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Sample records for conductive bacterial nanowires

  1. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  2. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorby, Yuri A.; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J.; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Hill, Eric A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kennedy, David W.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution. PMID:16849424

  3. Structure of the Type IVa Major Pilin from the Electrically Conductive Bacterial Nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Patrick N.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-10-11

    Several species of bacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires belong to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is over 85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  4. Structure of the type IVa major pilin from the electrically conductive bacterial nanowires of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Mueller, Karl T

    2013-10-11

    Several species of δ proteobacteria are capable of reducing insoluble metal oxides as well as other extracellular electron acceptors. These bacteria play a critical role in the cycling of minerals in subsurface environments, sediments, and groundwater. In some species of bacteria such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, the transport of electrons is proposed to be facilitated by filamentous fibers that are referred to as bacterial nanowires. These nanowires are polymeric assemblies of proteins belonging to the type IVa family of pilin proteins and are mainly comprised of one subunit protein, PilA. Here, we report the high resolution solution NMR structure of the PilA protein from G. sulfurreducens determined in detergent micelles. The protein is >85% α-helical and exhibits similar architecture to the N-terminal regions of other non-conductive type IVa pilins. The detergent micelle interacts with the first 21 amino acids of the protein, indicating that this region likely associates with the bacterial inner membrane prior to fiber formation. A model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus fiber is proposed based on docking of this structure into the fiber model of the type IVa pilin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This model provides insight into the organization of aromatic amino acids that are important for electrical conduction.

  5. Bacterial Nanowires: Is the Subsurface Hardwired?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, Y. A.; Davis, C. A.; Atekwana, E.

    2006-05-01

    Bacteria, ranging from oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacteria to heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria, produce electrically-conductive appendages referred to as bacterial nanowires. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, including Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens, produce electrically conductive nanowires in direct response to electron acceptor limitation and facilitate electron transfer to solid phase iron oxides. Nanowires produced by S. oneidensis strain MR-1, which served as our primary model organism, are functionalized by decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA that are distributed along the length of the nanowires. Mutants deficient in MtrC and OmcA produce nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants also differ from wild type cells in their ability to reduce solid phase iron oxides, to produce electrical current in a mediator less microbial fuel cell, and to form complex biofilms at air liquid interfaces. Recent results obtained using direct cell counts and low frequency electrical measurements demonstrate that microbial growth correlated with real and imaginary electrical conductivity response in uncoated silica sand columns. Direct observation of packing material with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) revealed a fine network of extracellular structures that were morphologically similar to nanowires observed in metal reducing bacteria. No such structures were observed in control columns. We hypothesize that microbial nanowires may in part be responsible for the electrical response observed in the biostimulated columns.

  6. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  7. Bacterial Nanowires Facilitate Extracellular Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorby, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria, including Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens, produce electrically conductive nanowires that facilitate electron transfer to solid phase iron oxides. Nanowires produced by S. oneidensis strain MR-1 are functionalized by decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA that are distributed along the length of the nanowires, as confirmed by immunolocalization experiments using peptide specific antibodies. Mutants lacking MtrC and OmcA produce nanowires that were poorly conductive, are unable to reduce solid phase iron oxides, and do not produce electric current in microbial fuel cells. Although less completely characterized, nanowires are also produced by organisms throughout a broad metabolic spectrum, from sulfate reducing bacteria to oxygenic, phototrophic cyanobacteria. Our research suggests that electrically conductive nanowires may be common throughout the microbial world and may serve as structures for efficient electron transfer and energy dissemination in complex communities such as microbial mats and biofilms.

  8. Quantum Conductance in Metal Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    Quantum Conductance in Metal Nanowires D. Ugarte Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory C.P. 6192, 13084-971 Campinas SP, Brazil. Electrical transport properties of metallic nanowires (NWs) have received great attention due to their quantum conductance behavior. Atomic scale wires can be generated by stretching metal contacts; during the elongation and just before rupture, the NW conductance shows flat plateaus and abrupt jumps of approximately a conductance quantum. In this experiments, both the NW atomic arrangement and conductance change simultaneously, making difficult to discriminate electronic and structural effects. In this work, the atomic structure of NWs was studied by time-resolved in situ experiments in a high resolution transmission electron microscope, while their electrical properties using an UHV mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). From the analysis of numerous HRTEM images and videos, we have deduced that metal (Au, Ag, Pt, etc.) junctions generated by tensile deformation are crystalline and free of defects. The neck structure is strongly dependent on the surface properties of the analyzed metal, this was verified by comparing different metal NWs (Au, Ag, Cu), which have similar atomic structure (FCC), but show very different faceting patterns. The correlation between the observed structural and transport properties of NW points out that the quantum conductance behavior is defined by preferred atomic arrangement at the narrowest constriction. In the case of magnetic (ex. Fe,Co,Ni) or quasi-magnetic (ex. Pd) wires, we have observed that one-atom-thick structures show a conductance of half the quantum as expected for a fully spin polarized current. This phenomenon seems to occur spontaneously for magnetic suspended atom-chains in zero magnetic field and at room temperature. These results open new opportunities for spin control in nanostructures. Funded by FAPESP, LNLS and CNPq.

  9. Maskless electrodeposited contact for conducting polymer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangarter, Carlos M.; Bangar, Mangesh; Hernandez, Sandra C.; Chen, Wilfred; Deshusses, Marc A.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.

    2008-02-01

    This letter reports a simple and scalable method to create mechanical joints and electrical contacts of conducting polymer nanowires to electrodes by selective maskless metal electrodeposition on electrodes. This is an attractive route for contacting nanowires as it bypasses harsh processing conditions of conventional methods. The electrodeposition conditions and initial resistance of the nanowires were found to have a significant impact on the selective maskless deposition. Different dopants were also investigated to understand the polymer reduction during cathodic deposition of metal. A single dodecyl sulfate doped polypyrrole nanowire with maskless electrodeposited nickel contacts was shown to have improved sensitivity toward ammonia gas.

  10. Conductive Nanowires Templated by Molecular Brushes.

    PubMed

    Raguzin, Ivan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of conductive nanowires using polymer bottle brushes as templates. In our approach, we synthesized poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate methyl iodide quaternary salt brushes by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization, loaded them with palladium salt, and reduced them in order to form metallic nanowires with average lengths and widths of 300 and 20 nm, respectively. The obtained nanowires were deposited between conductive gold pads and were connected to them by sputtering of additional pads to form an electric circuit. We connected the nanowires in an electric circuit and demonstrated that the conductivity of these nanowires is around 100 S·m(-1). PMID:26418290

  11. Lattice thermal conductivity crossovers in semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mingo, N; Broido, D A

    2004-12-10

    For binary compound semiconductor nanowires, we find a striking relationship between the nanowire's thermal conductivity kappa(nwire), the bulk material's thermal conductivity kappa(bulk), and the mass ratio of the material's constituent atoms, r, as kappa(bulk)/kappa(nwire) (alpha) (1+1/r)(-3/2). A significant consequence is the presence of crossovers in which a material with higher bulk thermal conductivity than the rest is no longer the best nanowire thermal conductor. We show that this behavior stems from a change in the dominant phonon scattering mechanism with decreasing nanowire size. The results have important implications for nanoscale heat dissipation, thermoelectricity, and thermal conductivity of nanocomposites. PMID:15697834

  12. Single conducting polymer nanowire based conductometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangar, Mangesh Ashok

    The detection of toxic chemicals, gases or biological agents at very low concentrations with high sensitivity and selectivity has been subject of immense interest. Sensors employing electrical signal readout as transduction mechanism offer easy, label-free detection of target analyte in real-time. Traditional thin film sensors inherently suffered through loss of sensitivity due to current shunting across the charge depleted/added region upon analyte binding to the sensor surface, due to their large cross sectional area. This limitation was overcome by use of nanostructure such as nanowire/tube as transducer where current shunting during sensing was almost eliminated. Due to their benign chemical/electrochemical fabrication route along with excellent electrical properties and biocompatibility, conducting polymers offer cost-effective alternative over other nanostructures. Biggest obstacle in using these nanostructures is lack of easy, scalable and cost-effective way of assembling these nanostructures on prefabricated micropatterns for device fabrication. In this dissertation, three different approaches have been taken to fabricate individual or array of single conducting polymer (and metal) nanowire based devices and using polymer by itself or after functionalization with appropriate recognition molecule they have been applied for gas and biochemical detection. In the first approach electrochemical fabrication of multisegmented nanowires with middle functional Ppy segment along with ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) and end gold segments for better electrical contact was studied. This multi-layered nanowires were used along with ferromagnetic contact electrode for controlled magnetic assembly of nanowires into devices and were used for ammonia gas sensing. The second approach uses conducting polymer, polypyrrole (Ppy) nanowires using simple electrophoretic alignment and maskless electrodeposition to anchor nanowire which were further functionalized with antibodies against

  13. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs. PMID:23039084

  14. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Jeffrey M; Marconnet, Amy M; Kim, Dong Rip; Rao, Pratap M; Panzer, Matthew A; Goodson, Kenneth E; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-10-06

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs.

  15. Thermal conductivity in porous silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, Jeffrey M.; Marconnet, Amy M.; Kim, Dong Rip; Rao, Pratap M.; Panzer, Matthew A.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2012-10-01

    The nanoscale features in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) can suppress phonon propagation and strongly reduce their thermal conductivities compared to the bulk value. This work measures the thermal conductivity along the axial direction of SiNW arrays with varying nanowire diameters, doping concentrations, surface roughness, and internal porosities using nanosecond transient thermoreflectance. For SiNWs with diameters larger than the phonon mean free path, porosity substantially reduces the thermal conductivity, yielding thermal conductivities as low as 1 W/m/K in highly porous SiNWs. However, when the SiNW diameter is below the phonon mean free path, both the internal porosity and the diameter significantly contribute to phonon scattering and lead to reduced thermal conductivity of the SiNWs.

