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Sample records for conducting molecular epidemiological

  1. [Molecular and genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Kang, D H

    2001-04-21

    Molecular epidemiology is defined as "the use of biological markers in epidemiologic research" and genetic epidemiology is defined as "the study of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in epidemiologic research". Traditional epidemiologic approaches defined as "the study of the distribution and determinants of disease frequency in human population" could not address the importance of genetic susceptibility of humans in disease occurrence. However, the use of biological or genetic markers identified and characterized by the help of advance in molecular biology and human genetics now can provide us better understanding of multi-factorial or multistep disease occurrence in humans. Biological markers used in molecular epidemiology are classified into three groups: biomarkers of exposure (i.e., carcinogen metabolites in human urine, DNA-adducts, etc.), biomarkers of effects (i.e., oncoproteins, tumor markers, etc.), and biomarkers of susceptibility (i.e., genetic polymorphisms of carcinogen metabolism enzymes, DNA repair, etc.). Susceptibility genes involved in disease pathogenesis are categorized into two groups: high penetrance genes (i.e., BRAC1, RB, etc.) and low penetrance genes (i.e., GSTs, XRCC1, etc.). This paper will address the usefulnesses of bomarkers in edpidemiologic research and will show the examples of the use of selected low penetrance genes involved in human carcinogenesis. The importance of multidisciplinary approaches among epidemiologists, molecular biologists, and human geneticists will also be discussed.

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Conway, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Malaria persists as an undiminished global problem, but the resources available to address it have increased. Many tools for understanding its biology and epidemiology are well developed, with a particular richness of comparative genome sequences. Targeted genetic manipulation is now effectively combined with in vitro culture assays on the most important human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, and with in vivo analysis of rodent and monkey malaria parasites in their laboratory hosts. Studies of the epidemiology, prevention, and treatment of human malaria have already been influenced by the availability of molecular methods, and analyses of parasite polymorphisms have long had useful and highly informative applications. However, the molecular epidemiology of malaria is currently undergoing its most substantial revolution as a result of the genomic information and technologies that are available in well-resourced centers. It is a challenge for research agendas to face the real needs presented by a disease that largely exists in extremely resource-poor settings, but it is one that there appears to be an increased willingness to undertake. To this end, developments in the molecular epidemiology of malaria are reviewed here, emphasizing aspects that may be current and future priorities. PMID:17223628

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of Foodborne Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi; Brown, Eric; Knabel, Stephen J.

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the basic principles and advancements in the molecular epidemiology of foodborne pathogens. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of infectious diseases and/or the dynamics of disease transmission. The goals of epidemiology include the identification of physical sources, routes of transmission of infectious agents, and distribution and relationships of different subgroups. Molecular epidemiology is the study of epidemiology at the molecular level. It has been defined as "a science that focuses on the contribution of potential genetic and environmental risk factors, identified at the molecular level, to the etiology, distribution and prevention of diseases within families and across populations".

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Amebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Clark, C. Graham; Petri, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of human amebiasis, remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and is responsible for up to 100,000 deaths worldwide each year. Entamoeba dispar, morphologically indistinguishable from E. histolytica, is more common in humans in many parts of the world. Similarly Entamoeba moshkovskii, which was long considered to be a free-living ameba, is also morphologically identical to E. histolytica and E. dispar, and is highly prevalent in some E. histolytica endemic countries. However, the only species to cause disease in humans is E. histolytica. Most old epidemiological data on E. histolytica are unusable as the techniques employed do not differentiate between the above three Entamoeba species. Molecular tools are now available not only to diagnose these species accurately but also to study intra-species genetic diversity. Recent studies suggest that only a minority of all E. histolytica infections progress to development of clinical symptoms in the host and there exist population level differences between the E. histolytica strains isolated from the asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals. Nevertheless the underlying factors responsible for variable clinical outcome of infection by E. histolytica remain largely unknown. We anticipate that the recently completed E. histolytica genome sequence and new molecular techniques will rapidly advance our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenicity of amebiasis. PMID:18571478

  5. [Molecular epidemiology in the epidemiological transition].

    PubMed

    Tapia-Conyer, R

    1997-01-01

    The epidemiological transition describes the changes in the health profile of populations where infectious diseases are substituted by chronic or non-communicable diseases. Even in industrialized countries, infectious diseases emerge as important public health problems and with a very important association with several type of neoplasm. Molecular epidemiology brings in new tools for the study of the epidemiological transition by discovering infectious agents as etiology of diseases, neither of both new. Much has been advanced in the understanding of the virulence and resistance mechanism of different strains, or improving the knowledge on transmission dynamics and dissemination pathways of infectious diseases. As to the non-communicable diseases, molecular epidemiology has enhanced the identification of endogenous risk factors link to alterations, molecular changes in genetic material, that will allow a more detail definition of risk and the identification of individual and groups at risk of several diseases. The potential impact of molecular epidemiology in other areas as environmental, lifestyles and nutritional areas are illustrated with several examples. PMID:9504120

  6. [Opportunity and challenge on molecular epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Duan, G C; Chen, S Y

    2016-08-10

    Molecular epidemiology, a branch of epidemiology, combines the theories and methods, both in epidemiology and molecular biology. Molecular epidemiology mainly focuses on biological markers, describing the distribution, occurrence, development and prognosis of diseases at the molecular level. The completion of Human Genome Project and rapid development of Precision Medicine and Big Data not only offer the new development opportunities but also bring about a higher demand and new challenge for molecular epidemiology. PMID:27539332

  7. Molecular epidemiology of glanders, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hornstra, Heidie; Pearson, Talima; Georgia, Shalamar; Liguori, Andrew; Dale, Julia; Price, Erin; O'Neill, Matthew; Deshazer, David; Muhammad, Ghulam; Saqib, Muhammad; Naureen, Abeera; Keim, Paul

    2009-12-01

    We collected epidemiologic and molecular data from Burkholderia mallei isolates from equines in Punjab, Pakistan from 1999 through 2007. We show that recent outbreaks are genetically distinct from available whole genome sequences and that these genotypes are persistent and ubiquitous in Punjab, probably due to human-mediated movement of equines.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    McManus, D P; Thompson, R C A

    2003-01-01

    Echinococcus granulosus exhibits substantial genetic diversity that has important implications for the design and development of vaccines, diagnostic reagents and drugs effective against this parasite. DNA approaches that have been used for accurate identification of these genetic variants are presented here as is a description of their application in molecular epidemiological surveys of cystic echinococcosis in different geographical settings and host assemblages. The recent publication of the complete sequences of the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the horse and sheep strains of E. granulosus and of E. multilocularis, and the availability of mt DNA sequences for a number of other E. granulosus genotypes, has provided additional genetic information that can be used for more in depth strain characterization and taxonomic studies of these parasites. This very rich sequence information has provided a solid molecular basis, along with a range of different biological, epidemiological, biochemical and other molecular-genetic criteria, for revising the taxonomy of the genus Echinococcus. This has been a controversial issue for some time. Furthermore, the accumulating genetic data may allow insight to several other unresolved questions such as confirming the occurrence and precise nature of the E. granulosus G9 genotype and its reservoir in Poland, whether it is present elsewhere, why the camel strain (G6 genotype) appears to affect humans in certain geographical areas but not others, more precise delineation of the host and geographic ranges of the genotypes characterised to date, and whether additional genotypes of E. granulosus remain to be identified. PMID:15042999

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis: Current Insights

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia E.; Bifani, Pablo J.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis (TB) have focused largely on utilizing molecular techniques to address short- and long-term epidemiologic questions, such as in outbreak investigations and in assessing the global dissemination of strains, respectively. This is done primarily by examining the extent of genetic diversity of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When molecular methods are used in conjunction with classical epidemiology, their utility for TB control has been realized. For instance, molecular epidemiologic studies have added much-needed accuracy and precision in describing transmission dynamics, and they have facilitated investigation of previously unresolved issues, such as estimates of recent-versus-reactive disease and the extent of exogenous reinfection. In addition, there is mounting evidence to suggest that specific strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to discrete phylogenetic clusters (lineages) may differ in virulence, pathogenesis, and epidemiologic characteristics, all of which may significantly impact TB control and vaccine development strategies. Here, we review the current methods, concepts, and applications of molecular approaches used to better understand the epidemiology of TB. PMID:17041139

  10. Epidemiology, Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento-Silva, Rosa Elena; Nakamura-Lopez, Yuko; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    The bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an enveloped, negative sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the pneumovirus genus within the family Paramyxoviridae. BRSV has been recognized as a major cause of respiratory disease in young calves since the early 1970s. The analysis of BRSV infection was originally hampered by its characteristic lability and poor growth in vitro. However, the advent of numerous immunological and molecular methods has facilitated the study of BRSV enormously. The knowledge gained from these studies has also provided the opportunity to develop safe, stable, attenuated virus vaccine candidates. Nonetheless, many aspects of the epidemiology, molecular epidemiology and evolution of the virus are still not fully understood. The natural course of infection is rather complex and further complicates diagnosis, treatment and the implementation of preventive measures aimed to control the disease. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms by which BRSV is able to establish infection is needed to prevent viral and disease spread. This review discusses important information regarding the epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of BRSV worldwide, and it highlights the importance of viral evolution in virus transmission. PMID:23202546

  11. [Future prospects of molecular epidemiology in tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomoshige; Iwamoto, Tomotada

    2009-12-01

    Before the availability of high-resolution genotyping tools in 1990s, there was a prevailing dogma of little genomic sequence diversity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Due to the low levels of genetic variation, it was assumed that M. tuberculosis exhibit very little phenotypic variation in immunologic and virulence factors. The fingerprinting method based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) of IS6110 insertion sequences had unveiled the underestimation of the sequence variation in M. tuberculosis and the importance of strain-to-strain variation for understanding pathogenesis, immune mechanisms, bacterial evolution, and host adaptation. This method became a gold standard for strain differentiation in the molecular epidemiological study. It had lead to a profusion of studies in molecular epidemiology such as the detection of unsuspected transmission, the estimation of the extent of recent transmission, the identification of laboratory cross-contamination, the identification of outbreaks, and distinction between reinfection and relapse. This, in 1990s, is the opening of the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. After the completion of genome project of the M. tuberculosis laboratory strain H37Rv, some of the clinical isolates were completely sequenced. This prompted the in silico genome comparison and identified various genomic markers which can give a unifying framework for both epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of M. tuberculosis population. Of them, variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) was found as the most promising PCR-based method which can provide adequate discrimination of M. tuberculosis strains in many cases, including the estimation of M. tuberculosis transmission and the identification of genetic lineages. PCR-based VNTR analysis is easy, rapid, and highly specific and can generate portable digit-based data, unlike the analog information obtained from IS6110 RFLP which is labor intensive. In this regards, investigators can

  12. Web tools for molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shabbeer, Amina; Ozcaglar, Cagri; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

    2012-06-01

    In this study we explore publicly available web tools designed to use molecular epidemiological data to extract information that can be employed for the effective tracking and control of tuberculosis (TB). The application of molecular methods for the epidemiology of TB complement traditional approaches used in public health. DNA fingerprinting methods are now routinely employed in TB surveillance programs and are primarily used to detect recent transmissions and in outbreak investigations. Here we present web tools that facilitate systematic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotype information and provide a view of the genetic diversity in the MTBC population. These tools help answer questions about the characteristics of MTBC strains, such as their pathogenicity, virulence, immunogenicity, transmissibility, drug-resistance profiles and host-pathogen associativity. They provide an integrated platform for researchers to use molecular epidemiological data to address current challenges in the understanding of TB dynamics and the characteristics of MTBC.

  13. Molecular markers in the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Martínez-Herrera, Erick; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of coccidioidomycosis in endemic areas has been observed to increase daily. To understand the causes of the spread of the disease and design strategies for fungal detection in clinical and environmental samples, scientists have resorted to molecular tools that allow fungal detection in a natural environment, reliable identification in clinical cases and the study of biological characteristics, such as reproductive and genetic structure, demographic history and diversification. We conducted a review of the most important molecular markers in the epidemiology of Coccidioides spp. and the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. A literature search was performed for scientific publications concerning the application of molecular tools for the epidemiology and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis. The use of molecular markers in the epidemiological study and diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis has allowed for the typing of Coccidioides spp. isolates, improved understanding of their mode of reproduction, genetic variation and speciation and resulted in the development specific, rapid and sensitive strategies for detecting the fungus in environmental and clinical samples. Molecular markers have revealed genetic variability in Coccidioides spp. This finding influences changes in the epidemiology of coccidioidomycosis, such as the emergence of more virulent or antifungal resistant genotypes. Furthermore, the molecular markers currently used to identify Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are specific and sensitive. However, they must be validated to determine their application in diagnosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  14. [From molecular to genomic and metagenomic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Zhebrun, A B

    2014-01-01

    The notion "molecular epidemiology" was introduced into scientific literature by Kilburn E. et al. in 1973. The first period of development of infectious diseases molecular epidemiology may be called "genotypic" (1980-1990s). During this period methodology of molecular marking of pathogens for purposes of monitoring of their spread and outbreak detection (novel nomenclature of diphtheria corynebacteria based on ribotyping; international network PulseNet for monitoring food source infections; international database of tuberculosis mycobacteria spoligotypes) was created. The second--"genomic" period started in the 2000s. Molecular epidemiology rapidly went through single markers (genotypes or single genes) to deciphering the whole genome of pathoge "mobileome", "resistome", "virulome" etc. took an important place in the studies of emerging and pandemic infections. Knowledge on genetic mechanisms leading to emergence and global dissemination of novel pathogens give molecular epidemiology its own scientific content and transforms it from a methodical approach to an independent field of epidemiology. The third--"metagenomic" period starts nowadays based on meta-genomic approach that allows to determine the whole set ofgenomes in the studied sample without the cultivation procedure. In the short-term this would lead to a change of a century-long paradigm of diagnostics and control of infections: instead of search of separate (key) pathogens--characteristics of the full specter of microorganisms in the material from patients and environmental samples with its identification up to any taxonomic depth. In the systems of regional and global epidemiologic control a universal monitoring of all known and re-emerging pathogens with construction and maintenance of metagenomic passports of human habitats will be realized. PMID:25286516

  15. [From molecular to genomic and metagenomic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Zhebrun, A B

    2014-01-01

    The notion "molecular epidemiology" was introduced into scientific literature by Kilburn E. et al. in 1973. The first period of development of infectious diseases molecular epidemiology may be called "genotypic" (1980-1990s). During this period methodology of molecular marking of pathogens for purposes of monitoring of their spread and outbreak detection (novel nomenclature of diphtheria corynebacteria based on ribotyping; international network PulseNet for monitoring food source infections; international database of tuberculosis mycobacteria spoligotypes) was created. The second--"genomic" period started in the 2000s. Molecular epidemiology rapidly went through single markers (genotypes or single genes) to deciphering the whole genome of pathoge "mobileome", "resistome", "virulome" etc. took an important place in the studies of emerging and pandemic infections. Knowledge on genetic mechanisms leading to emergence and global dissemination of novel pathogens give molecular epidemiology its own scientific content and transforms it from a methodical approach to an independent field of epidemiology. The third--"metagenomic" period starts nowadays based on meta-genomic approach that allows to determine the whole set ofgenomes in the studied sample without the cultivation procedure. In the short-term this would lead to a change of a century-long paradigm of diagnostics and control of infections: instead of search of separate (key) pathogens--characteristics of the full specter of microorganisms in the material from patients and environmental samples with its identification up to any taxonomic depth. In the systems of regional and global epidemiologic control a universal monitoring of all known and re-emerging pathogens with construction and maintenance of metagenomic passports of human habitats will be realized.

  16. Evolution, phylogeny, and molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Alexandra; Gomes, João P

    2014-04-01

    The Chlamydiaceae are a family of obligate intracellular bacteria characterized by a unique biphasic developmental cycle. It encompasses the single genus Chlamydia, which involves nine species that affect a wide range of vertebral hosts, causing infections with serious impact on human health (mainly due to Chlamydia trachomatis infections) and on farming and veterinary industries. It is believed that Chlamydiales originated ∼700mya, whereas C. trachomatis likely split from the other Chlamydiaceae during the last 6mya. This corresponds to the emergence of modern human lineages, with the first descriptions of chlamydial infections as ancient as four millennia. Chlamydiaceae have undergone a massive genome reduction, on behalf of the deletional bias "use it or lose it", stabilizing at 1-1.2Mb and keeping a striking genome synteny. Their phylogeny reveals species segregation according to biological properties, with huge differences in terms of host range, tissue tropism, and disease outcomes. Genome differences rely on the occurrence of mutations in the >700 orthologous genes, as well as on events of recombination, gene loss, inversion, and paralogous expansion, affecting both a hypervariable region named the plasticity zone, and genes essentially encoding polymorphic and transmembrane head membrane proteins, type III secretion effectors and some metabolic pathways. Procedures for molecular typing are still not consensual but have allowed the knowledge of molecular epidemiology patterns for some species as well as the identification of outbreaks and emergence of successful clones for C. trachomatis. This manuscript intends to provide a comprehensive review on the evolution, phylogeny, and molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia.

  17. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  18. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members. PMID:25973690

  19. Microarray technology for use in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Suzanne D; Whistler, Toni

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful laboratory tool for the simultaneous assessment of the activity of thousands genes. Remarkable advances in biological sample collection, preparation and automation of hybridization have enabled the application of microarray technology to large, population-based studies. Now, microarrays have the potential to serve as screening tools for the detection of altered gene expression activity that might contribute to diseases in human populations. Reproducible and reliable microarray results depend on multiple factors. In this chapter, biological sample parameters are introduced that should be considered for any microarray experiment. Then, the microarray technology that we have successfully applied to limited biological sample from all our molecular epidemiology studies is detailed. This reproducible and reliable approach for using microarrays should be applicable to any biological questions asked.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-02-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-02-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea. PMID:25441425

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Oropouche Virus, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Helena Baldez; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Casseb, Lívia M.N.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Pinto da Silva, Eliana V.; Silva, Mayra; Casseb, Samir M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV) is the causative agent of Oropouche fever, an urban febrile arboviral disease widespread in South America, with >30 epidemics reported in Brazil and other Latin American countries during 1960–2009. To describe the molecular epidemiology of OROV, we analyzed the entire N gene sequences (small RNA) of 66 strains and 35 partial Gn (medium RNA) and large RNA gene sequences. Distinct patterns of OROV strain clustered according to N, Gn, and large gene sequences, which suggests that each RNA segment had a different evolutionary history and that the classification in genotypes must consider the genetic information for all genetic segments. Finally, time-scale analysis based on the N gene showed that OROV emerged in Brazil ≈223 years ago and that genotype I (based on N gene data) was responsible for the emergence of all other genotypes and for virus dispersal. PMID:21529387

  3. Molecular epidemiology and evolution of fish Novirhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    The genus Novirhabdoviridae contains several of the important rhabdoviruses that infect fish hosts. There are four established virus species: Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), Hirame rhabdovirus(HIRRV), and Snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV). Viruses of these species vary in host and geographic range, and they have all been studied at the molecular and genomic level. As globally significant pathogens of cultured fish, IHNV and VHSV have been particularly well studied in terms of molecular epidemiology and evolution. Phylogenic analyses of hundreds of field isolates have defined five major genogroups of IHNV and four major genotypes of VHSV worldwide. These phylogenies are informed by the known histories of IHNV and VHSV, each involving a series of viral emergence events that are sometimes associated with host switches, most often into cultured rainbow trout. In general, IHNV has relatively low genetic diversity and a narrow host range, and has been spread from its endemic source in North American to Europe and Asia due to aquaculture activities. In contrast, VHSV has broad host range and high genetic diversity, and the source of emergence events is virus in widespread marine fish reservoirs in the northern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Common mechanisms of emergence and host switch events include use of raw feed, proximity to wild fish reservoirs of virus, and geographic translocations of virus or naive fish hosts associated with aquaculture.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of endemic Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, W. N.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    This is the first study to provide a comprehensive insight into the molecular epidemiology of endemic Clostridium difficile and particularly that associated with a recently recognized epidemic strain. We DNA fingerprinted all C. difficile isolates from the stools of patients with symptomatic antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and from repeated samples of the inanimate ward environment on two elderly medicine hospital wards over a 22-month period. Notably, C. difficile was not recoverable from either ward immediately before opening, but was found on both wards within 1-3 weeks of opening, and the level of environmental contamination rose markedly during the first 6 months of the study period. C. difficile infection (CDI) incidence data correlated significantly with the prevalence of environmental C. difficile on ward B (r = 0.76, P < 0.05) but not on ward A (r = 0.26, P > 0.05). We found that RAPD and RS-PCR typing had similar discriminatory power, although, despite fingerprinting over 200 C. difficile isolates, we identified only six distinct types. Only two distinct C. difficile strains were identified as causing both patient infection and ward contamination. Attempts to determine whether infected patients or contaminated environments are the prime source for cross-infection by C. difficile had limited success, as over 90% of C. difficile isolates were the UK epidemic clone. However, a non-epidemic strain caused a cluster of six cases of CDI, but was only isolated from the environment after the sixth patient became symptomatic. The initial absence of this strain from the environment implies patient-to-patient and/or staff-to-patient spread. In general, routine cleaning with detergent was unsuccessful at removing C. difficile from the environment. Understanding the epidemiology and virulence of prevalent strains is important if CDI is to be successfully controlled. PMID:11467790

  5. [Precision medicine: new opportunities and challenges for molecular epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Song, Jing; Hu, Yonghua

    2016-04-01

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the announcement of the Precision Medicine Initiative by U.S. President Barack Obama in January 2015, human beings have initially completed the " three steps" of " genomics to biology, genomics to health as well as genomics to society". As a new inter-discipline, the emergence and development of precision medicine have relied on the support and promotion from biological science, basic medicine, clinical medicine, epidemiology, statistics, sociology and information science, etc. Meanwhile, molecular epidemiology is considered to be the core power to promote precision medical as a cross discipline of epidemiology and molecular biology. This article is based on the characteristics and research progress of medicine and molecular epidemiology respectively, focusing on the contribution and significance of molecular epidemiology to precision medicine, and exploring the possible opportunities and challenges in the future. PMID:27087232

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Oral Chagas Disease Outbreaks in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Montilla, Marleny; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Floréz, Astrid Carolina; Zambrano, Pilar; Guhl, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, displays significant genetic variability revealed by six Discrete Typing Units (TcI-TcVI). In this pathology, oral transmission represents an emerging epidemiological scenario where different outbreaks associated to food/beverages consumption have been reported in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela. In Colombia, six human oral outbreaks have been reported corroborating the importance of this transmission route. Molecular epidemiology of oral outbreaks is barely known observing the incrimination of TcI, TcII, TcIV and TcV genotypes. Methodology and Principal Findings High-throughput molecular characterization was conducted performing MLMT (Multilocus Microsatellite Typing) and mtMLST (mitochondrial Multilocus Sequence Typing) strategies on 50 clones from ten isolates. Results allowed observing the occurrence of TcI, TcIV and mixed infection of distinct TcI genotypes. Thus, a majority of specific mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the sylvatic cycle of transmission were detected in the dataset with the foreseen presence of mitochondrial haplotypes and allelic multilocus genotypes associated to the domestic cycle of transmission. Conclusions These findings suggest the incrimination of sylvatic genotypes in the oral outbreaks occurred in Colombia. We observed patterns of super-infection and/or co-infection with a tailored association with the severe forms of myocarditis in the acute phase of the disease. The transmission dynamics of this infection route based on molecular epidemiology evidence was unraveled and the clinical and biological implications are discussed. PMID:23437405

  7. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Geun; Cho, Han-Gil; Paik, Soon-Young

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of viral gastroenteritis and a common cause of foodborne and waterborne outbreaks. Norovirus outbreaks are responsible for economic losses, most notably to the public health and food industry field. Norovirus has characteristics such as low infectious dose, prolonged shedding period, strong stability, great diversity, and frequent genome mutations. Besides these characteristics, they are known for rapid and extensive spread in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels, and schools. Norovirus is well known as a major agent of food-poisoning in diverse settings in South Korea. For these reasons, nationwide surveillance for norovirus is active in both clinical and environmental settings in South Korea. Recent studies have reported the emergence of variants and novel recombinants of norovirus. In this review, we summarized studies on the molecular epidemiology and nationwide surveillance of norovirus in South Korea. This review will provide information for vaccine development and prediction of new emerging variants of norovirus in South Korea. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(2): 61-67] PMID:25441425

  8. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of Legionella.

    PubMed

    Khodr, A; Kay, E; Gomez-Valero, L; Ginevra, C; Doublet, P; Buchrieser, C; Jarraud, S

    2016-09-01

    Legionella are opportunistic pathogens that develop in aquatic environments where they multiply in protozoa. When infected aerosols reach the human respiratory tract they may accidentally infect the alveolar macrophages leading to a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' disease (LD). The ability of Legionella to survive within host-cells is strictly dependent on the Dot/Icm Type 4 Secretion System that translocates a large repertoire of effectors into the host cell cytosol. Although Legionella is a large genus comprising nearly 60 species that are worldwide distributed, only about half of them have been involved in LD cases. Strikingly, the species Legionella pneumophila alone is responsible for 90% of all LD cases. The present review summarizes the molecular approaches that are used for L. pneumophila genotyping with a major focus on the contribution of whole genome sequencing (WGS) to the investigation of local L. pneumophila outbreaks and global epidemiology studies. We report the newest knowledge regarding the phylogeny and the evolution of Legionella and then focus on virulence evolution of those Legionella species that are known to have the capacity to infect humans. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary forces and adaptation mechanisms acting on the Dot/Icm system itself as well as the role of mobile genetic elements (MGE) encoding T4ASSs and of gene duplications in the evolution of Legionella and its adaptation to different hosts and lifestyles. PMID:27180896

  9. Epidemiologic and Molecular Prognostic Review of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Jigisha P.; Dolecek, Therese A.; Horbinski, Craig; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Lightner, Donita D.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Villano, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary CNS malignancy with a median survival of 15 months. The average incidence rate (IR) of GBM is 3.19/100,000 population and the median age of diagnosis is 64 years. Incidence is higher in men and individuals of white race and non-Hispanic ethnicity. Many genetic and environmental factors have been studied in GBM but the majority are sporadic and no risk factor accounting for a large proportion of GBMs has been identified. However, several favorable clinical prognostic factors are identified including, younger age at diagnosis, cerebellar location, high performance status and maximal tumor resection. GBMs comprise of primary and secondary subtypes which evolve through different genetic pathways, affect patients at different ages and have differences in outcomes. We report the current epidemiology of GBM with new data from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) 2006–2010 as well as demonstrate and discuss trends in incidence and survival. We also provide a concise review on molecular markers in GBM that have helped distinguish biologically similar subtypes of GBM and have prognostic and predictive value. PMID:25053711

  10. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    PubMed

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Hemoglobinopathies in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Munkongdee, Thongperm; Tanakulmas, Jatuporn; Butthep, Punnee; Winichagoon, Pranee; Main, Barbara; Yiannakis, Miriam; George, Joby; Devenish, Robyn; Fucharoen, Suthat; Svasti, Saovaros

    2016-06-01

    Determining the magnitude of the thalassemia problem in a country is important for implementing a national prevention and control program. In order to acquire accurate thalassemia prevalence data, the gene frequency of α- and β-thalassemia (α- and β-thal) in different regions of a country should be determined. The molecular basis of thalassemia in Cambodia was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques in a community-based cross-sectional survey of 1631 unrelated individuals from three regions, Battambang, Preah Vihear and Phnom Penh. Thalassemia mutations were detected in 62.7% of the three studied population of Cambodia. Hb E (HBB: c.79G > A) was the most common β-globin gene mutation with a frequency ranging from 0.139 to 0.331, while the most frequent α-globin gene mutation was the -α(3.7) (rightward) deletion (0.098-0.255). The other frequencies were 0.001-0.003 for β-thal, 0.008-0.011 for α-thal-1 (- -(SEA)), 0.003-0.008 for α-thal-2 [-α(4.2) (leftward deletion)], 0.021-0.044 for Hb Constant Spring (Hb CS, HBA2: c.427T > C) and 0.009-0.036 for Hb Paksé (HBA2: c.429A > T). A regional specific thalassemia gene frequency was observed. Preah Vihear had the highest prevalence of Hb E (55.9%), α-thal-2 (24.0%) and nondeletional α-thal (15.1%), whereas Phnom Penh had the lowest frequency of thalassemia genes. Interestingly, in Preah Vihear, the frequency of Hb Paksé was extremely high (0.036), almost equivalent to that of Hb CS (0.044). Our results indicate the importance of micromapping and epidemiology studies of thalassemia, which will assist in establishing the national prevention and control program in Cambodia. PMID:27117566

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Germany.

    PubMed

    Horn, Nicole Nari; Kresken, Michael; Körber-Irrgang, Barbara; Göttig, Stephan; Wichelhaus, Cornelia; Wichelhaus, Thomas A

    2014-07-01

    Antimicrobial drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae has become an increasing public health problem. Hence, surveillance of resistance development is of crucial importance to implement adequate treatment guidelines. Data on the spread of antibiotic resistance among gonococcal isolates in Germany, however, is scarce. In a resistance surveillance study conducted by the Paul Ehrlich Society for Chemotherapy between October 2010 and December 2011, 23 laboratories all over Germany were requested to send N. gonorrhoeae isolates to the study laboratory in Frankfurt am Main. Species verification was performed biochemically using ApiNH and with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Etest method. For molecular epidemiological analysis, N. gonorrhoeae strains were genotyped by means of N. gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing. A total of 213 consecutive gonococcal isolates were analyzed in this nationwide study. Applying EUCAST breakpoints, high resistance rates were found for ciprofloxacin (74%) and tetracycline (41%). Penicillin non-susceptibility was detected in 80% of isolates. The rate of azithromycin resistance was 6%, while all strains were susceptible to spectinomycin, cefixime, and ceftriaxone. Molecular typing of gonococcal isolates revealed a great heterogeneity of 99 different sequence types (ST), but ST1407 predominated (n=39). This is the first comprehensive German multi-centre surveillance study on antibiotic susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of N. gonorrhoeae with implications for antibiotic choice for treatment of gonorrhoea. The World Health Organization supports the concept that an efficacious treatment of gonorrhoea results in at least 95% of infections being cured. Accordingly, as spectinomycin is not available on the German market, only the third generation cephalosporins cefixime and ceftriaxone are regarded as valuable drugs

  13. Understanding the molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth-disease virus.

    PubMed

    Klein, Joern

    2009-03-01

    The use of molecular epidemiology is an important tool in understanding and consequently controlling FMDV. In this review I will present basic information about the disease, needed to perform molecular epidemiology. I will give a short introduction to the history and impact of foot-and-mouth disease, clinical picture, infection route, subclinical and persistent infections, general aspects of the transmission of FMDV, serotype-specific epidemiological characteristics, field epidemiology of FMDV, evolution and molecular epidemiology of FMDV. This is followed by two chapters describing the molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease in global surveillance and molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease in outbreak investigation.

  14. The use of genetic markers in the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, L S; Leitão, T M J S; Taylor, M L; Muniz, M M; Zancopé-Oliveira, R M

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, a dimorphic fungal pathogen that can infect both humans and animals. This disease has worldwide distribution and affects mainly immunocompromised individuals. In the environment, H. capsulatum grows as mold but undergoes a morphologic transition to the yeast morphotype under special conditions. Molecular techniques are important tools to conduct epidemiologic investigations for fungal detection, identification of infection sources, and determination of different fungal genotypes associated to a particular disease symptom. In this study, we performed a systematic review in the PubMed database to improve the understanding about the molecular epidemiology of histoplasmosis. This search was restricted to English and Spanish articles. We included a combination of specific keywords: molecular typing [OR] genetic diversity [OR] polymorphism [AND] H. capsulatum; molecular epidemiology [AND] histoplasmosis; and molecular epidemiology [AND] Histoplasma. In addition, we used the specific terms: histoplasmosis [AND] outbreaks. Non-English or non-Spanish articles, dead links, and duplicate results were excluded from the review. The results reached show that the main methods used for molecular typing of H. capsulatum were: restriction fragment length polymorphism, random amplified polymorphic DNA, microsatellites polymorphism, sequencing of internal transcribed spacers region, and multilocus sequence typing. Different genetic profiles were identified among H. capsulatum isolates, which can be grouped according to their source, geographical origin, and clinical manifestations. PMID:26589702

  15. Molecular epidemiology of canine parvovirus in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Nadia; Desario, Costantina; Kadiri, Ahlam; Cavalli, Alessandra; Berrada, Jaouad; Zro, Khalil; Sebbar, Ghizlane; Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Parisi, Antonio; Elia, Gabriella; Buonavoglia, Canio; Malik, Jamal; Decaro, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Since it first emergence in the mid-1970's, canine parvovirus 2 (CPV-2) has evolved giving rise to new antigenic variants termed CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c, which have completely replaced the original strain and had been variously distributed worldwide. In Africa limited data are available on epidemiological prevalence of these new types. Hence, the aim of the present study was to determine circulating variants in Morocco. Through TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay, 91 samples, collected from symptomatic dogs originating from various cities between 2011 and 2015, were diagnosed. Positive specimens were characterised by means of minor groove binder (MGB) probe PCR. The results showed that all samples but one (98.9%) were CPV positive, of which 1 (1.1%) was characterised as CPV-2a, 43 (47.7%) as CPV-2b and 39 (43.3%) as CPV-2c. Interestingly, a co-infection with CPV-2b and CPV-2c was detected in 4 (4.4%) samples and 3 (3.3%) samples were not characterised. Sequencing of the full VP2 gene revealed these 3 uncharacterised strains as CPV-2c, displaying a change G4068A responsible for the replacement of aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 427, impacting the MGB probe binding. In this work we provide a better understanding of the current status of prevailing CPV strains in northern Africa.

  16. [Molecular epidemiology of cystic fibrosis in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Messaoud, T; Bel Haj Fredj, S; Bibi, A; Elion, J; Férec, C; Fattoum, S

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent autosomal recessive genetic disease in North European population. This pathology seems to not be rare in Tunisia. On another hand, development of molecular biology techniques has largely contributed to implement the study of the different mutations in the CFTR gene where over 1,300 mutations were reported. Herein, we describe the strategy used to detect molecular defects responsible of cystic fibrosis on 390 children (383 families) in Tunisian population. Several techniques were performed for genotype diagnosis: DNA extraction was from peripheral blood. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacylamide gel electrophoresis, and reverse dot blot procedures were used to detect known point mutations. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used in a next step searching for the unknown point mutations that are later identified by automated sequencing on ABIprism 310. This strategy allowed us to detect 17 different mutations located on the different exons of the CFTR gene. The most frequent was the F508del (50.74%) followed by three other mutations (G542X, W1282X and N1303K) known to be common in the Mediterranean area. For mutations (T665S, 2766 del8, F1166C, L1043R) were exclusively found, up to now, in the Tunisian population. Our results permitted to establish cystic fibrosis mutations and their distribution in Tunisia and to implement an appropriate prevention program of these diseases through the genetic council and prenatal diagnosis.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of human intestinal amoebas in iran.

    PubMed

    Hooshyar, H; Rostamkhani, P; Rezaian, M

    2012-01-01

    Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran.

  18. Zoonotic Potential and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia Species and Giardiasis†

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Molecular diagnostic tools have been used recently in assessing the taxonomy, zoonotic potential, and transmission of Giardia species and giardiasis in humans and animals. The results of these studies have firmly established giardiasis as a zoonotic disease, although host adaptation at the genotype and subtype levels has reduced the likelihood of zoonotic transmission. These studies have also identified variations in the distribution of Giardia duodenalis genotypes among geographic areas and between domestic and wild ruminants and differences in clinical manifestations and outbreak potentials of assemblages A and B. Nevertheless, our efforts in characterizing the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis and the roles of various animals in the transmission of human giardiasis are compromised by the lack of case-control and longitudinal cohort studies and the sampling and testing of humans and animals living in the same community, the frequent occurrence of infections with mixed genotypes and subtypes, and the apparent heterozygosity at some genetic loci for some G. duodenalis genotypes. With the increased usage of multilocus genotyping tools, the development of next-generation subtyping tools, the integration of molecular analysis in epidemiological studies, and an improved understanding of the population genetics of G. duodenalis in humans and animals, we should soon have a better appreciation of the molecular epidemiology of giardiasis, the disease burden of zoonotic transmission, the taxonomy status and virulences of various G. duodenalis genotypes, and the ecology of environmental contamination. PMID:21233509

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Intestinal Amoebas in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hooshyar, H; Rostamkhani, P; Rezaian, M

    2012-01-01

    Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran. PMID:23193500

  20. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Taisei; Noda, Masahiro; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory illness (ARI) due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza virus (HPIV), and human enterovirus infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma. PMID:24062735

  1. Molecular epidemiology and evolution of porcine parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Streck, André Felipe; Canal, Cláudio Wageck; Truyen, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV), recently named Ungulate protoparvovirus 1, is considered to be one of the most important causes of reproductive failure in swine. Fetal death, mummification, stillbirths and delayed return to estrus are predominant clinical signs commonly associated with PPV infection in a herd. It has recently been shown that certain parvoviruses exhibit a nucleotide substitution rate close to that commonly determined for RNA viruses. However, the PPV vaccines broadly used in the last 30 years have most likely reduced the genetic diversity of the virus and led to the predominance of strains with a capsid profile distinct from that of the original vaccine-based strains. Furthermore, a number of novel porcine parvovirus species with yet-unknown veterinary relevance and characteristics have been described during the last decade. In this review, an overview of PPV molecular evolution is presented, highlighting characteristics of the various genetic elements, their evolutionary rate and the discovery of new capsid profiles driven by the currently used vaccines.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of canine histoplasmosis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoshiteru; Sano, Ayako; Ueda, Yachiyo; Inomata, Tomo; Takayama, Akiko; Poonwan, Nateewan; Nanthawan, Mekha; Mikami, Yuzuru; Miyaji, Makoto; Nishimura, Kazuko; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2007-05-01

    A recent case of canine histoplasmosis, the first confirmed case of disseminated infection accompanied by carcinoma in Japan, was diagnosed by clinical characteristics, histopathological examination, chest radiographs, ocular fundoscopy and molecular biological data. The clinical manifestations were not limited to cutaneous symptoms but were referable to disseminated infection, similar to human autochthonous cases. The partial sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1/2) regions of the ribosomal DNA genes of this and other Japanese canine histoplasmosis strains were 99-100% identical to the sequence AB211551 derived from a human isolate in Thailand, and showed a close relationship to the sequences derived from Japanese autochthonous systemic and cutaneous human cases. The phylogenetic analysis of 97 sequences of the ITS1/2 region disclosed six genotypes. The genotypes derived from Japanese autochthonous human and dog cases belonged to the cluster consisting of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum and H. capsulatum var. farciminosum sequences, indicating that these varieties might cause not only cutaneous but also systemic histoplasmosis, regardless of their host species. The current status of the 3 varieties of Histoplasma capsulatum according to the host species remains a subject of further investigation. PMID:17464845

  3. Molecular Epidemiology and Genomics of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Bessen, Debra E.; McShan, W. Michael; Nguyen, Scott V.; Shetty, Amol; Agrawal, Sonia; Tettelin, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus; GAS) is a strict human pathogen with a very high prevalence worldwide. This review highlights the genetic organization of the species and the important ecological considerations that impact its evolution. Recent advances are presented on the topics of molecular epidemiology, population biology, molecular basis for genetic change, genome structure and genetic flux, phylogenomics and closely related streptococcal species, and the long- and short-term evolution of GAS. The application of whole genome sequence data to addressing key biological questions is discussed. PMID:25460818

  4. Multicollinearity in Regression Analyses Conducted in Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vatcheva, Kristina P.; Lee, MinJae; McCormick, Joseph B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.

    2016-01-01

    The adverse impact of ignoring multicollinearity on findings and data interpretation in regression analysis is very well documented in the statistical literature. The failure to identify and report multicollinearity could result in misleading interpretations of the results. A review of epidemiological literature in PubMed from January 2004 to December 2013, illustrated the need for a greater attention to identifying and minimizing the effect of multicollinearity in analysis of data from epidemiologic studies. We used simulated datasets and real life data from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort to demonstrate the adverse effects of multicollinearity in the regression analysis and encourage researchers to consider the diagnostic for multicollinearity as one of the steps in regression analysis. PMID:27274911

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among South African Gold Miners

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James J.; Connors, Jeremy; Chihota, Violet N.; Shashkina, Elena; van der Meulen, Minty; Graviss, Edward A.; Ha, Ngan P.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Grant, Alison D.; Fielding, Katherine L.; Dorman, Susan E.; Churchyard, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: HIV-associated tuberculosis remains a major health problem among the gold-mining workforce in South Africa. We postulate that high levels of recent transmission, indicated by strain clustering, are fueling the tuberculosis epidemic among gold miners. Objectives: To combine molecular and epidemiologic data to describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity, estimate levels of transmission, and examine risk factors for clustering. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates in 15 gold mine shafts across three provinces in South Africa. All isolates were subject IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and we performed spoligotyping analysis and combined it with basic demographic and clinical information. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 1,602 M. tuberculosis patient isolates, 1,240 (78%) had genotyping data available for analysis. A highly diverse bacillary population was identified, comprising a total of 730 discrete genotypes. Four genotypic families (Latin American Mediterranean spoligotype family; W-Beijing; AH or X; and T1–T4) accounted for over 50% of all strains. Overall, 45% (560/1,240) of strains were genotypically clustered. The minimum estimate for recent transmission (n − 1 method) was 32% (range, 27–34%). There were no individual-level risk factors for clustering, apart from borderline evidence for being non–South African and having self-reported HIV infection. Conclusions: The high M. tuberculosis genetic diversity and lack of risk factors for clustering are indicative of a universal risk for disease among gold miners and likely mixing with nonmining populations. Our results underscore the urgent need to intensify interventions to interrupt transmission across the entire gold-mining workforce in South Africa. PMID:25419914

  6. Genetic analysis of metabolic polymorphisms in molecular epidemiological studies: social and ethical implications.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, P; Vähäkangas, K

    1999-01-01

    The use of genetic biomarkers in epidemiological studies raises specific social and ethical issues related to the selection of molecular markers and methods of analysis, obtaining participation, the storage of biological samples and their linkage with individual data, the disclosure of information and the publication of results. Several of these issues are similar to those associated with the use of any type of biomarker in epidemiology. Other problems are specifically related to the use of genetic material and the perception that genetic information raises special concerns regarding privacy, risk of abuse and psychosocial impact in this chapter we define how genetic studies performed in the context of molecular epidemiological studies (genetic analysis) differ from genetic screening or genetic testing conducted in a clinical or public health context We then examine the ethical implications of this distinction and describe how general ethical principles may apply to genetic analysis in the area of molecular epidemiology. In particular we discuss specific questions such as those of obtaining participation, working with archival samples and communicating results. We advocate an approach whereby ethical issues are tackled as an intrinsic part of study design; this requires broad discussion with all the parties involved.

  7. Thermal conductivity behavior of superatom molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Wee-Liat; O'Brien, Evan; Dougherty, Patrick; Epstein, Jillian; Higgs, C. Fred; McGaughey, Alan; Roy, Xavier; Malen, Jonathan

    The room temperature thermal conductivity of several superatom molecular crystals (SMCs) are measured and found to be below 0.3 W/mK. The trend of room temperature thermal conductivity of the different crystals agree well with their sound speeds obtained independently using nano-indentation. These crystals, however, can exhibit non-crystalline thermal conductivity behavior depending on their constituent elements. A superatom is a cluster of atoms that acts as a stable entity [e.g., fullerenes (C60)]. By careful mixing and assembling these nano-sized superatoms, the resulting superatom-assembled materials hold promises for improving various technological devices. Organic-inorganic superatoms can assemble into unary SMCs or co-crystallized with C60 superatoms into binary SMCs. Thermal transport is of considerable interest with possible new physics in these hierarchically atomic precise crystals in the low temperature regime. The thermal conductivity of the SMCs are measured using the frequency domain thermoreflectance setup. Unary SMCs exhibit an almost invariant thermal conductivity down to a temperature of 150 K. Binary SMCs, however, can either show a crystalline-like increase or an amorphous-like decrease with decreasing temperature.

  8. The epidemiology and molecular mechanisms linking obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Rosalyn D; Gallagher, Emily J; Scheinman, Eyal J; Damouni, Rawan; LeRoith, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of obesity is associated with increasing rates of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies have reported that these conditions are linked to increased rates of cancer incidence and mortality. Obesity, particularly abdominal obesity, is associated with insulin resistance and the development of dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and ultimately type 2 diabetes. Although many metabolic abnormalities occur with obesity and type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia appear to be central to these conditions and may contribute to dyslipidemia and altered levels of circulating estrogens and androgens. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological and molecular links between obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, and how hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia may contribute to cancer development. We will discuss how these metabolic abnormalities may interact with estrogen signaling in breast cancer growth. Finally, we will discuss the effects of type 2 diabetes medications on cancer risk. PMID:23810003

  9. [Seroepidemiology and molecular epidemiology of enterovirus type 71 in the world and the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Akhmadishina, L V; Koroleva, G A; Ivanova, O E; Trotsenko, O E; Mikhaĭlov, M I; Lukashev, A N

    2013-01-01

    A review of recent publications on epidemiology and seroepidemiology of enterovirus type 71 in various regions of the world and authors' own results of study of seroepidemiology and molecular epidemiology of EV71 in Russia are presented. PMID:24605685

  10. Molecular and epidemiological studies of Porcine rubulavirus infection - an overview.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus-La Piedad-Michoacan-Mexico virus (PorPV-LPMV) was identified as the causative agent of a viral disease that emerged spontaneously in Mexican swine in the 1980s. Since the report of the initial outbreak of the disease, only one full-length genome from a strain isolated in 1984 (PorPV-LPMV/1984) has been sequenced; sequence data are scarce from other isolates. The genetic variation of this virus that has spread throughout the main endemic region of Mexico is almost a complete mystery. The development of molecular techniques for improved diagnostics and to investigate the persistence, molecular epidemiology, and the possible reservoirs of PorPV are needed. Together, this will provide greater knowledge regarding the molecular genetic changes and useful data to establish new strategies in the control of this virus in Mexico.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Outbreak, Tumbes, Peru, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Baldeviano, G Christian; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Arrospide, Nancy; Gonzalez, Rommell V; Sánchez, Juan F; Macedo, Silvia; Conde, Silvia; Tapia, L Lorena; Salas, Carola; Gamboa, Dionicia; Herrera, Yeni; Edgel, Kimberly A; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Lescano, Andrés G

    2015-05-01

    During 2010-2012, an outbreak of 210 cases of malaria occurred in Tumbes, in the northern coast of Peru, where no Plasmodium falciparum malaria case had been reported since 2006. To identify the source of the parasite causing this outbreak, we conducted a molecular epidemiology investigation. Microsatellite typing showed an identical genotype in all 54 available isolates. This genotype was also identical to that of parasites isolated in 2010 in the Loreto region of the Peruvian Amazon and closely related to clonet B, a parasite lineage previously reported in the Amazon during 1998-2000. These findings are consistent with travel history of index case-patients. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in the Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pfcrt, and Pfmdr1 loci, which are strongly associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and deletion of the Pfhrp2 gene. These results highlight the need for timely molecular epidemiology investigations to trace the parasite source during malaria reintroduction events.

  12. Hepatitis A virus: host interactions, molecular epidemiology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Goncalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Forbi, Joseph C; de Paula, Vanessa S; Purdy, Michael A; Xia, Guoliang; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2014-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the commonest viral cause of liver disease and presents an important public health problem worldwide. Several unique HAV properties and molecular mechanisms of its interaction with host were recently discovered and should aid in clarifying the pathogenesis of hepatitis A. Genetic characterization of HAV strains have resulted in the identification of different genotypes and subtypes, which exhibit a characteristic worldwide distribution. Shifts in HAV endemicity occurring in different parts of the world, introduction of genetically diverse strains from geographically distant regions, genotype displacement observed in some countries and population expansion detected in the last decades of the 20th century using phylogenetic analysis are important factors contributing to the complex dynamics of HAV infections worldwide. Strong selection pressures, some of which, like usage of deoptimized codons, are unique to HAV, limit genetic variability of the virus. Analysis of subgenomic regions has been proven useful for outbreak investigations. However, sharing short sequences among epidemiologically unrelated strains indicates that specific identification of HAV strains for molecular surveillance can be achieved only using whole-genome sequences. Here, we present up-to-date information on the HAV molecular epidemiology and evolution, and highlight the most relevant features of the HAV-host interactions.

  13. First Molecular Epidemiological Study of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Libya

    PubMed Central

    Amro, Ahmad; Gashout, Aisha; Al-Dwibe, Hamida; Zahangir Alam, Mohammad; Annajar, Badereddin; Hamarsheh, Omar; Shubar, Hend; Schönian, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major public health problem in Libya. The objective of this study was to investigate, for the first time, epidemiological features of CL outbreaks in Libya including molecular identification of parasites, the geographical distribution of cases and possible scenarios of parasite transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 450 patients that came from 49 areas distributed in 12 districts in north-west Libya. The patients' ages ranged from 9 months to 87 years (median age 25 years); 54% of the cases were males. Skin scrapings spotted on glass slides were collected for molecular identification of causative agent. The ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) was amplified and subsequently characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. In total, 195 samples were successfully identified of which 148 (75.9%) were Leishmania major, and 47 (24.1%) Leishmania tropica. CL cases infected with L. major were found in all CL areas whereas L. tropica cases came mainly from Al Jabal Al Gharbi (46.4%), Misrata (17.8%) and Tarhuna districts (10.7%). A trend of seasonality was noticed for the infections with L. major which showed a clear peak between November and January, but was less pronounced for infections by L. tropica. Conclusion The first molecular study on CL in Libya revealed that the disease is caused by L. major and L. tropica and the epidemiological patterns in the different foci were the same as in other Mediterranean foci of CL. PMID:22724036

  14. Malignant Catarrhal Fever: Understanding Molecular Diagnostics in Context of Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Cunha, Cristina W.; Taus, Naomi S.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a frequently fatal disease, primarily of ruminants, caused by a group of gammaherpesviruses. Due to complexities of pathogenesis and epidemiology in various species, which are either clinically-susceptible or reservoir hosts, veterinary clinicians face significant challenges in laboratory diagnostics. The recent development of specific assays for viral DNA and antibodies has expanded and improved the inventory of laboratory tests and opened new opportunities for use of MCF diagnostics. Issues related to understanding and implementing appropriate assays for specific diagnostic needs must be addressed in order to take advantage of molecular diagnostics in the laboratory. PMID:22072925

  15. Molecular epidemiology of American tegumentary leishmaniasis in Panama.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Aracelis; Carrasco, Ricardo; Paz, Hector; Pascale, Juan M; Samudio, Franklyn; Saldaña, Azael; Santamaría, Giovanna; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Calzada, Jose E

    2009-10-01

    American tegumentary leishmaniasis is an increasing public health problem in Panama. This study describes the clinical characteristics and the molecular epidemiology of leishmaniasis in Panama over a 5-year period (2004-2008). Additionally, we applied a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-based assay to identify Leishmania species in clinical isolates, skin scrapings, and sandflies specimens. Whereas 60.3% of cases were detected with conventional parasitologic techniques (smear or in vitro culture), the PCR detected 72% positive patients. Our clinical-epidemiologic data corroborate the high incidence of L. (Viannia) panamensis and provide evidence of peridomestic and/or domestic transmission. Mucosal involvement was observed in 4.2% of the patients. The overall natural infection rate with Leishmania in 103 pools of sandflies was 0.46%. Lutzomyia gomezi and Lutzomya panamensis were the prevalent species incriminated as vectors at the capture sites in central Panama. This study contributes to a better knowledge of the current epidemiology of tegumentary leishmaniasis in Panama.

  16. Proceedings of The Second International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE) Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Campbell, Peter T.; Nishihara, Reiko; Phipps, Amanda I.; Beck, Andrew H.; Sherman, Mark E.; Chan, Andrew T.; Troester, Melissa A.; Bass, Adam J.; Fitzgerald, Kathryn C.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Nan, Hongmei; Peters, Ulrike; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Zhang, Xuehong; Giovannucci, Edward L.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wang, Molin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Begg, Colin B.

    2015-01-01

    Disease classification system increasingly incorporates information on pathogenic mechanisms to predict clinical outcomes and response to therapy and intervention. Technological advancements to interrogate omics (genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, interactomics, etc.) provide widely-open opportunities in population-based research. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) represents integrative science of molecular pathology and epidemiology. This unified paradigm requires multidisciplinary collaboration between pathology, epidemiology, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and computational biology. Integration of these fields enables better understanding of etiologic heterogeneity, disease continuum, causal inference, and the impact of environment, diet, lifestyle, host factors (including genetics and immunity), and their interactions on disease evolution. Hence, the Second International MPE Meeting was held in Boston in December 2014, with aims to: (1) develop conceptual and practical frameworks; (2) cultivate and expand opportunities; (3) address challenges; and (4) initiate the effort of specifying guidelines for MPE. The meeting mainly consisted of presentations of method developments and recent data in various malignant neoplasms and tumors (breast, prostate, ovarian and colorectal cancers, renal cell carcinoma, lymphoma, and leukemia), followed by open discussion sessions on challenges and future plans. In particular, we recognized need for efforts to further develop statistical methodologies. This meeting provided an unprecedented opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration, consistent with the purposes of the BD2K (Big Data to Knowledge), GAME-ON (Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology), and Precision Medicine Initiatives of the U.S.A. National Institute of Health. The MPE Meeting Series can help advance transdisciplinary population science, and optimize training and education systems for 21st century

  17. Molecular Pathological Epidemiology Gives Clues to Paradoxical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Reiko; VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Shibuya, Kenji; Mittleman, Murray A.; Wang, Molin; Field, Alison E.; Giovannucci, Edward; Lochhead, Paul; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    A number of epidemiologic studies have described what appear to be paradoxical associations, where an incongruous relationship is observed between a certain well-established risk factor for disease incidence and favorable clinical outcome among patients with that disease. For example, the “obesity paradox” represents the association between obesity and better survival among patients with a certain disease such as coronary heart disease. Paradoxical observations cause vexing clinical and public health problems as they raise questions on causal relationships and hinder the development of effective interventions. Compelling evidence indicates that pathogenic processes encompass molecular alterations within cells and the microenvironment, influenced by various exogenous and endogenous exposures, and that interpersonal heterogeneity in molecular pathology and pathophysiology exists among patients with any given disease. In this article, we introduce methods of the emerging integrative interdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE), which is founded on the unique disease principle and disease continuum theory. We analyze and decipher apparent paradoxical findings, utilizing the MPE approach and available literature data on tumor somatic genetic and epigenetic characteristics. Through our analyses in colorectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and glioblastoma (malignant brain tumor), we can readily explain paradoxical associations between disease risk factors and better prognosis among disease patients. The MPE paradigm and approach can be applied to not only neoplasms but also various non-neoplastic diseases where there exists indisputable ubiquitous heterogeneity of pathogenesis and molecular pathology. The MPE paradigm including consideration of disease heterogeneity plays an essential role in advancements of precision medicine and public health. PMID:26445996

  18. Molecular epidemiologic evaluation of transmissibility and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rhee, J T; Piatek, A S; Small, P M; Harris, L M; Chaparro, S V; Kramer, F R; Alland, D

    1999-06-01

    Discovery of genotypic markers associated with increased transmissibility in Mycobacterium tuberculosis would represent an important step in advancing mycobacterial virulence studies. M. tuberculosis strains may be classified into one of three genotypes on the basis of the presence of specific nucleotide substitutions in codon 463 of the katG gene (katG-463) and codon 95 of the gyrA gene (gyrA-95). It has previously been reported that two of these three genotypes are associated with increased IS6110-based clustering, a potential proxy of virulence. We designed a case-control analysis of U.S.-born patients with tuberculosis in San Francisco, Calif., between 1991 and 1997 to investigate associations between katG-463 and gyrA-95 genotypes and epidemiologically determined measures of strain-specific infectivity and pathogenicity and IS6110-based clustering status. We used a new class of molecular probes called molecular beacons to genotype the isolates rapidly. Infectivity was defined as the propensity of isolates to cause tuberculin skin test conversions among named contacts, and pathogenicity was defined as their propensity to cause active disease among named contacts. The molecular beacon assay was a simple and reproducible method for the detection of known single nucleotide polymorphisms in large numbers of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. The results showed that no genotype of the katG-463- and gyrA-95-based classification system was associated with increased infectivity and pathogenicity or with increased IS6110-based clustering in San Francisco during the study period. We speculate that molecular epidemiologic studies investigating clinically relevant outcomes may contribute to the knowledge of the significance of laboratory-derived virulence factors in the propagation of tuberculosis in human communities.

  19. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  20. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  1. Concordance and discordance of sequence survey methods for molecular epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nur A.; Cebula, Thomas A.; Colwell, Rita R.; Robison, Richard A.; Johnson, W. Evan; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    The post-genomic era is characterized by the direct acquisition and analysis of genomic data with many applications, including the enhancement of the understanding of microbial epidemiology and pathology. However, there are a number of molecular approaches to survey pathogen diversity, and the impact of these different approaches on parameter estimation and inference are not entirely clear. We sequenced whole genomes of bacterial pathogens, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. (60 new genomes), and combined them with 55 genomes from GenBank to address how different molecular survey approaches (whole genomes, SNPs, and MLST) impact downstream inferences on molecular evolutionary parameters, evolutionary relationships, and trait character associations. We selected isolates for sequencing to represent temporal, geographic origin, and host range variability. We found that substitution rate estimates vary widely among approaches, and that SNP and genomic datasets yielded different but strongly supported phylogenies. MLST yielded poorly supported phylogenies, especially in our low diversity dataset, i.e., Y. pestis. Trait associations showed that B. pseudomallei and Y. pestis phylogenies are significantly associated with geography, irrespective of the molecular survey approach used, while Brucella spp. phylogeny appears to be strongly associated with geography and host origin. We contrast inferences made among monomorphic (clonal) and non-monomorphic bacteria, and between intra- and inter-specific datasets. We also discuss our results in light of underlying assumptions of different approaches. PMID:25737810

  2. Blastocystis: Genetic diversity and molecular methods for diagnosis and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2013-01-01

    Blastocystis, an unusual anaerobic, single-celled stramenopile, is a remarkably successful intestinal parasite of a vast array of host species including humans. Fecal Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis by nucleic-acid based methods in particular has led to significant advances in Blastocystis diagnostics and research over the past few years enabling accurate identification of carriers and molecular characterization by high discriminatory power. Moreover, Blastocystis comprises a multitude of subtypes (STs) (arguably species) many of which have been identified only recently and molecular epidemiological studies have revealed a significant difference in the distribution of STs across host species and geographical regions. Having a cosmopolitan distribution, the parasite is a common laboratory finding in the stools of individuals with and without intestinal symptoms across the entire globe and while the parasite remains extremely difficult to eradicate and isolate in culture, appropriate molecular tools are now available to resolve important questions such as whether the clinical outcome of colonization is linked to ST and whether Blastocystis is transmitted zoonotically. This review summarizes some of the recent advances in the molecular diagnosis of Blastocystis and gives an introduction to Blastocystis STs, including a recommendation of subtyping methodology based on recent data and method comparisons. A few suggestions for future directions and research areas are given in the light of relevant technological advances and the availability of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of rhinoviruses in Cyprus over three consecutive seasons.

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Nikolaou, E; Panayiotou, C; Tryfonos, C; Koliou, M; Christodoulou, C

    2015-07-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are widespread respiratory pathogens and a major cause of acute respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of rhinovirus infections in children in Cyprus over three consecutive winter seasons. From a total of 116 rhinovirus-positive samples, 68 were sequenced in the 5'-UTR and VP4/VP2 regions. Thirty-six (52.9%) samples were identified as HRV-A and 27 (39.7%) as HRV-C, with only five (7.4%) samples belonging to the HRV-B species. Of these, a total of 46 different genotypes were identified. In the VP2/VP4 phylogenetic tree all strains clustered in three different well-defined clades, whereas the 5'-UTR tree exhibited clades with a mixed clustering of HRV-A and HRV-C strains reflecting the evolutionary history of recombination between HRV-A and HRV-C that has been observed previously. In summary, a high intra- and inter-season diversity of HRV types was observed. Despite its geographical isolation the frequency of HRV species in Cyprus is comparable to that reported in other regions of the world supporting the concept of an unrestricted global circulation. This study assesses, for the first time, the epidemiology of rhinovirus infections in Cypriot children and will be helpful to clinicians and researchers interested in the treatment and control of viral respiratory tract infections.

  4. Initial Data on the Molecular Epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Marwan; El Safadi, Dima; Benamrouz, Sadia; Guyot, Karine; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Creusy, Colette; Mallat, Hassan; Hamze, Monzer; Dabboussi, Fouad; Viscogliosi, Eric; Certad, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. represent a major public health problem worldwide and infect the gastrointestinal tract of both immunocompetent and immunocompromised persons. The prevalence of these parasites varies by geographic region, and no data are currently available in Lebanon. To promote an understanding of the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosisin this country, the main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence Cryptosporidium in symptomatic hospitalized patients, and to analyze the genetic diversity of the corresponding isolates. Fecal specimens were collected in four hospitals in North Lebanon from 163 patients (77 males and 86 females, ranging in age from 1 to 88 years, with a mean age of 22 years) presenting gastrointestinal disorders during the period July to December 2013. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection obtained by modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining and/or nested PCR was 11%, and children <5 years old showed a higher rate of Cryptosporidium spp. The PCR products of the 15 positive samples were successfully sequenced. Among them, 10 isolates (66.7%) were identified as C. hominis, while the remaining 5 (33.3%) were identified as C. parvum. After analysis of the gp60 locus, C. hominis IdA19, a rare subtype, was found to be predominant. Two C. parvum subtypes were found: IIaA15G1R1 and IIaA15G2R1. The molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates is an important step in improving our understanding of the epidemiology and transmission of the infection. PMID:25950832

  5. Lung cancer molecular epidemiology in China: recent trends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is both the most common diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in China. During the past three decades, the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China are increasing rapidly. According to data from National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) in 2010, the crude incidence of lung cancer in China was 46.08 per 100,000 population (61.86 per 100,000 men and 29.54 per 100,000 women), with an estimated over 600,000 new diagnosed lung cancer patients (416,333 males and 189,613 females). Meanwhile, the crude mortality of lung cancer in China was 37.00 per 100,000 population (50.04 per 100,000 men and 23.33 per 100,000 women). Consistent with the change in developed countries, adenocarcinoma has become the most predominant histological subtype of lung cancer in China. For the majority advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, especially patients with adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy became increasing important in the treatment. Chinese researcher have done a lot work in terms of lung cancer molecular epidemiology, therefore, in this review, we further summarized the epidemiology of driver genes in NSCLC, hoping to help clinicians to better screen certain driver genes in China for treatment decisions. PMID:25806311

  6. Malaria Molecular Epidemiology: Lessons from the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research Network.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Ananias A; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Vinetz, Joseph M; Volkman, Sarah K; Cui, Liwang; Gamboa, Dionicia; Krogstad, Donald J; Barry, Alyssa E; Carlton, Jane M; van Eijk, Anna Maria; Pradhan, Khageswar; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhouse, Bryan; Pacheco, M Andreina; Vallejo, Andres F; Herrera, Socrates; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-09-01

    Molecular epidemiology leverages genetic information to study the risk factors that affect the frequency and distribution of malaria cases. This article describes molecular epidemiologic investigations currently being carried out by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) network in a variety of malaria-endemic settings. First, we discuss various novel approaches to understand malaria incidence and gametocytemia, focusing on Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Second, we describe and compare different parasite genotyping methods commonly used in malaria epidemiology and population genetics. Finally, we discuss potential applications of molecular epidemiological tools and methods toward malaria control and elimination efforts.

  7. Malaria Molecular Epidemiology: Lessons from the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Ananias A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Cui, Liwang; Gamboa, Dionicia; Krogstad, Donald J.; Barry, Alyssa E.; Carlton, Jane M.; van Eijk, Anna Maria; Pradhan, Khageswar; Mueller, Ivo; Greenhouse, Bryan; Andreina Pacheco, M.; Vallejo, Andres F.; Herrera, Socrates; Felger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology leverages genetic information to study the risk factors that affect the frequency and distribution of malaria cases. This article describes molecular epidemiologic investigations currently being carried out by the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMR) network in a variety of malaria-endemic settings. First, we discuss various novel approaches to understand malaria incidence and gametocytemia, focusing on Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Second, we describe and compare different parasite genotyping methods commonly used in malaria epidemiology and population genetics. Finally, we discuss potential applications of molecular epidemiological tools and methods toward malaria control and elimination efforts. PMID:26259945

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Aleutian mink disease virus in Finland.

