie, Shu-yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Sporadic Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases still have been reported in Zhejiang Province in recent years, and concerns about vaccine cross-protection and population-level immunity have been raised off and on within the public health sphere. Genotype I (GI) has replaced GIII as the dominant genotype in Asian countries during the past few decades, which caused considerable concerns about the potential change of epidemiology characteristics and the vaccine effectiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of JE neutralizing antibody and its waning antibody trend after live attenuated JE vaccine immunization. Additionally, this study analyzed the molecular characteristics of the E gene of Zhejiang Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains, and established genetic relationships with other JEV strains. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 serum specimens were sampled from community population aged from 0 to 92 years old in Xianju county of Zhejiang Province in 2013–2014. Microseroneutralization test results were analyzed to estimate the population immunity and to observe antibody dynamics in vaccinated children. E genes of 28 JEV strains isolated in Zhejiang Province were sequenced for phylogenetic tree construction and molecular characteristics analysis with other selected strains. Positive JE neutralizing antibody rates were higher in residents ≥35 years old (81%~98%) and lower in residents <35 years old (0~57%). 7 or 8 years after the 2nd live attenuated vaccine dose, the antibodies against for 4 different strains with microseroneutralization test were decreased by 55%~73% on seropositive rates and by 25%~38% on GMTs respectively. JEV strains isolated in recent years were all grouped into GI, while those isolated in the 1980s belonged to GIII. On important amino acid sites related to antigenicity, there was no divergence between the Zhejiang JE virus strains and the vaccine strain (SA14-14-2). Conclusion/Significances JE

  20. Preliminary molecular epidemiological investigation of hepatitis E virus sequences from Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Barbara; Muellner, Petra; Pearl, David L; Rajić, Andrijana; Houde, Alain; McEwen, Scott A

    2015-03-01

    cluster of these sequences, but not of the overall dataset of 12 HEV sequences collected from Québec retail livers. All seven retail liver sequences with close human matches were processed in-store. We conclude that some Canadian sequences of HEV collected from pigs/pork are more closely related to human sequences than others, and hypothesize that detection of some HEV sequences recovered from Canadian retail pork livers may be associated with exposure to human shedding. More research needs to be conducted at the processing level to help understand the molecular epidemiology of HEV in Canadian retail pork. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of betanodavirus-sequence analysis strategies and quasispecies influence outbreak source attribution.

    PubMed

    Hick, Paul; Gore, Kylie; Whittington, Richard

    2013-02-05

    The quasispecies structure of nervous necrosis virus (NNV) was determined to investigate an outbreak of viral nervous necrosis disease at a barramundi (Lates calcarifer) hatchery. A traditional epidemiological investigation indicated horizontal transmission of infection between two cohorts of fish. However, variation in the viral capsid protein gene sequence from cell culture-derived viral populations and from individual fish suggested that each cohort was infected with a different virus. Molecular support for the correct epidemiological conclusion was provided by determining the consensus NNV sequence directly from multiple fish, to show that each cohort was infected with the same quasispecies. Variation in the capsid gene of isolates obtained from this quasispecies was up to 3.3% compared with sequences determined directly from fish tissue, and ≤1.7% between individual fish within each cohort. Determination of the NNV quasispecies structure supported implementation of biosecurity measures to protect fish in the hatchery from environmental sources of infection.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Bulgaria--An update.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Pappa, Styliani; Panayotova, Elitsa; Papadopoulou, Elpida; Christova, Iva

    2016-05-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is endemic in Bulgaria. During 2013-2014, 11 confirmed CCHF cases have been reported in the country (seven in 2013 and four in 2014). The present study provides the CCHF molecular epidemiology in Bulgaria based on all currently available S, M, and L RNA segment nucleotide sequences spanning the years 1978-2014. A relatively low genetic difference (0-6%, the maximum seen in the M RNA segment) was seen among the CCHFV sequences suggesting that a slow evolving CCHFV strain belonging to "Europe 1" clade is present in Bulgaria. Although the virus emerged in new foci during the recent years, it is more active in the established endemic foci which seem to offer the most suitable ecosystem and environment. Understanding the CCHF epidemiology and virus evolution is the basis for public health programs and vaccine design.

  3. A review of the global prevalence, molecular epidemiology and economics of cystic echinococcosis in production animals.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Guillermo A; Carmena, David

    2013-02-18

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important and widespread zoonotic infection caused by the larval stages of taeniid cestodes of the genus Echinococcus. The disease represents a serious animal health concern in many rural areas of the world, causing important economic losses derived from decreased productivity and viscera condemnation in livestock species. In this review we aim to provide a comprehensive overview on recent research progress in the epidemiology of CE in production animals from a global perspective. Particular attention has been paid to the discussion of the extent and significance of recent molecular epidemiologic data. The financial burden associated to CE on the livestock industry has also been addressed. Data presented are expected to improve our current understanding of the parasite's geographical distribution, transmission, host range, immunogenicity, pathogenesis, and genotype frequencies. This information should be also valuable for the design and implementation of more efficient control strategies against CE.

  4. Molecular and epidemiological studies of Porcine rubulavirus infection – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus-La Piedad-Michoacan-Mexico virus (PorPV-LPMV) was identified as the causative agent of a viral disease that emerged spontaneously in Mexican swine in the 1980s. Since the report of the initial outbreak of the disease, only one full-length genome from a strain isolated in 1984 (PorPV-LPMV/1984) has been sequenced; sequence data are scarce from other isolates. The genetic variation of this virus that has spread throughout the main endemic region of Mexico is almost a complete mystery. The development of molecular techniques for improved diagnostics and to investigate the persistence, molecular epidemiology, and the possible reservoirs of PorPV are needed. Together, this will provide greater knowledge regarding the molecular genetic changes and useful data to establish new strategies in the control of this virus in Mexico. PMID:26584829

  5. Molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71 infection in the central region of Taiwan from 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Hao; Kuo, Ta-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Ting; Huang, Szu-Wei; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Wang, John; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease can be classified into three genotypes and many subtypes. The objectives of this study were to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of EV71 in the central region of Taiwan from 2002-2012 and to test the hypothesis that whether the alternative appearance of different EV71 subtypes in Taiwan is due to transmission from neighboring countries or from re-emergence of pre-existing local strains. We selected 174 EV71 isolates and used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify their VP1 region for DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using Neighbor-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. We found that the major subtypes of EV71 in Taiwan were B4 for 2002 epidemic, C4 for 2004-2005 epidemic, B5 for 2008-2009 epidemic, C4 for 2010 epidemic and B5 for 2011-2012 epidemic. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the 2002 and 2008 epidemics were associated with EV71 from Malaysia and Singapore; while both 2010 and 2011-2012 epidemics originated from different regions of mainland China including Shanghai, Henan, Xiamen and Gong-Dong. Furthermore, minor strains have been identified in each epidemic and some of them were correlated with the subsequent outbreaks. Therefore, the EV71 infection in Taiwan may originate from pre-existing minor strains or from other regions in Asia including mainland China. In addition, 101 EV71 isolates were selected for the detection of new recombinant strains using the nucleotide sequences spanning the VP1-2A-2B region. No new recombinant strain was found. Analysis of clinical manifestations showed that patients infected with C4 had significantly higher rates of pharyngeal vesicles or ulcers than patients infected with B5. This is the first study demonstrating that different EV 71 genotypes may have different clinical manifestations and the association of EV71 infections between Taiwan and mainland China.

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Enterovirus 71 Infection in the Central Region of Taiwan from 2002 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Huang, Szu-Wei; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Wang, John; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease can be classified into three genotypes and many subtypes. The objectives of this study were to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of EV71 in the central region of Taiwan from 2002–2012 and to test the hypothesis that whether the alternative appearance of different EV71 subtypes in Taiwan is due to transmission from neighboring countries or from re-emergence of pre-existing local strains. We selected 174 EV71 isolates and used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify their VP1 region for DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted using Neighbor-Joining, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. We found that the major subtypes of EV71 in Taiwan were B4 for 2002 epidemic, C4 for 2004–2005 epidemic, B5 for 2008–2009 epidemic, C4 for 2010 epidemic and B5 for 2011–2012 epidemic. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the 2002 and 2008 epidemics were associated with EV71 from Malaysia and Singapore; while both 2010 and 2011–2012 epidemics originated from different regions of mainland China including Shanghai, Henan, Xiamen and Gong-Dong. Furthermore, minor strains have been identified in each epidemic and some of them were correlated with the subsequent outbreaks. Therefore, the EV71 infection in Taiwan may originate from pre-existing minor strains or from other regions in Asia including mainland China. In addition, 101 EV71 isolates were selected for the detection of new recombinant strains using the nucleotide sequences spanning the VP1-2A-2B region. No new recombinant strain was found. Analysis of clinical manifestations showed that patients infected with C4 had significantly higher rates of pharyngeal vesicles or ulcers than patients infected with B5. This is the first study demonstrating that different EV 71 genotypes may have different clinical manifestations and the association of EV71 infections between Taiwan and mainland China. PMID:24391812

  7. Molecular epidemiologic evidence of homologous recombination in infectious bursal disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2012-09-01

    Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) surface protein VP2 have been used to identify strains of the virus and place them into phylogenetic groups. The amino acids across the hypervariable sequence region of VP2 (hvVP2) vary, but typically variant viruses have amino acids 222T, 249K, 286I, and 318D and classic viruses have 222P, 249Q, 286T, and 318G. A molecular epidemiologic study was conducted from 2001 to 2011 in commercial chickens (Gallus gallus) from Mexico, Colombia, and Venezuela. Although many IBDVs were identified, most had the typical variant or classic amino acid sequences across the hvVP2 region. Four viruses identified in 2004, one in 2006, and 10 in 2011 from Mexico had the amino acids 222T, 249Q, 286T, and 318D. Six samples from Venezuela in 2001, one sample from Colombia in 2001, two samples from Venezuela in 2004, and one sample from Venezuela in 2005 had the amino acids 222P, 249K, 286I, and 318G. These combinations of classic and variant amino acid sequence markers had not been identified previously in any IBDV strains. The VP2 amino acid sequences in the P(BC) and P(HI) loop structures of the Venezuela and Colombia viruses were similar to most classic viruses, whereas their minor P(DE) and P(FG) loop sequences were typical of Delaware variant strains. The Mexico viruses had VP2 P(BC) loop sequences that were typical of variant IBDV strains, but their minor PDE and PFG loop structures contained amino acids that were similar but not identical to classic strains. The P(HI) loop sequences of the Mexico viruses had 318D that is typical of a Delaware variant virus, but the other amino acids in this loop structure distinguished them from all other IBDV strains. The data suggest that one or more recombination events may have occurred to create this type of sequence diversity. Because of importation regulations, immunologic studies could not be conducted in the United States to determine the

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis in Germany over a 5-year period (2005-2009).

    PubMed

    Schleicher, X; Higgins, P G; Wisplinghoff, H; Körber-Irrgang, B; Kresken, M; Seifert, H

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the species distribution within the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex and the molecular epidemiology of A. baumannii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis, 376 Acinetobacter isolates were collected prospectively from hospitalized patients at 15 medical centres in Germany during three surveillance studies conducted over a 5-year period. Species identification was performed by molecular methods. Imipenem minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by broth microdilution. The prevalence of the most common carbapenemase-encoding genes was investigated by oxacillinase (OXA) -multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The molecular epidemiology was investigated by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR; DiversiLab™). Acinetobacter pittii was the most prevalent Acinetobacter species (n = 193), followed by A. baumannii (n = 140), A. calcoaceticus (n = 10) and A. nosocomialis (n = 8). The majority of A. baumannii was represented by sporadic isolates (n = 70, 50%) that showed unique rep-PCR patterns, 25 isolates (18%) clustered with one or two other isolates, and only 45 isolates (32%) belonged to one of the previously described international clonal lineages. The most prevalent clonal lineage was international clone (IC) 2 (n = 34) and IC 1 (n = 6). According to CLSI, 25 A. baumannii isolates were non-susceptible to imipenem (MIC ≥ 8 mg/L), all of which produced an OXA-58-like or OXA-23-like carbapenemase. The rate of imipenem susceptibility among A. baumannii isolates decreased from 96% in 2005 to 76% in 2009. All other Acinetobacter isolates were susceptible to imipenem. The population structure of carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii in Germany is highly diverse. Imipenem non-susceptibility was strongly associated with the clonal lineages IC 2 and IC 1. These data underscore the high clonality of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates.

  9. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  10. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population.

  11. Interdisciplinary education to integrate pathology and epidemiology: towards molecular and population-level health science.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; King, Emily E; Beck, Andrew H; Sherman, Mark E; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward

    2012-10-15

    In recent decades, epidemiology, public health, and medical sciences have been increasingly compartmentalized into narrower disciplines. The authors recognize the value of integration of divergent scientific fields in order to create new methods, concepts, paradigms, and knowledge. Herein they describe the recent emergence of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE), which represents an integration of population and molecular biologic science to gain insights into the etiologies, pathogenesis, evolution, and outcomes of complex multifactorial diseases. Most human diseases, including common cancers (such as breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal cancers, leukemia, and lymphoma) and other chronic diseases (such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, autoimmune diseases, psychiatric diseases, and some infectious diseases), are caused by alterations in the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, microbiome, and interactome of all of the above components. In this era of personalized medicine and personalized prevention, we need integrated science (such as MPE) which can decipher diseases at the molecular, genetic, cellular, and population levels simultaneously. The authors believe that convergence and integration of multiple disciplines should be commonplace in research and education. We need to be open-minded and flexible in designing integrated education curricula and training programs for future students, clinicians, practitioners, and investigators.

  12. Interdisciplinary Education to Integrate Pathology and Epidemiology: Towards Molecular and Population-Level Health Science

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; King, Emily E.; Beck, Andrew H.; Sherman, Mark E.; Milner, Danny A.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, epidemiology, public health, and medical sciences have been increasingly compartmentalized into narrower disciplines. The authors recognize the value of integration of divergent scientific fields in order to create new methods, concepts, paradigms, and knowledge. Herein they describe the recent emergence of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE), which represents an integration of population and molecular biologic science to gain insights into the etiologies, pathogenesis, evolution, and outcomes of complex multifactorial diseases. Most human diseases, including common cancers (such as breast, lung, prostate, and colorectal cancers, leukemia, and lymphoma) and other chronic diseases (such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, autoimmune diseases, psychiatric diseases, and some infectious diseases), are caused by alterations in the genome, epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, microbiome, and interactome of all of the above components. In this era of personalized medicine and personalized prevention, we need integrated science (such as MPE) which can decipher diseases at the molecular, genetic, cellular, and population levels simultaneously. The authors believe that convergence and integration of multiple disciplines should be commonplace in research and education. We need to be open-minded and flexible in designing integrated education curricula and training programs for future students, clinicians, practitioners, and investigators. PMID:22935517

  13. Real-Time Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis by Direct Genotyping of Smear-Positive Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, María; Herranz, Marta; Martínez Lirola, Miguel; González-Rivera, Milagros; Bouza, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We applied MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat typing) to directly analyze the bacilli present in 61 stain-positive specimens from tuberculosis patients. A complete MIRU type (24 loci) was obtained for all but one (no amplification in one locus) of the specimens (98.4%), and the allelic values fully correlated with those obtained from the corresponding cultures. Our study is the first to demonstrate that real-time genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can be achieved, fully transforming the way in which molecular epidemiology techniques can be integrated into control programs. PMID:22378907

  14. Molecular epidemiology of coxsackievirus A16 strains from four sentinel surveillance sites in Peru.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Gladys; Huaman, Jose L; Silva, Maria; Ampuero, Julia S; Paz, Irmia; Ocaña, Victor R; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Hontz, Robert D

    2016-11-01

    To determine the molecular epidemiology of seven coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) strains previously reported by this research group. Full-length VP1 and VP4 sequences were obtained and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Six strains were classified as genotype C. Moreover, one divergent strain not clustered in any of the three currently reported genotypes was found. This is the first report of CVA16 in Peru and provides valuable baseline data about its potential distribution in South America, as well as evidence of a potential divergent genotype that has never before been reported. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The Promise of Whole Genome Pathogen Sequencing for the Molecular Epidemiology of Emerging Aquaculture Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Sion C; Verner-Jeffreys, David W; Bartie, Kerry L; Aanensen, David M; Sheppard, Samuel K; Adams, Alexandra; Feil, Edward J

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing food-producing sector, and the sustainability of this industry is critical both for global food security and economic welfare. The management of infectious disease represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss the opportunities afforded by whole genome sequencing of bacterial and viral pathogens of aquaculture to mitigate disease emergence and spread. We outline, by way of comparison, how sequencing technology is transforming the molecular epidemiology of pathogens of public health importance, emphasizing the importance of community-oriented databases and analysis tools.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of clonal diploids: a quick overview and a short DIY (do it yourself) notice.

    PubMed

    De Meeûs, Thierry; Lehmann, Laurent; Balloux, François

    2006-03-01

    In this short review we report the basic notions needed for understanding the population genetics of clonal diploids. We focus on the consequences of clonality on the distribution of genetic diversity within individuals, between individuals and between populations. We then summarise how to detect clonality in mainly sexual populations, conversely, how to detect sexuality in mainly clonal populations and also how genetic differentiation between populations is affected by clonality in diploids. This information is then used for building recipes on how to analyse and interpret genetic polymorphism data in molecular epidemiology studies of clonal diploids.

  17. The Promise of Whole Genome Pathogen Sequencing for the Molecular Epidemiology of Emerging Aquaculture Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Sion C.; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; Bartie, Kerry L.; Aanensen, David M.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Adams, Alexandra; Feil, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest growing food-producing sector, and the sustainability of this industry is critical both for global food security and economic welfare. The management of infectious disease represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss the opportunities afforded by whole genome sequencing of bacterial and viral pathogens of aquaculture to mitigate disease emergence and spread. We outline, by way of comparison, how sequencing technology is transforming the molecular epidemiology of pathogens of public health importance, emphasizing the importance of community-oriented databases and analysis tools. PMID:28217117

  18. Molecular epidemiology studies on occupational and environmental exposure to mutagens and carcinogens, 1997-1999.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J; Binková, B

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new and evolving area of research, combining laboratory measurement of internal dose, biologically effective dose, biologic effects, and influence of individual susceptibility with epidemiologic methodologies. Biomarkers evaluated were selected according to basic scheme: biomarkers of exposure--metabolites in urine, DNA adducts, protein adducts, and Comet assay parameters; biomarkers of effect--chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene, and the activation of oncogenes coding for p53 or p21 proteins as measured on protein levels; biomarkers of susceptibility--genetic polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2. DNA adducts measured by 32P-postlabeling are the biomarker of choice for the evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Protein adducts are useful as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke (4-aminobiphenyl) or to smaller molecules such as acrylonitrile or 1,3-butadiene. Of the biomarkers of effect, the most common are cytogenetic end points. Epidemiologic studies support the use of chromosomal breakage as a relevant biomarker of cancer risk. The use of the Comet assay and methods analyzing oxidative DNA damage needs reliable validation for human biomonitoring. Until now there have not been sufficient data to interpret the relationship between genotypes, biomarkers of exposure, and biomarkers of effect for assessing the risk of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:10698723

  19. Force and conductance molecular break junctions with time series crosscorrelation.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Joseph M; Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-06-07

    Force and conductance, measured across 4,4'-bipyridine simultaneously, are crosscorrelated using a two dimensional (2D) histogram method. The result is a 2D multivariate statistical analysis superior to current one dimensional histogram techniques for exploring significant conductance and force modulations within SMBJs. This method is sensitive enough to crosscorrelate signal modulations between force and conductance traces associated with contact geometry perturbations predicted in literature such as Au-molecule contact twisting and slipping during junction elongation.

  20. Force and conductance molecular break junctions with time series crosscorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamill, Joseph M.; Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-05-01

    Force and conductance, measured across 4,4'-bipyridine simultaneously, are crosscorrelated using a two dimensional (2D) histogram method. The result is a 2D multivariate statistical analysis superior to current one dimensional histogram techniques for exploring significant conductance and force modulations within SMBJs. This method is sensitive enough to crosscorrelate signal modulations between force and conductance traces associated with contact geometry perturbations predicted in literature such as Au-molecule contact twisting and slipping during junction elongation.

  1. Raman scattering from molecular conduction junctions: Charge transfer mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Michal; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2012-03-01

    We present a model for the charge transfer contribution to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in a molecular junction. The model is a generalization of the equilibrium scheme for SERS of a molecule adsorbed on a metal surface [B. N. J. Persson. Chem. Phys. Lett.CHPLBC0009-261410.1016/0009-2614(81)85441-3 82, 561 (1981)]. We extend the same physical consideration to a nonequilibrium situation in a biased molecular junction and to nonzero temperatures. Two approaches are considered and compared: a semiclassical approach appropriate for nonresonance Raman scattering, and a quantum approach based on the nonequilibrium Green's function method. Nonequilibrium effects on this contribution to SERS are demonstrated with numerical examples. It is shown that the semiclassical approach provides an excellent approximation to the full quantum calculation as long as the molecular electronic state is outside the Fermi window, that is, as long as the field-induced charge transfer is small.

  2. Optically induced current in molecular conduction nanojunctions with semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainberg, Boris D.; Seideman, Tamar

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new approach to coherent control of transport via molecular junctions, which bypasses several of the hurdles to experimental realization of optically manipulated nanoelectronics noted in the previous literature. The method is based on the application of intrinsic semiconductor contacts and optical frequencies below the semiconductor bandgap. To explore the coherently controlled electronic dynamics, we introduce a density matrix formalism that accounts for both the discrete molecular state and the semiconductor quasicontinua within a single master equation and offers analytically soluble limits for a single and two-site molecular bridge. Our analytical theory predicts a new phenomenon, referred to as coherent destruction of induced tunnelling, which extends the phenomenon of coherent destruction of tunnelling frequently discussed in the previous literature. Our results illustrate the potential of semiconductor contacts in coherent control of photocurrent.

  3. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees.

    PubMed

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology.

  4. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees

    PubMed Central

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:27070316

  5. [RET/PTC Gene Rearrangements in the Sporadic and Radiogenic Thyroid Tumors: Molecular Genetics, Radiobiology and Molecular Epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Ushenkova, L N; Koterov, A N; Biryukov, A P

    2015-01-01

    A review of molecular genetic, radiobiological and molecular epidemiological studies of gene (chromosome) rearrangements RET/PTC in the cells of the thyroid gland as well as the laws in relation to radiation exposure in vitro, in vivo and human populations identified with them are submitted. The data on the c-RET gene and its chimeric constructs with the gene-donors (RET/PTC rearrangements) are considered. The information about the history of the RET/PTC discovery, their types, carcinogenic potential and specificity both to tumor and non-tumor thyroid disease especially for papillary thyroid carcinoma are provided. The data (seven studies) on the induction of RET/PTC after irradiation of tumor and normal thyroid cells in vitro and mice are reviewed. The mechanisms of RET/PTC induction may be associated with DNA double strand breaks and oxidative stress. Some information (three publications) about the possibility of RET/PTC induction by low doses of radiation with low LET (to 0.1 Gy) is given and it is concluded that their potential evidentiary is generally weak. The achievements in the molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC frequency for exposed and unexposed cohorts are stated. At the same time it is noted that, despite the vast array. of data accumulated from 30 countries of the world and more than 20 years of research, the formed provisions are weakly confirmed statistically and have no base corresponding to the canons of evidence-based medicine. The possibility of use of the RET/PTC presence or their frequencies as markers of the papillary thyroid carcinomas and, specifically, their radiogenic forms, is considered. In the first case the answer may be positive, while in the second, the situation is characterized by uncertainty. Based to the above mentioned we came to a conclusion about the need of a pooled or meta-analysis of the totality of the published data.