  16. The effect of nanowire length and diameter on the properties of transparent, conducting nanowire films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergin, Stephen M.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Rathmell, Aaron R.; Charbonneau, Patrick; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Wiley, Benjamin J.

    2012-03-01

    This article describes how the dimensions of nanowires affect the transmittance and sheet resistance of a random nanowire network. Silver nanowires with independently controlled lengths and diameters were synthesized with a gram-scale polyol synthesis by controlling the reaction temperature and time. Characterization of films composed of nanowires of different lengths but the same diameter enabled the quantification of the effect of length on the conductance and transmittance of silver nanowire films. Finite-difference time-domain calculations were used to determine the effect of nanowire diameter, overlap, and hole size on the transmittance of a nanowire network. For individual nanowires with diameters greater than 50 nm, increasing diameter increases the electrical conductance to optical extinction ratio, but the opposite is true for nanowires with diameters less than this size. Calculations and experimental data show that for a random network of nanowires, decreasing nanowire diameter increases the number density of nanowires at a given transmittance, leading to improved connectivity and conductivity at high transmittance (>90%). This information will facilitate the design of transparent, conducting nanowire films for flexible displays, organic light emitting diodes and thin-film solar cells.This article describes how the dimensions of nanowires affect the transmittance and sheet resistance of a random nanowire network. Silver nanowires with independently controlled lengths and diameters were synthesized with a gram-scale polyol synthesis by controlling the reaction temperature and time. Characterization of films composed of nanowires of different lengths but the same diameter enabled the quantification of the effect of length on the conductance and transmittance of silver nanowire films. Finite-difference time-domain calculations were used to determine the effect of nanowire diameter, overlap, and hole size on the transmittance of a nanowire network. For

  17. Thermal conductance of InAs nanowire composites.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ann I; Koh, Yee Kan; Cahill, David G; Samuelson, Lars; Linke, Heiner

    2009-12-01

    The ability to measure and understand heat flow in nanowire composites is crucial for applications ranging from high-speed electronics to thermoelectrics. Here we demonstrate the measurement of the thermal conductance of nanowire composites consisting of regular arrays of InAs nanowires embedded in PMMA using time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). On the basis of a proposed model for heat flow in the composite, we can, as a consistency check, extract the thermal conductivity Lambda of the InAs nanowires and find Lambda(NW) = 5.3 +/- 1.5 W m(-1) K(-1), in good agreement with theory and previous measurements of individual nanowires.

  18. Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

  19. Hopping conduction in single ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Ze; Zhou, Feng; Lu, Li; Jin, Aizi; Gu, Changzhi

    2005-06-01

    ZnO nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The dc electrical conductivity of a single ZnO nanowire was investigated over a wide temperature range from 300 to 6 K. It is found that the temperature dependence of conductivity follows the relation \\ln \\rho \\sim T^{-1/2} . The conductivity data suggest that the dominant conduction mechanism is Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping conduction. The strong electron-electron interaction in the nanowire is also proved by the I-V and d I/d V curves, on which there emerges a Coulomb gap-like structure at low temperatures.

  20. Growth of single conductive nanowires at prescribed loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuanding; Haynie, Donald T.

    2005-12-01

    Conductive 75 nm diameter nanowires have been self-assembled from aqueous solution between 15μm gap electrodes on a SiO2 substrate at predefined locations. Nanowire assembly was initiated by application an electric field, and it occurred along the direction of field lines where the field is strongest. Certain salts of palladium, but not of related metals, yielded nanowires under comparable conditions. The simple and straightforward approach to nanowire assembly outlined here could be used for nano/microscale device interconnection at precise positions at room temperature, important for device development, integration, and packaging.

  1. Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Cupronickel Nanowires for Transparent Conducting Nanowire Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rathmall, Aaron; Nguyen, Minh; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2012-01-01

    Nanowires of copper can be coated from liquids to create flexible, transparent conducting films that can potentially replace the dominant transparent conductor, indium tin oxide, in displays, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrochromic windows. One issue with these nanowire films is that copper is prone to oxidation. It was hypothesized that the resistance to oxidation could be improved by coating copper nanowires with nickel. This work demonstrates a method for synthesizing copper nanowires with nickel shells as well as the properties of cupronickel nanowires in transparent conducting films. Time- and temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements indicate that the sheet resistance of copper and silver nanowire films will double after 3 and 36 months at room temperature, respectively. In contrast, the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowires containing 20 mol % nickel will double in about 400 years. Coating copper nanowires to a ratio of 2:1 Cu:Ni gave them a neutral gray color, making them more suitable for use in displays and electrochromic windows. These properties, and the fact that copper and nickel are 1000 times more abundant than indium or silver, make cupronickel nanowires a promising alternative for the sustainable, efficient production of transparent conductors.

  2. Interpretation of optical conductivity of zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kaurav, N.

    2015-07-31

    The frequency dependent optical response of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanowires is theoretically analyzed within the two component schemes: one is the motion of coherent Drude electrons within the ZnO nanowire and the other is incoherent motion of electrons from one nanowire to other. The model has only one free parameter, the relaxation rate. The frequency dependent relaxation rates are expressed in terms of memory functions. The coherent Drude carriers form a sharp peak at zero frequency and a long tail at higher frequencies, i.e. in the infrared region. However, the hopping of carriers from one nanowire to other (incoherent motion of electrons) yields a peak value in the optical conductivity around mid infrared region. It is found that both the Drude and hopping carriers will contribute to the optical process of conduction in ZnO nanowire.

  3. Lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie

    2010-08-01

    We report detailed calculations of the lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires with diameters ranging from 20 to 140 nm. Results are compared with experimental data on GaN nanowires grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Calculations are based on the Boltzmann transport equation and take into account the change in the nonequilibrium phonon distribution in the case of diffuse scattering at the surfaces. Phonon dispersion relation is obtained in the elastic continuum approximation for each given nanowire. For valid comparisons with the experimental data, simulations are performed with a dopant concentration and impurity profile characteristic of thermal CVD GaN nanowires. Our results show that the room-temperature thermal conductivity of the nanowires has very low values, ranging from 6.74 W/m K at 20 nm to 16.4 W/m K at 140 nm. The obtained results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. We have also demonstrated that in addition to impurity scattering, boundary scattering, and phonon confinement, the change in the nonequilibrium phonon distribution leads to a further reduction in the thermal conductivity of the nanowires and has to be taken into account in the calculations. Our conclusion is different from that of an earlier study which attributed the very low thermal conductivity to the unusually large mass-difference scattering in the nanowires.

  4. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai-chuang; Liang, Xin-gang; Xu, Xiang-hua; Ohara, Taku

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires was predicted using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method using the Stillinger-Weber potential model and the Nose-Hoover thermostat. The dependence of the thermal conductivity on the wire length, cross-sectional area, and temperature was investigated. The surface along the longitudinal direction was set as a free boundary with potential boundaries in the other directions. The cross-sectional areas of the nanowires ranged from about 5 to 19 nm2 with lengths ranging from 6 to 54 nm. The thermal conductivity dependence on temperature agrees well with the experimental results. The reciprocal of the thermal conductivity was found to be linearly related to the nanowire length. These results quantitatively show that decreasing the cross-sectional area reduces the phonon mean free path in nanowires.

  5. Sn-doped bismuth telluride nanowires with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Mi, Gang; Li, Likai; Zhang, Yuanbo; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2012-10-21

    Bismuth telluride (Bi(2)Te(3)) nanowires with sub-100 nm diameters were synthesized by Au-Sn co-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. These Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires were single crystals with a hexagonal lattice. The Sn catalyst played a key role in achieving the one-dimensional nanowire structures, while the absence of Sn resulted in other morphologies such as nanoplates, nanooctahedrons and nanospheres. Raman spectra revealed that compared to the Bi(2)Te(3) bulk materials, the Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires displayed an A(1u) spectral peak, implying the breaking of symmetry. The temperature-dependent electrical measurement indicated that these Sn-doped Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires were metallic, with a high conductivity of 1.6 × 10(5) S m(-1) at 300 K. PMID:22990308

  6. Indirect measurement of thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Pennelli, Giovanni Nannini, Andrea; Macucci, Massimo

    2014-02-28

    We report indirect measurements of thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructures. We have exploited a measurement technique based on the Joule self-heating of silicon nanowires. A standard model for the electron mobility has been used to determine the temperature through the accurate measurement of the nanowire resistance. We have applied this technique to devices fabricated with a top-down process that yields nanowires together with large silicon areas used both as electrical and as thermal contacts. As there is crystalline continuity between the nanowires and the large contact areas, our thermal conductivity measurements are not affected by any temperature drop due to the contact thermal resistance. Our results confirm the observed reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructures and are comparable with those previously reported in the literature, achieved with more complex measurement techniques.