    PubMed

    Knuuttila, Anna; Uzcátegui, Nathalie; Kankkonen, Johanna; Vapalahti, Olli; Kinnunen, Paula

    2009-01-13

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is a parvovirus that causes an immune complex-mediated disease in minks. To gain a more detailed view of the molecular epidemiology of mink AMDV in Finland, we phylogenetically analysed 14 new Finnish strains from 5 farms and all 40 strains with corresponding sequences available in GenBank. A part of the major non-structural (NS1) protein gene was amplified and analysed phylogenetically. A rooted nucleotide tree was constructed using the maximum parsimony method. The strains described in this study showed 86-100% nucleotide identity and were nearly identical on each farm. The ratio of synonymous to non-synonymous substitutions was approximately 2.7, indicating a mild purifying selection. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that AMDV strains form three groups (I-III), all of which contained Finnish strains. The tree inferred that the three lineages of AMDV have been introduced to Finland independently. The analysis suggested that AMDV strains do not cluster into genotypes based on geographical origin, year of isolation or pathogenicity. Based on these data, the molecular clock is not applicable to AMDV, and within this gene area no recombination was detected. PMID:18799272

  9. Molecular Epidemiological and Antibiotic Susceptibility Characterization of Brucella Isolates from Humans in Sicily, Italy▿

    PubMed Central

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Graziani, Caterina; Santangelo, Carmela; Xibilia, Maria Teresa; Imbriani, Alida; Amato, Rosa; Neri, Domenico; Cuccia, Mario; Rinnone, Sebastiano; Di Marco, Vincenzo; Ciuchini, Franco

    2007-01-01

    Brucellosis is a serious problem in Sicily. Brucella melitensis was identified as the species most frequently isolated in humans in Italy. No data, however, are available about the molecular epidemiological characterization of Brucella isolates from humans. We have conducted this study to molecularly characterize clinical isolates of Brucella spp. and to evaluate their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Twenty Brucella isolates were studied. Differential growth characteristics and DNA polymorphisms such as the restriction patterns of the PCR-amplified omp2a and omp2b genes, rpoB nucleotide sequencing, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of 16 loci (MLVA-16) were used to characterize the strains. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the E-test method on two different agar media, and the results were compared. All isolates were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3. rpoB nucleotide sequence analysis allowed the identification of two different genotypes of B. melitensis biovar 3. On the other hand, the MLVA-16 typing assay recognized 17 distinct genotypes. All isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics (rifampin, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and the Mueller-Hinton agar plate is recommended for antibiotic susceptibility testing by the E-test method. Our findings identify B. melitensis biovar 3 as the etiological agent isolated in Sicily and encourage the use of both molecular methods, and in particular of the MLVA-16 assay, in epidemiological trace-back analysis. This study represents the first epidemiological data from molecular typing of Brucella strains circulating in Italy and, in particular, in eastern Sicily. PMID:17634297

  10. Molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates from children in China

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Li-Hua; Liu, Meng-Juan; Xu, Wen-Chun; Cui, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Wu, Kai-Feng; Zhang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates in Chongqing, China. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) strains were from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and 32 carriage strains from healthy children from January 2010 to December 2013 at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Multilocus sequence typing was used to identify the sequence types (STs). Capsular serotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Drug susceptibility and resistance was determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations. Results: In this study, 11 serotypes were identified among the 83 S. pneumoniae clinical isolates tested. Prevalent serotypes were 19A (20.4%), 6A/B (20.4%), 19F (15.7%), 14 (14.5%), and 23F (10.8%). Serotype 19F was the most frequent carriage strain, and serotype 19A was the most frequent invasive strain. The ST983 was the most prevalent ST for carriage strains, and ST320 was the most prevalent ST for invasive strains. For gene analysis, psaA (99.5%) and piaA (98.6%) were present and much conserved in all pneumococci tested. The cps2A and pcsB genes were more frequent in invasive isolates than carriage strains. Antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal isolates to erythromycin, penicillin, meropenem, cefotaxime, and clindamycin were higher than the carriage isolates from children. Conclusion: Our epidemiological evidence shows that 19A, 6A/B, 19F, 14, and 23F remain the most prevalent serotypes, which can be targeted by PCV13. Genotypes and drug resistance varied between carriage and invasive strains. The PsaA and PiaA may be good protein vaccine candidates. PMID:27052283

  11. Low-dose ionising radiation and cardiovascular diseases--Strategies for molecular epidemiological studies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Michaela; Auvinen, Anssi; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Jourdain, Jean-Rene; Laurier, Dominique; Little, Mark P; Peters, Annette; Raj, Ken; Russell, Nicola S; Tapio, Soile; Zhang, Wei; Gomolka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that high-dose ionising radiation causes cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, the evidence for a causal relationship between long-term risk of cardiovascular diseases after moderate doses (0.5-5 Gy) is suggestive and weak after low doses (<0.5 Gy). However, evidence is emerging that doses under 0.5 Gy may also increase long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. This would have major implications for radiation protection with respect to medical use of radiation for diagnostic purposes and occupational or environmental radiation exposure. Therefore, it is of great importance to gain information about the presence and possible magnitude of radiation-related cardiovascular disease risk at doses of less than 0.5 Gy. The biological mechanisms implicated in any such effects are unclear and results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. Molecular epidemiological studies can improve the understanding of the pathogenesis and the risk estimation of radiation-induced circulatory disease at low doses. Within the European DoReMi (Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration) project, strategies to conduct molecular epidemiological studies in this field have been developed and evaluated. Key potentially useful European cohorts are the Mayak workers, other nuclear workers, uranium miners, Chernobyl liquidators, the Techa river residents and several diagnostic or low-dose radiotherapy patient cohorts. Criteria for informative studies are given and biomarkers to be investigated suggested. A close collaboration between epidemiology, biology and dosimetry is recommended, not only among experts in the radiation field, but also those in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26041268

  12. Molecular pathological epidemiology in diabetes mellitus and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary study field, which has emerged as an integrated approach of molecular pathology and epidemiology, and investigates the relationship between exogenous and endogenous exposure factors, tumor molecular signatures, and tumor initiation, progression, and response to treatment. Molecular epidemiology broadly encompasses MPE and conventional-type molecular epidemiology. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer-associated death worldwide and remains as a major public health challenge. Over the past few decades, a number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus (DM) is an established independent risk factor for HCC. However, how DM affects the occurrence and development of HCC remains as yet unclearly understood. MPE may be a promising approach to investigate the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis of DM in HCC, and provide some useful insights for this pathological process, although a few challenges must be overcome. This review highlights the recent advances in this field, including: (1) introduction of MPE; (2) HCC, risk factors, and DM as an established independent risk factor for HCC; (3) molecular pathology, molecular epidemiology, and MPE in DM and HCC; and (4) MPE studies in DM and risk of HCC. More MPE studies are expected to be performed in future and I believe that this field can provide some very important insights on the molecular mechanisms, diagnosis, personalized prevention and treatment for DM and risk of HCC. PMID:27721917

  13. Molecular epidemiological analysis of three hepatitis C virus outbreaks in Jammu and Kashmir State, India.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Sanjim; Sharma, Uma; Chaudhary, Artee; Prakash, Charu; Gupta, Sunil; Venkatesh, S

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are associated with unsafe injection practices, intravenous drug abuse and other exposure to blood and body fluids. We report here three outbreaks of HCV infection from Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) State, India, which occurred over a period of 3 years and in which molecular epidemiological investigations identified a presumptive common source of infection, most likely a single healthcare venue. Representative blood samples collected from cases of hepatitis C were sent to the National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) for molecular characterization. These samples were positive by HCV ELISA. Subsequently, specimens were also tested for the presence of HCV RNA by RT-PCR. Sequencing was carried out for all positive samples. A total of 812 cases were laboratory confirmed by HCV ELISA; a total of 115 samples were sent to the NCDC for RT-PCR, and 77 were positive. Subtype 3a of HCV was found in all samples from Anantnag (February 2013); and for subtype 3b, in all samples from Srinagar (May 2015). Subtypes 3a and 3g were identified from two samples from the Kulgam outbreak (July 2014). A detailed epidemiological investigation should be conducted whenever a cluster of HCV cases is revealed, as this potentially allows for the identification of larger outbreaks. Epidemiological investigations of outbreaks should be further supported by inclusion of molecular tests. Efforts to limit therapeutic injections to only those cases having strong medical/surgical indications and to restrict the use of non-sterile needles are essential to prevent transmission of HCV.

  14. Resistance to Tospoviruses in Vegetable Crops: Epidemiological and Molecular Aspects.

    PubMed

    Turina, Massimo; Kormelink, Richard; Resende, Renato O

    2016-08-01

    During the past three decades, the economic impact of tospoviruses has increased, causing high yield losses in a variety of crops and ornamentals. Owing to the difficulty in combating thrips vectors with insecticides, the best way to limit/prevent tospovirus-induced diseases involves a management strategy that includes virus resistance. This review briefly presents current tospovirus taxonomy, diversity, molecular biology, and cytopathology as an introduction to a more extensive description of the two main resistance genes employed against tospoviruses: the Sw5 gene in tomato and the Tsw in pepper. Natural and experimental resistance-breaking (RB) isolates allowed the identification of the viral avirulence protein triggering each of the two resistance gene products; epidemiology of RB isolates is discussed to reinforce the need for allelic variants and the need to search for new/alternative resistance genes. Ongoing efforts for alternative resistance strategies are described not only for Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in pepper and tomato but also for other vegetable crops heavily impacted by tospoviruses. PMID:27296139

  15. Norovirus infection in Belarus: occurrence and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Paklonskayal, Natallia Uladzimirauna; Amvrosieva, Tamara Vasil'evna; Dziadziulia, Kanstantsin Leanidavich; Baranouskaya, Natallia Mikalaeuna; Kishkurno, Elena Petrovna; Kluiko, Nina Leonidovna

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study is to analyze molecular epidemiologic surveillance for norovirus infection in Belarus over the past five years (2009-2013). Laboratory diagnostics was carried out by RT-PCR in 684 patients. Two regions of norovirus genome, localized in RNA-polymerase and capsid protein genes, were used for phylogenetic analysis. Noroviruses were predominant causative agents in adults and second only to rotaviruses in children, they also prevailed among aetiological agents of outbreaks (66.7% of outbreaks). In 2009-2013, the major norovirus genotype was GII.4 (58.3% of all genotyped isolates). Genovariant GII.4 2006b circulated in 2009 and 2010, genovariant GII.4 2009 New Orleans - in 2010 and 2012. In addition to GII.4, genotypes GII.6 (16.6%), GII.2 (4.1%), GII.3 (2.2%), and recombinant genotypes GII.g-GII.12 and GII.g-GII.1 (10.4% and 8.3%, respectively) circulated in Belarus. The findings indicate a significant contribution of noroviruses in development of sporadic morbidity and outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in Belarus. Outbreaks or prominent increases of sporadic morbidity were mostly due to the emergence of a new genotype, or an epidemic genovariant.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Norovirus in Korea in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Kim, Hyun Soo; Hyun, Jungwon; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Wonkeun

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis. The molecular epidemiology of norovirus exhibits temporal and geographical fluctuations, and new variants of the GII.4 genotype emerge every 2-3 years to cause global epidemics of acute gastroenteritis. We investigated GI and GII genotypes of human norovirus strains isolated from patients with acute gastroenteritis in Korea in 2013. Norovirus antigen test was performed on 2,980 fecal specimens from January to December 2013. RNA was extracted from norovirus antigen-positive fecal suspensions, and the norovirus capsid (VP1) and polymerase (RdRp) genes were characterized by RT-PCR and sequencing. Of the 230 genotyped strains, GII.4 (77.3%) was the most frequently observed capsid genotype, followed by GII.3 (6.1%) and GII.13 (3.9%). A norovirus GII.4 variant, GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney 2012, was the most frequently found polymerase/capsid genotype (65.7%), followed by GII.P17/GII.17 (2.1%) and GII.P21/GII.3 (2.1%). Phylogenetic, similarity, and capsid epitope analyses of GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney 2012 strains were performed. We concluded that the norovirus GII.4 variant, GII.Pe/GII.4 Sydney 2012, was the main cause of norovirus-related gastroenteritis in Korea in 2013. PMID:26421289

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Aleutian mink disease virus in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjun; Wu, Wei; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Hailing; Bai, Xue; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Xijun

    2014-05-12

    Aleutian mink disease (mink plasmacytosis) is a very severe immune-complex-mediated disease affecting minks. It is caused by the Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV). To obtain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of AMDV in China, a total of 420 samples were collected from mink farms in five major mink-farming provinces in China. After testing serum antibodies using counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP), 23 of the 340 positive samples were randomly selected and analyzed. The full length of the major structural protein gene (VP2) from all the samples was amplified and sequenced. The sequences in the twenty-three samples from 5 farms in 5 provinces were phylogenetically analyzed, and eleven were found to have homologous sequences in GenBank. A rooted phylogenetic tree was constructed using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic (UPGMA) method. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AMDV strains formed five groups (I-VI), and four of them contained Chinese strains. The tree showed that the two AMVD lineages had been introduced to China independently. Over 70% of the Chinese isolates were classified into two groups, all of which contained Chinese strains. The results of the analysis suggested that the distribution of the AMDV strains was not based on geographical origin, and both indigenous AMDV and imported AMDV were prevalent in the primary mink production areas in China. PMID:24561116

  18. Molecular epidemiology of human coxsackievirus A16 strains

    PubMed Central

    YU, WENMIN; XU, HUANXIN; YIN, CHANGCHANG

    2016-01-01

    The hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) epidemics have mainly been caused by human enterovirus 71 and human coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), which circulated alternatively or together in the epidemic area. The aim of the present study was to provide guidance in the prevention and control of HFMD from CA16 infection. The molecular epidemiology of the human CA16 strains was investigated. Overall, 1,151 specimens (throat swabs) were collected from 1,151 patients with HFMD symptoms. The results of the homology comparison in the VP1 of CA16 strains showed that the CA16 strains belonged to the B1b subgenotype. The difference of the 6 CA16 strains analyzed showed that the most prominent strain was the A genotype, and the most close strains were the B1 gene subtype, particularly the B1b gene subtype. With regards to the amino acids, in addition to the A genotype, the differences of amino acids with other gene subtype was not significant. The present data suggest that more effective and highly targeted intervention mechanisms could be developed for the prevention and control of HFMD. PMID:27284420

  19. Delta hepatitis: molecular biology and clinical and epidemiological features.

    PubMed Central

    Polish, L B; Gallagher, M; Fields, H A; Hadler, S C

    1993-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus, discovered in 1977, requires the help of hepatitis B virus to replicate in hepatocytes and is an important cause of acute, fulminant, and chronic liver disease in many regions of the world. Because of the helper function of hepatitis delta virus, infection with it occurs either as a coinfection with hepatitis B or as a superinfection of a carrier of hepatitis B surface antigen. Although the mechanisms of transmission are similar to those of hepatitis B virus, the patterns of transmission of delta virus vary widely around the world. In regions of the world in which hepatitis delta virus infection is not endemic, the disease is confined to groups at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B infection and high-risk hepatitis B carriers. Because of the propensity of this viral infection to cause fulminant as well as chronic liver disease, continued incursion of hepatitis delta virus into areas of the world where persistent hepatitis B infection is endemic will have serious implications. Prevention depends on the widespread use of hepatitis B vaccine. This review focuses on the molecular biology and the clinical and epidemiologic features of this important viral infection. PMID:8358704

  20. Molecular epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Knowles, N J; Samuel, A R

    2003-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the most economically important veterinary pathogen due to its highly infectious nature, ability to cause persistent infections and long term effects on the condition and productivity of the many animal species it affects. Countries which have the disease have many trade restrictions placed upon them. In the last 15 years there have been significant advances in the understanding of FMD epidemiology. These have largely been due to the application of the molecular biological techniques of polymerase chain-reaction amplification and nucleotide sequencing. In the World Reference Laboratory for FMD (Pirbright, UK), a large sequence database has been built up. This database has been used to aid in the global tracing of virus movements. It has been possible to genetically group many FMDV's based on their geographic origin and this has led to their being referred to as topotypes. The implications of this are that inter-regional spread of viruses can often be easily recognised and any evolutionary changes which subsequently occur can be monitored. Using these techniques, for the first time, we have been able to unequivocally show the recent pandemic spread of a FMDV type O strain through the whole of Asia and into Africa and Europe. This type of surveillance will become increasingly important as further globalisation of markets occurs. An increased understanding of how FMDV strains move between geographic regions will play a pivotal role in the development of future disease control strategies.

  1. Molecular diagnosis and epidemiology of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chow, V T

    1997-11-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue fever contributes towards appropriate management of the disease and its potentially severe complications. Better and more rapid molecular procedures are increasingly available for detecting dengue viral RNA, antibodies and antigens. Using consensus primers based on the conserved non-structural-3 gene, the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique can amplify all four dengue virus types as well as certain flaviviruses. Consensus primers used together with four type-specific downstream primers in single-step or semi-nested RT-PCR formats can discriminate the specific dengue virus type by virtue of the diagnostic size of the RT-PCR target fragment on agarose gel electrophoresis. Alternatively, RT-PCR products may be labelled with digoxigenin and allowed to hybridise with individual biotinylated type-specific PCR primers which act as capture probes immobilised on solid phase via streptavidin-coated tubes. With automated instrumentation for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the hybridised RT-PCR products can be quantitated spectrophotometrically via anti-digoxigenin antibodies conjugated with an enzyme which reacts with colourimetric substrate. While RT-PCR is highly sensitive, specific and successfully identifies the dengue virus type in clinical serum samples and adult Aedes mosquitoes, it generally yields positive results in viraemic sera collected within 2 to 5 days of pyrexia. Sera obtained after the period of viraemia are more likely to be positive by serological tests such as IgM capture ELISA or the commercial Dengue Blot kit. The RT-PCR primers can also be utilised for direct cycle dideoxy DNA sequencing to monitor the molecular epidemiology and evolution of geographically and temporally separated virus strains. To exemplify this, nucleotide and amino acid sequence data as well as phylogenetic trees of several strains of dengue 1 and 2 viruses from patients and field-caught Aedes mosquitoes are

  2. The Current Status of the Disease Caused by Enterovirus 71 Infections: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Molecular Epidemiology, and Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections have a major public health impact in the Asia-Pacific region. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular epidemiology of EV71 infection as well as EV71 vaccine development. Previous studies were found using the search terms "enterovirus 71" and "epidemiology" or "pathogenesis" or "molecular epidemiology" or "vaccine" in Medline and PubMed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. The reported epidemiology of cases caused by EV71 infection varied from country to country; seasonal variations in incidence were observed. Most cases of EV71 infection that resulted in hospitalization for complications occurred in children less than five years old. The brainstem was the most likely major target of EV71 infection. The emergence of the EV71 epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region has been associated with the circulation of different genetic lineages (genotypes B3, B4, C1, C2, and C4) that appear to be undergoing rapid evolutionary changes. The relationship between the gene structure of the EV71 virus and the factors that ensure its survival, circulation, and evasion of immunity is still unknown. EV71 infection has emerged as an important global public health problem. Vaccine development, including the development of inactivated whole-virus live attenuated, subviral particles, and DNA vaccines, has been progressing. PMID:27618078

  3. Clinical, Epidemiologic, Histopathologic and Molecular Features of an Unexplained Dermopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Michele L.; Selby, Joseph V.; Katz, Kenneth A.; Cantrell, Virginia; Braden, Christopher R.; Parise, Monica E.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Lewin-Smith, Michael R.; Kalasinsky, Victor F.; Goldstein, Felicia C.; Hightower, Allen W.; Papier, Arthur; Lewis, Brian; Motipara, Sarita; Eberhard, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Morgellons is a poorly characterized constellation of symptoms, with the primary manifestations involving the skin. We conducted an investigation of this unexplained dermopathy to characterize the clinical and epidemiologic features and explore potential etiologies. Methods A descriptive study was conducted among persons at least 13 years of age and enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) during 2006–2008. A case was defined as the self-reported emergence of fibers or materials from the skin accompanied by skin lesions and/or disturbing skin sensations. We collected detailed epidemiologic data, performed clinical evaluations and geospatial analyses and analyzed materials collected from participants' skin. Results We identified 115 case-patients. The prevalence was 3.65 (95% CI = 2.98, 4.40) cases per 100,000 enrollees. There was no clustering of cases within the 13-county KPNC catchment area (p = .113). Case-patients had a median age of 52 years (range: 17–93) and were primarily female (77%) and Caucasian (77%). Multi-system complaints were common; 70% reported chronic fatigue and 54% rated their overall health as fair or poor with mean Physical Component Scores and Mental Component Scores of 36.63 (SD = 12.9) and 35.45 (SD = 12.89), respectively. Cognitive deficits were detected in 59% of case-patients and 63% had evidence of clinically significant somatic complaints; 50% had drugs detected in hair samples and 78% reported exposure to solvents. Solar elastosis was the most common histopathologic abnormality (51% of biopsies); skin lesions were most consistent with arthropod bites or chronic excoriations. No parasites or mycobacteria were detected. Most materials collected from participants' skin were composed of cellulose, likely of cotton origin. Conclusions This unexplained dermopathy was rare among this population of Northern California residents, but associated with significantly reduced health-related quality of

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis among Immigrants in Hamburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Diel, Roland; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Niemann, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    To study the characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) in foreign-born individuals living in Hamburg, Germany, and to discover in what way foreign-born individuals contribute to the incidence of TB in Hamburg, an in-depth epidemiological study was performed by a combination of classical and molecular methods. In total, 796 patients with TB were analyzed between 1997 and 2002 (88.7% of all patients with culture-positive TB in the study period). Of this total, 334 were foreign-born patients from 43 different countries. Of these, only 31 cases were identified as a consequence of the screening of 12,176 asylum seekers at entry. Of the foreign-born patients, 41.9% had been living in Germany for more than 5 years. On the basis of the IS6110 typing results for isolates from all patients, 246 patients (31%) were classified into 68 clusters, with each cluster containing from 2 to 38 patients. Among foreign-born individuals, 86 (26%) were represented in 40 clusters. In multivariate analyses, a previous history as a TB contact had the highest predictive risk for clustering among foreign-born patients, followed by drug addiction, alcohol dependence, being an asylum seeker, and unemployment. Epidemiological links verifying recent transmission could be confirmed for 39 of the 86 foreign-born members (45.3%) who formed a cluster, comprising 16 source patients and 23 directly infected patients. Of 2,227 previously known contacts of foreign-born patients subjected to traditional contact investigation, 14 foreign-born individuals (0.6%) subsequently contracted culture-confirmed TB, but only 9 transmissions could be confirmed by IS6110 typing (39.1% of the 23 confirmed fresh infections retrospectively confirmed by IS6110 typing). In conclusion, only a minority of TB cases among foreign-born individuals are detected by screening of asylum seekers or conventional contact tracing. Recent transmission does not play an important role in TB among immigrants in Hamburg. PMID:15243044

  5. Conductive Nanowires Templated by Molecular Brushes.

    PubMed

    Raguzin, Ivan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of conductive nanowires using polymer bottle brushes as templates. In our approach, we synthesized poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate methyl iodide quaternary salt brushes by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization, loaded them with palladium salt, and reduced them in order to form metallic nanowires with average lengths and widths of 300 and 20 nm, respectively. The obtained nanowires were deposited between conductive gold pads and were connected to them by sputtering of additional pads to form an electric circuit. We connected the nanowires in an electric circuit and demonstrated that the conductivity of these nanowires is around 100 S·m(-1). PMID:26418290

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Candida albicans and its closely related yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  8. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA PCR in the Teaching of Molecular Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinoso, Elina B.; Bettera, Susana G.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe a basic practical laboratory designed for fifth-year undergraduate students of Microbiology as part of the Epidemiology course. This practice provides the students with the tools for molecular epidemiological analysis of pathogenic microorganisms using a rapid and simple PCR technique. The aim of this work was to assay…

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  10. The contribution of molecular epidemiology to the understanding and control of viral diseases of salmonid aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Snow, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a science which utilizes molecular biology to define the distribution of disease in a population (descriptive epidemiology) and relies heavily on integration of traditional (or analytical) epidemiological approaches to identify the etiological determinants of this distribution. The study of viral pathogens of aquaculture has provided many exciting opportunities to apply such tools. This review considers the extent to which molecular epidemiological studies have contributed to better understanding and control of disease in aquaculture, drawing on examples of viral diseases of salmonid fish of commercial significance including viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), salmonid alphavirus (SAV) and infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). Significant outcomes of molecular epidemiological studies include:Improved taxonomic classification of viruses. A better understanding of the natural distribution of viruses. An improved understanding of the origins of viral pathogens in aquaculture. An improved understanding of the risks of translocation of pathogens outwith their natural host range. An increased ability to trace the source of new disease outbreaks. Development of a basis for ensuring development of appropriate diagnostic tools. An ability to classify isolates and thus target future research aimed at better understanding biological function. While molecular epidemiological studies have no doubt already made a significant contribution in these areas, the advent of new technologies such as pyrosequencing heralds a quantum leap in the ability to generate descriptive molecular sequence data. The ability of molecular epidemiology to fulfil its potential to translate complex disease pathways into relevant fish health policy is thus unlikely to be limited by the generation of descriptive molecular markers. More likely, full realisation of the potential to better explain viral transmission pathways will be dependent on the ability to assimilate

  11. Impact of immigration on HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in West Africa, Maghreb and Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Miri, Lamia; Wakrim, Lahcen; Kassar, Hassène; Hemminki, Kari; Khyatti, Meriem

    2014-01-01

    There is global concern about the relation between international migration and the course of the AIDS epidemic. Maghreb is a North African region, which lies between sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. It has been turned recently into a region of immigration, since there are more and more flows of West African migrants hoping to reach European countries. Here we provide an overview on HIV-1 molecular epidemiology particularly in West African countries, Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) and southern European countries (Spain, France, and Italy). The studies conducted in several countries of the region revealed different features of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology, especially for the distribution of viral subtypes and for transmitted drug resistance profiles. Furthermore, migration from West Africa to Europe seems to be a potential source of non-B subtype mobility to Maghreb and eventually to southern Europe, where HIV-1 non-B variants significantly increased in the last 10 to 15 years. As genetic differences between subtypes might impact the drug resistance pathways, it is important to provide continuous surveillance programs for the early detection of new variants spreading in the population before they become more prevalent, and to identify resistance profiles in different infected populations, especially migrants. PMID:24802562

  12. Impact of immigration on HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in West Africa, Maghreb and Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Miri, Lamia; Wakrim, Lahcen; Kassar, Hassène; Hemminki, Kari; Khyatti, Meriem

    2014-01-01

    There is global concern about the relation between international migration and the course of the AIDS epidemic. Maghreb is a North African region, which lies between sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. It has been turned recently into a region of immigration, since there are more and more flows of West African migrants hoping to reach European countries. Here we provide an overview on HIV-1 molecular epidemiology particularly in West African countries, Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) and southern European countries (Spain, France, and Italy). The studies conducted in several countries of the region revealed different features of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology, especially for the distribution of viral subtypes and for transmitted drug resistance profiles. Furthermore, migration from West Africa to Europe seems to be a potential source of non-B subtype mobility to Maghreb and eventually to southern Europe, where HIV-1 non-B variants significantly increased in the last 10 to 15 years. As genetic differences between subtypes might impact the drug resistance pathways, it is important to provide continuous surveillance programs for the early detection of new variants spreading in the population before they become more prevalent, and to identify resistance profiles in different infected populations, especially migrants.

  13. [Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus in Northern Cyprus].

    PubMed

    Arıkan, Ayşe; Şanlıdağ, Tamer; Süer, Kaya; Sayan, Murat; Akçalı, Sinem; Güler, Emrah

    2016-01-01

    Identification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains and understanding of molecular epidemiological characteristics are important for the effective surveillance of HBV infections. Genotype D is dominant in studies performed in Turkey but it is known that cases infected with genotypes A, E, G and H also exists. In contrast, there are no data regarding the molecular epidemiologic characteristics of the HBV in Northern Cyprus. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of genotypes and subgenotypes of HBV among the people living, educating and working in Northern Cyprus. A total of 160 cases (1.2%) who were HBsAg seropositive out of 13.892 subjects admitted to Nicosia, Near East University Hospital microbiology laboratory for the routine control and to blood center for donor screening tests between November 2011 to September 2014, were included in the study. HBV-DNA levels in the HBsAg positive cases were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and genotypes/subgenotypes were determined by sequence analysis of the viral pol gene (reverse transcriptase [rt] region, between 80-250. aminoacids). Sixty samples (60/160, 37.5%) were excluded from sequencing analysis due to negative and/or very low (< 30 IU/ml) HBV-DNA levels, so 100 samples were included in sequence analysis. Ninety-six of those cases (13 female, 87 male; mean age: 35.51 ± 12.88 years) were anti-HBc IgG, 95 were anti-HBe and five were HBeAg positive, with a mean HBV-DNA level of 5.36 x 10(6) ± 3.58 x 10(7) IU/ml. As 32 (32%) samples yielded HBV-DNA level below the threshold of 1000 IU/ml, sequence analyses were unsuccesful, eventually 68 (68/160, 42.5%) samples could be phylogenetically analyzed. The distribution of HBV genotypes/subgenotypes were found as follows: 48 were (70.6%) D/D1; four were (5.9%) D/D2; one was (1.5%) D/D3, five were (7.4%) A/A1, two were (2.9%) A/A2 and eight were (11.8%) genotype E. Among the most frequent D1 strains, 60.4% (29/48) cases were from Turkish; single

  14. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus in Misiones, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mojsiejczuk, Laura Noelia; Torres, Carolina; Sevic, Ina; Badano, Inés; Malan, Richard; Flichman, Diego Martin; Liotta, Domingo Javier; Campos, Rodolfo Hector

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. The aims of this study were to describe the molecular epidemiology of HBV in the Province of Misiones, Argentina and estimate the phylodynamic of the main groups in a Bayesian coalescent framework. To this end, partial or complete genome sequences were obtained from 52 blood donor candidates. The phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequences of S/P region showed a predominance of genotype D (65.4%), followed by genotype F (30.8%) and genotype A as a minority (3.8%). At subgenotype level, the circulation of subgenotypes D3 (42.3%), D2 (13.5%), F1b (11.5%) and F4 (9.6%) was mainly identified. The Bayesian coalescent analysis of 29 complete genome sequences for the main groups revealed that the subgenotypes D2 and D3 had several introductions to the region, with ancestors dating back from 1921 to 1969 and diversification events until the late '70s. The genotype F in Misiones has a more recent history; subgenotype F4 isolates were intermixed with sequences from Argentina and neighboring countries and only one significant cluster dated back in 1994 was observed. Subgenotype F1b isolates exhibited low genetic distance and formed a closely related monophyletic cluster, suggesting a very recent introduction. In conclusion, the phylogenetic and coalescent analyses showed that the European genotype D has a higher circulation, a longer history of diversification and may be responsible for the largest proportion of chronic HBV infections in the Province of Misiones. Genotype F, especially subgenotype F1b, had a more recent introduction and its diversification in the last 20years might be related to its involvement in new transmission events.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infection in Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Moumita; Bose, Sujoy; Saikia, Anjan; Medhi, Subhash; Deka, Manab

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to screen the molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Northeast India (NEI) who are ethnically distinct, tribal dominated and of lower socio-economic status with almost no information available from NEI on these aspects. Briefly, 3 ml blood was collected from 324 random liver disease cases with jaundice, receiving care at Central Hospital, N.F. Railway, Guwahati, Assam with informed consent. The patients detected with HAV-IgM positive status were included and were stratified as acute viral hepatitis (AVH) and fulminant hepatitis (FHF) based on clinical profile. Viral RNA was isolated and HAV-RNA was detected by Real-time PCR using primers for the VP3-VP1 region. HAV genotyping was studied by PCR-direct sequencing-phylogenetic analysis approach using the VP1/2A region of HAV isolates. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS13.0 software. A total of 69 cases were HAV infected with two HBV co-infected cases (n = 69 + 2 = 71), 62 cases and two co-infected cases were AVH and others were FHF cases. HAV infection was predominant in especially in the young and adult age group. HAV-RNA was detected in 28 cases, out of which 19 cases could be genotyped (12 AVH, 7 FHF); which showed the prevalence of genotype IIIA or IA only. Although HAV genotype IIIA was the major genotype in both the AVH (10/12, 83.33%) and FHF (5/7, 71.43%) group, but the difference in distribution of genotypes in AVH and FHF cases was statistically non-significant (P = 0.550). HAV genotype IIIA is associated with the majority of HAV infected cases and severity in NEI.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of measles in India, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Wairagkar, Niteen; Chowdhury, Deepika; Vaidya, Sunil; Sikchi, Sarika; Shaikh, Naseem; Hungund, Laxman; Tomar, R S; Biswas, D; Yadav, K; Mahanta, J; Das, V N R; Yergolkar, Prasanna; Gunasekaran, P; Raja, D; Jadi, R; Ramamurty, Nalini; Mishra, A C

    2011-07-01

    Measles is a childhood disease that causes great morbidity and mortality in India and worldwide. Because measles surveillance in India is in its infancy, there is a paucity of countrywide data on circulating Measles virus genotypes. This study was conducted in 21 of 28 States and 2 of 7 Union Territories of India by MeaslesNetIndia, a national network of 27 centers and sentinel practitioners. MeaslesNetIndia investigated 52 measles outbreaks in geographically representative areas from 2005 through June 2010. All outbreaks were serologically confirmed by detection of antimeasles virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in serum or oral fluid samples. Molecular studies, using World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended protocols obtained 203 N-gene, 40 H-gene, and 4 M-gene sequences during this period. Measles genotypes D4, D7, and D8 were found to be circulating in various parts of India during the study period. Further phylogenetic analysis revealed 4 lineages of Indian D8 genotypes: D8a, D8b, D8c, and D8d. This study generated a large, countrywide sequence database that can form the baseline for future molecular studies on measles virus transmission pathways in India. This study has created support and capabilities for countrywide measles molecular surveillance that must be carried forward.

  17. Molecular typing of Salmonella from Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil, showing the epidemiological relationship between poultry and human infection.

    PubMed

    Góis, P B P; Carneiro, M R P; Jain, S; Santos, M I S; Batista, M V A; Cândido, A L

    2015-09-25

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) has been widely used for epidemiological and phylogenetic purposes ow-ing to its rapidity and efficiency. The aim of this study was to perform genome typing of Salmonella samples isolated from different sources by RAPD profiling. Thirty-three Salmonella samples from the bacterial collection of the Laboratório de Virologia Comparada, Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Brazil, and two standard samples were used. RAPD profiling was conducted using six primers of the Ready-To-Go RAPD system. The amplified products were electro-phoresed on 5% polyacrylamide gel and silver-stained. RAPD analysis resulted in reproducible and stable banding patterns and showed high genetic diversity among the isolated strains. The Primer P1-generated dendrogram showed an epidemiologic relationship between the human and poultry isolated samples, highlighting the usefulness of RAPD for molecular typing and epidemiological studies.

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Natural Rubber Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Ma, Lian-Xiang; Tang, Yuan-Zheng; Wang, Ze-Peng; Li, Wei; Kukulka, David

    2015-04-01

    Thermal conductivity of natural rubber has been studied by classic molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations are performed on natural rubber models using the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) and the Green-Kubo molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Thermal conductivity results are found to be very sensitive to the time step used in the simulations. For a time step of 0.1 fs, the converged thermal conductivity is 0.35 W/mK. Additionally the anisotropic thermal conductivity of a specially-modeled natural rubber model with straight molecular chains was studied and values of thermal conductivity parallel to the molecular chains was found to be 1.71 W/mK and the anisotropy, 2Kz/(Kx + Ky), was 2.67.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in cattle and other food animals [Spanish][Epidemiología molecular de cryptosporidiosis en el ganado vacuno y en otros animales de abasto

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in cattle and other food animals Cryptosporidium is an enteric protozoan parasite that infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts. Cryptosporidial infection is known now as one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and livestock. Worldwide prevale...

  20. Combining Radiation Epidemiology With Molecular Biology-Changing From Health Risk Estimates to Therapeutic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The authors herein summarize six presentations dedicated to the key session "molecular radiation epidemiology" of the ConRad meeting 2015. These presentations were chosen in order to highlight the promise when combining conventional radiation epidemiology with molecular biology. Conventional radiation epidemiology uses dose estimates for risk predictions on health. However, combined with molecular biology, dose-dependent bioindicators of effect hold the promise to improve clinical diagnostics and to provide target molecules for potential therapeutic intervention. One out of the six presentations exemplified the use of radiation-induced molecular changes as biomarkers of exposure by measuring stabile chromosomal translocations. The remaining five presentations focused on molecular changes used as bioindicators of the effect. These bioindicators of the effect could be used for diagnostic purposes on colon cancers (genomic instability), thyroid cancer (CLIP2), or head and neck squamous cell cancers. Therapeutic implications of gene expression changes were examined in Chernobyl thyroid cancer victims and Mayak workers. PMID:27356062

  1. Combining Radiation Epidemiology With Molecular Biology-Changing From Health Risk Estimates to Therapeutic Intervention.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Port, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The authors herein summarize six presentations dedicated to the key session "molecular radiation epidemiology" of the ConRad meeting 2015. These presentations were chosen in order to highlight the promise when combining conventional radiation epidemiology with molecular biology. Conventional radiation epidemiology uses dose estimates for risk predictions on health. However, combined with molecular biology, dose-dependent bioindicators of effect hold the promise to improve clinical diagnostics and to provide target molecules for potential therapeutic intervention. One out of the six presentations exemplified the use of radiation-induced molecular changes as biomarkers of exposure by measuring stabile chromosomal translocations. The remaining five presentations focused on molecular changes used as bioindicators of the effect. These bioindicators of the effect could be used for diagnostic purposes on colon cancers (genomic instability), thyroid cancer (CLIP2), or head and neck squamous cell cancers. Therapeutic implications of gene expression changes were examined in Chernobyl thyroid cancer victims and Mayak workers.

  2. A molecular epidemiological survey of Babesia, Hepatozoon, Ehrlichia and Anaplasma infections of dogs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shotaro; Tateno, Morihiro; Ichikawa, Yasuaki; Endo, Yasuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Tick-borne diseases are often encountered in canine clinical practice. In the present study, a molecular epidemiological survey of dogs in Japan was conducted to understand the prevalence and geographical distribution of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. Pathogen-derived DNA in blood samples obtained from 722 dogs with a history of exposure to ticks and/or fleas was examined by PCR. The prevalence of Babesia gibsoni, Babesia odocoilei-like species, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. was 2.4% (16/722), 0.1% (1/722), 2.5% (18/722) and 1.5% (11/722), respectively. While B. gibsoni and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. were detected in the western part of Japan, H. canis was detected in Tohoku area in addition to western and central parts of Japan.

  3. A molecular epidemiological survey of Babesia, Hepatozoon, Ehrlichia and Anaplasma infections of dogs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shotaro; Tateno, Morihiro; Ichikawa, Yasuaki; Endo, Yasuyuki

    2015-10-01

    Tick-borne diseases are often encountered in canine clinical practice. In the present study, a molecular epidemiological survey of dogs in Japan was conducted to understand the prevalence and geographical distribution of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. Pathogen-derived DNA in blood samples obtained from 722 dogs with a history of exposure to ticks and/or fleas was examined by PCR. The prevalence of Babesia gibsoni, Babesia odocoilei-like species, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. was 2.4% (16/722), 0.1% (1/722), 2.5% (18/722) and 1.5% (11/722), respectively. While B. gibsoni and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. were detected in the western part of Japan, H. canis was detected in Tohoku area in addition to western and central parts of Japan. PMID:25947226

  4. A molecular epidemiological survey of Babesia, Hepatozoon, Ehrlichia and Anaplasma infections of dogs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KUBO, Shotaro; TATENO, Morihiro; ICHIKAWA, Yasuaki; ENDO, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne diseases are often encountered in canine clinical practice. In the present study, a molecular epidemiological survey of dogs in Japan was conducted to understand the prevalence and geographical distribution of Babesia spp., Hepatozoon spp., Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. Pathogen-derived DNA in blood samples obtained from 722 dogs with a history of exposure to ticks and/or fleas was examined by PCR. The prevalence of Babesia gibsoni, Babesia odocoilei-like species, Hepatozoon canis and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. was 2.4% (16/722), 0.1% (1/722), 2.5% (18/722) and 1.5% (11/722), respectively. While B. gibsoni and Ehrlichia spp./Anaplasma spp. were detected in the western part of Japan, H. canis was detected in Tohoku area in addition to western and central parts of Japan. PMID:25947226

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Rotavirus in Cats in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Iturriza-Gómara, M.; Dove, W.; Sandrasegaram, M.; Nakagomi, T.; Nakagomi, O.; Cunliffe, N.; Radford, A. D.; Morgan, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  6. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus in cats in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    German, A C; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Dove, W; Sandrasegaram, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Cunliffe, N; Radford, A D; Morgan, K L

    2015-02-01

    Rotaviruses are leading causes of gastroenteritis in the young of many species. Molecular epidemiological studies in children suggest that interspecies transmission contributes to rotavirus strain diversity in people. However, population-based studies of rotaviruses in animals are few. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors for infection, and genetic diversity of rotavirus A in a cross-sectional survey of cats housed within 25 rescue catteries across the United Kingdom. Morning litter tray fecal samples were collected during the winter and summer in 2012 from all pens containing kittens and a random sample of those housing adult cats. Group A rotavirus RNA was detected by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and positive samples were G and P genotyped using nested VP4 and VP7 PCR assays. A total of 1,727 fecal samples were collected from 1,105 pens. Overall, the prevalence of rotavirus was 3.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 4.9%). Thirteen out of 25 (52%; 95% CI, 31.3 to 72.2%) centers housed at least one rotavirus-positive cat. The prevalence of rotavirus was associated with season (odds ratio, 14.8 [95% CI, 1.1 to 200.4]; P = 0.04) but not age or diarrhea. It was higher during the summer (4.7%; 95% CI, 1.2 to 8.3%) than in winter (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 1.5%). Asymptomatic epidemics of infection were detected in two centers. G genotypes were characterized for 19 (33.3%) of the 57 rotavirus-positive samples and P genotypes for 36 (59.7%). Two rotavirus genotypes were identified, G3P[9] and G6P[9]. This is the first population-based study of rotavirus in cats and the first report of feline G6P[9], which questions the previous belief that G6P[9] in people is of bovine origin. PMID:25411173

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Brucella abortus in Northern Ireland—1991 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Andrew; Mallon, Thomas; Skuce, Robin; Groussaud, Pauline; Dainty, Amanda; Graham, Judith; Jones, Kerri; Pollock, Lorraine; Whatmore, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses worldwide. Bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus has far reaching animal health and economic impacts at both the local and national levels. Alongside traditional veterinary epidemiology, the use of molecular typing has recently been applied to inform on bacterial population structure and identify epidemiologically-linked cases of infection. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat VNTR analysis (MLVA) was used to investigate the molecular epidemiology of a well-characterised Brucella abortus epidemic in Northern Ireland involving 387 herds between 1991 and 2012. Results MLVA identified 98 unique B. abortus genotypes from disclosing isolates in the 387 herds involved in the epidemic. Clustering algorithms revealed the relatedness of many of these genotypes. Combined with epidemiological information on chronology of infection and geographic location, these genotype data helped to identify 7 clonal complexes which underpinned the outbreak over the defined period. Hyper-variability of some VNTR loci both within herds and individual animals led to detection of multiple genotypes associated with single outbreaks. However with dense sampling, these genotypes could still be associated with specific clonal complexes thereby permitting inference of epidemiological links. MLVA- based epidemiological monitoring data were congruent with an independent classical veterinary epidemiology study carried out in the same territory. Conclusions MLVA is a useful tool in ongoing disease surveillance of B. abortus outbreaks, especially when combined with accurate epidemiological information on disease tracings, geographical clustering of cases and chronology of infection. PMID:26325586

  8. Tracking the molecular epidemiology of Brazilian Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda M F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Myrrha, Luciana W; Fietto, Juliana L R; Silva, Abelardo; Almeida, Márcia R

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease of young chickens caused by Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Genome segment A encodes the capsid protein (VP2), while segment B encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In the present study, we trace the molecular epidemiology of IBDV in Brazil by analyzing 29 isolates collected in the major regions of poultry production. To genetically characterize the isolates, phylogenetic and population dynamic analyses were conducted using 68 VP1 (2634 nt) and 102 VP2 (1356 nt) coding sequences from IBDV isolates from different regions of the world. Furthermore, the evolution of IBDV was analyzed by characterizing the selective forces that operated during the diversification of viral isolates. We show that IBDV isolates were introduced into Brazil mainly from the Netherlands and the USA. These introductions were associated with all Brazilian poultry production regions analyzed in this work. In addition, we show that the evolution of IBDV has been shaped by a combination of very low recombination rates and relatively high rates of nucleotide substitution (2.988×10(-4) for VP1 and 3.2937×10(-4) for VP2), which themselves are a function of purifying selection operating on VP1 and VP2. Furthermore, our extended Bayesian skyline plot suggests that the increase in the effective population size of isolates of IBDV is consistent with its epidemiological history, with a large increase during the emergence of acute outbreaks of IBD in the 1980s.

  9. Apocalypse...now? Molecular epidemiology, predictive genetic tests, and social communication of genetic contents.

    PubMed

    Castiel, L D

    1999-01-01

    The author analyzes the underlying theoretical aspects in the construction of the molecular watershed of epidemiology and the concept of genetic risk, focusing on issues raised by contemporary reality: new technologies, globalization, proliferation of communications strategies, and the dilution of identity matrices. He discusses problems pertaining to the establishment of such new interdisciplinary fields as molecular epidemiology and molecular genetics. Finally, he analyzes the repercussions of the social communication of genetic content, especially as related to predictive genetic tests and cloning of animals, based on triumphal, deterministic metaphors sustaining beliefs relating to the existence and supremacy of concepts such as 'purity', 'essence', and 'unification' of rational, integrated 'I's/egos'. PMID:10089550

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Laguna Negra Virus, Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth S.; Medeiros, Daniele B.A.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.; Simith, Darlene B.; Pereira, Armando de S.; Elkhoury, Mauro R.; Santos, Elizabeth Davi; Lavocat, Marília; Marques, Aparecido A.; Via, Alba V.G.; Kohl, Vânia A.; Terças, Ana C.P.; D`Andrea, Paulo; Bonvícino, Cibele R.; Sampaio de Lemos, Elba R.

    2012-01-01

    We associated Laguna Negra virus with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Mato Grosso State, Brazil, and a previously unidentified potential host, the Calomys callidus rodent. Genetic testing revealed homologous sequencing in specimens from 20 humans and 8 mice. Further epidemiologic studies may lead to control of HPS in Mato Grosso State. PMID:22607717

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis are enteric protozoan parasites that infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts including humans. Infections with both parasites are known as one of the most common causes of diarrhea in humans and livestock. The epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis and giardias...

  12. The Current Status of the Disease Caused by Enterovirus 71 Infections: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Molecular Epidemiology, and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections have a major public health impact in the Asia-Pacific region. We reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and molecular epidemiology of EV71 infection as well as EV71 vaccine development. Previous studies were found using the search terms “enterovirus 71” and “epidemiology” or “pathogenesis” or “molecular epidemiology” or “vaccine” in Medline and PubMed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. The reported epidemiology of cases caused by EV71 infection varied from country to country; seasonal variations in incidence were observed. Most cases of EV71 infection that resulted in hospitalization for complications occurred in children less than five years old. The brainstem was the most likely major target of EV71 infection. The emergence of the EV71 epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region has been associated with the circulation of different genetic lineages (genotypes B3, B4, C1, C2, and C4) that appear to be undergoing rapid evolutionary changes. The relationship between the gene structure of the EV71 virus and the factors that ensure its survival, circulation, and evasion of immunity is still unknown. EV71 infection has emerged as an important global public health problem. Vaccine development, including the development of inactivated whole-virus live attenuated, subviral particles, and DNA vaccines, has been progressing. PMID:27618078

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Entamoeba: First Description of Entamoeba moshkovskii in a Rural Area from Central Colombia

    PubMed Central

    León, Cielo M.; Fonseca, Jairo; Reyes, Patricia; Moncada, Ligia; Olivera, Mario J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii are the most frequent species described in human infection where E. histolytica is the only true pathogen. The epidemiology of this infection is complex due to the absence of a routine exam that allows a correct discrimination of the Entamoeba species complex. Therefore, molecular methods appear as the unique epidemiological tool to accomplish the species discrimination. Herein, we conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the frequency of Entamoeba species infections in a group of asymptomatic individuals from a rural area in central Colombia. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 181 fecal samples from asymptomatic children under 16 years old from the hamlet La Vírgen, Cundinamarca (Colombia) that voluntarily accepted to participate in the study were collected. The fecal samples were examined by light microscopy and DNA-extracted, subsequently submitted to molecular discrimination of E. dispar/E. histolytica/E. moshkovskii infection based on a multiplex PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA fragment. To confirm the species description, twenty samples were randomly submitted to DNA sequencing of the aforementioned fragment. By direct microscopic examination, frequency of the complex E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii was 18.8% (34/181). PCR showed a frequency of 49.1% (89/181), discriminated as 23.2% (42/181) that were positive for E. dispar, 25.4% (46/181) for E. moshkovskii and 0.55% (1/ 181) for E. histolytica. Also, mixed infections were detected between E. dispar and E. moshkovskii at 4.42% (8/181) of the samples. Molecular barcoding confirmed the diagnosis depicted by the multiplex PCR assay. Conclusions/Significance This is the first description of E. moshkovskii in Colombia and the second report in South-America to our knowledge. Our results suggest the need to unravel the true epidemiology of Entamoeba infections around the world, including the real pathogenic role that E

  14. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  15. Highly conductive single naphthalene and anthracene molecular junction with well-defined conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenyang; Kaneko, Satoshi; Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-03-09

    We performed electronic investigation on single acene molecular junctions bridging Au-electrodes in ultra-high vacuum conditions using mechanically controllable break junction technique. While the molecular junctions displayed various conductance values at 100 K, they exhibited well-defined high conductance values (∼0.3 G{sub 0}) at 300 K, which is close to that of metal atomic contact. Direct π-binding of the molecules to the Au-electrodes leads to the high conductivities at the metal-molecule interface. At the elevated temperature, single molecular junctions trapped in local metastable structures can be fallen into energetically preferential more stable state and thus we fabricated structurally well-defined molecular junctions.

  16. Random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR in the teaching of molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Elina B; Bettera, Susana G

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we describe a basic practical laboratory designed for fifth-year undergraduate students of Microbiology as part of the Epidemiology course. This practice provides the students with the tools for molecular epidemiological analysis of pathogenic microorganisms using a rapid and simple PCR technique. The aim of this work was to assay RAPD-PCR technique in order to infer possible epidemiological relationships. The activity gives students an appreciation of the value of applying a simple molecular biological method as RAPD-PCR to a discipline-specific question. It comprises a three-session laboratory module to genetically assay DNAs from strains isolated from a food outbreak. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):391-396, 2016.

  17. Random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR in the teaching of molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Elina B; Bettera, Susana G

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we describe a basic practical laboratory designed for fifth-year undergraduate students of Microbiology as part of the Epidemiology course. This practice provides the students with the tools for molecular epidemiological analysis of pathogenic microorganisms using a rapid and simple PCR technique. The aim of this work was to assay RAPD-PCR technique in order to infer possible epidemiological relationships. The activity gives students an appreciation of the value of applying a simple molecular biological method as RAPD-PCR to a discipline-specific question. It comprises a three-session laboratory module to genetically assay DNAs from strains isolated from a food outbreak. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):391-396, 2016. PMID:26898662

  18. Integration of molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science for global precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Akihiro; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Nishihara, Reiko; Tan, Andy S; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine concept and the unique disease principle imply that each patient has unique pathogenic processes resulting from heterogeneous cellular genetic and epigenetic alterations and interactions between cells (including immune cells) and exposures, including dietary, environmental, microbial and lifestyle factors. As a core method field in population health science and medicine, epidemiology is a growing scientific discipline that can analyze disease risk factors and develop statistical methodologies to maximize utilization of big data on populations and disease pathology. The evolving transdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) can advance biomedical and health research by linking exposures to molecular pathologic signatures, enhancing causal inference and identifying potential biomarkers for clinical impact. The MPE approach can be applied to any diseases, although it has been most commonly used in neoplastic diseases (including breast, lung and colorectal cancers) because of availability of various molecular diagnostic tests. However, use of state-of-the-art genomic, epigenomic and other omic technologies and expensive drugs in modern healthcare systems increases racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. To address this, we propose to integrate molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science. Social epidemiology integrates the latter two fields. The integrative social MPE model can embrace sociology, economics and precision medicine, address global health disparities and inequalities, and elucidate biological effects of social environments, behaviors and networks. We foresee advancements of molecular medicine, including molecular diagnostics, biomedical imaging and targeted therapeutics, which should benefit individuals in a global population, by means of an interdisciplinary approach of integrative MPE and social health science.

  19. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-01-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment. PMID:26135251

  20. Controlling single-molecule junction conductance by molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Habuka, S.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Frederiksen, T.; Paulsson, M.; Ueba, H.

    2015-07-01

    For the rational design of single-molecular electronic devices, it is essential to understand environmental effects on the electronic properties of a working molecule. Here we investigate the impact of molecular interactions on the single-molecule conductance by accurately positioning individual molecules on the electrode. To achieve reproducible and precise conductivity measurements, we utilize relatively weak π-bonding between a phenoxy molecule and a STM-tip to form and cleave one contact to the molecule. The anchoring to the other electrode is kept stable using a chalcogen atom with strong bonding to a Cu(110) substrate. These non-destructive measurements permit us to investigate the variation in single-molecule conductance under different but controlled environmental conditions. Combined with density functional theory calculations, we clarify the role of the electrostatic field in the environmental effect that influences the molecular level alignment.

  1. Molecular epidemiological study of enteroviruses associated with encephalitis in children from Hangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li; Qiong, Zhang; Xiao-ting, Shen; Yu-jie, Liu; Jian-hua, Mao; Qiang, Shu; Shi-qiang, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Enterovirus (EV) has over 100 serotypes of species A–D, which can cause various symptoms in infants. Enterovirus encephalitis (EVE) is serve disease with high morbidity and mortality in children. To well define the epidemiology of EVE, we wanted to know more about EV and EV molecular typing by conducting this study in Hangzhou. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from children with diagnosis of encephalitis. Meanwhile, one-step real-time RT-PCR was used for the detection of EV, and we also identified the serotypes of EV by using gene sequencing of VP1 or 5′UTR region. A total of 126 CSF specimens were tested and EV was detected in 26 specimens (20.6%). The molecular typing results showed different types of EV strains including Coxsackievirus B2, Coxsackievirus B3, Echovirus 5, Echovirus 16, Echovirus 18, Echovirus 30, and all EV isolates belonging to the human EV species B. According to the sequence of VP1 and 5′UTR region, E30 may be major cause of children's EVE in Hangzhou, China. PMID:27749541

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  3. Molecular markers for the study of streptococcal epidemiology.

    PubMed

    McMillan, David J; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L; Smeesters, Pierre Robert; Sriprakash, Kadaba S

    2013-01-01

    Diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococcus, GAS) range from superficial infections such as pharyngitis and impetigo to potentially fatal rheumatic heart disease and invasive disease. Studies spanning emm-typing surveillance to population genomics are providing new insights into the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and biology of this organism. Such studies have demonstrated the differences that exist in the epidemiology of streptococcal disease between developing and developed nations. In developing nations, where streptococcal disease is endemic, the diversity of GAS emm-types circulating is much greater than that found in developed nations. An association between emm-type and disease, as observed in developed countries is also lacking. Intriguingly, comparative genetic studies suggest that emm-type is not always a good predictor of the evolutionary relatedness of geographically distant isolates. A view of GAS as a highly dynamic organism, in possession of a core set of virulence genes that contribute to host niche specialization and common pathogenic processes, augmented by accessory genes that change the relative virulence of specific lineages is emerging. Our inability to definitively identify genetic factors that contribute to specific disease outcome underscores the complex nature of streptococcal diseases. PMID:23179674

  4. Molecular epidemiology and clinical manifestations of human cryptosporidiosis in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Insulander, M; Silverlås, C; Lebbad, M; Karlsson, L; Mattsson, J G; Svenungsson, B

    2013-05-01

    This study describes the epidemiology and symptoms in 271 cryptosporidiosis patients in Stockholm County, Sweden. Species/genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and 18S rRNA genes. Species were C. parvum (n=111), C. hominis (n=65), C. meleagridis (n=11), C. felis (n=2), Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype 1 (n=2), and a recently described species, C. viatorum (n=2). Analysis of the Gp60 gene revealed five C. hominis allele families (Ia, Ib, Id, Ie, If), and four C. parvum allele families (IIa, IIc, IId, IIe). Most C. parvum cases (51%) were infected in Sweden, as opposed to C. hominis cases (26%). Clinical manifestations differed slightly by species. Diarrhoea lasted longer in C. parvum cases compared to C. hominis and C. meleagridis cases. At follow-up 25-36 months after disease onset, 15% of the patients still reported intermittent diarrhoea. In four outbreaks and 13 family clusters, a single subtype was identified, indicating a common infection source, which emphasizes the value of genotyping for epidemiological investigations.

  5. Thermal conductivity of diamond nanorods: Molecular simulation and scaling relations.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Clifford W; Shenderova, Olga; Brenner, Donald W

    2006-08-01

    Thermal conductivities of diamond nanorods are estimated from molecular simulations as a function of radius, length, and degree of surface functionalization. While thermal conductivity is predicted to be lower than carbon nanotubes, their thermal properties are less influenced by surface functionalization, making them prime candidates for thermal management where heat transfer is facilitated by cross-links. A scaling relation based on phonon surface scattering is developed that reproduces the simulation results and experimental measurements on silicon nanowires. PMID:16895381

  6. Molecular epidemiology, and possible real-world applications in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidemi; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction, a key idea in molecular epidemiology, has enabled the development of personalized medicine. This concept includes personalized prevention. While genome-wide association studies have identified a number of genetic susceptibility loci in breast cancer risk, however, the application of this knowledge to practical prevention is still underway. Here, we briefly review the history of molecular epidemiology and its progress in breast cancer epidemiology. We then introduce our experience with the trial combination of GWAS-identified loci and well-established lifestyle and reproductive risk factors in the risk prediction of breast cancer. Finally, we report our exploration of the cumulative risk of breast cancer based on this risk prediction model as a potential tool for individual risk communication, including genetic risk factors and gene-environment interaction with obesity.

  7. Deciphering the origin of the 2012 cholera epidemic in Guinea by integrating epidemiological and molecular analyses.

    PubMed

    Rebaudet, Stanislas; Mengel, Martin A; Koivogui, Lamine; Moore, Sandra; Mutreja, Ankur; Kande, Yacouba; Yattara, Ousmane; Sarr Keita, Véronique; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Garnotel, Eric; Keita, Sakoba; Piarroux, Renaud

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is typically considered endemic in West Africa, especially in the Republic of Guinea. However, a three-year lull period was observed from 2009 to 2011, before a new epidemic struck the country in 2012, which was officially responsible for 7,350 suspected cases and 133 deaths. To determine whether cholera re-emerged from the aquatic environment or was rather imported due to human migration, a comprehensive epidemiological and molecular survey was conducted. A spatiotemporal analysis of the national case databases established Kaback Island, located off the southern coast of Guinea, as the initial focus of the epidemic in early February. According to the field investigations, the index case was found to be a fisherman who had recently arrived from a coastal district of neighboring Sierra Leone, where a cholera outbreak had recently occurred. MLVA-based genotype mapping of 38 clinical Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor isolates sampled throughout the epidemic demonstrated a progressive genetic diversification of the strains from a single genotype isolated on Kaback Island in February, which correlated with spatial epidemic spread. Whole-genome sequencing characterized this strain as an "atypical" El Tor variant. Furthermore, genome-wide SNP-based phylogeny analysis grouped the Guinean strain into a new clade of the third wave of the seventh pandemic, distinct from previously analyzed African strains and directly related to a Bangladeshi isolate. Overall, these results highly suggest that the Guinean 2012 epidemic was caused by a V. cholerae clone that was likely imported from Sierra Leone by an infected individual. These results indicate the importance of promoting the cross-border identification and surveillance of mobile and vulnerable populations, including fishermen, to prevent, detect and control future epidemics in the region. Comprehensive epidemiological investigations should be expanded to better understand cholera dynamics and improve disease control

  8. Molecular epidemiology and clinical spectrum of hereditary spastic paraplegia in the Japanese population based on comprehensive mutational analyses.

    PubMed

    Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Saito, Kayoko; Furuya, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Murata, Miho; Suzuki, Mikiya; Sugiura, Akira; Sawai, Setsu; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ueda, Naohisa; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is one of the most genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and pyramidal weakness of lower limbs. Because >30 causative genes have been identified, screening of multiple genes is required for establishing molecular diagnosis of individual patients with HSP. To elucidate molecular epidemiology of HSP in the Japanese population, we have conducted mutational analyses of 16 causative genes of HSP (L1CAM, PLP1, ATL1, SPAST, CYP7B1, NIPA1, SPG7, KIAA0196, KIF5A, HSPD1, BSCL2, SPG11, SPG20, SPG21, REEP1 and ZFYVE27) using resequencing microarrays, array-based comparative genomic hybridization and Sanger sequencing. The mutational analysis of 129 Japanese patients revealed 49 mutations in 46 patients, 32 of which were novel. Molecular diagnosis was accomplished for 67.3% (33/49) of autosomal dominant HSP patients. Even among sporadic HSP patients, mutations were identified in 11.1% (7/63) of them. The present study elucidated the molecular epidemiology of HSP in the Japanese population and further broadened the mutational and clinical spectra of HSP. PMID:24451228

  9. Whole genome sequencing: the future for molecular epidemiological studies on aquatic pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advent of next generation sequencing (NGS) has transformed our ability to analyze the genomic content of isolated strains and communities of microorganisms. An important application of the new technology is for molecular epidemiology, as single sequencing reactions can generate nearly complete ...

  10. The Molecular Epidemiology and Genetic Environment of Carbapenemases Detected in Africa.

    PubMed

    Sekyere, John Osei; Govinden, Usha; Essack, Sabiha

    2016-01-01

    Research articles describing carbapenemases and their genetic environments in Gram-negative bacteria were reviewed to determine the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa. The emergence of resistance to the carbapenems, the last resort antibiotic for difficult to treat bacterial infections, affords clinicians few therapeutic options, with a resulting increase in morbidities, mortalities, and healthcare costs. However, the molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases throughout Africa is less described. Research articles and conference proceedings describing the genetic environment and molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases in Africa were retrieved from Google Scholar, Scifinder, Pubmed, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases. Predominant carbapenemase genes so far described in Africa include the blaOXA-48 type, blaIMP, blaVIM, and blaNDM in Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and Escherichia coli carried on various plasmid types and sizes, transposons, and integrons. Class D and class B carbapenemases, mainly prevalent in A. baumannii, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, Citrobacter spp., and E. coli were the commonest carbapenemases. Carbapenemases are mainly reported in North and South Africa as under-resourced laboratories, lack of awareness and funding preclude the detection and reporting of carbapenemase-mediated resistance. Consequently, the true molecular epidemiology of carbapenemases and their genetic environment in Africa is still unknown.

  11. Overview of molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sabat, A J; Budimir, A; Nashev, D; Sá-Leão, R; van Dijl, J m; Laurent, F; Grundmann, H; Friedrich, A W

    2013-01-01

    Typing methods for discriminating different bacterial isolates of the same species are essential epidemiological tools in infection prevention and control. Traditional typing systems based on phenotypes, such as serotype, biotype, phage-type, or antibiogram, have been used for many years. However, more recent methods that examine the relatedness of isolates at a molecular level have revolutionised our ability to differentiate among bacterial types and subtypes. Importantly, the development of molecular methods has provided new tools for enhanced surveillance and outbreak detection. This has resulted in better implementation of rational infection control programmes and efficient allocation of resources across Europe. The emergence of benchtop sequencers using next generation sequencing technology makes bacterial whole genome sequencing (WGS) feasible even in small research and clinical laboratories. WGS has already been used for the characterisation of bacterial isolates in several large outbreaks in Europe and, in the near future, is likely to replace currently used typing methodologies due to its ultimate resolution. However, WGS is still too laborious and time-consuming to obtain useful data in routine surveillance. Also, a largely unresolved question is how genome sequences must be examined for epidemiological characterisation. In the coming years, the lessons learnt from currently used molecular methods will allow us to condense the WGS data into epidemiologically useful information. On this basis, we have reviewed current and new molecular typing methods for outbreak detection and epidemiological surveillance of bacterial pathogens in clinical practice, aiming to give an overview of their specific advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23369389

  12. Elastomeric Conducting Polyaniline Formed Through Topological Control of Molecular Templates.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hangjun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Wu, Haosheng; Park, Sangwoo; Mohin, Jacob W; Klosterman, Luke; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2016-06-28

    A strategy for creating elastomeric conducting polyaniline networks is described. Simultaneous elastomeric mechanical properties (E < 10 MPa) and electronic conductivities (σ > 10 S cm(-1)) are achieved via molecular templating of conjugated polymer networks. Diblock copolymers with star topologies processed into self-assembled elastomeric thin films reduce the percolation threshold of polyaniline synthesized via in situ polymerization. Block copolymer templates with star topologies produce elastomeric conjugated polymer composites with Young's moduli ranging from 4 to 12 MPa, maximum elongations up to 90 ± 10%, and electrical conductivities of 30 ± 10 S cm(-1). Templated polyaniline films exhibit Young's moduli up to 3 orders of magnitude smaller compared to bulk polyaniline films while preserving comparable bulk electronic conductivity. Flexible conducting polymers have prospective applications in devices for energy storage and conversion, consumer electronics, and bioelectronics. PMID:27175931

  13. Elastomeric Conducting Polyaniline Formed Through Topological Control of Molecular Templates.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hangjun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Wu, Haosheng; Park, Sangwoo; Mohin, Jacob W; Klosterman, Luke; Yang, Zhou; Yang, Huai; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Bettinger, Christopher John

    2016-06-28

    A strategy for creating elastomeric conducting polyaniline networks is described. Simultaneous elastomeric mechanical properties (E < 10 MPa) and electronic conductivities (σ > 10 S cm(-1)) are achieved via molecular templating of conjugated polymer networks. Diblock copolymers with star topologies processed into self-assembled elastomeric thin films reduce the percolation threshold of polyaniline synthesized via in situ polymerization. Block copolymer templates with star topologies produce elastomeric conjugated polymer composites with Young's moduli ranging from 4 to 12 MPa, maximum elongations up to 90 ± 10%, and electrical conductivities of 30 ± 10 S cm(-1). Templated polyaniline films exhibit Young's moduli up to 3 orders of magnitude smaller compared to bulk polyaniline films while preserving comparable bulk electronic conductivity. Flexible conducting polymers have prospective applications in devices for energy storage and conversion, consumer electronics, and bioelectronics.

  14. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus argenteus infections in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Amornchai, Premjit; Nickerson, Emma K; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J

    2015-03-01

    Molecular typing of 246 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from unselected patients in Thailand showed that 10 (4.1%) were actually Staphylococcus argenteus. Contrary to the suggestion that S. argenteus is less virulent than S. aureus, we demonstrated comparable rates of morbidity, death, and health care-associated infection in patients infected with either of these two species.