  6. Hanford site: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-06

    The primary purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records which pertains to studies of worker health and mortality funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford site. Additionally, the guide provides information on the location and classification of the records and how they may be accessed. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of the DOE and the Hanford site, and Hanford`s organizational structure. It provides information on the methodology used to inventory and describe pertinent records stored in various onsite offices, in Hanford`s Records Holding Area (RHA), and at the Seattle Federal Records Center (SFRC). Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the record Series descrimations, and information on accessing records repositories.

  7. Progress and Opportunities in Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Colorectal Premalignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lochhead, Paul; Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward; Fuchs, Charles S.; Wu, Kana; Nishihara, Reiko; O’Brien, Michael; Ogino, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is integrative molecular and population health science to address molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of disease processes. MPE of colon and rectal premalignant lesions (including hyperplastic polyps, tubular adenomas, tubulovillous adenomas, villous adenomas, traditional serrated adenomas, sessile serrated adenomas / sessile serrated polyps, and hamartomatous polyps) can provide unique opportunities to examine the influence of diet, lifestyle and environmental exposures on specific pathways of carcinogenesis. Colorectal neoplasia can provide a practical model where both malignant epithelial tumor (carcinoma), and its precursor, are subjected to molecular pathology analyses. KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA oncogene mutations, microsatellite instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and LINE-1 methylation are commonly-examined tumor biomarkers. Future opportunities include comprehensive interrogation of genomics, epigenomics and pan-omics, as well as in vivo pathology analyses of tissue microenvironment, molecular networks and interactome by endomicroscopy. Considering the colorectal continuum hypothesis and emerging roles of gut microbiota and host immunity in tumorigenesis, detailed tumor location is important information. There are unique strengths and caveats, especially with regard to case ascertainment by colonoscopy. MPE of colorectal premalignant lesions can identify etiologic exposures associated with neoplastic initiation and progression, help us better understand colorectal carcinogenesis, and facilitate personalized prevention, screening, and therapy. PMID:24935274

  8. Molecular Identification and Epidemiological Tracing of Pasteurella multocida Meningitis in a Baby

    PubMed Central

    Boerlin, Patrick; Siegrist, Hans H.; Burnens, André P.; Kuhnert, Peter; Mendez, Purita; Prétat, Gérard; Lienhard, Reto; Nicolet, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of Pasteurella multocida meningitis in a 1-month-old baby exposed to close contact with two dogs and a cat but without any known history of injury by these animals. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the isolate from the baby allowed identification at the subspecies level and pointed to the cat as a possible source of infection. Molecular typing of Pasteurella isolates from the animals, from the baby, and from unrelated animals clearly confirmed that the cat harbored the same P. multocida subsp. septica strain on its tonsils as the one isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of the baby. This case stresses the necessity of informing susceptible hosts at risk of contracting zoonotic agents about some basic hygiene rules when keeping pets. In addition, this study illustrates the usefulness of molecular methods for identification and epidemiological tracing of Pasteurella isolates. PMID:10699029

  9. Epidemiologic and Molecular Analysis of Human Tularemia, United States, 1964–2004

    PubMed Central

    Staples, J. Erin; Kubota, Kristy A.; Chalcraft, Linda G.; Mead, Paul S.

    2006-01-01

    Tularemia in the United States is caused by 2 subspecies of Francisella tularensis, subspecies tularensis (type A) and subspecies holarctica (type B). We compared clinical and demographic features of human tularemia cases from 1964 to 2004 from 39 states in which an isolate was recovered and subtyped. Our data indicate that type A and type B infections differ with respect to affected populations, anatomic site of isolation, and geographic distribution. Molecular subtyping with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis further defined 2 subpopulations of type A (type A-east and type A-west) that differ with respect to geographic distribution, disease outcome, and transmission. Our data suggest that type A-west infections are less severe than either type B or type A-east infections. Through a combined epidemiologic and molecular approach to human cases of tularemia, we provide new insights into the disease for future investigation. PMID:16836829

  10. Measuring molecular biomarkers in epidemiologic studies: laboratory techniques and biospecimen considerations.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Heidi S

    2012-09-28

    The future of personalized medicine depends on the ability to efficiently and rapidly elucidate a reliable set of disease-specific molecular biomarkers. High-throughput molecular biomarker analysis methods have been developed to identify disease risk, diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic targets in human clinical samples. Currently, high throughput screening allows us to analyze thousands of markers from one sample or one marker from thousands of samples and will eventually allow us to analyze thousands of markers from thousands of samples. Unfortunately, the inherent nature of current high throughput methodologies, clinical specimens, and cost of analysis is often prohibitive for extensive high throughput biomarker analysis. This review summarizes the current state of high throughput biomarker screening of clinical specimens applicable to genetic epidemiology and longitudinal population-based studies with a focus on considerations related to biospecimens, laboratory techniques, and sample pooling. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Epidemiological transition of colorectal cancer in developing countries: Environmental factors, molecular pathways, and opportunities for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Vacca, Michele; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related mortality worldwide. The disease has been traditionally a major health problem in industrial countries, however the CRC rates are increasing in the developing countries that are undergoing economic growth. Several environmental risk factors, mainly changes in diet and life style, have been suggested to underlie the rise of CRC in these populations. Diet and lifestyle impinge on nuclear receptors, on the intestinal microbiota and on crucial molecular pathways that are implicated in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this respect, the epidemiological transition in several regions of the world offers a unique opportunity to better understand CRC carcinogenesis by studying the disease phenotypes and their environmental and molecular associations in different populations. The data from these studies may have important implications for the global prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:24876728

  12. Epidemiological transition of colorectal cancer in developing countries: environmental factors, molecular pathways, and opportunities for prevention.

    PubMed

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Vacca, Michele; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2014-05-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related mortality worldwide. The disease has been traditionally a major health problem in industrial countries, however the CRC rates are increasing in the developing countries that are undergoing economic growth. Several environmental risk factors, mainly changes in diet and life style, have been suggested to underlie the rise of CRC in these populations. Diet and lifestyle impinge on nuclear receptors, on the intestinal microbiota and on crucial molecular pathways that are implicated in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this respect, the epidemiological transition in several regions of the world offers a unique opportunity to better understand CRC carcinogenesis by studying the disease phenotypes and their environmental and molecular associations in different populations. The data from these studies may have important implications for the global prevention and treatment of CRC.

  13. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott T; Tisch, Daniel J; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    of data for diseases like malaria and HIV, there is a scarcity of this data for filarial nematodes. With the falling cost of genome sequencing, research on filarial nematodes could benefit from the addition of population genetics statistics and phylogenetics especially in dealing with elimination programs. A comprehensive review focusing on population genetics of filarial nematode does not yet exist. Here our goal is to provide a current overview of the molecular epidemiology of W. bancrofti (Wb) the primary causative agent of LF. We begin by reviewing studies utilizing molecular typing techniques with specific focus on genomic and population datasets. Next, we used whole mitochondrial genome data to construct a phylogeny and examine the evolutionary history of the Onchocercidae. Then, we provide a perspective to aid in understanding how population genetic techniques translate to modern epidemiology. Finally, we introduce the concept of genomic epidemiology and provide some examples that will aid in future studies of Wb.

  14. Human Metapneumovirus: Insights from a Ten-Year Molecular and Epidemiological Analysis in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reiche, Janine; Jacobsen, Sonja; Neubauer, Katrin; Hafemann, Susi; Nitsche, Andreas; Milde, Jeanette; Wolff, Thorsten; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a cause of respiratory tract illness at all ages. In this study the epidemiological and molecular diversity among patients of different ages was investigated. Between 2000–2001 and 2009–2010, HMPV was detected in 3% (138/4,549) of samples from outpatients with influenza-like illness with a new, sensitive real-time RT-PCR assay. Several hundred (797) clinical specimens from hospitalized children below the age of 4 years with acute respiratory illness were investigated and HMPV was detected in 11.9% of them. Investigation of outpatients revealed that HMPV infections occurred in individuals of all ages but were most prevalent in children (0–4 years) and the elderly (>60 years). The most present clinical features of HMPV infections were cough, bronchitis, fever/shivers and pneumonia. About two thirds of HMPV-positive samples were detected in February and March throughout the study period. Molecular characterization of HMPV revealed a complex cyclic pattern of group dominance where HMPV subgroup A and B viruses predominated in general for three consecutive seasons. German HMPV represented all genetic lineages including A1, A2, B1, B2, sub-clusters A2a and A2b. For Germany, not only time-dependent circulation of lineages and sub-clusters was observed but also co-circulation of two or three predominant lineages. Two newly emerging amino acid substitutions (positions 223 and 280) of lineage B2 were detected in seven German HMPV sequences. Our study gives new insights into the molecular epidemiology of HMPV in in- and outpatients over a time period of 10 years for the first time. It is one of only few long-term surveillance studies in Europe, and allows comparative molecular analyses of HMPV circulating worldwide. PMID:24505479

  15. Molecular pathological epidemiology: new developing frontiers of big data science to study etiologies and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Keum, NaNa; Nishihara, Reiko; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-03-01

    Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is an integrative field that utilizes molecular pathology to incorporate interpersonal heterogeneity of a disease process into epidemiology. In each individual, the development and progression of a disease are determined by a unique combination of exogenous and endogenous factors, resulting in different molecular and pathological subtypes of the disease. Based on "the unique disease principle," the primary aim of MPE is to uncover an interactive relationship between a specific environmental exposure and disease subtypes in determining disease incidence and mortality. This MPE approach can provide etiologic and pathogenic insights, potentially contributing to precision medicine for personalized prevention and treatment. Although breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers have been among the most commonly studied diseases, the MPE approach can be used to study any disease. In addition to molecular features, host immune status and microbiome profile likely affect a disease process, and thus serve as informative biomarkers. As such, further integration of several disciplines into MPE has been achieved (e.g., pharmaco-MPE, immuno-MPE, and microbial MPE), to provide novel insights into underlying etiologic mechanisms. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, available genomic and epigenomic data have expanded dramatically. The MPE approach can also provide a specific risk estimate for each disease subgroup, thereby enhancing the impact of genome-wide association studies on public health. In this article, we present recent progress of MPE, and discuss the importance of accounting for the disease heterogeneity in the era of big-data health science and precision medicine.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni in a geographically isolated country with a uniquely structured poultry industry.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Petra; Collins-Emerson, Julie M; Midwinter, Anne C; Carter, Philip; Spencer, Simon E F; van der Logt, Peter; Hathaway, Steve; French, Nigel P

    2010-04-01

    In New Zealand the number of campylobacteriosis notifications increased markedly between 2000 and 2007. Notably, this country's poultry supply is different than that of many developed countries as the fresh and frozen poultry available at retail are exclusively of domestic origin. To examine the possible link between human cases and poultry, a sentinel surveillance site was established to study the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni over a 3-year period from 2005 to 2008 using multilocus sequence typing. Studies showed that 60.1 to 81.4% of retail poultry carcasses from the major suppliers were contaminated with C. jejuni. Differences were detected in the probability and level of contamination and the relative frequency of genotypes for individual poultry suppliers and humans. Some carcasses were contaminated with isolates belonging to more than one sequence type (ST), and there was evidence of both ubiquitous and supplier-associated strains, an epidemiological pattern not recognized yet in other countries. The common poultry STs were also common in human clinical cases, providing evidence that poultry is a major contributor to human infection. Both internationally rare genotypes, such as ST-3069 and ST-474, and common genotypes, such as ST-45 and ST-48, were identified in this study. The dominant human sequence type in New Zealand, ST-474, was found almost exclusively in isolates from one poultry supplier, which provided evidence that C. jejuni has a distinctive molecular epidemiology in this country. These results may be due in part to New Zealand's geographical isolation and its uniquely structured poultry industry.

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni in a Geographically Isolated Country with a Uniquely Structured Poultry Industry▿

    PubMed Central

    Müllner, Petra; Collins-Emerson, Julie M.; Midwinter, Anne C.; Carter, Philip; Spencer, Simon E. F.; van der Logt, Peter; Hathaway, Steve; French, Nigel P.

    2010-01-01

    In New Zealand the number of campylobacteriosis notifications increased markedly between 2000 and 2007. Notably, this country's poultry supply is different than that of many developed countries as the fresh and frozen poultry available at retail are exclusively of domestic origin. To examine the possible link between human cases and poultry, a sentinel surveillance site was established to study the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni over a 3-year period from 2005 to 2008 using multilocus sequence typing. Studies showed that 60.1 to 81.4% of retail poultry carcasses from the major suppliers were contaminated with C. jejuni. Differences were detected in the probability and level of contamination and the relative frequency of genotypes for individual poultry suppliers and humans. Some carcasses were contaminated with isolates belonging to more than one sequence type (ST), and there was evidence of both ubiquitous and supplier-associated strains, an epidemiological pattern not recognized yet in other countries. The common poultry STs were also common in human clinical cases, providing evidence that poultry is a major contributor to human infection. Both internationally rare genotypes, such as ST-3069 and ST-474, and common genotypes, such as ST-45 and ST-48, were identified in this study. The dominant human sequence type in New Zealand, ST-474, was found almost exclusively in isolates from one poultry supplier, which provided evidence that C. jejuni has a distinctive molecular epidemiology in this country. These results may be due in part to New Zealand's geographical isolation and its uniquely structured poultry industry. PMID:20154115

  18. Standardization of a molecular method for epidemiologic identification of Leishmania strains.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R F; Menezes, E V; Xavier, A R E O; Royo, V A; Oliveira, D A; Júnior, A F M; Dias, E S; Lima, A C V M R; Michalsky, E M

    2016-10-06

    Molecular studies of the evolutionary relationships among Leishmania species suggest the presence of high genetic variation within this genus, which has a direct effect on public health in many countries. The coexistence of species in a particular region can result in different leishmaniasis clinical forms and treatment responses. We aimed to standardize the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for molecular epidemiological identification of Leishmania strains, and estimate existing inter-strain genomic differences and kDNA signatures using this technique. ERIC-PCR of genomic DNA revealed genetic polymorphisms between species, although some strains shared many DNA fragments. Leishmania guyanensis, L. amazonensis, and L. braziliensis clustered together in a dendrogram with similarities ranging from 42.0 to 61.0%, whereas L. chagasi grouped with these three species with a similarity of 28.0%. After amplification of kDNA, 780-bp bands were extracted from an agarose gel and purified for analysis of its genetic signature. kDNA ERIC-PCR electrophoretic patterns consisted of 100- to 600- bp fragments. Using these profiles, L. braziliensis and L. guyanensis grouped with a similarity of 26.0%, and L. amazonensis and L. chagasi clustered based on a similarity of 100%. The electrophoretic profiles and dendrograms showed that, for epidemiological identification by ERIC-PCR, genomic DNA had greater discriminatory power than kDNA did. More strains need to be analyzed to validate the kDNA ERIC-PCR method. The genomes of these strains should be sequenced for better epidemiological identification of Leishmania species.

  19. Metabolism and Biomarkers of Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Molecular Epidemiology Studies: Lessons Learned from Aromatic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are structurally related classes of carcinogens that are formed during the combustion of tobacco or during the high-temperature cooking of meats. Both classes of procarcinogens undergo metabolic activation by N-hydroxylation of the exocyclic amine group, to produce a common proposed intermediate, the arylnitrenium ion, which is the critical metabolite implicated in toxicity and DNA damage. However, the biochemistry and chemical properties of these compounds are distinct and different biomarkers of aromatic amines and HAAs have been developed for human biomonitoring studies. Hemoglobin adducts have been extensively used as biomarkers to monitor occupational and environmental exposures to a number of aromatic amines; however, HAAs do not form hemoglobin adducts at appreciable levels and other biomarkers have been sought. A number of epidemiologic studies that have investigated dietary consumption of well-done meat in relation to various tumor sites reported a positive association between cancer risk and well-done meat consumption, although some studies have shown no associations between well-done meat and cancer risk. A major limiting factor in most epidemiological studies is the uncertainty in quantitative estimates of chronic exposure to HAAs and, thus, the association of HAAs formed in cooked meat and cancer risk has been difficult to establish. There is a critical need to establish long-term biomarkers of HAAs that can be implemented in molecular epidemioIogy studies. In this review article, we highlight and contrast the biochemistry of several prototypical carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs to which humans are chronically exposed. The biochemical properties and the impact of polymorphisms of the major xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes on the biological effects of these chemicals are examined. Lastly, the analytical approaches that have been successfully employed to biomonitor aromatic amines and HAAs, and

  20. Genetic characterisation and molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. from humans and pigs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena M; Leles, Daniela; Jaeger, Lauren H; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Araújo, Adauto

    2012-10-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. of human and pig origin has been studied as a means to assess the potential of pigs as reservoirs for human ascariasis. In this study, human (H) and pig (P) Ascaris spp. haplotypes from two Brazilian regions were characterised based on two mitochondrial genes, nad1 and cox1. The results show six haplotypes of the cox1 gene, with two haplotypes (H9P9 and P3) corresponding to haplotypes previously characterised in China. Because P3 was found in humans in this study, it was designated as H14P3. Furthermore, five new Ascaris spp. nad1 haplotypes from humans (H12-H16) and five from pigs (P16-P20) were observed, with one being highly frequent and present in both hosts, here designated as H12P17. Phylogenetic and network analysis demonstrated that the molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. in Brazil is driven by the globally distributed haplotypes cox1 H14P3 and nad1 H12P17. In conclusion, in this study genetic characterisation of Ascaris spp. showed that humans and pigs share common haplotypes that are also present in two widely separated geographical regions of Brazil.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of rabies in bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Sabeta, C T; Mansfield, K L; McElhinney, L M; Fooks, A R; Nel, L H

    2007-10-01

    A panel of 124 rabies viruses from wildlife host species (principally the bat-eared fox, Otocyon megalotis) and domestic carnivore species were collected between 1980 and 2005 from a region of South Africa associated with endemic bat-eared fox rabies. We have studied the molecular epidemiology of bat-eared fox rabies by virtue of nucleotide sequence analyses of PCR amplicons specific to the variable G-L intergenic region as well as the conserved nucleoprotein gene of each of the rabies viruses in this South African panel. Although it was demonstrated that all of these viruses were very closely related, they could be segregated into two major phylogenetic groups. The data presented in this paper complement antigenic and surveillance data on rabies in this host species in South Africa. Most importantly our data support a hypothesis that the bat-eared fox independently maintains rabies cycles in specific geographical loci. This is the first molecular epidemiological investigation describing rabies transmission dynamics in this wildlife carnivore host species in South Africa.

  2. Nosocomial outbreak of Legionnaires' disease: molecular epidemiology and disease control measures.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Latham, R H; Meier, F A; Green, J A; Boshard, R; Mooney, B R; Edelstein, P H

    1987-02-01

    Molecular laboratory techniques were used to study the epidemiology of an outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. All patient isolates were Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and showed identical plasmid profiles and reactions with serogroup-specific monoclonal antibodies. L pneumophila was also cultured from four of five cooling tower water samples; however, the isolate from only one tower was serogroup 1 of the same subtype as patient isolates. Since the cases were temporally clustered and epidemiologically associated with exposure to cooling tower aerosols, the single cooling tower implicated by molecular analysis was the most likely source of the outbreak. Chlorination of cooling tower ponds has eradicated the epidemic strain. Since potable water also harbored the infecting organism and was the probable source for cooling tower contamination, decontamination of the hospital water system was also undertaken. Superchlorination of hot water holding tanks to 17 ppm on a weekly basis has effectively eradicated L pneumophila from the potable water system and appears to be a reasonable, simple, and relatively inexpensive alternative to previously described methods of control.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 in Mexico: emergence of BG and BF intersubtype recombinants.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Valls, Eduardo; Escoto-Delgadillo, Martha; López-Márquez, Francisco Carlos; Castillero-Manzano, Marcelo; Echegaray-Guerrero, Ernesto; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar Kurt; Kobayashi-Gutiérrez, Antonio; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam

    2010-07-01

    The molecular epidemiology of subtypes and intersubtype recombinants (IRs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Mexico has not been characterized fully. Understanding its regional distribution, prevalence, adaptability, viral fitness, pathogenicity, and immunogenicity is decisive for any design of an effective HIV vaccine. The aim of this study was to describe the presence of IRs types BG and BF in a Mexican population. Protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene were sequenced using an automated sequencing system. A phylogenic tree was constructed and genetic distances were calculated using MEGA 3.1. Recombination analysis was done by bootscan using SimPlot software. Two hundred and twenty-three HIV-1-positive individuals were enrolled in the study. At baseline, the mean plasma viral load was 285,500 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml and the mean CD4 cell count was 213 cells/ml. Subtype B was found in 220 (98.6%) samples, whereas IRs were found in three patients (1.4%): two (0.9%) with BG and one (0.45%) with BF. IRs were observed in 2/124 (1.6%) samples from treated patients and in 1/99 (1.0%) from naive patients. The presence of these HIV forms at low frequency points to the need for research on the diversity, geographic distribution, and evolution of other subtypes including circulating recombinant forms and IRs to understand the molecular epidemiology and tendencies of the HIV infection in Mexico.

  4. First insight into the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Prim, Rodrigo Ivan; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Rovaris, Darcita Büerger; Maurici, Rosemeri; Rossetti, Maria Lúcia; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Bazzo, Maria Luiza

    2016-03-01

    Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is useful for understanding disease transmission dynamics, and to establish strategic measures for TB control and prevention. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical, epidemiological and molecular characteristics of MTBC clinical isolates from Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. During one-year period, 406 clinical isolates of MTBC were collected from Central Laboratory of Public Health and typed by spoligotyping. Demographic and clinical data were collected from the Brazilian National Mandatory Disease Reporting System. The majority of cases occurred in highest population densities regions and about 50% had some condition associated with TB. Among all isolates, 5.7% were MDR, which showed association with drug addiction. LAM was the most predominant lineage with 47.5%, followed by the T superfamily with 25.9% and Haarlem with 12.3%. The MST showed two major groups: the first was formed mainly by the LAM lineage and the second was mainly formed by the T and Haarlem lineages. Others lineages were distributed in peripheral positions. This study provides the first insight into the population structure of M. tuberculosis in SC State. Spoligotyping and other genotyping analyses are important to establish strategic measures for TB control and prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from women with uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Widerström, Micael; Wiström, Johan; Ferry, Sven; Karlsson, Carina; Monsen, Tor

    2007-05-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of S. saprophyticus UTIs. In the current study, we compared 76 isolates of S. saprophyticus prospectively isolated from women with uncomplicated UTI participating in a randomized placebo-controlled treatment trial performed in northern Sweden from 1995 to 1997 with 50 strains obtained in 2006 from five different locations in northern Europe with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The aim was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of this uropathogenic species and to investigate whether specific clones are associated with UTI in women. A total of 47 different PFGE profiles were detected among the 126 analyzed isolates. Ten clusters consisting of 5 to 12 isolates each showing PFGE DNA similarity of >85% were identified. Several clusters of genetically highly related isolates were detected in the original trial as well as among isolates obtained during 2006 from different locations. In the original trial, clonal persistence was found among 16 of 21 (76%) patients examined in the placebo group at follow-up 8 to 10 days after inclusion, indicating a low spontaneous short-time bacteriological cure rate. We conclude that multiple clones of S. saprophyticus were causing lower UTIs in women. The result suggests that some human-pathogenic clones of S. saprophyticus are spread over large geographical distances and that such clones may persist over long periods of time.