  7. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays with controlled roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, JP; Sadhu, JS; Azeredo, BP; Hsu, KH; Ma, J; Kim, J; Seong, M; Fang, NX; Li, XL; Ferreira, PM; Sinha, S; Cahill, DG

    2012-12-01

    A two-step metal assisted chemical etching technique is used to systematically vary the sidewall roughness of Si nanowires in vertically aligned arrays. The thermal conductivities of nanowire arrays are studied using time domain thermoreflectance and compared to their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy determined roughness. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with small roughness is close to a theoretical prediction based on an upper limit of the mean-free-paths of phonons given by the nanowire diameter. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with large roughness is found to be significantly below this prediction. Raman spectroscopy reveals that nanowires with large roughness also display significant broadening of the one-phonon peak; the broadening correlates well with the reduction in thermal conductivity. The origin of this broadening is not yet understood, as it is inconsistent with phonon confinement models, but could derive from microstructural changes that affect both the optical phonons observed in Raman scattering and the acoustic phonons that are important for heat conduction. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4767456

  8. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays with controlled roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Joseph P.; Sadhu, Jyothi S.; Azeredo, Bruno P.; Hsu, Keng H.; Ma, Jun; Kim, Junhwan; Seong, Myunghoon; Fang, Nicholas X.; Li, Xiuling; Ferreira, Placid M.; Sinha, Sanjiv; Cahill, David G.

    2012-12-01

    A two-step metal assisted chemical etching technique is used to systematically vary the sidewall roughness of Si nanowires in vertically aligned arrays. The thermal conductivities of nanowire arrays are studied using time domain thermoreflectance and compared to their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy determined roughness. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with small roughness is close to a theoretical prediction based on an upper limit of the mean-free-paths of phonons given by the nanowire diameter. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with large roughness is found to be significantly below this prediction. Raman spectroscopy reveals that nanowires with large roughness also display significant broadening of the one-phonon peak; the broadening correlates well with the reduction in thermal conductivity. The origin of this broadening is not yet understood, as it is inconsistent with phonon confinement models, but could derive from microstructural changes that affect both the optical phonons observed in Raman scattering and the acoustic phonons that are important for heat conduction.

  9. Lattice thermal conductivity of a silicon nanowire under surface stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-06-01

    The effects of surface stress on the lattice thermal conductivity are investigated for a silicon nanowire. A phonon dispersion relation is derived based on a continuum approach for a nanowire under surface stress. The phonon Boltzmann equation and the relaxation time are employed to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. Surface stress, which has a significant influence on the phonon dispersion and thus the Debye temperature, decreases the lattice thermal conductivity. The conductivity varies with changing surface stress, e.g., due to adsorption layers and material coatings. This suggests a phonon engineering approach to tune the conductivity of nanomaterials.

  10. Tunable thermal conductivity in silicon twinning superlattice nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shiyun; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Sääskilahti, K.; Ni, Yuxiang; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations, the thermal conductivity of a set of Si phononic metamaterial nanowires with a twinning superlattice structure has been investigated. We first show that this latter structural modulation can yield 65% thermal-conductivity reduction compared to the straight wire case at room temperature. Second, a purely geometry-induced minimal thermal conductivity of the phononic metamaterial is observed at a specific period depending on the nanowire diameter. Mode analysis reveals that the the minimal thermal conductivity arises due to the disappearance of favored atom polarization directions. The current thermal-conductivity reduction mechanism can collaborate with the other known reduction mechanisms, such as the one related to coating, to further reduce thermal conductivity of the metamaterial. Current studies reveal that twinning superlattice nanowires could serve as a promising candidate for efficient thermoelectric conversion benefitting from the large suppression in thermal transport and without deterioration of electron-transport properties when the surface atoms are passivated.

  11. Manipulating connectivity and electrical conductivity in metallic nanowire networks.

    PubMed

    Nirmalraj, Peter N; Bellew, Allen T; Bell, Alan P; Fairfield, Jessamyn A; McCarthy, Eoin K; O'Kelly, Curtis; Pereira, Luiz F C; Sorel, Sophie; Morosan, Diana; Coleman, Jonathan N; Ferreira, Mauro S; Boland, John J

    2012-11-14

    Connectivity in metallic nanowire networks with resistive junctions is manipulated by applying an electric field to create materials with tunable electrical conductivity. In situ electron microscope and electrical measurements visualize the activation and evolution of connectivity within these networks. Modeling nanowire networks, having a distribution of junction breakdown voltages, reveals universal scaling behavior applicable to all network materials. We demonstrate how local connectivity within these networks can be programmed and discuss material and device applications.

  12. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-19

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  13. Sintering Behavior and Effect of Silver Nanowires on the Electrical Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Xiong, N N; Wang, Y H; Zhao, Y Z; Li, J Z

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of silver nanowires with a 160 nm average diameter ranging from 30 to 90 µm length and a 450 nm average diameter up to 100 µm length were successfully synthesized by a polyol process with FeCl3 and Na₂S as reaction inhibitor, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the morphologies and sintering behaviors of both of silver nanowires are impacted by glutaric acid and sintering temperature. The isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs) filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires as hybrid fillers were fabricated and the electrical properties were investigated based on the fraction of the silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers and the curing temperature, etc. The in situ monitoring the variation in electrical resistance of the ICAs explores that silver nanowires have influence on the curing behavior of the ICAs. Silver nanowires synthesized with Na2S as reaction inhibitor and treated with glutaric acid can significantly improve the electrical conductivity of the ICAs in the case of the low loading of silver fillers in the appropriate proportion range of the weight ratio of micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires, primarily as a result of connecting effect. When the loading of silver fillers in the ICAs is high, the electrical conductivity is also enhanced slightly in the case of the proper fraction of silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers. The effect of the curing temperature on the electrical conductivity relates to the fraction of silver nanowires and the total loading of silver fillers. The electrical conductivity of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires synthesized with FeCl₃ as reaction inhibitor is greatly damaged, indicating that the size of silver nanowires also is one of main factor to impact the electrical conductivity of the ICAs doped with silver nanowires. The electrical property of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver

  14. Sintering Behavior and Effect of Silver Nanowires on the Electrical Conductivity of Electrically Conductive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Xiong, N N; Wang, Y H; Zhao, Y Z; Li, J Z

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of silver nanowires with a 160 nm average diameter ranging from 30 to 90 µm length and a 450 nm average diameter up to 100 µm length were successfully synthesized by a polyol process with FeCl3 and Na₂S as reaction inhibitor, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the morphologies and sintering behaviors of both of silver nanowires are impacted by glutaric acid and sintering temperature. The isotropically conductive adhesives (ICAs) filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires as hybrid fillers were fabricated and the electrical properties were investigated based on the fraction of the silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers and the curing temperature, etc. The in situ monitoring the variation in electrical resistance of the ICAs explores that silver nanowires have influence on the curing behavior of the ICAs. Silver nanowires synthesized with Na2S as reaction inhibitor and treated with glutaric acid can significantly improve the electrical conductivity of the ICAs in the case of the low loading of silver fillers in the appropriate proportion range of the weight ratio of micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires, primarily as a result of connecting effect. When the loading of silver fillers in the ICAs is high, the electrical conductivity is also enhanced slightly in the case of the proper fraction of silver nanowires of the total of silver fillers. The effect of the curing temperature on the electrical conductivity relates to the fraction of silver nanowires and the total loading of silver fillers. The electrical conductivity of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver nanowires synthesized with FeCl₃ as reaction inhibitor is greatly damaged, indicating that the size of silver nanowires also is one of main factor to impact the electrical conductivity of the ICAs doped with silver nanowires. The electrical property of the ICAs filled with micro-sized silver flakes and silver

  15. Conductance of a proximitized nanowire in the Coulomb blockade regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heck, B.; Lutchyn, R. M.; Glazman, L. I.

    2016-06-01

    We identify the leading processes of electron transport across finite-length segments of proximitized nanowires and build a quantitative theory of their two-terminal conductance. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction, a nanowire can be tuned across the topological transition point by an applied magnetic field. Due to a finite segment length, electron transport is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. Upon increasing of the field, the shape and magnitude of the Coulomb blockade peaks in the linear conductance are defined, respectively, by Andreev reflection, single-electron tunneling, and resonant tunneling through the Majorana modes emerging after the topological transition. Our theory provides the framework for the analysis of experiments with proximitized nanowires [such as reported in S. M. Albrecht et al., Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162] and identifies the signatures of the topological transition in the two-terminal conductance.

  16. Copper Nanowires as Fully Transparent Conductive Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huizhang; Lin, Na; Chen, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhenwei; Xie, Qingshui; Zheng, Tongchang; Gao, Na; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong; Cai, Duanjun; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    In pondering of new promising transparent conductors to replace the cost rising tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), metal nanowires have been widely concerned. Herein, we demonstrate an approach for successful synthesis of long and fine Cu nanowires (NWs) through a novel catalytic scheme involving nickel ions. Such Cu NWs in high aspect ratio (diameter of 16.2 ± 2 nm and length up to 40 μm) provide long distance for electron transport and, meanwhile, large space for light transmission. Transparent electrodes fabricated using the Cu NW ink achieve a low sheet resistance of 1.4 Ohm/sq at 14% transmittance and a high transparency of 93.1% at 51.5 Ohm/sq. The flexibility and stability were tested with 100-timebending by 180°and no resistance change occurred. Ohmic contact was achieved to the p- and n-GaN on blue light emitting diode chip and bright electroluminescence from the front face confirmed the excellent transparency. PMID:23900572

  17. Copper Nanowires as Fully Transparent Conductive Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huizhang; Lin, Na; Chen, Yuanzhi; Wang, Zhenwei; Xie, Qingshui; Zheng, Tongchang; Gao, Na; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong; Cai, Duanjun; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2013-07-01

    In pondering of new promising transparent conductors to replace the cost rising tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), metal nanowires have been widely concerned. Herein, we demonstrate an approach for successful synthesis of long and fine Cu nanowires (NWs) through a novel catalytic scheme involving nickel ions. Such Cu NWs in high aspect ratio (diameter of 16.2 +/- 2 nm and length up to 40 μm) provide long distance for electron transport and, meanwhile, large space for light transmission. Transparent electrodes fabricated using the Cu NW ink achieve a low sheet resistance of 1.4 Ohm/sq at 14% transmittance and a high transparency of 93.1% at 51.5 Ohm/sq. The flexibility and stability were tested with 100-timebending by 180°and no resistance change occurred. Ohmic contact was achieved to the p- and n-GaN on blue light emitting diode chip and bright electroluminescence from the front face confirmed the excellent transparency.