  15. Conductive probe AFM measurements of conjugated molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Mizutani, Wataru; Liang, Tien-Tzu; Azehara, Hiroaki; Miyake, Koji; Sasaki, Shinya; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    The electrical conduction of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made from conjugated molecules was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), with a focus on the molecular structural effect on conduction. First, the electrical conduction of SAMs made from phenylene oligomer SAMs was measured. The resistances through the monolayers increased exponentially with an increase in molecular length and the decay constants of transconductance beta were about 0.45 to 0.61 A(-1) measured at lower bias region. We further investigated the influence of applied load on the resistances. The resistances through terphenyl SAMs increased with an increase in the applied load up to 14 nN. Second, using an insertion technique into insulating alkanethiol SAMs, the electrical conduction of single conjugated terphenyl methanethiol and oligo(para-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) molecules embedded into insulating alkanethiol SAMs were measured. Electrical currents through these single molecules of OPVs were estimated to be larger than those through single terphenyl molecules, suggesting that the OPV structure can increase the electrical conduction of single molecules. Third, apparent negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed at higher bias measurements of SAMs. The appearance of NDR might be related to roughness of SAM surface, because apparent NDR was often observed on rough surfaces. In any case, the tip-molecule contact condition strongly affected carrier transport through metal tip/SAM/metal junction.

  16. Frontier orbital control of molecular conductance and its switching.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-04-14

    For transmission of electrons through a π system, when the Landauer theory of molecular conductance is viewed from a molecular orbital (MO) perspective, there obtains a simple perturbation theoretic dependence, due to Yoshizawa and Tada, on a) the product of the orbital coefficients at the sites of electrode attachment, and b) the MO energies. The frontier orbitals consistently and simply indicate high or low transmission, even if other orbitals may contribute. This formalism, with its consequent reinforcement and/or interference of conductance, accounts for the (previously explained) difference in direct vs. cross conjugated transmission across an ethylene, as well as the comparative ON/OFF ratios in the experimentally investigated dimethyldihydropyrene and dithienylethene-type single-molecule switches. A strong dependence of the conductance on the site of attachment of the electrodes in a π system is an immediate extrapolation; the theory then predicts that for some specified sites the switching behavior will be inverted; i.e. the "open" molecular form of the switch will be more conductive.

  17. The Molecular Epidemiology of Chronic Aflatoxin Driven Impaired Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul Craig

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary fungal metabolites that contaminate dietary staples in tropical regions; chronic high levels of exposure are common for many of the poorest populations. Observations in animals indicate that growth and/or food utilization are adversely affected by aflatoxins. This review highlights the development of validated exposure biomarkers and their use here to assess the role of aflatoxins in early life growth retardation. Aflatoxin exposure occurs in utero and continues in early infancy as weaning foods are introduced. Using aflatoxin-albumin exposure biomarkers, five major studies clearly demonstrate strong dose response relationships between exposure in utero and/or early infancy and growth retardation, identified by reduced birth weight and/or low HAZ and WAZ scores. The epidemiological studies include cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys, though aflatoxin reduction intervention studies are now required to further support these data and guide sustainable options to reduce the burden of exposure. The use of aflatoxin exposure biomarkers was essential in understanding the observational data reviewed and will likely be a critical monitor of the effectiveness of interventions to restrict aflatoxin exposure. Given that an estimated 4.5 billion individuals live in regions at risk of dietary contamination the public health concern cannot be over stated. PMID:24455429

  18. Molecular epidemiology of noroviruses in Northern Greece, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Ifantidou, Athina M; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Markopoulou, Soultana; Kansouzidou, Athina; Malisiovas, Nikolaos; Papa, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are important human pathogens associated with acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide, displaying significant genetic heterogeneity. Genotype GII.4 is responsible for the majority of outbreaks reported to date. A total of 460 faecal samples from sporadic gastroenteritis cases were screened for the presence of NoV RNA. Four additional human samples collected during a waterborne NoV gastroenteritis outbreak observed in 2005 in northern Greece, were also included in the study. All PCR-positive samples were tested further using a multiplex RT-PCR, which targets the viral capsid VP1 region D. PCR products from all outbreak samples and from 20 randomly selected samples were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that GII.4 genotype predominated (70%), while genotypes GII.2 (10%), GII.7 (15%), and GI.1 (5%) were also detected. All the outbreak NoV strains belonged to the GI.1 genotype. The present study provides a first insight into the epidemiology and genetic diversity of NoVs in Greece and shows that various strains are circulating in the country and cause sporadic cases or outbreaks.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of adrenocortical tumors in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Gislaine; Komechen, Heloisa; Figueiredo, Francisco R O; Fachin, Natasha D; Pianovski, Mara A D; Figueiredo, Bonald C

    2012-03-31

    The high frequency of TP53 R337H carriers in southern Brazil is responsible for the highest known incidence of childhood adrenocortical tumor (ACT). Our aims were to examine other contributing mutations, age-related risk factors, epidemiological differences in ACT and to shed light on a method for increasing the survival rate of children. The fetal zone of the adrenal cortex is believed to be one of the tissues most susceptible to adenoma or carcinoma formation due to loss of p53 function. The founder germline R337H mutation is found in 95% of ACTs of young children, a much greater proportion than in adults. Despite intense educational campaigns about the high incidence of ACT in Paraná State, advanced cases remain common. Four advanced ACT cases (4/5) were admitted to a single institution in the first 6months of 2011 in Paraná State, none of the families knew about ACT, and 2 reported no familial cancer syndrome. Curative resection is possible when a small ACT is detected early.

  20. Molecular design of electron transport with orbital rule: toward conductance-decay free molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Tada, Tomofumi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we report our viewpoint of single molecular conductance in terms of frontier orbitals. The orbital rule derived from orbital phase and amplitude is a powerful guideline for the qualitative understanding of molecular conductance in both theoretical and experimental studies. The essence of the orbital rule is the phase-related quantum interference, and on the basis of this rule a constructive or destructive pathway for electron transport is easily predicted. We have worked on the construction of the orbital rule for more than ten years and recently found from its application that π-stacked molecular junctions fabricated experimentally are in line with the concept for conductance-decay free junctions. We explain the orbital rule using benzene molecular junctions with the para-, meta- and ortho-connections and discuss linear π-conjugated chains and π-stacked molecular junctions with respect to their small decay factors in this manuscript.

  1. Methodological and Clinical Aspects of the Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Minias, Alina; van Ingen, Jakko; Rastogi, Nalin; Brzostek, Anna; Żaczek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    Molecular typing has revolutionized epidemiological studies of infectious diseases, including those of a mycobacterial etiology. With the advent of fingerprinting techniques, many traditional concepts regarding transmission, infectivity, or pathogenicity of mycobacterial bacilli have been revisited, and their conventional interpretations have been challenged. Since the mid-1990s, when the first typing methods were introduced, a plethora of other modalities have been proposed. So-called molecular epidemiology has become an essential subdiscipline of modern mycobacteriology. It serves as a resource for understanding the key issues in the epidemiology of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases. Among these issues are disclosing sources of infection, quantifying recent transmission, identifying transmission links, discerning reinfection from relapse, tracking the geographic distribution and clonal expansion of specific strains, and exploring the genetic mechanisms underlying specific phenotypic traits, including virulence, organ tropism, transmissibility, or drug resistance. Since genotyping continues to unravel the biology of mycobacteria, it offers enormous promise in the fight against and prevention of the diseases caused by these pathogens. In this review, molecular typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria elaborated over the last 2 decades are summarized. The relevance of these methods to the epidemiological investigation, diagnosis, evolution, and control of mycobacterial diseases is discussed.

  2. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai-chuang; Liang, Xin-gang; Xu, Xiang-hua; Ohara, Taku

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires was predicted using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method using the Stillinger-Weber potential model and the Nose-Hoover thermostat. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on the wire length, cross-sectional area, and temperature was investigated. The surface along the longitudinal direction was set as a free boundary with potential boundaries in the other directions. The cross-sectional areas of the nanowires ranged from about 5 to 19 nm2 with lengths ranging from 6 to 54 nm. The thermal conductivity dependence on temperature agrees well with the experimental results. The reciprocal of the thermal conductivity was found to be linearly related to the nanowire length. These results quantitatively show that decreasing the cross-sectional area reduces the phonon mean free path in nanowires.

  3. Thermal conductivity of penta-graphene from molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-21

    Using classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and applying the original Tersoff interatomic potential, we study the thermal transport property of the latest two dimensional carbon allotrope, penta-graphene. It is predicted that its room-temperature thermal conductivity is about 167 W/mK, which is much lower than that of graphene. With normal mode decomposition, the accumulated thermal conductivity with respect to phonon frequency and mean free path is analyzed. It is found that the acoustic phonons make a contribution of about 90% to the thermal conductivity, and phonons with mean free paths larger than 100 nm make a contribution over 50%. We demonstrate that the remarkably lower thermal conductivity of penta-graphene compared with graphene results from the lower phonon group velocities and fewer collective phonon excitations. Our study highlights the importance of structure-property relationship and provides better understanding of thermal transport property and valuable insight into thermal management of penta-graphene.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bijlmer, H A; van Alphen, L; Geelen-van den Broek, L; Greenwood, B M; Valkenburg, H A; Dankert, J

    1992-01-01

    One hundred two invasive and 64 noninvasive isolates of Haemophilus influenzae were collected in the course of a 2-year prospective field study on the epidemiology of H. influenzae meningitis in The Gambia. The isolates were serotyped, biotyped, and subtyped by outer membrane protein (OMP) profile analysis (OMP subtyping). H. influenzae meningitis was found to be caused by serotype b (95%). In invasive disease, serotype a, although present in the throat of healthy children, caused only occasionally (5.9%) disease. The distribution of biotypes of H. influenzae appeared to be very similar to that found outside The Gambia. A distinct pattern of OMP subtypes, different from other parts of the world, is prevalent in H. influenzae type b (Hib) in The Gambia. OMP subtypes 2, 4, 5, 8, and 9 were observed to be predominant. These subtypes, except subtype 2, have not been described. L subtypes (subtypes 2, 4, and 8) were associated with invasive disease, whereas non-L subtypes (subtypes 5 and 9) were found more often in healthy carriers (P less than 0.001). A significant difference in geographical distribution was found in subtypes of noninvasive Hib strains (P less than 0.05). We conclude that in The Gambia H. influenzae invasive disease is caused mainly by type b strains with a limited number of OMP subtypes, which are different from the subtypes found elsewhere in the world. These data are important for the surveillance of Hib disease in developing countries and are baseline data for a Hib polyribosyl-ribitolphosphate-conjugated vaccine trial in The Gambia. Alternative Hib OMP vaccines should include a set of representative OMPs. Images PMID:1537907

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Mosquitoes during an Outbreak in China, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zexin; Liu, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wang, Huanyu; Lin, Xiaojuan; Song, Lizhi; Wang, Suting; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Xiaodong; Cui, Ning; Song, Yanyan; Xu, Aiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can cause serious encephalitis and Culex mosquitoes are the primary vector. In 2013, a JE outbreak occurred in Shandong Province, China with 407 confirmed cases, including 11 deaths. An investigation on JEV in mosquitoes during the outbreak was conducted. A total of 14,719 mosquitoes were collected at 3 sites. For the 12,695 Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes, 88/201 pooled samples were positive by RT-PCR for the presence of the pre-membrane or envelope protein coding genes. The maximum likelihood estimates of JEV positive individuals per 1,000 vectors were 12.0, 7.2, and 6.0 in the 3 sites respectively with an overall estimate of 9.1. Phylogenetic analysis on these pre-membrane (n = 72) and envelope (n = 26) sequences with those of reference strains revealed they belonged to genotype I. This study describes the molecular epidemiology of JEV and suggests the high infection rate in mosquitoes is an important factor for the outbreak. PMID:24809635

  6. [Studies on Vibrio vulnificus infection: molecular epidemiology of environment-derived strains and clinical isolates].

    PubMed

    Oonaka, Kenji; Furuhata, Katsunori; Hara, Motonobu; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2007-01-01

    To clarify the route and source of Vibrio vulnificus infection, we conducted molecular epidemiological investigation by DNA analysis of 355 environmental isolates (seawater-derived strain: 86, sea mud-derived strain:36, and oyster-derived strain: 233) and 65 human clinical isolates, for a total of 420 isolates, using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), with the following results. 1. When DNA was cleaved with 2 enzymes, Not I and Sfi I, and subjected to PFGE, Not I DNA interpretation was 76.9%, and Sfi I cleavage was 97.9%, showing that Sfi I was superior in cleaving DNA of this bacteria. 2. Sfi I-interpreted strains were subjected to PFGE and migration patterns were analyzed by UPGMA, but close classification was not possible because similarity was low, this infectious disease clearly originated from multiple rather than a single-clone. In this cluster, we concluded that this infectious disease was acquired through contact between the environment and human beings and viceversa. We identified an assortment of clinical isolates and environment-derived strains among more than 89% of strain groups tested, none of which could be expected to have the same origin. We conclued DNA analysis on these two types of restriction enzymes using PFGE, but were unable to classify test results in detail due to the proliferation of migration patterns and low degree of similarity.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of domestic and sylvatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rural northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Marta V.; Lauricella, Marta A.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Lanati, Leonardo; Marcet, Paula L.; Levin, Mariano J.; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Schijman, Alejandro G.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi populations and parasite transmission dynamics have been well documented throughout the Americas, but few studies have been conducted in the Gran Chaco ecoregion, one of the most highly endemic areas for Chagas disease, caused by T. cruzi. In this study we assessed the distribution of T. cruzi lineages (identified by PCR strategies) in Triatoma infestans, domestic dogs, cats, humans and sylvatic mammals from two neighboring rural areas with different histories of transmission and vector control in northern Argentina. Lineage II predominated among the 99 isolates characterized and lineage I among the six isolates obtained from sylvatic mammals. Trypanosoma cruzi lineage IIe predominated in domestic habitats; it was found in 87% of 54 isolates from Tr. infestans, in 82% of 33 isolates from dogs, and in the four cats found infected. Domestic and sylvatic cycles overlapped in the study area in the late 1980s, when intense domestic transmission occurred, and still overlap marginally. The introduction of T. cruzi from sylvatic into domestic habitats is likely to occur very rarely in the current epidemiological context. The household distribution of T. cruzi lineages showed that Tr. infestans, dogs and cats from a given house compound shared the same parasite lineage in most cases. Based on molecular evidence, this result lends further support to the importance of dogs and cats as domestic reservoir hosts of T. cruzi. We believe that in Argentina, this is the first time that lineage IIc has been isolated from naturally-infected domestic dogs and Tr. infestans. PMID:18585717

  8. Evolving Molecular Epidemiological Profile of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 in the Southwest Border of China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hua; Dao, Hong; Guo, Weizhong; Lai, Chunhui; Lai, Mingyue; Fan, Jianhua; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported in Xishuangbanna (Banna) Dai Autonomous Prefecture, a well-developed tourist destination in the southwest border of China, that HIV-1 transmitted dominantly through heterosexual contact with less divergent genotypes and few drug resistant mutations [1]. Due to the rapid increase of newly diagnosed HIV-1 cases per year in Banna in recent years, it’s important to evaluate the evolution of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology for the better understanding of ongoing HIV-1 outbreak in this region. Methodology/Principal Findings By sequencing of HIV-1 pol genes and phylogenetic analysis, we conducted a molecular epidemiologic study in 352 HIV-1-seropositive highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART)-naïve individuals newly diagnosed at the Banna Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 2009 and 2011. Of 283 samples (84.1% taken from heterosexually acquired adults, 10.6% from needle-sharing drug users, 2.8% from men who have sex with men, 0.4% from children born from HIV-1-infected mothers, and 2.1% remained unknown) with successful sequencing for pol gene, we identified 108 (38.2%) HIV-1 subtype CRF08_BC, 101 (35.7%) CRF01_AE, 49 (17.3%) CRF07_BC, 5 (1.8%) C/CRF57_BC, 3 (1.1%) B’, 1 (0.4%) B/CRF51_01B, and 16 (5.7%) unique recombinants forms. Among these infected individuals, 104 (36.7%) cases showed drug resistant or resistance-relevant mutations, and 4 of them conferring high-level resistance to 3TC/FTC, EFV/NVP or NFV. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 21 clusters (2–7 sequences) with only 21.2% (60/283) sequences involved. Conclusion/Significance In contrast to our previous findings, CRF08_BC, replaced CRF01_AE, became the dominant genotype of HIV-1 in Banna prefecture. The viral strains with drug resistance mutations were detected frequently in newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected individuals in this region. PMID:25207977

  9. Raman Scattering at Plasmonic Junctions Shorted by Conductive Molecular Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Apkarian, V. Ara; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-04-10

    Intensity spikes in Raman scattering, accompanied by switching between line spectra and band spectra, can be assigned to shorting the junction plasmon through molecular conductive bridges. This is demonstrated through Raman trajectories recorded at a plasmonic junction formed by a gold AFM tip in contact with a silver surface coated either with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol or biphenyl-4-thiol. The fluctuations are absent in the monothiol. In effect, the making and breaking of chemical bonds is tracked.

  10. Conductance saturation in a series of highly transmitting molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelin, T.; Korytár, R.; Sukenik, N.; Vardimon, R.; Kumar, B.; Nuckolls, C.; Evers, F.; Tal, O.

    2016-04-01

    Revealing the mechanisms of electronic transport through metal-molecule interfaces is of central importance for a variety of molecule-based devices. A key method for understanding these mechanisms is based on the study of conductance versus molecule length in molecular junctions. However, previous works focused on transport governed either by coherent tunnelling or hopping, both at low conductance. Here, we study the upper limit of conductance across metal-molecule-metal interfaces. Using highly conducting single-molecule junctions based on oligoacenes with increasing length, we find that the conductance saturates at an upper limit where it is independent of molecule length. With the aid of two prototype systems, in which the molecules are contacted by either Ag or Pt electrodes, we find two different possible origins for conductance saturation. The results are explained by an intuitive model, backed by ab initio calculations. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms that constrain the conductance of metal-molecule interfaces at the high-transmission limit.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria parva in the field.

    PubMed

    Geysen, D; Bishop, R; Skilton, R; Dolan, T T; Morzaria, S

    1999-09-01

    Molecular tools based on seminested RFLP-PCR techniques to characterize field parasites in bloodspots dried on filter paper permitted investigation of the extent and the dynamics of diversity of Theileria parva populations in the field. Parallel molecular studies explored the long-term genome stability of various isolates by probing Southern blots of EcoRI digested total genomic DNA with four different reference nucleic acid probes. Three polymorphic single copy loci encoding for antigen genes were developed for seminested PCR detection in order to apply them for a multilocus approach in population genetic studies. Seven alleles were identified for the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) locus by using restriction enzymes, and 4 alleles each for the p150 and p104 loci. A simple DNA extraction method gave good results in amplifying these loci from carrier animals using samples of blood dried on filter papers. Results from probing Southern blots of cultures taken at sequential timepoints indicate relative genome stability in T. parva in comparison to other parasitic protozoa such as Plasmodium. Comparatively homogeneous profiles in sympatric isolates from Zambia were identified using all four probes and PCR amplified products which contrasted with the variety found amongst Kenyan stocks. Preliminary characterization of T. parva field samples from the Southern Province of Zambia strongly suggest clonal expansion of one of the components of a non-Zambian trivalent vaccine used on a limited scale in the Province from 1985 until 1992. PMID:10540308

  12. Epidemiology and molecular virus characterization of reemerging rabies, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Cheryl; Sartorius, Benn; Sabeta, Claude; Zulu, Gugulethu; Paweska, Janusz; Mogoswane, Mamokete; Sutton, Chris; Nel, Louis H; Swanepoel, Robert; Leman, Patricia A; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Dyason, Edwin; Blumberg, Lucille

    2007-12-01

    The incidence of dog rabies in Limpopo Province, South Africa, increased from 5 cases in 2004 to 100 in 2006. Human rabies had last been confirmed in 1981, but investigations instituted after an index case was recognized in February 2006 identified 21 confirmed, 4 probable, and 5 possible human cases between August 5, 2005, and December 31, 2006. Twelve of these case-patients were identified retrospectively because the diagnosis of rabies was not considered: 6 of these patients consulted a traditional healer, 6 had atypical manifestations with prominent abdominal symptoms, and 6 of 7 patients tested had elevated liver enzyme activity. Molecular genetic analysis indicated that outbreak virus strains were most closely related to recent canine strains from southern Zimbabwe. Delayed recognition of the human cases may have resulted from decreased clinical suspicion after many years of effective control of the disease and the occurrence of atypical clinical presentations. PMID:18258039

  13. Epidemiology and molecular virus characterization of reemerging rabies, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Cheryl; Sartorius, Benn; Sabeta, Claude; Zulu, Gugulethu; Paweska, Janusz; Mogoswane, Mamokete; Sutton, Chris; Nel, Louis H; Swanepoel, Robert; Leman, Patricia A; Grobbelaar, Antoinette A; Dyason, Edwin; Blumberg, Lucille

    2007-12-01

    The incidence of dog rabies in Limpopo Province, South Africa, increased from 5 cases in 2004 to 100 in 2006. Human rabies had last been confirmed in 1981, but investigations instituted after an index case was recognized in February 2006 identified 21 confirmed, 4 probable, and 5 possible human cases between August 5, 2005, and December 31, 2006. Twelve of these case-patients were identified retrospectively because the diagnosis of rabies was not considered: 6 of these patients consulted a traditional healer, 6 had atypical manifestations with prominent abdominal symptoms, and 6 of 7 patients tested had elevated liver enzyme activity. Molecular genetic analysis indicated that outbreak virus strains were most closely related to recent canine strains from southern Zimbabwe. Delayed recognition of the human cases may have resulted from decreased clinical suspicion after many years of effective control of the disease and the occurrence of atypical clinical presentations.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular epidemiology of streptococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Rato, Márcia G; Bexiga, Ricardo; Florindo, Carlos; Cavaco, Lina M; Vilela, Cristina L; Santos-Sanches, Ilda

    2013-01-25

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS), Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (Group C Streptococcus, GCS) and Streptococcus uberis are relevant mastitis pathogens, a highly prevalent and costly disease in dairy industry due to antibiotherapy and loss in milk production. The aims of this study were the evaluation of antimicrobial drug resistance patterns, particularly important for streptococcal mastitis control and the identification of strain molecular features. Antimicrobial resistance was assessed by disk diffusion against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefazolin, cefoperazone, pirlimycin-PRL, rifaximin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin-ERY, gentamicin, tetracycline-TET and vancomycin. Genotypic relationships were identified using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), macrolide and/or tetracycline resistance gene profiling, GBS capsular typing, GBS virulence gene profiling and GBS and S. uberis multi locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of the isolates were susceptible to all drugs except to aminoglycoside, macrolide, lincosamide and tetracycline. Close to half of the TET resistant isolates have tetO and tetK and almost all ERY-PRL resistant isolates have ermB. A high degree of intra-species polymorphism was found for GCS. The GBS belonged to ST-2, -554, -61, -23 lineages and five new molecular serotypes and human GBS insertion sequences in the cpsE gene were found. Also, GBS of serotype V with scpB and lmb seem to be related with GBS isolates of human origin (same ST-2 and similar PFGE). Overall our results suggested that different therapeutic programs may have been implemented in the different farms and that in most cases clones were herd-specific. PMID:22964008

  15. Epidemiological and molecular characteristics of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey: A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Devrim; Willke, Ayse; Sayan, Murat; Koc, Meliha Meric; Akan, Ozay Arıkan; Sumerkan, Bulent; Saltoglu, Nese; Yaman, Akgun; Ayaz, Celal; Koksal, Iftihar

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological and molecular features of clinical meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in Turkey. MRSA isolates were collected from six regions of Turkey. The mecA and nuc genes were detected by PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by the disk diffusion method. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing were performed by the sequencing method for 270 randomly selected MRSA isolates. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definition was used for epidemiological diagnosis of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Resistance rates of MRSA to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, clindamycin, erythromycin, rifampicin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were 93.4%, 81.2%, 38.5%, 57.8%, 93.9%, 1.1% and 93.1%, respectively. The most frequent SCCmec type was SCCmec III (91.1%). SCCmec type IV was found in 5.2% of the isolates. The most frequent spa type was t030 (81.1%). Five isolates were CA-MRSA if only the epidemiological definition was used (5/725; 0.7%). Two isolates were defined as CA-MRSA both by epidemiological features and SCCmec typing (2/270; 0.7%). Of 14 SCCmec type IV isolates, 12 were not defined as CA-MRSA by epidemiological features. In conclusion, this is the most comprehensive multicentre study in Turkey investigating MRSA using both epidemiological and genotypic features. The CA-MRSA rate is low in Turkey. Combined use of epidemiological and genotypic methods is the most accurate approach for the diagnosis of CA-MRSA.

  16. Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder in a National Sample: Developmental Epidemiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, Barbara; Rowe, Richard; Messer, Julie; Goodman, Robert; Meltzer, Howard

    2004-01-01

    Background: Despite an expanding epidemiological evidence base, uncertainties remain over key aspects of the epidemiology of the "antisocial" disorders in childhood and adolescence. Methods: We used cross-sectional data on a nationally representative sample of 10,438 5-15-year-olds drawn from the 1999 British Child Mental Health Survey to examine…

  17. FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) Microarray: a Pangenome Molecular Toolbox for Serotyping, Virulence Profiling, Molecular Epidemiology, and Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha R.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Lacher, David W.; Mammel, Mark K.; Jackson, Scott A.; Lampel, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most Escherichia coli strains are nonpathogenic. However, for clinical diagnosis and food safety analysis, current identification methods for pathogenic E. coli either are time-consuming and/or provide limited information. Here, we utilized a custom DNA microarray with informative genetic features extracted from 368 sequence sets for rapid and high-throughput pathogen identification. The FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) platform contains three sets of molecularly informative features that together stratify strain identification and relatedness. First, 53 known flagellin alleles, 103 alleles of wzx and wzy, and 5 alleles of wzm provide molecular serotyping utility. Second, 41,932 probe sets representing the pan-genome of E. coli provide strain-level gene content information. Third, approximately 125,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of available whole-genome sequences (WGS) were distilled to 9,984 SNPs capable of recapitulating the E. coli phylogeny. We analyzed 103 diverse E. coli strains with available WGS data, including those associated with past foodborne illnesses, to determine robustness and accuracy. The array was able to accurately identify the molecular O and H serotypes, potentially correcting serological failures and providing better resolution for H-nontypeable/nonmotile phenotypes. In addition, molecular risk assessment was possible with key virulence marker identifications. Epidemiologically, each strain had a unique comparative genomic fingerprint that was extended to an additional 507 food and clinical isolates. Finally, a 99.7% phylogenetic concordance was established between microarray analysis and WGS using SNP-level data for advanced genome typing. Our study demonstrates FDA-ECID as a powerful tool for epidemiology and molecular risk assessment with the capacity to profile the global landscape and diversity of E. coli. IMPORTANCE This study describes a robust, state-of-the-art platform developed from available

  18. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of neonatal leukemia in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura, Suellen Valadares; Andrade, Francianne; Magalhães, Isis Q; Costa, Imaruí; Silva, Denise Bousfield; D'Andrea, Maria Lydia; Pinheiro, Vitória P; Lee, Maria Lucia M; Werneck, Fernando; Emerenciano, Mariana; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2015-04-01

    The clinical and molecular findings of 77 cases of neonatal leukemia (NL) and 380 of infant leukemia (IL) were selected to distinguish features between NL and IL. Somatic gene mutations associated with acute leukemia including FLT3, RAS and PTPN11 were revisited. There were 42 cases of congenital leukemia associated with Down syndrome (DS) and 39 of these cases presented features of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M7. Twenty-seven of the DS cases underwent spontaneous remission and were reclassified as a transient myeloproliferative disorder. GATA1 mutations were found in 70% of these cases. In non-DS, frequent abnormalities were MLL rearrangements, mainly MLL-AFF1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL-MLLT3 in AML. The FLT3 mutation was not found, while RAS (n = 4) and PTPN11 (n = 2) mutations were identified and reported for the first time in NL. There was substantial evidence to support that somatic abnormalities occur in utero. Thus, congenital leukemia is a good model for understanding leukemogenesis.

  19. Epidemiology and molecular diversity of rabies viruses in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Robardet, E; Ilieva, D; Iliev, E; Gagnev, E; Picard-Meyer, E; Cliquet, F

    2014-04-01

    A health emergency situation occurred in Bulgaria in 2007 when positive rabies cases were notified in Sofia district in the central-western part of the country, suggesting a southward spread of the disease for the first time in the last 10 years. Phylogenetic analysis on 49 isolates sampled between 2009 and 2011 showed, for the first time, evidence of the existence of NEE and D clustered lineages in Bulgaria. Their geographical distribution clearly reveals the permeability of natural barriers, as already suggested by the disease spread that occurred across the Balkan mountain range in 2007. The monitoring and passive surveillance programmes conducted since the first 2009 oral vaccination campaign, the spatio-temporal evolution of the disease in the country since 2007, and the need for further investigation of the role of jackals in virus dispersion are discussed. PMID:23830231

  20. Epidemiology and molecular diversity of rabies viruses in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Robardet, E; Ilieva, D; Iliev, E; Gagnev, E; Picard-Meyer, E; Cliquet, F

    2014-04-01

    A health emergency situation occurred in Bulgaria in 2007 when positive rabies cases were notified in Sofia district in the central-western part of the country, suggesting a southward spread of the disease for the first time in the last 10 years. Phylogenetic analysis on 49 isolates sampled between 2009 and 2011 showed, for the first time, evidence of the existence of NEE and D clustered lineages in Bulgaria. Their geographical distribution clearly reveals the permeability of natural barriers, as already suggested by the disease spread that occurred across the Balkan mountain range in 2007. The monitoring and passive surveillance programmes conducted since the first 2009 oral vaccination campaign, the spatio-temporal evolution of the disease in the country since 2007, and the need for further investigation of the role of jackals in virus dispersion are discussed.

  1. Size effects in molecular dynamics thermal conductivity predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellan, D. P.; Landry, E. S.; Turney, J. E.; McGaughey, A. J. H.; Amon, C. H.

    2010-06-01

    We predict the bulk thermal conductivity of Lennard-Jones argon and Stillinger-Weber silicon using the Green-Kubo (GK) and direct methods in classical molecular dynamics simulations. While system-size-independent thermal conductivities can be obtained with less than 1000 atoms for both materials using the GK method, the linear extrapolation procedure [Schelling , Phys. Rev. B 65, 144306 (2002)] must be applied to direct method results for multiple system sizes. We find that applying the linear extrapolation procedure in a manner consistent with previous researchers can lead to an underprediction of the GK thermal conductivity (e.g., by a factor of 2.5 for Stillinger-Weber silicon at a temperature of 500 K). To understand this discrepancy, we perform lattice dynamics calculations to predict phonon properties and from these, length-dependent thermal conductivities. From these results, we find that the linear extrapolation procedure is only accurate when the minimum system size used in the direct method simulations is comparable to the largest mean-free paths of the phonons that dominate the thermal transport. This condition has not typically been satisfied in previous works. To aid in future studies, we present a simple metric for determining if the system sizes used in direct method simulations are sufficiently large so that the linear extrapolation procedure can accurately predict the bulk thermal conductivity.

  2. Thermal conductance of carbon nanotube contacts: Molecular dynamics simulations and general description of the contact conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaway, Richard N.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-07-01

    The contact conductance of carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions is the key factor that controls the collective heat transfer through CNT networks or CNT-based materials. An improved understanding of the dependence of the intertube conductance on the contact structure and local environment is needed for predictive computational modeling or theoretical description of the effective thermal conductivity of CNT materials. To investigate the effect of local structure on the thermal conductance across CNT-CNT contact regions, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for different intertube contact configurations (parallel fully or partially overlapping CNTs and CNTs crossing each other at different angles) and local structural environments characteristic of CNT network materials. The results of MD simulations predict a stronger CNT length dependence present over a broader range of lengths than has been previously reported and suggest that the effect of neighboring junctions on the conductance of CNT-CNT junctions is weak and only present when the CNTs that make up the junctions are within the range of direct van der Waals interaction with each other. A detailed analysis of the results obtained for a diverse range of intertube contact configurations reveals a nonlinear dependence of the conductance on the contact area (or number of interatomic intertube interactions) and suggests larger contributions to the conductance from areas of the contact where the density of interatomic intertube interactions is smaller. An empirical relation accounting for these observations and expressing the conductance of an arbitrary contact configuration through the total number of interatomic intertube interactions and the average number of interatomic intertube interactions per atom in the contact region is proposed. The empirical relation is found to provide a good quantitative description of the contact conductance for various CNT configurations investigated in the MD

  3. Taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Romig, T; Ebi, D; Wassermann, M

    2015-10-30

    Echinococcus granulosus, formerly regarded as a single species with a high genotypic and phenotypic diversity, is now recognised as an assemblage of cryptic species, which differ considerably in morphology, development, host specificity (including infectivity/pathogenicity for humans) and other aspects. This diversity is reflected in the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and has led to the construction of phylogenetic trees and hypotheses on the origin and geographic dispersal of various taxa. Based on phenotypic characters and gene sequences, E. granulosus (sensu lato) has by now been subdivided into E. granulosus sensu stricto (including the formerly identified genotypic variants G1-3), Echinococcus felidis (the former 'lion strain'), Echinococcus equinus (the 'horse strain', genotype G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (the 'cattle strain', genotype G5) and Echinococcus canadensis. The latter species, as recognised here, shows the highest diversity and is composed of the 'camel strain', genotype G6, the 'pig strain', genotype G7, and two 'cervid strains', genotypes G8 and G10. There is debate whether the closely related G6 and G7 should be placed in a separate species, but more morphological and biological data are needed to support or reject this view. In this classification, the application of rules for zoological nomenclature led to the resurrection of old species names, which had before been synonymised with E. granulosus. This nomenclatural subdivision of the agents of cystic echinococcosis (CE) may appear inconvenient for practical applications, especially because molecular tools are needed for identification of the cyst stage, and because retrospective data on 'E. granulosus' are now difficult to interpret without examination of voucher specimens. However, the increased awareness for the diversity of CE agents - now emphasised by species names rather than genotype numbers - has led to a large number of recent studies on this issue and a rapid increase of knowledge

  4. Taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato.

    PubMed

    Romig, T; Ebi, D; Wassermann, M

    2015-10-30

    Echinococcus granulosus, formerly regarded as a single species with a high genotypic and phenotypic diversity, is now recognised as an assemblage of cryptic species, which differ considerably in morphology, development, host specificity (including infectivity/pathogenicity for humans) and other aspects. This diversity is reflected in the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and has led to the construction of phylogenetic trees and hypotheses on the origin and geographic dispersal of various taxa. Based on phenotypic characters and gene sequences, E. granulosus (sensu lato) has by now been subdivided into E. granulosus sensu stricto (including the formerly identified genotypic variants G1-3), Echinococcus felidis (the former 'lion strain'), Echinococcus equinus (the 'horse strain', genotype G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (the 'cattle strain', genotype G5) and Echinococcus canadensis. The latter species, as recognised here, shows the highest diversity and is composed of the 'camel strain', genotype G6, the 'pig strain', genotype G7, and two 'cervid strains', genotypes G8 and G10. There is debate whether the closely related G6 and G7 should be placed in a separate species, but more morphological and biological data are needed to support or reject this view. In this classification, the application of rules for zoological nomenclature led to the resurrection of old species names, which had before been synonymised with E. granulosus. This nomenclatural subdivision of the agents of cystic echinococcosis (CE) may appear inconvenient for practical applications, especially because molecular tools are needed for identification of the cyst stage, and because retrospective data on 'E. granulosus' are now difficult to interpret without examination of voucher specimens. However, the increased awareness for the diversity of CE agents - now emphasised by species names rather than genotype numbers - has led to a large number of recent studies on this issue and a rapid increase of knowledge

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinoviruses and Enteroviruses Highlights Their Diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Petty, Tom J; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Hongoa, Philipina; Vieille, Gaël; Turin, Lara; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-12-08

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and enteroviruses (HEVs) belong to the Enterovirus genus and are the most frequent cause of infection worldwide, but data on their molecular epidemiology in Africa are scarce. To understand HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in this setting, we enrolled febrile pediatric patients participating in a large prospective cohort assessing the causes of fever in Tanzanian children. Naso/oropharyngeal swabs were systematically collected and tested by real-time RT-PCR for HRV and HEV. Viruses from positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were then applied to highlight the HRV and HEV types as well as recombinant or divergent strains. Thirty-eight percent (378/1005) of the enrolled children harboured an HRV or HEV infection. Although some types were predominant, many distinct types were co-circulating, including a vaccinal poliovirus, HEV-A71 and HEV-D68. Three HRV-A recombinants were identified: HRV-A36/HRV-A67, HRV-A12/HRV-A67 and HRV-A96/HRV-A61. Four divergent HRV strains were also identified: one HRV-B strain and three HRV-C strains. This is the first prospective study focused on HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. This systematic and thorough large screening with careful clinical data management confirms the wide genomic diversity of these viruses, brings new insights about their evolution and provides data about associated symptoms.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of mastitis pathogens of dairy cattle and comparative relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Zadoks, Ruth N; Middleton, John R; McDougall, Scott; Katholm, Jorgen; Schukken, Ynte H

    2011-12-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, can be caused by a wide range of organisms, including gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, mycoplasmas and algae. Many microbial species that are common causes of bovine mastitis, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus also occur as commensals or pathogens of humans whereas other causative species, such as Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae or Staphylococcus chromogenes, are almost exclusively found in animals. A wide range of molecular typing methods have been used in the past two decades to investigate the epidemiology of bovine mastitis at the subspecies level. These include comparative typing methods that are based on electrophoretic banding patterns, library typing methods that are based on the sequence of selected genes, virulence gene arrays and whole genome sequencing projects. The strain distribution of mastitis pathogens has been investigated within individual animals and across animals, herds, countries and host species, with consideration of the mammary gland, other animal or human body sites, and environmental sources. Molecular epidemiological studies have contributed considerably to our understanding of sources, transmission routes, and prognosis for many bovine mastitis pathogens and to our understanding of mechanisms of host-adaptation and disease causation. In this review, we summarize knowledge gleaned from two decades of molecular epidemiological studies of mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle and discuss aspects of comparative relevance to human medicine.

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinoviruses and Enteroviruses Highlights Their Diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    L’Huillier, Arnaud G.; Kaiser, Laurent; Petty, Tom J.; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Hongoa, Philipina; Vieille, Gaël; Turin, Lara; Genton, Blaise; D’Acremont, Valérie; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and enteroviruses (HEVs) belong to the Enterovirus genus and are the most frequent cause of infection worldwide, but data on their molecular epidemiology in Africa are scarce. To understand HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in this setting, we enrolled febrile pediatric patients participating in a large prospective cohort assessing the causes of fever in Tanzanian children. Naso/oropharyngeal swabs were systematically collected and tested by real-time RT-PCR for HRV and HEV. Viruses from positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were then applied to highlight the HRV and HEV types as well as recombinant or divergent strains. Thirty-eight percent (378/1005) of the enrolled children harboured an HRV or HEV infection. Although some types were predominant, many distinct types were co-circulating, including a vaccinal poliovirus, HEV-A71 and HEV-D68. Three HRV-A recombinants were identified: HRV-A36/HRV-A67, HRV-A12/HRV-A67 and HRV-A96/HRV-A61. Four divergent HRV strains were also identified: one HRV-B strain and three HRV-C strains. This is the first prospective study focused on HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. This systematic and thorough large screening with careful clinical data management confirms the wide genomic diversity of these viruses, brings new insights about their evolution and provides data about associated symptoms. PMID:26670243

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Rhinoviruses and Enteroviruses Highlights Their Diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kaiser, Laurent; Petty, Tom J; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Hongoa, Philipina; Vieille, Gaël; Turin, Lara; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie; Tapparel, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) and enteroviruses (HEVs) belong to the Enterovirus genus and are the most frequent cause of infection worldwide, but data on their molecular epidemiology in Africa are scarce. To understand HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in this setting, we enrolled febrile pediatric patients participating in a large prospective cohort assessing the causes of fever in Tanzanian children. Naso/oropharyngeal swabs were systematically collected and tested by real-time RT-PCR for HRV and HEV. Viruses from positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were then applied to highlight the HRV and HEV types as well as recombinant or divergent strains. Thirty-eight percent (378/1005) of the enrolled children harboured an HRV or HEV infection. Although some types were predominant, many distinct types were co-circulating, including a vaccinal poliovirus, HEV-A71 and HEV-D68. Three HRV-A recombinants were identified: HRV-A36/HRV-A67, HRV-A12/HRV-A67 and HRV-A96/HRV-A61. Four divergent HRV strains were also identified: one HRV-B strain and three HRV-C strains. This is the first prospective study focused on HRV and HEV molecular epidemiology in sub-Saharan Africa. This systematic and thorough large screening with careful clinical data management confirms the wide genomic diversity of these viruses, brings new insights about their evolution and provides data about associated symptoms. PMID:26670243

  9. Molecular epidemiology of mastitis pathogens of dairy cattle and comparative relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Zadoks, Ruth N; Middleton, John R; McDougall, Scott; Katholm, Jorgen; Schukken, Ynte H

    2011-12-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, can be caused by a wide range of organisms, including gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, mycoplasmas and algae. Many microbial species that are common causes of bovine mastitis, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus also occur as commensals or pathogens of humans whereas other causative species, such as Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae or Staphylococcus chromogenes, are almost exclusively found in animals. A wide range of molecular typing methods have been used in the past two decades to investigate the epidemiology of bovine mastitis at the subspecies level. These include comparative typing methods that are based on electrophoretic banding patterns, library typing methods that are based on the sequence of selected genes, virulence gene arrays and whole genome sequencing projects. The strain distribution of mastitis pathogens has been investigated within individual animals and across animals, herds, countries and host species, with consideration of the mammary gland, other animal or human body sites, and environmental sources. Molecular epidemiological studies have contributed considerably to our understanding of sources, transmission routes, and prognosis for many bovine mastitis pathogens and to our understanding of mechanisms of host-adaptation and disease causation. In this review, we summarize knowledge gleaned from two decades of molecular epidemiological studies of mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle and discuss aspects of comparative relevance to human medicine. PMID:21968538

  10. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  11. Molecular Pathologic Epidemiology of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Emerging Transdisciplinary and Interdisciplinary Field

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Chan, Andrew T.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a complex disease resulting from somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations, including locus-specific CpG island methylation and global DNA or LINE-1 hypomethylation. Global molecular characteristics such as microsatellite instability (MSI), CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), global DNA hypomethylation, and chromosomal instability cause alterations of gene function in a genome-wide scale. Activation of oncogenes including KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA affects intracellular signaling pathways and has been associated with CIMP and MSI. Traditional epidemiology research has investigated various factors in relation to an overall risk of colon and/or rectal cancer. However, colorectal cancers comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases with different sets of genetic and epigenetic alterations. To better understand how a particular exposure influences the carcinogenic process, somatic molecular changes and tumor biomarkers have been studied in relation to the exposure of interest. Moreover, an investigation of interactive effects of tumor molecular changes and the exposures of interest on tumor behavior (prognosis or clinical outcome) can lead to a better understanding of tumor molecular changes, which may be prognostic or predictive tissue biomarkers. These new research efforts represent “Molecular Pathologic Epidemiology”, which is a multidisciplinary field of investigations of the interrelationship between exogenous and endogenous (e.g., genetic) factors, tumoral molecular signatures and tumor progression. Furthermore, integrating genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with molecular pathologic investigation is a promising area. Examining the relationship between susceptibility alleles identified by GWAS and specific molecular alterations can help elucidate the function of these alleles and provide insights into whether susceptibility alleles are truly causal. Although there are challenges, molecular pathologic epidemiology has unique strengths

  12. Strengthening the Reporting of Molecular Epidemiology for Infectious Diseases (STROME-ID): an extension of the STROBE statement.

    PubMed

    Field, Nigel; Cohen, Ted; Struelens, Marc J; Palm, Daniel; Cookson, Barry; Glynn, Judith R; Gallo, Valentina; Ramsay, Mary; Sonnenberg, Pam; Maccannell, Duncan; Charlett, Andre; Egger, Matthias; Green, Jonathan; Vineis, Paolo; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2014-04-01

    Molecular data are now widely used in epidemiological studies to investigate the transmission, distribution, biology, and diversity of pathogens. Our objective was to establish recommendations to support good scientific reporting of molecular epidemiological studies to encourage authors to consider specific threats to valid inference. The statement Strengthening the Reporting of Molecular Epidemiology for Infectious Diseases (STROME-ID) builds upon the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative. The STROME-ID statement was developed by a working group of epidemiologists, statisticians, bioinformaticians, virologists, and microbiologists with expertise in control of infection and communicable diseases. The statement focuses on issues relating to the reporting of epidemiological studies of infectious diseases using molecular data that were not addressed by STROBE. STROME-ID addresses terminology, measures of genetic diversity within pathogen populations, laboratory methods, sample collection, use of molecular markers, molecular clocks, timeframe, multiple-strain infections, non-independence of infectious-disease data, missing data, ascertainment bias, consistency between molecular and epidemiological data, and ethical considerations with respect to infectious-disease research. In total, 20 items were added to the 22 item STROBE checklist. When used, the STROME-ID recommendations should advance the quality and transparency of scientific reporting, with clear benefits for evidence reviews and health-policy decision making.

  13. Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle M; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2016-01-01

    More than 250,000 new cases of primary malignant brain tumors are diagnosed annually worldwide, 77% of which are gliomas. A small proportion of gliomas are caused by the inheritance of rare high-penetrance genetic variants or high-dose radiation. Since 2009, inherited genetic variants in 10 regions near eight different genes have been consistently associated with glioma risk via genome-wide association studies. Most of these variants increase glioma risk by 20-40%, but two have higher relative risks. One on chromosome 8 increases risk of IDH-mutated gliomas sixfold and another that affects TP53 function confers a 2.5-fold increased risk of glioma. Functions of some of the other risk variants are known or suspected, but future research will determine functions of other risk loci. Recent progress also has been made in defining subgroups of glioma based on acquired alterations within tumors. Allergy history has been consistently associated with reduced glioma risk, though the mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Future studies will need to be large enough so that environmental and constitutive genetic risk factors can be examined within molecularly defined, etiologically homogeneous subgroups.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Wild-Living Gorillas▿

    PubMed Central

    Neel, Cécile; Etienne, Lucie; Li, Yingying; Takehisa, Jun; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Ndong Bass, Innocent; Moudindo, Joseph; Mebenga, Aimé; Esteban, Amandine; Van Heuverswyn, Fran; Liegeois, Florian; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Walsh, Peter D.; Sanz, Crickette M.; Morgan, David B.; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N.; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Locatelli, Sabrina; Gonder, Mary K.; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Boesch, Christophe; Todd, Angelique; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Peeters, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees and gorillas are the only nonhuman primates known to harbor viruses closely related to HIV-1. Phylogenetic analyses showed that gorillas acquired the simian immunodeficiency virus SIVgor from chimpanzees, and viruses from the SIVcpz/SIVgor lineage have been transmitted to humans on at least four occasions, leading to HIV-1 groups M, N, O, and P. To determine the geographic distribution, prevalence, and species association of SIVgor, we conducted a comprehensive molecular epidemiological survey of wild gorillas in Central Africa. Gorilla fecal samples were collected in the range of western lowland gorillas (n = 2,367) and eastern Grauer gorillas (n = 183) and tested for SIVgor antibodies and nucleic acids. SIVgor antibody-positive samples were identified at 2 sites in Cameroon, with no evidence of infection at 19 other sites, including 3 in the range of the Eastern gorillas. In Cameroon, based on DNA and microsatellite analyses of a subset of samples, we estimated the prevalence of SIVgor to be 1.6% (range, 0% to 4.6%), which is significantly lower than the prevalence of SIVcpzPtt in chimpanzees (5.9%; range, 0% to 32%). All newly identified SIVgor strains formed a monophyletic lineage within the SIVcpz radiation, closely related to HIV-1 groups O and P, and clustered according to their field site of origin. At one site, there was evidence for intergroup transmission and a high intragroup prevalence. These isolated hot spots of SIVgor-infected gorilla communities could serve as a source for human infection. The overall low prevalence and sporadic distribution of SIVgor could suggest a decline of SIVgor in wild populations, but it cannot be excluded that SIVgor is still more prevalent in other parts of the geographical range of gorillas. PMID:19906908

  15. Molecular epidemiologic typing systems of bacterial pathogens: current issues and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Struelens, M J

    1998-01-01

    The epidemiologic typing of bacterial pathogens can be applied to answer a number of different questions: in case of outbreak, what is the extent and mode of transmission of epidemic clone(s)? In case of long-term surveillance, what is the prevalence over time and the geographic spread of epidemic and endemic clones in the population? A number of molecular typing methods can be used to classify bacteria based on genomic diversity into groups of closely-related isolates (presumed to arise from a common ancestor in the same chain of transmission) and divergent, epidemiologically-unrelated isolates (arising from independent sources of infection). Ribotyping, IS-RFLP fingerprinting, macrorestriction analysis of chromosomal DNA and PCR-fingerprinting using arbitrary sequence or repeat element primers are useful methods for outbreak investigations and regional surveillance. Library typing systems based on multilocus sequence-based analysis and strain-specific probe hybridization schemes are in development for the international surveillance of major pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Accurate epidemiological interpretation of data obtained with molecular typing systems still requires additional research on the evolution rate of polymorphic loci in bacterial pathogens. PMID:9830521

  16. Molecular epidemiology and phylogeny of Nipah virus infection: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Angeletti, Silvia; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae, characterized by high pathogenicity and endemic in South Asia. It is classified as a Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) agent. The case-fatality varies from 40% to 70% depending on the severity of the disease and on the availability of adequate healthcare facilities. At present no antiviral drugs are available for NiV disease and the treatment is just supportive. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses can be used to help in understanding the epidemiology and the temporal origin of this virus. This review provides an overview of evolutionary studies performed on Nipah viruses circulating in different countries. Thirty phylogenetic studies have been published from 2000 to 2015 years, searching on pub-med using the key words 'Nipah virus AND phylogeny' and twenty-eight molecular epidemiological studies from 2006 to 2015 have been performed, typing the key words 'Nipah virus AND molecular epidemiology'. Overall data from the published study demonstrated as phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis represent promising tools to evidence NiV epidemics, to study their origin and evolution and finally to act with effective preventive measure. PMID:27393089

  17. Nonmechanical Conductance Switching in a Molecular Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Baratz, Adva; Baer, Roi

    2012-02-16

    We present a molecular junction composed of a donor (polyacetylene strands) and an acceptor (malononitrile) connected together via a benzene ring and coupled weakly to source and drain electrodes on each side, for which a gate electrode induces intramolecular charge transfer, switching reversibly the character of conductance. Using a new brand of density functional theory, for which orbital energies are similar to the quasiparticle energies, we show that the junction displays a single, gate-tunable differential conductance channel in a wide energy range. The gate field must align parallel to the displacement vector between donors and acceptor to affect their potential difference; for strong enough fields, spontaneous intramolecular electron transfer occurs. This event radically affects conductance, reversing the charge of carriers, enabling a spin-polarized current channel. We discuss the physical principles controlling the operation of the junction and find interplay of quantum interference, charging, Coulomb blockade, and electron-hole binding energy effects. We expect that this switching behavior is a generic property for similar donor-acceptor systems of sufficient stability.

  18. Phonon-mediated negative differential conductance in molecular quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazunov, Alex; Feinberg, Denis; Martin, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Transport through a single-molecular conductor is considered, showing negative differential conductance behavior associated with phonon-mediated electron tunneling processes. This theoretical work is motivated by a recent experiment by Leroy using a carbon nanotube contacted by a scanning tunneling microscope tip [Nature 432, 371 (2004)], where negative differential conductance of the breathing-mode phonon side peaks could be observed. A peculiarity of this system is that the tunneling couplings which inject electrons and those which collect them on the substrate are highly asymmetrical. A quantum dot model is used, coupling a single electronic level to a local phonon, forming polaron levels. A “half-shuttle” mechanism is also introduced. A quantum kinetic formulation allows us to derive rate equations. Assuming asymmetric tunneling rates and in the absence of the half-shuttle coupling, negative differential conductance (NDC) is obtained for a wide range of parameters. A detailed explanation of this phenomenon is provided, showing that NDC is maximal for intermediate electron-phonon coupling. In addition, in the absence of a gate, the “floating” level results in two distinct lengths for the current plateaus, related to the capacitive couplings at the two junctions. It is shown that the half-shuttle mechanism tends to reinforce the negative differential regions, but it cannot trigger this behavior on its own.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of isolates of the Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from Spain.

    PubMed

    Frasés, Susana; Ferrer, Consuelo; Sánchez, Manuel; Colom-Valiente, María Francisca

    2009-06-30

    To study genetic diversity of Cryptococcus neoformans species complex in Spain, 97 isolates of the yeast recovered from human, animal and environmental samples have been analysed using three molecular epidemiological techniques. One of these, URA5 gene fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, has been previously described as a molecular epidemiology tool. Thus, standard profiles and reference strains have been defined for it. In addition, 5S rDNA/IGS RFLP and [GACA](4) microsatellite PCR fingerprinting were also used. Our results show five of the previously defined URA5 genotypes with a high frequency (33%) of the VNI type, which is in concordance with other studies. The high presence of VNIII pattern (28.9%) among our strains is remarkable and could be a specific feature of the isolates from our country. 5S rDNA/IGS RFLP showed a low intra-species discriminative power. Three different molecular profiles (S1-3), which showed a good correlation with the different species, varieties and genotypes, were obtained. [GACA](4) microsatellite PCR-fingerprinting analysis showed a high variability of patterns among the studied strains. Molecular profiles represented in a dendrogram clustered strains in four main groups related with the source of the yeast and also in concordance with some of the described genotypes (VNI-IV and VGI).

  20. Molecular epidemiology of isolates of the Cryptococcus neoformans species complex from Spain.

    PubMed

    Frasés, Susana; Ferrer, Consuelo; Sánchez, Manuel; Colom-Valiente, María Francisca

    2009-06-30

    To study genetic diversity of Cryptococcus neoformans species complex in Spain, 97 isolates of the yeast recovered from human, animal and environmental samples have been analysed using three molecular epidemiological techniques. One of these, URA5 gene fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, has been previously described as a molecular epidemiology tool. Thus, standard profiles and reference strains have been defined for it. In addition, 5S rDNA/IGS RFLP and [GACA](4) microsatellite PCR fingerprinting were also used. Our results show five of the previously defined URA5 genotypes with a high frequency (33%) of the VNI type, which is in concordance with other studies. The high presence of VNIII pattern (28.9%) among our strains is remarkable and could be a specific feature of the isolates from our country. 5S rDNA/IGS RFLP showed a low intra-species discriminative power. Three different molecular profiles (S1-3), which showed a good correlation with the different species, varieties and genotypes, were obtained. [GACA](4) microsatellite PCR-fingerprinting analysis showed a high variability of patterns among the studied strains. Molecular profiles represented in a dendrogram clustered strains in four main groups related with the source of the yeast and also in concordance with some of the described genotypes (VNI-IV and VGI). PMID:19631160

  1. [Molecular markers: an important tool in the diagnosis, treatment and epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Frías-de León, María Guadalupe; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Duarte-Escalante, Esperanza; Martínez-Hernández, José Enrique; Martínez-Rivera, María de Los Ángeles; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the incidence of invasive aspergillosis has represented a difficult problem for management of patients with this infection due to its high rate of mortality, limited knowledge concerning its diagnosis, and therapeutic practice. The difficulty in management of patients with aspergillosis initiates with detection of the fungus in the specimens of immunosuppressed patients infected with Aspergillus fumigatus; in addition, difficulty exists in terms of the development of resistance to antifungals as a consequence of their indiscriminate use in prophylactic and therapeutic practice and to ignorance concerning the epidemiological data of aspergillosis. With the aim of resolving these problems, molecular markers is employed at present with specific and accurate results. However, in Mexico, the use of molecular markers has not yet been implemented in the routine of intrahospital laboratories; despite the fact that these molecular markers has been widely referred in the literature, it is necessary for it to validated and standardized to ensure that the results obtained in any laboratory would be reliable and comparable. In the present review, we present an update on the usefulness of molecular markers in accurate identification of A. fumigatus, detection of resistance to antifugal triazoles, and epidemiological studies for establishing the necessary measures for prevention and control of aspergillosis.

  2. Epidemiological and molecular approaches for management of a measles outbreak in Liguria, Italy.

    PubMed

    Orsi, A; Alicino, C; Patria, A G; Parodi, V; Carloni, R; Turello, V; Comaschi, M; Moscatelli, P; Orengo, G; Martini, M; De Florentiis, D

    2010-06-01

    Since March 2010 a measles outbreak has been occurred in Genoa, Liguria, an administrative Region in Northern Italy. Epidemiological and molecular data on the outbreak, obtained from the passive mandatory notification system, the laboratory surveillance and an innovative syndrome surveillance system, were investigated. Overall 39 cases were reported in the urban area. Information about demography, vaccination status, hospitalization and geographic distribution of measles cases are available. 19 cases (48.7%) were laboratory-confirmed and were characterized by sequence analysis: 18 strains belonged to genotype D8, so identifying a new measles variant within the Liguria population. Adopted control measures seem to have limited viral circulation. The outbreak allowed to test the efficacy of the 3 surveillance systems active in Liguria, highlighting their advantages and some important limitations. More efforts are needed to collect and integrate any epidemiological and virological available data in order to better describe the local measles transmission dynamics.

  3. Molecular and antigenic characterization of rabies viruses from Iran identifies variants with distinct epidemiological origins.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, S A; Simani, S; Armstrong, J; Fayaz, A; Wandeler, A I

    2003-08-01

    A molecular epidemiological study of 48 recent rabies isolates recovered from cases reported throughout Iran identified three distinct viral variants, the evolutionary origins of which were identified by phylogenetic comparison with rabies viruses originating from Europe and Asia. Members of group 1 (15 isolates) were recovered from the northern half of the country only, while those of group 2 (31 isolates) were widely dispersed; both groups clustered within the widely disseminated cosmopolitan lineage. The two isolates of group 3 were detected in the northeastern tip of the country only and belonged to the Arctic strain. Rapid variant discrimination tools, employing restriction fragment length polymorphisms applied to amplified fragments of the viral genome, were devised whilst antigenic characterization of representative viruses identified a small panel of monoclonal antibodies that were also discriminatory. The future application of such methods should provide valuable epidemiological information on rabies incidence in Iran. PMID:12948379

  4. Molecular Design for Tuning Work Functions of Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Koldemir, Unsal; Braid, Jennifer L; Morgenstern, Amanda; Eberhart, Mark; Collins, Reuben T; Olson, Dana C; Sellinger, Alan

    2015-06-18

    In this Perspective, we provide a brief background on the use of aromatic phosphonic acid modifiers for tuning work functions of transparent conducting oxides, for example, zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium tin oxide (ITO). We then introduce our preliminary results in this area using conjugated phosphonic acid molecules, having a substantially larger range of dipole moments than their unconjugated analogues, leading to the tuning of ZnO and ITO electrodes over a 2 eV range as derived from Kelvin probe measurements. We have found that these work function changes are directly correlated to the magnitude and the direction of the computationally derived molecular dipole of the conjugated phosphonic acids, leading to the predictive power of computation to drive the synthesis of new and improved phosphonic acid ligands. PMID:26266603

  5. Sero-Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis in Zhejiang, an Eastern Province of China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ju-ying; Zhou, Jia-yue; Tang, Xue-wen; He, Han-qing; Xie, Rong-hui; Mao, Hai-yan; Zhang, Yan-jun; Xie, Shu-yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Sporadic Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases still have been reported in Zhejiang Province in recent years, and concerns about vaccine cross-protection and population-level immunity have been raised off and on within the public health sphere. Genotype I (GI) has replaced GIII as the dominant genotype in Asian countries during the past few decades, which caused considerable concerns about the potential change of epidemiology characteristics and the vaccine effectiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of JE neutralizing antibody and its waning antibody trend after live attenuated JE vaccine immunization. Additionally, this study analyzed the molecular characteristics of the E gene of Zhejiang Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains, and established genetic relationships with other JEV strains. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 serum specimens were sampled from community population aged from 0 to 92 years old in Xianju county of Zhejiang Province in 2013–2014. Microseroneutralization test results were analyzed to estimate the population immunity and to observe antibody dynamics in vaccinated children. E genes of 28 JEV strains isolated in Zhejiang Province were sequenced for phylogenetic tree construction and molecular characteristics analysis with other selected strains. Positive JE neutralizing antibody rates were higher in residents ≥35 years old (81%~98%) and lower in residents <35 years old (0~57%). 7 or 8 years after the 2nd live attenuated vaccine dose, the antibodies against for 4 different strains with microseroneutralization test were decreased by 55%~73% on seropositive rates and by 25%~38% on GMTs respectively. JEV strains isolated in recent years were all grouped into GI, while those isolated in the 1980s belonged to GIII. On important amino acid sites related to antigenicity, there was no divergence between the Zhejiang JE virus strains and the vaccine strain (SA14-14-2). Conclusion/Significances JE

  6. Molecular epidemiologic research on the effects of environmental pollutants on the fetus.

    PubMed Central

    Perera, F P; Jedrychowski, W; Rauh, V; Whyatt, R M

    1999-01-01

    Evidence shows that fetuses and infants are more affected than adults by a variety of environmental toxicants because of differential exposure, physiologic immaturity, and a longer lifetime over which disease initiated in early life can develop. In this article we review data on the effects of in utero exposure to common environmental contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particulate matter and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). We then summarize results from our molecular epidemiologic study to assess risks from in utero exposures to ambient air pollution and ETS. This research study, conducted in Poland, used biomarkers to measure the internal and bioeffective dose of toxicants and individual susceptibility factors. The study included 160 mothers and 160 newborns. Ambient air pollution was significantly associated (p= 0.05) with the amount of PAH bound to DNA (PAH-DNA adducts) in both maternal and infant cord white blood cells (WBC). Newborns with elevated PAH-DNA adducts (greater than the median) had significantly decreased birth weight (p= 0.05), birth length (p= 0.02), and head circumference (p= 0.0005) compared to the newborns with lower adducts (n= 135). Maternal and infant cotinine levels were increased by active and passive cigarette smoke exposure of the mother (p= 0.01). An inverse correlation was seen between newborn plasma cotinine (nanograms per milliliter) and birth weight (p= 0.0001) and length (p= 0.003). Adducts were elevated in placental tissue and WBC of newborns who were heterozygous or homozygous for the cytochrome P4501A1 MspI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) compared to newborns without the RFLP. Levels of PAH-DNA and cotinine were higher in newborns than mothers. These results document that there is significant transplacental transfer of PAH and ETS constituents from mother to fetus; that PAH-DNA adduct levels in maternal and newborn WBC were increased with environmental exposure to PAH from ambient

  7. Molecular and epidemiological studies of Porcine rubulavirus infection – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus-La Piedad-Michoacan-Mexico virus (PorPV-LPMV) was identified as the causative agent of a viral disease that emerged spontaneously in Mexican swine in the 1980s. Since the report of the initial outbreak of the disease, only one full-length genome from a strain isolated in 1984 (PorPV-LPMV/1984) has been sequenced; sequence data are scarce from other isolates. The genetic variation of this virus that has spread throughout the main endemic region of Mexico is almost a complete mystery. The development of molecular techniques for improved diagnostics and to investigate the persistence, molecular epidemiology, and the possible reservoirs of PorPV are needed. Together, this will provide greater knowledge regarding the molecular genetic changes and useful data to establish new strategies in the control of this virus in Mexico. PMID:26584829

  8. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630–24,662 bp and 35.5–35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9–39.3% (amino acid, 32.1–47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008–2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  9. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiological Characterization of a Novel Adenovirus in Antarctic Penguins Collected between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Tae-Kun; No, Jin Sun; Kim, Hankyeom; Kim, Won-Keun; Choi, Han-Gu; Kang, Sung-Ho; Song, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Antarctica is considered a relatively uncontaminated region with regard to the infectious diseases because of its extreme environment, and isolated geography. For the genetic characterization and molecular epidemiology of the newly found penguin adenovirus in Antarctica, entire genome sequencing and annual survey of penguin adenovirus were conducted. The entire genome sequences of penguin adenoviruses were completed for two Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) and two Gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua). The whole genome lengths and G+C content of penguin adenoviruses were found to be 24,630-24,662 bp and 35.5-35.6%, respectively. Notably, the presence of putative sialidase gene was not identified in penguin adenoviruses by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE-PCR) as well as consensus specific PCR. The penguin adenoviruses were demonstrated to be a new species within the genus Siadenovirus, with a distance of 29.9-39.3% (amino acid, 32.1-47.9%) in DNA polymerase gene, and showed the closest relationship with turkey adenovirus 3 (TAdV-3) in phylogenetic analysis. During the 2008-2013 study period, the penguin adenoviruses were annually detected in 22 of 78 penguins (28.2%), and the molecular epidemiological study of the penguin adenovirus indicates a predominant infection in Chinstrap penguin population (12/30, 40%). Interestingly, the genome of penguin adenovirus could be detected in several internal samples, except the lymph node and brain. In conclusion, an analysis of the entire adenoviral genomes from Antarctic penguins was conducted, and the penguin adenoviruses, containing unique genetic character, were identified as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Moreover, it was annually detected in Antarctic penguins, suggesting its circulation within the penguin population. PMID:27309961

  10. Molecular epidemiology studies on occupational and environmental exposure to mutagens and carcinogens, 1997-1999.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J; Binková, B

    2000-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is a new and evolving area of research, combining laboratory measurement of internal dose, biologically effective dose, biologic effects, and influence of individual susceptibility with epidemiologic methodologies. Biomarkers evaluated were selected according to basic scheme: biomarkers of exposure--metabolites in urine, DNA adducts, protein adducts, and Comet assay parameters; biomarkers of effect--chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, mutations in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene, and the activation of oncogenes coding for p53 or p21 proteins as measured on protein levels; biomarkers of susceptibility--genetic polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2. DNA adducts measured by 32P-postlabeling are the biomarker of choice for the evaluation of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Protein adducts are useful as a biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke (4-aminobiphenyl) or to smaller molecules such as acrylonitrile or 1,3-butadiene. Of the biomarkers of effect, the most common are cytogenetic end points. Epidemiologic studies support the use of chromosomal breakage as a relevant biomarker of cancer risk. The use of the Comet assay and methods analyzing oxidative DNA damage needs reliable validation for human biomonitoring. Until now there have not been sufficient data to interpret the relationship between genotypes, biomarkers of exposure, and biomarkers of effect for assessing the risk of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:10698723

  11. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees.