  6. A pilot study on the application of statistical classification procedures to molecular epidemiological data.

    PubMed

    Schwender, Holger; Zucknick, Manuela; Ickstadt, Katja; Bolt, Hermann M

    2004-06-15

    The development of new statistical methods for use in molecular epidemiology comprises the building and application of appropriate classification rules. The aim of this study was to assess various classification methods that can potentially handle genetic interactions. A data set comprising genotypes at 25 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) loci from 518 breast cancer cases and 586 age-matched population-based controls from the GENICA study was used to built a classification rule with the discrimination methods SVM (support vector machine), CART (classification and regression tree), Bagging, Random Forest, LogitBoost and k nearest neighbours (kNN). A blind pilot analysis of the genotypic data set was a first approach to obtain an impression of the statistical structure of the data. Furthermore, this analysis was performed to explore classification methods that may be applied to molecular-epidemiological evaluation. The results showed that all blindly applied classification methods had a slightly smaller misclassification rate than a random classification. The findings, nevertheless, suggest that SNP data might be useful for the classification of individuals into categories of high or low risk of diseases.

  7. Correlation of breaking forces, conductances and geometries of molecular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Koji; Pobelov, Ilya V.; Manrique, David Zsolt; Pope, Thomas; Mészáros, Gábor; Gulcur, Murat; Bryce, Martin R.; Lambert, Colin J.; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Electrical and mechanical properties of elongated gold-molecule-gold junctions formed by tolane-type molecules with different anchoring groups (pyridyl, thiol, amine, nitrile and dihydrobenzothiophene) were studied in current-sensing force spectroscopy experiments and density functional simulations. Correlations between forces, conductances and junction geometries demonstrate that aromatic tolanes bind between electrodes as single molecules or as weakly-conductive dimers held by mechanically-weak π − π stacking. In contrast with the other anchors that form only S-Au or N-Au bonds, the pyridyl ring also forms a highly-conductive cofacial link to the gold surface. Binding of multiple molecules creates junctions with higher conductances and mechanical strengths than the single-molecule ones. PMID:25758349

  8. Conducting Accessible Research: Including People With Disabilities in Public Health, Epidemiological, and Outcomes Studies.

    PubMed

    Rios, Dianne; Magasi, Susan; Novak, Catherine; Harniss, Mark

    2016-12-01

    People with disabilities are largely absent from mainstream health research. Exclusion of people with disabilities may be explicit, attributable to poorly justified exclusion criteria, or implicit, attributable to inaccessible study documents, interventions, or research measures. Meanwhile, people with disabilities experience poorer health, greater incidence of chronic conditions, and higher health care expenditure than people without disabilities. We outline our approach to "accessible research design"-research accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities. We describe a model that includes 3 tiers: universal design, accommodations, and modifications. Through our work on several large-scale research studies, we provide pragmatic examples of accessible research design. Making efforts to include people with disabilities in public health, epidemiological, and outcomes studies will enhance the interpretability of findings for a significant patient population.

  9. [Epidemiological survey of leprosy conducted in metropolitan France between 2009 and 2010].

    PubMed

    Bret, S; Flageul, B; Girault, P-Y; Lightburne, E; Morand, J-J

    2013-05-01

    There is no official leprosy register in France. The last epidemiological survey on leprosy in metropolitan France was done between 1995 and 1998. We performed a new epidemiological study of leprosy in metropolitan France in 2009 and 2010. We contacted 85 dermatology and infectious disease units by e-mail or by telephone in order to determine the number of leprosy patients either being followed up or newly diagnosed in 2009 and 2010. The response rate was 87%. In 2010, 127 patients were being followed up in metropolitan France, mostly at dermatology units (78%). Seventy-five patients were on anti-bacillary treatment and the prevalence was 0.011/10,000. There were 39 new cases diagnosed in 2009 and 2010 (mean 19 cases/year) (low case-detection rate: 0.003 per 10,000 inhabitants). Among the new cases, seven patients (18%) were of French origin, with two from metropolitan France and five from French overseas territories. Our study confirms the persistence of imported leprosy in France and shows no significant decrease in the number of new cases since 1998 (19 vs. 18 new cases/year) or in disease prevalence (0.013 vs. 0.011 per 10,000 inhabitants). This prevalence is very far removed from the one per 10,000 inhabitants proposed by the World Health Organization as the criteria for endemic disease. Most patients in our survey were immigrants (82%). Lepromatous forms (46%) were more frequent than the tuberculoid forms (33%). All patients had either travelled to or lived in areas of high leprosy prevalence, including metropolitan subjects. Leprosy remains present in metropolitan France, and it is still important to continue teaching about it at medical faculties in order to ensure diagnosis of new patients as early as possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  11. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mishiro, Izumi; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-10-05

    Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies.

  12. BioCAST/IFCT-1002: epidemiological and molecular features of lung cancer in never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Couraud, Sébastien; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Paris, Christophe; Dô, Pascal; Doubre, Hélène; Pichon, Eric; Dixmier, Adrien; Monnet, Isabelle; Etienne-Mastroianni, Bénédicte; Vincent, Michel; Trédaniel, Jean; Perrichon, Marielle; Foucher, Pascal; Coudert, Bruno; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Dansin, Eric; Labonne, Stéphanie; Missy, Pascale; Morin, Franck; Blanché, Hélène; Zalcman, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers (LCINS) (fewer than 100 cigarettes in lifetime) is considered as a distinct entity and harbours an original molecular profile. However, the epidemiological and molecular features of LCINS in Europe remain poorly understood. All consecutive newly diagnosed LCINS patients were included in this prospective observational study by 75 participating centres during a 14-month period. Each patient completed a detailed questionnaire about risk factor exposure. Biomarker and pathological analyses were also collected. We report the main descriptive overall results with a focus on sex differences. 384 patients were included: 65 men and 319 women. 66% had been exposed to passive smoking (significantly higher among women). Definite exposure to main occupational carcinogens was significantly higher in men (35% versus 8% in women). A targetable molecular alteration was found in 73% of patients (without any significant sex difference): EGFR in 51%, ALK in 8%, KRAS in 6%, HER2 in 3%, BRAF in 3%, PI3KCA in less than 1%, and multiple in 2%. We present the largest and most comprehensive LCINS analysis in a European population. Physicians should track occupational exposure in men (35%), and a somatic molecular alteration in both sexes (73%). Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  13. Molecular conductance measurements through printed Au nano-dots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weirong; Zhitenev, Nikolai; Bao, Zhenan; Abusch-Magder, David; Tennant, Don; Garfunkel, Eric

    2006-03-01

    Gold pads with ˜100 nm diameter are imprinted on self-assembled monolayers of alkane dithiols of different lengths using nano-transfer technique. The fabrication technique ensures formation of chemical bonds at both ends of molecules while minimizes defect creations compared to other metallization methods. The pads are contacted by conductive atomic force microscope (CAFM) to study electron transport through the SAM as a function of contact force. We found that atomic scale topography at the metal-molecules interface is essential to describe the conductance-stress relationship. In as-fabricated devices, only small percentage of molecules (below 1%) is wired to both contacts. A finite force (1-10 nN) deforms devices resulting in two competing effects: (a) contacting larger number of molecules leading; (b) deforming interfacial bonds and/or tilting the molecules. The estimated conductance of molecules is significantly smaller than in previous CAFM experiments and calculations.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of MRSA in 13 ICUs from eight European countries.

    PubMed

    Hetem, D J; Derde, L P G; Empel, J; Mroczkowska, A; Orczykowska-Kotyna, M; Kozińska, A; Hryniewicz, W; Goossens, H; Bonten, M J M

    2016-01-01

    The European epidemiology of MRSA is changing with the emergence of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) and livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). In this study, we investigated the molecular epidemiology of MRSA during 2 years in 13 ICUs in France, Greece, Italy, Latvia, Luxemburg, Portugal, Slovenia and Spain. Surveillance cultures for MRSA from nose and wounds were obtained on admission and twice weekly from all patients admitted to an ICU for ≥3 days. The first MRSA isolate per patient was genotyped in a central laboratory by MLST, spa typing, agr typing and SCCmec (sub)typing. Risk factors for patients with an unknown history of MRSA colonization were identified. Overall, 14 390 ICU patients were screened, of whom 8519 stayed in an ICU for ≥3 days. Overall MRSA admission prevalence was 3.9% and ranged from 1.0% to 7.0% for individual ICUs. Overall MRSA acquisition rate was 2.5/1000 patient days at risk and ranged from 0.2 to 8/1000 patient days at risk per ICU. In total, 557 putative MRSA isolates were submitted to the central laboratory for typing, of which 511 (92%) were confirmed as MRSA. Each country had a distinct epidemiology, with ST8-IVc (UK-EMRSA-2/-6, USA500) being most prevalent, especially in France and Spain, and detected in ICUs in five of eight countries. Seventeen (3%) and three (<1%) isolates were categorized as CA-MRSA and LA-MRSA, respectively. Risk factors for MRSA carriage on ICU admission were age >70 years and hospitalization within 1 year prior to ICU admission. The molecular epidemiology of MRSA in 13 European ICUs in eight countries was homogeneous within, but heterogeneous between, countries. CA-MRSA and LA-MRSA genotypes and Panton-Valentine leucocidin-producing isolates were detected sporadically. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Molecular Epidemiological Characteristics and Genetic Diversity of Salmonella Typhimurium in Guangdong, China, 2007–2011

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanhui; He, Dongmei; Li, Xiaocui; Liang, Zhaoming; Ke, Changwen

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the most important serovar associated with human salmonellosis worldwide. Here we aimed to explore the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of this serovar in Guangdong, China. Methodology We evaluated the molecular epidemiology and genetic characteristics of 294 endemic Salmonella Typhimurium clinical isolates which were collected from 1977 to 2011 in Guangdong, China, and compared them with a global set of isolates of this serovar using epidemiological data and Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis. Principal Finding The 294 isolates were assigned to 13 Sequencing types (STs) by MLST, of which ST34 and ST19 were the most common in Guangdong. All the STs were further assigned to two eBurst Groups, eBG1 and eBG138. The eBG1 was the major group endemic in Guangdong. Nucleotide and amino acid variability were comparable for all seven MLST loci. Tajima’s D test suggested positive selection in hisD and thrA genes (p<0.01), but positive selection was rejected for the five other genes (p>0.05). In addition, The Tajima’s D test within each eBG using the global set of isolates showed positive selection in eBG1 and eBG138 (p<0.05), but was rejected in eBG243 (p>0.05). We also analyzed the phylogenetic structure of Salmonella Typhimurium from worldwide sources and found that certain STs are geographically restricted. ACSSuT was the predominant multidrug resistance pattern for this serovar. The resistant profiles ACSSuTTmNaG, ACSSuTTmNa and ACSuTTmNaG seem to be specific for ST34, and ASSuTNa for ST19. Conclusion Here we presented a genotypic characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates using MLST and found two major STs are endemic in Guangdong. Our analyses indicate that genetic selection may have shaped the Salmonella Typhimurium populations. However, further evaluation with additional isolates from various sources will be essential to reveal the scope of the epidemiological characteristics

  16. First nationwide study regarding ceftriaxone resistance and molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Chun; Yin, Yue-Ping; Dai, Xiu-Qin; Unemo, Magnus; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a major public health concern worldwide. This is the first nationwide study, performed within the China Gonococcal Antimicrobial Susceptibility Programme (China-GASP), regarding AMR, including ceftriaxone genetic resistance determinants, and molecular epidemiology of gonococci in China. Gonococcal isolates (n = 1257) from consecutive patients were collected at 11 sentinel sites distributed across China during 2012-13. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline was determined using the agar dilution method. Ceftriaxone resistance determinants penA and penB were examined using sequencing. N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST) was performed for molecular epidemiology. Among isolates, 0.2% were resistant to spectinomycin, 4.4% to ceftriaxone, 42.9% to tetracyclines (high-level resistance) and 99.8% to ciprofloxacin. Among 890 sequenced isolates, 16 (1.8%) possessed a penA mosaic allele; 4 of these isolates belonged to the MDR internationally spread NG-MAST genogroup G1407 (first description in China). Non-mosaic penA alleles with an A501T mutation and an A102D alteration in porB1b were statistically associated with decreased susceptibility/resistance to ceftriaxone. NG-MAST G10339, G1424 and G1053 were associated with decreased susceptibility/resistance to ceftriaxone. In China, ceftriaxone and spectinomycin can continue to be recommended for gonorrhoea treatment, with the possible exception of Hainan and Sichuan provinces where ceftriaxone resistance exceeded 5% and AMR surveillance needs to be strengthened. Molecular approaches including genotyping and AMR determinant analysis can be valuable to supplement and enhance conventional surveillance of gonococcal AMR in China. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Epigenetics: Emerging Integrative Science to Analyze Environment, Host, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Lochhead, Paul; Chan, Andrew T.; Nishihara, Reiko; Cho, Eunyoung; Wolpin, Brian M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Meissner, Alexander; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics acts as an interface between environmental / exogenous factors, cellular responses and pathological processes. Aberrant epigenetic signatures are a hallmark of complex multifactorial diseases, including non-neoplastic disorders (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases) and neoplasms (e.g., leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and breast, lung, prostate, liver and colorectal cancers). Epigenetic signatures (DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression, etc.) may serve as biomarkers for risk stratification, early detection, and disease classification, as well as targets for therapy and chemoprevention. DNA methylation assays are widely applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue specimens as clinical pathology tests. To better understand the interplay between etiologic factors, cellular molecular characteristics, and disease evolution, the field of “Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE)” has emerged as an interdisciplinary integration of “molecular pathology” and “epidemiology”, with a similar conceptual framework to systems biology and network medicine. In contrast to traditional epidemiologic research including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), MPE is founded on the unique disease principle; that is, each disease process results from unique profiles of exposomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, microbiomes, and interactomes in relation to the macro-environment and tissue microenvironment. The widespread application of epigenomics (e.g., methylome) analyses will enhance our understanding of disease heterogeneity, epigenotypes (CpG island methylator phenotype, LINE-1 hypomethylation, etc.), and host-disease interactions. MPE may represent a logical evolution of GWAS, termed “GWAS-MPE approach”. Though epigenome-wide association study attracts increasing attention, currently, it has a fundamental problem in that each cell

  18. Picosecond time resolved conductance measurements of redox molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arielly, Rani; Nachman, Nirit; Zelinskyy, Yaroslav; May, Volkhard; Selzer, Yoram

    2017-03-01

    Due to bandwidth limitations of state of the art electronics, the transient transport properties of molecular junctions are experimentally a terra incognita, which can only be explored if novel picosecond current-probing techniques are developed. Here we demonstrate one such approach: the laser pulse-pair sequence scheme. The method is used to monitor in picosecond resolution the oxidation state of a redox molecule, 6-ferrocenyl-1-hexanethiol, within a junction and to quantify its redox rate constant, which is found to be (80 ps)-1.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among veterinary students and personnel at a veterinary hospital in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Aklilu, E; Zunita, Z; Hassan, L; Cheng, Chen Hui

    2013-06-28

    In this study, we report the molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among veterinary students and personnel in Malaysia. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from 103 veterinary medicine students and 28 personnel from a veterinary hospital. Antibiotic sensitivity test (AST), minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test, and PCR amplifications of nucA and mecA gene were performed. Molecular characterization of the isolates was conducted using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal protein A gene (spa) typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results from MLST show the presence of the pandemic and widespread MRSA clones, ST5 and ST59. Spa gene typing revealed spa type t267 which has a wide geographical distribution. A new spa type, t5697 was found in this study. Fingerprint analysis by using PFGE show heterogeneity of the isolates. These findings affirm the importance of MRSA in veterinary settings and underscore the need for further extensive research to devise contextual control and prevention strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of phylogenetics in the molecular epidemiology and evolutionary studies of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Hon, Chung-Chau; Tang, Julian W

    2010-01-01

    Since DNA sequencing techniques first became available almost 30 years ago, the amount of nucleic acid sequence data has increased enormously. Phylogenetics, which is widely applied to compare and analyze such data, is particularly useful for the analysis of genes from rapidly evolving viruses. It has been used extensively to describe the molecular epidemiology and transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the origins and subsequent evolution of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus (SCoV), and, more recently, the evolving epidemiology of avian influenza as well as seasonal and pandemic human influenza viruses. Recent advances in phylogenetic methods can infer more in-depth information about the patterns of virus emergence, adding to the conventional approaches in viral epidemiology. Examples of this information include estimations (with confidence limits) of the actual time of the origin of a new viral strain or its emergence in a new species, viral recombination and reassortment events, the rate of population size change in a viral epidemic, and how the virus spreads and evolves within a specific population and geographical region. Such sequence-derived information obtained from the phylogenetic tree can assist in the design and implementation of public health and therapeutic interventions. However, application of many of these advanced phylogenetic methods are currently limited to specialized phylogeneticists and statisticians, mainly because of their mathematical basis and their dependence on the use of a large number of computer programs. This review attempts to bridge this gap by presenting conceptual, technical, and practical aspects of applying phylogenetic methods in studies of influenza, HIV, and SCoV. It aims to provide, with minimal mathematics and statistics, a practical overview of how phylogenetic methods can be incorporated into virological studies by clinical and laboratory specialists.

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Leptospira Serogroup Pomona Infections Among Wild and Domestic Animals in Spain.

    PubMed

    Arent, Z J; Gilmore, C; San-Miguel Ayanz, J M; Neyra, L Quevedo; García-Peña, F J

    2017-03-01

    Strains of Leptospira serogroup Pomona are known to cause widespread animal infections in many parts of the world. Forty-three isolates retrieved from domestic animals and wild small mammals suggest that serogroup Pomona is epidemiologically relevant in Spain. This is supported by the high prevalence of serovar Pomona antibodies in livestock and wild animals. In this study, the strains were serologically and genetically characterized in an attempt to elucidate their epidemiology. Serological typing was based on the microscopic agglutination test but molecular typing involved species-specific polymerase chain reaction, restriction endonuclease analysis, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis. The study revealed that the infections are caused by two serovars, namely Pomona and Mozdok. Serovar Pomona was derived only from farm animals and may be adapted to pigs, which are recognized as the maintenance host. The results demonstrated that serovar Pomona is genetically heterogeneous and three different types were recognized. This heterogeneity was correlated with different geographical distributions of the isolates. All strains derived from small wild mammals were identified as serovar Mozdok. Some isolates of this serovar retrieved from cattle confirm that this serovar may also be the cause of infections in food-producing animals for which these wild species may be source of infection.

  2. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Causing Invasive Disease in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Grau, Imma; Tubau, Fe; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Roman; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults. Methods Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008–2013). Results Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse. Conclusions Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity. PMID:25379704

  3. Epidemiologic and molecular investigation of outbreaks of hepatitis C virus infection on a pediatric oncology service.

    PubMed

    Widell, A; Christensson, B; Wiebe, T; Schalén, C; Hansson, H B; Allander, T; Persson, M A

    1999-01-19

    Despite screening of blood donors, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can occur in patients who receive multiple transfusions. To clarify mechanisms of nosocomial transmission of HCV. Epidemiologic and molecular analyses of hepatitis C outbreaks. Pediatric oncology ward. Children with cancer. Epidemiologic analysis, HCV RNA detection, genotyping, and hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) sequencing. Ten cases of infection with acute HCV genotype 3a occurred between 1990 and 1993. Sequencing of HVR1 revealed three related strains. Despite an overhaul of hygiene procedures, a patient infected with genotype 1b generated nine subsequent infected patients in 1994. Several patients had high virus titers and strongly delayed anti-HCV antibody responses. All had permanent intravenous catheters. Multidose vials used for flushing or treatment had probably been contaminated during periods of overlapping treatment. Contamination of multidose vials was the most likely mode of HCV transmission; therefore, use of such vials should be restricted. Rigorous adherence to hygiene routines remains essential to preventing transmission of bloodborne infections.

  4. The re-emergence of tuberculosis: what have we learnt from molecular epidemiology?

    PubMed

    Borgdorff, M W; van Soolingen, D

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has re-emerged over the past two decades: in industrialized countries in association with immigration, and in Africa owing to the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Drug-resistant TB is a major threat worldwide. The variable and uncertain impact of TB control necessitates not only better tools (diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines), but also better insights into the natural history and epidemiology of TB. Molecular epidemiological studies over the last two decades have contributed to such insights by answering long-standing questions, such as the proportion of cases attributable to recent transmission, risk factors for recent transmission, the occurrence of multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and the proportion of recurrent TB cases attributable to re-infection. M. tuberculosis lineages have been identified and shown to be associated with geographical origin. The Beijing genotype is strongly associated with multidrug resistance, and may have escaped from bacille Calmette-Guérin-induced immunity. DNA fingerprinting has quantified the importance of institutional transmission and laboratory cross-contamination, and has helped to focus contact investigations. Questions to be answered in the near future with whole genome sequencing include identification of chains of transmission within clusters of patients, more precise quantification of mixed infection, and transmission probabilities and rates of progression from infection to disease of various M. tuberculosis lineages, as well as possible variations in vaccine efficacy by lineage. Perhaps most importantly, dynamics in the population structure of M. tuberculosis in response to control measures in high-prevalence areas should be better understood.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71 strains isolated from children in Yamagata, Japan, between 1990 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Katsumi; Aoki, Yoko; Matoba, Yohei; Yahagi, Kazue; Itagaki, Tsutomu; Katsushima, Fumio; Katsushima, Yuriko; Ito, Sueshi; Hongo, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Yoko

    2014-10-01

    Enterovirus 71 infections have become a major public issue in the Asia-Pacific region due to the large number of fatal cases. To clarify the longitudinal molecular epidemiology of enterovirus 71 (EV71) in a community, we isolated 240 strains from children, mainly with hand-foot-and-mouth diseases, between 1990 and 2013 in Yamagata, Japan. We carried out a sequence analysis of the VP1 region (891 bp) using 223 isolates and identified six subgenogroups (B2, B4, B5, C1, C2 and C4) during the study period. Subgenogroups C1 and B2 were found only between 1990 and 1993 and have not reappeared since. In contrast, strains in subgenogroups C2, C4 and B5 appeared repeatedly with genomic variations. Recent reports from several local communities in Japan have suggested that identical predominant subgenogroup strains, which have also been found in the Asia-Pacific region, have been circulating in a wide area in Japan. However, it is likely that there is a discrepancy between the major subgenogroups circulating in the Asia-Pacific region and those in Europe. It is necessary to continue the analysis of the longitudinal epidemiology of EV71 in local communities, as well as on regional and global levels, to develop strategies against severe EV71 infections.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of infant botulism in California and elsewhere, 1976-2010.