  18. Electrical Conductivity in Transparent Silver Nanowire Networks: Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrott, Michelle; Mutiso, Rose; Rathmell, Aaron; Wiley, Benjamin; Winey, Karen

    2012-02-01

    We model and experimentally measure the electrical conductivity of two-dimensional networks containing finite, conductive cylinders with aspect ratio ranging from 33 to 333. We have previously used our simulations to explore the effects of cylinder orientation and aspect ratio in three-dimensional composites, and now extend the simulation to consider two-dimensional silver nanowire networks. Preliminary results suggest that increasing the aspect ratio and area fraction of these rods significantly decreases the sheet resistance of the film. For all simulated aspect ratios, this sheet resistance approaches a constant value for high area fractions of rods. This implies that regardless of aspect ratio, there is a limiting minimum sheet resistance that is characteristic of the properties of the nanowires. Experimental data from silver nanowire networks will be incorporated into the simulations to define the contact resistance and corroborate experimentally measured sheet resistances of transparent thin films.

  19. Insights into semiconductor nanowire conductivity using electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Salehzadeh, O.; Poole, P. J.; Watkins, S. P.; Kavanagh, K. L.

    2012-10-01

    Copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) electrical contacts to gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium arsenide (InAs) nanowires (NWs) have been fabricated via electrodeposition. For undoped or low carbon-doped (1017/cm-3), p-type GaAs NWs, Cu or Fe nucleate and grow only on the gold catalyst at the NW tip, avoiding the sidewalls. Metal growth is limited by the Au contact resistance due to thick sidewall depletion layers. For InAs NWs and heavier-doped, core-shell (undoped core-C-doped shell) GaAs NWs, metal nucleation and growth occurs on the sidewalls as well as on the gold catalyst limited now by the ion electrolyte diffusivity.

  20. Enhanced film conductance of silver nanowire-based flexible transparent & conductive networks by bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xingda; Yang, Bingchu; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Conghua

    2015-07-01

    Bending is usually used to test durability of flexible transparent and conductive films. Due to the large stress incurred by this technique, bending has always been observed to deteriorate conductance of electrodes such as indium tin oxide film. In contrast, we here demonstrate that bending could be used to improve conductance of silver nanowire-based flexible transparent and conductive films. The enhanced conductance is due to improved contact between nanowires, which was favored by the hydrogen bond formed between residential polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on silver nanowire and TiOx nanoparticles pre-coated on the substrate. The enhanced conductance was found to be affected by bending direction; bending towards the substrate not only yielded quicker decrease in sheet resistance, but also showed better film conductance than bending towards the nanowires. Then, with assistance of surface modification of substrate and ultra-long silver nanowires (averaged at 124 μm, maximum at 438 μm), optoelectronic performance of 90.2% (transmittance at 550 nm) and 12.5 Ω sq-1 (sheet resistance) has been achieved by bending. Such performance was better than commercialized flexible ITO films, and even competed with that obtained from thermal annealing at temperature of 200 °C. Moreover, Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study showed strong coordination between C=O (heterocyclic ring of PVP) and silver atoms, showing obvious capping behavior of PVP on silver nanowires.

  1. Conductance quantization in magnetic nanowires electrodeposited in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoussine, F.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.; Encinas, A.; Piraux, L.

    2002-08-01

    Magnetic nanocontacts have been prepared by a templating method that involves the electrodeposition of Ni within the pores of track-etched polymer membranes. The nanocontacts are made at the extremity of a single Ni nanowire either inside or outside the pores. The method is simple, flexible, and controllable as the width of the constriction can be varied reversibly by controlling the potential between the electrodeposited nanowire and a ferromagnetic electrode. At room temperature, the electrical conductance shows quantization steps in units of e2/h, as expected for ferromagnetic metals without spin degeneracy. Our fabrication method enables future investigation of ballistic spin transport phenomena in electrodeposited magnetic nanocontacts.

  2. Nanowire Conductivity: A Numerical Solution of the Boltzmann Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Venkat; Mizel, Ari

    2002-03-01

    The conduction properties of large nanowires (diameter 100nm), are calculated by a direct numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. Nanowires are modelled by distinguishing a bulk-like interior region from a surface region of finite width and enhanced scattering. Of particular interest is the investigation of a negative longitudinal magnetoresistance in such a model, a result expected from kinetic-theoretical considerations. These calculations can be performed both using the relaxation time approximation and the collision integral, with a view to relating model parameters in either approach to experimental results. Such a direct numerical solution offers the advantage of significant freedom in incorporating nanowire characteristics and conditions such as the equilibrium electron density and temperature profile, or the presence of defects and impurities.

  3. A review of the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires: insights gained from terahertz conductivity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Hannah J.; Boland, Jessica L.; Davies, Christopher L.; Baig, Sarwat A.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2016-10-01

    Accurately measuring and controlling the electrical properties of semiconductor nanowires is of paramount importance in the development of novel nanowire-based devices. In light of this, terahertz (THz) conductivity spectroscopy has emerged as an ideal non-contact technique for probing nanowire electrical conductivity and is showing tremendous value in the targeted development of nanowire devices. THz spectroscopic measurements of nanowires enable charge carrier lifetimes, mobilities, dopant concentrations and surface recombination velocities to be measured with high accuracy and high throughput in a contact-free fashion. This review spans seminal and recent studies of the electronic properties of nanowires using THz spectroscopy. A didactic description of THz time-domain spectroscopy, optical pump-THz probe spectroscopy, and their application to nanowires is included. We review a variety of technologically important nanowire materials, including GaAs, InAs, InP, GaN and InN nanowires, Si and Ge nanowires, ZnO nanowires, nanowire heterostructures, doped nanowires and modulation-doped nanowires. Finally, we discuss how THz measurements are guiding the development of nanowire-based devices, with the example of single-nanowire photoconductive THz receivers.

  4. Synthetic Biological Protein Nanowires with High Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Pi, Shuang; Ward, Joy E; Woodard, Trevor L; Nevin, Kelly P; Xia, Qiangfei; Tuominen, Mark T; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-09-01

    Genetic modification to add tryptophan to PilA, the monomer for the electrically conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens, yields conductive protein filaments 2000-fold more conductive than the wild-type pili while cutting the diameter in half to 1.5 nm. PMID:27409066

  5. Tunable metallic-like conductivity in microbial nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Vargas, Madeline; Nevin, Kelly P.; Franks, Ashley E.; Leang, Ching; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Inoue, Kengo; Mester, Tünde; Covalla, Sean F.; Johnson, Jessica P.; Rotello, Vincent M.; Tuominen, Mark T.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-09-01

    Electronic nanostructures made from natural amino acids are attractive because of their relatively low cost, facile processing and absence of toxicity. However, most materials derived from natural amino acids are electronically insulating. Here, we report metallic-like conductivity in films of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens and also in pilin nanofilaments (known as microbial nanowires) extracted from these bacteria. These materials have electronic conductivities of ~5 mS cm-1, which are comparable to those of synthetic metallic nanostructures. They can also conduct over distances on the centimetre scale, which is thousands of times the size of a bacterium. Moreover, the conductivity of the biofilm can be tuned by regulating gene expression, and also by varying the gate voltage in a transistor configuration. The conductivity of the nanofilaments has a temperature dependence similar to that of a disordered metal, and the conductivity could be increased by processing.

  6. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires embedded on thermoelectric platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, JinYong; Cho, Kyoungah; Yoon, Dae Sung; Kim, Sangsig

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we propose a simple method for obtaining the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) embedded on a thermoelectric platform. The approximation of the heat flux in SiNWs with temperature differences enables the determination of thermal conductivity. Using this method, the thermal conductivities of our n- and p-type SiNWs are found to be 18.06  ±  0.12 and 20.29  ±  0.77 W m-1 · K-1, respectively. The atomic weight of arsenic ions in the n-type SiNWs is responsible for a lower thermal conductivity than that of boron ions in the p-type SiNWs. Our results demonstrate that this simple method is capable of measuring the thermal conductivity of thermoelectric nanomaterials embedded on thermoelectric devices.

  7. Single-crystal poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanowires with ultrahigh conductivity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Boram; Park, Kyung S; Baek, Jangmi; Oh, Hyun S; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Sung, Myung M

    2014-06-11

    We developed single-crystal poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiopene) (PEDOT) nanowires with ultrahigh conductivity using liquid-bridge-mediated nanotransfer printing with vapor phase polymerization. The single-crystal PEDOT nanowires are formed from 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) monomers that are self-assembled and crystallized during vapor phase polymerization process within nanoscale channels of a mold having FeCl3 catalysts. These PEDOT nanowires, aligned according to the pattern in the mold, are then directly transferred to specific positions on a substrate to generate a nanowire array by a direct printing process. The PEDOT nanowires have closely packed single-crystalline structures with orthorhombic lattice units. The conductivity of the single-crystal PEDOT nanowires is an average of 7619 S/cm with the highest up to 8797 S/cm which remarkably exceeds literature values of PEDOT nanostructures/thin films. Such distinct conductivity enhancement of single-crystal PEDOT nanowires can be attributed to improved carrier mobility in PEDOT nanowires. To demonstrate usefulness of single-crystal PEDOT nanowires, we fabricated an organic nanowire field-effect transistor array contacting the ultrahigh conductive PEDOT nanowires as metal electrodes.