    PubMed

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology.

  12. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees.

    PubMed

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:27070316

  13. Molecular Infectious Disease Epidemiology: Survival Analysis and Algorithms Linking Phylogenies to Transmission Trees

    PubMed Central

    Kenah, Eben; Britton, Tom; Halloran, M. Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has attempted to use whole-genome sequence data from pathogens to reconstruct the transmission trees linking infectors and infectees in outbreaks. However, transmission trees from one outbreak do not generalize to future outbreaks. Reconstruction of transmission trees is most useful to public health if it leads to generalizable scientific insights about disease transmission. In a survival analysis framework, estimation of transmission parameters is based on sums or averages over the possible transmission trees. A phylogeny can increase the precision of these estimates by providing partial information about who infected whom. The leaves of the phylogeny represent sampled pathogens, which have known hosts. The interior nodes represent common ancestors of sampled pathogens, which have unknown hosts. Starting from assumptions about disease biology and epidemiologic study design, we prove that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the possible assignments of interior node hosts and the transmission trees simultaneously consistent with the phylogeny and the epidemiologic data on person, place, and time. We develop algorithms to enumerate these transmission trees and show these can be used to calculate likelihoods that incorporate both epidemiologic data and a phylogeny. A simulation study confirms that this leads to more efficient estimates of hazard ratios for infectiousness and baseline hazards of infectious contact, and we use these methods to analyze data from a foot-and-mouth disease virus outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001. These results demonstrate the importance of data on individuals who escape infection, which is often overlooked. The combination of survival analysis and algorithms linking phylogenies to transmission trees is a rigorous but flexible statistical foundation for molecular infectious disease epidemiology. PMID:27070316

  14. Molecular epidemiology, phylogeny and evolution of the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Small, Scott T; Tisch, Daniel J; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2014-12-01

    of data for diseases like malaria and HIV, there is a scarcity of this data for filarial nematodes. With the falling cost of genome sequencing, research on filarial nematodes could benefit from the addition of population genetics statistics and phylogenetics especially in dealing with elimination programs. A comprehensive review focusing on population genetics of filarial nematode does not yet exist. Here our goal is to provide a current overview of the molecular epidemiology of W. bancrofti (Wb) the primary causative agent of LF. We begin by reviewing studies utilizing molecular typing techniques with specific focus on genomic and population datasets. Next, we used whole mitochondrial genome data to construct a phylogeny and examine the evolutionary history of the Onchocercidae. Then, we provide a perspective to aid in understanding how population genetic techniques translate to modern epidemiology. Finally, we introduce the concept of genomic epidemiology and provide some examples that will aid in future studies of Wb.

  15. Epidemiologic and Molecular Analysis of Human Tularemia, United States, 1964–2004

    PubMed Central

    Staples, J. Erin; Kubota, Kristy A.; Chalcraft, Linda G.; Mead, Paul S.

    2006-01-01

    Tularemia in the United States is caused by 2 subspecies of Francisella tularensis, subspecies tularensis (type A) and subspecies holarctica (type B). We compared clinical and demographic features of human tularemia cases from 1964 to 2004 from 39 states in which an isolate was recovered and subtyped. Our data indicate that type A and type B infections differ with respect to affected populations, anatomic site of isolation, and geographic distribution. Molecular subtyping with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis further defined 2 subpopulations of type A (type A-east and type A-west) that differ with respect to geographic distribution, disease outcome, and transmission. Our data suggest that type A-west infections are less severe than either type B or type A-east infections. Through a combined epidemiologic and molecular approach to human cases of tularemia, we provide new insights into the disease for future investigation. PMID:16836829

  16. Epidemiological transition of colorectal cancer in developing countries: Environmental factors, molecular pathways, and opportunities for prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Vacca, Michele; Malekzadeh, Reza; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related mortality worldwide. The disease has been traditionally a major health problem in industrial countries, however the CRC rates are increasing in the developing countries that are undergoing economic growth. Several environmental risk factors, mainly changes in diet and life style, have been suggested to underlie the rise of CRC in these populations. Diet and lifestyle impinge on nuclear receptors, on the intestinal microbiota and on crucial molecular pathways that are implicated in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this respect, the epidemiological transition in several regions of the world offers a unique opportunity to better understand CRC carcinogenesis by studying the disease phenotypes and their environmental and molecular associations in different populations. The data from these studies may have important implications for the global prevention and treatment of CRC. PMID:24876728

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni in a geographically isolated country with a uniquely structured poultry industry.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Petra; Collins-Emerson, Julie M; Midwinter, Anne C; Carter, Philip; Spencer, Simon E F; van der Logt, Peter; Hathaway, Steve; French, Nigel P

    2010-04-01

    In New Zealand the number of campylobacteriosis notifications increased markedly between 2000 and 2007. Notably, this country's poultry supply is different than that of many developed countries as the fresh and frozen poultry available at retail are exclusively of domestic origin. To examine the possible link between human cases and poultry, a sentinel surveillance site was established to study the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni over a 3-year period from 2005 to 2008 using multilocus sequence typing. Studies showed that 60.1 to 81.4% of retail poultry carcasses from the major suppliers were contaminated with C. jejuni. Differences were detected in the probability and level of contamination and the relative frequency of genotypes for individual poultry suppliers and humans. Some carcasses were contaminated with isolates belonging to more than one sequence type (ST), and there was evidence of both ubiquitous and supplier-associated strains, an epidemiological pattern not recognized yet in other countries. The common poultry STs were also common in human clinical cases, providing evidence that poultry is a major contributor to human infection. Both internationally rare genotypes, such as ST-3069 and ST-474, and common genotypes, such as ST-45 and ST-48, were identified in this study. The dominant human sequence type in New Zealand, ST-474, was found almost exclusively in isolates from one poultry supplier, which provided evidence that C. jejuni has a distinctive molecular epidemiology in this country. These results may be due in part to New Zealand's geographical isolation and its uniquely structured poultry industry. PMID:20154115

  18. Metabolism and Biomarkers of Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Molecular Epidemiology Studies: Lessons Learned from Aromatic Amines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are structurally related classes of carcinogens that are formed during the combustion of tobacco or during the high-temperature cooking of meats. Both classes of procarcinogens undergo metabolic activation by N-hydroxylation of the exocyclic amine group, to produce a common proposed intermediate, the arylnitrenium ion, which is the critical metabolite implicated in toxicity and DNA damage. However, the biochemistry and chemical properties of these compounds are distinct and different biomarkers of aromatic amines and HAAs have been developed for human biomonitoring studies. Hemoglobin adducts have been extensively used as biomarkers to monitor occupational and environmental exposures to a number of aromatic amines; however, HAAs do not form hemoglobin adducts at appreciable levels and other biomarkers have been sought. A number of epidemiologic studies that have investigated dietary consumption of well-done meat in relation to various tumor sites reported a positive association between cancer risk and well-done meat consumption, although some studies have shown no associations between well-done meat and cancer risk. A major limiting factor in most epidemiological studies is the uncertainty in quantitative estimates of chronic exposure to HAAs and, thus, the association of HAAs formed in cooked meat and cancer risk has been difficult to establish. There is a critical need to establish long-term biomarkers of HAAs that can be implemented in molecular epidemioIogy studies. In this review article, we highlight and contrast the biochemistry of several prototypical carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs to which humans are chronically exposed. The biochemical properties and the impact of polymorphisms of the major xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes on the biological effects of these chemicals are examined. Lastly, the analytical approaches that have been successfully employed to biomonitor aromatic amines and HAAs, and

  19. [UNIFICATION OF THE MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH OF THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, S Y; Mukhacheva, T A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic techniques and approaches in epidemiological studies were breakthrough in the understanding of the laws, ways, and mechanisms of the spread of the pathogens. However, lack of standard methods makes it difficult to compare results obtained by different scientific groups. In this work we propose to choose one fragment of the TBEV genome as a genetic marker whose sequencing would be both obligatory and sufficient for the molecular epidemiological studies. The best candidate for this purpose may be a fragment of the gene E of 454 nucleotides in length. The deduced amino acid sequence of this fragment was a basis for a new approach for the TBEV differentiation with clusteron being a structural unit (Kovalev and Mukhacheva, 2013). The clusteron approach was proved to be informative for studying the genetic structure of the TBEV-Sib population in the Middle Urals. TBE foci were shown to be unique in both quantitative and qualitative composition of the clusterons. The greatest clusteron diversity in the south of the Middle Urals, through the Trans-Siberian way, may reflect the history of the colonization, closely associated with the roads between Siberia and the European part of Russia. The age of three clusterons did not exceed 50 years, which may indicate an ongoing evolutionary process taking place in the TBEV-Sib populations. In turn, their spatial distribution indicates the crucial role of human factors in the spread of the TBEV (Kovalev & Mukhacheva, 2014). The clusteron approach provides formalization of ideas about the structure of the viral populations and could be used not only by researchers but also by epidemiological surveillance services. Unification of the studies of the TBEV on the basis of a standard genetic marker would consolidate the efforts of researchers from different regions of Russia and other countries. PMID:27451502

  20. Genetic characterisation and molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. from humans and pigs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena M; Leles, Daniela; Jaeger, Lauren H; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Araújo, Adauto

    2012-10-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. of human and pig origin has been studied as a means to assess the potential of pigs as reservoirs for human ascariasis. In this study, human (H) and pig (P) Ascaris spp. haplotypes from two Brazilian regions were characterised based on two mitochondrial genes, nad1 and cox1. The results show six haplotypes of the cox1 gene, with two haplotypes (H9P9 and P3) corresponding to haplotypes previously characterised in China. Because P3 was found in humans in this study, it was designated as H14P3. Furthermore, five new Ascaris spp. nad1 haplotypes from humans (H12-H16) and five from pigs (P16-P20) were observed, with one being highly frequent and present in both hosts, here designated as H12P17. Phylogenetic and network analysis demonstrated that the molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. in Brazil is driven by the globally distributed haplotypes cox1 H14P3 and nad1 H12P17. In conclusion, in this study genetic characterisation of Ascaris spp. showed that humans and pigs share common haplotypes that are also present in two widely separated geographical regions of Brazil. PMID:22944771

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from women with uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Widerström, Micael; Wiström, Johan; Ferry, Sven; Karlsson, Carina; Monsen, Tor

    2007-05-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in women. Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of S. saprophyticus UTIs. In the current study, we compared 76 isolates of S. saprophyticus prospectively isolated from women with uncomplicated UTI participating in a randomized placebo-controlled treatment trial performed in northern Sweden from 1995 to 1997 with 50 strains obtained in 2006 from five different locations in northern Europe with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The aim was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology of this uropathogenic species and to investigate whether specific clones are associated with UTI in women. A total of 47 different PFGE profiles were detected among the 126 analyzed isolates. Ten clusters consisting of 5 to 12 isolates each showing PFGE DNA similarity of >85% were identified. Several clusters of genetically highly related isolates were detected in the original trial as well as among isolates obtained during 2006 from different locations. In the original trial, clonal persistence was found among 16 of 21 (76%) patients examined in the placebo group at follow-up 8 to 10 days after inclusion, indicating a low spontaneous short-time bacteriological cure rate. We conclude that multiple clones of S. saprophyticus were causing lower UTIs in women. The result suggests that some human-pathogenic clones of S. saprophyticus are spread over large geographical distances and that such clones may persist over long periods of time.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 in Mexico: emergence of BG and BF intersubtype recombinants.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Valls, Eduardo; Escoto-Delgadillo, Martha; López-Márquez, Francisco Carlos; Castillero-Manzano, Marcelo; Echegaray-Guerrero, Ernesto; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar Kurt; Kobayashi-Gutiérrez, Antonio; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam

    2010-07-01

    The molecular epidemiology of subtypes and intersubtype recombinants (IRs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in Mexico has not been characterized fully. Understanding its regional distribution, prevalence, adaptability, viral fitness, pathogenicity, and immunogenicity is decisive for any design of an effective HIV vaccine. The aim of this study was to describe the presence of IRs types BG and BF in a Mexican population. Protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene were sequenced using an automated sequencing system. A phylogenic tree was constructed and genetic distances were calculated using MEGA 3.1. Recombination analysis was done by bootscan using SimPlot software. Two hundred and twenty-three HIV-1-positive individuals were enrolled in the study. At baseline, the mean plasma viral load was 285,500 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml and the mean CD4 cell count was 213 cells/ml. Subtype B was found in 220 (98.6%) samples, whereas IRs were found in three patients (1.4%): two (0.9%) with BG and one (0.45%) with BF. IRs were observed in 2/124 (1.6%) samples from treated patients and in 1/99 (1.0%) from naive patients. The presence of these HIV forms at low frequency points to the need for research on the diversity, geographic distribution, and evolution of other subtypes including circulating recombinant forms and IRs to understand the molecular epidemiology and tendencies of the HIV infection in Mexico.

  3. Genetic characterisation and molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. from humans and pigs in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena M; Leles, Daniela; Jaeger, Lauren H; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Araújo, Adauto

    2012-10-01

    The molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. of human and pig origin has been studied as a means to assess the potential of pigs as reservoirs for human ascariasis. In this study, human (H) and pig (P) Ascaris spp. haplotypes from two Brazilian regions were characterised based on two mitochondrial genes, nad1 and cox1. The results show six haplotypes of the cox1 gene, with two haplotypes (H9P9 and P3) corresponding to haplotypes previously characterised in China. Because P3 was found in humans in this study, it was designated as H14P3. Furthermore, five new Ascaris spp. nad1 haplotypes from humans (H12-H16) and five from pigs (P16-P20) were observed, with one being highly frequent and present in both hosts, here designated as H12P17. Phylogenetic and network analysis demonstrated that the molecular epidemiology of Ascaris spp. in Brazil is driven by the globally distributed haplotypes cox1 H14P3 and nad1 H12P17. In conclusion, in this study genetic characterisation of Ascaris spp. showed that humans and pigs share common haplotypes that are also present in two widely separated geographical regions of Brazil.

  4. Nosocomial outbreak of Legionnaires' disease: molecular epidemiology and disease control measures.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J M; Latham, R H; Meier, F A; Green, J A; Boshard, R; Mooney, B R; Edelstein, P H

    1987-02-01

    Molecular laboratory techniques were used to study the epidemiology of an outbreak of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. All patient isolates were Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and showed identical plasmid profiles and reactions with serogroup-specific monoclonal antibodies. L pneumophila was also cultured from four of five cooling tower water samples; however, the isolate from only one tower was serogroup 1 of the same subtype as patient isolates. Since the cases were temporally clustered and epidemiologically associated with exposure to cooling tower aerosols, the single cooling tower implicated by molecular analysis was the most likely source of the outbreak. Chlorination of cooling tower ponds has eradicated the epidemic strain. Since potable water also harbored the infecting organism and was the probable source for cooling tower contamination, decontamination of the hospital water system was also undertaken. Superchlorination of hot water holding tanks to 17 ppm on a weekly basis has effectively eradicated L pneumophila from the potable water system and appears to be a reasonable, simple, and relatively inexpensive alternative to previously described methods of control.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, shows distinct heterosexual and homosexual networks.

    PubMed

    Kolader, Marion-Eliëtte; Dukers, Nicole H T M; van der Bij, Akke K; Dierdorp, Mirjam; Fennema, Johan S A; Coutinho, Roel A; Bruisten, Sylvia M

    2006-08-01

    Molecular typing, added to epidemiological data, can better identify transmission patterns of gonorrhea in Western countries, where the incidence has recently been rising. From September 2002 to September 2003, patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of gonorrhea at the Clinic for Sexually Transmitted Infections in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, were subjected to a questionnaire pertaining to sexual risk behavior and sexual partners in the 6 months prior to the diagnosis. The Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates were all genotyped using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the porin and opacity genes. All patients with a completed questionnaire and genotyped isolates were included in the study. We obtained 885 N. gonorrhoeae isolates from 696 patients that revealed 88 clusters and 46 unique genotypes. Patients infected at multiple anatomical sites with one or more strains and patients infected several times during the study period were shown to pursue high-risk sexual behavior and were considered core groups. There were 11 clusters of > or =20 patients; in seven clusters, 81% to 100% of patients were men who have sex with men (MSM), three clusters contained 87 to 100% heterosexual men and women, and one cluster was formed by equal proportions of MSM and heterosexual male and female patients. However, the various clusters differed in characteristics such as types of coinfections, numbers of sexual partners, Internet use to seek sexual partners, and locations of sexual encounters. Molecular epidemiology of gonococcal isolates in Amsterdam revealed core groups and clusters of MSM and heterosexual patients that probably indicate distinct transmission networks.

  6. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  7. Hanford site: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-06

    The primary purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records which pertains to studies of worker health and mortality funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford site. Additionally, the guide provides information on the location and classification of the records and how they may be accessed. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of the DOE and the Hanford site, and Hanford`s organizational structure. It provides information on the methodology used to inventory and describe pertinent records stored in various onsite offices, in Hanford`s Records Holding Area (RHA), and at the Seattle Federal Records Center (SFRC). Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the record Series descrimations, and information on accessing records repositories.

  8. BioCAST/IFCT-1002: epidemiological and molecular features of lung cancer in never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Couraud, Sébastien; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Paris, Christophe; Dô, Pascal; Doubre, Hélène; Pichon, Eric; Dixmier, Adrien; Monnet, Isabelle; Etienne-Mastroianni, Bénédicte; Vincent, Michel; Trédaniel, Jean; Perrichon, Marielle; Foucher, Pascal; Coudert, Bruno; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Dansin, Eric; Labonne, Stéphanie; Missy, Pascale; Morin, Franck; Blanché, Hélène; Zalcman, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Lung cancer in never-smokers (LCINS) (fewer than 100 cigarettes in lifetime) is considered as a distinct entity and harbours an original molecular profile. However, the epidemiological and molecular features of LCINS in Europe remain poorly understood. All consecutive newly diagnosed LCINS patients were included in this prospective observational study by 75 participating centres during a 14-month period. Each patient completed a detailed questionnaire about risk factor exposure. Biomarker and pathological analyses were also collected. We report the main descriptive overall results with a focus on sex differences. 384 patients were included: 65 men and 319 women. 66% had been exposed to passive smoking (significantly higher among women). Definite exposure to main occupational carcinogens was significantly higher in men (35% versus 8% in women). A targetable molecular alteration was found in 73% of patients (without any significant sex difference): EGFR in 51%, ALK in 8%, KRAS in 6%, HER2 in 3%, BRAF in 3%, PI3KCA in less than 1%, and multiple in 2%. We present the largest and most comprehensive LCINS analysis in a European population. Physicians should track occupational exposure in men (35%), and a somatic molecular alteration in both sexes (73%).

  9. Effects of resonant phonon scattering from internal molecular modes on the thermal conductivity of molecular glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivchikov, A. I.; Yushchenko, A. N.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Bermejo, F. J.; Fernandez-Perea, R.; Bustinduy, I.; González, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal conductivity κ(T) of the crystalline and glassy phases of the two isomers of propyl alcohol has been measured. The two isomers differ by a minor chemical detail involving the position of the hydroxyl group with respect to the carbon backbone. Such a difference in molecular structure leads, however, to disparate behaviors for the temperature dependence of κ(T) , for both glass and crystal states. The κ(T) for the glass shows for 1-propanol an anomalously large plateau region comprising temperatures within 6-90K , while data for isomeric 2-propanol show only a small plateau up to 10K which is comparable to data on lower alcohols. The results emphasize the role played by internal molecular degrees of freedom as sources of strong resonant phonon scattering.

  10. Evaluation and comparison of molecular techniques for epidemiological typing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar dublin.

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, B; Schwarz, S

    1996-01-01

    A total of 28 unrelated isolates of the Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar dublin (S. dublin) collected during a 6-year period, as well as four samples of the S. dublin live vaccine strain Bovisaloral and its prototype strain S. dublin 442/039, were investigated by different molecular typing methods for the following reasons: (i) to find the most discriminatory method for the epidemiological typing of isolates belonging to this Salmonella serovar and (ii) to evaluate these methods for their capacity to discriminate among the live vaccine strain Bovisaloral, its prototype strain S. dublin 442/039, and field isolates of the serovar dublin. Five different plasmid profiles were observed; a virulence plasmid of 76 kbp as identified by hybridization with an spvB-spvC gene probe was present in all isolates. The detection of 16S rRNA genes and that of IS200 elements proved to be unsuitable for the epidemiological typing of S. dublin; only one hybridization pattern could be observed with each of these methods. The results obtained from macrorestriction analysis strongly depended on the choice of restriction enzyme. While the enzyme NotI yielded the lowest discriminatory index among all enzymes tested, it was the only enzyme that allowed discrimination between the Bovisaloral vaccine strain and its prototype strain. In contrast to the enzymes XbaI and SpeI, which only differentiated among the S. dublin field isolates, XhoI as well as AvrII also produced restriction fragment patterns of the Bovisaloral strain and of its prototype strain that were not shared by any of the S. dublin field isolates. Macrorestriction analysis proved to be the most discriminatory method not only for the epidemiological typing of S. dublin field isolates but also for the identification of the S. dublin live vaccine strain Bovisaloral. PMID:8904430

  11. Implementation of a molecular epidemiology approach to human pleural malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Puntoni, Riccardo; Filiberti, Rosangela; Cerrano, Paolo G; Neri, Monica; Andreatta, Rossana; Bonassi, Stefano

    2003-11-01

    The carcinogenic effect of asbestos has been reported in the literature since 40 years, and early studies describing the epidemic occurrence of malignant mesothelioma (MM) in asbestos workers, have become a paradigm of occupational cancer research. Research on MM was abandoned for many years since MM was considered as an asbestos-related disease, interesting only from a perspective of disease control and preventive policies. The introduction of new biological endpoints in the epidemiological studies has boosted research in the field, providing new tools for the study of emerging priority in cancer research and in public health. This approach, known as molecular epidemiology has a great potential in the study of MM, contributing to the understanding of susceptibility factors, to the evaluation of cancer risk in people occupationally or environmentally exposed to carcinogens, and to the enhancement of diagnosis and therapy. A comprehensive approach based on the use of banks of biological samples is presented and its advantages discussed here. The application of innovative endpoints, such as oncoproteins in biologic fluids, genetic polimorphisms, or gene function is discussed, and relevant literature reviewed.

  12. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Causing Invasive Disease in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Grau, Imma; Tubau, Fe; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Roman; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults. Methods Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008–2013). Results Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse. Conclusions Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity. PMID:25379704

  13. Molecular epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans isolates from Ugandan AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M; Zhang, J; Messer, S; Tumberland, M; Mbidde, E; Jessup, C; Ghannoum, M

    1998-11-01

    Little is known of the antifungal susceptibility patterns and molecular epidemiology of Cryptococcus neoformans from tropical regions. We studied 164 clinical isolates of C. neofomans from 120 Ugandan AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis by analyzing their electrophoretic karyotypes and antifungal susceptibility profiles. Computer-assisted analysis of karyotype patterns was performed to generate dendrograms. MICs of fluconazole and flucytosine were determined by reference methods. A total of 43 distinguishable DNA types were identified among the 164 isolates. Only 30 patients (25%) were infected with their own unique strain of c. neoformans, whereas 75% of the patients shared their infecting strain with at least one other patient. Among 17 patients with more than one CSF isolate of C. neoformans, sequential isolates were identical or highly related in 12 (71%) and were different in five patients (29%). The isolates were susceptible to both fluconazole and flucytosine and there were no instances in which a stepwise increase in either fluconazole or flucytosine MICs was observed among serial isolates. These findings suggest that the epidemiology of cryptococcal disease in AIDS patients from tropical regions may be somewhat different from that observed in more temperate climates.

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Hospital Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Fagbo, Shamsudeen F.; Skakni, Leila; Chu, Daniel K.W.; Garbati, Musa A.; Joseph, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    We investigated an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during March 29–May 21, 2014. This outbreak involved 45 patients: 8 infected outside KFMC, 13 long-term patients at KFMC, 23 health care workers, and 1 who had an indeterminate source of infection. Sequences of full-length MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from 10 patients and a partial sequence of MERS-CoV from another patient, when compared with other MERS-CoV sequences, demonstrated that this outbreak was part of a larger outbreak that affected multiple health care facilities in Riyadh and possibly arose from a single zoonotic transmission event that occurred in December 2013 (95% highest posterior density interval November 8, 2013–February 10, 2014). This finding suggested continued health care–associated transmission for 5 months. Molecular epidemiology documented multiple external introductions in a seemingly contiguous outbreak and helped support or refute transmission pathways suspected through epidemiologic investigation. PMID:26484549

  15. Molecular epidemiology and diagnosis of PBG deaminase gene defects in acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed Central

    Puy, H; Deybach, J C; Lamoril, J; Robreau, A M; Da Silva, V; Gouya, L; Grandchamp, B; Nordmann, Y

    1997-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the major autosomal dominant form of acute hepatic porphyrias. The disease is due to mutations in the gene encoding for porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase and is characterized by life-threatening neurovisceral attacks, often precipitated by drugs, fasting, cyclical hormonal changes, or infectious diseases. This report describes a prospective study on the molecular epidemiology of PBG deaminase gene defects in AIP. It uses a sensitive, reliable, and easy-to-handle method for routine AIP molecular diagnosis and family study based on an exon-by-exon denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) strategy followed by direct sequencing. Fifteen genomic DNA fragments, including all the coding sequence and covering 3.35 kb of the PBG deaminase gene, were investigated in 405 subjects from 121 unrelated French Caucasian AIP families who had not been screened previously at the DNA level. PBG deaminase gene mutations were identified in 109 families, but only 78 were of different type, and each of them had a prevalence rate < 5%. Among these mutations, 33 had not been published previously. Sixty percent of these 78 mutations were located in only three exons (exons 10, 12, and 14), 44% were missense, 18% were splice defect, 19% were frameshift, and 16% were nonsense. In addition, two de novo mutational events were characterized. The evaluation of the efficiency of the standard PBG deaminase enzymatic screening method for gene-carrier detection indicated 95% of concordancy with the molecular-based diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9199558

  16. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of Dengue Virus Circulating in Bhutan, 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Zangmo, Sangay; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Tantimavanich, Srisurang; Kosoltanapiwat, Nathamon; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Phuntsho, Kelzang; Wangchuk, Sonam; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most significant public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries, and is increasingly being detected in traditionally non-endemic areas. In Bhutan, dengue virus (DENV) has only recently been detected and limited information is available. In this study, we analyzed the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of DENV in two southern districts in Bhutan from 2013–2014. During this period, 379 patients were clinically diagnosed with suspected dengue, of whom 119 (31.4%) were positive for DENV infection by NS1 ELISA and/or nested RT-PCR. DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected with DENV-1 being predominant. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 using envelope gene demonstrated genotype V, closely related to strains from northern India. PMID:26295474

  17. Molecular epidemiology of human metapneumovirus from 2009 to 2011 in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nidaira, Minoru; Taira, Katsuya; Hamabata, Hirotsune; Kawaki, Tatsuyoshi; Gushi, Kazuo; Mahoe, Youko; Maeshiro, Noriyuki; Azama, Yasuhito; Okano, Shou; Kyan, Hisako; Kudaka, Jun; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Noda, Masahiro; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2012-07-01

    To clarify the molecular epidemiology of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) in Okinawa Prefecture, located in a subtropical region of Japan, we performed genetic analysis of the F gene in HMPV from patients with acute respiratory infection from January 2009 to December 2011. HMPV was detected in 18 of 485 throat swabs (3.7%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that 17 strains belonged to subgroup A2 and 1 strain belonged to subgroup B1. We did not observe seasonal prevalence of HMPV during the investigation period. A high level of sequence identity was observed in the strains belonging to subgroup A2 (>95%), and no amino acid substitution was found compared with other strains detected in Japan and other countries. The pairwise distance values among the present strains belonging to subgroup A2 were short. Our results suggest that the predominant HMPV strains belonging to A2 are highly homologous and seasonal epidemics were not seen in Okinawa during the investigation period.

  18. Molecular Testing for Clinical Diagnosis and Epidemiological Investigations of Intestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stensvold, C. Rune

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies. PMID:24696439

  19. Molecular testing for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Jaco J; Stensvold, C Rune

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies.

  20. Molecular epidemiological study of enteroviruses associated with encephalitis in children from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Shukla, Deepti; Kumar, Rashmi; Idris, Mohammad Z; Misra, Usha K; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-11-01

    Enteroviruses have been reported in encephalitis cases. However, clinical and epidemiological characteristics of enteroviruses in encephalitis are not fully established. We prospectively investigated 204 children with encephalitis over a period of 2 years (2009 to 2010) for enterovirus. Enterovirus was detected in 45 specimens (22.1%); of these, 40 were typed by seminested reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and sequencing of the VP1 gene. Molecular typing of enterovirus revealed the predominance of echovirus 21 associated with an epidemic during the rainy seasons of 2010 and the circulation of echovirus 1, coxsackievirus B1, enterovirus 75, enterovirus 76, coxsackievirus B5, and echovirus 19. The nucleotide divergence among echovirus 21 strains was 0 to 2% at the nucleotide level. This study suggests that enterovirus is an important cause of encephalitis in children from India. To our knowledge, this is the first report of echovirus 21 in encephalitis cases worldwide.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of HPV infection using a clinical array methodology in 2952 women in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsiodras, S; Hatzakis, A; Spathis, A; Margari, N; Meristoudis, C; Chranioti, A; Kyrgiou, M; Panayiotides, J; Kassanos, D; Petrikkos, G; Nasioutziki, M; Loufopoulos, A; Paraskevaidis, E; Karakitsos, P

    2011-08-01

    The molecular epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a sample of Greek women (n = 2952, mean age 42.2 ± 13.3 years) was examined. HPV prevalence was 50.7% (95% confidence interval, 48.8-52.6). The most frequent HPV types were HPV 53, 51 and 66 (10.2%, 9.4% and 9.3%, respectively). HPV positivity was associated with age, age of sexual debut, number of sexual partners and duration of sexual relationship, while marriage or multiparity protected against infection (all p <0.001). Follow-up of this cohort will assist in predicting the effect of vaccination with the new HPV vaccines on future screening with HPV-based tests for cervical cancer. PMID:21595788

  2. [Research on conventional and molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in Orizaba, Veracruz, 1995-2008].

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Corona, Ma Eugenia; García-García, Lourdes; León, Alfredo Ponce de; Bobadilla-del Valle, Miriam; Torres, Martha; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Palacios-Merino, Carmen; Molina-Hernández, Susana; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Juárez-Sandino, Luis; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Sada, Eduardo; Marquina, Brenda; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the achievements of the Mexican Consortium against Tuberculosis, in the Sanitary District of Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico between 1995 and 2008. In brief, the main results can be classified as follows: 1) Conventional and molecular epidemiology (measurement of burden of disease, trends, risk factors and vulnerable groups, consequences of drug resistance, identification of factors that favor nosocomial and community transmission); 2) Development of diagnostic techniques to detect drug resistance, description of circulating clones and adaptation of simple techniques to be used in the field; 3) Evaluation of usefulness of tuberculin skin test, immunologic responses to BCG, impact of directly observed therapy for tuberculosis (DOTS), and study of immunological biomarkers and 4) Comments on ethical aspects of tuberculosis research. Additionally, we describe the impact on public policies, transference of technology, capacity building and future perspectives.

  3. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of Dengue Virus Circulating in Bhutan, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Zangmo, Sangay; Klungthong, Chonticha; Chinnawirotpisan, Piyawan; Tantimavanich, Srisurang; Kosoltanapiwat, Nathamon; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Phuntsho, Kelzang; Wangchuk, Sonam; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the most significant public health problems in tropical and subtropical countries, and is increasingly being detected in traditionally non-endemic areas. In Bhutan, dengue virus (DENV) has only recently been detected and limited information is available. In this study, we analyzed the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of DENV in two southern districts in Bhutan from 2013-2014. During this period, 379 patients were clinically diagnosed with suspected dengue, of whom 119 (31.4%) were positive for DENV infection by NS1 ELISA and/or nested RT-PCR. DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were detected with DENV-1 being predominant. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-1 using envelope gene demonstrated genotype V, closely related to strains from northern India.

  4. Molecular epidemiological survey of Theileria orientalis in Thua Thien Hue Province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Khukhuu, Altangerel; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Long, Phung Thang; Ueno, Akio; Li, Yan; Luo, Yuzi; Macedo, Alan Caine Costa de; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2011-05-01

    Theileria orientalis is a benign bovine protozoan parasite that occasionally causes serious economic loss in the livestock industry. We report the findings of a molecular epidemiological survey of T. orientalis in 94 Vietnamese yellow cattle, 43 water buffaloes, 21 sheep, 21 goats and 85 blood-sucking ticks of cattle in the Thua Thien Hue province of Vietnam. The major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) gene of T. orientalis was detected using polymerase chain reaction from 13 cattle (13.8%), 11 water buffaloes (25.6%), 1 sheep (4.8%) and 9 ticks (10.6%). Phylogenetic analysis using MPSP gene sequences showed the presence of seven genotypes, four previously categorized genotypes (Types 1, 3, 5 and 7) and three new genotypes (Types N-1, N-2 and N-3).

  5. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia.

  6. Syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, molecular epidemiological strain typing and determination of macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum in 2013-2014 in Tuva Republic, Russia.

    PubMed

    Khairullin, Rafil; Vorobyev, Denis; Obukhov, Andrey; Kuular, Ural-Herel; Kubanova, Anna; Kubanov, Alexey; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of syphilis in the Tuva Republic (geographical centre of Asia), Russia has been exceedingly high historically. No detailed examinations and no molecular investigations of Treponema pallidum strains transmitted in the Tuva Republic, or in general, in Russia, were published internationally. We examined the syphilis epidemiology in 1994-2013, and the molecular epidemiology and macrolide resistance in T. pallidum strains in 2013-2014 in the Tuva Republic. Among 95 mainly primary or secondary syphilis patients, the arp, tpr, tp0548 and 23S rRNA genes in 85 polA gene-positive genital ulcer specimens were characterized. The syphilis incidence in Tuva Republic peaked in 1998 (1562), however declined to 177 in 2013. Among the 70 (82%) completely genotyped specimens, six molecular strain types were found. Strain type 14d/f accounted for 91%, but also 14c/f, 14d/g, 14b/f, 14i/f, 9d/f, and 4d/f were identified. Two (2.4%) specimens contained the 23S rRNA A2058G macrolide resistance mutation. This is the first internationally published typing study regarding T. pallidum in Russia, performed in the Tuva Republic with the highest syphilis incidence in Russia. The two molecular strain types 4d/f and 9d/f have previously been described only in Eastern and Northern China and for the first time, macrolide-resistant syphilis was described in Russia. PMID:27102715

  7. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asma, I; Sim, B L H; Brent, R D; Johari, S; Yvonne Lim, A L

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a particular concern in immunocompromised individuals where symptoms may be severe. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia in order to identify risk factors and facilitate control measures. A modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid fast staining method was used to test for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the stools of 346 HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia. Standard coproscopical methods were used to identify infections with other protozoan or helminths parasites. To identify the species of Cryptosporidium, DNA was extracted and nested-PCR was used to amplify a portion of the SSU rRNA gene. A total of 43 (12.4%) HIV-infected patients were found to be infected with Cryptosporidium spp. Of the 43 Cryptosporidium-positive HIV patients, 10 (23.3%) also harboured other protozoa, and 15 (34.9%) had both protozoa and helminths. The highest rates of cryptosporidiosis were found in adult males of Malay background, intravenous drug users, and those with low CD4 T cell counts (i.e., < 200 cells/mm3). Most were asymptomatic and had concurrent opportunistic infections mainly with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. DNA sequence analysis of 32 Cryptosporidium isolates identified C. parvum (84.3%), C. hominis (6.3%), C. meleagridis (6.3%), and C. felis (3.1%). The results of the present study revealed a high prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients. The results also confirmed the potential significance of zoonotic transmission of C. parvum in HIV infected patients, as it was the predominant species found in this study. However, these patients were found to be susceptible to a wide range of Cryptosporidium species. Epidemiological and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates provides clinicians and researchers with further information regarding the origin of the infection, and may enhance treatment and control

  8. Molecular epidemiology of noroviruses associated with sporadic gastroenteritis in children in Novosibirsk, Russia, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    Zhirakovskaia, Elena V; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Bodnev, Sergey A; Klemesheva, Vera V; Netesov, Sergey V; Tikunova, Nina V

    2015-05-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are an important cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. To monitor the molecular epidemiology of NoVs genogroup II (GII) in Novosibirsk, Russia, a total of 10,198 stool samples from young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis and two asymptomatic comparison groups were collected from 2003 to 2012. All samples were screened for the presence of NoV GII, rotavirus, and astrovirus by RT-PCR. The prevalence of NoV in gastroenteritis cases was 13.1%, varying from 7.1% to 21.3% in different seasons. Rotavirus and/or astrovirus were detectable in 25% of the NoV-positive samples. NoV was detected throughout the year with a seasonal increase during winter months. Based on sequence analysis of regions D and/or C within the VP1 gene, 892 identified NoV strains were divided into nine genotypes—GII.3 (51%), GII.4 (44%), GII.6 (2%), as well as GII.1, GII.2, GII.5, GII.7, GII.16, and GII.21 (totally, 3%). The prevalence of NoV in the comparison groups was considerably lower (∼2.5%); only GII.4 (n = 6), GII.21 (n = 2) and GII.1 (n = 1) genotypes were revealed. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the ORF1/ORF2 junction region sequences, GII.P21/GII.3 recombinant and GII.P4/GII.4 were prevalent genotypes (totally, 93%) and their ratio changed every season. The median age of children with NoV infection was 6.6 months (range, <1-35 months), but it was different depending on NoV genotype. Children infected with the NoV GII.3 were younger (median 6.2 months) than GII.4-positive patients (median 9.1 months). This is the first long-term systematic study of NoV molecular epidemiology in Russia.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asma, I; Sim, B L H; Brent, R D; Johari, S; Yvonne Lim, A L

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a particular concern in immunocompromised individuals where symptoms may be severe. The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia in order to identify risk factors and facilitate control measures. A modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid fast staining method was used to test for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the stools of 346 HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia. Standard coproscopical methods were used to identify infections with other protozoan or helminths parasites. To identify the species of Cryptosporidium, DNA was extracted and nested-PCR was used to amplify a portion of the SSU rRNA gene. A total of 43 (12.4%) HIV-infected patients were found to be infected with Cryptosporidium spp. Of the 43 Cryptosporidium-positive HIV patients, 10 (23.3%) also harboured other protozoa, and 15 (34.9%) had both protozoa and helminths. The highest rates of cryptosporidiosis were found in adult males of Malay background, intravenous drug users, and those with low CD4 T cell counts (i.e., < 200 cells/mm3). Most were asymptomatic and had concurrent opportunistic infections mainly with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. DNA sequence analysis of 32 Cryptosporidium isolates identified C. parvum (84.3%), C. hominis (6.3%), C. meleagridis (6.3%), and C. felis (3.1%). The results of the present study revealed a high prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in hospitalized HIV/AIDS patients. The results also confirmed the potential significance of zoonotic transmission of C. parvum in HIV infected patients, as it was the predominant species found in this study. However, these patients were found to be susceptible to a wide range of Cryptosporidium species. Epidemiological and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates provides clinicians and researchers with further information regarding the origin of the infection, and may enhance treatment and control

  10. Conductivity of carbon-based molecular junctions from ab-initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Luo, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) are prompting candidates for next generational electronics. In this review we provide a mini overview of recent results on the conductivity of carbon-based molecular junctions obtained from ab-initio methods. CNMs used as nanoelectrodes and molecular materials in molecular junctions are discussed. The functionalities that include the nanomechanically controlled molecular conductance switches, negative differential resistance devices, and electronic rectifiers realized by using CNMs have been demonstrated.

  11. Molecular epidemiology in cancer risk assessment and prevention: recent progress and avenues for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Wogan, G N

    1992-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology is increasingly being applied in studies of cancer risks derived from exposure to environmental carcinogens of both endogenous and exogenous origins. Analytical methods have been developed that are capable of detecting and quantifying levels of covalent adducts of several important classes of carcinogens with cellular DNA and blood proteins. Methods of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect ambient levels of exposure are in current use. These are being used in studies related to tobacco use (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, tobacco-specific nitrosamines); dietary exposures (aflatoxins, N-nitrosamines, heterocyclic amines); medicinal exposures (cisplatin, alkylating agents, 8-methoxypsoralen, ultraviolet photoproducts); occupational exposures (aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, oxides of ethylene and styrene, and vinyl chloride); and oxidative damage (8-hydroxyguanine, thymine glycol). Methodologic improvements together with their expanded use in feasibility studies continue to produce results that support the validity of this approach for detecting and quantifying exposure to carcinogens. Genetic markers are also being used to detect early biological responses in efforts to link carcinogen exposure to initiating events in the carcinogenesis process. These include, in addition to traditional cytogenetic markers (e.g., chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei), other alterations in chromosomal structure such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms, loss of heterozygosity, and translocation markers. Specific genetic changes have recently been identified as critical molecular events in the initiation and development of many cancers. Important among these are activation of oncogenes, especially those of the ras family, and inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes (e.g., p53 and Rb) by point mutations and/or chromosomal deletions and other structural changes. Although some of

  12. [Hemoglobinopathies in Tunisia. An updated review of the epidemiologic and molecular data].

    PubMed

    Fattoum, Slaheddine

    2006-11-01

    The hemoglobinopathies affect the blood red cells and are the most common monogenic diseases worldwide. The high frequency and clinical severity of the hemoglobinopathies, make them a major public health problem. We report here an updated review on epidemiologic and molecular data of the hemoglobinopathies in Tunisia. From 1980 to 2005, a screening of hemoglobinopathies was performed on a total of 44299 individuals according to 2 kinds of work: a systematic screening on several populations (24240) from different regions of the country and a cohort of individuals referred to our laboratory for hemoglobinopathies suspicion (20059). Blood was collected in EDTA tubes from the studied individuals to determine the hematological parameters, the hemoglobin electrophoretic data and the iron status. DNA analysis was performed by the usual PCR based-procedures for the molecular defects identification. Systematic surveys allowed us to show an average prevalence of hemoglobinopathy carriers of 4.48% reaching 12.50% in some focus regions. The average frequency of B-thal trait is of 2.21% and that of sickle cell trait is of 1.89%. Hemoglobin screening on newborns has shown a frequency of alpha-thal trait of 5.48%. Oriented studies from our hospital experience allowed us to list more than 2394 major forms. Molecular analysis on beta-thalassemia patients allowed to identify 21 different alleles. The two most frequent mutations (cd39 C-->T and IVS1-110 G-->A) accounted for 70% of the total encountered beta-thal mutations. Among the other mutations, three were described for the first time in the world on Tunisian families. The sickle cell disease is associated with the Benin haplotype in 95% of the studied cases. Concerning alpha-thal mutation, the - alpha37 deletion was the most common. We also note the identification of several rare Hemoglobin variants as well as diverse associated forms of anomalies. Knowledge of epidemiological and molecular data of hemoglobinopathies is

  13. An integrative analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus carriers in Vietnam achieved through targeted surveillance and molecular epidemiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multidisciplinary, molecular and conventional epidemiological approach was applied to an investigation of endemic foot-and-mouth disease in Vietnam. Within the study space, it was found that 22.3 percent of sampled ruminants had previously been infected with FMD virus (FMDV) and that 2.4 percent w...

  14. Circular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Kuller, L H

    1999-11-01

    Circular epidemiology can be defined as the continuation of specific types of epidemiologic studies beyond the point of reasonable doubt of the true existence of an important association or the absence of such an association. Circular epidemiology is an extreme example of studies of the consistency of associations. A basic problem for epidemiology is the lack of a systematic approach to acquiring new knowledge to reach a goal of improving public health and preventive medicine. For epidemiologists, research support unfortunately is biased toward the continued study of already proven hypotheses. Circular epidemiology, however, freezes at one point in the evolution of epidemiologic studies, failing to move from descriptive to analytical case-control and longitudinal studies, for example, to experimental, clinical trials. Good epidemiology journals are filled with very well-conducted epidemiologic studies that primarily repeat the obvious or are variations on the theme.

  15. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON TWO CYCLOSPORIASIS OUTBREAKS IN VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two cyclosporiasis outbreaks in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) were investigated using molegular epidemiology. The cause of the 1999 outbreak has not been identiifed whereas the 2001 oubreak has been linked epidemiologically to the consumption of Thai basil. The internal tran...

  16. Correlation of breaking forces, conductances and geometries of molecular junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Koji; Pobelov, Ilya V.; Manrique, David Zsolt; Pope, Thomas; Mészáros, Gábor; Gulcur, Murat; Bryce, Martin R.; Lambert, Colin J.; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Electrical and mechanical properties of elongated gold-molecule-gold junctions formed by tolane-type molecules with different anchoring groups (pyridyl, thiol, amine, nitrile and dihydrobenzothiophene) were studied in current-sensing force spectroscopy experiments and density functional simulations. Correlations between forces, conductances and junction geometries demonstrate that aromatic tolanes bind between electrodes as single molecules or as weakly-conductive dimers held by mechanically-weak π − π stacking. In contrast with the other anchors that form only S-Au or N-Au bonds, the pyridyl ring also forms a highly-conductive cofacial link to the gold surface. Binding of multiple molecules creates junctions with higher conductances and mechanical strengths than the single-molecule ones. PMID:25758349

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Groves, Mitchell D; Crouch, Bethany; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Jordan, David; Pang, Stanley; Barton, Mary D; Giffard, Phil; Abraham, Sam; Trott, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44) was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping) and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC) 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST) 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable,) were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3-92.5, P < 0.001) and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2-532.7, P < 0.001) and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Aleutian disease virus in free-ranging domestic, hybrid, and wild mink.

    PubMed

    Nituch, Larissa A; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2012-06-01

    Aleutian mink disease (AMD) is a prominent infectious disease in mink farms. The AMD virus (AMDV) has been well characterized in Europe where American mink (Neovison vison) are an introduced species; however, in North America, where American mink are native and the disease is thought to have originated, the virus' molecular epidemiology is unknown. As such, we characterized viral isolates from Ontario free-ranging mink of domestic, hybrid, and wild origin at two proteins: NS1, a nonstructural protein, and VP2, a capsid protein. AMDV DNA was detected in 25% of free-ranging mink (45 of 183), indicating prevalent active infection. Median-joining networks showed that Ontario AMDV isolates formed two subgroups in the NS1 region and three in the VP2 region, which were somewhat separate from, but closely related to, AMDVs circulating in domestic mink worldwide. Molecular analyses showed evidence of AMDV crossing from domestic to wild mink. Our results suggest that AMDV isolate grouping is linked to both wild endogenous reservoirs and the long-term global trade in domestic mink, and that AMD spills back and forth between domestic and wild mink. As such, biosecurity on mink farms is warranted to prevent transmission of the disease between mink farms and the wild. PMID:25568054

  19. Molecular epidemiology of Aleutian disease virus in free-ranging domestic, hybrid, and wild mink

    PubMed Central

    Nituch, Larissa A; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2012-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease (AMD) is a prominent infectious disease in mink farms. The AMD virus (AMDV) has been well characterized in Europe where American mink (Neovison vison) are an introduced species; however, in North America, where American mink are native and the disease is thought to have originated, the virus’ molecular epidemiology is unknown. As such, we characterized viral isolates from Ontario free-ranging mink of domestic, hybrid, and wild origin at two proteins: NS1, a nonstructural protein, and VP2, a capsid protein. AMDV DNA was detected in 25% of free-ranging mink (45 of 183), indicating prevalent active infection. Median-joining networks showed that Ontario AMDV isolates formed two subgroups in the NS1 region and three in the VP2 region, which were somewhat separate from, but closely related to, AMDVs circulating in domestic mink worldwide. Molecular analyses showed evidence of AMDV crossing from domestic to wild mink. Our results suggest that AMDV isolate grouping is linked to both wild endogenous reservoirs and the long-term global trade in domestic mink, and that AMD spills back and forth between domestic and wild mink. As such, biosecurity on mink farms is warranted to prevent transmission of the disease between mink farms and the wild. PMID:25568054

  20. Application of whole-genome sequencing for bacterial strain typing in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Cummings, Lisa A; Land, Tyler A; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cookson, Brad T

    2015-04-01

    Nosocomial infections pose a significant threat to patient health; however, the gold standard laboratory method for determining bacterial relatedness (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]) remains essentially unchanged 20 years after its introduction. Here, we explored bacterial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as an alternative approach for molecular strain typing. We compared WGS to PFGE for investigating presumptive outbreaks involving three important pathogens: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (n=19), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=17), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n=15). WGS was highly reproducible (average≤0.39 differences between technical replicates), which enabled a functional, quantitative definition for determining clonality. Strain relatedness data determined by PFGE and WGS roughly correlated, but the resolution of WGS was superior (P=5.6×10(-8) to 0.016). Several discordant results were noted between the methods. A total of 28.9% of isolates which were indistinguishable by PFGE were nonclonal by WGS. For A. baumannii, a species known to undergo rapid horizontal gene transfer, 16.2% of isolate pairs considered nonidentical by PFGE were clonal by WGS. Sequencing whole bacterial genomes with single-nucleotide resolution demonstrates that PFGE is prone to false-positive and false-negative results and suggests the need for a new gold standard approach for molecular epidemiological strain typing.

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Australian Veterinarians

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Mitchell D.; Crouch, Bethany; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Jordan, David; Pang, Stanley; Barton, Mary D.; Giffard, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from veterinarians in Australia in 2009. The collection (n = 44) was subjected to extensive molecular typing (MLST, spa, SCCmec, dru, PFGE, virulence and antimicrobial resistance genotyping) and antimicrobial resistance phenotyping by disk diffusion. MRSA was isolated from Australian veterinarians representing various occupational emphases. The isolate collection was dominated by MRSA strains belonging to clonal complex (CC) 8 and multilocus sequence type (ST) 22. CC8 MRSA (ST8-IV [2B], spa t064; and ST612-IV [2B], spa variable,) were strongly associated with equine practice veterinarians (OR = 17.5, 95% CI = 3.3–92.5, P < 0.001) and were often resistant to gentamicin and rifampicin. ST22-IV [2B], spa variable, were strongly associated with companion animal practice veterinarians (OR = 52.5, 95% CI = 5.2–532.7, P < 0.001) and were resistant to ciprofloxacin. A single pig practice veterinarian carried ST398-V [5C2], spa t1451. Equine practice and companion animal practice veterinarians frequently carried multiresistant-CC8 and ST22 MRSA, respectively, whereas only a single swine specialist carried MRSA ST398. The presence of these strains in veterinarians may be associated with specific antimicrobial administration practices in each animal species. PMID:26735694

  2. Application of whole-genome sequencing for bacterial strain typing in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Stephen J; SenGupta, Dhruba J; Cummings, Lisa A; Land, Tyler A; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Cookson, Brad T

    2015-04-01

    Nosocomial infections pose a significant threat to patient health; however, the gold standard laboratory method for determining bacterial relatedness (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE]) remains essentially unchanged 20 years after its introduction. Here, we explored bacterial whole-genome sequencing (WGS) as an alternative approach for molecular strain typing. We compared WGS to PFGE for investigating presumptive outbreaks involving three important pathogens: vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (n=19), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (n=17), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n=15). WGS was highly reproducible (average≤0.39 differences between technical replicates), which enabled a functional, quantitative definition for determining clonality. Strain relatedness data determined by PFGE and WGS roughly correlated, but the resolution of WGS was superior (P=5.6×10(-8) to 0.016). Several discordant results were noted between the methods. A total of 28.9% of isolates which were indistinguishable by PFGE were nonclonal by WGS. For A. baumannii, a species known to undergo rapid horizontal gene transfer, 16.2% of isolate pairs considered nonidentical by PFGE were clonal by WGS. Sequencing whole bacterial genomes with single-nucleotide resolution demonstrates that PFGE is prone to false-positive and false-negative results and suggests the need for a new gold standard approach for molecular epidemiological strain typing. PMID:25631811

  3. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape. PMID:24486486

  4. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile Infection in a Major Chinese Hospital: an Underrecognized Problem in Asia?

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Clare; Liu, Wen En; Jian, Zi Juan; Gao, Qian; Ling, Thomas Kin Wah; Chow, Viola; So, Erica; Chan, Raphael; Hardy, Katie; Xu, Li; Manzoor, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is almost unrecognized in mainland China. We have undertaken a study in a large Chinese teaching hospital in Changsha, Hunan, China, to identify cases of C. difficile, record patient characteristics, and define the molecular epidemiology with respect to ribotype distribution and cross-infection. Between April 2009 and February 2010, we examined fecal samples from 70 hospitalized patients with diarrhea who were receiving or had received antibiotics within the previous 6 weeks. Clinical information was collected and the samples were cultured for C. difficile retrospectively. Isolates were ribotyped, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat assay (MLVA) subtyping was performed on clusters of the same ribotype. The mean age of patients from whom C. difficile was cultured was 58 years, with only 4/21 patients aged >65 years. All patients, with a single exception, had received a third-generation cephalosporin and/or a quinolone antibiotic. Twenty-one isolates of C. difficile were recovered, and seven different ribotypes were identified, the dominant types being 017 (48%), 046 (14%), and 012 (14%). We identified two clusters of cross-infection with indistinguishable isolates of ribotype 017, with evidence of spread both within and between wards. We have identified C. difficile as a possibly significant problem, with cross-infection and a distinct ribotype distribution, in a large Chinese hospital. C. difficile may be underrecognized in China, and further epidemiological studies across the country together with the introduction of routine diagnostic testing are needed to ascertain the size of this potentially significant problem. PMID:23903542

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses in the Adamawa Province of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Bronsvoort, B. M. de C.; Radford, A. D.; Tanya, V. N.; Nfon, C.; Kitching, R. P.; Morgan, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious viral disease of even-toed ungulates and is one of the most important economic diseases of livestock. Most studies of FMDV are done in countries where control measures are being implemented. In contrast, in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa, where FMDV is endemic and new strains are likely to emerge, there are only sporadic submissions to the World Reference Laboratory, Pirbright, United Kingdom. This paper describes the molecular epidemiology of FMDV in the Adamawa province of Cameroon based on a population sample of cattle herds. Serotypes SAT2 and A were isolated in the cross-sectional study. SAT2 isolates were all similar, with phylogenetic distances of <6%, and were most closely related to published sequences of isolates from Eritrea and Saudi Arabia. Serotype A isolates were more variable, with phylogenetic distances of 0 to 11%, and were most closely related to historic isolates from Cameroon. Use of a population-based sample gives a representative sample of virus diversity and will improve our understanding of the evolution of FMDV and its epidemiology. A supplementary study of pigs passing through the railhead collection yard at Ngaoundere detected a serotype O virus. A third pilot longitudinal study monitored viral persistence in three cattle herds over 12 months, and serotype O and A viruses were recovered from a herd 12 months after it was first recorded as being infected with SAT2 virus. The pig type O isolate was not closely related to that recovered from the cattle, suggesting that the pigs had not introduced the O virus into the cattle herds. PMID:15131187

  7. Molecular Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Clostridium difficile Isolates from a University Teaching Hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Xie, Xiu-Li; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    While the developed world has seen a significant increase in the number of scientific articles on Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), the developing world still lags behind on this subject due to limited laboratory capacity, low awareness, and limited surveillance of this problem. As such, CDI is considered a neglected but potentially huge problem in developing countries. The major aim of this study was to systemically evaluate the utility of several molecular typing tools for CDI, including their relevance in epidemiological studies in developing countries such as China. A total of 116 non-repetitive toxigenic C. difficile isolates from Chinese patients, were studied. The isolates comprised 83 (71.6%) A+B+CDT- isolates, 27 (23.3%) A-B+CDT- isolates, and 6 (5.1%) A+B+CDT+ isolates. Typing methods evaluated included multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, PCR ribotyping, multilocus sequence typing, and sequencing of slpA and tcdC genes, which identified 113, 30, 22, 18, and 8 genotypes each and exhibited discriminatory powers of 0.999, 0.916, 0.907, 0.883, and 0.765, respectively. Compared to A+B+ strains, A-B+ strains exhibited higher prevalence of drug resistance to clindamycin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, rifampicin, rifaximin, and tetracycline. Furthermore, drug resistance rates of strains with different PCR ribotypes differed, supporting the importance of molecular typing in management and control of CDI. Based on our earlier suggestion to improve the diagnostic laboratory capacity of CDI in developing countries, setting up efficient surveillance programs complemented by relevant molecular typing methods is warranted. PMID:27799923

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of the Pertussis Epidemic in Washington State in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Katherine E.; Williams, Margaret M.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Milton, Andrea; Pawloski, Lucia; Harrison, Marsenia; Martin, Stacey W.; Meyer, Sarah; Qin, Xuan; DeBolt, Chas; Tasslimi, Azadeh; Syed, Nusrat; Sorrell, Ronald; Tran, Mike; Hiatt, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Although pertussis disease is vaccine preventable, Washington State experienced a substantial rise in pertussis incidence beginning in 2011. By June 2012, the reported cases reached 2,520 (37.5 cases per 100,000 residents), a 1,300% increase compared with the same period in 2011. We assessed the molecular epidemiology of this statewide epidemic using 240 isolates collected from case patients reported from 19 of 39 Washington counties during 2012 to 2013. The typing methods included pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pertactin gene (prn) mutational analysis. Using the scheme PFGE-MLVA-MLST-prn mutations-Prn deficiency, the 240 isolates comprised 65 distinct typing profiles. Thirty-one PFGE types were found, with the most common types, CDC013 (n = 51), CDC237 (n = 44), and CDC002 (n = 42), accounting for 57% of them. Eleven MLVA types were observed, mainly comprising type 27 (n = 183, 76%). Seven MLST types were identified, with the majority of the isolates typing as prn2-ptxP3-ptxA1-fim3-1 (n = 157, 65%). Four different prn mutations accounted for the 76% of isolates exhibiting pertactin deficiency. PFGE provided the highest discriminatory power (D = 0.87) and was found to be a more powerful typing method than MLVA and MLST combined (D = 0.67). This study provides evidence for the continued predominance of MLVA 27 and prn2-ptxP3-ptxA1 alleles, along with the reemergence of the fim3-1 allele. Our results indicate that the Bordetella pertussis population causing this epidemic was diverse, with a few molecular types predominating. The PFGE, MLVA, and MLST profiles were consistent with the predominate types circulating in the United States and other countries. For prn, several mutations were present in multiple molecular types. PMID:25031439

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in 100 Patients With Tuberculosis Using Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Pooideh, Mohammad; Jabbarzadeh, Ismail; Ranjbar, Reza; Saifi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a widespread infectious disease. Today, TB has created a public health crisis in the world. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates is useful for surveying the dynamics of TB infection, identifying new outbreaks, and preventing the disease. Different molecular methods for clustering of M. tuberculosis isolates have been used. Objectives: During a one year study of genotyping, 100 M. tuberculosis isolates from patients referred to Pasteur Institute of Iran were collected and their genotyping was accomplished using pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method. Materials and Methods: Identification of all M. tuberculosis isolates was accomplished using standard biochemical and species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using proportional method. After preparing PFGE plaques for each isolate of M. tuberculosis, XbaI restriction enzyme was applied for genome digestion. Finally, the digested DNA fragments were separated on 1% agarose gel and analyzed with GelCompar II software. Results: Genotyping of the studied isolates in comparison with the molecular weight marker revealed two common types; pulsotype A with 71 isolates and one multidrug resistant mycobacterium (MDR) case, and pulsotype B including 29 isolates and three MDR cases. No correlation between the antibiotypes and pulsotypes was observed. Conclusions: Molecular epidemiology studies of infectious diseases have been useful when bacterial isolates have been clustered in a period of time and in different geographical regions with variable antibiotic resistance patterns. In spite of high geographical differences and different antibiotic resistant patterns, low genetic diversity among the studied TB isolates may refer to the low rate of mutations in XbaI restriction sites in the mycobacterial genome. We also identified three MDR isolates in low-incidence pulsotype B, which could be disseminated and is highly

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Amoebiasis: A Cross-Sectional Study among North East Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Joyobrato; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Singha, Baby; Paul, Jaishree

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies carried out using culture or microscopy in most of the amoebiasis endemic developing countries, yielded confusing results since none of these could differentiate the pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica from the non-pathogenic Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii. The Northeastern part of India is a hot spot of infection since the climatic conditions are most conducive for the infection and so far no systemic study has been carried out in this region. Methodology/Principal Findings Following a cross-sectional study designed during the period 2011–2014, a total of 1260 fecal samples collected from the Northeast Indian population were subjected to microscopy, fecal culture and a sensitive and specific DNA dot blot screening assay developed in our laboratory targeting the Entamoeba spp. Further species discrimination using PCR assay performed in microscopy, culture and DNA dot blot screening positive samples showed E. histolytica an overall prevalence rate of 11.1%, 8.0% and 13.7% respectively. In addition, infection rates of nonpathogenic E. dispar and E. moshkovskii were 11.8% (95% CI = 10.2, 13.8) and 7.8% (95% CI = 6.4, 9.4) respectively. The spatial distributions of infection were 18.2% (107/588) of Assam, 11.7% (23/197) of Manipur, 10.2% (21/207) of Meghalaya, and 8.2% (22/268) of Tripura states. Association study of the disease with demographic features suggested poor living condition (OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.83, 5.63), previous history of infection in family member (OR = 3.18; 95% CI = 2.09, 4.82) and unhygienic toilet facility (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.28, 2.49) as significant risk factors for amoebiasis. Children in age group <15 yr, participants having lower levels of education, and daily laborers exhibited a higher infection rate. Conclusions/Significance Despite the importance of molecular diagnosis of amoebiasis, molecular epidemiological data based on a large sample size from endemic countries are rarely reported in the

  11. Molecular origins of conduction channels observed in shot-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of shot noise from single molecules have indicated the presence of various conduction channels. We present three descriptions of these channels in molecular terms showing that the number of conduction channels is limited by bottlenecks in the molecule and that the channels can be linked to transmission through different junction states. We introduce molecular-conductance orbitals, which allow the transmission to be separated into contributions from individual orbitals and contributions from interference between pairs of orbitals.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses isolated from 1991 to 2013 in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-Chung; Chang, Chia-Yi; Huang, Tien-Shine; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Chang, Chieh; Wang, Fun-In; Huang, Yu-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was first identified in Taiwan in 1991, but the genetic diversity and evolution of PRRSV has not been thoroughly investigated over the past 20 years. The aim of this study was to bridge the gap in understanding of its molecular epidemiology. A total of 31 PRRSV strains were collected and sequenced. The sequences were aligned using the MUSCLE program, and phylogenetic analysis were performed by the maximum-likelihood method and the neighbor-joining method using MEGA 5.2 software. In the early 1990s, two prototype strains, WSV and MD001 of the North American genotype, were first identified. Over the years, both viruses evolved separately. The population dynamics of PRRSV revealed that the strains of the MD001 group were predominant in Taiwan. Evolution was manifested in changes in the nsp2 and ORF5 genes. In addition, a suspected newly invading exotic strain was recovered in 2013, suggesting that international spread is still taking place and that it is affecting the population dynamics. Overall, the results provide an important basis for vaccine development for the control and prevention of PRRS. PMID:26246243

  13. Molecular epidemiology of KPC-2-producing Enterobacteriaceae (non-Klebsiella pneumoniae) isolated from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Carolina Padilha; Pereira, Polyana Silva; Marques, Elizabeth de Andrade; Faria, Celio; de Souza, Maria da Penha Araújo Herkenhoff; de Almeida, Robmary; Alves, Carlene de Fátima Morais; Asensi, Marise Dutra; Carvalho-Assef, Ana Paula D'Alincourt

    2015-08-01

    In Brazil, since 2009, there has been an ever increasing widespread of the bla(KPC-2) gene, mainly in Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study aims to assess the molecular epidemiology and genetic background of this gene in Enterobacteriaceae (non-K. pneumoniae) species from 9 Brazilian states between 2009 and 2011. Three hundred eighty-seven isolates were analyzed exhibiting nonsusceptibility to carbapenems, in which the bla(KPC-2) gene was detected in 21.4%. By disk diffusion and E-test, these isolates exhibited high rates of resistance to most of the antimicrobials tested, including tigecycline (45.6% nonsusceptible) and polymyxin B (16.5%), the most resistant species being Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae. We found great clonal diversity and a variety of bla(KPC-2)-carrying plasmids, all of them exhibiting a partial Tn4401 structure. Therefore, this study demonstrates the dissemination of KPC-2 in 9 Enterobacteriaceae species, including species that were not previously described such as Pantoea agglomerans and Providencia stuartii. PMID:25935630

  14. Molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 variants in the global AIDS pandemic: an update.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Michael M; Nájera, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    The picture of HIV-1 genetic diversity in the global pandemic continues to evolve. Identification of new variants, including circulating and unique recombinant forms, recognition of new outbreaks and of changes in established epidemics, and characterization of growing numbers of full-length genomes provide a view of high dynamism and increasing complexity. The pervasive role of recombination as a major driving force in the generation of diversity in the HIV-1 pandemic is becoming evident, and is particularly visible in areas in which different genetic forms meet, referred to as "geographic recombination hotspots". The importance of superinfection and its impact on HIV-1 diversification and propagation is surfacing, although restrictions to superinfection are also apparent. Genetic diversity within subtypes is increasing over time and new geographically localized lineages deriving from point introductions are being recognized. Characterization of such variants may be of relevance to vaccine development and may allow the detection of intrasubtype recombination and superinfection. Recent studies supporting the correlation of HIV-1 clades to immune responses and to drug resistance-associated mutations lend increasing relevance to the role of molecular epidemiology as an essential tool in combating the AIDS pandemic. However, knowledge on the global HIV-1 genetic diversity and its implications is still far from adequate and a major scaling up of efforts is needed. PMID:16425961

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Porcine Cytomegalovirus (PCMV) in Sichuan Province, China: 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiwen; Zhou, Yuancheng

    2013-01-01

    Porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) is an immunosuppressive virus that mainly inhibits the immune function of the macrophage and T-cell lymphatic systems, and has caused huge economic losses to the porcine breeding industry. Molecular epidemiological investigation of PCMV is important for prevention and treatment, and this study is the first such investigation in Sichuan Province, Southwest China. A PCMV positive infection rate of 84.4% (865/1025) confirmed that PCMV is widely distributed in Sichuan Province. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the PCMV glycoprotein B gene (gB) nucleotide and amino acid sequences from 24 novel Sichuan isolates and 18 other PCMV gB sequences from Genbank. PCMV does not appear to have evolved into different serotypes, and two distinct sequence groups were identified (A and B). However, whether PCMV from this region has evolved into different genotypes requires further research. Analysis of the amino acid sequences confirmed the conservation of gB, but amino acid substitutions in the major epitope region have caused antigenic drift, which may have altered the immunogenicity of PCMV. PMID:23762243

  16. Molecular epidemiology and mechanisms of carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Chinese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zhou, Jian-ying; Qu, Ting-ting; Shen, Ping; Wei, Ze-qing; Yu, Yun-song; Li, Lan-juan

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the molecular epidemiology and carbapenem resistance mechanisms of 258 non-duplicate carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from 2006 to 2007 at 28 hospitals in China. Up to 88% of the carbapenem-resistant isolates were multidrug-resistant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that levels of intrahospital and interhospital dissemination of clones were low. To assess the mechanisms leading to resistance, all 258 carbapenem-resistant isolates were analysed for expression of the chromosomal beta-lactamase (AmpC), the porin important for entry of carbapenems (OprD) and an efflux system (MexAB-OprM) known to extrude some beta-lactams. Carbapenem resistance was driven mainly by mutational inactivation of OprD, accompanied or not by hyperexpression of AmpC or MexAB-OprM. Metallo-beta-lactamase genes were detected in 22 carbapenem-resistant isolates in China, belonging to eight pulsotypes. The bla(OXA-50) gene was detected among all of the carbapenem-resistant isolates, whereas the bla(GES-5) gene was detected in only one carbapenem-resistant isolate.