    PubMed

    Dabritz, Haydee A; Hill, Karen K; Barash, Jason R; Ticknor, Lawrence O; Helma, Charles H; Dover, Nir; Payne, Jessica R; Arnon, Stephen S

    2014-12-01

    Infant botulism (IB), first identified in California in 1976, results from Clostridium botulinum spores that germinate, multiply, and produce botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) in the immature intestine. From 1976 to 2010 we created an archive of 1090 BoNT-producing isolates consisting of 1012 IB patient (10 outpatient, 985 hospitalized, 17 sudden death), 25 food, 18 dust/soils, and 35 other strains. The mouse neutralization assay determined isolate toxin type (56% BoNT/A, 32% BoNT/B). Amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis of the isolates was combined with epidemiologic information. The AFLP dendrogram, the largest to date, contained 154 clades; 52% of isolates clustered in just 2 clades, 1 BoNT/A (n=418) and 1 BoNT/B (n=145). These clades constituted an endemic C. botulinum population that produced the entire clinical spectrum of IB. Isolates from the patient's home environment (dust/soil, honey) usually located to the same AFLP clade as the patient's isolate, thereby identifying the likely source of infective spores. C. botulinum A(B) strains were identified in California for the first time. Combining molecular methods and epidemiological data created an effective tool that yielded novel insights into the genetic diversity of C. botulinum and the clinical spectrum, occurrence, and distribution of IB in California. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Classification of rare missense substitutions, using risk surfaces, with genetic- and molecular-epidemiology applications.

    PubMed

    Tavtigian, Sean V; Byrnes, Graham B; Goldgar, David E; Thomas, Alun

    2008-11-01

    Many individually rare missense substitutions are encountered during deep resequencing of candidate susceptibility genes and clinical mutation screening of known susceptibility genes. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are among the most resequenced of all genes, and clinical mutation screening of these genes provides an extensive data set for analysis of rare missense substitutions. Align-GVGD is a mathematically simple missense substitution analysis algorithm, based on the Grantham difference, which has already contributed to classification of missense substitutions in BRCA1, BRCA2, and CHEK2. However, the distribution of genetic risk as a function of Align-GVGD's output variables Grantham variation (GV) and Grantham deviation (GD) has not been well characterized. Here, we used data from the Myriad Genetic Laboratories database of nearly 70,000 full-sequence tests plus two risk estimates, one approximating the odds ratio and the other reflecting strength of selection, to display the distribution of risk in the GV-GD plane as a series of surfaces. We abstracted contours from the surfaces and used the contours to define a sequence of missense substitution grades ordered from greatest risk to least risk. The grades were validated internally using a third, personal and family history-based, measure of risk. The Align-GVGD grades defined here are applicable to both the genetic epidemiology problem of classifying rare missense substitutions observed in known susceptibility genes and the molecular epidemiology problem of analyzing rare missense substitutions observed during case-control mutation screening studies of candidate susceptibility genes.

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F.; Skakni, Leila; Chu, Daniel K.W.; Garbati, Musa A.; Joseph, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    We investigated an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during March 29–May 21, 2014. This outbreak involved 45 patients: 8 infected outside KFMC, 13 long-term patients at KFMC, 23 health care workers, and 1 who had an indeterminate source of infection. Sequences of full-length MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from 10 patients and a partial sequence of MERS-CoV from another patient, when compared with other MERS-CoV sequences, demonstrated that this outbreak was part of a larger outbreak that affected multiple health care facilities in Riyadh and possibly arose from a single zoonotic transmission event that occurred in December 2013 (95% highest posterior density interval November 8, 2013–February 10, 2014). This finding suggested continued health care–associated transmission for 5 months. Molecular epidemiology documented multiple external introductions in a seemingly contiguous outbreak and helped support or refute transmission pathways suspected through epidemiologic investigation. PMID:26484549

  9. A 15-year analysis of molecular epidemiology of avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus in China.

    PubMed

    Han, Zongxi; Sun, Chuyang; Yan, Baolong; Zhang, Xiaonan; Wang, Yu; Li, Chengren; Zhang, Qingxia; Ma, Yazhen; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Qiaoran; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the epidemiology and pathogenicity of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in China was carried out by molecular characterization of the S1 gene from 46 isolates obtained for this study and 174 reference strains isolated over a 15-year period. Nine types were found according to sequence analysis and phylogenetic study of the S1 gene. The co-circulation of multiple IBV types and the ongoing emergence of IBV variants are the epidemiological challenges in China. Factors contributing to the continual emergence include mutations, insertions and deletions in the S1 protein genes; recombination between local IBV strains circulating in chicken flocks in China; and recombination between local strains and vaccine strains. Vaccination-challenge analysis between circulating field strains and Mass-type H120 vaccine indicated the need to develop new vaccines from local IBV strains. These results also emphasize the importance of continued IBV surveillance in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F; Skakni, Leila; Chu, Daniel K W; Garbati, Musa A; Joseph, Mercy; Peiris, Malik; Hakawi, Ahmed M

    2015-11-01

    We investigated an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during March 29-May 21, 2014. This outbreak involved 45 patients: 8 infected outside KFMC, 13 long-term patients at KFMC, 23 health care workers, and 1 who had an indeterminate source of infection. Sequences of full-length MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from 10 patients and a partial sequence of MERS-CoV from another patient, when compared with other MERS-CoV sequences, demonstrated that this outbreak was part of a larger outbreak that affected multiple health care facilities in Riyadh and possibly arose from a single zoonotic transmission event that occurred in December 2013 (95% highest posterior density interval November 8, 2013-February 10, 2014). This finding suggested continued health care-associated transmission for 5 months. Molecular epidemiology documented multiple external introductions in a seemingly contiguous outbreak and helped support or refute transmission pathways suspected through epidemiologic investigation.

  11. A molecular epidemiological perspective of rhinovirus types circulating in Amsterdam from 2007 to 2012.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, L; Bruning, A H L; Thomas, X V; Minnaar, R P; Rebers, S P H; Schinkel, J; de Jong, M D; Pajkrt, D; Wolthers, K C

    2016-12-01

    Rhinoviruses (RVs) are frequently detected respiratory viruses that cause mild common cold symptoms, but may also lead to more severe respiratory tract infections. The large number of RV types, classified into species A, B and C, hampers clear insights into the epidemiology and clinical significance of each RV type. The aim of this study was to map the circulation of RV types in the Amsterdam area. RV-positive nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal samples, collected from 2007 to 2012 in the Academic Medical Centre (Amsterdam, the Netherlands), were typed based on the sequence of the region coding for capsid proteins VP4 and VP2. RV-A, RV-B and RV-C were found in proportions of of 52.4% (334/637), 11.3% (72/637), and 36.2% (231/637), respectively. We detected 129 of the 167 currently classified types. RVs circulated throughout the entire year with a peak in the autumn and a decline in the summer. Some RV types were observed throughout the entire sampling period and others had a more seasonal pattern. Nine RV-A and four RV-B novel provisionally assigned types were identified. This study provides an insight into the molecular epidemiology of RVs in the Amsterdam area. The RVs circulating are diverse and include several provisionally new types. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular dynamics in plastic conducting compounds of polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurado, D.; Bée, M.; Gonzalez, M.; Mondelli, C.; Dufour, B.; Rannou, P.; Pron, A.; Travers, J. P.

    2003-08-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) has been protonated (doped) with phthalosulfonic acid and sulfosuccinic acid diesters. Freestanding films exhibiting high electrical conductivity and good plasticity were obtained. The dynamics of protons attached to the alkyl chains of these "plastdopants" has been studied by using quasielastic neutron scattering techniques. A glass transition was thus detected at a temperature corresponding to that measured by DSC. This dynamical transition occurred in the temperature range, in which both a thermochromism and an insulator-metal electrical transitions (IMT) were also observed. The local diffusive motions of these protons are described in terms of diffusion within spheres whose temperature dependent radii are distributed in size along the alkyl chains.

  13. Molecular epidemiological study of enteroviruses associated with encephalitis in children from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Shukla, Deepti; Kumar, Rashmi; Idris, Mohammad Z; Misra, Usha K; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-11-01

    Enteroviruses have been reported in encephalitis cases. However, clinical and epidemiological characteristics of enteroviruses in encephalitis are not fully established. We prospectively investigated 204 children with encephalitis over a period of 2 years (2009 to 2010) for enterovirus. Enterovirus was detected in 45 specimens (22.1%); of these, 40 were typed by seminested reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and sequencing of the VP1 gene. Molecular typing of enterovirus revealed the predominance of echovirus 21 associated with an epidemic during the rainy seasons of 2010 and the circulation of echovirus 1, coxsackievirus B1, enterovirus 75, enterovirus 76, coxsackievirus B5, and echovirus 19. The nucleotide divergence among echovirus 21 strains was 0 to 2% at the nucleotide level. This study suggests that enterovirus is an important cause of encephalitis in children from India. To our knowledge, this is the first report of echovirus 21 in encephalitis cases worldwide.

  14. Combined Proteomic-Molecular Epidemiology Approach to Identify Precision Targets in Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mostovenko, Ekaterina; Liu, Yanhong; Amirian, E Susan; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Armstrong, Georgina N; Bondy, Melissa L; Nilsson, Carol L

    2017-07-11

    Primary brain tumors are predominantly malignant gliomas. Grade IV astrocytomas (glioblastomas, GBM) are among the most deadly of all tumors; most patients will succumb to their disease within 2 years of diagnosis despite standard of care. The grim outlook for brain tumor patients indicates that novel precision therapeutic targets must be identified. Our hypothesis is that the cancer proteomes of glioma tumors may contain protein variants that are linked to the aggressive pathology of the disease. To this end, we devised a novel workflow that combined variant proteomics with molecular epidemiological mining of public cancer data sets to identify 10 previously unrecognized variants linked to the risk of death in low grade glioma or GBM. We hypothesize that a subset of the protein variants may be successfully developed in the future as novel targets for malignant gliomas.

  15. Epidemiological-molecular evidence of metabolic reprogramming on proliferation, autophagy and cell signaling in pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil; Sund, Malin

    2015-01-28

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest human cancers with little progress made in survival over the past decades, and 5-year survival usually below 5%. Despite this dismal scenario, progresses have been made in understanding of the underlying tumor biology through among other definition of precursor lesions, delineation of molecular pathways, and advances in genome-wide technology. Further, exploring the relationship between epidemiological risk factors involving metabolic features to that of an altered cancer metabolism may provide the foundation for new therapies. Here we explore how nutrients and caloric intake may influence the KRAS-driven ductal carcinogenesis through mediators of metabolic stress, including autophagy in presence of TP53, advanced glycation end products (AGE) and the receptors (RAGE) and ligands (HMGB1), as well as glutamine pathways, among others. Effective understanding the cancer metabolism mechanisms in pancreatic cancer may propose new ways of prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of human metapneumovirus from 2009 to 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Taira, Katsuya; Hamabata, Hirotsune; Kawaki, Tatsuyoshi; Gushi, Kazuo; Mahoe, Youko; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Azama, Yasuhito; Okano, Shou; Kyan, Hisako; Kudaka, Jun; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Noda, Masahiro; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2012-07-01

    To clarify the molecular epidemiology of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) in Okinawa Prefecture, located in a subtropical region of Japan, we performed genetic analysis of the F gene in HMPV from patients with acute respiratory infection from January 2009 to December 2011. HMPV was detected in 18 of 485 throat swabs (3.7%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 17 strains belonged to subgroup A2 and 1 strain belonged to subgroup B1. We did not observe seasonal prevalence of HMPV during the investigation period. A high level of sequence identity was observed in the strains belonging to subgroup A2 (>95%), and no amino acid substitution was found compared with other strains detected in Japan and other countries. The pairwise distance values among the present strains belonging to subgroup A2 were short. Our results suggest that the predominant HMPV strains belonging to A2 are highly homologous and seasonal epidemics were not seen in Okinawa during the investigation period.

  17. Molecular testing for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Jaco J; Stensvold, C Rune

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies.

  18. VP1 sequencing protocol for foot and mouth disease virus molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Knowles, N J; Wadsworth, J; Bachanek-Bankowska, K; King, D P

    2016-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences of field strains of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) contribute to our understanding of the distribution and evolution of viral lineages that circulate in different regions of the world. This paper outlines a practical reversetranscription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing strategy that can be used to generate RNA sequences encoding the VP1 (1D) region of FMDV. The protocol contains a panel of PCR and sequencing primers that can be selected to characterise genetically diverse isolates representing all seven FMDV serotypes. A list of sequences is also described, comprising prototype sequences for all proposed FMDV topotypes, in order to provide a framework for phylogenetic analysis. The technical details and prototype sequences provided in this paper can be employed by FMD Reference Laboratories and others in an approach to harmonise the molecular epidemiology of FMDV.

  19. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia in a hematology unit: molecular epidemiology and analysis of clinical course.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Su Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Shin, Wan-Shik; Kim, Myungshin; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Min, Woo-Sung; Kim, Chun-Choo

    2005-04-01

    An increase in vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) bacteremia in hemato-oncological patients (n=19) in our institution from 2000 through 2001 led us to analyze the molecular epidemiologic patterns and clinical features unique to our cases. The pulsed field gel electrophoresis of the isolates revealed that the bacteremia was not originated from a single clone but rather showed endemic pattern of diverse clones with small clusters. A different DNA pattern of blood and stool isolates from one patient suggested exogenous rather than endogenous route of infection. Enterococcus faecium carrying vanA gene was the causative pathogen in all cases. Patients with VRE bacteremia showed similar clinical courses compared with those with vancomycin-susceptible enterococcal (VSE) bacteremia. Vancomycin resistance did not seem to be a poor prognostic factor because of similar mortality (5/8, 62.5%) noted in VSE bacteremia. Initial disease severity and neutropenic status may be major determinants of prognosis in patients with VRE bacteraemia.

  20. Molecular Testing for Clinical Diagnosis and Epidemiological Investigations of Intestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stensvold, C. Rune

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies. PMID:24696439

  1. Acral melanoma foot lesions. Part 1: epidemiology, aetiology, and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Desai, A; Ugorji, R; Khachemoune, A

    2017-09-22

    Acral melanoma (AM) is a rare subtype of cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM) found on acral skin, primarily on the soles of the feet. Although rare, it is the most common subtype of MM found in patients of African or East Asian ethnicity and has a poor prognosis, often because of the more advanced stage of presentation at diagnosis. The pathogenesis of AM is unclear, but genetic alterations, including mutations in BRAF, NRAS, and KIT have been implicated. Early diagnosis of AM is important for a better prognosis, but its identification is often challenging, leading to easy misdiagnosis. In the first of this two-part review, we review the history, epidemiology, aetiology and molecular pathology of AM; in part 2 we will review diagnosis and management. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. Current approaches for TYMS polymorphisms and their importance in molecular epidemiology and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Lima, Aurea; Azevedo, Rita; Sousa, Hugo; Seabra, Vítor; Medeiros, Rui

    2013-08-01

    TS is critical for providing the requisite nucleotide precursors in order to maintain DNA synthesis and repair. Furthermore, it is an important target for several drugs such as 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate. However, several mechanisms of resistance to TS inhibitors have been explained as linked to TYMS overexpression. Some authors have described the relationship between genetic polymorphisms on TYMS, in particular rs34743033, rs2853542 and rs34489327, with the development of several diseases and with the clinical response to drug therapy and/or survival. Nevertheless, the obtained results described in the literature are controversial, which has lead to a search strategy to understand the impact of these polymorphisms on molecular epidemiology and pharmacogenetics. With the progress of these scientific areas, early identification of individuals at risk of disease along with improvement in the prediction of patients' outcome will offer a powerful tool for the translation of TYMS polymorphisms into clinical practice and individualization of treatments.

  3. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of Dengue Virus Circulating in Bhutan, 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Zangmo, Sangay; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Tantimavanich, Srisurang; Kosoltanapiwat, Nathamon; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Phuntsho, Kelzang; Wangchuk, Sonam; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most significant public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries, and is increasingly being detected in traditionally non-endemic areas. In Bhutan, dengue virus (DENV) has only recently been detected and limited information is available. In this study, we analyzed the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of DENV in two southern districts in Bhutan from 2013–2014. During this period, 379 patients were clinically diagnosed with suspected dengue, of whom 119 (31.4%) were positive for DENV infection by NS1 ELISA and/or nested RT-PCR. DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected with DENV-1 being predominant. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 using envelope gene demonstrated genotype V, closely related to strains from northern India. PMID:26295474

  4. Molecular Epidemiology Survey of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-positive Isolated from Sanandaj, Iran.

    PubMed

    Manafi, Abbas; Khodabandehloo, Mazaher; Rouhi, Samaneh; Ramazanzadeh, Rashid; Shahbazi, Babak; Narenji, Hanar

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains that are Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive cause severe skin and soft tissue infections as well as necrotizing pneumonia. The presence of PVL gene is a marker for methicillin-resistant S. aureus; therefore, survey on prevalence and phylogenetic distribution of PVL is of great importance for public health. The aim of this research was molecular epidemiology survey of S. aureus PVL positive, isolated from two tertiary hospitals of Sanandaj. A total of 264 staphylococci isolates were collected from clinical specimens, hospital personnel and hospital environment of two tertiary hospitals of Sanandaj, in 2012 (Toohid and Besat). Bacterial cultures and biochemical tests were performed for S. aureus detection. Then, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) were used for the determination of prevalence and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus PVL, respectively. Data were analyzed using the Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). From 264 staphylococci isolates, 88 (33.33%) were detected as S. aureus. Furthermore, 20 out of 88 (22.72%) strains of S. aureus were PVL positive according to PCR results. Rep-PCR showed six main clusters of S. aureus samples. PVL had similar clonality between different samples. No significant relationship was observed between PVL positive S. aureus and rep-PCR patterns (P = 0.98). These results showed that a clone of S. aureus PVL positive has spread between the community and hospital settings. Therefore, appropriate measures are required to prevent the spread of staphylococci and other bacteria in hospitals.

  5. An Overview of Genetic Polymorphisms and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Molecular Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingsong; Yagyu, Kiyoko; Egawa, Naoto; Ueno, Makoto; Mori, Mitsuru; Nakao, Haruhisa; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozue; Wakai, Kenji; Hosono, Satoyo; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2011-01-01

    Background Although pancreatic cancer has been extensively studied, few risk factors have been identified, and no validated biomarkers or screening tools exist for early detection in asymptomatic individuals. We present a broad overview of molecular epidemiologic studies that have addressed the relationship between pancreatic cancer risk and genetic polymorphisms in several candidate genes and suggest avenues for future research. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed using the PubMed database. Results Overall, individual polymorphisms did not seem to confer great susceptibility to pancreatic cancer; however, interactions of polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing genes, DNA repair genes, and folate-metabolizing genes with smoking, diet, and obesity were shown in some studies. The major problem with these studies is that, due to small sample sizes, they lack sufficient statistical power to explore gene–gene or gene–environment interactions. Another important challenge is that the measurement of environmental influence needs to be improved to better define gene–environment interaction. It is noteworthy that 2 recent genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer have reported that variants in ABO blood type and in 3 other chromosomal regions are associated with risk for this cancer, thus providing new insight into pancreatic cancer etiology. Conclusions As is the case in other complex diseases, common, low-risk variants in different genes may act collectively to confer susceptibility to pancreatic cancer in individuals with repeated environmental exposures, such as smoking and red meat intake. Clarification of gene–gene and gene–environmental interaction is therefore indispensable for future studies. To address these issues, a rigorously designed molecular epidemiologic study with a large sample is desirable. PMID:21071884

  6. Molecular and Epidemiological Review of Toxigenic Diphtheria Infections in England between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Both, Leonard; Collins, Sarah; de Zoysa, Aruni; White, Joanne; Mandal, Sema

    2014-01-01

    Human infections caused by toxigenic corynebacteria occur sporadically across Europe. In this report, we undertook the epidemiological and molecular characterization of all toxigenic corynebacterium strains isolated in England between January 2007 and December 2013. Epidemiological aspects include case demographics, risk factors, clinical presentation, treatment, and outcome. Molecular characterization was performed using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) alongside traditional phenotypic methods. In total, there were 20 cases of toxigenic corynebacteria; 12 (60.0%) were caused by Corynebacterium ulcerans, where animal contact was the predominant risk factor. The remaining eight (40.0%) were caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains; six were biovar mitis, which were associated with recent travel abroad. Adults 45 years and older were particularly affected (55.0%; 11/20), and typical symptoms included sore throat and fever. Respiratory diphtheria with the absence of a pharyngeal membrane was the most common presentation (50.0%; 10/20). None of the eight C. diphtheriae cases were fully immunized. Diphtheria antitoxin was issued in two (9.5%) cases; both survived. Two (9.5%) cases died, one due to a C. diphtheriae infection and one due to C. ulcerans. MLST demonstrated that the majority (87.5%; 7/8) of C. diphtheriae strains represented new sequence types (STs). By adapting several primer sequences, the MLST genes in C. ulcerans were also amplified, thereby providing the basis for extension of the MLST scheme, which is currently restricted to C. diphtheriae. Despite high population immunity, occasional toxigenic corynebacterium strains are identified in England and continued surveillance is required. PMID:25502525

  7. [Molecular genetic study of a family featuring cardiac conduction block].

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaojun; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Lu, Yongjuan; Jiang, Yunshan; Li, Hui; Huang, Xianghong; Sun, Zhishan; Li, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the genetic mechanism for a family affected with cardiac conduction block. METHODS Affected family members were screened for potential mutations of known candidate genes. As no pathogenic mutation was found, two patients and one healthy member from the family were further analyzed by exomic sequencing followed by Sanger sequencing. The pathogenicity of suspected mutation was analyzed using bioinformatics software. RESULTS Sequencing of the full exome has identified a c.G1725T mutation in the CLCA2 gene. Sanger sequencing has detected the same mutation in all five patients, but not in the normal member from the family. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the mutation has resulted in substitution of the 575th amino acid cysteine (C) by tryptophan (W). The site is highly conserved and becomes pathogenic with the mutation. CONCLUSION The heterozygous c.G1725T mutation in exon 11 of the CLCA2 gene probably underlies the disease and fit the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.

  8. Molecular origins of conduction channels observed in shot-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of shot noise from single molecules have indicated the presence of various conduction channels. We present three descriptions of these channels in molecular terms showing that the number of conduction channels is limited by bottlenecks in the molecule and that the channels can be linked to transmission through different junction states. We introduce molecular-conductance orbitals, which allow the transmission to be separated into contributions from individual orbitals and contributions from interference between pairs of orbitals.