  8. The lattice thermal conductivity of a semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau; Chong, Wen-Yen; Chang, Tai-Ming

    2006-06-01

    It has been found experimentally as well as theoretically that the lattice thermal conductivity can be largely reduced by the size confinement effect. The significant boundary scattering effect is one of the dominant factors. In most existing lattice thermal conductivity models, an empirical relation is used for this scattering rate. An unconfined or confined phonon distribution obtained based on the phonon Boltzmann equation and the relaxation time approximation is then employed to calculate the lattice thermal conductivity. In this work, we first attempt to derive an analytical form of the boundary scattering rate for phonon conduction in a semiconductor nanowire and then claim two reasonable ways to take it into account correctly. Consistent mathematical models in the sense that the effects of the size confinement on (i) the phonon dispersion relation, (ii) the phonon distribution, (iii) the phonon group and phase velocities, and (iv) the Debye temperature are finally proposed.

  9. Effects of alkali treatments on Ag nanowire transparent conductive films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunho; Kang, Jun-gu; Eom, Tae-yil; Moon, Bongjin; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we employ various alkali materials (alkali metals with different base strengths, and ammonia gas and solution) to improve the conductivity of silver nanowire (Ag NW)-networked films. The alkali treatment appears to remove the surface oxide and improve the conductivity. When applied with TiO2 nanoparticles, the treatment appears more effective as the alkalis gather around wire junctions and help them weld to each other via heat emitted from the reduction reaction. The ammonia solution treatment is found to be quick and aggressive, damaging the wires severely in the case of excessive treatment. On the other hand, the ammonia gas treatment seems much less aggressive and does not damage the wires even after a long exposure. The results of this study highlight the effectiveness of the alkali treatment in improving of the conductivity of Ag NW-networked transparent conductive films.

  10. Oscillations of electrical conductivity in single bismuth nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, T. W.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Karim, S.; Neumann, R.

    2008-03-01

    Bismuth nanowires were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Single wires with diameters ranging between 70 and 550nm were created in membranes with one single nanopore and their electrical resistance was investigated while leaving them embedded in the template. The specific electrical conductivity oscillates as a function of wire diameter. The modulations are discussed on the basis of quantum-size effects which lead to a splitting of the energy bands into subbands and, thus, cause an oscillation of the density of states at the Fermi level depending on the diameter.

  11. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of thin silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-10

    We compute the lattice thermal conductivity (kappa) of silicon nanowires as a function of temperature by molecular dynamics simulations. In wires with amorphous surfaces kappa may reach values close to that of amorphous silicon and is nearly constant between 200 and 600 K; this behavior is determined by the presence of a majority of nonpropagating vibrational modes. We develop a parameter-free model that accounts for the temperature dependence observed in our simulations and provides a qualitative explanation of recent experiments. PMID:20163124

  12. Integrated freestanding single-crystal silicon nanowires: conductivity and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hoon; Ritz, Clark S; Huang, Minghuang; Ziwisky, Michael W; Blise, Robert J; Lagally, Max G

    2011-02-01

    Integrated freestanding single-crystal silicon nanowires with typical dimension of 100 nm × 100 nm × 5 µm are fabricated by conventional 1:1 optical lithography and wet chemical silicon etching. The fabrication procedure can lead to wafer-scale integration of silicon nanowires in arrays. The measured electrical transport characteristics of the silicon nanowires covered with/without SiO(2) support a model of Fermi level pinning near the conduction band. The I-V curves of the nanowires reveal a current carrier polarity reversal depending on Si-SiO(2) and Si-H bonds on the nanowire surfaces.

  13. Strain- and defect-mediated thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kathryn F; Piccione, Brian; Zanjani, Mehdi B; Lukes, Jennifer R; Gianola, Daniel S

    2014-07-01

    The unique thermal transport of insulating nanostructures is attributed to the convergence of material length scales with the mean free paths of quantized lattice vibrations known as phonons, enabling promising next-generation thermal transistors, thermal barriers, and thermoelectrics. Apart from size, strain and defects are also known to drastically affect heat transport when introduced in an otherwise undisturbed crystalline lattice. Here we report the first experimental measurements of the effect of both spatially uniform strain and point defects on thermal conductivity of an individual suspended nanowire using in situ Raman piezothermography. Our results show that whereas phononic transport in undoped Si nanowires with diameters in the range of 170-180 nm is largely unaffected by uniform elastic tensile strain, another means of disturbing a pristine lattice, namely, point defects introduced via ion bombardment, can reduce the thermal conductivity by over 70%. In addition to discerning surface- and core-governed pathways for controlling thermal transport in phonon-dominated insulators and semiconductors, we expect our novel approach to have broad applicability to a wide class of functional one- and two-dimensional nanomaterials. PMID:24885097

  14. Monte Carlo Simulation of Thermal Conductivity in Randomly Distributed Nanowire Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, W.; Yang, R.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal conductivity of composites made of two types of randomly stacked nanowires with high contrast ratio of bulk thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity predictions based on solving the phonon Boltzmann transport equation by using the Monte Carlo method are presented for different contrast ratios of thermal conductivity, sizes of nanowires and the volumetric fractions in the composites. For composites made of nanowires with high contrast ratio thermal conductivity, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites increase dramatically when the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is higher than the geometry percolation threshold, although existing correlations in percolation theory do not fit the results due to the phonon interface scattering. On the other hand, when the the size of nanowires is small and the volumetric fraction of high thermal conductivity nanowire is less than percolation threshold, the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the volumetric fraction of the high thermal conductivity nanowires. The results of this study may help the development of nanoscale thermoelectric materials in which the figure of merit is optimized by choosing appropriate nanowire size, property contrast and composition. RY acknowledges the funding support for this work by DoD/AFOSR MURI grant FA9550-06-1-0326. The simulation was conducted on a 24-node cluster supported by Intel Corporation and managed by Prof. Gang Chen and Mr. Lu Hu at MIT.

  15. Effects of electron-beam irradiation on conducting polypyrrole nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Young Ki; Park, Dong Hyuk; Park, Se Hee; Park, Soung Kyu; Joo, Jinsoo

    2009-02-02

    Conducting polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires (NWs) were irradiated by a relatively high energy (300 keV-2 MeV) electron-beam (e-beam) generated from a linear electron accelerator in an atmospheric environment. From the current-voltage characteristics of pristine and 2 MeV e-beam irradiated PPy NWs, we observed a dramatic variation in resistance from 8.0x10{sup 2} to 1.45x10{sup 8} {omega}, that is, we observed a transition from conducting states to nonconducting states through the e-beam irradiation. To discern conformational changes and the doping states of PPy NWs through the e-beam irradiation, we measured Raman and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra for the PPy NWs. As the energy of the e-beam irradiation increased, we observed that the PPy NWs were changed from doping states to dedoping states with conformational modification including the variation in {pi}-conjugation length.

  16. Glucose sensor based on conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koinkar, Pankaj; Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In the present investigation, a glucose sensor based on conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. The CPNEJ platform was modified by glucose oxidase by cross-linking in the presence of glutaraldehyde. The signal transduction mechanism of the sensor is based on the change in micro electrode junction conductance as a result of glucose oxidation induced change in the polymer redox state. Small size of CPNEJ sensor causes to regenerate enzyme naturally without need of redox mediators, as a result it consumes minimum amount of oxygen and also gives very fast response. This sensor exhibited good linear response range from 1 mM to 20 mM of glucose concentration with excellent sensitivity of 12 μA/mM.

  17. Resistance of Single Ag Nanowire Junctions and Their Role in the Conductivity of Nanowire Networks.

    PubMed

    Bellew, Allen T; Manning, Hugh G; Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Ferreira, Mauro S; Boland, John J

    2015-11-24

    Networks of silver nanowires appear set to replace expensive indium tin oxide as the transparent conducting electrode material in next generation devices. The success of this approach depends on optimizing the material conductivity, which until now has largely focused on minimizing the junction resistance between wires. However, there have been no detailed reports on what the junction resistance is, nor is there a known benchmark for the minimum attainable sheet resistance of an optimized network. In this paper, we present junction resistance measurements of individual silver nanowire junctions, producing for the first time a distribution of junction resistance values and conclusively demonstrating that the junction contribution to the overall resistance can be reduced beyond that of the wires through standard processing techniques. We find that this distribution shows the presence of a small percentage (6%) of high-resistance junctions, and we show how these may impact the performance of network-based materials. Finally, through combining experiment with a rigorous model, we demonstrate the important role played by the network skeleton and the specific connectivity of the network in determining network performance. PMID:26448205

  18. Quantized Conductance in InSb nanowires at zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammhuber, Jakob; Cassidy, Maja; Zhang, Hao; Gül, Önder; Pei, Fei; de Moor, Michiel; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Kouwenhoven, Leo

    We present measurements of InSb nanowires in the ballistic transport regime. In 1D materials such as nanowires, electron scattering has an increased chance of back-reflection, obscuring the observation of quantized conductance at low magnetic fields. By improving the contacts to the nanowire as well as its dielectric environment backscattering events are minimized and conductance quantization is observable at zero magnetic field with high device yield. We study the evolution of individual sub-bands in an external magnetic field, observing a degeneracy between the 2nd and 3rd sub-band when the magnetic field is orientated perpendicular to the nanowire axis.