  17. Molecular Epidemiology and Characterization of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Wild Bird Populations in Northern England▿

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Laura A.; Bennett, Malcolm; Coffey, Peter; Elliott, John; Jones, Trevor R.; Jones, Richard C.; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Leatherbarrow, A. Howard; McNiffe, Kenny; Norman, David; Williams, Nicola J.; Chantrey, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Campylobacter infections have been reported at prevalences ranging from 2 to 50% in a range of wild bird species, although there have been few studies that have investigated the molecular epidemiology of Campylobacter spp. Consequently, whether wild birds are a source of infection in humans or domestic livestock or are mainly recipients of domestic animal strains and whether separate cycles of infection occur remain unknown. To address these questions, serial cross-sectional surveys of wild bird populations in northern England were carried out over a 2-year period. Fecal samples were collected from 2,084 wild bird individuals and screened for the presence of Campylobacter spp. A total of 56 isolates were recovered from 29 birds sampled at 15 of 167 diverse locales. Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter lari, and Campylobacter coli were detected by PCR, and the prevalences of different Campylobacter spp. in different avian families ranged from 0% to 33%. Characterization of 36 C. jejuni isolates by multilocus sequence typing revealed that wild birds carry both livestock-associated and unique strains of C. jejuni. However, the apparent absence of unique wild bird strains of C. jejuni in livestock suggests that the direction of infection is predominantly from livestock to wild birds. C. lari was detected mainly in wild birds sampled in an estuarine or coastal habitat. Fifteen C. lari isolates were analyzed by macrorestriction pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, which revealed genetically diverse populations of C. lari in Eurasian oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus) and clonal populations in magpies (Pica pica). PMID:19286781

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Imported Cases of Leishmaniasis in Australia from 2008 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Tamalee; Barratt, Joel; Sandaradura, Indy; Lee, Rogan; Harkness, John; Marriott, Deborah; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector borne disease caused by protozoa of the genus Leishmania. Human leishmaniasis is not endemic in Australia though imported cases are regularly encountered. This study aimed to provide an update on the molecular epidemiology of imported leishmaniasis in Australia. Of a total of 206 biopsies and bone marrow specimens submitted to St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney for leishmaniasis diagnosis by PCR, 55 were found to be positive for Leishmania DNA. All PCR products were subjected to restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for identification of the causative species. Five Leishmania species/species complexes were identified with Leishmania tropica being the most common (30/55). Travel or prior residence in a Leishmania endemic region was the most common route of acquisition with ~47% of patients having lived in or travelled to Afghanistan. Cutaneous leishmaniasis was the most common manifestation (94%) with only 3 cases of visceral leishmaniasis and no cases of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis encountered. This report indicates that imported leishmaniasis is becoming increasingly common in Australia due to an increase in global travel and immigration. As such, Australian clinicians must be made aware of this trend and consider leishmaniasis in patients with suspicious symptoms and a history of travel in endemic areas. This study also discusses the recent identification of a unique Leishmania species found in native kangaroos and a potential vector host which could create the opportunity for the establishment of a local transmission cycle within humans. PMID:25734905

  19. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Viruses Co-circulating in Upper Myanmar in 2006.

    PubMed

    Thant, Kyaw Zin; Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Parquet, Maria Del Carmen; Inoue, Shingo; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Khin, Pe Thet; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-03-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of circulating dengue viruses (DENV) in Upper Myanmar, DENV isolation was attempted by inoculating the sera of a panel of 110 serum samples onto a C6/36 mosquito cell line. The samples were collected from dengue (DEN) patients admitted at Mandalay Children's Hospital in 2006. Infected culture fluids were subjected to a RT-PCR to detect the DENV genome. Three DENV strains were isolated. This was the first DENV isolation performed either in Mandalay or in Upper Myanmar. One strain belonged to DENV serotype-3 (DENV-3), and two other strains belonged to DENV serotype-4 (DEN-4). The sequence data for the envelope gene of these strains were used in a phylogenetic comparison of DENV-3 and DENV-4 from various countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this DENV-3 strain was clustered within genotype II, and the two DENV-4 strains were clustered within genotype I in each serotype. The Myanmar strains were closely related to strains from the neighboring countries of Thailand and Bangladesh. These results are important for elucidating the trends of recent and future DEN outbreaks in Myanmar. PMID:25859150

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis isolates from free-ranging wildlife in South African game reserves.

    PubMed

    Michel, A L; Coetzee, M L; Keet, D F; Maré, L; Warren, R; Cooper, D; Bengis, R G; Kremer, K; van Helden, P

    2009-02-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is endemic in African buffalo and a number of other wildlife species in the Kruger National Park (KNP) and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP) in South Africa. It was thought that the infection had been introduced into the KNP ecosystem through direct contact between cattle and buffalo, a hypothesis which was confirmed in this study by IS6110 and PGRS restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. The molecular characterisation of 189 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from nine wildlife species in the HiP, including three smaller associated parks, and the Kruger National Park with adjacent areas showed that the respective epidemics were each caused by an infiltration of a single M. bovis genotype. The two M. bovis strains had different genetic profiles, as demonstrated by hybridisation with the IS6110 and PGRS RFLP probes, as well as with regard to evidence of evolutionary changes to the IS profile. While the M. bovis type in HiP was transmitted between buffaloes and to at least baboon, bushpig and lion without obvious genetic changes in the RFLP patterns, in the KNP a dominant strain was represented in 73% of the M. bovis isolates, whilst the remaining 27% were variants of this strain. No species-specific variants were observed, except for one IS6110 type which was found only in a group of five epidemiologically related greater kudu. This finding was attributed to species-specific behaviour patterns rather than an advanced host-pathogen interaction.

  1. Cryptosporidiosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Kenya: clinical features, epidemiology, molecular characterization and antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Wanyiri, Jane W; Kanyi, Henry; Maina, Samuel; Wang, David E; Steen, Aaron; Ngugi, Paul; Kamau, Timothy; Waithera, Tabitha; O'Connor, Roberta; Gachuhi, Kimani; Wamae, Claire N; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Ward, Honorine D

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the epidemiological and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis, the molecular characteristics of infecting species and serum antibody responses to three Cryptosporidium-specific antigens in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in Kenya. Cryptosporidium was the most prevalent enteric pathogen and was identified in 56 of 164 (34%) of HIV/AIDS patients, including 25 of 70 (36%) with diarrhea and 31 of 94 (33%) without diarrhea. Diarrhea in patients exclusively infected with Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with the number of children per household, contact with animals, and water treatment. Cryptosporidium hominis was the most prevalent species and the most prevalent subtype family was Ib. Patients without diarrhea had significantly higher serum IgG levels to Chgp15, Chgp40 and Cp23, and higher fecal IgA levels to Chgp15 and Chgp40 than those with diarrhea suggesting that antibody responses to these antigens may be associated with protection from diarrhea and supporting further investigation of these antigens as vaccine candidates.

  2. Molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus type-1 and 2 isolated in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Muhd Hasyim; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur; Hussin, Salasawati

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Detection of different serotypes of dengue virus and provide information on origin, distribution and genotype of the virus. Methods: Dengue virus serotypes identified as DEN-1 and DEN-2 were amplified and sequenced with E gene. The consensus sequences were aligned with references E gene sequences of globally available GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-joining and Kimura 2-parameter model to construct phylogenetic tree. Results: A total of 53 dengue virus isolates were positive, of which 38 (71.7%) were DENV-1 and 15 (28.3%) were DENV-2. Phylogenetic tree of DENV-1 and DENV-2 showed that the isolates were clustered in genotype I and cosmopolitan genotype, respectively considered the predominant genotypes in Southeast Asian countries. The molecular epidemiology genotype I DENV-1 and cosmopolitan genotype DENV-2 have been co-circulating in Klang Valley areas, Malaysia without shifting of genotype. Conclusion: The study reveals that DENV-1 and DENV-2 have been circulating in Malaysia. The isolates are clustered in genotype 1 and cosmopolitian genotype, respectively. The study results would help in planning for prevention and control of dengue virus in Malaysia. PMID:26150855

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility/resistance and molecular epidemiological characteristics of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in 2009 in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Glazkova, Slavyana; Golparian, Daniel; Titov, Leonid; Pankratova, Nataliya; Suhabokava, Nataliya; Shimanskaya, Irina; Domeika, Marius; Unemo, Magnus

    2011-08-01

    Increased antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a global concern, and ultimately gonorrhoea may become untreatable. Nonetheless, AMR data from East-Europe are scarce beyond Russia, and no AMR data or other characteristics of gonococci have been reported from Belarus for more than 20 years. The aim was to describe the prevalence of AMR, and report molecular epidemiological characteristics of gonococci circulating in 2009 in Belarus. In a sample of 80 isolates, resistance prevalences to antimicrobials used for gonorrhoea treatment in Belarus were: Ceftriaxone 0%, spectinomycin 0%, azithromycin 17.3%, tetracycline 25.9%, ciprofloxacin 34.6% and erythromycin 59.2%. The isolates displayed no penA mosaic alleles, 38 porB gene sequences and 35 N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence types, of which 20 have not been described before worldwide. Due to the high levels of antimicrobial resistance, only ceftriaxone and spectinomycin can be recommended for empirical treatment of gonorrhoea in Belarus according to WHO recommendations. Continuous gonococcal AMR surveillance in Eastern Europe is crucial. This is now initiated in Belarus using WHO protocols.

  4. Molecular epidemiology in environmental health: the potential of tumor suppressor gene p53 as a biomarker.

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, J C; Weasel, L H

    1997-01-01

    One of the challenges in environmental health is to attribute a certain health effect to a specific environmental exposure and to establish a cause-effect relationship. Molecular epidemiology offers a new approach to addressing these challenges. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53 can shed light on past environmental exposure, and carcinogenic agents and doses can be distinguished on the basis of mutational spectra and frequency. Mutations in p53 have successfully been used to establish links between dietary aflatoxin exposure and liver cancer, exposure to ultraviolet light and skin cancer, smoking and cancers of the lung and bladder, and vinyl chloride exposure and liver cancer. In lung cancer, carcinogens from tobacco smoke have been shown to form adducts with DNA. The location of these adducts correlates with those positions in the p53 gene that are mutated in lung cancer, confirming a direct etiologic link between exposure and disease. Recent investigations have also explored the use of p53 as a susceptibility marker for cancer. Furthermore, studies in genetic toxicology have taken advantage of animals transgenic for p53 to screen for carcinogens in vivo. In this review, we summarize recent developments in p53 biomarker research and illustrate applications to environmental health. PMID:9114284

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Isolated in Shandong, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meijie; Liu, Lijuan; Ma, Yunhua; Zhang, Zhijun; Li, Ning; Zhang, Fusen; Zhao, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen prevalent in hospitals worldwide. In order to understand the molecular epidemiology of multi-drug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii, we investigated the genotypes of A. baumannii isolated from 10 hospitals in Shandong, China, from August 2013 to December 2013, by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antimicrobial resistance genes were analyzed by PCR and DNA sequencing. By PFGE analysis, we discovered 11 PFGE types in these 10 hospitals. By MLST, we assigned these isolates to 12 sequence types (STs), 10 of which belong to the cloning complex CC92, including the prevalent ST369, ST208, ST195, and ST368. Two new STs, namely ST794 and ST809, were detected only in one hospital. All isolates of the MDR A. baumannii were resistant to carbapenem, except 2 isolates, which did not express the blaOXA-23 carbapenemase gene, indicating blaOXA-23 is the major player for carbapenem resistance. We also discovered armA is likely to be responsible for amikacin resistance, and may play a role in gentamicin and tobramycin resistance. aac(3)-I is another gene responsible for gentamicin and tobramycin resistance. In summary, we discovered that the majority of the isolates in Shandong, China, were the STs belonging to the CC92. Besides, two new STs were detected in one hospital. These new STs should be further investigated for prevention of outbreaks caused by A. baumannii.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of Shigella spp strains isolated in two different metropolitam areas of southeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Michelle; Stehling, Eliana Guedes; Moretti, Maria Luiza; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias

    2009-01-01

    Shigella spp., the human pathogen responsible for shigellosis, is highly infectious even at low levels. The incidence rate of shigellosis varies with geographical distribution, location human development index, and age groups, being higher among children aged under 5 years. In Brazil, a few works indicate that shigellosis cases are underestimated, with S. flexneri and S. sonnei strains being the major agents responsible for the shigellosis cases. The present study used pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to investigate the molecular epidemiology of 119 strains of S. sonnei and S. flexneri isolated from shigellosis cases that occurred in the metropolitan areas of Ribeirão Preto and Campinas Cities, São Paulo Sate, southeast Brazil. The results indicated (i) the existence of just a few strain clusters for both species, but with genotype variability with either a high speed of genetic change or constant introduction of several genotypes, considering the intense migration to these two metropolitan areas, and (ii) the prevalence of specific genotypes in each geographical area, which suggests the successful adaptation of some genotypes to the local environmental conditions. Our results indicate the need of more efficacious sanitary barriers to prevent Shigella spp. outbreaks and epidemics. PMID:24031415

  7. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis isolates from free-ranging wildlife in South African game reserves.

    PubMed

    Michel, A L; Coetzee, M L; Keet, D F; Maré, L; Warren, R; Cooper, D; Bengis, R G; Kremer, K; van Helden, P

    2009-02-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is endemic in African buffalo and a number of other wildlife species in the Kruger National Park (KNP) and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP) in South Africa. It was thought that the infection had been introduced into the KNP ecosystem through direct contact between cattle and buffalo, a hypothesis which was confirmed in this study by IS6110 and PGRS restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. The molecular characterisation of 189 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from nine wildlife species in the HiP, including three smaller associated parks, and the Kruger National Park with adjacent areas showed that the respective epidemics were each caused by an infiltration of a single M. bovis genotype. The two M. bovis strains had different genetic profiles, as demonstrated by hybridisation with the IS6110 and PGRS RFLP probes, as well as with regard to evidence of evolutionary changes to the IS profile. While the M. bovis type in HiP was transmitted between buffaloes and to at least baboon, bushpig and lion without obvious genetic changes in the RFLP patterns, in the KNP a dominant strain was represented in 73% of the M. bovis isolates, whilst the remaining 27% were variants of this strain. No species-specific variants were observed, except for one IS6110 type which was found only in a group of five epidemiologically related greater kudu. This finding was attributed to species-specific behaviour patterns rather than an advanced host-pathogen interaction. PMID:18786785

  8. Recent advances and perspectives in molecular epidemiology of Taenia solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Nakao, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Cysticercosis caused by accidental ingestion of eggs of Taenia solium is spreading all over the world through globalization and is one of the most neglected, neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) or neglected zoonotic diseases (NZDs). In the present study, the reason why T. solium cysticercosis has been neglected is discussed at first, and followed with an overview on the most recent advances and perspectives in molecular approaches for epidemiology of T. solium taeniasis/cysticercosis, since although taeniasis does not constitute recognized zoonoses, transmission and complete development are dependent on human definitive hosts. Main topics are discussions on (1) the two, Asian and Afro/American, genotypes of T. solium, (2) comparative analysis of mitochondrial (haploid) and nuclear (diploid) genes, and (3) the presence of hybrids of these two genotypes which indicates out-crossing of two genotypes in hermaphrodite tapeworms in Madagascar. Additional topics are on (4) the usefulness of phylogeographic analyses to discuss where the infection was acquired from, and (5) miscellaneous unsolved topics around these genetic diversity of T. solium.

  9. [Research advances in molecular epidemiology and vaccines of Coxsackievirus A16].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Peng; Tan, Xiao-Juan; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2014-07-01

    Epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) have mainly been caused by Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) and Enterovirus A 71 (EV-A71), which circulated alternatively or together in the affected area. CVA16 has caused numerous outbreaks and epidemics in multiple countries and geographical regions, and has become an important public health problem. Based on an analysis of the complete VP1 coding region, all CVA16 strains can be divided into genotypes A, B1, and B2. Furthermore, genotype B1 can be divided into subgenotypes B1a, B1b, and B1c. After 2000, no reports of genotype B2 virus strains have been reported. All of the CVA16 strains reported in mainland China have belonged to subgenotypes B1a and B1b. Most CVA16-associated infections cause only mild symptoms; however, some CVA16 infections can lead to severe complications and even death. Vaccination is considered to be the most effective method to control the transmission and infection rate of this virus. A number of research groups are studying various vaccine types, including inactivated vaccines, genetic engineering vaccines, and DNA vaccines, amongst others. In this review, an overview is provided of the research advances in molecular epidemiology and vaccines of CVA16.

  10. Evolving microbiology and molecular epidemiology of acute otitis media in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E; Casey, Janet R

    2007-10-01

    The addition of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) to the routine immunization schedule in the United States for infants has produced a much more favorable impact on the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) than anticipated. Because the serotypes included in PCV7 were those most frequently expressing antibiotic resistance in 2001, predictions were made that up to 98% of pneumococcal AOM episodes would be caused by penicillin susceptible strains. However, recent studies have shown that the benefits of PCV7 are becoming eroded. Replacement serotypes of pneumococci have emerged, expressing polysaccharide capsules different from those included in PCV7, with increasing frequency. These replacement strains are coming to dominate in the nasopharynx and in AOM isolates (and in invasive disease). Expansion in the isolation of serotypes 3, 7F, 15B/C/F, 19A, 22F, 33F, and 38 has been described in various surveillance systems. Pneumococcal strains expressing non-PCV7 capsular serotypes also appear to be rapidly acquiring resistance to penicillin and other antibiotics. Emergence of strains of pneumococci expressing non-PCV7 capsular serotypes is occurring by multiple mechanisms including capsular switching as suggested by molecular epidemiology studies. Expansion of the number of serotypes included in pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is needed to sustain a long-term benefit from immunization against these bacteria.

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Viruses Co-circulating in Upper Myanmar in 2006

    PubMed Central

    Thant, Kyaw Zin; Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Parquet, Maria del Carmen; Inoue, Shingo; Lwin, Yee Yee; Lin, Sanda; Aye, Kay Thi; Khin, Pe Thet; Myint, Tin; Htwe, Khin; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of circulating dengue viruses (DENV) in Upper Myanmar, DENV isolation was attempted by inoculating the sera of a panel of 110 serum samples onto a C6/36 mosquito cell line. The samples were collected from dengue (DEN) patients admitted at Mandalay Children’s Hospital in 2006. Infected culture fluids were subjected to a RT-PCR to detect the DENV genome. Three DENV strains were isolated. This was the first DENV isolation performed either in Mandalay or in Upper Myanmar. One strain belonged to DENV serotype-3 (DENV-3), and two other strains belonged to DENV serotype-4 (DEN-4). The sequence data for the envelope gene of these strains were used in a phylogenetic comparison of DENV-3 and DENV-4 from various countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this DENV-3 strain was clustered within genotype II, and the two DENV-4 strains were clustered within genotype I in each serotype. The Myanmar strains were closely related to strains from the neighboring countries of Thailand and Bangladesh. These results are important for elucidating the trends of recent and future DEN outbreaks in Myanmar. PMID:25859150

  12. The molecular epidemiology of dengue virus serotype 4 in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Klungthong, Chonticha; Zhang, Chunlin; Mammen, Mammen P; Ubol, Sukathida; Holmes, Edward C

    2004-11-10

    Dengue represents a major public health problem in Thailand, with all four viral serotypes co-circulating. Dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4) is the least frequently sampled serotype, although one that is often associated with hemorrhagic fever during secondary infection. To determine the evolutionary forces shaping the genetic diversity of DENV-4, and particularly whether its changing prevalence could be attributed to instances of adaptive evolution in the viral genome, we undertook a large-scale molecular epidemiological analysis of DENV-4 in Bangkok, Thailand, using both E gene and complete coding region sequences. This analysis revealed extensive genetic diversity within a single locality at a single time, including the discovery of a new and divergent genotype of DENV-4, as well as a pattern of continual lineage turnover. We also recorded the highest average rate of evolutionary change for this serotype, at 1.072 x 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site, per year. However, despite this abundant genetic variation, there was no evidence for adaptive evolution in any gene, codon, or lineage of DENV-4, with the highest rate of nonsynonymous substitution observed in NS2A. Consequently, the rapid turnover of DENV-4 lineages through time is most likely the consequence of a high rate of deleterious mutation in the viral genome coupled to seasonal fluctuations in the size of the vector population.

  13. Molecular Typing of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato: Taxonomic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiqing; van Dam, Alje P.; Schwartz, Ira; Dankert, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the spirochete that causes human Lyme borreliosis (LB), is a genetically and phenotypically divergent species. In the past several years, various molecular approaches have been developed and used to determine the phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity within the LB-related spirochetes and their potential association with distinct clinical syndromes. These methods include serotyping, multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, rRNA gene restriction analysis (ribotyping), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, plasmid fingerprinting, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting analysis, species-specific PCR and PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and other conserved genes. On the basis of DNA-DNA reassociation analysis, 10 different Borrelia species have been described within the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex: B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia japonica, Borrelia andersonii, Borrelia valaisiana, Borrelia lusitaniae, Borrelia tanukii, Borrelia turdi, and Borrelia bissettii sp. nov. To date, only B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii are well known to be responsible for causing human disease. Different Borrelia species have been associated with distinct clinical manifestations of LB. In addition, Borrelia species are differentially distributed worldwide and may be maintained through different transmission cycles in nature. In this paper, the molecular methods used for typing of B. burgdorferi sensu lato are reviewed. The current taxonomic status of B. burgdorferi sensu lato and its epidemiological and clinical implications, especiallly correlation between the variable clinical presentations and the infecting Borrelia species, are discussed in detail. PMID:10515907

  14. Phenotypic Characters and Molecular Epidemiology of Campylobacter Jejuni in East China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dexin; Zhang, Xiaoping; Xue, Feng; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Luyan; Jiang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the distribution, phenotypic and molecular typing characters of Campylobacter jejuni in domestic fowl, and livestock populations in East China, to provide some reference for researches on its molecular epidemiology. A total of 1250 samples were collected from different animal sources, and C. jejuni strains were then isolated and tested for antibiotic sensitivity. Antibiotics-resistance gene and pathogenic genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenic analysis on the C. jejuni strains was performed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 108 out of the 1250 samples (mean 8.64%) were C. jejuni positive. These 108 C. jejuni strains were highly sensitive to antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, amoxicillin, amikacin, cefotaxime, and azithromycin, whereas they were highly resistant to antibiotics such as cefoperazone, cotrimoxazole, cefamandole, sulfamethoxazole, and cefradine. Pathogenicity related gene identification indicated that the mean carrying rate of adhesion related gene cadF and racR, flagellin gene flaA, toxin regulating gene cdtA, cdtB, cdtC, wlaN and virB11, heat shock proteins and transferring proteins related genes dnaJ and ceuE, CiaB and pldA were 92.45%, 38.69%, 73.58%, 71.70%, 52.83%, 96.23%, 12.26%, 1.89%, 0.94%, 65.09%, 39.62% and 9.43%, respectively. A total of 58.82% of these strains contained more than 6 pathogenicity-related genes. MLST typed 58 ST types from the 108 isolated C. jejuni strains, including 24 new types, and ST-21 was the major type, accounting for 39.3% of the total strains.

  15. In vivo mutations in human blood cells: biomarkers for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, R J; Nicklas, J A; Fuscoe, J C; Skopek, T R; Branda, R F; O'Neill, J P

    1993-01-01

    Mutations arising in vivo in recorder genes of human blood cells provide biomarkers for molecular epidemiology by serving as surrogates for cancer-causing genetic changes. Current markers include mutations of the glycophorin-A (GPA) or hemoglobin (Hb) genes, measured in red blood cells, or mutations of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) or HLA genes, measured in T-lymphocytes. Mean mutant frequencies (variant frequencies) for normal young adults are approximately: Hb (4 x 10(-8)) < hprt (5 x 10(-6)) = GPA (10 x 10(-6)) < HLA (30 x 10(-6)). Mutagen-exposed individuals show decided elevations. Molecular mutational spectra are also being defined. For the hprt marker system, about 15% of background mutations are gross structural alterations of the hprt gene (e.g., deletions); the remainder are point mutations (e.g., base substitutions or frameshifts). Ionizing radiations result in dose-related increases in total gene deletions. Large deletions may encompass several megabases as shown by co-deletions of linked markers. Possible hprt spectra for defining radiation and chemical exposures are being sought. In addition to their responsiveness to environmental mutagens/carcinogens, three additional findings suggest that the in vivo recorder mutations are relevant in vivo surrogates for cancer mutations. First, a large fraction of GPA and HLA mutations show exchanges due to homologous recombination, an important mutational event in cancer. Second, hprt mutations arise preferentially in dividing T-cells, which can accumulate additional mutations in the same clone, reminiscent of the multiple hits required in the evolution of malignancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8319611

  16. Spatial and Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia intestinalis Deep in the Amazon, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coronato Nunes, Beatriz; Pavan, Márcio G.; Jaeger, Lauren H.; Monteiro, Kerla J. L.; Xavier, Samanta C. C.; Monteiro, Fernando A.; Bóia, Márcio N.; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current control policies for intestinal parasitosis focuses on soil-transmitted helminths, being ineffective against Giardia intestinalis, a highly prevalent protozoon that impacts children’s nutritional status in developing countries. The objective of this study was to explore spatial and molecular epidemiology of Giardia intestinalis in children of Amerindian descent in the Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross sectional survey was performed in the Brazilian Amazon with 433 children aged 1 to 14 years. Fecal samples were processed through parasitological techniques and molecular characterization. Prevalence of G. intestinalis infection was 16.9% (73/433), reaching 22.2% (35/158) among children aged 2–5 years, and a wide distribution throughout the city with some hot spots. Positivity-rate was similar among children living in distinct socioeconomic strata (48/280 [17.1%] and 19/116 [16.4%] below and above the poverty line, respectively). Sequencing of the β-giardin gene revealed 52.2% (n = 12) of assemblage A and 47.8% (n = 11) of assemblage B with high haplotype diversity for the latter. The isolates clustered into two well-supported G. intestinalis clades. A total of 38 haplotypes were obtained, with the following subassemblages distribution: 5.3% (n = 2) AII, 26.3% (n = 10) AIII, 7.9% (n = 3) BIII, and 60.5% (n = 23) new B genotypes not previously described. Conclusions/Significance Giardia intestinalis infection presents a high prevalence rate among Amerindian descended children living in Santa Isabel do Rio Negro/Amazon. The wide distribution observed in a small city suggests the presence of multiple sources of infection, which could be related to environmental contamination with feces, possibly of human and animal origin, highlighting the need of improving sanitation, safe water supply and access to diagnosis and adequate treatment of infections. PMID:27392098

  17. A new approach to the method of source-sink potentials for molecular conduction.

    PubMed

    Pickup, Barry T; Fowler, Patrick W; Borg, Martha; Sciriha, Irene

    2015-11-21

    We re-derive the tight-binding source-sink potential (SSP) equations for ballistic conduction through conjugated molecular structures in a form that avoids singularities. This enables derivation of new results for families of molecular devices in terms of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of the molecular graph. In particular, we define the transmission of electrons through individual molecular orbitals (MO) and through MO shells. We make explicit the behaviour of the total current and individual MO and shell currents at molecular eigenvalues. A rich variety of behaviour is found. A SSP device has specific insulation or conduction at an eigenvalue of the molecular graph (a root of the characteristic polynomial) according to the multiplicities of that value in the spectra of four defined device polynomials. Conduction near eigenvalues is dominated by the transmission curves of nearby shells. A shell may be inert or active. An inert shell does not conduct at any energy, not even at its own eigenvalue. Conduction may occur at the eigenvalue of an inert shell, but is then carried entirely by other shells. If a shell is active, it carries all conduction at its own eigenvalue. For bipartite molecular graphs (alternant molecules), orbital conduction properties are governed by a pairing theorem. Inertness of shells for families such as chains and rings is predicted by selection rules based on node counting and degeneracy.

  18. A new approach to the method of source-sink potentials for molecular conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pickup, Barry T. E-mail: P.W.Fowler@sheffield.ac.uk; Fowler, Patrick W. E-mail: P.W.Fowler@sheffield.ac.uk; Borg, Martha; Sciriha, Irene

    2015-11-21

    We re-derive the tight-binding source-sink potential (SSP) equations for ballistic conduction through conjugated molecular structures in a form that avoids singularities. This enables derivation of new results for families of molecular devices in terms of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the adjacency matrix of the molecular graph. In particular, we define the transmission of electrons through individual molecular orbitals (MO) and through MO shells. We make explicit the behaviour of the total current and individual MO and shell currents at molecular eigenvalues. A rich variety of behaviour is found. A SSP device has specific insulation or conduction at an eigenvalue of the molecular graph (a root of the characteristic polynomial) according to the multiplicities of that value in the spectra of four defined device polynomials. Conduction near eigenvalues is dominated by the transmission curves of nearby shells. A shell may be inert or active. An inert shell does not conduct at any energy, not even at its own eigenvalue. Conduction may occur at the eigenvalue of an inert shell, but is then carried entirely by other shells. If a shell is active, it carries all conduction at its own eigenvalue. For bipartite molecular graphs (alternant molecules), orbital conduction properties are governed by a pairing theorem. Inertness of shells for families such as chains and rings is predicted by selection rules based on node counting and degeneracy.

  19. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  20. inTB - a data integration platform for molecular and clinical epidemiological analysis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is currently the second highest cause of death from infectious diseases worldwide. The emergence of multi and extensive drug resistance is threatening to make tuberculosis incurable. There is growing evidence that the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may have important clinical consequences. Therefore, combining genetic, clinical and socio-demographic data is critical to understand the epidemiology of this infectious disease, and how virulence and other phenotypic traits evolve over time. This requires dedicated bioinformatics platforms, capable of integrating and enabling analyses of this heterogeneous data. Results We developed inTB, a web-based system for integrated warehousing and analysis of clinical, socio-demographic and molecular data for Mycobacterium sp. isolates. As a database it can organize and display data from any of the standard genotyping methods (SNP, MIRU-VNTR, RFLP and spoligotype), as well as an extensive array of clinical and socio-demographic variables that are used in multiple countries to characterize the disease. Through the inTB interface it is possible to insert and download data, browse the database and search specific parameters. New isolates are automatically classified into strains according to an internal reference, and data uploaded or typed in is checked for internal consistency. As an analysis framework, the system provides simple, point and click analysis tools that allow multiple types of data plotting, as well as simple ways to download data for external analysis. Individual trees for each genotyping method are available, as well as a super tree combining all of them. The integrative nature of inTB grants the user the ability to generate trees for filtered subsets of data crossing molecular and clinical/socio-demografic information. inTB is built on open source software, can be easily installed locally and easily adapted to other diseases. Its design allows for use by research

  1. Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of clinical mastitis in sheep caused by Mannheimia haemolytica.

    PubMed

    Omaleki, Lida; Browning, Glenn F; Allen, Joanne L; Markham, Philip F; Barber, Stuart R

    2016-08-15

    The aetiology and epidemiology of outbreaks of clinical mastitis in sheep under extensive pastoral conditions are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a detailed investigation of a clinical mastitis outbreak that affected more than 10% of 230 at-risk ewes on a sheep and grain producing property in south east Australia during drought conditions in 2009. Milk samples were collected aseptically from all affected ewes and plated on sheep blood agar for bacterial identification. M. haemolytica was isolated from 80% of the samples that yielded cultivable microorganisms and thus was the main microorganism responsible for the outbreak. Analysis of the restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns of the isolates using pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed some evidence of clonality, suggesting the possibility of horizontal transmission, but there was also considerable diversity between the clusters of closely related isolates. Multilocus sequence typing of the M. haemolytica isolates revealed most of the isolates belonged to ST1 with no association between the PFGE and MLST fingerprints of the isolates. Resistance to neomycin, streptomycin and sulphafurazole was detected in some of the isolates, but they were all susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftiofur, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, erythromycin and trimethoprim. This is the first published record of a comparison of the strains of M. haemolytica involved in a clinical mastitis outbreak in sheep and demonstrates the importance of this pathogen in sheep production systems, particularly during adverse climatic conditions and increased stocking rate. PMID:27374911

  2. Epidemiology and molecular genetics of colorectal cancer in iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Malekzadeh, Reza; Bishehsari, Faraz; Mahdavinia, Mahboobeh; Ansari, Reza

    2009-03-01

    Although the incidence of colorectal cancer in Iranian older age subjects is currently very low compared to Western population, the younger generation is experiencing an accelerated rate approaching the Western rates and the burden of disease will increase dramatically in near future. The high frequency of positive family history of colorectal cancer in Iranian patients indicates that a significant number of colorectal cancers in Iran arise in family members and relatives of colorectal cancer patients. It is clear that the familial clustering of colorectal cancer is more often seen in younger probands and cancer located in the right side of the colon. These epidemiologic findings call for a broader attempt to promote public awareness and screening strategies in those families with a member affected by colorectal cancer, especially at younger age or with proximal tumors. Based on our present understanding, the possibility of preventing or curing most colon and rectal cancers is now plausible. The molecular biology of colon cancer has been the subject of many researches and is better understood than those for any other solid cancer and have established an important example for cancer research. It is now clear that colorectal cancer develops as the result of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to malignant transformation of normal mucosa. In spite of these scientific progresses and the fact that screening can reduce the rate of death by detecting early cancer or premalignant polyps, the rate of screening is very low globally and negligible in Iran and many other developing countries which is due to cost, resistance by physicians, patients, and the healthcare system. In Iran screening should at least be started in family members at earlier age with colonoscopy as the preferred modality of screening method. PMID:19249887

  3. Acinetobacter seifertii Isolated from China: Genomic Sequence and Molecular Epidemiology Analyses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunxing; Wang, Jianfeng; Fu, Ying; Ruan, Zhi; Yu, Yunsong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. have increasing public health concerns because of their global occurrence and ability to acquire multidrug resistance. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii (ACB) complex encompasses A. calcoaceticus, A. baumannii, A. pittii (formerly genomic species 3), and A nosocomial (formerly genomic species 13TU), which are predominantly responsible for clinical pathogenesis in the Acinetobacter genus. In our previous study, a putative novel species isolated from 385 non-A. baumannii spp. strains based on the rpoB gene phylogenetic tree was reported. Here, the putative novel species was identified as A. seifertii based on the whole-genome phylogenetic tree. A. seifertii was recognized as a novel member of the ACB complex and close to A. baumannii and A. nosocomials. Furthermore, we studied the characteristics of 10 A. seifertii isolates, which were distributed widely in 6 provinces in China and mainly caused infections in the elderly or children. To define the taxonomic status and characteristics, the biochemical reactions, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and whole-genome sequence analysis were performed. The phenotypic characteristics failed to distinguish A. serfertii from other species in the ACB complex. Most of the A. seifertii isolates were susceptible to antibiotics commonly used for nosocomial Acinetobacter spp. infections, but one isolate (strain A362) was resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, ceftazidime and amikacin. The different patterns of MLST and PFGE suggested that the 10 isolates were not identical and lacked clonal relatedness. Our study reported for the first time the molecular epidemiological and genomic features of widely disseminated A. seifertii in China. These observations could enrich the knowledge of infections caused by non-A. baumannii and may provide a scientific basis for future clinical treatment. PMID

  4. Molecular epidemiology and surveillance of circulating rotavirus and adenovirus in Congolese children with gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Mayindou, Gontran; Ngokana, Berge; Sidibé, Anissa; Moundélé, Victoire; Koukouikila-Koussounda, Felix; Christevy Vouvoungui, Jeannhey; Kwedi Nolna, Sylvie; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Ntoumi, Francine

    2016-04-01

    Infectious Diarrhea caused by rotavirus and adenovirus, is a leading cause of death in children in sub-Sahara Africa but there is limited published data on the diverse rotavirus genotypes and adenovirus serotypes circulating in the Republic of Congo. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus A (RVA) and Adenovirus serotype 40 and 41 in Congolese children hospitalized with severe gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from 655 Congolese children less than 60 months of age hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis between June 2012 and June 2013. Rotavirus and adenovirus antigens were tested using commercially available ELISA kits and the RVA G- and P- genotypes were identified by seminested multiplex RT-PCR. Three hundred and four (46.4%) children were tested positive for RVA. Adenovirus infection was found in 5.5% of the 564 tested children. Rotavirus infection was frequently observed in children between 6-12 months (55.9%). The dry season months recorded increased RVA infection while no seasonality of adenovirus infection was demonstrated. The most common RVA genotypes were G1 (57.5%), G2 (6.4%), G1G2 mixture (15.5%), P[8] (58%), P[6] (13.2%), and P[8]P[6] mixture (26%). Additionally, the genotype G12P[6] was significantly associated with increased vomiting. This first study on Congolese children demonstrates a high prevalence and clinical significance of existing rotavirus genotypes. Adenovirus prevalence is similar to that of other Central African countries. This baseline epidemiology and molecular characterization study will contribute significantly to the RVA surveillance after vaccine implementation in the country.

  5. Taxonomy, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus multilocularis: From fundamental knowledge to health ecology.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Jenny; Gottstein, Bruno; Saarma, Urmas; Millon, Laurence

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most severe parasitic diseases in humans and represents one of the 17 neglected diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2012. Considering the major medical and veterinary importance of this parasite, the phylogeny of the genus Echinococcus is of considerable importance; yet, despite numerous efforts with both mitochondrial and nuclear data, it has remained unresolved. The genus is clearly complex, and this is one of the reasons for the incomplete understanding of its taxonomy. Although taxonomic studies have recognised E. multilocularis as a separate entity from the Echinococcus granulosus complex and other members of the genus, it would be premature to draw firm conclusions about the taxonomy of the genus before the phylogeny of the whole genus is fully resolved. The recent sequencing of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus genomes opens new possibilities for performing in-depth phylogenetic analyses. In addition, whole genome data provide the possibility of inferring phylogenies based on a large number of functional genes, i.e. genes that trace the evolutionary history of adaptation in E. multilocularis and other members of the genus. Moreover, genomic data open new avenues for studying the molecular epidemiology of E. multilocularis: genotyping studies with larger panels of genetic markers allow the genetic diversity and spatial dynamics of parasites to be evaluated with greater precision. There is an urgent need for international coordination of genotyping of E. multilocularis isolates from animals and human patients. This could be fundamental for a better understanding of the transmission of alveolar echinococcosis and for designing efficient healthcare strategies.

  6. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of Blastocystis infection in humans in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, S; Crisafi, B; Gabrielli, S; Paoletti, M; Cancrini, G

    2016-02-01

    In order to describe the molecular epidemiology of Blastocystis infection in Italy, 189 isolates, which had been collected during the years 2012-2014 from mildly symptomatic patients, or those affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or chronic diarrhoea, or otherwise immunosuppressed, were subtyped by sequence analysis of the SSU rRNA gene (536 bp). Six subtypes (STs) were detected: ST1 (15·3%), ST2 (13·8%), ST3 (46·0%), ST4 (21·7%), ST6 (3·2%) and ST8 (0·5%). They clustered in distinct clades, as inferred from Bayesian inference phylogenetic and median joining network analyses. A high genetic differentiation was found at the inter-subtype level; it ranged from Jukes-Cantor (JC) distance = 0·02 (between ST1 and ST4) to JC = 0·11 (between ST6 and ST2). At the intra-ST level, a high genetic homogeneity was registered in ST4, whereas higher genetic variation was found in isolates corresponding to ST1 and ST2. Accordingly, high values of haplotype and nucleotide diversity were observed in ST1, ST2 and ST3. No association was found between patient gender and ST, whereas ST3 and ST1 were significantly more prevalent in patients aged 15-50 years. A significant occurrence of Blastocystis ST4 in patients suffering from IBS, IBD or chronic diarrhoea was observed; in addition, a slight significant association between ST1 and ST3 and IBS patients was found. Multiple correspondence analysis showed some significant contribution of different variables (subtypes, haplotypes, age) in the observed pattern of ordination of the 189 patients in the symptom categories.

  7. Burkholderia cepacia complex in Serbian patients with cystic fibrosis: prevalence and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Z V; Novovic, K; Kojic, M; Minic, P; Sovtic, A; Djukic, S; Jovcic, B

    2016-08-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) organisms remain significant pathogens in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence, epidemiological characteristics, and presence of molecular markers associated with virulence and transmissibility of the Bcc strains in the National CF Centre in Belgrade, Serbia. The Bcc isolates collected during the four-year study period (2010-2013) were further examined by 16 s rRNA gene, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA, multilocus sequence typing analysis, and phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequence of seven alleles. Fifty out of 184 patients (27.2 %) were colonized with two Bcc species, B. cenocepacia (n = 49) and B. stabilis (n = 1). Thirty-four patients (18.5 %) had chronic colonization. Typing methods revealed a high level of similarity among Bcc isolates, indicating a person-to-person transmission or acquisition from a common source. New sequence types (STs) were identified, and none of the STs with an international distribution were found. One centre-specific ST, B. cenocepacia ST856, was highly dominant and shared by 48/50 (96 %) patients colonized by Bcc. This clone was characterized by PCR positivity for both the B. cepacia epidemic strain marker and cable pilin, and showed close genetic relatedness to the epidemic strain CZ1 (ST32). These results indicate that the impact of Bcc on airway colonization in the Serbian CF population is high and virtually exclusively limited to a single clone of B. cenocepacia. The presence of a highly transmissible clone and probable patient-to-patient spread was observed. PMID:27177755

  8. Molecular Epidemiological Characterization and Health Burden of Thalassemias in the Chaoshan Region, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangbin; Lin, Min; Yang, Hui; Pan, Mei-Chen; Cai, Ying-Mu; Wu, Jiao-Ren; Lin, Fen; Zhan, Xiao-Fen; Luo, Zhao-Yun; Yang, Hui-Tian; Yang, Li-Ye

    2016-01-01

    Thalassemia is one of the most prevalent inherited disease in southern China. However, there have been only a few epidemiological studies of thalassemia in the Chaoshan region of Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China (PRC). A total of 6231 unrelated subjects in two main geographical cities of the Chaoshan region was analyzed for thalassemia. Seven hundred and thirty-six cases of suspected thalassemia carriers with microcytosis [mean corpuscular volume (MCV) <82.0 fL] were found by complete blood cell (CBC) count, and were tested by reverse dot-blot gene chip to reveal a total of 331 mutant chromosomes, including 278 α-thalassemia (α-thal) alleles and 53 β-thalassemia (β-thal) alleles. The most common α-thal mutations were the Southeast Asian (- -(SEA)), followed by the -α(3.7) (rightward) and -α(4.2) (leftward) deletions. The two most common β-thal mutations were HBB: c.316-197C>T and HBB: c.126_129delCTTT, accounting for 69.81% of the β-thal defects in the studied individuals. In addition, a rare mutation, Cap +1 (A>C) (HBB: c.-50A>C) was described for the first time in the Chaoshan region. Our results gave a heterozygote frequency of 5.31% for common α- and β-thal in the Chaoshan region, and also indicated a higher prevalence of thalassemia with a heterozygote frequency of 6.29% in Chaozhou, followed by Shantou (3.37%). This study provided a detailed prevalence and molecular characterization of thalassemia in the Chaoshan region, and will be valuable for developing a strategy for prevention of thalassemia and reducing excessive health care costs in this area. PMID:26865073

  9. Genotype Distribution and Molecular Epidemiology of Hepatitis C Virus in Hubei, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Lu, Yanjun; Liu, Weiyong; Zhu, Yaowu; Yan, Xiaoling; Xu, Jingxin; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Yue; Liu, Wei; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Central China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 patients from Hubei Province in central China were enrolled. These patients were tested positive for HCV antibody prior to blood transfusion. Among them, 177 were characterized by partial NS5B and/or Core-E1 sequences and classified into five subtypes: 1b, 83.0% (147/177); 2a, 13.0% (23/177); 3b, 2.3% (4/177); 6a, 1.1% (2/177); 3a, 0.6% (1/177). Analysis of genotype-associated risk factors revealed that paid blood donation and transfusion before 1997 were strongly associated with subtypes 1b and 2a, while some subtype 2a cases were also found in individuals with high risk sexual behaviors; subtypes 3b, 6a, and 3a were detected only in intravenous drug users. Phylogeographic analyses based on the coalescent datasets demonstrated that 1b, 2a, 3b, and 6a were locally epidemic in Hubei Province. Among them, subtype 1b Hubei strains may have served as the origins of this subtype in China, and 2a and 3b Hubei strains may have descended from the northwest and southwest of China, respectively, while 6a Hubei strains may have been imported from the central south and southwest. Conclusion/Significance The results suggest that the migration patterns of HCV in Hubei are complex and variable among different subtypes. Implementation of mandatory HCV screening before donation has significantly decreased the incidence of transfusion-associated HCV infection since 1997. More attention should be paid to intravenous drug use and unsafe sexual contact, which may have become new risk factors for HCV infection in Hubei Province. PMID:26325070

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J in Layer Flocks in China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yulong; Yun, Bingling; Qin, Liting; Pan, Wei; Qu, Yue; Liu, Zaisi; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei

    2012-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-type chickens in 1988. No field cases of ALV-J infection or tumors in layer chickens were observed worldwide until 2004. However, layer flocks in China have experienced outbreaks of this virus in recent years. The molecular epidemiology of ALV-J strains isolated from layer flocks was investigated. The env genes of 77.8% (21/27) of the ALV-J layer isolates with a high degree of genetic variation were significantly different from the env genes of the prototype strain of ALV-J (HPRS-103) and American and Chinese strains from meat-type chickens (designated ALV-J broiler isolates). A total of 205 nucleotides were deleted from the 3′ untranslated region of 89.5% (17/19) of the ALV-J layer isolates. Approximately 94.7% (16/17) of the layer isolates contained a complete E element of 146 to 149 residues. The U3 sequences of 84.2% (16/19) of the ALV-J layer isolates displayed less than 92.5% sequence homology to those of the ALV-J broiler isolates, although the transcriptional regulatory elements that are typical of avian retroviruses were highly conserved. Several unique nucleotide substitutions in the env gene, the U3 region, and the E element of most of the ALV-J layer isolates were detected. These results suggested that the env gene, E element, and U3 region in the ALV-J layer isolates have evolved rapidly and were significantly different from those of the ALV-J broiler isolates. These findings will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of layer tumor diseases induced by ALV-J. PMID:22205787

  11. Surveillance of Canine Rabies in the Central African Republic: Impact on Human Health and Molecular Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Tricou, Vianney; Bouscaillou, Julie; Kamba Mebourou, Emmanuel; Koyanongo, Fidèle Dieudonné; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2016-01-01

    Background Although rabies represents an important public health threat, it is still a neglected disease in Asia and Africa where it causes tens of thousands of deaths annually despite available human and animal vaccines. In the Central African Republic (CAR), an endemic country for rabies, this disease remains poorly investigated. Methods To evaluate the extent of the threat that rabies poses in the CAR, we analyzed data for 2012 from the National Reference Laboratory for Rabies, where laboratory confirmation was performed by immunofluorescence and PCR for both animal and human suspected cases, and data from the only anti-rabies dispensary of the country and only place where post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is available. Both are located in Bangui, the capital of the CAR. For positive samples, a portion of the N gene was amplified and sequenced to determine the molecular epidemiology of circulating strains. Results In 2012, 966 exposed persons visited the anti-rabies dispensary and 632 received a post-exposure rabies vaccination. More than 90% of the exposed persons were from Bangui and its suburbs and almost 60% of them were under 15-years of age. No rabies-related human death was confirmed. Of the 82 samples from suspected rabid dogs tested, 69 were confirmed positive. Most of the rabid dogs were owned although unvaccinated. There was a strong spatiotemporal correlation within Bangui and within the country between reported human exposures and detection of rabid dogs (P<0.001). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three variants belonging to Africa I and II lineages actively circulated in 2012. Conclusions These data indicate that canine rabies was endemic in the CAR in 2012 and had a detrimental impact on human health as shown by the hundreds of exposed persons who received PEP. Implementation of effective public health interventions including mass dog vaccination and improvement of the surveillance and the access to PEP are urgently needed in this country. PMID

  12. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gaunt, Eleanor R.; Jansen, Rogier R.; Poovorawan, Yong; Templeton, Kate E.; Toms, Geoffrey L.; Simmonds, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens of the Pneumovirinae subfamily of the Paramyxoviridae. Two major surface antigens are expressed by both viruses; the highly conserved fusion (F) protein, and the extremely diverse attachment (G) glycoprotein. Both viruses comprise two genetic groups, A and B. Circulation frequencies of the two genetic groups fluctuate for both viruses, giving rise to frequently observed switching of the predominantly circulating group. Nucleotide sequence data for the F and G gene regions of HRSV and HMPV variants from the UK, the Netherlands, Bangkok and data available from Genbank were used to identify clades of both viruses. Several contemporary circulating clades of HRSV and HMPV were identified by phylogenetic reconstructions. The molecular epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics of clades were modelled in parallel. Times of origin were determined and positively selected sites were identified. Sustained circulation of contemporary clades of both viruses for decades and their global dissemination demonstrated that switching of the predominant genetic group did not arise through the emergence of novel lineages each respiratory season, but through the fluctuating circulation frequencies of pre-existing lineages which undergo proliferative and eclipse phases. An abundance of sites were identified as positively selected within the G protein but not the F protein of both viruses. For HRSV, these were discordant with previously identified residues under selection, suggesting the virus can evade immune responses by generating diversity at multiple sites within linear epitopes. For both viruses, different sites were identified as positively selected between genetic groups. PMID:21390255

  13. [Evaluation of discriminatory power of molecular epidemiology techniques in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Venezuelan isolates].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marìa Victoria; León, Cristy; Escalona, Arnelly; Abadia, Edgar; Da Mata, Omaira; de Waard, Jacobus; Takiff, Howard Eugene

    2016-03-01

    The techniques of spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit and variable-number tandem repeat typing with 24 loci (MIRU-VNTR-24), have been used to study the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was: to evaluate the discriminative power of MIRU-VNTR 24 loci alone and in association with spoligotyping in clinical isolates of M tuberculosis in Venezuela; the allelic diversity of the 24 loci; and the discriminative power for the combination of 24 and 15 loci, 12 traditional loci (12t), those with higher allelic diversity and a new combination named 12inv. We analyzed one set of 104 strains of different lineages and a second set of 431 strains belonging to the Latin-America and Mediterranean lineage (LAM) that is predominant in Venezuela. The determination of allelic diversity showed that 4052, 2163b, 424 y 2996 are highly discriminative. Clustering rates of MIRU-VNTR 24 loci, spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR combined with spoligotyping for 104 isolates were 18.27%, 71.15% and 14.4%, respectively, whereas with the 431 LAM strains the values were 43.2 %, 95.8% and 37.4%. MIRU-VNTR combinations of 15, 12inv and 4 loci were more discriminatory than 12t. Clustering rates for MIRU-VNTR 15 and 12inv loci coupled with spoligotyping in the 104 isolated was 21% and 23%, while for LAM strains was 52% and 46% respectively. The number of different genetics patterns for 15 and 12inv loci were similar. In conclusion, we propose the use of a small number of informative loci MIRU-VNTR coupled to spoligotyping to investigate the transmission of tuberculosis in Venezuela.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis population structure and molecular epidemiological analysis in Sucre municipality, Miranda state, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Margareth A; Abadía, Edgar; Solalba Gómez; Maes, Mailis; Muñoz, Mariana; Gómez, Daniela; Guzmán, Patricia; Méndez, María Victoria; Ramirez, Carmen; Mercedes, España; de Waard, Jacobus; Takiff, Howard

    2014-12-01

    Sucre municipality is a large, densely populated marginal area in the eastern part of Caracas, Venezuela that consistently has more cases of tuberculosis than other municipalities in the country. To identify the neighborhoods in the municipality with the highest prevalence of tuberculosis, and determine whether the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain distribution in this municipality is different from that previously found in the western part of Caracas and the rest of Venezuela, we collected data on all tuberculosis cases in the municipality diagnosed in 2005-6. We performed two separate molecular epidemiological studies, spoligotyping 44 strains in a first study, and spoligotyping 131 strains, followed by MIRU-VNTR 15 on 21 clustered isolates in the second. With spoligotyping, the most common patterns were Shared International Type SIT17 (21%); SIT42 (15%); SIT93 (11%); SIT20 (7%); SIT53 (6%), a distribution similar to other parts of Venezuela, except that SIT42 and SIT20 were more common. MIRU-VNTR 15 showed that six of seven SIT17 strains examined belonged to a large cluster previously found circulating in Venezuela, but all of the SIT42 strains were related to a cluster centered in the neighborhoods of Unión and Maca, with a MIRU-VNTR pattern not previously seen in Venezuela. It appears that a large percentage of the tuberculosis in the Sucre municipality is caused by the active transmission of two strain families centered within distinct neighborhoods, one reflecting communication with the rest of the country, and the other suggesting the insular, isolated nature of some sectors. PMID:25558753

  15. Molecular epidemiology of HBV infection in chronic hepatitis B virus infected patients in northeast India.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Anjan; Bose, Moumita; Barman, Narendra Nath; Deka, Manab; Thangkhiew, Rangsan Singh; Bose, Sujoy

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of HBV in chronic HBV infected cases from northeast India (NEI), since scanty data are available from the region which has a predominant ethnically distinct tribal population. A total of 523 clinically diagnosed index chronic HBV infected cases and 172 asymptomatic patients (based on family screening) were enrolled with informed consent. Patients were stratified based on serology, imaging, pathology, and clinical data and grouped as chronic HBV and cirrhotic cohorts. Analysis for serum HBV DNA levels and HBV genotyping was performed, and was statistically co-related with disease severity. Males were more prone to chronic HBV infection. Majority of the patients who had Chronic HBV infection based on family screening were females (59.88%), majorly wives of index patients. Mean viral load in Chronic HBV patients was almost 4.5-folds higher than cirrhosis patients, and was significantly associated with e-antigen positive status(P < 0.001) in both groups. HBV genotype D was the most prevalent genotype (62.30%) in NEI. Mixed genotype infection of A + D was found from Assam, along with C + D cases (1.29%) cumulatively. There is a high prevalence of HBV genotype C (13.96%) in our studied cohort which was found to be associated with higher viral load(P = 0.018), e-antigen positivity(P = 0.043), and increased cirrhosis risk compared to Chronic HBV cases [OR = 1.670]. Family contacts in NEI are prone to infection with HBV and development of Chronic HBV. Higher presence of e-positive cases and genotype C along with the mixed genotypes in NEI is unique and of significance with reference to predisposition to disease severity and even response to antiviral therapy.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of dengue viruses in southern China from 1978 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weili; Bai, Zhijun; Zhou, Houqing; Tu, Zeng; Fang, Meiyu; Tang, Boheng; Liu, Jinhua; Liu, Licheng; Liu, Jianwei; Chen, Weijun

    2011-01-01

    To investigate molecular epidemiology of dengue viruses (DENV) in southern China, a total of 14 dengue isolates were collected in southern China during each epidemic year between 1978 and 2006 and their full-length genome sequences were obtained by using RT-PCR method. The E gene sequences from additional 6 dengue fever patients in Guangzhou in 2006 were also obtained by using RT-PCR method. Combined with DENVs sequences published in GenBank, phylogenetic analysis and recombination analysis were performed. One hundred and twenty-five E gene sequences and 60 complete genome sequences published in the GenBank were also involved. Phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a wide genetic diversity of DENVs isolated in southern China. DENV-1 strains exist in almost all of the clades of genotype I and IV except the Asia 1 clade of genotype I; DENV-2 stains are grouped into four of the five genotypes except American genotype. DENV-4 strains are grouped into 2 genotypes (I and II). Phylogenetic analysis also showed that all DENV-4 isolates and two DENV-2 isolates were closely related to the prior isolates from neighboring Southeast Asia countries. The DENV-1 strain isolated during the 2006 epidemic is highly homologous to the strains isolated during the 2001 epidemic.Recombination analysis showed no inter-serotype recombination, but 22 intra-serotype recombination events were found across the 32 complete genomes of all Chinese isolates. The study suggested that dengue fever epidemic in Southern China over the past 30 years presented two important modes, 1) imported-cases-induced endemic prevalence; 2) endogenous epidemic outbreak with natural epidemic focus. Recombination may play an important role in dengue virus evolution and adaptation.

  17. Taxonomy, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus multilocularis: From fundamental knowledge to health ecology.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Jenny; Gottstein, Bruno; Saarma, Urmas; Millon, Laurence

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most severe parasitic diseases in humans and represents one of the 17 neglected diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2012. Considering the major medical and veterinary importance of this parasite, the phylogeny of the genus Echinococcus is of considerable importance; yet, despite numerous efforts with both mitochondrial and nuclear data, it has remained unresolved. The genus is clearly complex, and this is one of the reasons for the incomplete understanding of its taxonomy. Although taxonomic studies have recognised E. multilocularis as a separate entity from the Echinococcus granulosus complex and other members of the genus, it would be premature to draw firm conclusions about the taxonomy of the genus before the phylogeny of the whole genus is fully resolved. The recent sequencing of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus genomes opens new possibilities for performing in-depth phylogenetic analyses. In addition, whole genome data provide the possibility of inferring phylogenies based on a large number of functional genes, i.e. genes that trace the evolutionary history of adaptation in E. multilocularis and other members of the genus. Moreover, genomic data open new avenues for studying the molecular epidemiology of E. multilocularis: genotyping studies with larger panels of genetic markers allow the genetic diversity and spatial dynamics of parasites to be evaluated with greater precision. There is an urgent need for international coordination of genotyping of E. multilocularis isolates from animals and human patients. This could be fundamental for a better understanding of the transmission of alveolar echinococcosis and for designing efficient healthcare strategies. PMID:26260408

  18. Molecular epidemiology of the human papillomavirus infection in self-collected samples from young women.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Flávia Gatto; Machado, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Carlos Eurico Dos Santos; Ferreira, Alda Teixeira; Padovani, Cacilda Tezelli Junqueira; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the highest in young, sexually active women less than 35 years of age. Direct diagnosis of infection by enabling genotyping methods is important considering that the viral types are divided into high (HR-HPV) and low (LR-HPV) oncogenic risk. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of HPV infection in self-collected samples from young women. A cross-sectional study of 245 sexually active students (18 to 35 years of age) was undertaken with self-collected samples. Extracted DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the PGMY 09/11 and PC04/GH20 primers for the detection of HPV DNA and the β-globin gene, respectively. Viral genotyping was performed by type-specific PCR (TS-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Of the 236 valid samples, 68 (28.9%) were positive for HPV DNA, as genotyped by TS-PCR and RFLP. The HR-HPV were most prevalent, especially HPV-16, -31, -33, and -45, and the most prevalent LR-HPV were HPV-6 and -83. Multi-type HPV infections were detected in 17 (25%) samples. HPV infection was statistically more prevalent among younger women with lower educational levels and who had more partners in the past 2 years. A high prevalence of HPV infection was found in the age group examined, especially HR-HPV types, as well as the presence of risk behaviors associated with HPV infection were observed. Considering these results, vaccinating females before the onset of sexual activity in Brazil should be emphasized.

  19. Molecular systematics of filarial parasites, with an emphasis on groups of medical and veterinary importance, and its relevance for epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Morales-Hojas, Ramiro

    2009-09-01

    Filarial parasites are members of the Phylum Nemata that comprise several species of medical and veterinary importance. Among the human diseases caused by members of this group of nematodes are river blindness and lymphatic filariasis, which afflict millions of people in the tropics. These diseases not only have an impact on the health of the people affected but also bear a great socioeconomic burden. Despite their relevance, the systematics of the filarial parasites is not well understood yet, and additional molecular phylogenetic studies are required to comprehend the evolution of these parasites. Identifying the patterns of evolution of these parasites will be of relevance in preventing emerging zoonoses. The present review examines the information about the molecular systematics of filarial parasites available in the literature and evaluates the relevance of the different directions of future research. Furthermore, it is also intended to highlight the relevance of molecular systematic studies in the molecular epidemiology research area.

  20. Community-associated Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia among Greek children: epidemiology, molecular characteristics, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Doudoulakakis, A G; Bouras, D; Drougka, E; Kazantzi, M; Michos, A; Charisiadou, A; Spiliopoulou, I; Lebessi, E; Tsolia, M

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an infrequent cause of community-associated (CA-SA) pneumonia in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, epidemiological, microbiological, and molecular characteristics of CA-SA pneumonia among children hospitalized in two large tertiary care referral centers during an 8-year period. Cases of CA-SA pneumonia admitted between 2007 and 2014 were retrospectively examined through medical record review. Molecular investigation was performed for available strains; mecA, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) (lukS-lukF-PV), and fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA) genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clones were assigned by agr groups, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), SCCmec, and multilocus sequencing typing (MLST). In total, 41 cases were recorded (boys, 61 %), with a median age of 4.3 months (range, 1-175). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for 31 cases (75.6 %). Complications included empyema (25/41, 61 %), pneumatoceles (7/41, 17 %), and lung abscess (1/41, 2.5 %). Intensive care unit (ICU) admission was required in 58.5 %. Two deaths occurred (4.9 %). Definitive therapy was based on vancomycin with or without other antibiotics (55.9 %), followed by clindamycin and linezolid (26.5 % each). All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC90 2 mg/L, range 1-2), teicoplanin, and linezolid, whereas 26.8 % were resistant to clindamycin. Among the 25 studied strains, 20 were mecA-positive (MRSA), carrying also the fnbA gene. Of these, 90 % belonged to the ST80-IV/agr3/PVL-positive clone. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains showed polyclonality, 3/5 were PVL-positive, and 3/5 were fnbA-positive. MRSA and particularly the ST80-IV clone predominated among staphylococcal pneumonia cases in children. Treatment provided was effective in all but two patients, despite the relatively high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin and a high resistance to

  1. New insights into the molecular epidemiology of Trichinella infection in domestic pigs, wild boars, and bears in Romania.

    PubMed

    Nicorescu, Isabela Madalina Dragoi; Ionita, Mariana; Ciupescu, Laurentiu; Buzatu, Cristian Vasile; Tanasuica, Rodica; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu

    2015-09-15

    Trichinellosis is a food-borne zoonosis caused by the parasitic nematode Trichinella, characterized by an extremely wide host range and geographical distribution. In Romania, it is recognized as one of the most serious zoonotic diseases. A cross-sectional study, covering all regions of Romania, was conducted in 2014 to investigate and update the prevalence of Trichinella infection among domestic pigs, wild boars, and bears. Additional, molecular identification of Trichinella species circulating among these animals was performed in order to establish the biogeography of Trichinella species within the seven geographical regions of Romania. For this, a total of 113,383 pigs raised in non-controlled housing conditions (backyards), 5596 hunted wild boars and 147 hunted bears were subjected to Trichinella analysis. The highest prevalence of Trichinella infections was found in bears (12.93%), followed by wild boars (1.66%) and domestic pigs (0.20%). Of 294 Trichinella isolates that tested positive by multiplex PCR, 219 (74.49%) were identified as Trichinella spiralis, 66 (22.45%) as Trichinella britovi, and 9 isolates (3.06%) as mixed infections of T. spiralis and T. britovi. T. spiralis was more prevalent in domestic pigs (165/228; 72.37%) than in game (63/228; 27.63%), while T. britovi showed a higher prevalence in game (50/75; 66.66%) than in domestic pigs (25/75; 33.33%). Moreover, the present study revealed a significant host- and area- related distribution of Trichinella species within the seven regions of Romania. Therefore, these findings are of epidemiological relevance, updating data on the prevalence and distribution of Trichinella species circulating among domestic and wild animals in South-Eastern Europe.

  2. [A view of the representation of the Pan-American Health Organization in Mexico with respect to support for molecular epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Coello, L

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the fact that epidemiology has the same commitments that in the past, in terms of political orientation, the changes of the epidemiological patterns offer new challenges. The scientific and technological development gives new tools for a better knowledge of the behaviour of diseases in populations. This is the case of molecular biology, which provides with the option of identifying risk factors in individuals and in populations. Several developing countries including Mexico, have satisfactory epidemiology programs and research groups in molecular biology contributing to the better epidemiological understanding. IMETAF is a collaborative network to reinforce infrastructure, support projects and personnel training. The World Health Organization, the Panamerican Health Organization and consequently, the Mexico Representation of the mentioned Organizations, contribute to the development of modern technology related to epidemiological tasks.