  9. Molecular epidemiology in cancer risk assessment and prevention: recent progress and avenues for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Wogan, G N

    1992-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is increasingly being applied in studies of cancer risks derived from exposure to environmental carcinogens of both endogenous and exogenous origins. Analytical methods have been developed that are capable of detecting and quantifying levels of covalent adducts of several important classes of carcinogens with cellular DNA and blood proteins. Methods of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect ambient levels of exposure are in current use. These are being used in studies related to tobacco use (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, tobacco-specific nitrosamines); dietary exposures (aflatoxins, N-nitrosamines, heterocyclic amines); medicinal exposures (cisplatin, alkylating agents, 8-methoxypsoralen, ultraviolet photoproducts); occupational exposures (aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, oxides of ethylene and styrene, and vinyl chloride); and oxidative damage (8-hydroxyguanine, thymine glycol). Methodologic improvements together with their expanded use in feasibility studies continue to produce results that support the validity of this approach for detecting and quantifying exposure to carcinogens. Genetic markers are also being used to detect early biological responses in efforts to link carcinogen exposure to initiating events in the carcinogenesis process. These include, in addition to traditional cytogenetic markers (e.g., chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei), other alterations in chromosomal structure such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms, loss of heterozygosity, and translocation markers. Specific genetic changes have recently been identified as critical molecular events in the initiation and development of many cancers. Important among these are activation of oncogenes, especially those of the ras family, and inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes (e.g., p53 and Rb) by point mutations and/or chromosomal deletions and other structural changes. Although some of

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Newcastle disease virus isolates from vaccinated commercial poultry farms in non-epidemic areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Umali, Dennis Villaseñor; Ito, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Terumasa; Shirota, Kazutoshi; Katoh, Hiromitsu; Ito, Toshihiro

    2013-11-09

    Newcastle Disease (ND) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of poultry. At present, limited molecular epidemiological data are available regarding the causes of ND outbreaks in vaccinated commercial poultry farms. Knowing the genomic characteristics of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infecting commercial poultry operations in spite of vaccination might give important insights on the infection dynamics of these viruses. In addition, molecular analyses at the subgenotype level and studies on the relationship of Japanese NDVs with other isolates from around the world are lacking. Therefore, in the present study, a molecular epidemiological investigation was conducted to characterize nine NDVs isolated from vaccinated commercial poultry flocks in five different Prefectures in non-epidemic areas of Japan between 1969 and 2002. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic studies were performed to characterize the complete fusion (F)-protein gene, 3-prime end of the nucleoprotein (NP)-gene and 5-prime end of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (L)-gene. Sequence data were compared with 180 NDV strains from GenBank representing different NDV genotypes and subgenotypes from different regions of the world at different time periods. Deduced amino acids were analyzed for homologies, recombination and mutation. Recombination events were estimated using Recombination Detection Program (RDP) version 3.44. Phylogenetic trees were constructed to determine evolutionary relationships among strains. Mean death time (MDT: 48-56 hr), Intracerebral Pathogenicity Index (ICPI: 1.7-1.9) and deduced amino acid sequences of the F0 proteolytic cleavage site (112RRQKR116) revealed that all nine field isolates were velogenic. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates could be classified into two genetic lineages and three sublineages namely genotypes VIa (lineage 4a), VId (lineage 4d) and VIId (lineage 5d). No recombination events were observed but a point mutation in one of

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Newcastle disease virus isolates from vaccinated commercial poultry farms in non-epidemic areas of Japan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Newcastle Disease (ND) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of poultry. At present, limited molecular epidemiological data are available regarding the causes of ND outbreaks in vaccinated commercial poultry farms. Knowing the genomic characteristics of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infecting commercial poultry operations in spite of vaccination might give important insights on the infection dynamics of these viruses. In addition, molecular analyses at the subgenotype level and studies on the relationship of Japanese NDVs with other isolates from around the world are lacking. Therefore, in the present study, a molecular epidemiological investigation was conducted to characterize nine NDVs isolated from vaccinated commercial poultry flocks in five different Prefectures in non-epidemic areas of Japan between 1969 and 2002. Methods Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic studies were performed to characterize the complete fusion (F)-protein gene, 3-prime end of the nucleoprotein (NP)-gene and 5-prime end of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (L)-gene. Sequence data were compared with 180 NDV strains from GenBank representing different NDV genotypes and subgenotypes from different regions of the world at different time periods. Deduced amino acids were analyzed for homologies, recombination and mutation. Recombination events were estimated using Recombination Detection Program (RDP) version 3.44. Phylogenetic trees were constructed to determine evolutionary relationships among strains. Results Mean death time (MDT: 48-56 hr), Intracerebral Pathogenicity Index (ICPI: 1.7-1.9) and deduced amino acid sequences of the F0 proteolytic cleavage site (112RRQKR116) revealed that all nine field isolates were velogenic. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates could be classified into two genetic lineages and three sublineages namely genotypes VIa (lineage 4a), VId (lineage 4d) and VIId (lineage 5d). No recombination events were observed but

  12. An integrative analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus carriers in Vietnam achieved through targeted surveillance and molecular epidemiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multidisciplinary, molecular and conventional epidemiological approach was applied to an investigation of endemic foot-and-mouth disease in Vietnam. Within the study space, it was found that 22.3 percent of sampled ruminants had previously been infected with FMD virus (FMDV) and that 2.4 percent w...

  13. Penicillium marneffei Infection and Recent Advances in the Epidemiology and Molecular Biology Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Cooper, Chester R.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Sirisanthana, Thira

    2006-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei infection is an important emerging public health problem, especially among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in the areas of endemicity in southeast Asia, India, and China. Within these regions, P. marneffei infection is regarded as an AIDS-defining illness, and the severity of the disease depends on the immunological status of the infected individual. Early diagnosis by serologic and molecular assay-based methods have been developed and are proving to be important in diagnosing infection. The occurrence of natural reservoirs and the molecular epidemiology of P. marneffei have been studied; however, the natural history and mode of transmission of the organism remain unclear. Soil exposure, especially during the rainy season, has been suggested to be a critical risk factor. Using a highly discriminatory molecular technique, multilocus microsatellite typing, to characterize this fungus, several isolates from bamboo rats and humans were shown to share identical multilocus genotypes. These data suggest either that transmission of P. marneffei may occur from rodents to humans or that rodents and humans are coinfected from common environmental sources. These putative natural cycles of P. marneffei infection need further investigation. Studies on the fungal genetics of P. marneffei have been focused on the characterization of genetic determinants that may play important roles in asexual development, mycelial-to-yeast phase transition, and the expression of antigenic determinants. Molecular studies have identified several genes involved in germination, hyphal development, conidiogenesis, and yeast cell polarity. A number of functionally important genes, such as the malate synthase- and catalase-peroxidase protein-encoding genes, have been identified as being upregulated in the yeast phase. Future investigations pertaining to the roles of these genes in host-fungus interactions may provide the key knowledge to understanding the

  14. Relative abundance of Mycobacterium bovis molecular types in cattle: a simulation study of potential epidemiological drivers.

    PubMed

    Trewby, Hannah; Wright, David M; Skuce, Robin A; McCormick, Carl; Mallon, Thomas R; Presho, Eleanor L; Kao, Rowland R; Haydon, Daniel T; Biek, Roman

    2017-08-22

    The patterns of relative species abundance are commonly studied in ecology and epidemiology to provide insights into underlying dynamical processes. Molecular types (MVLA-types) of Mycobacterium bovis, the causal agent of bovine tuberculosis, are now routinely recorded in culture-confirmed bovine tuberculosis cases in Northern Ireland. In this study, we use ecological approaches and simulation modelling to investigate the distribution of relative abundances of MVLA-types and its potential drivers. We explore four biologically plausible hypotheses regarding the processes driving molecular type relative abundances: sampling and speciation; structuring of the pathogen population; historical changes in population size; and transmission heterogeneity (superspreading). Northern Irish herd-level MVLA-type surveillance shows a right-skewed distribution of MVLA-types, with a small number of types present at very high frequencies and the majority of types very rare. We demonstrate that this skew is too extreme to be accounted for by simple neutral ecological processes. Simulation results indicate that the process of MVLA-type speciation and the manner in which the MVLA-typing loci were chosen in Northern Ireland cannot account for the observed skew. Similarly, we find that pathogen population structure, assuming for example a reservoir of infection in a separate host, would drive the relative abundance distribution in the opposite direction to that observed, generating more even abundances of molecular types. However, we find that historical increases in bovine tuberculosis prevalence and/or transmission heterogeneity (superspreading) are both capable of generating the skewed MVLA-type distribution, consistent with findings of previous work examining the distribution of molecular types in human tuberculosis. Although the distribution of MVLA-type abundances does not fit classical neutral predictions, our simulations show that increases in pathogen population size and

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Yellow Fever in Bolivia from 1999 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Baronti, Cécile; Goitia, Norma Janeth Velasquez; Cook, Shelley; Roca, Yelin; Revollo, Jimmy; Flores, Jorge Vargas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Yellow fever (YF) is a serious public health problem in Bolivia since at least the 19th century. Surprisingly, very limited information has been made available to date regarding the genetic characterisation and epidemiology of Bolivian YF virus (YFV) strains. Here, we conducted the genetic characterization of 12 human isolates of YFV collected in Bolivia between 1999 and 2008, by sequencing and analysis of two regions of the viral genome: a fragment encoding structural proteins “PrM” (premembrane and envelope) and a distal region “EMF,” spanning the end of the virus genome. Our study reveals a high genetic diversity of YFV strains circulating in Bolivia during the last decade: we identified not only “Peruvian-like” genotype II viruses (related to previously characterized Bolivian strains), but also, for the fist time, “Brazilian-like” genotype I viruses. During the complete period of the study, only cases of “jungle” YF were detected (i.e., circulation of YFV via a sylvatic cycle) with no cluster of urban cases. However, the very significant spread of the Aedes aegypti mosquito across Bolivian cities threatens the country with the reappearance of an urban YFV transmission cycle and thus is required a sustained epidemiological surveillance. PMID:20925524

  16. A new approach to the method of source-sink potentials for molecular conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pickup, Barry T. E-mail: P.W.Fowler@sheffield.ac.uk; Fowler, Patrick W. E-mail: P.W.Fowler@sheffield.ac.uk; Borg, Martha; Sciriha, Irene

    2015-11-21

    We re-derive the tight-binding source-sink potential (SSP) equations for ballistic conduction through conjugated molecular structures in a form that avoids singularities. This enables derivation of new results for families of molecular devices in terms of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of the molecular graph. In particular, we define the transmission of electrons through individual molecular orbitals (MO) and through MO shells. We make explicit the behaviour of the total current and individual MO and shell currents at molecular eigenvalues. A rich variety of behaviour is found. A SSP device has specific insulation or conduction at an eigenvalue of the molecular graph (a root of the characteristic polynomial) according to the multiplicities of that value in the spectra of four defined device polynomials. Conduction near eigenvalues is dominated by the transmission curves of nearby shells. A shell may be inert or active. An inert shell does not conduct at any energy, not even at its own eigenvalue. Conduction may occur at the eigenvalue of an inert shell, but is then carried entirely by other shells. If a shell is active, it carries all conduction at its own eigenvalue. For bipartite molecular graphs (alternant molecules), orbital conduction properties are governed by a pairing theorem. Inertness of shells for families such as chains and rings is predicted by selection rules based on node counting and degeneracy.

  17. A new approach to the method of source-sink potentials for molecular conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickup, Barry T.; Fowler, Patrick W.; Borg, Martha; Sciriha, Irene

    2015-11-01

    We re-derive the tight-binding source-sink potential (SSP) equations for ballistic conduction through conjugated molecular structures in a form that avoids singularities. This enables derivation of new results for families of molecular devices in terms of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of the molecular graph. In particular, we define the transmission of electrons through individual molecular orbitals (MO) and through MO shells. We make explicit the behaviour of the total current and individual MO and shell currents at molecular eigenvalues. A rich variety of behaviour is found. A SSP device has specific insulation or conduction at an eigenvalue of the molecular graph (a root of the characteristic polynomial) according to the multiplicities of that value in the spectra of four defined device polynomials. Conduction near eigenvalues is dominated by the transmission curves of nearby shells. A shell may be inert or active. An inert shell does not conduct at any energy, not even at its own eigenvalue. Conduction may occur at the eigenvalue of an inert shell, but is then carried entirely by other shells. If a shell is active, it carries all conduction at its own eigenvalue. For bipartite molecular graphs (alternant molecules), orbital conduction properties are governed by a pairing theorem. Inertness of shells for families such as chains and rings is predicted by selection rules based on node counting and degeneracy.

  18. Epidemiological modelling of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Holly E; Ferrari, Alize J; Nelson, Paul; Polanczyk, Guilherme V; Flaxman, Abraham D; Vos, Theo; Whiteford, Harvey A; Scott, James G

    2013-12-01

    The most recent Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD 2010) is the first to include attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) for burden quantification. We present the epidemiological profiles of ADHD and CD across three time periods for 21 world regions. A systematic review of global epidemiology was conducted for each disorder (based on a literature search of the Medline, PsycInfo and EMBASE databases). A Bayesian metaregression tool was used to derive prevalence estimates by age and sex in three time periods (1990, 2005 and 2010) for 21 world regions including those with little or no data. Prior expert knowledge and covariates were applied to each model to adjust suboptimal data. Final prevalence output for ADHD were adjusted to reflect an equivalent value if studies had measured point prevalence using multiple informants while final prevalence output for CD were adjusted to reflect a value equivalent to CD only. Prevalence was pooled for males and females aged 5-19 years with no difference found in global prevalence between the three time periods. Male prevalence of ADHD in 2010 was 2.2% (2.0-2.3) while female prevalence was 0.7% (0.6-0.7). Male prevalence of CD in 2010 was 3.6% (3.3-4.0) while female prevalence was 1.5% (1.4-1.7). ADHD and CD were estimated to be present worldwide with ADHD prevalence showing some regional variation while CD prevalence remained relatively consistent worldwide. We present the first prevalence estimates of both ADHD and CD globally and for all world regions. Data were sparse with large parts of the world having no estimates of either disorder. Epidemiological studies are urgently needed in certain parts of the world. Our findings directly informed burden quantification for GBD 2010. As mental disorders gained increased recognition after the first GBD study in 1990, the inclusion of ADHD and CD in GBD 2010 ensures their importance will be recognized alongside other childhood disorders. © 2013 The

  19. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  20. [Epidemiological basis and results of the National Survey 2001 conducted in the Swiss pig population].

    PubMed

    Hadorn, D; Hauser, R; Stärk, K D C

    2002-10-01

    Free trade with animals and animal products requires transparency concerning health information of animal populations. On the basis of the bilateral agreement with the European Union (EU), Switzerland is obliged to document freedom from Aujeszky's disease (AD) in its pig population by conducting surveys on a regular basis. Such a survey was planned for the first time for the year 2001. In this context, it was evaluated whether additional pig diseases should be included in the survey. This article describes the evaluation procedure for the selection of pig diseases integrated in the survey 2001. Additionally, it reports and interprets the results of this survey. All of the 2537 farms and 41,719 blood samples were tested negative. Therefore, it could be documented with a confidence of 99.98% that the AD-prevalence in Switzerland is below 1%.

  1. Effect of Tensile Strain on Thermal Conductivity in Monolayer Graphene Nanoribbons: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; He, Xiaodong; Yang, Lin; Wu, Guoqiang; Sha, Jianjun; Hou, Chengyu; Yin, Cunlu; Pan, Acheng; Li, Zhongzhou; Liu, Yubai

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with different tensile strain is investigated by using a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. Significant increasing amplitude of the molecular thermal vibration, molecular potential energy vibration and thermal conductivity vibration of stretching GNRs were detected. Some 20%∼30% thermal conductivity decay is found in 9%∼15% tensile strain of GNR cases. It is explained by the fact that GNR structural ridges scatter some low-frequency phonons which pass in the direction perpendicular to the direction of GNR stretching which was indicated by a phonon density of state investigation. PMID:23881138

  2. Syndromic Surveillance of Infectious Diseases meets Molecular Epidemiology in a Workflow and Phylogeographic Application.

    PubMed

    Janies, Daniel; Witter, Zachary; Gibson, Christian; Kraft, Thomas; Senturk, Izzet F; Çatalyürek, Ümit

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, epidemiologists have counted cases and groups of symptoms. Modeling on these data consists of predicting expansion or contraction in the number of cases over time in epidemic curves or compartment models. Geography is considered a variable when these data are presented in choropleth maps. These approaches have significant drawbacks if the cases counted are not accurately diagnosed. For example, most regional public health authorities count influenza like illnesses (ILI). Cases of these diseases are designated as ILI if the patient exhibits fever, respiratory symptoms, and perhaps gastrointestinal symptoms. Several molecular epidemiological studies have shown that there are many pathogens that cause these symptoms and the relative proportions of these pathogens change over time and space. One way to bridge the gap between syndromic and genetic surveillance of infectious diseases is to compare signals of symptoms to pathogens recorded in molecular databases. We present a web-based workflow application that uses chief complaints found in the public Twitter feed as a syndromic surveillance tool and connects outbreak signals in these data to pathogens historically known to circulate in the same area. For the pathogen(s) of interest, we provide Genbank links to metadata and sequences in a workflow for phylogeographic analysis and visualization. The visualizations provide information on the geographic traffic of the spread of the pathogens and places that are hubs for their transport.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Mitchell D.; Crouch, Bethany; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Jordan, David; Pang, Stanley; Barton, Mary D.; Giffard, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44) was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping) and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC) 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST) 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable,) were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3–92.5, P < 0.001) and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2–532.7, P < 0.001) and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species. PMID:26735694

  4. Molecular and epidemiological updates on cystic echinococcosis infecting water buffaloes from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) represents a serious parasitic disease at both animal and public health levels. The majority of reports negated the CE infection in buffaloes from Egypt; however, one study illustrated their infection with G6 genotype (camel strain). The present work contributed to update the epidemiological and molecular knowledge about CE infecting this economically important animal for better understanding of its role in maintaining the Echinococcus life cycle. A total of 120 slaughtered water buffaloes at Mansoura abattoir, Dakahlia province, Egypt, were inspected for the existence of hydatid cysts. Cysts location and fertility were examined. Five out of 27 revealed cysts were tested molecularly using both cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen subunit 1 (nadh1) genes. Low prevalence (4.2%) as well as considerably low fertility rate (14.8%) of buffaloes CE was noted. G1 genotype (common sheep strain) was revealed from the five examined cysts. At the level of nadh1 partial sequences, a globally singleton G1 haplotype was reported. This the first report about the G1 infection in buffaloes from Egypt. This study proposed the minimized role of this animal in echinococcosis transmission. These findings could provide preliminary data for the local control of this disease.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Aleutian disease virus in free-ranging domestic, hybrid, and wild mink

    PubMed Central

    Nituch, Larissa A; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2012-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease (AMD) is a prominent infectious disease in mink farms. The AMD virus (AMDV) has been well characterized in Europe where American mink (Neovison vison) are an introduced species; however, in North America, where American mink are native and the disease is thought to have originated, the virus’ molecular epidemiology is unknown. As such, we characterized viral isolates from Ontario free-ranging mink of domestic, hybrid, and wild origin at two proteins: NS1, a nonstructural protein, and VP2, a capsid protein. AMDV DNA was detected in 25% of free-ranging mink (45 of 183), indicating prevalent active infection. Median-joining networks showed that Ontario AMDV isolates formed two subgroups in the NS1 region and three in the VP2 region, which were somewhat separate from, but closely related to, AMDVs circulating in domestic mink worldwide. Molecular analyses showed evidence of AMDV crossing from domestic to wild mink. Our results suggest that AMDV isolate grouping is linked to both wild endogenous reservoirs and the long-term global trade in domestic mink, and that AMD spills back and forth between domestic and wild mink. As such, biosecurity on mink farms is warranted to prevent transmission of the disease between mink farms and the wild. PMID:25568054

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Groves, Mitchell D; Crouch, Bethany; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Jordan, David; Pang, Stanley; Barton, Mary D; Giffard, Phil; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44) was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping) and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC) 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST) 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable,) were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3-92.5, P < 0.001) and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2-532.7, P < 0.001) and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Genotypes of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Regions of South China.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Lu, Junwan; Zong, Li; Li, Ailing; Pan, Ruowang; Cheng, Cong; Li, Kunpeng; Chen, Liqiang; Ying, Jianchao; Tou, Huifen; Zhu, Chuanxin; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Jinsong; Ni, Liyan; Xu, Zuyuan; Bao, Qiyu; Li, Peizhen

    2016-05-20

    The aim of this study was to analyze the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of Acinetobacter baumannii. A total of 398 isolates were collected in 7 regions of South China from January to June of 2012. Drug sensitivity was tested toward 15 commonly used antibiotics; thus, 146 multi-drug-resistant strains (resistant to more than 7 drugs) were identified, representing 36.7% of all isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used for molecular subtyping. According to the PFGE results (with a cutoff of 70% similarity for the DNA electrophoretic bands), 146 strains were subdivided into 15 clusters, with cluster A being the largest (33.6%, distributed in all districts except Jiaxing). Cluster B was also widespread and included 14.4% of all strains. In addition, MLST results revealed 11 sequence types (ST), with ST208 being the most prevalent, followed by ST191 and ST729. Furthermore, 4 novel alleles and 6 novel STs were identified. Our results showed that multi-drug-resistant A. baumannii in South China shares the origin with other widespread strains in other countries. The nosocomial infections caused by A. baumannii have been severe in South China. Continuous monitoring and judicious antibiotic use are required.

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Adenovirus Type 21 Respiratory Strains Isolated From US Military Trainees (1996-2014).