  19. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling.

  20. Growth of gallium nitride and indium nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Ling, Yichuan; Wang, Gongming; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang; Li, Yat

    2013-02-01

    We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices.We report a general strategy for synthesis of gallium nitride (GaN) and indium nitride (InN) nanowires on conductive and flexible carbon cloth substrates. GaN and InN nanowires were prepared via a nanocluster-mediated growth method using a home built chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with Ga and In metals as group III precursors and ammonia as a group V precursor. Electron microscopy studies reveal that the group III-nitride nanowires are single crystalline wurtzite structures. The morphology, density and growth mechanism of these nanowires are determined by the growth temperature. Importantly, a photoelectrode fabricated by contacting the GaN nanowires through a carbon cloth substrate shows pronounced photoactivity for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The ability to synthesize group III-nitride nanowires on conductive and flexible substrates should open up new opportunities for nanoscale photonic, electronic and electrochemical devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr

  1. Effects of lithium insertion on thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-04-27

    Recently, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been applied as high-performance Li battery anodes, since they can overcome the pulverization and mechanical fracture during lithiation. Although thermal stability is one of the most important parameters that determine safety of Li batteries, thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion remains unclear. In this letter, using molecular dynamics simulations, we study room temperature thermal conductivity of SiNWs with Li insertion. It is found that compared with the pristine SiNW, there is as much as 60% reduction in thermal conductivity with 10% concentration of inserted Li atoms, while under the same impurity concentration the reduction in thermal conductivity of the mass-disordered SiNW is only 30%. With lattice dynamics calculations and normal mode decomposition, it is revealed that the phonon lifetimes in SiNWs decrease greatly due to strong scattering of phonons by vibrational modes of Li atoms, especially for those high frequency phonons. The observed strong phonon scattering phenomenon in Li-inserted SiNWs is similar to the phonon rattling effect. Our study serves as an exploration of thermal properties of SiNWs as Li battery anodes or weakly coupled with impurity atoms.

  2. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries. PMID:26284489

  3. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    PubMed

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  4. Probing the low thermal conductivity of single-crystalline porous Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunshan; Lina Yang Collaboration; Lingyu Kong Collaboration; Baowen Li Collaboration; John T L Thong Collaboration; Kedar Hippalgaonkar Collaboration

    Pore-like structures provide a novel way to reduce the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires, compared to both smooth-surface VLS nanowires and rough EE nanowires. Because of enhanced phonon scattering with interface and decrease in phonon transport path, the porous nanostructures show reduction in thermal conductance by few orders of magnitude. It proves to be extremely challenging to evaluate porosity accurately in an experimental manner and further understand its effect on thermal transport. In this study, we use the newly developed electron-beam based micro-electrothermal device technique to study the porosity dependent thermal conductivity of mesoporous silicon nanowires that have single-crystalline scaffolding. Based on the Casino simulation, the power absorbed by the nanowire, coming from the loss of travelling electron energy, has a linear relationship with it cross section. The relationship has been verified experimentally as well. Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to theoretically predict the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires with a specific value of porosity. These single-crystalline porous silicon nanowires show extremely low thermal conductivity, even below the amorphous limit. These structures together with our experimental techniques provide a particularly intriguing platform to understand the phonon transport in nanoscale and aid the performance improvement in future nanowires-based devices.

  5. Boundary scattering effect on the thermal conductivity of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Yao, Yagang; Hu, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the surface boundary structures of crystal nanowires (NWs) is one of the most popular ways to control the thermal conductivity of NWs. In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamic simulations (NEMD) and time domain normal mode analysis (TDNMA) are performed to investigate the thermal transport properties of Ar (length of 52.9 nm, width of 4.23 nm) and Ge (56.5 nm long and 4.52 nm wide) NWs with different surface boundary structures. Results show that both the total and modal thermal conductivity have a dramatic difference among the NWs with the same diameter (the maximal and minimal thermal conductivity of Ar (Ge) NWs are 1.25 (15.3) and 0.60 (5.64) W/mK, respectively), which suggests the efficiency of nanoscale thermoelectric devices and heat dissipation devices can be largely tuned by only changing the boundary orientation. The fundamental mechanism responsible for such a discrepancy is found to mainly originate from different phonon group velocity (combined with phonon relaxation time for Ar NWs). The results are quite helpful for understanding the boundary scattering effect on thermal transport and also facilitating the design of nanoscale devices by tailoring the boundary structures.

  6. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V). Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated. PMID:21711623

  7. Thermal boundary conductance between Al films and GaN nanowires investigated with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Wang; Jones, Reese E; Hopkins, Patrick E; Beechem, Thomas E

    2014-05-28

    GaN nanowires are being pursued for optoelectronic and high-power applications. In either use, increases in operating temperature reduce both performance and reliability making it imperative to minimize thermal resistances. Since interfaces significantly influence the thermal response of nanosystems, the thermal boundary resistance between GaN nanowires and metal contacts has major significance. In response, we have performed systematic molecular dynamics simulations to study the thermal boundary conductance between GaN nanowires and Al films as a function of nanowire dimensions, packing density, and the depth the nanowire is embedded into the metal contact. At low packing densities, the apparent Kapitza conductance between GaN nanowires and an aluminum film is shown to be larger than when contact is made between films of these same materials. This enhancement decreases toward the film-film limit, however, as the packing density increases. For densely packed nanowires, maximizing the Kapitza conductance can be achieved by embedding the nanowires into the films, as the conductance is found to be proportional to the total contact area.

  8. Solid State Electron Transfer via Bacterial Nanowires: Contributions Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Geophysical Response of Biostimulated Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Estella Atekwana

    2012-05-08

    The degradation of organic matter by microorganisms provides a source of electrical potential or so-called 'self potential' (SP) that can be measured by using a voltmeter. During this process electrons are being produced as a waste-product and bacterial cells have to dispose of these to allow for the complete biodegradation of organic matter. Especially in anaerobic microbial communities, exo-cellular electron transfer is the most important driving force behind this process and organisms have developed different, but also similar, ways to transfer electrons to other microorganisms. Recently, it has been postulated that direct electron transfer from cell-to-cell is actually done by 'hard-wired' microorganisms. This shuttling of electrons is most likely done by certain c-type cytochromes that form the functional part of electrically conductive nanowires. In this study we investigated if nanowires can explain the geoelectrical (self potential and spectral induced polarization) signals observed at some biostimulated environments such as DOE sites. The objectives of our project are to: (1) investigate any temporal changes in the geophysical signatures (Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP)) associated with nanowires of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type and mtrc/omcA deletion mutant, (2) demonstrate that mutant strains of bacteria that produce nonconductive nanowires do not contribute to geoelectrical responses. We accomplished the following: (1) Provided training to students and a postdoctoral fellow that worked on the project, (2) Conducted several SP & IP measurements correlating the distribution of nanowires and SIP/SP signals in partial fulfillment of object No. 1 and 2. On the following we will report and discuss the results of our last experiment with some emphasis on the source mechanisms of both SP and IP associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type in sand columns.

  9. Effect of cross-sectional geometry on thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Peixin

    2016-06-01

    By incorporating the direction-dependent phonon-boundary scattering from the surface of the nanowires with different cross-sectional shapes into the linearized phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we theoretically investigate the effect of cross-sectional geometry on the thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex nanowires. It is demonstrated that the surface-to-volume ratio (SVR) is a universal gauge for both pure silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and silicon-germanium nanowires (SiGe NWs), and the thermal conductivity of nanowires decreases monotonically with the increase of SVR. We also find that the thermal conductivity of high-frequency phonons in nanowires is more strongly SVR dependent than that of low-frequency phonons, and the thermal conductivity of high-frequency phonons is severely suppressed by alloy scattering, therefore the SVR dependence on thermal conductivity of Si1-xGex NWs decreases with the increase of Ge atom concentration x (x < 0.5). These findings are useful for understanding and tuning the thermal conductivity of nanowires by geometry.

  10. Tailoring thermal conductivity of silicon/germanium nanowires utilizing core-shell architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikurt, S.; Ozden, A.; Kandemir, A.; Sevik, C.; Kinaci, A.; Haskins, J. B.; Cagin, T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-dimensional nanostructured materials show large variations in their thermal transport properties. In this work, we investigate the influence of the core-shell architecture on nanowire (1D) thermal conductivity and evaluate its validity as a strategy to achieve a better thermoelectric performance. To obtain the thermal conductivity values, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are conducted for core-shell nanowires of silicon and germanium. To explore the parameter space, we have calculated thermal conductivity values of the Si-core/Ge-shell and Ge-core/Si-shell nanowires having different cross-sectional sizes and core contents at several temperatures. Our results indicate that (1) increasing the cross-sectional area of pristine Si and pristine Ge nanowires increases the thermal conductivity, (2) increasing the Ge core size in the Ge-core/Si-shell structure results in a decrease in the thermal conductivity at 300 K, (3) the thermal conductivity of the Si-core/Ge-shell nanowires demonstrates a minima at a specific core size, (4) no significant variation in the thermal conductivity is observed in nanowires for temperatures larger than 300 K, and (5) the predicted thermal conductivity within the frame of applied geometrical constraints is found to be around 10 W/(mK) for the Si and Ge core-shell architecture with a smooth interface. The value is still higher than the amorphous limit (1 W/(mK)). This represents a significant reduction in thermal conductivity with respect to their bulk crystalline and pristine nanowire forms. Furthermore, we observed additional suppression of thermal conductivity through the introduction of interface roughness to Si/Ge core-shell nanowires.