  3. Molecular heterogeneity in Yersinia enterocolitica and 'Y. enterocolitica-like' species--Implications for epidemiology, typing and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Jugsharan S; Sachdeva, Pooja

    2005-07-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an extremely heterogeneous species. Serotyping and biotyping have been used extensively, in the past, to study its heterogeneity and epidemiology. Application of methods like ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and a host of other genomic techniques have further revealed molecular heterogeneity in this species. Furthermore, these methods may be used effectively to supplement serotyping and biotyping schema for studying epidemiology of Y. enterocolitica. This is evident from the ability of some of these methods to subtype strains belonging to serogroups O:3, O:9 and O:8 - which are most commonly encountered in human Yersiniosis. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and nucleotide sequencing have reiterated the taxonomic relationships of this organism. However there is paucity of information about the molecular heterogeneity of 'Y. enterocolitica-like' species, which need to be addressed in the future. Also, newer techniques such as amplified fragment length polymorphism, VNTR-based typing and multilocus sequence typing should be applied to further understand epidemiology, population structure and evolutionary genetics of Y. enterocolitica and 'Y. enterocolitica-like' species. PMID:15985218

  4. Confirming Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission from a cadaver to an embalmer using molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Janelle A; Meissner, Jeanne Sullivan; Ahuja, Shama Desai; Shashkina, Elena; O'Flaherty, Tholief; Proops, Douglas C

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping results and epidemiologic investigation were used to confirm tuberculosis transmission from a cadaver to an embalmer. This investigation highlights the utility of genotyping in identifying unsuspected epidemiologic links and unusual transmission settings. In addition, the investigation provides additional evidence for the occupational risk of tuberculosis among funeral service workers and indicates a need for education about tuberculosis risk and the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures among funeral service workers.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in Québec.

    PubMed

    Larochelle, Renée; D'Allaire, Sylvie; Magar, Ronald

    2003-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains identified in samples from 226 field cases originating from Québec herds and submitted over a 4-year period (March 1998-July 2002) were studied. Sequencing of PRRSV strains was performed on the ORF5 gene amplified product and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns for enzymes MluI, HincII and SacII were determined on these sequences. Twenty-four other PRRSV isolates including three vaccine strains were also included for comparison purposes and the total of 250 PRRSV strains were used in a phylogenetic analysis. Clinical and epidemiological data were collected through a questionnaire for each of the submitted field cases. About 75% of the cases were submitted during autumn and winter. Over 60% of the cases were submitted for reproductive problems, 33% for respiratory problems and 6% for increased PRRSV serological titers in the herd in absence of clinical signs. In 69% of the cases there was a PRRS vaccination program for the herd. However, only 26% of the animals from which samples were obtained had been vaccinated themselves. The genomic analysis of this large number of strains revealed a great variability of PRRSV ORF5 with 59% of amino acid positions being polymorphic. A total of 29 RFLP patterns were obtained. The main RFLP patterns obtained were 1-8-4 (28%), 1-4-4 (16%), 1-2-4 (9%) and 1-11-4 (9%). The global findings derived from the molecular analysis of 226 PRRSV strains suggest that PRRSV circulating in Québec represent a different sub-population of strains. Vaccine-like strains were identified in 10% of the cases. A phylogenetic tree enabled the identification of 44 groupings comprising two to 23 strains each. Of the 250 sequences analyzed, 183 (73%) could be included in one of these groupings. The data collected from the questionnaires were used to establish epidemiological links between strains within groupings. The main relationships between strains within a

  6. Molecular epidemiology of coal worker's pneumoconiosis: Application to risk assessment of oxidant and monokine generation by mineral dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Borm, P.J.; Meijers, J.M.; Swaen, G.M. )

    1990-01-01

    It is generally accepted that fibrotic lung diseases are mediated by macrophage-derived cytokines and growth factors. Basic research continues to find new factors involved in these disease processes to incorporate into new hypotheses. Two hypotheses implicitly generated by recent findings were tested in an epidemiologic approach among workers in coal mines. This approach is described as molecular epidemiology and is exemplified by two studies focused on different mechanistic aspects of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP): antioxidants in red blood cells of miners with CWP and generation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by blood monocytes of miners with CWP. Most findings in the antioxidant study may merely be reflections of pulmonary inflammatory processes. Some data in the TNF study indicate, however, that TNF release is a risk factor for the development of lung fibrosis after prolonged exposure to coal mine dust.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of severe respiratory disease by human rhinoviruses and enteroviruses at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Launes, C; Armero, G; Anton, A; Hernandez, L; Gimferrer, L; Cisneros, C; Jordan, I; Muñoz-Almagro, C

    2015-08-01

    In order to describe the molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus (HRV) and enterovirus (EV) infection in severely ill children, we studied all episodes of bronchospasm/bronchopneumonia in 6-month-old to 18-year-old patients from January 2010 to May 2012 who required mechanical ventilation. HRV/EVs were detected in 55 (57.3%) of 96 patients, of which 50 (91%) were HRV (HRV-A, 16; HRV-B, 1; HRV-C, 18) and 5 (9%) were EVs (EV-D68, 3). No significant differences in epidemiologic and clinical characteristics were found between different types. In six of the 13 patients who required invasive mechanical ventilation, HRV was the only pathogen detected.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of severe respiratory disease by human rhinoviruses and enteroviruses at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Launes, C; Armero, G; Anton, A; Hernandez, L; Gimferrer, L; Cisneros, C; Jordan, I; Muñoz-Almagro, C

    2015-08-01

    In order to describe the molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus (HRV) and enterovirus (EV) infection in severely ill children, we studied all episodes of bronchospasm/bronchopneumonia in 6-month-old to 18-year-old patients from January 2010 to May 2012 who required mechanical ventilation. HRV/EVs were detected in 55 (57.3%) of 96 patients, of which 50 (91%) were HRV (HRV-A, 16; HRV-B, 1; HRV-C, 18) and 5 (9%) were EVs (EV-D68, 3). No significant differences in epidemiologic and clinical characteristics were found between different types. In six of the 13 patients who required invasive mechanical ventilation, HRV was the only pathogen detected. PMID:25964153

  9. Challenges and opportunities in international molecular cancer prevention research: An ASPO Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and International Cancer Prevention Interest Groups Report.

    PubMed

    Epplein, Meira; Bostick, Roberd M; Mu, Lina; Ogino, Shuji; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer estimates that over half of the new cancer cases and almost two-thirds of the cancer deaths in 2012 occurred in low and middle income countries. To discuss the challenges and opportunities to reducing the burden of cancer worldwide, the Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and the International Issues in Cancer Special Interest Groups joined forces to hold a session during the 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology (March 2014, Arlington, Virginia). The session highlighted three topics of particular interest to molecular cancer prevention researchers working internationally, specifically: 1) biomarkers in cancer research; 2) environmental exposures and cancer; and 3) molecular pathological epidemiology. A major factor for successful collaboration illuminated during the discussion was the need for strong, committed, and reliable international partners. A key element of establishing such relationships is to thoroughly involve individual international collaborators in the development of the research question; engaged international collaborators are particularly motivated to champion and shepherd the project through all necessary steps, including issues relating to institutional review boards, political sensitivity, laboratory-based assays, and tumor subtyping. Also essential is allotting time for the building, maintaining, and investing in such relationships so that successful international collaborations may take root and bloom. While there are many challenges inherent to international molecular cancer research, the opportunities for furthering the science and prevention of cancer worldwide are great, particularly at this time of increasing cancer incidence and prevalence in low and middle income countries.

  10. Understanding conductivity in molecular switches: a real space approach in octaphyrins.

    PubMed

    Woller, T; Ramos-Berdullas, N; Mandado, M; Alonso, M; de Proft, F; Contreras-García, J

    2016-04-28

    In recent years, expanded porphyrins have emerged as a promising class of π-conjugated molecules that display unique electronic, optical and conformational properties. Several expanded porphyrins can switch between planar and twisted conformations, which have different photophysical properties. Such a change of topology involves a Hückel-Möbius aromaticity switch in a single molecule and it can be induced by solvent, pH and metallation. These features make expanded porphyrins suitable for the development of a novel type of molecular switches for molecular electronic devices. Octaphyrins consisting of eight pyrrole rings, exhibit twisted-Hückel, Möbius and Hückel π-conjugation topologies depending on the oxidation and protonation state, with distinct electronic structures and aromaticity. Our working hypothesis is that a significant change in the conductance of expanded porphyrins will be observed after the topology switching. Despite the potential of Hückel-Möbius systems as conductance switches, the relationship between the conductance and the molecular topology is not yet understood. We have explored the performance of local descriptors of conductivity in simple molecules, as well as the relationship with conductance. Since these indexes provide a qualitative measure of delocalization and conductance in the probe molecules, we have carried out a local analysis of electrical conductance changes as a function of the π-conjugation in two examples. In one of them, the locality of the electronic changes ensures the ability of these indexes to describe the conductance as local. Moreover, it enables to identify which conformational switch would be more efficient from an electronic device perspective. However, we also show that it is not always possible to reduce conductance changes to one bond, and in those molecules where a deep rearrangement occurs far from the structural perturbation, local measures show a limited efficiency. This is a first step for the

  11. Clinical features and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A baumannii complex in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Feng; Yang, Chih-Man; Lin, Chung-Hui; Huang, Mei-Luan; Tu, Chi-Chao; Liou, Ming-Li

    2009-11-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan to investigate the clinical features and molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A baumannii (MDR Acb) complex. Case patients had higher mortality than controls did. MDR Acb complex acquisition risk factors include longer hospital stays, higher ratio of nasogastric tube and Foley catheter use, and more carbapenem use. All available isolates were divided into 36 subtypes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The proportion of the same subtypes with their appearance within 1 and 2 months was 62.5% and 87.5%, respectively. We concluded that many different MDR Acb complex clones could be found in a hospital and that the same clones often spread on a small scale within a short period of time if no outbreaks noted.

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Children with Recurrent Upper Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Maj, Maciej; Siwiec, Radosław; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A total of 125 isolates were recovered from adenoids and/or nasopharynx of 170 children aged 2 to 5 from south-east Poland; they had undergone adenoidectomy for recurrent and/or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. Pneumococcal isolates were analyzed by phenotyping (serotyping and antimicrobial resistance tests) and genotyping together with the clonality of the pneumococcal isolates based on resistance determinants, transposon distribution and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Serotypes 19F, 6B and 23F constituted 44.8% of the isolates. Among all of the strains, 44.8% showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin and resistance to co-trimoxazole (52.8%), tetracycline (38.4%), erythromycin (53.6%), clindamycin (52.8%) and chloramphenicol (27.2%) was observed. Tn6002 was found in 34.8% of erythromycin-resistant isolates while composite Tn2010-in 16.7% of erm(B)-carrying isolates that harboured also mef(E) gene. Tn3872-related elements were detected in 27.3% of erythromycin-resistant strains. In the majority of chloramphenicol-resistant catpC194-carrying isolates (79.4%), ICESp23FST81-family elements were detected. The genotyping showed that pneumococcal population was very heterogeneous; 82 sequence types (STs) were identified, and the most frequent contributed to not more than 8% of the isolates. Nearly 44% STs were novel, each of them was recovered only from one child. Four STs belonged to one of the 43 worldwide spread resistant pneumococcal clones currently accepted by Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), i.e. Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Norway NT-42 and Poland 6B-20, accounting for 12 (16.7%) of the 75 nonususceptible isolates, and five STs were single-locus variants of PMEN resistant clones (England 14-9, Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Greece 21-30, Denmark 14-32), accounting 9 (12%) of nonsusceptible isolates. A few MDR clones belonging to 6B and 19F serotypes found among preschool children emphasizes rather the role of clonal

  13. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Adenovirus Respiratory Infections in Taiwanese Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Shen, Fan-Ching; Wang, Shan-Li; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Tsai, Huey-Pin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chi, Chia-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are important causes of respiratory infections in children. They usually cause mild upper respiratory symptoms, but they can also produce severe pneumonia and other complications. The aims of this retrospective study were to better define the molecular epidemiology of respiratory adenoviruses circulating in Taiwanese children during 2002 and 2013, detect reinfections and co-infections, and characterize the clinical features and laboratory findings according to the causative genotypes. We collected a representative sample of 182 isolates of adenoviruses from 175 children during the 12-year study period. The most prevalent species was HAdV-B genotype 3 (HAdV-3) (92/182, 50.5%) followed by HAdV-C (HAdV-2) (38/182, 20.9%). A single outbreak of HAdV-E (6/182, 3.3%) was noted in 2007. The mean age of children with adenovirus infections was 3.7 ± 2.0 years, with a slight predominance of males (53.1%). Children with HAdV-B tended to be older, had more lower respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal symptoms, and a higher rate of hospitalization than those with HAdV-C (P < 0.05). Adenovirus co-infections were noted in 25/175 (14.3%) of the children. The most frequent co-infections were with species B (HAdV-3) and C (HAdV-2) (14/25, 56.0%). Additional infections were noted in 23/175 (13.1%) of the children. Of these repeated infections, the initial isolates were always genotypes of HAdV-C. The second isolates were genotypes of HAdV-B or HAdV-E. The clinical features of the first HAdV-B infection and the reinfection of HAdV-B followed the HAdV-C were similar. In conclusion, HAdV-B, C, and E were the only adenovirus species that were isolated from children who were sufficiently ill with respiratory infections to require a visit to the hospital. Human adenovirus B (HAdV-3) accounted for half of these species. HAdV-B was more likely than other species to produce severe disease. The high incidence of adenovirus co-infection and

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Children with Recurrent Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Maj, Maciej; Siwiec, Radosław; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A total of 125 isolates were recovered from adenoids and/or nasopharynx of 170 children aged 2 to 5 from south-east Poland; they had undergone adenoidectomy for recurrent and/or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. Pneumococcal isolates were analyzed by phenotyping (serotyping and antimicrobial resistance tests) and genotyping together with the clonality of the pneumococcal isolates based on resistance determinants, transposon distribution and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Serotypes 19F, 6B and 23F constituted 44.8% of the isolates. Among all of the strains, 44.8% showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin and resistance to co-trimoxazole (52.8%), tetracycline (38.4%), erythromycin (53.6%), clindamycin (52.8%) and chloramphenicol (27.2%) was observed. Tn6002 was found in 34.8% of erythromycin-resistant isolates while composite Tn2010—in 16.7% of erm(B)-carrying isolates that harboured also mef(E) gene. Tn3872-related elements were detected in 27.3% of erythromycin-resistant strains. In the majority of chloramphenicol-resistant catpC194-carrying isolates (79.4%), ICESp23FST81-family elements were detected. The genotyping showed that pneumococcal population was very heterogeneous; 82 sequence types (STs) were identified, and the most frequent contributed to not more than 8% of the isolates. Nearly 44% STs were novel, each of them was recovered only from one child. Four STs belonged to one of the 43 worldwide spread resistant pneumococcal clones currently accepted by Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), i.e. Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Norway NT-42 and Poland 6B-20, accounting for 12 (16.7%) of the 75 nonususceptible isolates, and five STs were single-locus variants of PMEN resistant clones (England 14–9, Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Greece 21–30, Denmark 14–32), accounting 9 (12%) of nonsusceptible isolates. A few MDR clones belonging to 6B and 19F serotypes found among preschool children emphasizes rather the role of

  15. Molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of human rhinovirus affecting hospitalized children in Rome.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, Alessandra; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Chiavelli, Stefano; Concato, Carlo; Giovanetti, Marta; Cella, Eleonora; Spano, Lucia; Scagnolari, Carolina; Moretti, Corrado; Papoff, Paola; Muraca, Maurizio; Midulla, Fabio; Antonelli, Guido

    2013-08-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) have been re-classified into three species (A-C), but the recently discovered HRV-C strains are not fully characterized yet. This study aimed to undertake a molecular and epidemiological characterization of HRV strains infecting children hospitalized over one year in two large research hospitals in Rome. Nasal washings from single HRV infections were retrospectively subjected to phylogenetic analysis on two genomic regions: the central part of the 5'Untranslated Region (5'UTR) and the Viral Protein (VP) 4 gene with the 5' portion of the VP2 gene (VP4/2). Forty-five different strains were identified in 73 HRV-positive children: 55 % of the cases were HRV-A, 38 % HRV-C and only 7 % HRV-B. HRV-C cases were less frequent than HRV-A during summer months and more frequent in cases presenting wheezing with respect to HRV-A. Species distribution was similar with respect to patient age, and seasonality differed during summer months with fewer HRV-C than HRV-A cases. On admission, a significantly higher number of HRV-C cases presented with wheezing with respect to HRV-A. The inter- and intra-genotype variability in VP4/2 was higher than in 5'UTR; in particular, HRV-A patient VP4/2 sequences were highly divergent (8-14 %) at the nucleotide level from those of their reference strains, but VP4 amino acid sequence was highly conserved. In HRV-C isolates, the region preceding the initiator AUG, the amino acids involved in VP4 myristoylation, the VP4-VP2 cleavage site and the cis-acting replication element were highly conserved. Differently, VP4 amino acid conservation was significantly lower in HRV-C than in HRV-A strains, especially in the transiently exposed VP4 N-terminus. This study confirmed the high number of different HRV genotypes infecting hospitalized children over one year and reveals a greater than expected variability in HRV-C VP4 protein, potentially suggestive of differences in replication.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Children with Recurrent Upper Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Maj, Maciej; Siwiec, Radosław; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    A total of 125 isolates were recovered from adenoids and/or nasopharynx of 170 children aged 2 to 5 from south-east Poland; they had undergone adenoidectomy for recurrent and/or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. Pneumococcal isolates were analyzed by phenotyping (serotyping and antimicrobial resistance tests) and genotyping together with the clonality of the pneumococcal isolates based on resistance determinants, transposon distribution and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Serotypes 19F, 6B and 23F constituted 44.8% of the isolates. Among all of the strains, 44.8% showed decreased susceptibility to penicillin and resistance to co-trimoxazole (52.8%), tetracycline (38.4%), erythromycin (53.6%), clindamycin (52.8%) and chloramphenicol (27.2%) was observed. Tn6002 was found in 34.8% of erythromycin-resistant isolates while composite Tn2010-in 16.7% of erm(B)-carrying isolates that harboured also mef(E) gene. Tn3872-related elements were detected in 27.3% of erythromycin-resistant strains. In the majority of chloramphenicol-resistant catpC194-carrying isolates (79.4%), ICESp23FST81-family elements were detected. The genotyping showed that pneumococcal population was very heterogeneous; 82 sequence types (STs) were identified, and the most frequent contributed to not more than 8% of the isolates. Nearly 44% STs were novel, each of them was recovered only from one child. Four STs belonged to one of the 43 worldwide spread resistant pneumococcal clones currently accepted by Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN), i.e. Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Norway NT-42 and Poland 6B-20, accounting for 12 (16.7%) of the 75 nonususceptible isolates, and five STs were single-locus variants of PMEN resistant clones (England 14-9, Spain 9V-3, Spain 23F-1, Greece 21-30, Denmark 14-32), accounting 9 (12%) of nonsusceptible isolates. A few MDR clones belonging to 6B and 19F serotypes found among preschool children emphasizes rather the role of clonal

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria annulata and identification of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences variants in apparently healthy buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Kasib; He, Lan; Hussain, Altaf; Azam, Sabita; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Li; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yan-Qin; Zhao, Junlong

    2013-01-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of piroplasms in buffaloes and cattle from Sheikhupura and Okara districts of Punjab, Pakistan using reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay. The genetic diversity within 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of various obtained Theileria species (spp.) was also investigated. Briefly, 102 blood samples from buffaloes and cattle in the study districts were collected on blood collection cards and brought to the laboratory. DNA was extracted; the V4 hypervariable region of 18S rRNA was amplified and analyzed using RLB. Out of total samples analyzed, 61 (59.8%) were hybridized with Babesia/Theileria (B/T) genus-specific probe. Only one species of piroplasm was detected in buffaloes and cattle in study districts, i.e. Theileria (T.) annulata. Six samples only hybridized with B/T genus-specific and Theileria genus-specific probes but not with any species-specific probe indicating the presence of novel species or variants. The sequences of 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions of these six samples revealed the presence of T. annulata variants as confirmed through sequence identity estimation and phylogenetic analyses. Meanwhile, an unexpected sequence variation was observed within the 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions sequences of T. annulata identified in the present study. This is the first report on the simultaneous detection of species of piroplasms infecting buffaloes and cattle in Pakistan and molecular characterization of T. annulata 18S rRNA gene and ITS regions. The present study may address the new insights into the epidemiology of theileriosis which will help researches in designing control strategies and developing various molecular diagnostic tools at national level.

  18. Molecular Conduction through Adlayers: Cooperative Effects can Help or Hamper Electron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, Matthew G; Seideman, Tamar; Ratner, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    We use a one-electron, tight-binding model of a molecular adlayer sandwiched between two metal electrodes to explore how cooperative effects between molecular wires influence electron transport through the adlayer. When compared to an isolated molecular wire, an adlayer exhibits cooperative effects that generally enhance conduction away from an isolated wire s resonance and diminish conductance near such a resonance. We also find that the interwire distance (related to the adlayer density) is a key quantity. Substrate-mediated coupling induces most of the cooperative effects in dense adlayers, whereas direct, interwire coupling (if present) dominates in sparser adlayers. In this manner, cooperative effects through dense adlayers cannot be removed, suggesting an optimal adlayer density for maximizing conduction.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of group B streptococcal meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period from Angola.

    PubMed

    Florindo, Carlos; Gomes, João P; Rato, Márcia G; Bernardino, Luís; Spellerberg, Barbara; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Borrego, Maria J

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major pathogen of neonates and immunocompromised adults. Prior studies have demonstrated that, beyond the neonatal period, S. agalactiae rarely causes invasive infections in children. However, during 2004-2005, S. agalactiae was the causative agent of 60 meningitis episodes in children aged 3 months to 12 years from Angola. To identify and study the specific causative genetic lineages of S. agalactiae childhood meningitis, which lack characterization to date, we conducted an extensive molecular analysis of the recovered isolates (n = 21). This constitutes what we believe to be the first molecular study of the population structure of invasive S. agalactiae isolates from Africa. A low genetic diversity was observed among the isolates, where the majority belonged to clonal complex (CC) 17 presenting the capsular subtype III-2 (86 % of cases) and marked by the intron group II GBSi1, which has previously been observed to be associated with neonatal hosts. The predominance of single-locus variants of sequence type (ST) 17 suggested the local diversification of this hypervirulent clone, which displayed novel alleles of the fbsB and sip virulence genes. The absence of the scpB-lmb region in two S. agalactiae isolates with the Ia/ST23 genotype is more typical of cattle than human isolates. Globally, these data provide novel information about the enhanced invasiveness of the CC17 genetic lineage in older children and suggest the local diversification of this clone, which may be related to the future emergence of a novel epidemic clone in Angola. PMID:21474607

  20. Intra-molecular electron transfer and electric conductance via sequential hopping: Unified theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlin, Yuri A.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2005-10-01

    The relation between intra-molecular electron transfer in the donor-bridge-acceptor system and zero-bias conductance of the same bridge in the metal-molecule-metal junction is analyzed for the sequential hopping regime of both processes. The electron transfer rate and molecular conductance are expressed in terms of rates characterizing each individual step of electron motion. Based on the results obtained, we derive the analytical expression that relates these two quantities in the general case of the energy landscape governing hopping transport.

  1. Water harvesting using a conducting polymer: A study by molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostwal, Mayur M.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Tsotsis, Theodore T.

    2009-06-15

    The results of extensive molecular simulations of adsorption and diffusion of water vapor in polyaniline, made conducting by doping it with HCl or HBr over a broad range of temperatures, are reported. The atomistic model of the polymers was generated using energy minimization, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, and two different force fields. The computed sorption isotherms are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The computed activation energies for the diffusion of water molecules in the polymers also compare well with what has been reported in the literature. The results demonstrate the potential of conducting polyaniline for water harvesting from air.

  2. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations. PMID:27531063

  3. Conduction transition of nano-scaled molecular wires driven by environment coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shih-Jye

    2008-03-01

    We propose a hybridization model to simulate a molecular wire coupling with the environmental molecules. Results reveal that the conduction transition from conducting to semiconducting depends on the coupling strength. In our simulations, the non-equilibrium Green's function method is employed to calculate the current-voltage relationship for the molecular wire through metallic contacts. Our calculations show that the band gap can be manipulated from the outside molecules coupling. Temperature dependence of the conductivity is represented in our results with strong dependence in high temperature range, which is qualitatively comparable with the experimental results of DNA. In our results, with small coupling, the current is enhanced by the exchange. On the contrary, too large a coupling results in localization of the transport carriers, leading to a semiconducting like property. We try to associate this study with the conducting property of DNA, which can be manipulated by environmental modulation.

  4. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations.

  5. Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehortúa, Santiago L.; Jiménez, J. Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n = 159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n = 21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p = 0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p = 0.028), with history of β-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p = 0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection

  6. Epidemiological and genetic clues for molecular mechanisms involved in uterine leiomyoma development and growth

    PubMed Central

    Commandeur, Arno E.; Styer, Aaron K.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are highly prevalent benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. In the USA, the lifetime risk for women developing uterine leiomyomas is estimated as up to 75%. Except for hysterectomy, most therapies or treatments often provide only partial or temporary relief and are not successful in every patient. There is a clear racial disparity in the disease; African-American women are estimated to be three times more likely to develop uterine leiomyomas and generally develop more severe symptoms. There is also familial clustering between first-degree relatives and twins, and multiple inherited syndromes in which fibroid development occurs. Leiomyomas have been described as clonal and hormonally regulated, but despite the healthcare burden imposed by the disease, the etiology of uterine leiomyomas remains largely unknown. The mechanisms involved in their growth are also essentially unknown, which has contributed to the slow progress in development of effective treatment options. METHODS A comprehensive PubMed search for and critical assessment of articles related to the epidemiological, biological and genetic clues for uterine leiomyoma development was performed. The individual functions of some of the best candidate genes are explained to provide more insight into their biological function and to interconnect and organize genes and pathways in one overarching figure that represents the current state of knowledge about uterine leiomyoma development and growth. RESULTS In this review, the widely recognized roles of estrogen and progesterone in uterine leiomyoma pathobiology on the basis of clinical and experimental data are presented. This is followed by fundamental aspects and concepts including the possible cellular origin of uterine fibroids. The central themes in the subsequent parts are cytogenetic aberrations in leiomyomas and the racial/ethnic disparities in uterine fibroid biology. Then, the attributes of various in vitro and

  7. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and molecular typing of salmonella typhi isolated from patients with typhoid fever in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Kanj, Souha S; Kanafani, Zeina A; Shehab, Marwa; Sidani, Nisreen; Baban, Tania; Baltajian, Kedak; Dakdouki, Ghenwa K; Zaatari, Mohamad; Araj, George F; Wakim, Rima Hanna; Dbaibo, Ghassan; Matar, Ghassan M

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the epidemiology and the clinical manifestations of typhoid fever as well as the susceptibility and strain relatedness of Salmonella typhi isolates in Lebanon from 2006 to 2007. A total of 120 patients with typhoid fever were initially identified from various areas of the country based on positive culture results for S. typhi from blood, urine, stools, bone marrow and/or positive serology. Clinical, microbiological and molecular analysis was performed on cases with complete data available. These results indicated that drinking water was an unlikely mode of transmission of the infection. Despite increasing reports of antimicrobial resistance among S. typhi isolates, the vast majority of these isolates were susceptible to various antibiotic agents, including ampicillin, cephalosporins, quinolones, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Molecular analysis of the isolates revealed a predominance of one single genotype with no variation in distribution across the geographical regions. PMID:25922325

  8. Molecular epidemiology of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm in U.S. primate centers unravels the origin of SIVmac and SIVstm.

    PubMed

    Apetrei, Cristian; Kaur, Amitinder; Lerche, Nicholas W; Metzger, Michael; Pandrea, Ivona; Hardcastle, Johnny; Falkenstein, Shelley; Bohm, Rudolf; Koehler, Jeffrey; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Williams, Tessa; Staprans, Silvija; Plauche, Gail; Veazey, Ronald S; McClure, Harold; Lackner, Andrew A; Gormus, Bobby; Robertson, David L; Marx, Preston A

    2005-07-01

    Retrospective molecular epidemiology was performed on samples from four sooty mangabey (SM) colonies in the United States to characterize simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm diversity in SMs and to trace virus circulation among different primate centers (PCs) over the past 30 years. The following SIVsm sequences were collected from different monkeys: 55 SIVsm isolates from the Tulane PC sampled between 1984 and 2004, 10 SIVsm isolates from the Yerkes PC sampled in 2002, 7 SIVsm isolates from the New Iberia PC sampled between 1979 and 1986, and 8 SIVsm isolates from the California PC sampled between 1975 and 1977. PCR and sequencing were done to characterize the gag, pol, and env gp36 genes. Phylogenetic analyses were correlated with the epidemiological data. Our analysis identified nine different divergent phylogenetic lineages that cocirculated in these four SM colonies in the Unites States in the past 30 years. Lineages 1 to 5 have been identified previously. Two of the newly identified SIVsm lineages found in SMs are ancestral to SIVmac251/SIVmac239/SIVmne and SIVstm. We further identified the origin of these two macaque viruses in SMs from the California National Primate Research Center. The diversity of SIVsm isolates in PCs in the United States mirrors that of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M subtypes and offers a model for the molecular epidemiology of HIV and a new approach to vaccine testing. The cocirculation of divergent SIVsm strains in PCs resulted in founder effects, superinfections, and recombinations. This large array of SIVsm strains showing the same magnitude of diversity as HIV-1 group M subtypes should be extremely useful for modeling the efficacy of vaccination strategies under the real-world conditions of HIV-1 diversity. The genetic variability of SIVsm strains among PCs may influence the diagnosis and monitoring of SIVsm infection and, consequently, may bias the results of pathogenesis studies. PMID:15994793

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Cowó, Ángel E.; Chen, Marcelo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chun-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208) and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9%) were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%). Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4%) subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001); exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001); versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003); oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044); times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021); illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001); and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002). In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan’s Centers for Disease Control has

  10. Molecular epidemiology of clinical and carrier strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the hospital settings of north India

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Javid A; Thoker, Manzoor A; Khan, Jamal A; Ali, Asif; Khan, Mohammed A; Rizwan, Mohammed; Bhat, Khalid H; Dar, Mohammad J; Ahmed, Niyaz; Ahmad, Shamim

    2006-01-01

    Background The study was conducted between 2000 and 2003 on 750 human subjects, yielding 850 strains of staphylococci from clinical specimens (575), nasal cultures of hospitalized patients (100) and eye & nasal sources of hospital workers (50 & 125 respectively) in order to determine their epidemiology, acquisition and dissemination of resistance genes. Methods Organisms from clinical samples were isolated, cultured and identified as per the standard routine procedures. Susceptibility was measured by the agar diffusion method, as recommended by the Nat ional Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). The modified method of Birnboin and Takahashi was used for isolation of plasmids from staphylococci. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing of clinical and carrier Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated during our study was performed as described previously. Results It was shown that 35.1% of Staphylococcus aureus and 22.5% of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates were resistant to methicillin. Highest percentage of MRSA (35.5%) was found in pus specimens (n = 151). The multiple drug resistance of all MRSA (n = 180) and Methicillin resistant Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (MRCNS) (n = 76) isolates was detected. In case of both methicillin-resistant as well as methicillin-sensitive Saphylococcal isolates zero resistance was found to vancomycin where as highest resistance was found to penicillin G followed by ampicillin. It was shown that the major reservoir of methicillin resistant staphylococci in hospitals are colonized/infected inpatients and colonized hospital workers, with carriers at risk for developing endogenous infection or transmitting infection to health care workers and patients. The results were confirmed by molecular typing using PFGE by SmaI-digestion. It was shown that the resistant markers G and T got transferred from clinical S. aureus (JS-105) to carrier S. aureus (JN-49) and the

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

    PubMed

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Cowó, Ángel E; Chen, Marcelo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chun-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208) and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9%) were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%). Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4%) subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001); exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001); versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003); oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044); times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021); illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001); and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002). In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan's Centers for Disease Control has

  12. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 Infection among Men who Have Sex with Men in Taiwan in 2012.

    PubMed

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Wang, Sheng-Fan; Cowó, Ángel E; Chen, Marcelo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hung, Chun-Po; Chen, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The number of men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 in Taiwan has increased rapidly in the past few years. The goal of this study was to conduct a molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 infection among MSM in Taiwan to identify risk factors for intervention. Voluntary counseling program and anonymous testing were provided to patrons at 1 gay bar, 7 night clubs and 3 gay saunas in Taipei and New Taipei Cities in 2012. HIV-1 subtypes were determined using gag subtype-specific PCR and phylogenetic analysis by env sequences. Recent HIV-1 infection was determined using LAg-Avidity EIA. In-depth interviews and questionnaires were used to identify risk factors. The prevalence and incidence of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan were 4.38% (53/1,208) and 3.29 per 100 person-years, respectively. Of 49 cases genotyped, 48 (97.9%) were infected with subtype B and 1 with CRF01_AE (2%). Phylogenetic analysis of 46 HIV-1 strains showed that 25 (54.4%) subtype B strains formed 9 clusters with each other or with other local strains. The CRF01_AE case clustered with a reference strain from a Thai blood donor with bootstrap value of 99. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that risk factors associated with HIV-1 infection included use of oil-based solution as lubricant (vs. saliva or water-based lubricants, OR= 4.23; p <0.001); exclusively receptive role (vs. insertive role, OR= 9.69; p <0.001); versatile role (vs. insertive role, OR= 6.45; p= 0.003); oral sex (vs. insertive role, OR= 11.93; p= 0.044); times of sexual contact per week (2-3 vs. zero per week, OR= 3.41; p= 0.021); illegal drug use (OR= 4.12; p <0.001); and history of sexually transmitted diseases (OR= 3.65; p= 0.002). In conclusion, there was no new HIV-1 subtype or circulating recombinant form responsible for the increase of HIV-1 among MSM in Taiwan in 2012. Misuse of oil-based solution as lubricant is a new risk factor identified among MSM in Taiwan. The Taiwan's Centers for Disease Control has

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Giardia duodenalis in an endangered carnivore--the African painted dog.

    PubMed

    Ash, A; Lymbery, A; Lemon, J; Vitali, S; Thompson, R C A

    2010-12-15

    The African painted dog (Lycaon pictus) is an endangered carnivore of sub-Saharan Africa. To assist in conservation efforts a parasitological survey was conducted on wild and captive populations. Faecal samples were collected and examined for the presence of parasites using traditional microscopy techniques. The protozoan Giardia duodenalis was identified at a prevalence of approximately 26% in the wild populations and 62% in the captive population. Molecular characterisation of these isolates using three loci, 18S rRNA, β-giardin and the glutamate dehydrogenase gene revealed the zoonotic assemblages A and B existed in high proportions in both populations. The dog assemblages C and D were rarely observed. The identification of the zoonotic genotype suggests this species has the potential to act as a reservoir for human infections. Zoonotic transmission may be possible in captive populations due to the close interaction with humans however, in wild populations anthropozoonotic transmission seems more likely. This study is the first to observe G. duodenalis in the African painted dog and to identify a possible emerging disease in this wild carnivore.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  15. Destruction and recovery of a nanorod conductive network in polymer nanocomposites via molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangyang; Cao, Dapeng; Wu, Youping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Liqun

    2016-03-28

    By adopting coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the effects of end-functionalization and shear flow on the destruction and recovery of a nanorod conductive network in a functionalized polymer matrix. We find that the end-functionalization of polymeric chains can enhance the electrical conductivity of nanorod filled polymer nanocomposites, indicated by the decrease of the percolation threshold. However, there exists an optimal end-functionalization extent to reach the maximum electrical conductivity. In the case of steady shear flow, both homogeneous conductive probability and directional conductive probability perpendicular to the shear direction decrease with the shear rate, while the directional conductive probability parallel to the shear direction increases. Importantly, we develop a semi-empirical equation to describe the change of the homogeneous conductive probability as a function of the shear rate. Meanwhile, we obtain an empirical formula describing the relationship between the anisotropy of the conductive probability and the orientation of the nanorods. In addition, the conductivity stability increases with increasing nanorod volume fraction. During the recovery process of the nanorod conductive network, it can be fitted well by the model combining classical percolation theory and a time-dependent nanorod aggregation kinetic equation. The fitted recovery rate is similar for different nanorod volume fractions. In summary, this work provides some rational rules for fabricating polymer nanocomposites with excellent performance of electrical conductivity. PMID:26895557

  16. Destruction and recovery of a nanorod conductive network in polymer nanocomposites via molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangyang; Cao, Dapeng; Wu, Youping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Liqun

    2016-03-28

    By adopting coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the effects of end-functionalization and shear flow on the destruction and recovery of a nanorod conductive network in a functionalized polymer matrix. We find that the end-functionalization of polymeric chains can enhance the electrical conductivity of nanorod filled polymer nanocomposites, indicated by the decrease of the percolation threshold. However, there exists an optimal end-functionalization extent to reach the maximum electrical conductivity. In the case of steady shear flow, both homogeneous conductive probability and directional conductive probability perpendicular to the shear direction decrease with the shear rate, while the directional conductive probability parallel to the shear direction increases. Importantly, we develop a semi-empirical equation to describe the change of the homogeneous conductive probability as a function of the shear rate. Meanwhile, we obtain an empirical formula describing the relationship between the anisotropy of the conductive probability and the orientation of the nanorods. In addition, the conductivity stability increases with increasing nanorod volume fraction. During the recovery process of the nanorod conductive network, it can be fitted well by the model combining classical percolation theory and a time-dependent nanorod aggregation kinetic equation. The fitted recovery rate is similar for different nanorod volume fractions. In summary, this work provides some rational rules for fabricating polymer nanocomposites with excellent performance of electrical conductivity.

  17. Identification of the current path for a conductive molecular wire on a tripodal platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, M. A.; Bahoosh, S. G.; Valášek, M.; Bürkle, M.; Mayor, M.; Pauly, F.; Scheer, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the chemical synthesis as well as charge transport measurements and calculations for a new tripodal platform based on a rigid 9,9'-spirobifluorene equipped with a phenylene-ethynylene wire. The transport experiments are performed with the help of the low-temperature mechanically controlled break junction technique with gold electrodes. By combining experimental and theoretical investigations of elastic and inelastic charge transport, we show that the current proceeds through the designated molecular wire and identify a binding geometry that is compatible with the experimental observations. The conductive molecular wire on the platform features a well-defined and relatively high conductance of the order of 10-3G0 despite the length of the current path of more than 1.7 nm, demonstrating that this platform is suitable to incorporate functional units like molecular switches or sensors.We present the chemical synthesis as well as charge transport measurements and calculations for a new tripodal platform based on a rigid 9,9'-spirobifluorene equipped with a phenylene-ethynylene wire. The transport experiments are performed with the help of the low-temperature mechanically controlled break junction technique with gold electrodes. By combining experimental and theoretical investigations of elastic and inelastic charge transport, we show that the current proceeds through the designated molecular wire and identify a binding geometry that is compatible with the experimental observations. The conductive molecular wire on the platform features a well-defined and relatively high conductance of the order of 10-3G0 despite the length of the current path of more than 1.7 nm, demonstrating that this platform is suitable to incorporate functional units like molecular switches or sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08708b

  18. Molecular epidemiology of giardiasis among Orang Asli in Malaysia: application of the triosephosphate isomerase gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Giardia duodenalis is a flagellate parasite which has been considered the most common protozoa infecting human worldwide. Molecular characterization of G. duodenalis isolates have revealed the existence of eight groups (Assemblage A to H) which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are found in humans and in many other mammals. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted to identify assemblage’s related risk factors of G. duodenalis among Orang Asli in Malaysia. Stool samples were collected from 611 individuals aged between 2 and 74 years old of whom 266 were males and 345 were females. Socioeconomic data were collected through a pre-tested questionnaire. All stool samples were processed with formalin-ether sedimentation and Wheatley’s trichrome staining techniques for the primary identification of G. duodenalis. Molecular identification was carried out by the amplification of a triosephosphate isomerase gene using nested-PCR assay. Results Sixty-two samples (10.2%) were identified as assemblage A and 36 (5.9%) were assemblage B. Risk analysis based on the detected assemblages using univariate and logistic regression analyses identified subjects who have close contact with household pets i.e. dogs and cats (OR = 2.60; 95% CI = 1.42, 4.78; P = 0.002) was found to be significant predictor for assemblage A. On the other hand, there were three significant risk factors caused by assemblage B: (i) children ≤15 years old (OR = 2.33; 95% CI = 1.11, 4.87; P = 0.025), (ii) consuming raw vegetables (OR = 2.82; 95% CI = 1.27, 6.26; P = 0.011) and (iii) the presence of other family members infected with giardiasis (OR = 6.31; 95% CI = 2.99, 13.31; P < 0.001). Conclusions The present study highlighted that G. duodenalis infection among Orang Asli was caused by both assemblages with significant high prevalence of assemblage A. Therefore, taking precaution after having contact with household

  19. Molecular mobility of imidazoles in molten state as a key factor to enhance proton conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarumaneeroj, Chatchai; Tashiro, Kohji; Chirachanchai, Suwabun

    2014-03-01

    A systematic study on alkyl urocanates related to the proton conductivity performances to clarify the role of molecular mobility and hydrogen bond in proton transfer is carried out. Depending on the methylene units, the melting (Tm) and degradation temperatures (Td) change remarkably. When methylene unit is four, C4U shows the lowest melting point (as low as 46 °C) and this suggests the favorable molecular mobility in the molten state. The short hydrogen bond distance and the short T1 relaxation time lead to a scheme of proton conductivity of C4U to be under a regular imidazole arrangement with highly active alkyl chain molecular motion. When C4U is in molten state, the proton transfer is under vehicle mechanism clarified by Volgel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation. By applying C4U as a proton conductive additive in a sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) membrane without any acid dopants, the proton conductivity in the heating process up to 170 °C continuously increases to be ∼104 times higher than that of the neat SPEEK. The present work not only demonstrates the thermal mobility as a key factor to govern the proton conductivity but also proposes the effective proton transfer of heterocyclic compounds based on the molten state.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Antiamoebin Ion Channel: Linking Structure and Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Wei, Chenyu; Bjelkmar, Paer; Wallace, B. A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to ascertain which of the potential multimeric forms of the transmembrane peptaibol channel, antiamoebin, is consistant with its measured conductance. Estimates of the conductance obtained through counting ions that cross the channel and by solving the Nernst-Planck equation yield consistent results, indicating that the motion of ions inside the channel can be satisfactorily described as diffusive.The calculated conductance of octameric channels is markedly higher than the conductance measured in single channel recordings, whereas the tetramer appears to be non-conducting. The conductance of the hexamer was estimated to be 115+/-34 pS and 74+/-20 pS, at 150 mV and 75 mV, respectively, in satisfactory agreement with the value of 90 pS measured at 75 mV. On this basis we propose that the antiamoebin channel consists of six monomers. Its pore is large enough to accommodate K(+) and Cl(-) with their first solvation shells intact. The free energy barrier encountered by K(+) is only 2.2 kcal/mol whereas Cl(-) encounters a substantially higher barrier of nearly 5 kcal/mol. This difference makes the channel selective for cations. Ion crossing events are shown to be uncorrelated and follow Poisson statistics. keywords: ion channels, peptaibols, channel conductance, molecular dynamics

  1. Molecular epidemiology of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Abdulgader, Shima M.; Shittu, Adebayo O.; Nicol, Mark P.; Kaba, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a serious global problem, with considerable impact on patients and substantial health care costs. This systematic review provides an overview on the clonal diversity of MRSA, as well as the prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive MRSA in Africa. A search on the molecular characterization of MRSA in Africa was conducted by two authors using predefined terms. We screened for articles published in English and French through to October 2014 from five electronic databases. A total of 57 eligible studies were identified. Thirty-four reports from 15 countries provided adequate genotyping data. CC5 is the predominant clonal complex in the healthcare setting in Africa. The hospital-associated MRSA ST239/ST241-III [3A] was identified in nine African countries. This clone was also described with SCCmec type IV [2B] in Algeria and Nigeria, and type V [5C] in Niger. In Africa, the European ST80-IV [2B] clone was limited to Algeria, Egypt and Tunisia. The clonal types ST22-IV [2B], ST36-II [2A], and ST612-IV [2B] were only reported in South Africa. No clear distinctions were observed between MRSA responsible for hospital and community infections. The community clones ST8-IV [2B] and ST88-IV [2B] were reported both in the hospital and community settings in Angola, Cameroon, Gabon, Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria, and São Tomé and Príncipe. The proportion of PVL-positive MRSA carriage and/or infections ranged from 0.3 to 100% in humans. A number of pandemic clones were identified in Africa. Moreover, some MRSA clones are limited to specific countries or regions. We strongly advocate for more surveillance studies on MRSA in Africa. PMID:25983721

  2. Thermal conductivity predictions of herringbone graphite nanofibers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Khadem, Masoud H; Wemhoff, Aaron P

    2013-02-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate the thermal conductivity of herringbone graphite nanofibers (GNFs) at room temperature by breaking down the axial and transverse conductivity values into intralayer and interlayer components. The optimized Tersoff potential is used to account for intralayer carbon-carbon interactions while the Lennard-Jones potential is used to model the interlayer carbon-carbon interactions. The intralayer thermal conductivity of the graphene layers near room temperature is calculated for different crease angles and number of layers using NEMD with a constant applied heat flux. The edge effect on a layer's thermal conductivity is investigated by computing the thermal conductivity values in both zigzag and armchair directions of the heat flow. The interlayer thermal conductivity is also predicted by imposing hot and cold Nosé-Hoover thermostats on two layers. The limiting case of a 90° crease angle is used to compare the results with those of single-layer graphene and few-layer graphene. The axial and transverse thermal conductivities are then calculated using standard trigonometric conversions of the calculated intralayer and interlayer thermal conductivities, along with calculations of few-layer graphene without a crease. The results show a large influence of the crease angle on the intralayer thermal conductivity, and the saturation of thermal conductivity occurs when number of layers is more than three. The axial thermal conductivity, transverse thermal conductivity in the crease direction, and transverse thermal conductivity normal to the crease for the case of a five-layer herringbone GNF with a 45° crease angle are calculated to be 27 W∕m K, 263 W∕m K, and 1500 W∕m K, respectively, where the axial thermal conductivity is in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  3. First-principles calculation on the conductance of ruthenium-quasi cumulene-ruthenium molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jing; Shen, Xin; Shen, Zi-Yong; Zhao, Xing-Yu; Hou, Shi-Min

    2009-09-01

    The conductance of a family of ruthenium-quasi cumulene-ruthenium molecular junctions including different numbers of carbon atoms, both in even numbers and odd numbers, are investigated using a fully self-consistent ab initio approach which combines the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism with density functional theory. Our calculations demonstrate that although the overall transport properties of the Ru-quasi cumulene-Ru junctions with an even number of carbon atoms are different from those of the junctions with an odd number of carbon atoms, the difference between the corresponding current-voltage ( I-V) characteristics of these molecular junctions declines to lesser than 16% when the voltage goes up. In each group, the molecular junctions give a large transmission around the Fermi level since the Ru-C π bonds can extend the π conjugation of the carbon chains into the Ru electrodes, and their I-V characteristics are almost linear and independent of the chain length, illustrating potential applications as conducting molecular wires in future molecular electronic devices and circuits.

  4. Conductance of a single flexible molecular wire composed of alternating donor and acceptor units

    PubMed Central

    Nacci, Christophe; Ample, Francisco; Bleger, David; Hecht, Stefan; Joachim, Christian; Grill, Leonhard

    2015-01-01

    Molecular-scale electronics is mainly concerned by understanding charge transport through individual molecules. A key issue here is the charge transport capability through a single—typically linear—molecule, characterized by the current decay with increasing length. To improve the conductance of individual polymers, molecular design often either involves the use of rigid ribbon/ladder-type structures, thereby sacrificing for flexibility of the molecular wire, or a zero band gap, typically associated with chemical instability. Here we show that a conjugated polymer composed of alternating donor and acceptor repeat units, synthesized directly by an on-surface polymerization, exhibits a very high conductance while maintaining both its flexible structure and a finite band gap. Importantly, electronic delocalization along the wire does not seem to be necessary as proven by spatial mapping of the electronic states along individual molecular wires. Our approach should facilitate the realization of flexible ‘soft' molecular-scale circuitry, for example, on bendable substrates. PMID:26145188

  5. Microbiological and molecular epidemiological analyses of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at a tertiary care hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inomata, Shinya; Yano, Hisakazu; Tokuda, Koichi; Kanamori, Hajime; Endo, Shiro; Ishizawa, Chiyuki; Ogawa, Miho; Ichimura, Sadahiro; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kakuta, Risako; Ozawa, Daiki; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Gu, Yoshiaki; Hatta, Masumitsu; Oshima, Kengo; Nakashima, Kazutoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    Molecular characterization of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is generally conducted referred to staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV or V. CA-MRSA is now a cause of concern since such strains have been isolated not only from individuals in a community but also from patients in healthcare settings. The aim of this study was to analyze microbiological and molecular epidemiological features of CA-MRSA strains at a Japanese tertiary care hospital using PCR based-open reading frame typing (POT). This technique allows for molecular classification into CA-MRSA (POT-CA) and hospital-associated (HA-) MRSA (POT-HA) with clonal discrimination. Clinical MRSA isolates obtained from consecutive patients between October 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013 at the hospital were analyzed in combination with the clinical definition for CA-MRSA by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and POT. Of 219 isolates (76 clonal groups), 64 (29.3%) were clinical-HA/POT-CA isolates (22 clonal groups). Some clones of them accumulated in this hospital and might be involved in nosocomial transmission. Virulent factors of the isolates were analyzed, and only one (1.6%) Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene positive isolate but no arginine catabolic mobile element genes positive isolate were found in clinical-HA/POT-CA. Additionally, clinical-HA/POT-CA isolates showed higher antimicrobial susceptibility than clinical-HA/POT-HA, especially to minocycline, doxycycline, and amikacin. The most frequent genotype of molecular CA-MRSA was multi-locus sequence type 5-SCCmecIV, previously not detected in Japan. Although CA-MRSA at this hospital showed low virulence and higher antimicrobial susceptibility, the risk of nosocomial infection from them should be recognized, requiring stricter infection control measures.

  6. Negative differential conductance and hysteretic current switching of benzene molecular junction in a transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Huan; Ding, Guo-Hui; Dong, Bing

    2014-11-01

    We study charge transport through single benzene molecular junction (BMJ) directly sandwiched between two platinum electrodes by using a tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Pronounced negative differential conductance is observed at finite bias voltage, resulting from charge redistribution in BMJ and a Coulomb blockade effect at the interface of molecule-electrode contacts. In the presence of a transverse electric field, hysteretic switching behavior and large spin-polarization of current are obtained, indicating the potential application of BMJ for acting as a nanoscale current modulator or spintronic molecular device.

  7. A large-scale genomic approach affords unprecedented resolution for the molecular epidemiology and evolutionary history of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Virginie; Verdier, Axel; Thiaucourt, François; Manso-Silván, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp), is a devastating disease of domestic goats and of some wild ungulate species. The disease is currently spreading in Africa and Asia and poses a serious threat to disease-free areas. A comprehensive view of the evolutionary history and dynamics of Mccp is essential to understand the epidemiology of CCPP. Yet, analysing the diversity of genetically monomorphic pathogens, such as Mccp, is complicated due to their low variability. In this study, the molecular epidemiology and evolution of CCPP was investigated using a large-scale genomic approach based on next-generation sequencing technologies, applied to a sample of strains representing the global distribution of this disease. A highly discriminatory multigene typing system was developed, allowing the differentiation of 24 haplotypes among 25 Mccp strains distributed in six genotyping groups, which showed some correlation with geographic origin. A Bayesian approach was used to infer the first robust phylogeny of the species and to date the principal events of its evolutionary history. The emergence of Mccp was estimated only at about 270 years ago, which explains the low genetic diversity of this species despite its high mutation rate, evaluated at 1.3 × 10(-6) substitutions per site per year. Finally, plausible scenarios were proposed to elucidate the evolution and dynamics of CCPP in Asia and Africa, though limited by the paucity of Mccp strains, particularly in Asia. This study shows how combining large-scale genomic data with spatial and temporal data makes it possible to obtain a comprehensive view of the epidemiology of CCPP, a precondition for the development of improved disease surveillance and control measures. PMID:26149260

  8. Molecular epidemiology of echoviruses 11 and 30 in Russia: different properties of genotypes within an enterovirus serotype.

    PubMed

    Yarmolskaya, Maria S; Shumilina, Elena Yu; Ivanova, Olga E; Drexler, Jan Felix; Lukashev, Alexander N

    2015-03-01

    Over 100 known enterovirus serotypes differ in their epidemiological and pathogenic properties. Much less is known about variation of these features on a sub-serotype level, such as genotypes. Echovirus 11 (E11) and E30 are amongst the most frequent causative agents of aseptic meningitis. We studied the molecular epidemiology of these pathogens to evaluate potential epidemiological and pathogenic dissimilarities of their genotypes. The complete VP1 genome region was sequenced for 97 E11 and 62 E30 isolates collected in Russia from 2008 to 2012, and they were studied in comparison with all 140 E11 and 432 E30 sequences available in GenBank. A geographic pattern of genotype prevalence was observed for both types. Russian E11 isolates belonged mainly to A genotype, which is common in Asia, and D5, which is predominant in Europe. For E30, genotype III by classification of Ke et al. (2011), also termed genotype a by Bailly et al. (2009), was endemic in Russia from 2003 to 2012, while it was not detected in Europe and North America during this time. The E30 genotypes VI-B, VI-G, and VI-H (e, f and h) were regularly introduced from different countries, became predominant and vanished after no more than 4years. In addition to geographic patterns, E11 genotypes also differed by isolation source. Genotype A2 viruses were significantly more often found in sewage, compared to genotype D5 that was isolated from both sewage and human samples. In addition, there was evidence of a different capacity for international transfers among E11 GtA subclusters.

  9. epiPATH: an information system for the storage and management of molecular epidemiology data from infectious pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Amadoz, Alicia; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Background Most research scientists working in the fields of molecular epidemiology, population and evolutionary genetics are confronted with the management of large volumes of data. Moreover, the data used in studies of infectious diseases are complex and usually derive from different institutions such as hospitals or laboratories. Since no public database scheme incorporating clinical and epidemiological information about patients and molecular information about pathogens is currently available, we have developed an information system, composed by a main database and a web-based interface, which integrates both types of data and satisfies requirements of good organization, simple accessibility, data security and multi-user support. Results From the moment a patient arrives to a hospital or health centre until the processing and analysis of molecular sequences obtained from infectious pathogens in the laboratory, lots of information is collected from different sources. We have divided the most relevant data into 12 conceptual modules around which we have organized the database schema. Our schema is very complete and it covers many aspects of sample sources, samples, laboratory processes, molecular sequences, phylogenetics results, clinical tests and results, clinical information, treatments, pathogens, transmissions, outbreaks and bibliographic information. Communication between end-users and the selected Relational Database Management System (RDMS) is carried out by default through a command-line window or through a user-friendly, web-based interface which provides access and management tools for the data. Conclusion epiPATH is an information system for managing clinical and molecular information from infectious diseases. It facilitates daily work related to infectious pathogens and sequences obtained from them. This software is intended for local installation in order to safeguard private data and provides advanced SQL-users the flexibility to adapt it to their

  10. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Deodutta; Morgan, Marisa; Yoo, Changwon; Deoraj, Alok; Roy, Sandhya; Yadav, Vijay Kumar; Garoub, Mohannad; Assaggaf, Hamza; Doke, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenols (BPs), and phthalates. Meta-analysis showed that PCBs exposure, not Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, increased the summary odds ratio for breast cancer and endometriosis. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EDC interactions and disease associations identified several hundred genes that were altered by exposure to PCBs, phthalate or BPA. EDCs-modified genes in breast neoplasms and endometriosis are part of steroid hormone signaling and inflammation pathways. All three EDCs–PCB 153, phthalates, and BPA influenced five common genes—CYP19A1, EGFR, ESR2, FOS, and IGF1—in breast cancer as well as in endometriosis. These genes are environmentally and estrogen responsive, altered in human breast and uterine tumors and endometriosis lesions, and part of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in cancer. Our findings suggest that breast cancer and endometriosis share some common environmental and molecular risk factors. PMID:26512648

  11. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Deodutta; Morgan, Marisa; Yoo, Changwon; Deoraj, Alok; Roy, Sandhya; Yadav, Vijay Kumar; Garoub, Mohannad; Assaggaf, Hamza; Doke, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenols (BPs), and phthalates. Meta-analysis showed that PCBs exposure, not Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, increased the summary odds ratio for breast cancer and endometriosis. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EDC interactions and disease associations identified several hundred genes that were altered by exposure to PCBs, phthalate or BPA. EDCs-modified genes in breast neoplasms and endometriosis are part of steroid hormone signaling and inflammation pathways. All three EDCs-PCB 153, phthalates, and BPA influenced five common genes-CYP19A1, EGFR, ESR2, FOS, and IGF1-in breast cancer as well as in endometriosis. These genes are environmentally and estrogen responsive, altered in human breast and uterine tumors and endometriosis lesions, and part of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in cancer. Our findings suggest that breast cancer and endometriosis share some common environmental and molecular risk factors. PMID:26512648

  12. Molecular epidemiology of norovirus in asymptomatic food handlers in Busan, Korea, and emergence of genotype GII.17.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hee Soo; Lee, Mi Ok; Ku, Pyeong Tae; Hwang, Su Jeong; Park, Dong Ju; Baik, Hyung Suk

    2016-10-01

    The molecular epidemiology of norovirus infections was studied in food handlers without any symptoms from January to December 2015 in Busan city, Korea. A total of 2,174 fecal specimens from asymptomatic food handlers were analyzed, and 2.3% (49/2,174) were norovirus-positive. Fourteen of 335 samples (4.2%) were positive in January; fifteen of 299 samples (5.0%) in February, and seven of 189 samples (3.7%) in December. However, norovirus was rarely detected in other months. From sequencing analysis, 11 genotypes (five GI and six GII genotypes) were detected. Among the 42 capid gene sequences identified, 14 were from the GI genogroup, while 28 were from the GII genogroup. The most commonly detected genotype was GII.17, comprising 15 (35.7%) of positive samples. From January 2012 to December 2015, 5,138 samples were collected from gastroenteritis patients and outbreaks in Busan. The most detected genotype in 2012, 2013, and 2014 was GII.4 (121, 24, and 12 cases, respectively), but in 2015, GII.17 (25 cases) was the most common. The GII.4 genotype was the major cause of acute gastroenteritis from 2012 to 2014, but the GII.17 genotype became the most prevalent cause in 2015. Continued epidemiological surveillance of GII.17 is needed, together with assessment of the risk of norovirus infection. PMID:27687231

  13. Integrated Bioinformatics, Environmental Epidemiologic and Genomic Approaches to Identify Environmental and Molecular Links between Endometriosis and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Deodutta; Morgan, Marisa; Yoo, Changwon; Deoraj, Alok; Roy, Sandhya; Yadav, Vijay Kumar; Garoub, Mohannad; Assaggaf, Hamza; Doke, Mayur

    2015-10-23

    We present a combined environmental epidemiologic, genomic, and bioinformatics approach to identify: exposure of environmental chemicals with estrogenic activity; epidemiologic association between endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) and health effects, such as, breast cancer or endometriosis; and gene-EDC interactions and disease associations. Human exposure measurement and modeling confirmed estrogenic activity of three selected class of environmental chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenols (BPs), and phthalates. Meta-analysis showed that PCBs exposure, not Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, increased the summary odds ratio for breast cancer and endometriosis. Bioinformatics analysis of gene-EDC interactions and disease associations identified several hundred genes that were altered by exposure to PCBs, phthalate or BPA. EDCs-modified genes in breast neoplasms and endometriosis are part of steroid hormone signaling and inflammation pathways. All three EDCs-PCB 153, phthalates, and BPA influenced five common genes-CYP19A1, EGFR, ESR2, FOS, and IGF1-in breast cancer as well as in endometriosis. These genes are environmentally and estrogen responsive, altered in human breast and uterine tumors and endometriosis lesions, and part of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in cancer. Our findings suggest that breast cancer and endometriosis share some common environmental and molecular risk factors.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of rabies from Maranhão and surrounding states in the northeastern region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sato, G; Kobayashi, Y; Shoji, Y; Sato, T; Itou, T; Ito, F H; Santos, H P; Brito, C J C; Sakai, T

    2006-11-01

    Although many outbreaks of rabies have been reported in northern Brazil, few epidemiological studies of these outbreaks have been undertaken. In this study, molecular epidemiological analyses were performed using 41 rabies virus samples isolated in the Maranhão (MA), Pará (PA), and Tocantins (TO) states of northeastern Brazil. A 599-bp region of the glycoprotein (G) gene was first amplified from each sample by RT-PCR, then sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. A phylogenetic tree divided the 41 isolates into two clades: Clade I was associated with terrestrial carnivores and Clade II was associated with vampire bats. The Clade I isolates were further sub-divided into two groups. The first group was closer to carnivore isolates that predominate in central Brazil, whereas the second group more closely resembled wild fox isolates from the northeastern coastal state of Paraíba (PB). MA isolates of Clade II formed an entirely separate group. These results demonstrate that bat- and dog-transmitted rabies occur in northwestern Brazil. PMID:16773238

  15. Molecular typing and epidemiology of enteroviruses in Cyprus, 2003-2007.

    PubMed

    Tryfonos, Christina; Richter, Jan; Koptides, Dana; Yiangou, Minas; Christodoulou, Christina G

    2011-10-01

    Human enteroviruses (HEVs) are responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical diseases. Even though usually associated with non-specific febrile illness, they are the most common cause of viral meningitis and pose a serious public-health problem, especially during outbreaks. Rapid detection and identification of HEV serotypes in clinical specimens are important in appropriate patient management and epidemiological investigation. A 5 year study (2003-2007) of clinical specimens from patients with viral meningitis and/or symptoms of enteroviral infection was carried out in Cyprus to determine the underlying enteroviral aetiology. Reverse transcription, followed by a sequential PCR strategy targeting the 5' non-coding region and VP1 region, was used for typing the isolated enteroviruses. The serotype of each isolate was determined by blast search of the VP1 amplicon sequence against GenBank. Clinical specimens from a total of 146 patients were diagnosed as enterovirus-positive. Twenty-two different serotypes were identified. The main strains identified were echovirus 18 and echovirus 30, followed by coxsackievirus B5, echovirus 9, echovirus 6, coxsackievirus A10 and coxsackievirus B2. However, rapid changes in serotype frequency and diversity were observed over time. Serotype distribution corresponded essentially with observations reported from other European countries in the same period. The present report demonstrates the epidemiology of enteroviruses in Cyprus from 2003 to 2007.

  16. Investigation of mechanism and molecular epidemiology of linezolid-resistant Enterococcus faecalis in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipeng; He, Yunyan; Xia, Yun; Wang, Huijuan; Liang, Shumei

    2014-08-01

    Enterococcus is a major cause of important nosocomial infections. Linezolid, the first member of an entirely new class of antibiotics (oxazolidinones), is effective against serious infections caused by Enterococcus. However, resistance to linezolid has been discovered throughout the world rapidly. From 2011 to 2013, nine linezolid-resistant E. faecalis isolates were collected and the possible mechanisms of linezolid resistance, including mutations in domain V of 23S rRNA genes and in ribosomal proteins L3 and L4, and the multiresistance gene cfr, were investigated. Furthermore, an epidemiological survey of the nine linezolid-resistant E. faecalis isolates was performed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and DiversiLab. The three methods were compared to evaluate their merits and demerits, respectively. We failed to find the resistance mechanisms that have been revealed in recent years by PCR and sequencing analysis in the linezolid-resistant E. faecalis. Epidemiological investigation suggested that a small-scale outbreak of linezolid-resistant E. faecalis emerged in neurosurgery ICU from March to May of 2013. DiversiLab was a reliable typing tool and a suitable alternative to PFGE because it was as discriminatory as PFGE and better than MLST.

  17. Molecular epidemiological investigation of Newcastle disease virus from domestic ducks in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Kwon, Jun-Hun; Yang, Chang-Bum; Choi, Kang-Seuk

    2009-03-01

    To expand the epidemiological understanding of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) found in domestic ducks in Korea, 14 NDV isolates from apparently healthy domestic ducks were biologically and genetically characterized. Thirteen and 1 isolates of NDV were categorized into lentogenic and velogenic viruses, respectively, based on in vivo pathogenicity tests. Twelve lentogenic viruses showed HA activity to horse RBCs, while 1 lentogenic virus and the velogenic virus were negative. Lentogenic viruses (n=13) had sequence motifs of (112)ERQERL(117) (n=1) or (112)GRQGRL(117) (n=12) at the F0 cleavage site, while the velogenic virus (n=1) had a sequence motif of (112)RRQKRF(117) at the same site. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that at least three distinct genotypes may exist in domestic ducks in Korea; one class I genotype (genotype 2), and two class II (genotypes I and VII) genotypes. The class I virus was most closely related to strains of genotype 2 which were isolated in birds from the USA, Germany and Denmark. Twelve lentogenic class II viruses were grouped together in genotype I, and were then divided into at least three clusters, namely Aomori-like, Ulster2C-like, and V4-like. The velogenic class II virus was assigned to genotype VII which represents viruses responsible for recent epidemics in many Asian countries including Korea. The epidemiological importance of domestic duck isolates of NDV in Korea is discussed.

  18. Molecular typing and epidemiology of enteroviruses in Cyprus, 2003-2007.

    PubMed

    Tryfonos, Christina; Richter, Jan; Koptides, Dana; Yiangou, Minas; Christodoulou, Christina G

    2011-10-01

    Human enteroviruses (HEVs) are responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical diseases. Even though usually associated with non-specific febrile illness, they are the most common cause of viral meningitis and pose a serious public-health problem, especially during outbreaks. Rapid detection and identification of HEV serotypes in clinical specimens are important in appropriate patient management and epidemiological investigation. A 5 year study (2003-2007) of clinical specimens from patients with viral meningitis and/or symptoms of enteroviral infection was carried out in Cyprus to determine the underlying enteroviral aetiology. Reverse transcription, followed by a sequential PCR strategy targeting the 5' non-coding region and VP1 region, was used for typing the isolated enteroviruses. The serotype of each isolate was determined by blast search of the VP1 amplicon sequence against GenBank. Clinical specimens from a total of 146 patients were diagnosed as enterovirus-positive. Twenty-two different serotypes were identified. The main strains identified were echovirus 18 and echovirus 30, followed by coxsackievirus B5, echovirus 9, echovirus 6, coxsackievirus A10 and coxsackievirus B2. However, rapid changes in serotype frequency and diversity were observed over time. Serotype distribution corresponded essentially with observations reported from other European countries in the same period. The present report demonstrates the epidemiology of enteroviruses in Cyprus from 2003 to 2007. PMID:21596905

  19. Molecular dynamics predictions of the influence of graphite stacking arrangement on the thermal conductivity tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem, Masoud H.; Wemhoff, Aaron P.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of stacking configuration on the phonon-based thermal conductivity of graphite is investigated using equilibrium molecular dynamics. Hexagonal (AAA), Bernal (ABA), and Rhombohedral (ABC) stacking forms are considered in a 5 × 5 nm domain. The intralayer thermal conductivity values are predicted to be 450-800 W/m K for both zigzag and armchair directions for different configurations, which are in agreement with previous results for graphite and few-layer graphene. The interlayer thermal conductivity values are calculated in the range of 9-55 W/m K. The intralayer thermal conductivity in the armchair direction appears to increase with increasing vertical alignment of carbon atoms in adjacent layers.