    PubMed

    Kajon, Adriana E; Hang, Jun; Hawksworth, Anthony; Metzgar, David; Hage, Elias; Hansen, Christian J; Kuschner, Robert A; Blair, Patrick; Russell, Kevin L; Jarman, Richard G

    2015-09-15

    The circulation of human adenovirus type 21 (HAdV21) in the United States has been documented since the 1960s in association with outbreaks of febrile respiratory illness (FRI) in military boot camps and civilian cases of respiratory disease. To describe the molecular epidemiology of HAdV21 respiratory infections across the country, 150 clinical respiratory isolates obtained from continuous surveillance of military recruit FRI, and 23 respiratory isolates recovered from pediatric and adult civilian cases of acute respiratory infection were characterized to compile molecular typing data spanning 37 years (1978-2014). Restriction enzyme analysis and genomic sequencing identified 2 clusters of closely related genomic variants readily distinguishable from the prototype and designated 21a-like and 21b-like. A-like variants predominated until 1999. A shift to b-like variants was noticeable by 2007 after a 7-year period (2000-2006) of cocirculation of the 2 genome types. US strains are phylogenetically more closely related to European and Asian strains isolated over the last 4 decades than to the Saudi Arabian prototype strain AV-1645 isolated in 1956. Knowledge of circulating HAdV21 variants and their epidemic behavior will be of significant value to local and global FRI surveillance efforts. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of hydropericardium syndrome outbreak-associated serotype 4 fowl adenovirus isolates in central China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Teng; Jin, Qianyue; Ding, Peiyang; Wang, Yinbiao; Chai, Yongxiao; Li, Yafei; Liu, Xiao; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Gaiping

    2016-11-18

    In several parts of China, there have been a large number of hydropericardium syndrome (HPS) outbreaks caused by serotype 4 fowl adenovirus (FAdV-4) in broiler chickens since 2015. These outbreak-associated FAdV-4 strains were distinct from previous circulating strains which did not lead to severe HPS outbreaks. To better understand the molecular epidemiology of the currently circulating FAdV strains for effective diagnosis and treatment of HPS, we isolated 12 HPS outbreak-associated FAdV-4 strains from different regions in central China and investigated their molecular characteristics by performing phylogenetic analyses based on the hexon genes. Our results indicated the FAdV-4 strains in this study all belonged to serotype FAdV-4, species FAdV-C. And in comparison with ON1, KR5, MX-SHP95, PK-01, PJ-06 strains within the cluster where outbreak-associated FAdV-4 strains were located, the nucleotide sequence divergence were 1.31, 1.10, 1.42, 2.77 and 2.84%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the hexon genes of the 12 outbreak-associated strains clustered to a relatively independent branch of the tree, and evolved from the same ancestor and we suggested that these outbreak-associated FAdV-4 strains originate from earlier strains in India.

  10. Molecular and epidemiological updates on cystic echinococcosis infecting water buffaloes from Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Cystic echinococcosis (CE) represents a serious parasitic disease at both animal and public health levels. The majority of reports negated the CE infection in buffaloes from Egypt; however, one study illustrated their infection with G6 genotype (camel strain). The present work contributed to update the epidemiological and molecular knowledge about CE infecting this economically important animal for better understanding of its role in maintaining the Echinococcus life cycle. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 slaughtered water buffaloes at Mansoura abattoir, Dakahlia province, Egypt, were inspected for the existence of hydatid cysts. Cysts location and fertility were examined. Five out of 27 revealed cysts were tested molecularly using both cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen subunit 1 (nadh1) genes. Results: Low prevalence (4.2%) as well as considerably low fertility rate (14.8%) of buffaloes CE was noted. G1 genotype (common sheep strain) was revealed from the five examined cysts. At the level of nadh1 partial sequences, a globally singleton G1 haplotype was reported. Conclusion: This the first report about the G1 infection in buffaloes from Egypt. This study proposed the minimized role of this animal in echinococcosis transmission. These findings could provide preliminary data for the local control of this disease. PMID:28096605

  11. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  12. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  13. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Prevalence of dissocial conduct disorder in adolescents using an epidemiological diagnostic questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Pineda, D A; Puerta, I C

    Prevalence of Conduct Disorder has been calculated between 4 to 10%. To estimate the prevalence CD in Colombian adolescents, using a rating scale by self report. 190 male adolescents from secondary school population, 12 to 16 year-old, were stratified and selected in a randomizing procedure, from Medellín, Colombia. A checklist including 14 diagnostic symptoms taken from the DSM-IV Criterion A for CD was constructed, with a scale of 0 = never to 3 = almost always (Reliability alpha coefficient: 0.86). Prevalences were calculated as follow: (1) codifying as 'Probable TDC' a T score over 60; (2) codifying as Adolescent Antisocial Behavior (AAB) having three or more answers qualified with 1 or more points, and (3) codifying as CD obtaining three or more answers qualified with 2 or 3 points. The most prevalent CD symptoms were 'staying out at night before 13 year-old' (10.5%), 'having been cruel to animals' (8.4%), 'having been cruel to people' (7.4%), 'having broken into someone else's house or car' (7.3%), and 'using weapon or other objects that can cause serious physical harm to others' (6.9%). The prevalence of 'Probable CD' was 13.7%; prevalence of AAB was 56.8% and prevalence of CD was 8.4%. It was not found significant differences between socioeconomic strata. The prevalence of CD in the studied sample was 8.4%, independent of the socioeconomic strata.

  15. Porcine deltacoronavirus infection: Etiology, cell culture for virus isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwonil; Hu, Hui; Saif, Linda J

    2016-12-02

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Deltacoronavirus) is a novel swine enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes acute diarrhea/vomiting, dehydration and mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. PDCoV diarrhea was first reported in the US in early 2014, concurrently with co-circulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) (family Coronaviridae, genus Alphacoronavirus). The origin of PDCoV in pigs and also its sudden emergence or route of introduction into the US still remains unclear. In the US, since 2013-2014, the newly emerged PDCoV and PEDV have spread nationwide, causing a high number of pig deaths and significant economic impacts. The current US PDCoV strains are enteropathogenic and infect villous epithelial cells of the entire small and large intestines although the jejunum and ileum are the primary sites of infection. Similar to PEDV infections, PDCoV infections also cause acute, severe atrophic enteritis accompanied by transient viremia (viral RNA) that leads to severe diarrhea and/or vomiting, followed by dehydration as the potential cause of death in nursing piglets. At present, differential diagnosis of PDCoV, PEDV, and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is essential to control viral diarrheas in US swine. Cell culture-adapted US PDCoV (TC-PDCoV) strains have been isolated and propagated by us and in several other laboratories. TC-PDCoV strains will be useful to develop serologic assays and to evaluate if serial cell-culture passage attenuates TC-PDCoV as a potential vaccine candidate strain. A comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of epidemic PDCoV strains is currently needed to prevent and control the disease in affected regions and to develop an effective vaccine. This review focuses on the etiology, cell culture isolation and propagation, molecular epidemiology, disease mechanisms and pathogenesis of PDCoV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular epidemiological analysis of Saffold cardiovirus genotype 3 from upper respiratory infection patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsuey-Li; Lin, Ting-Han; Chiu, Shu-Chun; Huang, Yuan-Pin; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Lee, Chia-Chi; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Lin, Jih-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Saffold cardiovirus (SAFV) belongs to the Cardiovirus genus of Picornaviridae family, and may be a relevant new human pathogen; Thus far, eleven genotypes have been identified. The SAFV type 3 (SAFV-3) is thought to be the major genotype and is detected relatively frequently in children with acute gastroenteritis and respiratory illness. The epidemiology and pathogenicity of SAFV-3 remain unclear. To investigate the genomic and epidemiologic profiles of SAFV-3 infection in Taiwan. Virus was detected in respiratory samples from children suffering for URI. SAFV-3 isolates were detected by isolation on cell culture and IF assay. The molecular typing was performed by RT-PCR and was sequenced to compare with reference strains available in the NCBI GeneBank. Serum samples were collected from 2005 to 2013 in Taiwan for seroprevalence investigation. A total of 226 specimens collected from children with URIs, 22 (9.73%) were positive for SAFV-3. The majority of SAFV-3 infections were found in children less than 6 years of age (14 of 22, 63.6%). Genetic analysis of VP1 coding region of Taiwanese isolates shown an 83.2-97.7% difference from other available SAFV-3 sequences in NCBI GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis revealed there is three genetic groups of SAFV-3 co-circulated in Taiwan during the study period. In addition, seroprevalence investigation results indicated that SAFV-3 infection occurs early in life and 43.7-77.8% of children aged between 6 months to 9 years old, had neutralizing antibodies against SAFV-3. SAFV-3 may have circulated in Taiwan for some time and it appears to be one of the etiological agents responsible for URIs in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni infection in Israel-a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, M; Moran-Gilad, J; Rokney, A; Davidov, Y; Agmon, V; Peretz, C; Valinsky, L

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of Campylobacter infection in Israel, particularly among children <2 years of age, has risen over the last decade and became one of the highest among industrialized countries. This study explored the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni in Israel over a decade (2003-2012) using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) combined with demographic metadata. Representative clinical isolates (438) from a large national repository together with selected veterinary isolates (74) were subject to MLST. The distribution of age groups, ethnicity and clinical source across various genotypes was evaluated using Poisson modelling. The 512 studied isolates were assigned 126 distinct sequence types (STs) (18.8% novel STs) grouped into 21 clonal complexes (CCs). Most human, poultry and bovine STs clustered together in the leading CCs. Three dominant STs (ST21, ST6608, ST4766) were detected only since 2006. Patients infected with the leading CCs were similarly distributed along densely populated areas. The frequency of blood isolates was higher in patients infected with CC353 (relative rate (RR)=2.0, 95% CI 1.03-3.9, adjusted p value (adj.p) 0.047) and CC42 (RR=4.4, 95% CI 1.7-11.6, adj.p 0.018) and lower with CC257 (RR=0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9, adj. p 0.047). The distribution of age groups and ethnicity also varied across the leading CCs. In conclusion, C. jejuni isolates in a national sample appeared highly diverse with a high proportion of new STs. Phylogenic analysis was compatible with poultry and cattle as possible food sources of clinical infection. Demographic characteristics of the infected patients coupled with strain invasiveness across different genotypes revealed a complex epidemiology of C. jejuni transmission in Israel. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Human Enterovirus Serotype 68 in Thailand, 2006–2011

    PubMed Central

    Linsuwanon, Piyada; Puenpa, Jiratchaya; Suwannakarn, Kamol; Auksornkitti, Vittawat; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background Publications worldwide have reported on the re-occurrence of human enterovirus 68 (EV68), a rarely detected pathogen usually causing respiratory illness. However, epidemiological data regarding this virus in particular on the Asian continent has so far been limited. Methodology/Findings We investigated the epidemiology and genetic variability of EV68 infection among Thai children with respiratory illnesses from 2006–2011 (n = 1810). Semi-nested PCR using primer sets for amplification of the 5′-untranslated region through VP2 was performed for rhino-enterovirus detection. Altogether, 25 cases were confirmed as EV68 infection indicating a prevalence of 1.4% in the entire study population. Interestingly, the majority of samples were children aged >5 years (64%). Also, co-infection with other viruses was found in 28%, while pandemic H1N1 influenza/2009 virus was the most common co-infection. Of EV68-positive patients, 36% required hospitalizations with the common clinical presentations of fever, cough, dyspnea, and wheezing. The present study has shown that EV68 was extremely rare until 2009 (0.9%). An increasing annual prevalence was found in 2010 (1.6%) with the highest detection frequency in 2011 (4.3%). Based on analysis of the VP1 gene, the evolutionary rate of EV68 was estimated at 4.93×10−3 substitutions/site/year. Major bifurcation of the currently circulating EV68 strains occurred 66 years ago (1945.31 with (1925.95–1960.46)95% HPD). Among the current lineages, 3 clusters of EV68 were categorized based on the different molecular signatures in the BC and DE loops of VP1 combined with high posterior probability values. Each cluster has branched off from their common ancestor at least 36 years ago (1975.78 with (1946.13–1984.97)95% HPD). Conclusion Differences in epidemiological characteristic and seasonal profile of EV68 have been found in this study. Results from Bayesian phylogenetic investigations also revealed that EV68 should be

  19. Implementation of new tools in molecular epidemiology studies of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in South America.

    PubMed

    Avila, Héctor G; Santos, Guilherme B; Cucher, Marcela A; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Pérez, Matías G; Baldi, Germán; Jensen, Oscar; Pérez, Verónica; López, Raúl; Negro, Perla; Scialfa, Exequiel; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B; Rosenzvit, Mara; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species and genotypes in intermediate and definitive hosts and in human isolates from endemic regions of Argentina and Brazil including those where no molecular data is available by a combination of classical and alternative molecular tools. A total of 227 samples were isolated from humans, natural intermediate and definitive hosts. Amplification of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene fragment was performed and a combination of AluI digestion assay, High Resolution Melting analysis (HRM) assay and DNA sequencing was implemented for Echinococcus species/genotype determination. E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1) was found in sheep (n=35), cattle (n=67) and dogs (n=5); E. ortleppi (G5) in humans (n=3) and cattle (n=108); E. canadensis (G6) in humans (n=2) and E. canadensis (G7) in pigs (n=7). We reported for the first time the presence of E. ortleppi (G5) and E. canadensis (G6) in humans from San Juan and Catamarca Argentinean provinces and E. canadensis (G7) in pigs from Cordoba Argentinean province. In this work, we widened molecular epidemiology studies of E. granulosus s. l. in South America by analyzing several isolates from definitive and intermediate hosts, including humans from endemic regions were such information was scarce or unavailable. The presence of different species/genotypes in the same region and host species reinforce the need of rapid and specific techniques for accurate determination of Echinococcus species such as the ones proposed in this work.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of the pertussis epidemic in Washington State in 2012.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Katherine E; Williams, Margaret M; Cassiday, Pamela K; Milton, Andrea; Pawloski, Lucia; Harrison, Marsenia; Martin, Stacey W; Meyer, Sarah; Qin, Xuan; DeBolt, Chas; Tasslimi, Azadeh; Syed, Nusrat; Sorrell, Ronald; Tran, Mike; Hiatt, Brian; Tondella, Maria Lucia

    2014-10-01

    Although pertussis disease is vaccine preventable, Washington State experienced a substantial rise in pertussis incidence beginning in 2011. By June 2012, the reported cases reached 2,520 (37.5 cases per 100,000 residents), a 1,300% increase compared with the same period in 2011. We assessed the molecular epidemiology of this statewide epidemic using 240 isolates collected from case patients reported from 19 of 39 Washington counties during 2012 to 2013. The typing methods included pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pertactin gene (prn) mutational analysis. Using the scheme PFGE-MLVA-MLST-prn mutations-Prn deficiency, the 240 isolates comprised 65 distinct typing profiles. Thirty-one PFGE types were found, with the most common types, CDC013 (n = 51), CDC237 (n = 44), and CDC002 (n = 42), accounting for 57% of them. Eleven MLVA types were observed, mainly comprising type 27 (n = 183, 76%). Seven MLST types were identified, with the majority of the isolates typing as prn2-ptxP3-ptxA1-fim3-1 (n = 157, 65%). Four different prn mutations accounted for the 76% of isolates exhibiting pertactin deficiency. PFGE provided the highest discriminatory power (D = 0.87) and was found to be a more powerful typing method than MLVA and MLST combined (D = 0.67). This study provides evidence for the continued predominance of MLVA 27 and prn2-ptxP3-ptxA1 alleles, along with the reemergence of the fim3-1 allele. Our results indicate that the Bordetella pertussis population causing this epidemic was diverse, with a few molecular types predominating. The PFGE, MLVA, and MLST profiles were consistent with the predominate types circulating in the United States and other countries. For prn, several mutations were present in multiple molecular types. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Molecular Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile Isolates from a University Teaching Hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xie, Xiu-Li; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    While the developed world has seen a significant increase in the number of scientific articles on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), the developing world still lags behind on this subject due to limited laboratory capacity, low awareness, and limited surveillance of this problem. As such, CDI is considered a neglected but potentially huge problem in developing countries. The major aim of this study was to systemically evaluate the utility of several molecular typing tools for CDI, including their relevance in epidemiological studies in developing countries such as China. A total of 116 non-repetitive toxigenic C. difficile isolates from Chinese patients, were studied. The isolates comprised 83 (71.6%) A+B+CDT- isolates, 27 (23.3%) A-B+CDT- isolates, and 6 (5.1%) A+B+CDT+ isolates. Typing methods evaluated included multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, PCR ribotyping, multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing of slpA and tcdC genes, which identified 113, 30, 22, 18, and 8 genotypes each and exhibited discriminatory powers of 0.999, 0.916, 0.907, 0.883, and 0.765, respectively. Compared to A+B+ strains, A-B+ strains exhibited higher prevalence of drug resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, rifampicin, rifaximin, and tetracycline. Furthermore, drug resistance rates of strains with different PCR ribotypes differed, supporting the importance of molecular typing in management and control of CDI. Based on our earlier suggestion to improve the diagnostic laboratory capacity of CDI in developing countries, setting up efficient surveillance programs complemented by relevant molecular typing methods is warranted. PMID:27799923

  2. Report of the Second International Symposium on Molecular Epidemiology in Childhood Leukaemia and Embryonal Tumours, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pombo de Oliveira, MS; Ferman, S; de Camargo, B

    2008-01-01

    The recent International Symposium on Molecular epidemiology in Embryonal Tumours and Paediatric Leukaemia was held on 4–6 March 2008 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It proved a very productive meeting in which studies relating to genetics, therapeutical trials, identification of risk factors in acute leukaemia neuroblastoma and Wilms’ tumours were presented. Over 120 participants gathered for three days of fruitful discussions, including representatives of paediatrics, haematology, laboratory, epidemiology and pathology. Debates were held about strategies of applications of important biomarkers for clinical trials. Highlights of each of the scientific presentations are summarized below. PMID:22275972

  3. Molecular conductance of double-stranded DNA evaluated by electrochemical capacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, W. C.; Gonçalves, L. M.; Liébana, S.; Pividori, M. I.; Bueno, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Conductance was measured in two different double stranded DNA (both with 20 bases), the more conducting poly(dG)-poly(dC) (ds-DNAc) and the less conducting poly(dA)-poly(dT) (ds-DNAi), by means of Electrochemical Capacitance Spectroscopy (ECS). The use of the ECS approach, exemplified herein with DNA nanowires, is equally a suitable and time-dependent advantageous alternative for conductance measurement of molecular systems, additionally allowing better understanding of the alignment existing between molecular scale conductance and electron transfer rate.Conductance was measured in two different double stranded DNA (both with 20 bases), the more conducting poly(dG)-poly(dC) (ds-DNAc) and the less conducting poly(dA)-poly(dT) (ds-DNAi), by means of Electrochemical Capacitance Spectroscopy (ECS). The use of the ECS approach, exemplified herein with DNA nanowires, is equally a suitable and time-dependent advantageous alternative for conductance measurement of molecular systems, additionally allowing better understanding of the alignment existing between molecular scale conductance and electron transfer rate. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01076h

  4. Epidemiologic cutoff values for triazole drugs in Cryptococcus gattii: correlation of molecular type and in vitro susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Iqbal, Naureen; Bolden, Carol B; DeBess, Emilio E; Marsden-Haug, Nicola; Worhle, Ron; Thakur, Rameshwari; Harris, Julie R

    2012-06-01

    Cryptococcus gattii causes infection in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide but has garnered increased attention since its 1999 emergence in North America. C. gattii can be divided into 4 molecular types that may represent cryptic species. Recent evidence has shown that azole antifungal MIC values differ among these molecular types. We tested a large collection of C. gattii isolates for susceptibility to 4 azole drugs. We found that isolates of molecular type VGII have the highest geometric mean (GM) fluconazole MIC values (8.6 μg/mL), while isolates of molecular type VGI have the lowest (1.7 μg/mL). For fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole GM MIC values, VGI < VGIII < VGIV < VGII. The GM MIC values for posaconazole were similarly represented across molecular types, with the exception that VGII < VGIII and VGIV. We used the MIC values to establish preliminary epidemiologic cutoff values for each azole and molecular type of C. gattii.

  5. Cyclic conductance switching in networks of redox-active molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianhui; Agustsson, Jon S; Wu, Songmei; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel; Leroux, Yann; Mayor, Marcel; Jeannin, Olivier; Ran, Ying-Fen; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio

    2010-03-10

    Redox-active dithiolated tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (TTFdT) were inserted in two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays to build interlinked networks of molecular junctions. Upon oxidation of the TTFdT to the dication state, we observed a conductance increase of the networks by up to 1 order of magnitude. Successive oxidation and reduction cycles demonstrated a clear switching behavior of the molecular junction conductance. These results show the potential of interlinked nanoparticle arrays as chemical sensors.

  6. The Molecular and Morphologic Structures That Make Saltatory Conduction Possible in Peripheral Nerve.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Steven L

    2017-03-14

    Saltatory conduction is the process by which action potentials are rapidly and efficiently propagated along myelinated axons. In the peripheral nervous system, saltatory conduction is made possible by a series of morphologically and molecularly distinct subdomains in both axons and their associated myelinating Schwann cells. This review briefly summarizes current knowledge on the molecular structure and physiology of the node of Ranvier and adjacent regions of the axoglial unit in peripheral nerve.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium among Indigenous Children from the Colombian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Angie; Munoz, Marina; Gómez, Natalia; Tabares, Juan; Segura, Laura; Salazar, Ángela; Restrepo, Cristian; Ruíz, Miguel; Reyes, Patricia; Qian, Yuchen; Xiao, Lihua; López, Myriam C; Ramírez, Juan D

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of intestinal parasites in children is most likely due to lack of natural or acquired resistance and differences in behavior and habits closely related to environmental and socioeconomic determinants. The most important protozoa that parasitize humans are Giardia, Entamoeba, Blastocystis, and Cryptosporidium. These parasites present wide intraspecific genetic diversity and subsequently classified into assemblages and subtypes. The Amazon basin is the largest in the world and is the fifth freshwater reserve on the planet. Contradictorily, people living in these areas (Indigenous populations) have poor quality of life, which favors the infection of diseases of fecal-oral transmission. The aim of this work was to unravel the molecular epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium across four communities (Puerto Nariño, San Juan del Soco, Villa Andrea and Nuevo Paraíso). We obtained 284 fecal samples from children under 15 years old that were analyzed by direct microscopy (261 samples) and Real Time PCR (qPCR) (284 samples). The positive samples for these protozoa were further characterized by several molecular markers to depict assemblages and subtypes. We observed a frequency of Giardia infection by microscopy of 23.7% (62 samples) and by qPCR of 64.8% (184 samples); for Blastocystis by microscopy of 35.2% (92 samples) and by qPCR of 88.7% (252 samples) and for Cryptosporidium only 1.9% (5 samples) were positive by microscopy and qPCR 1.8% (5 samples). Regarding the Giardia assemblages, using the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) marker we observed AI, BIII and BIV assemblages and when using triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) we observed assemblages AI, AII, BIII and BIV. In contrast, Blastocystis STs detected were 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. Lastly, the species C. viatorum, C. hominis (with the subtypes IdA19 and IaA12R8) and C. parvum (with the subtype IIcA5G3c) were identified. We observed a high profile of zoonotic transmission

  8. Molecular epidemiology of hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Medina, G; Egea, A L; Otth, C; Otth, L; Fernández, H; Bocco, J L; Wilson, M; Sola, C