  11. Extraordinarily high conductivity of flexible adhesive films by hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammed Ajmal, C.; Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Ryeol Choi, Hyouk; Baik, Seunghyun

    2016-06-01

    Highly conductive flexible adhesive (CFA) film was developed using micro-sized silver flakes (primary fillers), hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires (secondary fillers) and nitrile butadiene rubber. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were synthesized by decorating silver nanowires with silver nanoparticle clusters using bifunctional cysteamine as a linker. The dispersion in ethanol was excellent for several months. Silver nanowires constructed electrical networks between the micro-scale silver flakes. The low-temperature surface sintering of silver nanoparticles enabled effective joining of silver nanowires to silver flakes. The hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires provided a greater maximum conductivity (54 390 S cm-1) than pure silver nanowires, pure multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with silver nanoparticles in nitrile butadiene rubber matrix. The resistance change was smallest upon bending when the hybrids of silver nanoparticle-nanowires were employed. The adhesion of the film on polyethylene terephthalate substrate was excellent. Light emitting diodes were successfully wired to the CFA circuit patterned by the screen printing method for application demonstration.

  12. Highly conductive indium nanowires deposited on silicon by dip-pen nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhukhov, Anton; Volodin, Vladimir; Klimenko, Anatoliy; Shcheglov, Dmitriy; Karnaeva, Natalya; Latyshev, Alexander

    2015-04-14

    In this paper, we developed a new dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) method. Using this method, we fabricated conductive nanowires with diameters of 30–50 nm on silicon substrates. To accomplish this, indium was transferred from an atomic force microscopy tip to the surface by applying a potential difference between the tip and substrate. The fabricated indium nanowires were several micrometers in length. Unlike thermal DPN, our DPN method hardly oxidized the indium, producing nanowires with conductivities from 5.7 × 10{sup −3} to 4 × 10{sup −2} Ω cm.

  13. Ion beam-induced variation in electrical conductivity of Ag nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Gehlawat, Devender; Kaur, Amandeep; Rana, Pallavi

    2013-08-01

    The art of fabricating nanostructures within the pores of template leads to the production of true replica of pore geometry. Thus, nanostructures of desirable shape and dimensions can be synthesized using the ion-based etched-track technology. In the present study, silver nanowires were synthesized by using the track-etched polycarbonate membrane as the template in an aqueous medium containing AgNO3 as the precursor. Free-standing silver nanowires were irradiated with different fluences of Li3+ ion beam and a detailed investigation of I-V characteristics of pristine and irradiated Ag nanowires was made. Variation in electrical conductivity of silver nanowires at different fluences was also observed. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the polycrystalline nature of Ag nanowires with cubic geometry with face-centered lattice.

  14. Chirality-Discriminated Conductivity of Metal-Amino Acid Biocoordination Polymer Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianzhong; Wu, Yijin; Deng, Ke; He, Meng; He, Liangcan; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xugang; Liu, Yaling; Li, Shunxing; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-27

    Biocoordination polymer (BCP) nanowires are successfully constructed through self-assembly of chiral cysteine amino acids and Cd cations in solution. The varied chirality of cysteine is explored to demonstrate the difference of BCP nanowires in both morphology and structure. More interestingly and surprisingly, the electrical property measurement reveals that, although all Cd(II)/cysteine BCP nanowires behave as semiconductors, the conductivity of the Cd(II)/dl-cysteine nanowires is 4 times higher than that of the Cd(II)/l-cysteine or Cd(II)/d-cysteine ones. The origin of such chirality-discriminated characteristics registered in BCP nanowires is further elucidated by theoretical calculation. These findings demonstrate that the morphology, structure, and property of BCP nanostructures could be tuned by the chirality of the bridging ligands, which will shed light on the comprehension of chirality transcription as well as construction of chirality-regulated functional materials. PMID:27556354

  15. Chirality-Discriminated Conductivity of Metal-Amino Acid Biocoordination Polymer Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianzhong; Wu, Yijin; Deng, Ke; He, Meng; He, Liangcan; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xugang; Liu, Yaling; Li, Shunxing; Tang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-27

    Biocoordination polymer (BCP) nanowires are successfully constructed through self-assembly of chiral cysteine amino acids and Cd cations in solution. The varied chirality of cysteine is explored to demonstrate the difference of BCP nanowires in both morphology and structure. More interestingly and surprisingly, the electrical property measurement reveals that, although all Cd(II)/cysteine BCP nanowires behave as semiconductors, the conductivity of the Cd(II)/dl-cysteine nanowires is 4 times higher than that of the Cd(II)/l-cysteine or Cd(II)/d-cysteine ones. The origin of such chirality-discriminated characteristics registered in BCP nanowires is further elucidated by theoretical calculation. These findings demonstrate that the morphology, structure, and property of BCP nanostructures could be tuned by the chirality of the bridging ligands, which will shed light on the comprehension of chirality transcription as well as construction of chirality-regulated functional materials.

  16. Composition, Reactivity and Regulation of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal - Reducing Bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Terrance J; Whitfield, Christopher

    2013-03-06

    This is the final technical report for the project. There were two objectives in the proposal. The first was to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages, known as bacterial nanowires, which resemble pili but are longer and are electrically conductive. They were first identified on the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB), Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project investigated the role of these structures in: (i) the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors; (ii) the use of as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor to form nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction. The Beveridge group investigated these processes using advanced cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) to visualize the points of connection between the distal ends of nanowires and the effect they have on solid phase Fe minerals. At the same time, immuno-electron microscopy was applied in an attempt to identify where metal reductases and cytochromes are located on the cell surface, or in the nanowires. The second objective was to define the surface physicochemistry of Shewanella spp. in an attempt to decipher how weak bonding (electrostatics and hydrophobicity) affects the adherence of the bacteria to Fe oxides. This bonding could be dictated by the chemistry of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or the presence/absence of capsular polysaccharide.

  17. Electrical Conductivity Studies on Individual Conjugated Polymer Nanowires: Two-Probe and Four-Probe Results

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Two- and four-probe electrical measurements on individual conjugated polymer nanowires with different diameters ranging from 20 to 190 nm have been performed to study their conductivity and nanocontact resistance. The two-probe results reveal that all the measured polymer nanowires with different diameters are semiconducting. However, the four-probe results show that the measured polymer nanowires with diameters of 190, 95–100, 35–40 and 20–25 nm are lying in the insulating, critical, metallic and insulting regimes of metal–insulator transition, respectively. The 35–40 nm nanowire displays a metal–insulator transition at around 35 K. In addition, it was found that the nanocontact resistance is in the magnitude of 104Ω at room temperature, which is comparable to the intrinsic resistance of the nanowires. These results demonstrate that four-probe electrical measurement is necessary to explore the intrinsic electronic transport properties of isolated nanowires, especially in the case of metallic nanowires, because the metallic nature of the measured nanowires may be coved by the nanocontact resistance that cannot be excluded by a two-probe technique. PMID:20652139

  18. Coffee ring effect resulted conductive nanowire patterns by evaporating colloidal suspension droplets without sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Seong, Baekhoon; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-11-01

    Drying colloidal suspensions containing non-volatile solute will form a ring like pattern, which is called ``coffee ring effect.'' Here, we present the coffee ring effect with silver nanowires dispersing into DI water, resulting in a highly dense-packed nanowire ring patterns. The effect of nanowire length, concentration, droplet size, and substrate temperature were investigated. With shorter nanowires, a distinct ring could be obtained. Meanwhile, the concentration of the colloidal suspension was found to affect the ring width. The droplet size and nanowire length played a significant role in affecting the occurrence of the coffee ring effect. When smaller droplets (i.e., less than 150 μm) containing long nanowires (~ 20 μm), the coffee ring effect was suppressed. While smaller droplets containing short nanowires (~ 1 μm), the coffee ring effect was not affected. By increasing the temperature of the substrate, multi-ring pattern was formed inside the original ring. The resistivity of the semi-circle of the nanowire ring was measured, and had a minimum value of 1.32 × 10-6 Ωm without any sintering process. These findings could be exploited to basic study of ring stain effect as well as the practical use, such as evaporative lithography and ink-jet printing for conductive film and display. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (Grant number: 2014-023284).

  19. Assessing charge carrier trapping in silicon nanowires using picosecond conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Ronald; Kurstjens, Rufi; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-07-11

    Free-standing semiconductor nanowires on bulk substrates are increasingly being explored as building blocks for novel optoelectronic devices such as tandem solar cells. Although carrier transport properties, such as mobility and trap densities, are essential for such applications, it has remained challenging to quantify these properties. Here, we report on a method that permits the direct, contact-free quantification of nanowire carrier diffusivity and trap densities in thin (∼25 nm wide) silicon nanowires-without any additional processing steps such as transfer of wires onto a substrate. The approach relies on the very different terahertz (THz) conductivity response of photoinjected carriers within the silicon nanowires from those in the silicon substrate. This allows quantifying both the picosecond dynamics and the efficiency of charge carrier transport from the silicon nanowires into the silicon substrate. Varying the excitation density allows for quantification of nanowire trap densities: for sufficiently low excitation fluences the diffusion process stalls because the majority of charge carriers become trapped at nanowire surface defects. Using a model that includes these effects, we determine both the diffusion constant and the nanowire trap density. The trap density is found to be orders of magnitude larger than the charge carrier density that would be generated by AM1.5 sunlight.

  20. A molecule detector: Adsorbate induced conductance gap change of ultra-thin silicon nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, X. Q.; Li, H.; Taft, C. A.; Paiva, G.