  20. Impact of molecular orientation on thermal conduction in linear-chain polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Kurabayashi, K.; Goodson, K.E.

    1999-07-01

    Polymer films are serving as passive regions in fast logic circuits and as active regions in organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes. Recent data illustrated the strong anisotropy in the thermal conductivity of polyimide films of thickness near one micrometer, with the in-plane value larger by a factor of approximately five. This manuscript extends previous theoretical work on heat conduction in stretched bulk polymers to model the conductivity anisotropy in linear-chain polymer films. Predictions are based on the standard deviation of the angle of molecular orientation with respect to the film in-plane direction, which can be investigated using birefringence data, and the expected conductivity anisotropy in a material with perfectly-aligned strands. The modeling and previous data indicate that the anisotropy factor could increase to a value larger than 10 for polyimide films much thinner than 1 micrometer.

  1. Thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hyżorek, Krzysztof; Tretiakov, Konstantin V

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity of liquid argon in nanochannels has been calculated over a wide range of densities using two independent methods-the Green-Kubo approach in equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and the Müller-Plathe method in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The Lennard-Jones potential was used to model interatomic interactions. The influence of transversal size and shape of a nanochannel on the thermal conductivity of liquid argon along the length of the channel has been investigated. The transversal size of nanochannel varied from 2.25 nm to 15 nm. The simulations revealed that the thermal conductivity weakly depends on the shape (square vs circular) of channel and scales with a cross-sectional area of nanochannel. It has been observed that thermal conductivity increases with an increase of the transversal size of the channel. Also, it reaches bulk values for some characteristic size of channel that depends strongly on density. Good agreement of the computed thermal conductivities of liquid argon over a wide density range with the experimental data allowed the value of the characteristic size of channel as a function of density to be estimated. This value depends on density and varies from 5 nm to 11 nm.

  2. Thermal conductivity of armchair black phosphorus nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Feng; Liao, Xiangbiao; Xiao, Hang; Chen, Xi

    2016-04-01

    The effects of size, strain, and vacancies on the thermal properties of armchair black phosphorus nanotubes are investigated based on qualitative analysis from molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that thermal conductivity has a remarkable size effect, because of the restricted paths for phonon transport, which is strongly dependent on the diameter and length of the nanotube. Owing to the intensified low-frequency phonons, axial tensile strain can facilitate thermal transport. In contrast, compressive strain weakens thermal transport due to the enhanced phonon scattering around the buckling of the nanotube. In addition, the thermal conductivity is dramatically reduced by single vacancies, particularly those with high defect concentrations.

  3. Intragenomic Variation in the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 Region of Dientamoeba fragilis as a Molecular Epidemiological Marker▿

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Aldert; van der Heijden, Harold M.; Greve, Sophie; Speijer, Dave; Landman, Wil J.; van Gool, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that has been recognized to be a causative agent of gastrointestinal symptoms. Because in most studies only some infected persons experience symptoms, it is possible that D. fragilis is a heterogeneous species with variants that display similar morphologies but different pathogenicities. The search for genetic variation in D. fragilis was based on the small-subunit rRNA gene, which was not found to be useful for molecular epidemiology. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of additional rRNA gene cluster sequences, the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1)-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region. For comparative purposes, we also isolated the ITS-1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS-2 region of Histomonas meleagridis, a protozoan parasite of birds and a close relative of D. fragilis. This region was found to be highly variable, and 11 different alleles of the ITS-1 sequence could be identified. Variation in the ITS-1 region was found to be intragenomic, with up to four different alleles in a single isolate. So-called C profiles were produced from the ITS-1 repertoire of single isolates,. Analysis of the C profiles of isolates from nonrelated patients identified several clearly distinguishable strains of D. fragilis. Within families, it was shown that members can be infected with the same or different strains of D. fragilis. In conclusion, the ITS-1 region can serve as a molecular epidemiological tool for the subtyping of D. fragilis directly from feces. This may serve as a means of studying the transmission, geographical distribution, and relationships between strains and the pathogenicity of this parasite. PMID:18650356

  4. Molecular dynamics calculation of the thermal conductivity coefficient of single-layer and multilayer graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selezenev, A. A.; Aleinikov, A. Yu.; Ganchuk, N. S.; Ganchuk, S. N.; Jones, R. E.; Zimmerman, J. A.

    2013-04-01

    The thermal conductivity coefficients of single-layer and multilayer graphene sheets have been calculated using the molecular dynamics simulation. Calculations have been performed for graphene sheets with lengths in the range 20-130 nm and at average temperatures in the range 230-630 K. The results obtained have been compared with the experimental data and results of calculations carried out in other works.

  5. Can molecular projected density of states (PDOS) be systematically used in electronic conductance analysis?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Using benzenediamine and benzenedithiol molecular junctions as benchmarks, we investigate the widespread analysis of the quantum transport conductance in terms of the projected density of states (PDOS) onto molecular orbitals (MOs). We first consider two different methods for identifying the relevant MOs: (1) diagonalization of the Hamiltonian of the isolated molecule and (2) diagonalization of a submatrix of the junction Hamiltonian constructed by considering only basis elements localized on the molecule. We find that these two methods can lead to substantially different MOs and hence PDOS. Furthermore, within Method 1, the PDOS can differ depending on the isolated molecule chosen to represent the molecular junction (e.g., with or without dangling bonds); within Method 2, the PDOS depends on the chosen basis set. We show that these differences can be critical when the PDOS is used to provide a physical interpretation of the conductance (especially when its value is small, as it happens typically at zero bias). In this work, we propose a new approach in an attempt to reconcile the two traditional methods. Although some improvements were achieved, the main problems remain unsolved. Our results raise more general questions and doubts on a PDOS-based analysis of the conductance. PMID:26171300

  6. Molecular epidemiological analysis of dengue fever in Bolivia from 1998 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Roca, Yelin; Baronti, Cécile; Revollo, Roberto Jimmy; Cook, Shelley; Loayza, Roxana; Ninove, Laetitia; Fernandez, Roberto Torrez; Flores, Jorge Vargas; Herve, Jean-Pierre; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2009-06-01

    Dengue fever was first recognized in Bolivia in 1931. However, very limited information was available to date regarding the genetic characterization and epidemiology of Bolivian dengue virus strains. Here, we performed genetic characterization of the full-length envelope gene of 64 Bolivian isolates from 1998 to 2008 and investigated their origin and evolution to determine whether strains circulated simultaneously or alternatively, and whether or not multiple introductions of distinct viral variants had occurred during the period studied. We determined that, during the last decade, closely related viruses circulated during several consecutive years (5, 6, and 6 years for DENV-1, DENV-2, and DENV-3, respectively) and the co-circulation of two or even three serotypes was observed. Emergence of new variants (distinct from those identified during the previous episodes) was identified in the case of DENV-1 (2007 outbreak) and DENV-2 (2001 outbreak). In all cases, it is likely that the viruses originated from neighboring countries.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of Salmonella enteritidis phage type 1b and 6a isolates in Portugal.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, A. R.; Machado, J.

    2003-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is an important serovar comprising 76 % of Salmonella isolates in Portugal in 2001. For better understand the epidemiology of salmonellosis, a total of 47 isolates of S. Enteritidis phage type (PT) 1b and 6a were analysed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and genomic DNA was subjected to macro restriction with XbaI. For PT 1b isolates, only three different patterns were observed, and PT6a showed a total of 10 digestion patterns. Curiously, the main pattern among PT1b isolates seams quite similar to main pattern of PT6a isolates, but when the two patterns were analysed with Bionumerics, we observed that they exhibited some differences. It was concluded that, in 2001, there was one predominant pattern for PT1b and PT6a and, possibly, we were in presence of clonal strains that exists all over the country. PMID:12948358

  8. Molecular Epidemiological Analysis of Dengue Fever in Bolivia from 1998 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Yelin; Baronti, Cécile; Revollo, Roberto Jimmy; Cook, Shelley; Loayza, Roxana; Ninove, Laetitia; Fernandez, Roberto Torrez; Flores, Jorge Vargas; Herve, Jean-Pierre; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever was first recognized in Bolivia in 1931. However, very limited information was available to date regarding the genetic characterization and epidemiology of Bolivian dengue virus strains. Here, we performed genetic characterization of the full-length envelope gene of 64 Bolivian isolates from 1998 to 2008 and investigated their origin and evolution to determine whether strains circulated simultaneously or alternatively, and whether or not multiple introductions of distinct viral variants had occurred during the period studied. We determined that, during the last decade, closely related viruses circulated during several consecutive years (5, 6, and 6 years for DENV-1, DENV-2, and DENV-3, respectively) and the co-circulation of two or even three serotypes was observed. Emergence of new variants (distinct from those identified during the previous episodes) was identified in the case of DENV-1 (2007 outbreak) and DENV-2 (2001 outbreak). In all cases, it is likely that the viruses originated from neighboring countries. PMID:19505253

  9. The Molecular and Spatial Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever in Rural Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Pham Thanh, Duy; Thompson, Corinne N; Rabaa, Maia A; Sona, Soeng; Sopheary, Sun; Kumar, Varun; Moore, Catrin; Tran Vu Thieu, Nga; Wijedoru, Lalith; Holt, Kathryn E; Wong, Vanessa; Pickard, Derek; Thwaites, Guy E; Day, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Turner, Paul; Parry, Christopher M; Baker, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, is an endemic cause of febrile disease in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to better understand the epidemiology of pediatric typhoid fever in Cambodia. We accessed routine blood culture data from Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap province between 2007 and 2014, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on the isolated bacteria to characterize the S. Typhi population. The resulting phylogenetic information was combined with conventional epidemiological approaches to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of S. Typhi and population-level risk factors for reported disease. During the study period, there were 262 cases of typhoid within a 100 km radius of AHC, with a median patient age of 8.2 years (IQR: 5.1-11.5 years). The majority of infections occurred during the rainy season, and commune incidences as high as 11.36/1,000 in children aged <15 years were observed over the study period. A population-based risk factor analysis found that access to water within households and increasing distance from Tonle Sap Lake were protective. Spatial mapping and WGS provided additional resolution for these findings, and confirmed that proximity to the lake was associated with discrete spatiotemporal disease clusters. We confirmed the dominance of MDR H58 S. Typhi in this population, and found substantial evidence of diversification (at least seven sublineages) within this single lineage. We conclude that there is a substantial burden of pediatric typhoid fever in rural communes in Cambodia. Our data provide a platform for additional population-based typhoid fever studies in this location, and suggest that this would be a suitable setting in which to introduce a school-based vaccination programme with Vi conjugate vaccines.

  10. Genomics, evolution, and molecular epidemiology of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC).

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Meile, Leo; Lacroix, Christophe; Stevens, Marc J A

    2015-07-01

    The Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) is a group of human and animal derived streptococci that are commensals (rumen and gastrointestinal tract), opportunistic pathogens or food fermentation associates. The classification of SBSEC has undergone massive changes and currently comprises 7 (sub)species grouped into four branches based on sequences identities: the Streptococcus gallolyticus, the Streptococcus equinus, the Streptococcus infantarius and the Streptococcus alactolyticus branch. In animals, SBSEC are causative agents for ruminal acidosis, potentially laminitis and infective endocarditis (IE). In humans, a strong association was established between bacteraemia, IE and colorectal cancer. Especially the SBSEC-species S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus is an emerging pathogen for IE and prosthetic joint infections. S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and the S. infantarius branch are further associated with biliary and urinary tract infections. Knowledge on pathogenic mechanisms is so far limited to colonization factors such as pili and biofilm formation. Certain strain variants of S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus and S. infantarius subsp. infantarius are associated with traditional dairy and plant-based food fermentations and display traits suggesting safety. However, due to their close relationship to virulent strains, their use in food fermentation has to be critically assessed. Additionally, implementing accurate and up-to-date taxonomy is critical to enable appropriate treatment of patients and risk assessment of species and strains via recently developed multilocus sequence typing schemes to enable comparative global epidemiology. Comparative genomics revealed that SBSEC strains harbour genomics islands (GI) that seem acquired from other streptococci by horizontal gene transfer. In case of virulent strains these GI frequently encode putative virulence factors, in strains from food fermentation the GI encode functions that are

  11. The Molecular and Spatial Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever in Rural Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Rabaa, Maia A; Sona, Soeng; Sopheary, Sun; Kumar, Varun; Moore, Catrin; Tran Vu Thieu, Nga; Wijedoru, Lalith; Holt, Kathryn E.; Wong, Vanessa; Pickard, Derek; Thwaites, Guy E.; Day, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Turner, Paul; Parry, Christopher M.; Baker, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, is an endemic cause of febrile disease in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to better understand the epidemiology of pediatric typhoid fever in Cambodia. We accessed routine blood culture data from Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap province between 2007 and 2014, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on the isolated bacteria to characterize the S. Typhi population. The resulting phylogenetic information was combined with conventional epidemiological approaches to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of S. Typhi and population-level risk factors for reported disease. During the study period, there were 262 cases of typhoid within a 100 km radius of AHC, with a median patient age of 8.2 years (IQR: 5.1–11.5 years). The majority of infections occurred during the rainy season, and commune incidences as high as 11.36/1,000 in children aged <15 years were observed over the study period. A population-based risk factor analysis found that access to water within households and increasing distance from Tonle Sap Lake were protective. Spatial mapping and WGS provided additional resolution for these findings, and confirmed that proximity to the lake was associated with discrete spatiotemporal disease clusters. We confirmed the dominance of MDR H58 S. Typhi in this population, and found substantial evidence of diversification (at least seven sublineages) within this single lineage. We conclude that there is a substantial burden of pediatric typhoid fever in rural communes in Cambodia. Our data provide a platform for additional population-based typhoid fever studies in this location, and suggest that this would be a suitable setting in which to introduce a school-based vaccination programme with Vi conjugate vaccines. PMID:27331909

  12. Genomics, evolution, and molecular epidemiology of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC).

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Meile, Leo; Lacroix, Christophe; Stevens, Marc J A

    2015-07-01

    The Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) is a group of human and animal derived streptococci that are commensals (rumen and gastrointestinal tract), opportunistic pathogens or food fermentation associates. The classification of SBSEC has undergone massive changes and currently comprises 7 (sub)species grouped into four branches based on sequences identities: the Streptococcus gallolyticus, the Streptococcus equinus, the Streptococcus infantarius and the Streptococcus alactolyticus branch. In animals, SBSEC are causative agents for ruminal acidosis, potentially laminitis and infective endocarditis (IE). In humans, a strong association was established between bacteraemia, IE and colorectal cancer. Especially the SBSEC-species S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus is an emerging pathogen for IE and prosthetic joint infections. S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus and the S. infantarius branch are further associated with biliary and urinary tract infections. Knowledge on pathogenic mechanisms is so far limited to colonization factors such as pili and biofilm formation. Certain strain variants of S. gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus and S. infantarius subsp. infantarius are associated with traditional dairy and plant-based food fermentations and display traits suggesting safety. However, due to their close relationship to virulent strains, their use in food fermentation has to be critically assessed. Additionally, implementing accurate and up-to-date taxonomy is critical to enable appropriate treatment of patients and risk assessment of species and strains via recently developed multilocus sequence typing schemes to enable comparative global epidemiology. Comparative genomics revealed that SBSEC strains harbour genomics islands (GI) that seem acquired from other streptococci by horizontal gene transfer. In case of virulent strains these GI frequently encode putative virulence factors, in strains from food fermentation the GI encode functions that are

  13. Molecular epidemiology, evolution and phylogeny of Chikungunya virus: An updating review.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Angeletti, Silvia; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, causing a febrile illness associated with severe arthralgia and rash. In this review, we summarized a series of articles published from 2013 to 2016 concerning CHIKV epidemiology, phylogeny, vaccine and therapies, to give an update of our most recent article written in 2014 (Lo Presti et al.,2014). CHIKV infection was first reported in 1952 from Makonde plateaus and since this time caused many outbreaks worldwide, involving the Indian Ocean region, African countries, American continent and Italy. CHIKV infection is still underestimated and it is normally associated with clinical symptoms overlapping with dengue virus, recurring epidemics and mutations within the viral genome. These characteristics promote the geographical spread and the inability to control vector-mediated transmission of the virus. For these reasons, the majority of studies were aimed to describe outbreaks and to enhance knowledge on CHIKV biology, pathogenesis, infection treatment, and prevention. In this review, 16 studies on CHIKV phylogenetic and phylodinamics were considered, during the years 2013-2016. Phylogenetic and phylodinamic analysis are useful tools to investigate how the genealogy of a pathogen population is influenced by pathogen's demographic history, host immunological milieu and environmental/ecological factors. Phylogenetic tools were revealed important to reconstruct the geographic spread of CHIKV during the epidemics wave and to have information on the circulating strains of the virus, that are important for the prediction and control of the epidemics, as well as for vaccines and antiviral drugs development. In conclusion, this updating review can give a critical appraisal of the epidemiology, therapeutic and phylogenesis of CHIKV, reinforcing the need to monitor the geographic spread of virus and vectors. PMID:27085290

  14. The Molecular and Spatial Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever in Rural Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Pham Thanh, Duy; Thompson, Corinne N; Rabaa, Maia A; Sona, Soeng; Sopheary, Sun; Kumar, Varun; Moore, Catrin; Tran Vu Thieu, Nga; Wijedoru, Lalith; Holt, Kathryn E; Wong, Vanessa; Pickard, Derek; Thwaites, Guy E; Day, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Turner, Paul; Parry, Christopher M; Baker, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, is an endemic cause of febrile disease in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to better understand the epidemiology of pediatric typhoid fever in Cambodia. We accessed routine blood culture data from Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap province between 2007 and 2014, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on the isolated bacteria to characterize the S. Typhi population. The resulting phylogenetic information was combined with conventional epidemiological approaches to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of S. Typhi and population-level risk factors for reported disease. During the study period, there were 262 cases of typhoid within a 100 km radius of AHC, with a median patient age of 8.2 years (IQR: 5.1-11.5 years). The majority of infections occurred during the rainy season, and commune incidences as high as 11.36/1,000 in children aged <15 years were observed over the study period. A population-based risk factor analysis found that access to water within households and increasing distance from Tonle Sap Lake were protective. Spatial mapping and WGS provided additional resolution for these findings, and confirmed that proximity to the lake was associated with discrete spatiotemporal disease clusters. We confirmed the dominance of MDR H58 S. Typhi in this population, and found substantial evidence of diversification (at least seven sublineages) within this single lineage. We conclude that there is a substantial burden of pediatric typhoid fever in rural communes in Cambodia. Our data provide a platform for additional population-based typhoid fever studies in this location, and suggest that this would be a suitable setting in which to introduce a school-based vaccination programme with Vi conjugate vaccines. PMID:27331909

  15. Molecular simulations and lattice dynamics determination of Stillinger-Weber GaN thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Jain, Ankit; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-09-28

    The bulk thermal conductivity of Stillinger-Weber (SW) wurtzite GaN in the [0001] direction at a temperature of 300 K is calculated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD), non-equilibrium MD (NEMD), and lattice dynamics (LD) methods. While the NEMD method predicts a thermal conductivity of 166 ± 11 W/m·K, both the EMD and LD methods predict thermal conductivities that are an order of magnitude greater. We attribute the discrepancy to significant contributions to thermal conductivity from long-mean free path phonons. We propose that the Grüneisen parameter for low-frequency phonons is a good predictor of the severity of the size effects in NEMD thermal conductivity prediction. For weakly anharmonic crystals characterized by small Grüneisen parameters, accurate determination of thermal conductivity by NEMD is computationally impractical. The simulation results also indicate the GaN SW potential, which was originally developed for studying the atomic-level structure of dislocations, is not suitable for prediction of its thermal conductivity.

  16. Epidemiology of Enterocytozoon bieneusi Infection in Humans.

    PubMed

    Matos, Olga; Lobo, Maria Luisa; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A review was conducted to examine published works that focus on the complex epidemiology of Enterocytozoon bieneusi infection in humans. Studies on the prevalence of these emerging microsporidian pathogens in humans, in developed and developing countries, the different clinical spectra of E. bieneusi intestinal infection in children, in different settings, and the risk factors associated with E. bieneusi infection have been reviewed. This paper also analyses the impact of the recent application of PCR-based molecular methods for species-specific identification and genotype differentiation has had in increasing the knowledge of the molecular epidemiology of E. bieneusi in humans. The advances in the epidemiology of E. bieneusi, in the last two decades, emphasize the importance of epidemiological control and prevention of E. bieneusi infections, from both the veterinary and human medical perspectives.

  17. Epidemiology of Enterocytozoon bieneusi Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Olga; Lobo, Maria Luisa; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    A review was conducted to examine published works that focus on the complex epidemiology of Enterocytozoon bieneusi infection in humans. Studies on the prevalence of these emerging microsporidian pathogens in humans, in developed and developing countries, the different clinical spectra of E. bieneusi intestinal infection in children, in different settings, and the risk factors associated with E. bieneusi infection have been reviewed. This paper also analyses the impact of the recent application of PCR-based molecular methods for species-specific identification and genotype differentiation has had in increasing the knowledge of the molecular epidemiology of E. bieneusi in humans. The advances in the epidemiology of E. bieneusi, in the last two decades, emphasize the importance of epidemiological control and prevention of E. bieneusi infections, from both the veterinary and human medical perspectives. PMID:23091702

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Avian Malaria in Wild Breeding Colonies of Humboldt and Magellanic Penguins in South America.

    PubMed

    Sallaberry-Pincheira, Nicole; Gonzalez-Acuña, Daniel; Herrera-Tello, Yertiza; Dantas, Gisele P M; Luna-Jorquera, Guillermo; Frere, Esteban; Valdés-Velasquez, Armando; Simeone, Alejandro; Vianna, Juliana A

    2015-06-01

    Avian malaria is a disease caused by species of the genera Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, and Plasmodium. It affects hundreds of bird species, causing varied clinical signs depending on the susceptibility of the host species. Although high mortality has been reported in captive penguins, limited epidemiological studies have been conducted in wild colonies, and isolated records of avian malaria have been reported mostly from individuals referred to rehabilitation centers. For this epidemiological study, we obtained blood samples from 501 adult Humboldt and 360 adult Magellanic penguins from 13 colonies throughout South America. To identify malaria parasitaemia, we amplified the mtDNA cytochrome b for all three parasite genera. Avian malaria was absent in most of the analyzed colonies, with exception of the Punta San Juan Humboldt penguin colony, in Peru, where we detected at least two new Haemoproteus lineages in three positive samples, resulting in a prevalence of 0.6% for the species. The low prevalence of avian malaria detected in wild penguins could be due to two possible causes: A low incidence, with high morbidity and mortality in wild penguins or alternatively, penguins sampled in the chronic stage of the disease (during which parasitaemia in peripheral blood samples is unlikely) would be detected as false negatives.

  19. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of material property effects on thermal boundary conductance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X W; Jones, R E; Duda, J C; Hopkins, P E

    2013-07-14

    Thermal boundary resistance (inverse of conductance) between different material layers can dominate the overall thermal resistance in nanostructures and therefore impact the performance of the thermal property limiting nano devices. Because relationships between material properties and thermal boundary conductance have not been fully understood, optimum devices cannot be developed through a rational selection of materials. Here we develop generic interatomic potentials to enable material properties to be continuously varied in extremely large molecular dynamics simulations to explore the dependence of thermal boundary conductance on the characteristic properties of materials such as atomic mass, stiffness, and interfacial crystallography. To ensure that our study is not biased to a particular model, we employ different types of interatomic potentials. In particular, both a Stillinger-Weber potential and a hybrid embedded-atom-method + Stillinger-Weber potential are used to study metal-on-semiconductor compound interfaces, and the results are analyzed considering previous work based upon a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. These studies, therefore, reliably provide new understanding of interfacial transport phenomena particularly in terms of effects of material properties on thermal boundary conductance. Our most important finding is that thermal boundary conductance increases with the overlap of the vibrational spectra between metal modes and the acoustic modes of the semiconductor compound, and increasing the metal stiffness causes a continuous shift of the metal modes. As a result, the maximum thermal boundary conductance occurs at an intermediate metal stiffness (best matched to the semiconductor stiffness) that maximizes the overlap of the vibrational modes.

  1. Molecular rectification and conductance switching in carbon-based molecular junctions by structural rearrangement accompanying electron injection.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Richard; Dieringer, Jon; Solak, Ali Osman; Snyder, Brian; Nowak, Aletha M; McGovern, William R; DuVall, Stacy

    2003-09-01

    Molecular junctions were fabricated consisting of a 3.7 nm thick layer of nitroazobenzene (NAB) molecules between a pyrolyzed photoresist substrate (PPF) and a titanium top contact which was protected from oxidation by a layer of gold. Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and AFM revealed that the NAB layer was 2-3 molecules thick and was bonded to the two conducting contacts by C-C and N-Ti covalent bonds. The current/voltage behavior of the PPF/NAB(3.7)/Ti junctions showed strong and reproducible rectification, with the current at +2 V exceeding that at -2 V by a factor of 600. The observed current density at +3 V was 0.71 A/cm(2), or about 10(5) e(-)/s/molecule. The i/V response was strongly dependent on temperature and scan rate, with the rectification ratio decreasing for lower temperature and faster scans. Junction conductivity increased with time over several seconds at room temperature in response to positive voltage pulses, with the rate of increase larger for more positive potentials. Voltage pulses to positive potentials and back to zero volts revealed that electrons are injected from the Ti to the NAB, to the extent of about 0.1-1 e(-)/molecule for a +3 V pulse. These electrons cause an activated transition of the NAB into a more conductive quinoid state, which in turn causes an increase in conductivity. The transition to the quinoid state involves nuclear rearrangement which occurs on a submillisecond to several second time scale, depending on the voltage applied. The quinoid state is stable as long as the applied electric field is present, but reverts back to NAB within several minutes after the field is relaxed. The results are interpreted in terms of a thermally activated, potential dependent electron transfer into the 3.7 nm NAB layer, which brings about a conductivity increase of several orders of magnitude.

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Nontyphoidal Salmonella in Poultry and Poultry Products in India: Implications for Human Health.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Sellappan; Purushothaman, Venketaraman; Murthy, Thippichettypalayam Ramasamy Gopala Krishna; Sukumar, Kuppannan; Srinivasan, Palani; Gowthaman, Vasudevan; Balusamy, Mohan; Atterbury, Robert; Kuchipudi, Suresh V

    2015-09-01

    Human infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars are increasingly becoming a threat to human health globally. While all motile Salmonellae have zoonotic potential, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium are most commonly associated with human disease, for which poultry are a major source. Despite the increasing number of human NTS infections, the epidemiology of NTS in poultry in India has not been fully understood. Hence, as a first step, we carried out epidemiological analysis to establish the incidence of NTS in poultry to evaluate the risk to human health. A total of 1215 samples (including poultry meat, tissues, egg and environmental samples) were collected from 154 commercial layer farms from southern India and screened for NTS. Following identification by cultural and biochemical methods, Salmonella isolates were further characterized by multiplex PCR, allele-specific PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In the present study, 21/1215 (1.73 %) samples tested positive for NTS. We found 12/392 (3.06 %) of tissue samples, 7/460 (1.52 %) of poultry products, and 2/363 (0.55 %) of environmental samples tested positive for NTS. All the Salmonella isolates were resistant to oxytetracycline, which is routinely used as poultry feed additive. The multiplex PCR results allowed 16/21 isolates to be classified as S. Typhimurium, and five isolates as S. Enteritidis. Of the five S. Enteritidis isolates, four were identified as group D Salmonella by allele-specific PCR. All of the isolates produced different banding patterns in ERIC PCR. Of the thirteen macro restriction profiles (MRPs) obtained by PFGE, MRP 6 was predominant which included 6 (21 %) isolates. In conclusion, the findings of the study revealed higher incidence of contamination of NTS Salmonella in poultry tissue and animal protein sources used for poultry. The results of the study warrants further investigation

  3. Epidemiology and Molecular Characterization of Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, I-Wen; Chen, Pei-Chen; Wang, Hui-Ying; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Hsieh, Li-Yun; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2014-01-01

    Our multicenter nationwide surveillance data indicated that erythromycin (ERY) resistance among group A Streptococcus (GAS) isolates in Taiwan declined from 53.1% in 1998 and 2000 to 14.6% in 2002 and 2004 and 10.7% in 2006 to 2010 (P < 0.01). The present study aimed to assess the epidemiology of GAS in Taiwan and identify factors associated with ERY resistance. All 127 ERY-resistant (ERYr) isolates and 128 randomly selected ERY-susceptible (ERYs) isolates recovered from 1998 to 2010 were emm typed. ERYr isolates were also characterized by ERY resistance phenotype and mechanisms and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Multilocus sequence typing was performed on selected ERYr isolates. The predominant emm types in ERYr isolates were emm22 (n = 33, 26.0%), emm12 (n = 24, 18.9%), emm4 (n = 21, 16.5%), and emm106 (n = 15, 11.8%). In ERYs isolates, emm12 (n = 27, 21.9%), emm1 (n = 18, 14.1%), emm106 (n = 16, 12.5%), and emm11 (n = 9, 7.1%) predominated. The most common ERY resistance phenotype was the M phenotype (resistant to macrolides) (70.9%), with all but one isolate carrying mef(A), followed by the constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance (cMLSB) phenotype (26.8%), with isolates carrying erm(B) or erm(TR). ERYr isolates of the emm12-sequence type 36 (ST36) lineage with the cMLSB phenotype were mostly present before 2004, while those of the emm22-ST46 lineage with the M phenotype predominated in later years. Recovery from respiratory (throat swab) specimens was an independent factor associated with ERY resistance. emm1 and emm11 GAS isolates were significantly associated with ERYs, while emm22 was detected only in ERYr GAS. In addition, emm106 isolates were prevalent among the abscess/pus isolates, whereas emm12 isolates were strongly associated with a respiratory (throat) origin. In addition to identifying factors associated with ERY resistance in GAS, our study provides helpful information on the changing GAS epidemiology in Taiwan. PMID

  4. 77 FR 21785 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Prevalence, Incidence, Epidemiology and Molecular...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... objectives include determining trends in HIV molecular variants and risk factors associated with HIV... recent infection testing algorithm (RITA). This research effort will allow for an evaluation of trends in... trend analyses over a 10-year period and will complement similar monitoring of HIV prevalence,...

  5. Multi-locus sequence analysis of mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae for the molecular epidemiology of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) is the causative agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), a devastating disease of domestic goats. The exact distribution of CCPP is not known but it is present in Africa and the Middle East and represents a significant threat to many disease-free areas including Europe. Furthermore, CCPP has been recently identified in Tajikistan and China. A typing method with an improved resolution based on Multi-Locus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) has been developed to trace new epidemics and to elucidate whether the recently identified cases in continental Asia were due to recent importation of Mccp. The H2 locus, a polymorphic region already in use as a molecular marker for Mccp evolution, was complemented with seven new loci selected according to the analysis of polymorphisms observed among the genome sequences of three Mccp strains. A total of 25 strains, including the two new strains from Asia, were analysed by MLSA resulting in the discrimination of 15 sequence types based on 53 polymorphic positions. A distance tree inferred from the concatenated sequences of the eight selected loci revealed two evolutionary lineages comprising five groups, which showed good correlation with geographic origins. The presence of a distinct Asian cluster strongly indicates that CCPP was not recently imported to continental Asia. It is more likely that the disease has been endemic in the area for a long time, as supported by historical clinical descriptions. In conclusion, this MLSA strategy constitutes a highly discriminative tool for the molecular epidemiology of CCPP. PMID:21756321

  6. Absence of Putative Artemisinin Resistance Mutations Among Plasmodium falciparum in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Steve M.; Parobek, Christian M.; DeConti, Derrick K.; Kayentao, Kassoum; Coulibaly, Sheick Oumar; Greenwood, Brian M.; Tagbor, Harry; Williams, John; Bojang, Kalifa; Njie, Fanta; Desai, Meghna; Kariuki, Simon; Gutman, Julie; Mathanga, Don P.; Mårtensson, Andreas; Ngasala, Billy; Conrad, Melissa D.; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Tshefu, Antoinette K.; Moormann, Ann M.; Vulule, John M.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Meshnick, Steven R.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites that are resistant to artemisinins have been detected in Southeast Asia. Resistance is associated with several polymorphisms in the parasite's K13-propeller gene. The molecular epidemiology of these artemisinin resistance genotypes in African parasite populations is unknown. We developed an assay to quantify rare polymorphisms in parasite populations that uses a pooled deep-sequencing approach to score allele frequencies, validated it by evaluating mixtures of laboratory parasite strains, and then used it to screen P. falciparum parasites from >1100 African infections collected since 2002 from 14 sites across sub-Saharan Africa. We found no mutations in African parasite populations that are associated with artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asian parasites. However, we observed 15 coding mutations, including 12 novel mutations, and limited allele sharing between parasite populations, consistent with a large reservoir of naturally occurring K13-propeller variation. Although polymorphisms associated with artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum in Southeast Asia are not prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, numerous K13-propeller coding polymorphisms circulate in Africa. Although their distributions do not support a widespread selective sweep for an artemisinin-resistant phenotype, the impact of these mutations on artemisinin susceptibility is unknown and will require further characterization. Rapid, scalable molecular surveillance offers a useful adjunct in tracking and containing artemisinin resistance. PMID:25180240

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Influenza A/H3N2 Viruses Circulating in Mexico from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Nelson, Martha I.; Cobián Güemes, Ana Georgina; López-Martínez, Irma; Cruz-Ortiz, Natividad; Iguala-Vidales, Miguel; García, Elvia Rodríguez; Barrera-Badillo, Gisela; Díaz-Quiñonez, Jose Alberto; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.; Isa, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    In this work, nineteen influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in Mexico between 2003 and 2012 were studied. Our findings show that different human A/H3N2 viral lineages co-circulate within a same season and can also persist locally in between different influenza seasons, increasing the chance for genetic reassortment events. A novel minor cluster was also identified, named here as Korea, that circulated worldwide during 2003. Frequently, phylogenetic characterization did not correlate with the determined antigenic identity, supporting the need for the use of molecular evolutionary tools additionally to antigenic data for the surveillance and characterization of viral diversity during each flu season. This work represents the first long-term molecular epidemiology study of influenza A/H3N2 viruses in Mexico based on the complete genomic sequences and contributes to the monitoring of evolutionary trends of A/H3N2 influenza viruses within North and Central America. PMID:25075517

  8. Evolution, molecular epidemiology and perspectives on the research of taeniid parasites with special emphasis on Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Bobes, Raúl J; Fragoso, Gladis; Fleury, Agnès; García-Varela, Martín; Sciutto, Edda; Larralde, Carlos; Laclette, Juan P

    2014-04-01

    Human cysticercosis is known since old historical times in Greece and China; however, human infections by tapeworms have accompanied human beings for more that hundred thousand years. The disease is tightly bound to poverty and lack of hygiene, and has been eradicated in developed countries, but continues being a public health problem in developing countries of Latin-American, Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, and is also remerging in a number of non endemic countries. It is considered a neglected disease. Here we revise a number of key scientific contributions on taeniid biology that open new avenues for more effective approaches to the control of cysticercosis. The evolution of flatworms and class Cestoda is analyzed, with special emphasis on the emergence of taeniid parasites and the colonization of the human species by tapeworms. The complex molecular host-parasite interplay in this relationship as result of co-evolution between two distantly related organisms. The relevant host and parasite's factors, in the prospect of identifying species-specific molecular markers useful in epidemiological studies carried out in endemic countries. The new possibilities arising with the characterization of the genomes for several species of tapeworms, including a deeper understanding of these organisms, as well as improved tools for diagnosis, vaccination and drug treatment. The need to revise the current control and management strategies for this tropical neglected disease.

  9. Cystic echinococcosis in water buffaloes: epidemiological survey and molecular evidence of ovine (G1) and buffalo (G3) strains.

    PubMed

    Capuano, F; Rinaldi, L; Maurelli, M P; Perugini, A G; Veneziano, V; Garippa, G; Genchi, C; Musella, V; Cringoli, G

    2006-04-30

    A survey of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of the Italian Mediterranean breed was carried out in Campania, a region of southern Italy. In addition, a molecular study was performed on 48 hydatid cysts coming from 48 water buffaloes in order to determine the Echinococcus granulosus strain(s) present in this host. Out of a total of 722 water buffaloes examined for CE, 76 (10.5%) were found infected. The average number of cysts per buffalo was 4.3 (minimum 1, maximum 45). Seventeen buffaloes had hydatid cysts only in the liver (with an average of 5 cysts/liver), 34 only in the lungs (with an average of 1.8 cysts/lungs), and 25 buffaloes had cysts both in the liver and in the lungs. Fertile cysts were found in 10 (13.2%) out of the 76 positive buffaloes. The sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene of the 48 hydatid cysts produced sequences of 419 bp for each sample analysed. For 33 samples, alignment of the obtained sequences with those present in GenBank showed a total homology with the common domestic sheep strain G1; for 15 samples, sequences obtained showed 100% homology with buffalo strain G3. The findings of the present survey represent the first epidemiological and molecular comprehensive studies on CE in water buffalo from an endemic area for E. granulosus.

  10. Diarrhoeal disease: current concepts and future challenges. Molecular biological approaches to the epidemiology of diarrhoeal diseases in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D N; Echeverria, P

    1993-12-01

    Diarrhoea in developing countries is caused by an increasingly long list of bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens with rotavirus, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter, Shigella, and Salmonella heading the list. Using methods to detect most of the known enteropathogens, one or more enteropathogen(s) is isolated in two-thirds of diarrhoeal illnesses in the developing world. Many of these enteropathogens are also frequently isolated from children without diarrhoea. An aetiologic agent is more frequently isolated from cases of invasive diarrhoea than from those with secretory diarrhoea. Deoxyribonucleic acid probes have proved very useful in detecting pathogens such as enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enteroinvasive (EIEC), and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), but have not yet proved to be particularly rapid or less expensive. Molecular biology has proved useful in epidemiological studies as a means of strain identification. Plasmids were initially used as convenient markers and proved useful in identifying epidemic strains of bacteria. Other molecular markers, such as ribotyping, are accurate enough to be used as taxonomic tools.

  11. Cystic echinococcosis in water buffaloes: epidemiological survey and molecular evidence of ovine (G1) and buffalo (G3) strains.

    PubMed

    Capuano, F; Rinaldi, L; Maurelli, M P; Perugini, A G; Veneziano, V; Garippa, G; Genchi, C; Musella, V; Cringoli, G

    2006-04-30

    A survey of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of the Italian Mediterranean breed was carried out in Campania, a region of southern Italy. In addition, a molecular study was performed on 48 hydatid cysts coming from 48 water buffaloes in order to determine the Echinococcus granulosus strain(s) present in this host. Out of a total of 722 water buffaloes examined for CE, 76 (10.5%) were found infected. The average number of cysts per buffalo was 4.3 (minimum 1, maximum 45). Seventeen buffaloes had hydatid cysts only in the liver (with an average of 5 cysts/liver), 34 only in the lungs (with an average of 1.8 cysts/lungs), and 25 buffaloes had cysts both in the liver and in the lungs. Fertile cysts were found in 10 (13.2%) out of the 76 positive buffaloes. The sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene of the 48 hydatid cysts produced sequences of 419 bp for each sample analysed. For 33 samples, alignment of the obtained sequences with those present in GenBank showed a total homology with the common domestic sheep strain G1; for 15 samples, sequences obtained showed 100% homology with buffalo strain G3. The findings of the present survey represent the first epidemiological and molecular comprehensive studies on CE in water buffalo from an endemic area for E. granulosus. PMID:16480832

  12. Absence of putative artemisinin resistance mutations among Plasmodium falciparum in Sub-Saharan Africa: a molecular epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve M; Parobek, Christian M; DeConti, Derrick K; Kayentao, Kassoum; Coulibaly, Sheick Oumar; Greenwood, Brian M; Tagbor, Harry; Williams, John; Bojang, Kalifa; Njie, Fanta; Desai, Meghna; Kariuki, Simon; Gutman, Julie; Mathanga, Don P; Mårtensson, Andreas; Ngasala, Billy; Conrad, Melissa D; Rosenthal, Philip J; Tshefu, Antoinette K; Moormann, Ann M; Vulule, John M; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Ter Kuile, Feiko O; Meshnick, Steven R; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Juliano, Jonathan J

    2015-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites that are resistant to artemisinins have been detected in Southeast Asia. Resistance is associated with several polymorphisms in the parasite's K13-propeller gene. The molecular epidemiology of these artemisinin resistance genotypes in African parasite populations is unknown. We developed an assay to quantify rare polymorphisms in parasite populations that uses a pooled deep-sequencing approach to score allele frequencies, validated it by evaluating mixtures of laboratory parasite strains, and then used it to screen P. falciparum parasites from >1100 African infections collected since 2002 from 14 sites across sub-Saharan Africa. We found no mutations in African parasite populations that are associated with artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asian parasites. However, we observed 15 coding mutations, including 12 novel mutations, and limited allele sharing between parasite populations, consistent with a large reservoir of naturally occurring K13-propeller variation. Although polymorphisms associated with artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum in Southeast Asia are not prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa, numerous K13-propeller coding polymorphisms circulate in Africa. Although their distributions do not support a widespread selective sweep for an artemisinin-resistant phenotype, the impact of these mutations on artemisinin susceptibility is unknown and will require further characterization. Rapid, scalable molecular surveillance offers a useful adjunct in tracking and containing artemisinin resistance.

  13. Tunable Sub-nanopores of Graphene Flake Interlayers with Conductive Molecular Linkers for Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keunsik; Yoon, Yeoheung; Cho, Yunhee; Lee, Sae Mi; Shin, Yonghun; Lee, Hanleem; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-07-26

    Although there are numerous reports of high performance supercapacitors with porous graphene, there are few reports to control the interlayer gap between graphene sheets with conductive molecular linkers (or molecular pillars) through a π-conjugated chemical carbon-carbon bond that can maintain high conductivity, which can explain the enhanced capacitive effect of supercapacitor mechanism about accessibility of electrolyte ions. For this, we designed molecularly gap-controlled reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) via diazotization of three different phenyl, biphenyl, and para-terphenyl bis-diazonium salts (BD1-3). The graphene interlayer sub-nanopores of rGO-BD1-3 are 0.49, 0.7, and 0.96 nm, respectively. Surprisingly, the rGO-BD2 0.7 nm gap shows the highest capacitance in 1 M TEABF4 having 0.68 nm size of cation and 6 M KOH having 0.6 nm size of hydrated cation. The maximum energy density and power density of the rGO-BD2 were 129.67 W h kg(-1) and 30.3 kW kg(-1), respectively, demonstrating clearly that the optimized sub-nanopore of the rGO-BDs corresponding to the electrolyte ion size resulted in the best capacitive performance. PMID:27309489

  14. Molecular Epidemiology of Enteric Adenovirus Gastroenteritis in under-Five-Year-Old Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Ghahremani, Pedram; Hashempoor, Tayebeh; Karimi, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute gastroenteritis is one of the major sources of morbidity and mortality among young children in developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of human adenovirus- (HAdV-) 40 and HAdV-41 in children hospitalized with gastroenteritis in five different health centers of Iran. Methods. In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, we studied 2682 fecal specimens that were collected from children under the age of 5 years in five educational and therapeutic pediatric centers in Iran from February 2012 to February 2013. Samples were tested for HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, using a specific pair of primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results. HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 were detected in 132 (5.18%) of the patients with diarrhea. A significantly higher prevalence of HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 (58.3%) was observed in children under 12 months of age, compared to other age groups. The male to female ratio was 1.7. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated that HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 could be considered etiological agents for acute gastroenteritis among children in Iran. The PCR as a rapid test may increase the chance for a relatively mild course of the disease followed by a complete recovery and avoiding administration of unnecessary antibiotics. PMID:26880883

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella species by restriction endonuclease and alloenzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, L S; Troup, N J; Woods, T; Bibb, W; McKinney, R M

    1987-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation into nosocomial Legionella infections at Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), we applied the technique of restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) to determine strain differences among three species, including Legionella pneumophila, Legionella dumoffii, and Legionella micdadei. A total of 26 human and environmental water isolates from SUMC were selected for REA and compared with control strains that were not epidemiologically linked to SUMC. REA results were compared with results of alloenzyme typing, typing by monoclonal antibodies, and plasmid fingerprinting in all but L. micdadei strains. REA and alloenzyme typing showed that SUMC patient isolates were derived from distinct strains of three species. L. pneumophila strains from SUMC patients were genotypically identical to those isolated from potable water. REA was especially useful in proving that SUMC L. dumoffii patient isolates were derived from a single strain and that patients may have been exposed to a common source(s). REA typing correlated well with alloenzyme typing. These methods complement serologic typing of L. pneumophila and provide discriminating capability between strains of other Legionella species such as L. dumoffii, for which serologic types have not been identified. In addition, REA typing is somewhat easier to perform than alloenzyme typing and can be done in clinical laboratories. Images PMID:2822760

  16. Two Independent HIV Epidemics in Saint Petersburg, Russia Revealed by Molecular Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Dukhovlinova, Elena; Masharsky, Alexey; Toussova, Olga; Verevochkin, Sergei; Solovyeva, Tatiana; Meringof, Maria; Paintsil, Elijah; White, Edward; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Kozlov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    The HIV epidemic in Russia, one of the world's fastest growing, has been concentrated mostly among people who inject drugs (PWID). We sought to explore the epidemiology of the epidemic in St. Petersburg by sampling from the highest risk groups of PWID and men who have sex with men (MSM) and use viral sequencing data to better understand the nature of the city's epidemic. Serological testing confirmed an HIV prevalence among PWID in excess of 40%. All but 1 of 110 PWID whose blood samples were tested for genetic diversity were infected by subtype A virus, specifically by the AFSU strain. The remaining person was infected with a CRF-06cpx recombinant. Analysis of pairwise genetic distance among all PWID studied revealed an average of 3.1% sequence divergence, suggesting clonal introduction of the AFSU strain and/or constraints on sequence divergence. The HIV prevalence was less than 10% among MSM. All 17 sequences from HIV-infected MSM were found to be a clade B virus with a much higher average sequence diversity of 15.7%. These findings suggest two independent epidemics with little overlap between the two highest at-risk populations, which will require different HIV prevention approaches.

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases isolated in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, Alessandra; García-Fernández, Aurora; Varesi, Paola; Fortini, Daniela; Gerardi, Serena; Penni, Adriano; Mancini, Carlo; Giordano, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) are a major problem in many different hospitals worldwide, causing outbreaks as well as sporadic infections. The prevalence of Escherichia coli ESBL producers was analyzed in a surveillance study performed on the population attending the Policlinico Umberto I, the largest university hospital in Rome, Italy. We also investigated genotypes, pathogenicity islands, and plasmids in the ESBL-positive E. coli isolates as further markers that are useful in describing the epidemiology of the infections. In this survey, 163 nonreplicate isolates of Escherichia coli were isolated from patients from 86 different wards, and 28 were confirmed as ESBL producers. A high prevalence (26/28) of CTX-M-15 producers was observed within the bacterial population circulating in this hospital, and the dissemination of this genetic trait was associated with the spread of related strains; however, these do not have the characteristics of a single epidemic clone spreading. The dissemination was also linked to horizontal transfer among the prevalent E. coli genotypes of multireplicon plasmids showing FIA, FIB, and FII replicons in various combinations, which are well adapted to the E. coli species. The analysis of related bacteria suggests a probable interpatient transmission occurring in several wards, causing small outbreaks. PMID:17959756

  18. Impact of bisphenol a on the cardiovascular system - epidemiological and experimental evidence and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoqian; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous plasticizing agent used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. There is well-documented and broad human exposure to BPA. The potential risk that BPA poses to the human health has attracted much attention from regulatory agencies and the general public, and has been extensively studied. An emerging and rapidly growing area in the study of BPA's toxicity is its impact on the cardiovascular (CV) system. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that higher urinary BPA concentration in humans is associated with various types of CV diseases, including angina, hypertension, heart attack and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Experimental studies have demonstrated that acute BPA exposure promotes the development of arrhythmias in female rodent hearts. Chronic exposure to BPA has been shown to result in cardiac remodeling, atherosclerosis, and altered blood pressure in rodents. The underlying mechanisms may involve alteration of cardiac Ca2+ handling, ion channel inhibition/activation, oxidative stress, and genome/transcriptome modifications. In this review, we discuss these recent findings that point to the potential CV toxicity of BPA, and highlight the knowledge gaps in this growing research area.

  19. Rift Valley fever virus (Bunyaviridae: Phlebovirus): an update on pathogenesis, molecular epidemiology, vectors, diagnostics and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Michel; Bouloy, Michèle; Bird, Brian H.; Kemp, Alan; Paweska, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus is an arbovirus in the Bunyaviridae family that, from phylogenetic analysis, appears to have first emerged in the mid-19th century and was only identified at the begininning of the 1930s in the Rift Valley region of Kenya. Despite being an arbovirus with a relatively simple but temporally and geographically stable genome, this zoonotic virus has already demonstrated a real capacity for emerging in new territories, as exemplified by the outbreaks in Egypt (1977), Western Africa (1988) and the Arabian Peninsula (2000), or for re-emerging after long periods of silence as observed very recently in Kenya and South Africa. The presence of competent vectors in countries previously free of RVF, the high viral titres in viraemic animals and the global changes in climate, travel and trade all contribute to make this virus a threat that must not be neglected as the consequences of RVF are dramatic, both for human and animal health. In this review, we present the latest advances in RVF virus research. In spite of this renewed interest, aspects of the epidemiology of RVF virus are still not fully understood and safe, effective vaccines are still not freely available for protecting humans and livestock against the dramatic consequences of this virus. PMID:21188836

  20. Outbreak of Legionnaire's disease linked to a decorative fountain by molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hlady, W G; Mullen, R C; Mintz, C S; Shelton, B G; Hopkins, R S; Daikos, G L

    1993-10-15

    The incubation period of Legionnaires' disease in five patients was traced to attendance at conventions in a hotel in the Orlando, Florida, area between January 6 and February 2, 1992. The five case patients (mean age, 69 years) were older than 55 randomly chosen controls (mean age, 53 years) who had also attended one of the same conventions (p = 0.007). All case patients were males, as were 40% of the controls (p = 0.01). No significant differences in exposures were found between case patients and controls, but all case patients and 65% of the controls reported exposure to a decorative fountain in the hotel lobby. Water from the fountain was the only one of 55 environmental specimens to test positive for Legionella. Both the environmental isolate and the only clinical isolate were Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, with identical patterns identified on monoclonal antibody subtyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of genomic restriction fragments. The fountain's recirculating system had been irregularly maintained, and water in the fountain may have been heated by submersed lighting. These findings demonstrate the utility of monoclonal antibody subtyping and PFGE of genomic restriction fragments in assessing the significance of environmental isolates of L. pneumophila, especially when other epidemiologic findings are inconclusive. They also show that decorative fountains may be a potential source of infection with L. pneumophila, and emphasize the need for standard maintenance and disinfection procedures.

  1. Epidemiological and molecular analysis of a waterborne outbreak of norovirus GII.4.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Li, H; Sun, L; Mo, Y; Chen, S; Wu, X; Liang, J; Zheng, H; Ke, C; Varma, J K; Klena, J D; Chen, Q; Zou, L; Yang, X

    2012-12-01

    Contaminated water is one of the main sources of norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis outbreaks globally. Waterborne NoV outbreaks are infrequently attributed to GII.4 NoV. In September 2009, a NoV outbreak affected a small school in Guangdong Province, China. Epidemiological investigations indicated that household use water, supplied by a well, was the probable source (relative risk 1·9). NoV nucleic acid material in concentrated well-water samples was detected using real-time RT-PCR. Nucleotide sequences of NoV extracted from diarrhoea and well-water specimens were identical and had the greatest sequence identity to corresponding sequences from the epidemic strain GII.4-2006b. Our report documents the first laboratory-confirmed waterborne outbreak caused by GII.4 NoV genotype in China. Our investigations indicate that well water, intended exclusively for household use but not for consumption, caused this outbreak. The results of this report serve as a reminder that private well water intended for household use should be tested for NoV.

  2. Epidemiological and molecular investigation of a rubella outbreak, Romania, 2011 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Mihaela; Abernathy, Emily; Chen, Min-Hsin; Icenogle, Joseph; Janta, Denisa; Stanescu, Aurora; Pistol, Adriana; Santibanez, Sabine; Mankertz, Annette; Hübschen, Judith M; Mihaescu, Grigore; Necula, Gheorghe; Lupulescu, Emilia

    2016-09-22

    We describe a rubella outbreak that occurred in Romania between September 2011 and December 2012. During this period 24,627 rubella cases, 41.1% (n=10,134) of which female, were notified based on clinical criteria, and a total of 6,182 individuals were found serologically positive for IgM-specific rubella antibody. The median age of notified cases was 18 years (range: <1-65) and the most affected age group 15 to 19 years (n=16,245 cases). Of all notified cases, 24,067 cases (97.7%) reported no history of vaccination. Phylogenetic analysis of 19 sequences (739 nucleotides each), from 10 districts of the country revealed that the outbreak was caused by two distinct rubella virus strains of genotype 2B, which co-circulated with both temporal and geographical overlap. In addition to the 6,182 IgM-positive rubella cases, 28 cases of congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) were identified, including 11 neonatal deaths and one stillbirth. The outbreak underscores the need to encourage higher vaccination uptake in the population, particularly in women of reproductive age, and to strengthen epidemiological and laboratory investigations of suspected rubella cases. Genetic characterisation of wild-type rubella virus is an essential component to enhance surveillance and here we report rubella virus sequences from Romania. PMID:27684329

  3. Molecular epidemiology and population structure of the honey bee brood pathogen Melissococcus plutonius

    PubMed Central

    Budge, Giles E; Shirley, Mark D F; Jones, Benjamin; Quill, Emiline; Tomkies, Victoria; Feil, Edward J; Brown, Mike A; Haynes, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Melissococcus plutonius is the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB), which is a serious brood disease of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera). EFB remains a threat because of a poor understanding of disease epidemiology. We used a recently published multi-locus sequence typing method to characterise 206 M. plutonius isolates recovered from outbreaks in England and Wales over the course of 2 years. We detected 15 different sequence types (STs), which were resolved by eBURST and phylogenetic analysis into three clonal complexes (CCs) 3, 12 and 13. Single and double locus variants within CC3 were the most abundant and widespread genotypes, accounting for 85% of the cases. In contrast, CCs 12 and 13 were rarer and predominantly found in geographical regions of high sampling intensity, consistent with a more recent introduction and localised spread. K-function analysis and interpoint distance tests revealed significant geographical clustering in five common STs, but pointed to different dispersal patterns between STs. We noted that CCs appeared to vary in pathogenicity and that infection caused by the more pathogenic variants is more likely to lead to honey bee colony destruction, as opposed to treatment. The importance of these findings for improving our understanding of disease aetiology and control are discussed. PMID:24599072

  4. Molecular Epidemiological Study of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype b Strains Obtained from Children with Meningitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Toshihiro; Kuroki, Haruo; Ishikawa, Nobuyasu; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Ito, Schuichi; Miyamae, Takako; Mori, Masaaki; Uehara, Suzuko; Yokota, Shumpei

    1999-01-01

    We report an epidemiological study of 30 Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) strains derived from the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis. The Hib strains were biotyped, tested for β-lactamase production, and genotyped by long PCR-ribotyping, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, and genomic DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The phenotypic study characterized 22 of the strains (73%) as biotype I. A genotypic study using long PCR-ribotyping with HaeIII restriction digestion showed no polymorphisms among these 30 Hib strains, but RAPD analysis with two sets of primers demonstrated two distinctive subtypes: one typical of the strains of biotype group II and the second characteristic of the strains of biotype groups I and IV. Each RAPD group was subtyped into several genotypic groups by PFGE-RFLP with SmaI digestion. The genotyping of clinically isolated Hib strains may help to elucidate transmission routes in community infections, endemicity, and the reasons for vaccine failure. PMID:10405399

  5. Epidemiology and molecular characterisation of duck hepatitis A virus from different duck breeds in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Erfan, Ahmed M; Selim, Abdullah A; Moursi, Mohamed K; Nasef, Soad A; Abdelwhab, E M

    2015-06-12

    Duck hepatitis virus (DHV) is an acute highly contagious disease of ducklings caused by three distinct serotypes of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV), a member of the RNA family Picornaviridae, where serotype 1 is the most widespread serotype worldwide. To date, little if any is known about the prevalence and genetic characterisation of DHAV outside Asia. The current study describes surveillance on DHV in 46 commercial duck farms in Egypt with a history of high mortality in young ducklings from 3 to 15 day-old from 2012 to 2014. Clinical samples were examined by generic RT-PCR assays followed by partial sequence analysis of the 5'UTR, VP1 and 3D genes of the vaccine strain and 15 field viruses. The overall positive rate was 37% (n=17/46). All duck breeds (Pekin, Muscovy, Mallard and Green Winged) were susceptible to the disease with mortality ranged from 15% to 96.7%. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Egyptian strains cluster in the DHAV serotype 1 with Asian viruses and distinguishable from the vaccine strains. So far, this is the first report on the genetic characterisation of DHAV in Egypt. This study may be useful to better understand the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae among Japanese children with acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Hotomi, Muneki; Nakajima, Kouji; Hiraoka, Masanobu; Nahm, Moon H; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine may change the epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The increased prevalence of non-vaccine serotypes as the cause of pneumococcal diseases has already reported in the United States and Europe. However, little attention has been focused on the S. pneumoniae. In this study, nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae were identified in 15 isolates (6.4%) out of 236 pneumococcal strains obtained from the nasopharynges of children with acute otitis media (AOM), in 3 isolates (14.3%) out of 21 strains from acute rhinosinusitis, and in 2 isolates (12.5%) out of 16 nasopharyngeal carriage strains obtained from normal healthy children. Among the 20 nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae isolates, 15 (75.0%) isolates had the pspK gene. Seven sequence types (STs) were identified: ST7502 (5 strains), ST1106 (2 strains), ST7803 (2 strains), ST7786 (1 strain), ST6741 (1 strain), ST7496 (1 strain), and ST8642 (1 strain). Because nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains are not targeted by the current available pneumococcal vaccines, these strains will gradually become more common in nasopharyngeal carriage. The increase in colonization and dissemination of these strains would increase the risk of AOM and other systemic pneumococcal diseases against which current vaccines cannot provide protection. Nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae may thus become more prevalent as human pathogen.

  7. The molecular epidemiology of rabies associated with chiropteran hosts in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth

    2006-05-01

    While large-scale dog vaccination campaigns have significantly reduced urban rabies throughout Mexico, reports of sylvatic rabies, including cases of spill-over of bat strains into livestock and humans, are increasing. To improve knowledge of these epidemiological trends, 64 Mexican rabies virus isolates from various host species, have been characterized. Phylogenetic analysis at the viral P locus identified distinct viral strains associated with terrestrial reservoirs (dog, skunk and fox/bobcat) and a variant associated with the insectivorous bat, T. brasiliensis, consistent with prior reports. Of the two distinct clades of viruses associated with the vampire bat reservoir, one comprised just four specimens and formed an outlying group to all other vampire bat rabies isolates including those from South America and the Caribbean, a finding consistent with the early emergence of the vampire bat reservoir in Mexico. Antigenic variation of the vampire bat specimens did not correlate with the main genetic groupings; moreover complete N gene sequence analysis of selected specimens indicated limited variation within the encoded nucleoprotein that could form the basis of antigenic variation. A single isolate recovered from a cat represents a new viral variant not previously identified in North America that probably circulates in a species of insectivorous bat. PMID:16303200

  8. A Molecular Epidemiological and Genetic Diversity Study of Tuberculosis in Ibadan, Nnewi and Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Lovett; Zhang, Jian; Gomgnimbou, Michel K.; Abdurrahman, Saddiq T.; Le Moullec, Stéphanie; Mohamed, Fatima; Uzoewulu, Gertrude N.; Sogaolu, Olumide M.; Goh, Khye Seng; Emenyonu, Nnamdi; Refrégier, Guislaine; Cuevas, Luis E.; Sola, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Background Nigeria has the tenth highest burden of tuberculosis (TB) among the 22 TB high-burden countries in the world. This study describes the biodiversity and epidemiology of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB in Ibadan, Nnewi and Abuja, using 409 DNAs extracted from culture positive TB isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings DNAs extracted from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex were studied by spoligotyping and 24 VNTR typing. The Cameroon clade (CAM) was predominant followed by the M. africanum (West African 1) and T (mainly T2) clades. By using a smooth definition of clusters, 32 likely epi-linked clusters related to the Cameroon genotype family and 15 likely epi-linked clusters related to other “modern” genotypes were detected. Eight clusters concerned M. africanum West African 1. The recent transmission rate of TB was 38%. This large study shows that the recent transmission of TB in Nigeria is high, without major regional differences, with MDR-TB clusters. Improvement in the TB control programme is imperative to address the TB control problem in Nigeria. PMID:22723859

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Proteus mirabilis infections of the catheterized urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Sabbuba, N A; Mahenthiralingam, E; Stickler, D J

    2003-11-01

    Proteus mirabilis compromises the care of many patients undergoing long-term indwelling bladder catheterization. It forms crystalline bacterial biofilms in catheters which block the flow of urine, causing either incontinence due to leakage or painful distention of the bladder due to urinary retention. If it is not dealt with, catheter blockage can lead to pyelonephritis and septicemia. We have examined the epidemiology of catheter-associated P. mirabilis infections by use of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of NotI restriction enzyme digests of bacterial DNA. This technique was shown to be more discriminatory than the classical phenotypic Dienes typing technique. We demonstrated that each of 42 isolates from diverse environmental sources and 10 of 12 isolates from blood, wound swabs, and mid-stream urine samples of hospitalized patients had distinct genotypes. Examination of a set of 55 isolates of P. mirabilis, each from a different clinical or environmental source, identified 49 distinct genotypes and 43 Dienes types. The index of discrimination was 0.993 for the PFGE method and 0.988 for the Dienes method. Applying the PFGE method to isolates from catheter-associated urinary tract infections confirmed that the strains present in the crystalline catheter biofilms were identical to those isolated from the same patient's urine. An analysis of samples taken during a prospective study of infections in catheterized nursing home patients revealed that a single genotype of P. mirabilis can persist in the urinary tract despite many changes of catheter, periods of noncatheterization, and antibiotic therapy.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Enteric Adenovirus Gastroenteritis in under-Five-Year-Old Children in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Ghahremani, Pedram; Hashempoor, Tayebeh; Karimi, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute gastroenteritis is one of the major sources of morbidity and mortality among young children in developed and developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of human adenovirus- (HAdV-) 40 and HAdV-41 in children hospitalized with gastroenteritis in five different health centers of Iran. Methods. In a cross-sectional epidemiological study, we studied 2682 fecal specimens that were collected from children under the age of 5 years in five educational and therapeutic pediatric centers in Iran from February 2012 to February 2013. Samples were tested for HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, using a specific pair of primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results. HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 were detected in 132 (5.18%) of the patients with diarrhea. A significantly higher prevalence of HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 (58.3%) was observed in children under 12 months of age, compared to other age groups. The male to female ratio was 1.7. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated that HAdV-40 and HAdV-41 could be considered etiological agents for acute gastroenteritis among children in Iran. The PCR as a rapid test may increase the chance for a relatively mild course of the disease followed by a complete recovery and avoiding administration of unnecessary antibiotics. PMID:26880883

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Enterococcus cecorum isolates recovered from enterococcal spondylitis outbreaks in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Borst, Luke B; Suyemoto, M Mitsu; Robbins, Kabel M; Lyman, Roberta L; Martin, Michael P; Barnes, H John

    2012-10-01

    Enterococcus cecorum, a normal intestinal inhabitant, is increasingly responsible for outbreaks of arthritis and osteomyelitis in chickens worldwide. Enterococcal spondylitis (ES) is a specific manifestation of E. cecorum-associated disease in which increased flock morbidity and mortality result from chronic infection involving the free thoracic vertebra. In this study the genetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance of isolates recovered from ES-affected flocks in the southeastern United States were determined. ES outbreaks from 2007 to 2011 were investigated in North Carolina (15 flocks, 13 farms, four integrators), South Carolina (one flock, one farm, one integrator) and Alabama (six flocks, six farms, one integrator). From these 22 epidemiologically distinct outbreaks, 326 isolates of E. cecorum were recovered. Isolates from spinal lesions and caeca of affected birds (cases) and caeca of unaffected birds (controls) were genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; phenotyped using both GenIII MicroPlate™ (Biolog; Hayward, CA, USA) microbial identification plates and antimicrobial sensitivity testing; and compared with each other. Isolates from spinal lesions were incapable of mannitol metabolism and the majority of these isolates were genetically clonal. In contrast, caecal isolates from control birds varied in their ability to metabolize mannitol and were genetically diverse. Isolates from both case and control birds had high levels of antimicrobial resistance. These findings indicate that the increase in E. cecorum-associated disease in the southeast United States is due to the emergence of new clones with increased pathogenicity and multidrug resistance. PMID:22978557

  12. Molecular Identification and Epidemiological Features of Human Adenoviruses Associated with Acute Respiratory Infections in Hospitalized Children in Southern China, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changbing; Zhao, Mingqi; Deng, Li; Zhong, Jiayu; Zhang, Yingying; Ye, Jun; Jing, Shuping; Cheng, Zetao; Guan, Yongxin; Ma, Yi; Sun, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the major worldwide health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Human adenovirus (HAdV) is one of the most common pathogens associated with viral ARI, and thus calls for specific diagnosis and better understanding of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics. Methods Total 4,130 children with ARI requiring hospitalization from 2012 to 2013 were retrospectively studied. Throat swab specimens were collected from each patient. Fluorescence Quantitative PCR was performed to detect adenovirus as well as other common ARI-related pathogens. The seven HAdV hypervariable regions (HVRs) of the hexon gene from fifty-seven HAdVs-positive samples collected in the seasonal peaks were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of HVRs was also conducted to confirm the molecular types and genetic variation. In addition, epidemiological features and co-infection with other human respiratory pathogens were investigated and analyzed. Results Of 4,130 hospitalized pediatric patients tested, the positive rates of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP), and HAdV were 13.7%, 13.2%, and 12.0%, respectively. The HAdV positive patients accounted for 7.9%, 17.2%, 17.5% and 10.7% in age groups <1, 1–3, 3–6 and 6–14 years, respectively. Eighty-four HAdV positive children were co-infected with other respiratory pathogens (84/495, 17.0%). The most common co-infection pathogens with HAdV were MP (57.1%) and Human Bocavirus (HBoV) (16.7%). The majority of HAdV infected patients were totally recovered (96.9%, 480/495); However, four (0.8%) patients, who were previously healthy and at the age of 2 years or younger died of pneumonia. Seasonal peaks of HAdV infection occurred in the summer season of 2012 and 2013; the predominant HAdV type was HAdV-3 (70%), followed by HAdV-7 (28%). These epidemiological features were different from those in Northern China. The HAdV-55 was identified and reported for the

  13. Disorder effect on conductance in a doped C60 molecular bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Aliasghar

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we study electrical conductance in a C60 molecular nanobridge with randomly point dopants sandwiched between two (5,5) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in two cases with opened end and closed end. Two different ways of coupling C60 fullerene through one and five carbon atoms to the uncap- and cap-edges are considered in each case. Our calculations are based on the Green's function technique in the tight-binding approximation. The CNT surface self-energy is also obtained, analytically. The effects of contacts, various strengths of random disorder, cage type, and the bond dimerization on the conductance are investigated. Our results indicate that the appearance of conductance resonances is a manifestation of resonant states of CNT caps, which lie within the molecular HOMO-LUMO gap and consequently they change by disorder concentration. By controlling the disorder concentration, bond dimerization, and contact geometries, this kind of system can explain the extended states from the localized states. The numerical results can serve as a base for developments in designing nanoelectronic devices.