    2013-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen of public health importance. In Chile, the Cordobes/Chilean clone was the predominant healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) clone in 1998. Since then, the molecular epidemiological surveillance of MRSA has not been performed in Southern Chile. We aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology of HA-MRSA infections in Southern Chile to identify the MRSA clones involved, and their evolutionary relationships with epidemic international MRSA lineages. A total of 303 single inpatient isolates of S. aureus were collected in the Valdivia County Hospital (2007-2008), revealing 33% (100 MRSA/303) prevalence for HA-MRSA infections. The SCCmec types I and IV were identified in 97% and 3% of HA-MRSA, respectively. All isolates lacked the pvl genes. A random sample (n = 29) of all MRSA was studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), SCCmec subtyping, agr and spa typing, and virulence genes profiling. PFGE analysis revealed the predominance (89%, 26/29) of pulsotype A and three additional pulsotypes, designated H1, I33, and G1. Pulsotype A (ST5-SCCmecI-spa-t149) is clonally related to the Cordobes/Chilean clone. Pulsotype H1 (ST5-SCCmecIVNT-spa-t002) is genetically related to the Pediatric clone (ST5-SCCmecIV). Pulsotype I33 (ST5-SCCmecIVc-spa-t002) is clonally related by PFGE to the community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) clone spread in Argentina, I-ST5-IVa-PVL(+). The G1 pulsotype (ST8-SCCmecIVc-spa-t024) is clonally related to the epidemic USA300 CA-MRSA. Here, we demonstrate the stability of the Cordobes/Chilean clone over time as the major HA-MRSA clone in Southern Chile. The identification of two CA-MRSA clones might suggest that these clones have entered into the healthcare setting from the community. These results emphasize the importance of the local surveillance of MRSA infections in the community and hospital settings.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of noroviruses associated with sporadic gastroenteritis in children in Novosibirsk, Russia, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Zhirakovskaia, Elena V; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Bodnev, Sergey A; Klemesheva, Vera V; Netesov, Sergey V; Tikunova, Nina V

    2015-05-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are an important cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. To monitor the molecular epidemiology of NoVs genogroup II (GII) in Novosibirsk, Russia, a total of 10,198 stool samples from young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis and two asymptomatic comparison groups were collected from 2003 to 2012. All samples were screened for the presence of NoV GII, rotavirus, and astrovirus by RT-PCR. The prevalence of NoV in gastroenteritis cases was 13.1%, varying from 7.1% to 21.3% in different seasons. Rotavirus and/or astrovirus were detectable in 25% of the NoV-positive samples. NoV was detected throughout the year with a seasonal increase during winter months. Based on sequence analysis of regions D and/or C within the VP1 gene, 892 identified NoV strains were divided into nine genotypes—GII.3 (51%), GII.4 (44%), GII.6 (2%), as well as GII.1, GII.2, GII.5, GII.7, GII.16, and GII.21 (totally, 3%). The prevalence of NoV in the comparison groups was considerably lower (∼2.5%); only GII.4 (n = 6), GII.21 (n = 2) and GII.1 (n = 1) genotypes were revealed. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the ORF1/ORF2 junction region sequences, GII.P21/GII.3 recombinant and GII.P4/GII.4 were prevalent genotypes (totally, 93%) and their ratio changed every season. The median age of children with NoV infection was 6.6 months (range, <1-35 months), but it was different depending on NoV genotype. Children infected with the NoV GII.3 were younger (median 6.2 months) than GII.4-positive patients (median 9.1 months). This is the first long-term systematic study of NoV molecular epidemiology in Russia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Amoebiasis: A Cross-Sectional Study among North East Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Joyobrato; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Singha, Baby; Paul, Jaishree

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies carried out using culture or microscopy in most of the amoebiasis endemic developing countries, yielded confusing results since none of these could differentiate the pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica from the non-pathogenic Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii. The Northeastern part of India is a hot spot of infection since the climatic conditions are most conducive for the infection and so far no systemic study has been carried out in this region. Methodology/Principal Findings Following a cross-sectional study designed during the period 2011–2014, a total of 1260 fecal samples collected from the Northeast Indian population were subjected to microscopy, fecal culture and a sensitive and specific DNA dot blot screening assay developed in our laboratory targeting the Entamoeba spp. Further species discrimination using PCR assay performed in microscopy, culture and DNA dot blot screening positive samples showed E. histolytica an overall prevalence rate of 11.1%, 8.0% and 13.7% respectively. In addition, infection rates of nonpathogenic E. dispar and E. moshkovskii were 11.8% (95% CI = 10.2, 13.8) and 7.8% (95% CI = 6.4, 9.4) respectively. The spatial distributions of infection were 18.2% (107/588) of Assam, 11.7% (23/197) of Manipur, 10.2% (21/207) of Meghalaya, and 8.2% (22/268) of Tripura states. Association study of the disease with demographic features suggested poor living condition (OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.83, 5.63), previous history of infection in family member (OR = 3.18; 95% CI = 2.09, 4.82) and unhygienic toilet facility (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.28, 2.49) as significant risk factors for amoebiasis. Children in age group <15 yr, participants having lower levels of education, and daily laborers exhibited a higher infection rate. Conclusions/Significance Despite the importance of molecular diagnosis of amoebiasis, molecular epidemiological data based on a large sample size from endemic countries are rarely reported in the

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Amoebiasis: A Cross-Sectional Study among North East Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Nath, Joyobrato; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Singha, Baby; Paul, Jaishree

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological studies carried out using culture or microscopy in most of the amoebiasis endemic developing countries, yielded confusing results since none of these could differentiate the pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica from the non-pathogenic Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii. The Northeastern part of India is a hot spot of infection since the climatic conditions are most conducive for the infection and so far no systemic study has been carried out in this region. Following a cross-sectional study designed during the period 2011-2014, a total of 1260 fecal samples collected from the Northeast Indian population were subjected to microscopy, fecal culture and a sensitive and specific DNA dot blot screening assay developed in our laboratory targeting the Entamoeba spp. Further species discrimination using PCR assay performed in microscopy, culture and DNA dot blot screening positive samples showed E. histolytica an overall prevalence rate of 11.1%, 8.0% and 13.7% respectively. In addition, infection rates of nonpathogenic E. dispar and E. moshkovskii were 11.8% (95% CI = 10.2, 13.8) and 7.8% (95% CI = 6.4, 9.4) respectively. The spatial distributions of infection were 18.2% (107/588) of Assam, 11.7% (23/197) of Manipur, 10.2% (21/207) of Meghalaya, and 8.2% (22/268) of Tripura states. Association study of the disease with demographic features suggested poor living condition (OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.83, 5.63), previous history of infection in family member (OR = 3.18; 95% CI = 2.09, 4.82) and unhygienic toilet facility (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.28, 2.49) as significant risk factors for amoebiasis. Children in age group <15 yr, participants having lower levels of education, and daily laborers exhibited a higher infection rate. Despite the importance of molecular diagnosis of amoebiasis, molecular epidemiological data based on a large sample size from endemic countries are rarely reported in the literature. Improved and faster method of diagnosis employed here to

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium among Indigenous Children from the Colombian Amazon Basin

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Angie; Munoz, Marina; Gómez, Natalia; Tabares, Juan; Segura, Laura; Salazar, Ángela; Restrepo, Cristian; Ruíz, Miguel; Reyes, Patricia; Qian, Yuchen; Xiao, Lihua; López, Myriam C.; Ramírez, Juan D.

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of intestinal parasites in children is most likely due to lack of natural or acquired resistance and differences in behavior and habits closely related to environmental and socioeconomic determinants. The most important protozoa that parasitize humans are Giardia, Entamoeba, Blastocystis, and Cryptosporidium. These parasites present wide intraspecific genetic diversity and subsequently classified into assemblages and subtypes. The Amazon basin is the largest in the world and is the fifth freshwater reserve on the planet. Contradictorily, people living in these areas (Indigenous populations) have poor quality of life, which favors the infection of diseases of fecal-oral transmission. The aim of this work was to unravel the molecular epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium across four communities (Puerto Nariño, San Juan del Soco, Villa Andrea and Nuevo Paraíso). We obtained 284 fecal samples from children under 15 years old that were analyzed by direct microscopy (261 samples) and Real Time PCR (qPCR) (284 samples). The positive samples for these protozoa were further characterized by several molecular markers to depict assemblages and subtypes. We observed a frequency of Giardia infection by microscopy of 23.7% (62 samples) and by qPCR of 64.8% (184 samples); for Blastocystis by microscopy of 35.2% (92 samples) and by qPCR of 88.7% (252 samples) and for Cryptosporidium only 1.9% (5 samples) were positive by microscopy and qPCR 1.8% (5 samples). Regarding the Giardia assemblages, using the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) marker we observed AI, BIII and BIV assemblages and when using triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) we observed assemblages AI, AII, BIII and BIV. In contrast, Blastocystis STs detected were 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. Lastly, the species C. viatorum, C. hominis (with the subtypes IdA19 and IaA12R8) and C. parvum (with the subtype IIcA5G3c) were identified. We observed a high profile of zoonotic transmission

  13. Thermal conductivity of cross-linked polyethylene from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xue; Yang, Ming; Liu, Changlin; Li, Xiaobo; Tang, Dawei

    2017-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of cross-linked bulk polyethylene is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic structure of the cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) is generated through simulated bond formation using LAMMPS. The thermal conductivity of PEX is studied with different degrees of crosslinking, chain length, and tensile strain. Generally, the thermal conductivity increases with the increasing degree of crosslinking. When the length of the primitive chain increases, the thermal conductivity increases linearly. When the polymer is stretched along one direction, the thermal conductivity increases in the stretched direction and decreases in the direction perpendicular to it. However, the thermal conductivity varies slightly when the polymer is stretched in three directions simultaneously.

  14. Sixty years of follow-up of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors: current progress in molecular epidemiology studies.

    PubMed

    Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori; Hamatani, Kiyohiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the on-going molecular epidemiology studies among atomic-bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Japan. The focus is on: (a) inter-individual variations in sensitivity to radiation-induced somatic mutations (glycophorin A (GPA) mutations) and their potential relevance to differences in susceptibility to radiation-related cancers and (b) the role of specific mutations/rearrangements in radiation-induced thyroid and colorectal cancers. The glycophorin A mutant fractions showed large differences between the survivors at each of the estimated bone marrow doses. Of note is the finding at doses>or=1 Gy; that the slope of the mutant fraction was significantly higher in the 'cancer group' than in the 'non-cancer group'. This study provided the basis for validating the use of gammaH2AX and reticulocyte micronucleus assays for evaluating radiosensitivity differences and genetic instability, respectively, in our studies in the coming years. Preliminary results from our molecular oncology studies on adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer provide evidence for the induction of RET/PTC rearrangements and BRAF point mutation (both known to be early stage events in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer) but with a difference: cases associated with the rearrangements were more frequent at high doses, and developed sooner than those with BRAF mutation. In the case of colorectal cancer, the results suggest that radiation exposure might influence microsatellite instability (MSI) status through MSI-related epigenetic and genetic alterations-processes that might occur in the early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  15. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of environmental MRSA at an equine teaching hospital: introduction, circulation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    van Balen, Joany; Mowery, Jade; Piraino-Sandoval, Micha; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Kohn, Catherine; Hoet, Armando E

    2014-03-19

    The role that environmental contamination might play as a reservoir and a possible source of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for patients and personnel at equine veterinary hospitals remains undefined, as the environment has only been monitored during outbreaks or for short periods. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the monthly presence, distribution, and characteristics of environmental MRSA at an equine hospital, and to establish patterns of contamination over time using molecular epidemiological analyses. For this purpose, a yearlong active MRSA surveillance was performed targeting the environment and incoming patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, SCCmec typing, PFGE typing, and dendrographic analysis were used to characterize and analyze these isolates. Overall, 8.6% of the surfaces and 5.8% of the horses sampled were positive for MRSA. The most common contaminated surfaces were: computers, feed-water buckets, and surgery tables-mats. Ninety percent of the isolates carried SCCmec type IV, and 62.0% were classified as USA500. Molecular analysis showed that new pulsotypes were constantly introduced into the hospital throughout the year. However, maintenance of strains in the environment was also observed when unique clones were detected for 2 consecutive months on the same surfaces. Additionally, pulsotypes were circulating throughout several areas and different contact surfaces of the hospital. Based on these results, it is evident that MRSA is constantly introduced and frequently found in the equine hospital environment, and that some contact surfaces could act as "hot-spots". These contaminated surfaces should be actively targeted for strict cleaning and disinfection as well as regular monitoring.

  17. Burkholderia cenocepacia in cystic fibrosis: epidemiology and molecular mechanisms of virulence.

    PubMed

    Drevinek, P; Mahenthiralingam, E

    2010-07-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria have gained notoriety as pathogens in cystic fibrosis (CF) because they are difficult to identify and treat, and also have the ability to spread between CF individuals. Of the 17 formally named species within the complex, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia dominate in CF. Multilocus sequence typing has proven to be a very useful tool for tracing the global epidemiology of Bcc bacteria and has shown that B. cenocepacia strains with high transmissibility, such as the ET-12 strain (ST-28) and the Czech strain (ST-32), have spread epidemically within CF populations in Canada and Europe. The majority of research on the molecular pathogenesis of Bcc bacteria has focused on the B. cenocepacia ET-12 epidemic lineage, with gene mutation, genome sequence analysis and, most recently, global gene expression studies shedding considerable light on the virulence and antimicrobial resistance of this pathogen. These studies demonstrate that the ability of B. cenocepacia to acquire foreign DNA (genomic islands, insertion sequences and other mobile elements), regulate gene expression via quorum sensing, compete for iron during infection, and mediate antimicrobial resistance and inflammation via its membrane and surface polysaccharides are key features that underpin the virulence of different strains. With the wealth of molecular knowledge acquired in the last decade on B. cenocepacia strains, we are now in a much better position to develop strategies for the treatment of pathogenic colonization with Bcc and to answer key questions on pathogenesis concerning, for example, the factors that trigger the rapid clinical decline in CF patients.

  18. Molecular epidemiology and pathology of spirorchiid infection in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Chapman, Phoebe A; Owen, Helen; Flint, Mark; Soares Magalhães, Ricardo J; Traub, Rebecca J; Cribb, Thomas H; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat T; Mills, Paul C

    2017-04-01

    Spirorchiid blood fluke infections affect endangered turtle populations globally, and are reported as a common cause of mortality in Queensland green sea turtles. Both the flukes and their ova are pathogenic and can contribute to the stranding or death of their host. Of particular interest are ova-associated brain lesions, which have been associated with host neurological deficits. Accurate estimations of disease frequency and the relative effect of infection relating to different spirorchiid species are made difficult by challenges in morphological identification of adults of some genera, and a lack of species-level identifying features for ova. A new specifically designed molecular assay was used to detect and identify cryptic spirorchiids and their ova in Queensland green sea turtle tissues collected from 2011 to 2014 in order to investigate epidemiology, tissue tropisms and pathology. Eight spirorchiid genotypes were detected in 14 distinct tissues, including multiple tissues for each. We found no evidence of a characteristic pathway of the eggs to the exterior; instead the results suggest that a high proportion of eggs become lost in dead-end tissues. The most common lesions observed were granulomas affecting most organs with varying severity, followed by arteritis and thrombi in the great vessels. The number of spirorchiid types detected increased with the presence and severity of granulomatous lesions. However, compared with other organs the brain showed relatively low levels of spirorchiid diversity. An inverse relationship between host age and spirorchiid diversity was evident for the liver and kidneys, but no such relationship was evident for other organs. Molecular data in this study, the first of its kind, provides the first species-level examination of spirorchiid ova and associated pathology, and paves the way for the future development of targeted ante-mortem diagnosis of spirorchiidiasis.

  19. Molecular Typing of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato: Taxonomic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiqing; van Dam, Alje P.; Schwartz, Ira; Dankert, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the spirochete that causes human Lyme borreliosis (LB), is a genetically and phenotypically divergent species. In the past several years, various molecular approaches have been developed and used to determine the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity within the LB-related spirochetes and their potential association with distinct clinical syndromes. These methods include serotyping, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, rRNA gene restriction analysis (ribotyping), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, plasmid fingerprinting, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analysis, species-specific PCR and PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and other conserved genes. On the basis of DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, 10 different Borrelia species have been described within the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex: B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia japonica, Borrelia andersonii, Borrelia valaisiana, Borrelia lusitaniae, Borrelia tanukii, Borrelia turdi, and Borrelia bissettii sp. nov. To date, only B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii are well known to be responsible for causing human disease. Different Borrelia species have been associated with distinct clinical manifestations of LB. In addition, Borrelia species are differentially distributed worldwide and may be maintained through different transmission cycles in nature. In this paper, the molecular methods used for typing of B. burgdorferi sensu lato are reviewed. The current taxonomic status of B. burgdorferi sensu lato and its epidemiological and clinical implications, especiallly correlation between the variable clinical presentations and the infecting Borrelia species, are discussed in detail. PMID:10515907

  20. Molecular epidemiology of environmental MRSA at an equine teaching hospital: introduction, circulation and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The role that environmental contamination might play as a reservoir and a possible source of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) for patients and personnel at equine veterinary hospitals remains undefined, as the environment has only been monitored during outbreaks or for short periods. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the monthly presence, distribution, and characteristics of environmental MRSA at an equine hospital, and to establish patterns of contamination over time using molecular epidemiological analyses. For this purpose, a yearlong active MRSA surveillance was performed targeting the environment and incoming patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, SCCmec typing, PFGE typing, and dendrographic analysis were used to characterize and analyze these isolates. Overall, 8.6% of the surfaces and 5.8% of the horses sampled were positive for MRSA. The most common contaminated surfaces were: computers, feed-water buckets, and surgery tables-mats. Ninety percent of the isolates carried SCCmec type IV, and 62.0% were classified as USA500. Molecular analysis showed that new pulsotypes were constantly introduced into the hospital throughout the year. However, maintenance of strains in the environment was also observed when unique clones were detected for 2 consecutive months on the same surfaces. Additionally, pulsotypes were circulating throughout several areas and different contact surfaces of the hospital. Based on these results, it is evident that MRSA is constantly introduced and frequently found in the equine hospital environment, and that some contact surfaces could act as “hot-spots”. These contaminated surfaces should be actively targeted for strict cleaning and disinfection as well as regular monitoring. PMID:24641543

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Baja California, Mexico: A result of human migration?

    PubMed

    Flores-López, Carlos A; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael; Reynaud, Yann; García-Ortiz, Rosa Alejandra; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Rivera, Sandra; Vázquez-Chacón, Carlos A; Vaughan, Gilberto; Martínez-Guarneros, José Armando; Victoria-Cota, Nelva Lorena; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Rastogi, Nalin; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel

    2016-07-11

    The State of Baja California (BC) exhibits the highest incidence and prevalence rates of tuberculosis (TB), and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in Mexico. However information about the circulation of M. tuberculosis lineages in BC and Mexico as a whole is limited. Here, we describe the genetic relationship and genetic diversity among M. tuberculosis clinical isolates (n=140) collected in BC between October 2009 and April 2011 with other regions of Mexico, the United States, and Latin America. All specimens were genotyped based on 24 mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU)-variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) loci. Population structure and minimum spanning tree (MST) analyses were used to assess the genetic diversity and distribution of BC isolates in comparison to USA and South America strains. Among the nine lineages observed, LAM, Haarlem and S were the most frequent identified in BC. Population structure analysis clustered most BC isolates (41%) into three distinctive groups that included strains from San Diego and South America, whereas other BC strains (22%) clustered with other Mexican strains. A subset of isolates (12%) seemed to be autochthonous of BC, while 25% were cosmopolitan and grouped into multiple clusters. It is highly likely that the TB genetic structure observed in BC is due to human migration. Additional studies are required to determine the mechanism involved in the phylogeographic distribution of M. tuberculosis in Mexico. Implementation of domestic molecular TB surveillance programs is required to better understand the molecular epidemiology of TB not only in the region but at the national level.

  2. Spatial and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia intestinalis Deep in the Amazon, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coronato Nunes, Beatriz; Pavan, Márcio G.; Jaeger, Lauren H.; Monteiro, Kerla J. L.; Xavier, Samanta C. C.; Monteiro, Fernando A.; Bóia, Márcio N.; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current control policies for intestinal parasitosis focuses on soil-transmitted helminths, being ineffective against Giardia intestinalis, a highly prevalent protozoon that impacts children’s nutritional status in developing countries. The objective of this study was to explore spatial and molecular epidemiology of Giardia intestinalis in children of Amerindian descent in the Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross sectional survey was performed in the Brazilian Amazon with 433 children aged 1 to 14 years. Fecal samples were processed through parasitological techniques and molecular characterization. Prevalence of G. intestinalis infection was 16.9% (73/433), reaching 22.2% (35/158) among children aged 2–5 years, and a wide distribution throughout the city with some hot spots. Positivity-rate was similar among children living in distinct socioeconomic strata (48/280 [17.1%] and 19/116 [16.4%] below and above the poverty line, respectively). Sequencing of the β-giardin gene revealed 52.2% (n = 12) of assemblage A and 47.8% (n = 11) of assemblage B with high haplotype diversity for the latter. The isolates clustered into two well-supported G. intestinalis clades. A total of 38 haplotypes were obtained, with the following subassemblages distribution: 5.3% (n = 2) AII, 26.3% (n = 10) AIII, 7.9% (n = 3) BIII, and 60.5% (n = 23) new B genotypes not previously described. Conclusions/Significance Giardia intestinalis infection presents a high prevalence rate among Amerindian descended children living in Santa Isabel do Rio Negro/Amazon. The wide distribution observed in a small city suggests the presence of multiple sources of infection, which could be related to environmental contamination with feces, possibly of human and animal origin, highlighting the need of improving sanitation, safe water supply and access to diagnosis and adequate treatment of infections. PMID:27392098

  3. Molecular epidemiology of cryptococcal genotype VNIc/ST5 in Siriraj Hospital, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chongtrakool, Piriyaporn; Suwannakarn, Kamol; Kiratisin, Pattarachai

    2017-01-01

    Despite the strong association between Cryptococcus neoformans infection and the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status of patients globally, most cryptococcosis cases in Far East Asia occur in non-HIV individuals. Molecular epidemiological studies, using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), have shown that more than 95% of cryptococcal strains belong to a specific subtype of VNI. However, this association has never been specifically examined in other parts of Asia. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the VNIc/ST5 genotype distribution among cryptococcosis patients in Thailand. Fifty-one C. neoformans isolates were collected from clinical samples in Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. The strains were predominantly isolated from HIV-positive patients (88.57%) and all were molecular type VNI MATα. An MLST analysis identified five sequence types (ST) in Siriraj Hospital, of which ST4 (45.10%) and ST6 (35.29%) were most common, and ST5 (15.69%), ST32 (1.96%), and ST93 (1.96) were less common. Contrary to reports from Far East Asia, ST5 was predominantly (83.33%) found in HIV patients (P = 0.657), and there was no significant change in the prevalence of ST5 over the past 10 years (P = 0.548). A further analysis of comorbidities showed higher morbidity and delays in the cryptococcal diagnosis in patients with tuberculosis coinfection or without HIV. Our study suggests that although the Thai population is genetically closely related to the Far East Asian population, ST5 is not associated with non-HIV status in Thailand. Therefore, this association may not be related to the host’s genetic background. However, its mechanism remains unclear. PMID:28323835

  4. Molecular Epidemiological Study of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the Focus of Bushehr City, Southwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi-Ershadi, Mohammad Reza; Shahbazi, Farideh; Darvishi, Mohammad; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Jafari, Reza; Khajeian, Mohammad; Rassi, Yavar; Soleimani, Hassan; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Darabi, Hossein; Arandian, Mohammad Hossein; Sanei-Dehkordi, Alireza; Heidari, Mansour

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) represents the most frequent vector borne parasitoses in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiological features of CL including human infection and the reservoir host in the city of Bushehr, Bushehr Province, Iran during 2010–2011. Methods: Studies on human infection was carried out on 2962 school children aged 7–14 years old from 60 primary schools and among 400 households with a total population of 1568 in four infected districts of the city in December 2010. Serosity materials from patients on glass slides were collected for molecular identification of causative agent. Rodents were caught by Sherman traps and examined for identification of the parasite. Results: Prevalence of scars and ulcers among the inhabitants were 5.86% and 0.12% respectively. Molecular study indicated the presence of two coexisting species: Leishmania major and L. tropica among patients. The scar rate was 1.24% but no ulcers were seen among the students. Nineteen rodents were caught and identified as Tatera indica (47.4%) and Rattus norvegicus (52.6%). Specimens from 7 T. indica and 9 R. norvegicus were examined by two techniques, microscopic examination and nested-PCR. Out of 7 T. indica, 14.3% were infected with L. major and 42.9% with L. turanica by nested-PCR. Out of 9 R. norvegicus 22.2% were infected with L. turanica and 11.1% with L. gerbilli. Conclusion: Based on this survey L. major and L. tropica are the causative agents of the disease among patients and T. indica plays a predominant role in the dissemination of L. major in the city. PMID:24409436

  5. Phenotypic Characters and Molecular Epidemiology of Campylobacter Jejuni in East China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dexin; Zhang, Xiaoping; Xue, Feng; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Luyan; Jiang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution, phenotypic and molecular typing characters of Campylobacter jejuni in domestic fowl, and livestock populations in East China, to provide some reference for researches on its molecular epidemiology. A total of 1250 samples were collected from different animal sources, and C. jejuni strains were then isolated and tested for antibiotic sensitivity. Antibiotics-resistance gene and pathogenic genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenic analysis on the C. jejuni strains was performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 108 out of the 1250 samples (mean 8.64%) were C. jejuni positive. These 108 C. jejuni strains were highly sensitive to antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, amoxicillin, amikacin, cefotaxime, and azithromycin, whereas they were highly resistant to antibiotics such as cefoperazone, cotrimoxazole, cefamandole, sulfamethoxazole, and cefradine. Pathogenicity related gene identification indicated that the mean carrying rate of adhesion related gene cadF and racR, flagellin gene flaA, toxin regulating gene cdtA, cdtB, cdtC, wlaN and virB11, heat shock proteins and transferring proteins related genes dnaJ and ceuE, CiaB and pldA were 92.45%, 38.69%, 73.58%, 71.70%, 52.83%, 96.23%, 12.26%, 1.89%, 0.94%, 65.09%, 39.62% and 9.43%, respectively. A total of 58.82% of these strains contained more than 6 pathogenicity-related genes. MLST typed 58 ST types from the 108 isolated C. jejuni strains, including 24 new types, and ST-21 was the major type, accounting for 39.3% of the total strains. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Molecular epidemiology of human calicivirus gastroenteritis outbreaks in Hungary, 1998 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Gábor; Farkas, Tibor; Berke, Tamás; Jiang, Xi; Matson, David O; Szücs, György

    2002-11-01

    Between November 1998 and November 2000, 196 stool specimens from 21 outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis occurring in 11 of the 19 counties of Hungary were collected and tested for human caliciviruses. Human caliciviruses were detected and characterized by a type-common enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by cloning and sequencing. Twenty (95%) and 14 (67%) outbreaks were positive by EIA and RT-PCR, respectively, and 12 RT-PCR-positive outbreaks were also confirmed by sequencing. Comparative sequence analysis revealed 13 Norwalk-like virus sequences in the 12 outbreaks, including 11 Norwalk-like virus genogroup II (seven in Hawaii-like, two Lordsdale-like, one Melksham-like, and one Hillingdon-like) and two Norwalk-like virus genogroup I (related to Southampton-like and Desert Shield-like clusters) viruses. Multiple Norwalk-like virus clusters, with a predominance of Hawaii-like viruses, played an important role in nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks during the study period. This is the first country-wide molecular epidemiological investigation of human calicivirus-associated, gastroenteritis outbreaks in Hungary and Central-Eastern Europe.

  7. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus type-1 and 2 isolated in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Muhd Hasyim; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Hussin, Salasawati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Detection of different serotypes of dengue virus and provide information on origin, distribution and genotype of the virus. Methods: Dengue virus serotypes identified as DEN-1 and DEN-2 were amplified and sequenced with E gene. The consensus sequences were aligned with references E gene sequences of globally available GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-joining and Kimura 2-parameter model to construct phylogenetic tree. Results: A total of 53 dengue virus isolates were positive, of which 38 (71.7%) were DENV-1 and 15 (28.3%) were DENV-2. Phylogenetic tree of DENV-1 and DENV-2 showed that the isolates were clustered in genotype I and cosmopolitan genotype, respectively considered the predominant genotypes in Southeast Asian countries. The molecular epidemiology genotype I DENV-1 and cosmopolitan genotype DENV-2 have been co-circulating in Klang Valley areas, Malaysia without shifting of genotype. Conclusion: The study reveals that DENV-1 and DENV-2 have been circulating in Malaysia. The isolates are clustered in genotype 1 and cosmopolitian genotype, respectively. The study results would help in planning for prevention and control of dengue virus in Malaysia. PMID:26150855

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated in Shandong, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meijie; Liu, Lijuan; Ma, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Fusen; Zhao, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen prevalent in hospitals worldwide. In order to understand the molecular epidemiology of multi-drug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii, we investigated the genotypes of A. baumannii isolated from 10 hospitals in Shandong, China, from August 2013 to December 2013, by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antimicrobial resistance genes were analyzed by PCR and DNA sequencing. By PFGE analysis, we discovered 11 PFGE types in these 10 hospitals. By MLST, we assigned these isolates to 12 sequence types (STs), 10 of which belong to the cloning complex CC92, including the prevalent ST369, ST208, ST195, and ST368. Two new STs, namely ST794 and ST809, were detected only in one hospital. All isolates of the MDR A. baumannii were resistant to carbapenem, except 2 isolates, which did not express the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase gene, indicating blaOXA-23 is the major player for carbapenem resistance. We also discovered armA is likely to be responsible for amikacin resistance, and may play a role in gentamicin and tobramycin resistance. aac(3)-I is another gene responsible for gentamicin and tobramycin resistance. In summary, we discovered that the majority of the isolates in Shandong, China, were the STs belonging to the CC92. Besides, two new STs were detected in one hospital. These new STs should be further investigated for prevention of outbreaks caused by A. baumannii. PMID:27818659

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance and molecular epidemiological characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in 2009 in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Glazkova, Slavyana; Golparian, Daniel; Titov, Leonid; Pankratova, Nataliya; Suhabokava, Nataliya; Shimanskaya, Irina; Domeika, Marius; Unemo, Magnus

    2011-08-01

    Increased antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a global concern, and ultimately gonorrhoea may become untreatable. Nonetheless, AMR data from East-Europe are scarce beyond Russia, and no AMR data or other characteristics of gonococci have been reported from Belarus for more than 20 years. The aim was to describe the prevalence of AMR, and report molecular epidemiological characteristics of gonococci circulating in 2009 in Belarus. In a sample of 80 isolates, resistance prevalences to antimicrobials used for gonorrhoea treatment in Belarus were: Ceftriaxone 0%, spectinomycin 0%, azithromycin 17.3%, tetracycline 25.9%, ciprofloxacin 34.6% and erythromycin 59.2%. The isolates displayed no penA mosaic alleles, 38 porB gene sequences and 35 N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence types, of which 20 have not been described before worldwide. Due to the high levels of antimicrobial resistance, only ceftriaxone and spectinomycin can be recommended for empirical treatment of gonorrhoea in Belarus according to WHO recommendations. Continuous gonococcal AMR surveillance in Eastern Europe is crucial. This is now initiated in Belarus using WHO protocols.

  10. On the evolution and molecular epidemiology of the potyvirus Papaya ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Bateson, Marion F; Lines, Rosemarie E; Revill, Peter; Chaleeprom, Worawan; Ha, Cuong V; Gibbs, Adrian J; Dale, James L

    2002-10-01

    The potyvirus Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) is found throughout the tropics and subtropics. Its P biotype is a devastating pathogen of papaya crops and its W biotype of cucurbits. PRSV-P is thought to arise by mutation from PRSV-W. However, the relative impact of mutation and movement on the structure of PRSV populations is not well characterized. To investigate this, we have determined the coat protein sequences of isolates of both biotypes of PRSV from Vietnam (50), Thailand (13), India (1) and the Philippines (1), and analysed them together with 28 PRSV sequences already published, so that we can better understand the molecular epidemiology and evolution of PRSV. In Thailand, variation was greater among PRSV-W isolates (mean nucleotide divergence 7.6%) than PRSV-P isolates (mean 2.6%), but in Vietnamese populations the P and W biotypes were more but similarly diverse. Phylogenetic analyses of PRSV also involving its closest known relative, Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus, indicate that PRSV may have originated in Asia, particularly in the Indian subcontinent, as PRSV populations there are most diverse and hence have probably been present longest. Our analyses show that mutation, together with local and long-distance movement, contributes to population variation, and also confirms an earlier conclusion that populations of the PRSV-P biotype have evolved on several occasions from PRSV-W populations.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Imported Cases of Leishmaniasis in Australia from 2008 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Tamalee; Barratt, Joel; Sandaradura, Indy; Lee, Rogan; Harkness, John; Marriott, Deborah; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector borne disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. Human leishmaniasis is not endemic in Australia though imported cases are regularly encountered. This study aimed to provide an update on the molecular epidemiology of imported leishmaniasis in Australia. Of a total of 206 biopsies and bone marrow specimens submitted to St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney for leishmaniasis diagnosis by PCR, 55 were found to be positive for Leishmania DNA. All PCR products were subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for identification of the causative species. Five Leishmania species/species complexes were identified with Leishmania tropica being the most common (30/55). Travel or prior residence in a Leishmania endemic region was the most common route of acquisition with ~47% of patients having lived in or travelled to Afghanistan. Cutaneous leishmaniasis was the most common manifestation (94%) with only 3 cases of visceral leishmaniasis and no cases of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis encountered. This report indicates that imported leishmaniasis is becoming increasingly common in Australia due to an increase in global travel and immigration. As such, Australian clinicians must be made aware of this trend and consider leishmaniasis in patients with suspicious symptoms and a history of travel in endemic areas. This study also discusses the recent identification of a unique Leishmania species found in native kangaroos and a potential vector host which could create the opportunity for the establishment of a local transmission cycle within humans. PMID:25734905

  12. Molecular epidemiology of aminoglycosides resistance on Klebsiella pneumonia in a hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Caiqian; Xing, Bangrong; Yang, Xiaoyan; Fu, Yongmei; Feng, Yaqun; Zhang, Yongbiao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology of aminoglycosides resistance among Klebsiella pneumonia in hospitals in China, the antibiotics resistance and the possession of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) from 162 isolates were examined using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and PCR sequencing. Overall, 47.5% (77/162) of strains showed an ESBL phenotype. According to antibiotics resistance, ESBLs-positive K. pneumoniae showed significantly higher resistance to most antibiotics than ESBLs-negative strains (P<0.05). Moreover, 162 strains harboured aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes genes (AMEs) including aac (3)-II (n = 49), aac (6')-Ib (n = 32), ant (3")-I (n = 22) and ant (2")-I (n = 7). Overall, 11.1% (18/162) and 6.2% (10/162) of isolates carried 16S rRNA methylase genes (armA and rmtB), in which the aminoglycoside MIC was more than 256 μg/ml. In conclusion, our study characterised aminoglycosides resistance among K. pneumoniae strains in China hospitals and revealed antibiotic resistance and the increased presence of AMEs and 16S rRNA methylase genes in K. pneumonia, enabling the prevalence of aminoglycosides resistance of K. pneumoniae to be tracked from patients.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis isolates from free-ranging wildlife in South African game reserves.

    PubMed

    Michel, A L; Coetzee, M L; Keet, D F; Maré, L; Warren, R; Cooper, D; Bengis, R G; Kremer, K; van Helden, P

    2009-02-02

    Bovine tuberculosis is endemic in African buffalo and a number of other wildlife species in the Kruger National Park (KNP) and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP) in South Africa. It was thought that the infection had been introduced into the KNP ecosystem through direct contact between cattle and buffalo, a hypothesis which was confirmed in this study by IS6110 and PGRS restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. The molecular characterisation of 189 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from nine wildlife species in the HiP, including three smaller associated parks, and the Kruger National Park with adjacent areas showed that the respective epidemics were each caused by an infiltration of a single M. bovis genotype. The two M. bovis strains had different genetic profiles, as demonstrated by hybridisation with the IS6110 and PGRS RFLP probes, as well as with regard to evidence of evolutionary changes to the IS profile. While the M. bovis type in HiP was transmitted between buffaloes and to at least baboon, bushpig and lion without obvious genetic changes in the RFLP patterns, in the KNP a dominant strain was represented in 73% of the M. bovis isolates, whilst the remaining 27% were variants of this strain. No species-specific variants were observed, except for one IS6110 type which was found only in a group of five epidemiologically related greater kudu. This finding was attributed to species-specific behaviour patterns rather than an advanced host-pathogen interaction.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients from Southeast Austria.

    PubMed

    Masoud-Landgraf, Lilian; Badura, Alexandra; Eber, Ernst; Feierl, Gebhard; Posch, Josefa; Zarfel, Gernot; Zach, Maximilian; Marth, Egon

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogen in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, the predominant source of its acquisition, however, is under discussion. In order to study the molecular epidemiology, we evaluated 86 P. aeruginosa isolates from 43 CF patients from southeast Austria. The DiversiLab system was used to identify genetic relationships among the isolates. Antibiotic susceptibilities were tested with a broth microdilution method (Micronaut Merlin). A total of 39 unrelated P. aeruginosa genotypes were found of which 34 were unique to a single patient and one was unique to a sibling pair. We found low rates of resistance for β-lactams with resistance to piperacillin/tazobactam and ceftazidime ranging from 4 to 6%. Resistance rates for meropenem and ciprofloxacin were 11% and 15%, respectively. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant isolates was 2%. We conclude that the majority of P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients originate from environmental sources and patient-to-patient spread is very uncommon in our centre.

  15. Molecular epidemiologic analysis of a Pneumocystis pneumonia outbreak among renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Urabe, N; Ishii, Y; Hyodo, Y; Aoki, K; Yoshizawa, S; Saga, T; Murayama, S Y; Sakai, K; Homma, S; Tateda, K

    2016-04-01

    Between 18 November and 3 December 2011, five renal transplant patients at the Department of Nephrology, Toho University Omori Medical Centre, Tokyo, were diagnosed with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We used molecular epidemiologic methods to determine whether the patients were infected with the same strain of Pneumocystis jirovecii. DNA extracted from the residual bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the five outbreak cases and from another 20 cases of PCP between 2007 and 2014 were used for multilocus sequence typing to compare the genetic similarity of the P. jirovecii. DNA base sequencing by the Sanger method showed some regions where two bases overlapped and could not be defined. A next-generation sequencer was used to analyse the types and ratios of these overlapping bases. DNA base sequences of P. jirovecii in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from four of the five PCP patients in the 2011 outbreak and from another two renal transplant patients who developed PCP in 2013 were highly homologous. The Sanger method revealed 14 genomic regions where two differing DNA bases overlapped and could not be identified. Analyses of the overlapping bases by a next-generation sequencer revealed that the differing types of base were present in almost identical ratios. There is a strong possibility that the PCP outbreak at the Toho University Omori Medical Centre was caused by the same strain of P. jirovecii. Two different types of base present in some regions may be due to P. jirovecii's being a diploid species.

  16. Recent advances and perspectives in molecular epidemiology of Taenia solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Cysticercosis caused by accidental ingestion of eggs of Taenia solium is spreading all over the world through globalization and is one of the most neglected, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) or neglected zoonotic diseases (NZDs). In the present study, the reason why T. solium cysticercosis has been neglected is discussed at first, and followed with an overview on the most recent advances and perspectives in molecular approaches for epidemiology of T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis, since although taeniasis does not constitute recognized zoonoses, transmission and complete development are dependent on human definitive hosts. Main topics are discussions on (1) the two, Asian and Afro/American, genotypes of T. solium, (2) comparative analysis of mitochondrial (haploid) and nuclear (diploid) genes, and (3) the presence of hybrids of these two genotypes which indicates out-crossing of two genotypes in hermaphrodite tapeworms in Madagascar. Additional topics are on (4) the usefulness of phylogeographic analyses to discuss where the infection was acquired from, and (5) miscellaneous unsolved topics around these genetic diversity of T. solium.

  17. Norovirus infections in young children in Lusaka Province, Zambia: clinical characteristics and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Howard, Leigh M; Mwape, Innocent; Siwingwa, Mpanji; Simuyandi, Michelo; Guffey, M Brad; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Chi, Benjamin H; Edwards, Kathryn M; Chilengi, Roma

    2017-01-23

    The burden, clinical features, and molecular epidemiology of norovirus infection in young children in southern Africa are not well defined. Using data from a health facility-based surveillance study of children <5 years in Lusaka Province, Zambia presenting with diarrhea, we assessed the burden of norovirus infection. A convenience sample of 454 stool specimens was tested for norovirus using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RT-PCR positive samples underwent additional nucleotide sequencing for genogroup and genotype identification. Clinical features and severity of diarrheal illnesses were compared between norovirus-positive and -negative subjects using Chi-squared and t-tests. Norovirus was detected in 52/454 (11.5%) specimens tested. Abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting were the most common presenting features in norovirus-associated illnesses. However, there were no significant differences in the clinical features of norovirus-positive compared to norovirus-negative illnesses. Of 43 isolates that were available for sequencing, 31 (72.1%) were genogroup II (GII) and 12 (27.9%) were genogroup I (GI). The distribution of genotypes was diverse. Noroviruses were detected in approximately 10% of young children with diarrhea in the Lusaka Province of Zambia, with GII representing the majority of infections. These findings support the role of norovirus in symptomatic diarrhea disease in Africa. Further studies are needed to confirm these observations and to evaluate prevention strategies.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus from patients with acute gastroenteritis in northwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Manso, C F; Romalde, J L

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of norovirus (NoV) infections seems to be related to the emergence of new variants that evolved by genetic drift of the capsid gene. In this work, that represents a first effort to describe the molecular epidemiology of NoV in the northwest of Spain, a total of eight different NoV genotypes (GII.1, GII.3, GII.4, GII.6, GII.7, GII.12, GII.13, GII.14) were detected. The major genotypes observed were GII.4 (45·42%) and GII.14 (34·9%), being detected in all age groups. In addition, and although most of GII.4 sequences belonged to 2006b (7·2%) and 2010 (50·35%) variants, the presence of new NoV variants was observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that a high number of GII.4 sequences (35·24%) could be assigned to the newly emerging Sydney 2012 variant, even during late 2010. The high prevalence of NoV GII.14 observed in this study may indicate the emergence of this genotype in Spain.

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Viruses Co-circulating in Upper Myanmar in 2006

    PubMed Central

    Thant, Kyaw Zin; Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Parquet, Maria del Carmen; Inoue, Shingo; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Khin, Pe Thet; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of circulating dengue viruses (DENV) in Upper Myanmar, DENV isolation was attempted by inoculating the sera of a panel of 110 serum samples onto a C6/36 mosquito cell line. The samples were collected from dengue (DEN) patients admitted at Mandalay Children’s Hospital in 2006. Infected culture fluids were subjected to a RT-PCR to detect the DENV genome. Three DENV strains were isolated. This was the first DENV isolation performed either in Mandalay or in Upper Myanmar. One strain belonged to DENV serotype-3 (DENV-3), and two other strains belonged to DENV serotype-4 (DEN-4). The sequence data for the envelope gene of these strains were used in a phylogenetic comparison of DENV-3 and DENV-4 from various countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this DENV-3 strain was clustered within genotype II, and the two DENV-4 strains were clustered within genotype I in each serotype. The Myanmar strains were closely related to strains from the neighboring countries of Thailand and Bangladesh. These results are important for elucidating the trends of recent and future DEN outbreaks in Myanmar. PMID:25859150

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Viruses Co-circulating in Upper Myanmar in 2006.

    PubMed

    Thant, Kyaw Zin; Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Parquet, Maria Del Carmen; Inoue, Shingo; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Khin, Pe Thet; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-03-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of circulating dengue viruses (DENV) in Upper Myanmar, DENV isolation was attempted by inoculating the sera of a panel of 110 serum samples onto a C6/36 mosquito cell line. The samples were collected from dengue (DEN) patients admitted at Mandalay Children's Hospital in 2006. Infected culture fluids were subjected to a RT-PCR to detect the DENV genome. Three DENV strains were isolated. This was the first DENV isolation performed either in Mandalay or in Upper Myanmar. One strain belonged to DENV serotype-3 (DENV-3), and two other strains belonged to DENV serotype-4 (DEN-4). The sequence data for the envelope gene of these strains were used in a phylogenetic comparison of DENV-3 and DENV-4 from various countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this DENV-3 strain was clustered within genotype II, and the two DENV-4 strains were clustered within genotype I in each serotype. The Myanmar strains were closely related to strains from the neighboring countries of Thailand and Bangladesh. These results are important for elucidating the trends of recent and future DEN outbreaks in Myanmar.

  1. Population-Based Molecular Epidemiology of Leprosy in Cebu, Philippines ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Kimura, Miyako; Li, Wei; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Hyeyoung; Kiran, Madanahally D.; Black, William C.; Balagon, Marivic; Gelber, Robert; Cho, Sang-Nae; Brennan, Patrick J.; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2009-01-01

    To address the persisting problem of leprosy in Cebu, Philippines, we compiled a database of more than 200 patients who attend an established referral skin clinic. We described the patient characteristics in conventional demographic parameters and also applied multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing for Mycobacterium leprae in biopsied skin lesion samples. These combined approaches revealed that transmission is ongoing, with the affected including the young Cebuano population under 40 years of age in both crowded cities and rural areas of the island. The emergence of multicase families (MCF) is indicative of infection unconstrained by standard care measures. For the SNPs, we designed a low-cost PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism typing method. MLVA in M. leprae was highly discriminatory in this population yet could retain broad groups, as defined by the more stable SNPs, implying temporal marker stability suitable for interpreting population structures and evolution. The majority of isolates belong to an Asian lineage (SNP type 1), and the rest belong to a putative postcolonial lineage (SNP type 3). Specific alleles at two VNTR loci, (GGT)5 and 21-3, were highly associated with SNP type 3 in this population. MLVA identified M. leprae genotype associations for patients with known epidemiological links such as in MCFs and in some villages. These methods provide a molecular database and a rational framework for targeted approaches to search and confirm leprosy transmission in various scenarios. PMID:19571027

  2. Molecular epidemiology of GI and GII noroviruses in sewage: 1-year surveillance in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N; Lin, X; Wang, S; Tao, Z; Xiong, P; Wang, H; Liu, Y; Song, Y; Xu,