  14. Thermal conductivity of molecular crystals of monatomic alcohols: From methanol to butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolyuk, O. A.

    2011-05-01

    Experimental data on the thermal conductivity κ(T) of some simple alcohols have been compared, analyzed, and generalized. The objects of study were methyl, protonated and deuterated ethyl, 1-propyl and 1-butyl alcohols in the thermodynamically equilibrium phase with complete orientational order. The temperature ranged from 2 K to the melting point at the equilibrium vapor pressure. In the region above the temperature of the maximum thermal conductivity, κ(T) deviates from a 1/T dependence. This is because the total thermal conductivity has an extra contribution κII(T) from short-lived phonons in addition to kI(T) owing to propagating phonons; i.e., κ(T) = kI(T) + κII(T). kI(T) is well described by the Debye-Peierls model for phonon-phonon processes and scattering of phonons by dislocations. For T > 40 K, kI(T) varies as A/T and κII(T) is essentially temperature-independent. The Debye temperature ΘD of the alcohols depends on the molecular mass as ΘD = 678М-0.42 K and the coefficient A characterizing the rate of phonon-phonon scattering increases with the molecular mass of the simple monatomic alcohols as A = 0.85М0.8 W/m, which suggests a decreasing intensity of the phonon-phonon process.

  15. Multicentre study highlighting clinical relevance of new high-throughput methodologies in molecular epidemiology of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; de Sousa, B; Calderón, E J; Huang, L; Badura, R; Maltez, F; Bassat, Q; de Armas, Y; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2016-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes severe interstitial pneumonia (PcP) in immunosuppressed patients. This multicentre study assessed the distribution frequencies of epidemiologically relevant genetic markers of P. jirovecii in different geographic populations from Portugal, the USA, Spain, Cuba and Mozambique, and the relationship between the molecular data and the geographical and clinical information, based on a multifactorial approach. The high-throughput typing strategy for P. jirovecii characterization consisted of DNA pooling using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension. The frequencies of relevant P. jirovecii single nucleotide polymorphisms (mt85, SOD110, SOD215, DHFR312, DHPS165 and DHPS171) encoded at four loci were estimated in ten DNA pooled samples representing a total of 182 individual samples. Putative multilocus genotypes of P. jirovecii were shown to be clustered due to geographic differences but were also dependent on clinical characteristics of the populations studied. The haplotype DHFR312T/SOD110C/SOD215T was associated with severe AIDS-related PcP and high P. jirovecii burdens. The frequencies of this genetic variant of P. jirovecii were significantly higher in patients with AIDS-related PcP from Portugal and the USA than in the colonized patients from Portugal, and Spain, and children infected with P. jirovecii from Cuba or Mozambique, highlighting the importance of this haplotype, apparently associated with the severity of the disease and specific clinical groups. Patients from the USA and Mozambique showed higher rates of DHPS mutants, which may suggest the circulation of P. jirovecii organisms potentially related with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in those geographical regions. This report assessed the worldwide distribution of P. jirovecii haplotypes and their epidemiological impact in distinct geographic and clinical populations.

  16. Disentangling the genetic origins of a plant pathogen during disease spread using an original molecular epidemiology approach.

    PubMed

    Xhaard, Constance; Barrès, Benoît; Andrieux, Axelle; Bousset, Lydia; Halkett, Fabien; Frey, Pascal

    2012-05-01

    The advent of molecular epidemiology has greatly improved our ability to identify the population sources and track the pathogen movement. Yet the wide spatial and temporal scales usually considered are useful only to infer historical migration pathways. In this study, Bayesian genetic assignments and a landscape epidemiology approach were combined to unravel genetic origin and annual spread during a single epidemic of a plant pathogen: the poplar rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina. The study focused on a particular area-the Durance River valley-which enabled inoculum sources to be identified and channelled spread of the epidemic along a one-dimensional corridor. Spatio-temporal monitoring of disease showed that the epidemic began in the upstream part of the valley and spread out downstream. Using genetic assignment tests, individuals collected at the end of the epidemic were sorted into two genetic groups; very few hybrids were detected, although individuals from both groups coexisted locally downstream in the valley. The epidemic originated from two genetically distinct inoculum sources. Individuals of each group then dispersed southwards along the Durance River and became mixed in poplar riparian stands. These two genetic groups were found previously at a wider spatial scale and proved to result from distinct evolutionary histories on either wild or cultivated poplars. This study showed that the two groups can mix during an epidemic but do not hybridize because they then reproduce asexually. In general, the methods employed here could be useful for elucidating the genetic origin and retracing the colonization history and migration pathways of recent epidemics.

  17. Multicentre study highlighting clinical relevance of new high-throughput methodologies in molecular epidemiology of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; de Sousa, B; Calderón, E J; Huang, L; Badura, R; Maltez, F; Bassat, Q; de Armas, Y; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2016-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes severe interstitial pneumonia (PcP) in immunosuppressed patients. This multicentre study assessed the distribution frequencies of epidemiologically relevant genetic markers of P. jirovecii in different geographic populations from Portugal, the USA, Spain, Cuba and Mozambique, and the relationship between the molecular data and the geographical and clinical information, based on a multifactorial approach. The high-throughput typing strategy for P. jirovecii characterization consisted of DNA pooling using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension. The frequencies of relevant P. jirovecii single nucleotide polymorphisms (mt85, SOD110, SOD215, DHFR312, DHPS165 and DHPS171) encoded at four loci were estimated in ten DNA pooled samples representing a total of 182 individual samples. Putative multilocus genotypes of P. jirovecii were shown to be clustered due to geographic differences but were also dependent on clinical characteristics of the populations studied. The haplotype DHFR312T/SOD110C/SOD215T was associated with severe AIDS-related PcP and high P. jirovecii burdens. The frequencies of this genetic variant of P. jirovecii were significantly higher in patients with AIDS-related PcP from Portugal and the USA than in the colonized patients from Portugal, and Spain, and children infected with P. jirovecii from Cuba or Mozambique, highlighting the importance of this haplotype, apparently associated with the severity of the disease and specific clinical groups. Patients from the USA and Mozambique showed higher rates of DHPS mutants, which may suggest the circulation of P. jirovecii organisms potentially related with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in those geographical regions. This report assessed the worldwide distribution of P. jirovecii haplotypes and their epidemiological impact in distinct geographic and clinical populations. PMID:27021425

  18. Length dependence of thermal conductivity by approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaoui, Hayat; Palla, Pier Luca; Cleri, Fabrizio; Lampin, Evelyne

    2016-08-01

    The length dependence of thermal conductivity over more than two orders of magnitude has been systematically studied for a range of materials, interatomic potentials, and temperatures using the atomistic approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics (AEMD) method. By comparing the values of conductivity obtained for a given supercell length and maximum phonon mean free path (MFP), we find that such values are strongly correlated, demonstrating that the AEMD calculation with a supercell of finite length actually probes the thermal conductivity corresponding to a maximum phonon MFP. As a consequence, the less pronounced length dependence usually observed for poorer thermal conductors, such as amorphous silica, is physically justified by their shorter average phonon MFP. Finally, we compare different analytical extrapolations of the conductivity to infinite length and demonstrate that the frequently used Matthiessen rule is not applicable in AEMD. An alternative extrapolation more suitable for transient-time, finite-supercell simulations is derived. This approximation scheme can also be used to classify the quality of different interatomic potential models with respect to their capability of predicting the experimental thermal conductivity.

  19. Tunable ionic-conductivity of collapsed Sandia octahedral molecular sieves (SOMS).

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, Jason; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    This proposal focuses on the synthesis and characterization of ''tunable'' perovskite ceramics with resulting controlled strength and temperature of dielectric constants and/or with ionic conductivity. Traditional methods of synthesis involve high temperature oxide mixing and baking. We developed a new methodology of synthesis involving the (1) low temperature hydrothermal synthesis of metastable porous phases with ''tuned'' stoichiometry, and element types, and then (2) low temperature heat treatment to build exact stoichiometry perovskites, with the desired vacancy concentrations. This flexible pathway can lead to compositions and structures not attainable by conventional methods. During the course of this program, a series of Na-Nb perovskites were synthesized by calcining and collapsing microporous Sandia Octahedral Molecular Sieve (SOMS) phases. These materials were studied by various characterization techniques and conductivity measurements to better delineate stability and stoichiometry/bulk conductivity relationships. The conductivity can be altered by changing the concentration and type of the substituting framework cation(s) or by ion exchange of sodium. To date, the Na{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}Nb{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} shows the best conductivity.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus among Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in Two Chinese Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fei-Fei; Chen, Ye; Dong, De-Ping; Song, Zhen; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; Han, Li-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the predominant causes of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), but limited data were available regarding the characterization of S. aureus from SSTIs patients in Jiangsu Province in China. We aimed to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus among SSTIs patients in two hospitals of Jiangsu Province. Methods: Sixty-two patients with SSTIs from two Chinese hospitals in Jiangsu Province were enrolled in this study, and 62 S. aureus isolates were collected from February 2014 to January 2015. S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, toxin gene detection, and molecular typing with sequence type, Staphylococcus protein A gene type, accessory gene regulator (agr) group, and Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type. Results: Sixteen (25.8%) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were detected, and there was no isolate found resistant to vancomycin, teicoplanin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and linezolid. The sei was the toxin gene most frequently found, and no lukS/F-PV-positive isolates were detected among the SSTIs’ patients. Molecular analysis revealed that ST398 (10/62, 16.1%; 2 MRSA and 8 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus) to be the dominant clone, followed by ST5 (8/62, 12.9%) and ST7 (8/62, 12.9%). Conclusions: The livestock ST398 was the most common clone among patients with S. aureus SSTIs in Jiangsu Province, China. Surveillance and further studies on the important livestock ST398 clone in human infections are necessarily requested. PMID:27647191

  1. Molecular epidemiology of ampicillin-resistant clinical isolates of Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Vatopoulos, A C; Mainas, E; Balis, E; Threlfall, E J; Kanelopoulou, M; Kalapothalki, V; Malamou-Lada, H; Legakis, N J

    1994-01-01

    During the last 6 years in Greece, there has been a significant increase in the number of ampicillin-resistant Salmonella clinical isolates reported. In this study 23 ampicillin-resistant Salmonella strains, consecutively isolated from patients with epidemiologically unrelated cases of food poisoning, were investigated. By serotyping and phage typing, 21 of these strains were identified as Salmonella enteritidis phage type 6a, 1 was identified as Salmonella typhimurium, and 1 was identified as Salmonella saintpaul. By plasmid pattern analysis, the 21 S. enteritidis strains were further differentiated into five groups. Group I consisted of 5 strains (carrying two plasmids of ca. 38 and 34 MDa), group II consisted of 10 strains (three plasmids of ca. 38, 34, and 2.5 MDa), group III consisted of 3 strains (four plasmids of ca. 38, 34, 15, and 2.5 MDa), group IV consisted of 1 strain (five plasmids of ca. 100, 38, 34, 24, and 15 MDa), and group V consisted of 2 strains (three plasmids of ca. 100, 38, and 24 MDa). Ampicillin resistance was easily transferred to Escherichia coli and was associated with the transfer of the 34-MDa plasmid, classified in the N incompatibility group for all strains of groups I to IV, and with the transfer of the 100-MDa plasmid for the group V strains. EcoRI restriction endonuclease digestions showed an extensive homology among the 34-MDa conjugative R plasmids. Hybridizations of the EcoRI restriction fragments of the 34-MDa plasmids with a TEM-type probe revealed the locus of the beta-lactamase gene to be situated on a ca. 6.6-MDa fragment, common in all plasmids. These results indicate that ampicillin resistance in Greece is due to the spread of a limited number of clones of S. enteritidis phage type 6A, carrying related 34-MDa R plasmids. Work is in progress to obtain a better understanding of ampicillin resistance in S. enteritidis. Images PMID:8051261

  2. Molecular epidemiological and serological studies of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in Thailand cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Ratthanophart, Jadsada; Vitoonpong, Ratchaneekorn; Kim, Bo-Hye; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    BLV is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. BLV has negative effects on animal health and causes economic losses worldwide. However, epidemiological studies on BLV are relatively unknown in many parts of Asian countries. Thus, this study sought to explore BLV infections in cattle in Thailand to determine the extent of the geographic distribution of BLV and to measure its prevalence rates. For this study, 744 cattle from 11 farms in 9 provinces of Thailand were screened in 2013 and 2014 by ELISA and nested PCR. Of those cattle, 41 BLVs were genetically characterized using 188 BLV gp51 env gene sequences available in GenBank. The BLV prevalence in Thailand was high, ranging from 5.3% to 87.8%, as determined by PCR and 11.0% to 100% as determined by ELISA, according to geographical region. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Thailand BLVs belonged to genotypes 1 and 6 and a new genotype 10, which are sporadically observed across Thailand with a prevalence of 31.7%, 19.5%, and 48.8%, respectively. A significant number of amino acid substitutions were also found in the gp51 sequences, of which unique changes in genotype 10 have not been reported previously. Briefly, the majority of substitutions were confined to CD4+/CD8+ T-cell epitopes, neutralizing domains, and E-D-A epitopes. Those observations indicate that BLV infections in Thailand cattle are prevalent and that the geographic distribution of BLV is dynamic, with a high level of genetic diversity. This distribution implies a long-term BLV infection in cattle populations and the movement of infected cattle. In sum, this study suggests that intensive surveillance and effective prevention strategies are required to determine the prevalence of BLV in Thailand and control continuous infections with BLVs.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Candida species isolated from urine at an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ergon, M C; Gülay, Z

    2005-03-01

    Candida spp. has been the leading microorganism isolated from the urine specimens of patients hospitalized at the Anesthesiology and Reanimation intensive care unit (ICU) of Dokuz Eylul University Hospital, Izmir, since 1998. This study was undertaken to investigate the clonal relationship of Candida urine isolates in order to find the mode of spread among the patients. Epidemiological surveillance of 38 Candida albicans, 15 Candida tropicalis and 12 Candida glabrata recovered from the urine specimens of patients who were hospitalized in the ICU between June 11, 2000 and October 15, 2001 was carried out by antifungal susceptibility testing and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Two short primers [Cnd3 (5'-CCAGATGCAC-3') and Cnd4 (5'-ACGGTACACT-3')] were used for RAPD. None of the isolates had high minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values (>1 microg ml(-1)) against amphotericin B with MIC50 values of 0.5 microg ml(-1), 0.5 microg ml(-1) and 0.125 microg ml(-1) for C. albicans, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata isolates, respectively. However, three C. glabrata isolates were resistant and one C. albicans and five C. glabrata isolates were dose-dependent susceptible (D-DS) to fluconazole. Among C. albicans isolates 19 and 20 patterns were detected with primers Cnd3 and Cnd4, respectively. When primers Cnd3 and Cnd4 were evaluated together, three and four genotypes were identified for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata isolates, respectively. Our results suggest that the source of C. albicans isolates was mostly endogenous. It is difficult to interpret the mode of spread of C. tropicalis and C. glabrata urine isolates as we obtained insufficient banding patterns for these species.

  4. [Molecular epidemiologic surveillance and antifungal agent sensitivity of Candida albicans isolated from anesthesia intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Gülay, Zeynep; Ergon, Cem; Ozkütük, Aydan; Yücesoy, Mine; Biçmen, Meral

    2002-01-01

    Patients in intensive care units (ICU) are at risk of nosocomial infections. The incidence of nosocomial fungal infections has increased in parallel with the increase of nosocomial infections. Candida albicans is the most frequent pathogenic species among the fungi. The aim of this study was to make an epidemiological surveillance of C. albicans urine isolates which were isolated from patients who were hospitalized in ICU between June 2000 and October 2001 by antifungal susceptibility testing and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. For this purpose, 38 C. albicans which were isolated from 29 patients were investigated for amphotericin B and fluconazole susceptibility with the microdilution method. The range of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of amphotericin B was between 0.25-1 microgram/ml and MIC50 value was 0.5 microgram/ml and none of the isolates had high (MIC > 1 microgram/ml) MIC values. The MIC values for fluconazole varied between 0.25-16 micrograms/ml and MIC50 value was 1 microgram/ml. While none of the isolates was resistant to fluconazole, two isolates were detected as dose dependent susceptible. RAPD analysis was performed with two different primers in order to investigate clonal relationship, and 22 patterns were detected with one of the primers and 24 patterns were detected with the other. In conclusion, it is thought that the origin of the C. albicans urine isolates were mostly endogenous but exogenous spread might also be considered as isolates that were clonally related were isolated from different patients at the same time interval.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus uberis Clinical Mastitis in Dairy Herds: Strain Heterogeneity and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Davies, P L; Leigh, J A; Bradley, A J; Archer, S C; Emes, R D; Green, M J

    2016-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing was successfully completed on 494 isolates of Streptococcus uberis from clinical mastitis cases in a study of 52 commercial dairy herds over a 12-month period. In total, 195 sequence types (STs) were identified. S. uberis mastitis cases that occurred in different cows within the same herd and were attributed to a common ST were classified as potential transmission events (PTEs). Clinical cases attributed to 35 of the 195 STs identified in this study were classified PTE. PTEs were identified in 63% of the herds. PTE-associated cases, which include the first recorded occurrence of that ST in that herd (index case) and all persistent infections with that PTE ST, represented 40% of all the clinical mastitis cases and occurred in 63% of the herds. PTE-associated cases accounted for >50% of all S. uberis clinical mastitis cases in 33% of the herds. Nine STs (ST-5, -6, -20, -22, -24, -35, -233, -361, and -512), eight of which were grouped within a clonal complex (sharing at least four alleles), were statistically overrepresented (OVR STs). The findings indicate that 38% of all clinical mastitis cases and 63% of the PTEs attributed to S. uberis in dairy herds may be caused by the nine most prevalent strains. The findings suggest that a small subset of STs is disproportionally important in the epidemiology of S. uberis mastitis in the United Kingdom, with cow-to-cow transmission of S. uberis potentially occurring in the majority of herds in the United Kingdom, and may be the most important route of infection in many herds. PMID:26491180

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Streptococcus uberis Clinical Mastitis in Dairy Herds: Strain Heterogeneity and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, J. A.; Bradley, A. J.; Archer, S. C.; Emes, R. D.; Green, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing was successfully completed on 494 isolates of Streptococcus uberis from clinical mastitis cases in a study of 52 commercial dairy herds over a 12-month period. In total, 195 sequence types (STs) were identified. S. uberis mastitis cases that occurred in different cows within the same herd and were attributed to a common ST were classified as potential transmission events (PTEs). Clinical cases attributed to 35 of the 195 STs identified in this study were classified PTE. PTEs were identified in 63% of the herds. PTE-associated cases, which include the first recorded occurrence of that ST in that herd (index case) and all persistent infections with that PTE ST, represented 40% of all the clinical mastitis cases and occurred in 63% of the herds. PTE-associated cases accounted for >50% of all S. uberis clinical mastitis cases in 33% of the herds. Nine STs (ST-5, -6, -20, -22, -24, -35, -233, -361, and -512), eight of which were grouped within a clonal complex (sharing at least four alleles), were statistically overrepresented (OVR STs). The findings indicate that 38% of all clinical mastitis cases and 63% of the PTEs attributed to S. uberis in dairy herds may be caused by the nine most prevalent strains. The findings suggest that a small subset of STs is disproportionally important in the epidemiology of S. uberis mastitis in the United Kingdom, with cow-to-cow transmission of S. uberis potentially occurring in the majority of herds in the United Kingdom, and may be the most important route of infection in many herds. PMID:26491180

  7. Molecular epidemiological and serological studies of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection in Thailand cattle.

    PubMed

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Ratthanophart, Jadsada; Vitoonpong, Ratchaneekorn; Kim, Bo-Hye; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    BLV is the etiological agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. BLV has negative effects on animal health and causes economic losses worldwide. However, epidemiological studies on BLV are relatively unknown in many parts of Asian countries. Thus, this study sought to explore BLV infections in cattle in Thailand to determine the extent of the geographic distribution of BLV and to measure its prevalence rates. For this study, 744 cattle from 11 farms in 9 provinces of Thailand were screened in 2013 and 2014 by ELISA and nested PCR. Of those cattle, 41 BLVs were genetically characterized using 188 BLV gp51 env gene sequences available in GenBank. The BLV prevalence in Thailand was high, ranging from 5.3% to 87.8%, as determined by PCR and 11.0% to 100% as determined by ELISA, according to geographical region. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Thailand BLVs belonged to genotypes 1 and 6 and a new genotype 10, which are sporadically observed across Thailand with a prevalence of 31.7%, 19.5%, and 48.8%, respectively. A significant number of amino acid substitutions were also found in the gp51 sequences, of which unique changes in genotype 10 have not been reported previously. Briefly, the majority of substitutions were confined to CD4+/CD8+ T-cell epitopes, neutralizing domains, and E-D-A epitopes. Those observations indicate that BLV infections in Thailand cattle are prevalent and that the geographic distribution of BLV is dynamic, with a high level of genetic diversity. This distribution implies a long-term BLV infection in cattle populations and the movement of infected cattle. In sum, this study suggests that intensive surveillance and effective prevention strategies are required to determine the prevalence of BLV in Thailand and control continuous infections with BLVs. PMID:27090024

  8. Molecular Epidemiology and Phylogenetic Analysis of Human Adenovirus Caused an Outbreak in Taiwan during 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Cheng; Lu, Po-Liang; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Chu, Pei-Yu; Wang, Chu-Feng; Lin, Jih-Hui; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of adenovirus has been surveyed in Taiwan in 2011. To better understand the evolution and epidemiology of adenovirus in Taiwan, full-length sequence of hexon and fiber coapsid protein was analyzed using series of phylogenetic and dynamic evolution tools. Six different serotypes were identified in this outbreak and the species B was predominant (HAdV-3, 71.50%; HAdV-7, 15.46%). The most frequent diagnosis was acute tonsillitis (54.59%) and bronchitis (47.83%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that hexon protein gene sequences were highly conserved for HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 circulation in Taiwan. However, comparison of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and phylogenetic trees of fiber gene in HAdV-7 clearly indicated that the predominant genotype in Taiwan has shifted from 7b to 7d. Several positive selection sites were observed in hexon protein. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of hexon protein of HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 were 0.234×10-3 substitutions/site/year (95% HPD: 0.387~0.095×10-3) and 1.107×10-3 (95% HPD: 0. 541~1.604) respectively; those of the fiber protein of HAdV-3 and HAdV-7 were 1.085×10-3 (95% HPD: 1.767~0.486) and 0.132×10-3 (95% HPD: 0.283~0.014) respectively. Phylodynamic analysis by Bayesian skyline plot (BSP) suggested that using individual gene to evaluate the effective population size might possibly cause miscalculation. In summary, the virus evolution is ongoing, and continuous surveillance of this virus evolution will contribute to the control of the epidemic. PMID:25992619

  9. Molecular Epidemiology and Phylogenetic Analyses of Influenza B Virus in Thailand during 2010 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Suwannakarn, Kamol; Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Korkong, Sumeth; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Influenza B virus remains a major contributor to the seasonal influenza outbreak and its prevalence has increased worldwide. We investigated the epidemiology and analyzed the full genome sequences of influenza B virus strains in Thailand between 2010 and 2014. Samples from the upper respiratory tract were collected from patients diagnosed with influenza like-illness. All samples were screened for influenza A/B viruses by one-step multiplex real-time RT-PCR. The whole genome of 53 influenza B isolates were amplified, sequenced, and analyzed. From 14,418 respiratory samples collected during 2010 to 2014, a total of 3,050 tested positive for influenza virus. Approximately 3.27% (471/14,418) were influenza B virus samples. Fifty three isolates of influenza B virus were randomly chosen for detailed whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene showed clusters in Victoria clades 1A, 1B, 3, 5 and Yamagata clades 2 and 3. Both B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages were found to co-circulate during this time. The NA sequences of all isolates belonged to lineage II and consisted of viruses from both HA Victoria and Yamagata lineages, reflecting possible reassortment of the HA and NA genes. No significant changes were seen in the NA protein. The phylogenetic trees generated through the analysis of the PB1 and PB2 genes closely resembled that of the HA gene, while trees generated from the analysis of the PA, NP, and M genes showed similar topology. The NS gene exhibited the pattern of genetic reassortment distinct from those of the PA, NP or M genes. Thus, antigenic drift and genetic reassortment among the influenza B virus strains were observed in the isolates examined. Our findings indicate that the co-circulation of two distinct lineages of influenza B viruses and the limitation of cross-protection of the current vaccine formulation provide support for quadrivalent influenza vaccine in this region. PMID:25602617

  10. Molecular epidemiology and strain-specific characteristics of Streptococcus agalactiae at the herd and cow level.

    PubMed

    Mahmmod, Y S; Klaas, I C; Katholm, J; Lutton, M; Zadoks, R N

    2015-10-01

    Host-adaptation of Streptococcus agalactiae subpopulations has been described whereby strains that are commonly associated with asymptomatic carriage or disease in people differ phenotypically and genotypically from those causing mastitis in dairy cattle. Based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), the most common strains in dairy herds in Denmark belong to sequence types (ST) that are also frequently found in people. The aim of this study was to describe epidemiological and diagnostic characteristics of such strains in relation to bovine mastitis. Among 1,199 cattle from 6 herds, cow-level prevalence of S. agalactiae was estimated to be 27.4% based on PCR and 7.8% based on bacteriological culture. Quarter-level prevalence was estimated at 2.8% based on bacteriological culture. Per herd, between 2 and 26 isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and MLST. Within each herd, a single PFGE type and ST predominated, consistent with a contagious mode of transmission or point source infection within herds. Evidence of within-herd evolution of S. agalactiae was detected with both typing methods, although ST belonged to a single clonal complex (CC) per herd. Detection of CC23 (3 herds) was associated with significantly lower approximate count (colony-forming units) at the quarter level and significantly lower cycle threshold value at the cow level than detection of CC1 (2 herds) or CC19 (1 herd), indicating a lower bacterial load in CC23 infections. Median values for the number of infected quarters and somatic cell count (SCC) were numerically but not significantly lower for cows infected with CC23 than for cows with CC1 or CC19. For all CC, an SCC threshold of 200,000 cells/mL was an unreliable indicator of infection status, and prescreening of animals based on SCC as part of S. agalactiae detection and eradication campaigns should be discouraged. PMID:26233443

  11. Molecular Conductance through a Quadruple-Hydrogen-Bond-Bridged Supramolecular Junction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Gong, Zhong-Liang; Li, Shu-Ying; Hong, Wenjing; Zhong, Yu-Wu; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-09-26

    A series of self-complementary ureido pyrimidinedione (UPy) derivatives modified with different aurophilic anchoring groups were synthesized. Their electron transport properties through the quadruple hydrogen bonds in apolar solvent were probed employing the scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (STMBJ) technique. The molecule terminated with a thiol shows the optimal electron transport properties, with a statistical conductance value that approaches 10(-3)  G0 . The (1) H NMR spectra and control experiments verify the formation of quadruple hydrogen bonds, which can be effectively modulated by the polarity of the solvent environment. These findings provide a new design strategy for supramolecular circuit elements in molecular electronics. PMID:27576570

  12. Molecular Dynamics Study of Gramicidin A in Lipid Bilayer: Electrostatic Map and Ion Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Iwayama, Masashi; Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Mizukami, Taku; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Takasu, Masako; Nagao, Hidemi

    The electrostatic potential (ESP) of gramicidin A (GA) in the DMPC lipid bilayers with/without an external uniform electrostatic field was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. We found that the ESP profile with an external electrostatic field became step shape. The water and polar groups of the lipid and GA are rearranged in order to restore a flat ESP in the water bulk and GA channel interior. The reorientation of the polar head group enhances the ESP difference between each hydration regions of the membrane, and this should yield an increase of ion conductance through the GA channel.

  13. Unraveling the electrical conduction of C-40 quasi-fullerene molecular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rupan Preet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the state of art theoretical calculations of charge transport through quasi-fullerene molecule C40 coupled rigidly between two 3D gold electrodes by applying different electro-chemical potentials. The methodology we adopted has been based on density functional theory approach combined with Keldysh’s non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) framework suggested for mesoscopic systems. The results exhibited by this molecular junction confirmed it to be highly metallic and showed prominent conduction of the order of twice of the quantum conductance, i.e., 2*G0 at zero bias. Our results are consistent with theoretical predictions in ab initiocalculations with some variants of quasi-fullerenes.

  14. Deleterious Effects of Exact Exchange Functionals on Predictions of Molecular Conductance.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qingguo; Yamada, Atsushi; Baer, Roi; Dunietz, Barry D

    2016-08-01

    Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) describes well the atomistic structure of molecular junctions and their coupling to the semi-infinite metallic electrodes but severely overestimates conductance due to the spuriously large density of charge-carrier states of the KS system. Previous works show that inclusion of appropriate amounts of nonlocal exchange in the functional can fix the problem and provide realistic conductance estimates. Here however we discover that nonlocal exchange can also lead to deleterious effects which artificially overestimate transmittance even beyond the KS-DFT prediction. The effect is a result of exchange coupling between nonoverlapping states of diradical character. We prescribe a practical recipe for eliminating such artifacts. PMID:27454778

  15. Molecularly Rigid Microporous Polyamine Captures and Stabilizes Conducting Platinum Nanoparticle Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Daping; He, Dong Sheng; Yang, Jinlong; Low, Ze-Xian; Malpass-Evans, Richard; Carta, Mariolino; McKeown, Neil B; Marken, Frank

    2016-08-31

    A molecularly rigid polyamine based on a polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-EA-TB) is shown to capture and stabilize platinum nanoparticles during colloid synthesis in the rigid framework. Stabilization here refers to avoiding aggregation without loss of surface reactivity. In the resulting rigid framework with embedded platinum nanoparticles, the volume ratio of platinum to PIM-EA-TB in starting materials is varied systematically from approximately 1.0 to 0.1 with the resulting platinum nanoparticle diameter varying from approximately 4.2 to 3.1 nm, respectively. Elemental analysis suggests that only a fraction of the polymer is "captured" to give nanocomposites rich in platinum. A transition occurs from electrically conducting and electrochemically active (with shorter average interparticle distance) to nonconducting and only partially electrochemically active (with longer average interparticle distance) polymer-platinum composites. The conducting nanoparticle network in the porous rigid macromolecular framework could be beneficial in electrocatalysis and in sensing applications. PMID:27509837

  16. [Molecular epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species isolated from urine samples of patients in intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Yüksekkaya, Serife; Fındık, Duygu; Arslan, Uğur

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse the amphotericin B and fluconazole susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of Candida strains (Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata) isolated from the urine samples of patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit. Identification of the isolates was done according to microscopic morphology (chlamydospor, blastospor, pseudohyphae and true hyphae) on cornmeal agar, germ tube formation and carbohydrate assimilation patterns (API ID 32C bioMérieux, France). Antifungal susceptibilities of the isolates were determined by in vitro broth microdilution method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). To investigate the clonal relationship of the isolates, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was performed by using Cnd3 primer. Of the 56 Candida isolates minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges, MIC50 and MIC90 values for amphotericin B were 0.125-1 µg/ml, 0.125 and 0.5 µg/ml for C.albicans, 0.125-1 µg/ml, 0.25 and 1 µg/ml for C.tropicalis and 0.125-1 µg/ml, 0.25 and 1 µg/ml for C.glabrata, respectively. Fluconazole MIC ranges, MIC50 and MIC90 values were 0.25-4 µg/ml, 0.25 and 0.5 µg/ml for C.albicans, 0.25-16 µg/ml, 0.5 and 1 µg/ml for C.tropicalis and 0.5-64 µg/ml, 8 and 16 µg/ml for C.glabrata, respectively. For amphotericin B, none of the isolates had high MIC values (MIC > 1 µg/ml). While one of the C.glabrata isolates was resistant to fluconazole (MIC ≥ 64 µg/ml), one C.tropicalis and two C.glabrata isolates were dose-dependent susceptible (MIC: 16-32 µg/ml). The results of RAPD analysis indicated an exogenous spread from two clones for C.albicans, one clone for C.glabrata and one clone for C.tropicalis. This study underlines the importance of molecular epidemiological analysis of clinical samples together with hospital environmental samples in terms of Candida spp. To determine the exogenous origin for the related strains and to prevent

  17. Prevalence and molecular epidemiological data on Dirofilaria immitis in dogs from Northeastern States of India.

    PubMed

    Borthakur, Sonjoy Kumar; Deka, Dilip Kumar; Islam, Saidul; Sarma, Dilip Kumar; Sarmah, Prabhat Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis in stray, pet, and working dogs (n = 413, 266, and 103, resp.) from Guwahati (Assam) and Aizawl (Mizoram), areas located in two Northeastern States of India. Diagnostic methods applied were microscopy (wet film and Knott's concentration technique), immunological test (Ag ELISA by SNAP 4Dx ELISA kit), and molecular tools (polymerase chain reaction and sequencing), which evidenced 11.38, 18.03, and 13.93% of positive animals, respectively. No significant differences were observed by area (18.23% versus 17.68%) nor by sex (18.1% versus 17.9%), whereas stray dogs proved more infected than other groups (P < 0.05). ELISA test evidenced an overall 22.69% of occult infections, mainly in working dogs (60%), and molecular techniques detected Dirofilaria (Nochtiella) repens in 4 stray dogs from Guwahati. Characterization of D. immitis isolates for ITS-2 region showed close identity with South Asian isolates.

  18. Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiological Data on Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs from Northeastern States of India

    PubMed Central

    Borthakur, Sonjoy Kumar; Deka, Dilip Kumar; Islam, Saidul; Sarma, Dilip Kumar; Sarmah, Prabhat Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis in stray, pet, and working dogs (n = 413, 266, and 103, resp.) from Guwahati (Assam) and Aizawl (Mizoram), areas located in two Northeastern States of India. Diagnostic methods applied were microscopy (wet film and Knott's concentration technique), immunological test (Ag ELISA by SNAP 4Dx ELISA kit), and molecular tools (polymerase chain reaction and sequencing), which evidenced 11.38, 18.03, and 13.93% of positive animals, respectively. No significant differences were observed by area (18.23% versus 17.68%) nor by sex (18.1% versus 17.9%), whereas stray dogs proved more infected than other groups (P < 0.05). ELISA test evidenced an overall 22.69% of occult infections, mainly in working dogs (60%), and molecular techniques detected Dirofilaria (Nochtiella) repens in 4 stray dogs from Guwahati. Characterization of D. immitis isolates for ITS-2 region showed close identity with South Asian isolates. PMID:25685835

  19. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium parvum in dairy calves in Punjab (India).

    PubMed

    Joute, J R; Gill, J P S; Singh, B B

    2016-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important zoonotic protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal tract of vertebrate animals and man. The current study was contemplated for molecular detection of Cryptosporidium species prevalent in dairy calves in Punjab, India. A total of 302 faecal samples were screened by modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Molecular characterisation was done using PCR followed by sequence analysis of the representative isolates. An overall prevalence of 26.15 % was obtained with the highest prevalence obtained in 0-30 day old calves in both diarrhoeic and non-diarrhoeic animals. PCR analysis revealed the expected bands at 1,325 and 835 bp from all the isolates for primary and secondary/nested PCR respectively. Ten representative samples were sequenced in both directions. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of C. parvum in all the samples. The high rate of calves infected with C. parvum can act as a great source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis which indicates a potential risk of zoonotic transmission from animal to human beings in Punjab (India). PMID:27605777

  20. Molecular epidemiology of betanodaviruses isolated from sea bass and sea bream cultured along the Tunisian coasts.

    PubMed

    Haddad-Boubaker, Sondès; Bigarré, Laurent; Bouzgarou, Nadia; Megdich, Aida; Baud, Marine; Cabon, Joëlle; Chéhida, Noureddine Ben

    2013-06-01

    Viral nervous necrosis (VNN) is a serious viral disease affecting farmed sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Only scarce molecular data are available on the disease-causing betanodavirus populations in Tunisia. Therefore, we carried out the first molecular survey of betanodaviruses in farmed sea bass and sea bream (Sparus aurata) along the Tunisian coasts. Among 81 samples from five farms, 20 tested positive with RT-PCR, not only in clinical cases but also in asymptomatic fish before and during outbreaks. Positive fish were found in all farms, except in one farm investigated in the south of Tunisia. Sequencing the fragments of both genomic components (RNA1 and RNA2) in 16 isolates revealed that the Tunisian viruses were related to the red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) genotype. Furthermore, the newly sequenced isolates were generally highly related to one another suggesting a recent common ancestor. They also showed high identities with other isolates obtained from wild fishes in the Mediterranean, but were slightly more divergent from strains recently obtained from farmed fishes in the Mediterranean. The poor genetic diversity of the viral population along the Tunisian coasts is striking. One hypothesis is that it is the result of the maintenance of a homogenous genetic pool among infected wild fish, groupers for instance and subsequent dissemination to farmed fish over the seasons. PMID:23288625

  1. Comparison of PCR-based approaches to molecular epidemiologic analysis of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, M C; Stock, F; DeGirolami, P C; Samore, M H; Cartwright, C P

    1996-01-01

    Representative isolates of the 10 serogroups of Clostridium difficile and 39 clinical isolates (30 toxigenic and 9 nontoxigenic), including 5 isolates from a confirmed nosocomial outbreak, were analyzed by using two previously described arbitrary-primer PCR (AP-PCR) molecular typing methodologies (AP-PG05 and AP-ARB11) and PCR ribotyping. The two AP-PCR methods investigated gave comparable results; AP-PG05 and AP-ARB11 identified 8 and 7 groups among the serogroup isolates and classified the clinical isolates into 21 and 20 distinct groups, respectively. PCR ribotyping also identified 8 unique groups among the serogroup isolates but classified the clinical isolates into 23 groups. In addition, when results obtained by the PCR methods were compared with typing data generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), PCR ribotyping and PFGE were found to be in agreement for 83% (29 of 35) of isolates typeable by both techniques while AP-PG05 was in agreement with PFGE for 60% (20 of 33) and AP-ARB11 was in agreement with PFGE for only 44% (17 of 36). These results indicate that PCR ribotyping is a more discriminatory approach than AP-PCR for typing C. difficile and, furthermore, that this technique generates results that are in higher concordance with those obtained by using an established method for differentiating isolates of this organism on a molecular level than are results generated by using AP-PCR. PMID:8727893

  2. Molecular and epidemiologic findings of childhood acute leukemia in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Quesada, Carlos; Vargas, Mario; Venegas, Patricia; Calvo, Melvin; Obando, Catalina; Valverde, Berta; Cartín, Walter; Carrillo, Juan Manuel; Jimenez, Rafael; González, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    In Central America, nearly 70% of pediatric cancer is related to hemato-oncologic disorders, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Preliminary studies have described a high incidence of childhood leukemia in these countries; however, no molecular analyses of these malignancies have yet been carried out. We studied diagnostic samples from 84 patients from the National Children's Hospital in San Jose, Costa Rica (65 precursor B-ALL, 5 T-cell ALL, and 14 acute myeloblastic leukemia). Our methodology included cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction approaches. The observed rate of leukemia was 52.2 cases per million children per year. Twelve out of 65 (18.4%) precursor B-ALL tested positive for TEL-AML1 and 3 cases for BCR-ABL (4.6%). In addition, we detected 2 patients carrying an E2A-PBX1 transcript (3.1%) and 1 patient with an MLL-AF4 fusion gene (1.5%). None of the T-cell ALL cases were positive for either SIL-TAL1 or HOX11L2. Within 14 acute myeloblastic leukemia patients, we confirmed 2 cases with FLT3-internal tandem duplication+, 1 patient with AML1-ETO, and only 1 case carrying a PML-RARalpha rearrangement. The present study confirms the relatively high incidence of pediatric leukemia in Costa Rica and constitutes the first report regarding the incidence of the main molecular alterations of childhood leukemia in our region.

  3. Molecular dynamics prediction of phonon-mediated thermal conductivity of f.c.c. Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evteev, Alexander V.; Momenzadeh, Leila; Levchenko, Elena V.; Belova, Irina V.; Murch, Graeme E.

    2014-03-01

    The phonon-mediated thermal conductivity of f.c.c. Cu is investigated in detail in the temperature range 40-1300 K. The calculations are performed in the framework of equilibrium molecular dynamics making use of the Green-Kubo formalism and one of the most reliable embedded-atom method potentials for Cu. It is found that the temporal decay of the heat current autocorrelation function (HCACF) of the Cu model at low and intermediate temperatures demonstrate a more complex behaviour than the two-stage decay observed previously for the f.c.c. Ar model. After the first stage of decay, it demonstrates a peak in the temperature range 40-800 K. A decomposition model of the HCACF is introduced. In the framework of that model we demonstrate that a classical description of the phonon thermal transport in the Cu model can be used down to around one quarter of the Debye temperature (about 90 K). Also, we find that above 300 K the thermal conductivity of the Cu model varies with temperature more rapidly than ?, following an exponent close to -1.4 in agreement with previous calculations on the Ar model. Phonon thermal conductivity of Cu is found to be about one order of magnitude higher than Ar. The phonon contribution to the total thermal conductivity of Cu can be estimated to be about 0.5% at 1300 K and about 10% at 90 K.

  4. Methodology for determining the electronic thermal conductivity of metals via direct nonequilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Sheng-Ying; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Stackhouse, Stephen; Qin, Guangzhao; Di Napoli, Edoardo; Hu, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Many physical properties of metals can be understood in terms of the free electron model, as proven by the Wiedemann-Franz law. According to this model, electronic thermal conductivity can be inferred from the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE). However, the BTE does not perform well for some complex metals, such as Cu. Moreover, the BTE cannot clearly describe the origin of the thermal energy carried by electrons or how this energy is transported in metals. The charge distribution of conduction electrons in metals is known to reflect the electrostatic potential of the ion cores. Based on this premise, we develop a methodology for evaluating electronic thermal conductivity of metals by combining the free electron model and nonequilibrium ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We confirm that the kinetic energy of thermally excited electrons originates from the energy of the spatial electrostatic potential oscillation, which is induced by the thermal motion of ion cores. This method directly predicts the electronic thermal conductivity of pure metals with a high degree of accuracy, without explicitly addressing any complicated scattering processes of free electrons. Our methodology offers a route to understand the physics of heat transfer by electrons at the atomistic level. The methodology can be further extended to the study of similar electron-involved problems in materials, such as electron-phonon coupling, which is underway currently.

  5. Thermal boundary conductance between Al films and GaN nanowires investigated with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Wang; Jones, Reese E; Hopkins, Patrick E; Beechem, Thomas E

    2014-05-28

    GaN nanowires are being pursued for optoelectronic and high-power applications. In either use, increases in operating temperature reduce both performance and reliability making it imperative to minimize thermal resistances. Since interfaces significantly influence the thermal response of nanosystems, the thermal boundary resistance between GaN nanowires and metal contacts has major significance. In response, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations to study the thermal boundary conductance between GaN nanowires and Al films as a function of nanowire dimensions, packing density, and the depth the nanowire is embedded into the metal contact. At low packing densities, the apparent Kapitza conductance between GaN nanowires and an aluminum film is shown to be larger than when contact is made between films of these same materials. This enhancement decreases toward the film-film limit, however, as the packing density increases. For densely packed nanowires, maximizing the Kapitza conductance can be achieved by embedding the nanowires into the films, as the conductance is found to be proportional to the total contact area.

  6. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  7. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  8. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors. PMID:26931711

  9. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Carrying aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS1 and blaSPM Genes in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Bruna Fuga; Ferreira, Melina Lorraine; de Campos, Paola Amaral; Royer, Sabrina; Batistão, Deivid William da Fonseca; Dantas, Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti; Gonçalves, Iara Rossi; Faria, Ana Luiza Souza; de Brito, Cristiane Silveira; Yokosawa, Jonny; Gontijo-Filho, Paulo Pinto; Ribas, Rosineide Marques

    2016-01-01

    We described a comprehensive analysis of the molecular epidemiology of multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. Molecular analysis included typing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis, identification of genes of interest through PCR-based assays and sequencing of target genes. Case-control study was conducted to better understand the prognostic of patients and the impact of inappropriate therapy in patients with bacteremia, as well as the risk factors of MDR infections. We observed a high rate of MDR isolates (40.7%), and 51.0% of them was independently associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Bacteremia was detected in 66.9% of patients, and prolonged hospital stay was expressive in those resistant to fluoroquinolone. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR), qnrS1 and aac(6’)Ib-cr, were detected in two different nosocomial isolates (5.3%), and the aac(6’)-Ib7 variant was detected at a high frequency (87.5%) in those negative to PMQR. The presence of mutations in gyrA and parC genes was observed in 100% and 85% of selected isolates, respectively. Isolates harboring PMQR genes or mutations in gyrA and parC were not closely related, except in those containing SPM (São Paulo metallo-β-lactamase) clone. In addition, there is no study published in Brazil to date reporting the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates harboring both qnrS1 and aac(6’)Ib-cr genes, with alarming frequency of patients with inappropriate therapy. PMID:27219003

  10. Ensemble Sampling vs. Time Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Singh, David J.; Henry, Asegun

    2015-01-29

    In this report we compare time sampling and ensemble averaging as two different methods available for phase space sampling. For the comparison, we calculate thermal conductivities of solid argon and silicon structures, using equilibrium molecular dynamics. We introduce two different schemes for the ensemble averaging approach, and show that both can reduce the total simulation time as compared to time averaging. It is also found that velocity rescaling is an efficient mechanism for phase space exploration. Although our methodology is tested using classical molecular dynamics, the ensemble generation approaches may find their greatest utility in computationally expensive simulations such asmore » first principles molecular dynamics. For such simulations, where each time step is costly, time sampling can require long simulation times because each time step must be evaluated sequentially and therefore phase space averaging is achieved through sequential operations. On the other hand, with ensemble averaging, phase space sampling can be achieved through parallel operations, since each ensemble is independent. For this reason, particularly when using massively parallel architectures, ensemble sampling can result in much shorter simulation times and exhibits similar overall computational effort.« less

  11. Ensemble Sampling vs. Time Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gordiz, Kiarash; Singh, David J.; Henry, Asegun

    2015-01-29

    In this report we compare time sampling and ensemble averaging as two different methods available for phase space sampling. For the comparison, we calculate thermal conductivities of solid argon and silicon structures, using equilibrium molecular dynamics. We introduce two different schemes for the ensemble averaging approach, and show that both can reduce the total simulation time as compared to time averaging. It is also found that velocity rescaling is an efficient mechanism for phase space exploration. Although our methodology is tested using classical molecular dynamics, the ensemble generation approaches may find their greatest utility in computationally expensive simulations such as first principles molecular dynamics. For such simulations, where each time step is costly, time sampling can require long simulation times because each time step must be evaluated sequentially and therefore phase space averaging is achieved through sequential operations. On the other hand, with ensemble averaging, phase space sampling can be achieved through parallel operations, since each ensemble is independent. For this reason, particularly when using massively parallel architectures, ensemble sampling can result in much shorter simulation times and exhibits similar overall computational effort.

  12. Revisiting the supernumerary: the epidemiological and molecular basis of extra teeth.

    PubMed

    Fleming, P S; Xavier, G M; DiBiase, A T; Cobourne, M T

    2010-01-01

    Supernumerary teeth are a common clinical and radiographic finding and may produce occlusal and dental problems. The aetiological basis of extra teeth is poorly understood in human populations; however, the mouse provides a useful model system to investigate the complex genetics of tooth development. This article describes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of supernumerary teeth. We have reviewed biological evidence that provides insight into why supernumerary tooth formation may occur. Indeed, many of the molecular signalling pathways known to be involved in normal development of the tooth germ can also give rise to additional teeth if inappropriately regulated. These include components of the Hedgehog, FGF, Wnt, TNF and BMP families, which provide a useful resource of candidate genes that may potentially play a role in human supernumerary tooth formation. PMID:20057458

  13. From ancient to contemporary molecular eco-epidemiology of Chagas disease in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Guhl, Felipe; Auderheide, Arthur; Ramírez, Juan David

    2014-08-01

    One of the best-studied populations with regard to Chagas disease is from the coastal area of northern Chile at the foot of the western Andean slopes. The extremely arid climate here generates rapid, spontaneous desiccation of buried bodies, arresting the decay process. The absence of rainfall then preserves these dried bodies (mummies) for millennia. The aim of the present study was to perform the first molecular paleoepidemiological study on a set of 43 mummified human remains from the Atacama Desert in Northern Chile in order to elucidate the transmission dynamics and determinants of ancient genotypes, to try to unravel the natural history of the Trypanosoma cruzi taxon and Chagas disease. Interestingly, TcBat, a recently described Discrete Taxonomic Unit, emerges as the plausible ancestor of T. cruzi. The findings herein presented allow us to present a plausible model of T. cruzi transmission in pre-Columbian civilisations. PMID:24675555

  14. Combining molecular dynamics and an electrodiffusion model to calculate ion channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael A; Nguyen, Thuy Hien; Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-12-14

    Establishing the relation between the structures and functions of protein ion channels, which are protein assemblies that facilitate transmembrane ion transport through water-filled pores, is at the forefront of biological and medical sciences. A reliable way to determine whether our understanding of this relation is satisfactory is to reproduce the measured ionic conductance over a broad range of applied voltages. This can be done in molecular dynamics simulations by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. Since this approach is computationally very expensive we develop a markedly more efficient alternative in which molecular dynamics is combined with an electrodiffusion equation. This alternative approach applies if steady-state ion transport through channels can be described with sufficient accuracy by the one-dimensional diffusion equation in the potential given by the free energy profile and applied voltage. The theory refers only to line densities of ions in the channel and, therefore, avoids ambiguities related to determining the surface area of the channel near its endpoints or other procedures connecting the line and bulk ion densities. We apply the theory to a simple, model system based on the trichotoxin channel. We test the assumptions of the electrodiffusion equation, and determine the precision and consistency of the calculated conductance. We demonstrate that it is possible to calculate current/voltage dependence and accurately reconstruct the underlying (equilibrium) free energy profile, all from molecular dynamics simulations at a single voltage. The approach developed here applies to other channels that satisfy the conditions of the electrodiffusion equation. PMID:25494790

  15. Prevalence and molecular epidemiology of porcine cysticercosis in naturally infected pigs (Sus scrofa) in Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Chawhan, P; Singh, B; Sharma, R; Gill, P S

    2015-12-01

    Porcine cysticercosis is a serious zoonosis in resource-poor countries. Despite the evidence showing that the disease is endemic in the Punjab region of India, molecular characterisation of Taenia solium cysticercosis from naturally infected pigs has not been carried out. The authors examined a total of 519 pigs slaughtered in small slaughter shops (shops that sell meat from animals that are slaughtered on the premises as the customer waits) in the urban slums of Punjab state in northern India. The expected polymerase chain reaction products with molecular sizes of 286 bp, 420 bp, 1150 bp and 333 bp corresponding to the targeted large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA), cytochrome oxidase 1, internal transcribed spacer 1, and diagnostic antigen Ts14 genes, respectively, were amplified from the cysts collected from all 22 infected carcasses. The detection limits for the respective primers (except those targeting the Ts14 gene) were estimated. The analytical sensitivities of both the TBR and JB primers (targeting the rRNA and cytochrome oxidase genes, respectively) were found to be higher (10 pg) than that of the internal transcribed spacer 1 gene (1 ng) primers. Ten representative samples from cytochrome oxidase 1 gene amplified products were sequenced in both directions for phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing demonstrated that all cysticerci were of the Asian genotype of T. solium and not of the African/Latin American genotype or T. asiatica. The results confirm the presence of T. solium porcine cysticercosis in Punjab state and there is therefore an urgent need for science-based policies for prevention and control of this serious zoonosis. PMID:27044164

  16. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Influenza Viruses Circulating within European Swine between 2009 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Simon J.; Langat, Pinky; Reid, Scott M.; Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Cotten, Matthew; Kelly, Michael; Van Reeth, Kristien; Qiu, Yu; Simon, Gaëlle; Bonin, Emilie; Foni, Emanuela; Chiapponi, Chiara; Larsen, Lars; Hjulsager, Charlotte; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Urbaniak, Kinga; Dürrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Huovilainen, Anita; Davidson, Irit; Dán, Ádám; Loeffen, Willie; Edwards, Stephanie; Bublot, Michel; Vila, Thais; Maldonado, Jaime; Valls, Laura; Brown, Ian H.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence in humans of the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, a complex reassortant virus of swine origin, highlighted the importance of worldwide influenza virus surveillance in swine. To date, large-scale surveillance studies have been reported for southern China and North America, but such data have not yet been described for Europe. We report the first large-scale genomic characterization of 290 swine influenza viruses collected from 14 European countries between 2009 and 2013. A total of 23 distinct genotypes were identified, with the 7 most common comprising 82% of the incidence. Contrasting epidemiological dynamics were observed for two of these genotypes, H1huN2 and H3N2, with the former showing multiple long-lived geographically isolated lineages, while the latter had short-lived geographically diffuse lineages. At least 32 human-swine transmission events have resulted in A(H1N1)pdm09 becoming established at a mean frequency of 8% across European countries. Notably, swine in the United Kingdom have largely had a replacement of the endemic Eurasian avian virus-like (“avian-like”) genotypes with A(H1N1)pdm09-derived genotypes. The high number of reassortant genotypes observed in European swine, combined with the identification of a genotype similar to the A(H3N2)v genotype in North America, underlines the importance of continued swine surveillance in Europe for the purposes of maintaining public health. This report further reveals that the emergences and drivers of virus evolution in swine differ at the global level. IMPORTANCE The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus contains a reassortant genome with segments derived from separate virus lineages that evolved in different regions of the world. In particular, its neuraminidase and matrix segments were derived from the Eurasian avian virus-like (“avian-like”) lineage that emerged in European swine in the 1970s. However, while large-scale genomic characterization of swine has been reported for southern

  17. Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Porcine kobuvirus and Its Coinfection Rate with PEDV and SaV in Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Porcine kobuvirus (PKV) has circulated throughout China in recent years. Although many studies have detected it throughout the world, its molecular epidemiology has not been characterized in northwest China. To understand its prevalence, 203 fecal samples were collected from different regions of Gansu Province and tested with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In this study, we tested these samples for PKV, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), and sapovirus and analyzed the amplified 2C gene fragments of PKV. Overall, 126 (62.1%) samples were positive for PKV. Of the 74 piglets samples among the 203 fecal samples, 65 (87.8%) were positive for PKV. PKV infection was often accompanied by PEDV, but the relationship between the two viruses must be confirmed. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the PKV strains isolated from the same regions clustered on the same branches. This investigation shows that PKV infections are highly prevalent in pigs in northwest China, especially in piglets with symptoms of diarrhea. PMID:27294133

  18. Molecular Epidemiological Investigation of Porcine kobuvirus and Its Coinfection Rate with PEDV and SaV in Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lan, Xi; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Porcine kobuvirus (PKV) has circulated throughout China in recent years. Although many studies have detected it throughout the world, its molecular epidemiology has not been characterized in northwest China. To understand its prevalence, 203 fecal samples were collected from different regions of Gansu Province and tested with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In this study, we tested these samples for PKV, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), and sapovirus and analyzed the amplified 2C gene fragments of PKV. Overall, 126 (62.1%) samples were positive for PKV. Of the 74 piglets samples among the 203 fecal samples, 65 (87.8%) were positive for PKV. PKV infection was often accompanied by PEDV, but the relationship between the two viruses must be confirmed. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the PKV strains isolated from the same regions clustered on the same branches. This investigation shows that PKV infections are highly prevalent in pigs in northwest China, especially in piglets with symptoms of diarrhea. PMID:27294133

  19. Molecular epidemiology of canine picornavirus in Hong Kong and Dubai and proposal of a novel genus in Picornaviridae.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Choi, Garnet K Y; Huang, Yi; Sivakumar, Saritha; Tsoi, Hoi-Wah; Yip, Cyril C Y; Jose, Shanty V; Bai, Ru; Wong, Emily Y M; Joseph, Marina; Li, Tong; Wernery, Ulrich; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-07-01

    Previously, we reported the discovery of a novel canine picornavirus (CanPV) in the fecal sample of a dog. In this molecular epidemiology study, CanPV was detected in 15 (1.11%) of 1347 canine fecal samples from Hong Kong and one (0.76%) of 131 canine fecal samples from Dubai, with viral loads 1.06×10(3) to 6.64×10(6) copies/ml. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis showed that CanPV was clustered with feline picornavirus (FePV), bat picornavirus (BatPV) 1 to 3, Ia io picornavirus 1 (IaioPV1) and bovine picornavirus (BoPV), and this cluster was most closely related to the genera Enterovirus and Sapelovirus. The Ka/Ks ratios of all the coding regions were <0.1. According to the definition of the Picornavirus Study Group of ICTV, CanPV, FePV, BatPV 1 to 3, IaioPV1 and BoPV should constitute a novel genus in Picornaviridae. BEAST analysis showed that this genus diverged from its most closely related genus, Sapelovirus, about 49 years ago.

  20. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology.

    PubMed

    Gessain, Antoine; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Turpin, Jocelyn; Mahieux, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Non-human primates are considered to be likely sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by some retroviruses, as the simian immunodeficiency viruses and the simian T lymphotropic viruses, which have the ability to cross-species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread. This leads to a pandemic situation for HIV-1 or an endemic one for HTLV-1. Here, we present the available data on the discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology of the recently discovered HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 deltaretroviruses, as well as the simian foamy retroviruses present in different human populations at risk, especially in central African hunters. We discuss also the natural history in humans of these retroviruses of zoonotic origin (magnitude and geographical distribution, possible inter-human transmission). In Central Africa, the increase of the bushmeat trade during the last decades has opened new possibilities for retroviral emergence in humans, especially in immuno-compromised persons.

  1. Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis in Border Collie Dogs in Japan: Clinical and Molecular Epidemiological Study (2000–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Kawamichi, Takuji; Koie, Hiroshi; Tamura, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Imamoto, Shigeki; Saito, Miyoko; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Matsuki, Naoaki; Tamahara, Satoshi; Sato, Shigenobu; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is an inherited, neurodegenerative lysosomal disease that causes premature death. The present study describes the clinical and molecular epidemiologic findings of NCL in Border Collies in Japan for 12 years, between 2000 and 2011. The number of affected dogs was surveyed, and their clinical characteristics were analyzed. In 4 kennels with affected dogs, the dogs were genotyped. The genetic relationships of all affected dogs and carriers identified were analyzed. The survey revealed 27 affected dogs, but there was a decreasing trend at the end of the study period. The clinical characteristics of these affected dogs were updated in detail. The genotyping survey demonstrated a high mutant allele frequency in examined kennels (34.8%). The pedigree analysis demonstrated that all affected dogs and carriers in Japan are related to some presumptive carriers imported from Oceania and having a common ancestor. The current high prevalence in Japan might be due to an overuse of these carriers by breeders without any knowledge of the disease. For NCL control and prevention, it is necessary to examine all breeding dogs, especially in kennels with a high prevalence. Such endeavors will reduce NCL prevalence and may already be contributing to the recent decreasing trend in Japan. PMID:22919312

  2. Molecular epidemiological characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates originating from food poisoning outbreaks that occurred in Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasunori; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Hu, Dong-Liang; Sato'o, Yusuke; Ono, Hisaya K; Monma, Chie; Arai, Teruyoshi; Konishi, Noriko; Kato, Rei; Hirai, Akihiko; Nakama, Akiko; Kai, Akemi; Kamata, Yoichi

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP), one of the commonest food-borne diseases, results from the ingestion of one or more staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) produced in foods by Staphylococcus aureus. In the present study, 203 S. aureus strains originating from 83 outbreaks that had occurred in Tokyo were examined for their coagulase type and genotype of SEs to analyze their molecular epidemiological characteristics. The representative subsets of the 83 S. aureus isolates were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and S. aureus pathogenicity island (SaPI) scanning. The isolates were integrated into eight specific clonal complexes (CC) s; CC81, CC8, CC6, CC5, CC508, CC59, CC20 and CC30. The profiles of the coagulase type, SE/SEl genotype and the suspected type of enterotoxin-encoding mobile genetic element (MGE) indicated a correlation with each CC. SaPI scanning showed fixed regularity between the distributions of genomic islands, including SaPIs, and the phylogenetic lineage based on MLST. These results indicate that the S. aureus isolates, which classified into eight CCs, have distinguishable properties concerning specific coagulase type, enterotoxin genotype and MGE type. Strains of S. aureus harboring these particular elements possess the potential to cause SFP.

  3. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV Type 1 CRF02_AG in Cameroon and African Patients Living in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Véras, Nazle Mendonca Collaço; Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Gray, Rebecca R.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Presti, Alessandra Lo; Olearo, Flaminia; Cappelli, Giulia; Colizzi, Vittorio; Takou, Desiré; Torimiro, Judith; Russo, Gianluca; Callegaro, Annapaola; Salpini, Romina; D'Arrigo, Roberta; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Ciccozzi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 CRF02_AG accounts for >50% of infected individuals in Cameroon. CRF02_AG prevalence has been increasing both in Africa and Europe, particularly in Italy because of migrations from the sub-Saharan region. This study investigated the molecular epidemiology of CRF02_AG in Cameroon by employing Bayesian phylodynamics and analyzed the relationship between HIV-1 CRF02_AG isolates circulating in Italy and those prevalent in Africa to understand the link between the two epidemics. Among 291 Cameroonian reverse transcriptase sequences analyzed, about 70% clustered within three distinct clades, two of which shared a most recent common ancestor, all related to sequences from Western Africa. The major Cameroonian clades emerged during the mid-1970s and slowly spread during the next 30 years. Little or no geographic structure was detected within these clades. One of the major driving forces of the epidemic was likely the high accessibility between locations in Southern Cameroon contributing to the mobility of the population. The remaining Cameroonian sequences and the new strains isolated from Italian patients were interspersed mainly within West and Central African sequences in the tree, indicating a continuous exchange of CRF02_AG viral strains between Cameroon and other African countries, as well as multiple independent introductions in the Italian population. The evaluation of the spread of CRF02_AG may provide significant insight about the future dynamics of the Italian and European epidemic. PMID:21453131

  4. Molecular epidemiological investigation of G6PD deficiency by a gene chip among Chinese Hakka of southern Jiangxi province

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Lin, Min; Ye, Jun; Zheng, Bao-Ping; Jiang, Li-Xia; Zhu, Juan-Juan; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Lai, Mi; Zhong, Tian-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In southern China, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a significant health problem, and the incidence ranged from 0.5 to 4.08% in different Chinese population. The aims of this study are to investigate the molecular epidemiological characteristic of the G6PD gene among Chinese Hakka in southern Jiangxi province. 2331 unrelated subjects were screened for G6PD deficiency by a fluorescent test. DNA from deficient individuals was analyzed by a gene chip analysis for thirteen common Chinese G6PD mutations. In total, 3.60% (82/2331; 95% CI 2.77-4.27) of the sample were found to be G6PD-deficient. Eight mutations were found from 80 samples. However, mutation(s) for the two remaining samples were unknown. The most common mutations were G6PD Canton (1376 G>T) and G6PD Kaiping (1388 G>A), and the following mutations were 1311 polymorphism (1311 C>T), G6PD Gaohe (95 A>G), G6PD Chinese-5 (1024 C>T), G6PD Maewo (1360 C>T), Shunde (592 C>T), G6PD Viangchan (871 G>A) and Chinese-3 (493 A>G). This is the first report of G6PD deficiency among Chinese Hakka population in Jiangxi province. PMID:26823837

  5. Evolution and molecular epidemiology of classical swine fever virus during a multi-annual outbreak amongst European wild boar.

    PubMed

    Goller, Katja V; Gabriel, Claudia; Dimna, Mireille Le; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Rossi, Sophie; Staubach, Christoph; Merboth, Matthias; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever is a viral disease of pigs that carries tremendous socio-economic impact. In outbreak situations, genetic typing is carried out for the purpose of molecular epidemiology in both domestic pigs and wild boar. These analyses are usually based on harmonized partial sequences. However, for high-resolution analyses towards the understanding of genetic variability and virus evolution, full-genome sequences are more appropriate. In this study, a unique set of representative virus strains was investigated that was collected during an outbreak in French free-ranging wild boar in the Vosges-du-Nord mountains between 2003 an