    2009-03-01

    Inspired by the work of Lieber and co-workers [F. Patolsky, B.P. Timko, G. Zheng, C.M. Lieber, MRS Bull. 32 (2007) 142], we present a general discussion of the possibility of using atomic-chain scaled Si nanowires to detect molecules. Surface-modified Si nanowires were optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The electronic transport properties of the whole system, including Si nanowires and adsorbed molecules, sandwiched between two gold electrodes are investigated by means of non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. However, the overall transport properties, including current-voltage ( I- V) and conductance-voltage ( G- V) characteristics hardly show adsorbate sensitivity. Interestingly, our results show that the conductance gap clearly varies with the different adsorbates. Therefore different molecules can cause differences in the conductance gap compared with the bare Si nanowire. The results provide valuable information regarding the development of atomic-chain scaled molecular detectors.

  1. Phonon thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires: The effects of surface roughness at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Oh, Jung; Shin, Mincheol; Jang, Moon-Gyu

    2012-02-01

    Using a Green's function method based on an elastic wave equation, the effects of surface roughness and the nanowire-contact interface scattering on phonon thermal conductivity are studied at low temperatures. It is found that the interface geometry between a nanowire and its contacts affects the transmission function at small energies related to the gapless modes and it gives rise to deviated results from the universal conductance. It is also shown that the surface roughness is crucial in the suppression of phonon thermal conductivity with reducing the nanowire size by averaging the transmission function over the rough-surface configurations. Furthermore, the phonon mean free path is proportional to the ratio of the correlation length and roughness heights quadratically as well as the cross-section area of the nanowire.

  2. Scanning thermal microscopy with heat conductive nanowire probes.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Maria; Bolshakov, Alexey; Tovee, Peter D; Zeze, Dagou A; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2016-03-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), which enables measurement of thermal transport and temperature distribution in devices and materials with nanoscale resolution is rapidly becoming a key approach in resolving heat dissipation problems in modern processors and assisting development of new thermoelectric materials. In SThM, the self-heating thermal sensor contacts the sample allowing studying of the temperature distribution and heat transport in nanoscaled materials and devices. The main factors that limit the resolution and sensitivities of SThM measurements are the low efficiency of thermal coupling and the lateral dimensions of the probed area of the surface studied. The thermal conductivity of the sample plays a key role in the sensitivity of SThM measurements. During the SThM measurements of the areas with higher thermal conductivity the heat flux via SThM probe is increased compared to the areas with lower thermal conductivity. For optimal SThM measurements of interfaces between low and high thermal conductivity materials, well defined nanoscale probes with high thermal conductivity at the probe apex are required to achieve a higher quality of the probe-sample thermal contact while preserving the lateral resolution of the system. In this paper, we consider a SThM approach that can help address these complex problems by using high thermal conductivity nanowires (NW) attached to a tip apex. We propose analytical models of such NW-SThM probes and analyse the influence of the contact resistance between the SThM probe and the sample studied. The latter becomes particularly important when both tip and sample surface have high thermal conductivities. These models were complemented by finite element analysis simulations and experimental tests using prototype probe where a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) is exploited as an excellent example of a high thermal conductivity NW. These results elucidate critical relationships between the performance of the SThM probe on

  3. Current-Driven Nanowire Formation on Crystalline Conducting Substrate Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Kumar, Ashish; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    Using a simulation study, we demonstrate a new, driven-assembly-based approach to single-layer nanowire formation on fcc crystalline substrate surfaces. In this approach, we manipulate individual epitaxial islands using an external electric field to drive the formation of single nanowires or arrays of them. We have developed and validated a fully nonlinear model of current-driven island evolution mediated by diffusional mass transport along the island edge and accounting for edge diffusional anisotropy and island coalescence and breakup. Using a linear stability theory, we analyze the morphological stability of islands with equilibrium shapes and predict the occurrence of morphological instability for islands larger than a critical size under the action of an electric field along the slowest edge diffusion direction on { 110 } , { 100 } , and { 111 } substrate surfaces. Consistent with the theoretical prediction, dynamical simulations show that large-size islands undergo a fingering instability which, following finger growth and, depending on the substrate orientation, necking instability, leads to formation of single or multiple nanowires. We find that the nanowires have constant widths, on the order of tens of nanometers, and explain analytically the nanowire dimensions.

  4. Thermal conductivity of tubular nanowire composites based on a thermodynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Georgy; Machrafi, Hatim

    2015-07-01

    A formula for the effective heat conductivity of a nanocomposite with cylindrical nanowire inclusions is derived. Both transversal and longitudinal heating along the wires are investigated. Several effects are examined: the volume fraction and sizes of the nanowires, the type of scattering at the particle-matrix interface and temperature. As illustration, silicon nanowires inclusions in a germanium matrix is considered; the results are shown to be in good agreement with other models and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Our main contribution consists of using extended irreversible thermodynamics to cope with the nano dimensions of the wires.

  5. Atmospheric-Pressure Processed Silver Nanowire (Ag-NW)/ZnO Composite Transparent Conducting Contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, John D.; Aggarwal, Shruti; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.; Ginley, David S.

    2015-06-14

    Composite transparent contacts (TCs) based on metal nanowires and metal oxide matrix materials hold great promise for high performance transparent contacts for photovoltaics and opto-electronic technologies with the potential of all-atmospheric pressure processing. The metal nanowire mesh can provide both electrical conductivity and mechanical robustness against bending while the matrix material can both control the electrical interface and protect the metal nanowires. Here, we demonstrate all atmospheric pressure processed Ag-NW/ZnO composite TCs that are 90% transparent in the visible with sheet resistance Rs ~= 10 Ohms/sq. In addition, the composite TCs have higher infrared transmission than conventional TCO films with the same sheet resistance.

  6. Modulation of thermal conductivity in kinked silicon nanowires: phonon interchanging and pinching effects.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Yang, Nuo; Wang, Bing-Shen; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-04-10

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the reduction of the thermal conductivity by kinks in silicon nanowires. The reduction percentage can be as high as 70% at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the reduction is also calculated. By calculating phonon polarization vectors, two mechanisms are found to be responsible for the reduced thermal conductivity: (1) the interchanging effect between the longitudinal and transverse phonon modes and (2) the pinching effect, that is, a new type of localization, for the twisting and transverse phonon modes in the kinked silicon nanowires. Our work demonstrates that the phonon interchanging and pinching effects, induced by kinking, are brand-new and effective ways in modulating heat transfer in nanowires, which enables the kinked silicon nanowires to be a promising candidate for thermoelectric materials.

  7. Nanoscale size dependence parameters on lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Mamand, S.M.; Omar, M.S.; Muhammad, A.J.

    2012-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of calculated lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified Callaway model is used to calculate lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct method is used to calculate phonon group velocity for these nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations are successfully investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocation densities are decreases with the decrease of wires diameter. -- Abstract: A detailed calculation of lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding Wurtzite GaN nanowires with diameter ranging from 97 to 160 nm in the temperature range 2-300 K, was performed using a modified Callaway model. Both longitudinal and transverse modes are taken into account explicitly in the model. A method is used to calculate the Debye and phonon group velocities for different nanowire diameters from their related melting points. Effect of Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations as structure dependent parameters are successfully used to correlate the calculated values of lattice thermal conductivity to that of the experimentally measured curves. It was observed that Gruneisen parameter will decrease with decreasing nanowire diameters. Scattering of phonons is assumed to be by nanowire boundaries, imperfections, dislocations, electrons, and other phonons via both normal and Umklapp processes. Phonon confinement and size effects as well as the role of dislocation in limiting thermal conductivity are investigated. At high temperatures and for dislocation densities greater than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} the lattice thermal conductivity would be limited by dislocation density, but for dislocation densities less than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}, lattice thermal conductivity would be independent of that.

  8. Thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} tilted nanowires, a molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shen Lacroix, David; Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Chaput, Laurent; Stein, Nicolas; Frantz, Cedric

    2015-06-08

    Evidence for an excellent compromise between structural stability and low thermal conductivity has been achieved with tilted Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires. The latter ones were recently fabricated and there is a need in modeling and characterization. The structural stability and the thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires along the tilted [015]* direction and along the [010] direction have been explored. For the two configurations of nanowires, the effect of the length and the cross section on the thermal conductivity is discussed. The thermal conductivity of infinite size tilted nanowire is 0.34 W/m K, significantly reduced compared to nanowire along the [010] direction (0.59 W/m K). This reveals that in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires the structural anisotropy can be as important as size effects to reduce the thermal conductivity. The main reason is the reduction of the phonon mean free path which is found to be 1.7 nm in the tilted nanowires, compared to 5.3 nm for the nanowires along the [010] direction. The fact that tilted Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowire is mechanically stable and it has extremely low thermal conductivity suggests these nanowires as a promising material for future thermoelectric generation application.

  9. Flexible transparent conducting hybrid film using a surface-embedded copper nanowire network: a highly oxidation-resistant copper nanowire electrode for flexible optoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Jung, Soo-Ho; Jin, Jungho; Lee, Dasom; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Daewon; Lee, Jung-Yong; Kim, Il-Doo; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2014-10-28

    We report a flexible high-performance conducting film using an embedded copper nanowire transparent conducting electrode; this material can be used as a transparent electrode platform for typical flexible optoelectronic devices. The monolithic composite structure of our transparent conducting film enables simultaneously an outstanding oxidation stability of the copper nanowire network (14 d at 80 °C), an exceptionally smooth surface topography (R(rms) < 2 nm), and an excellent opto-electrical performances (Rsh = 25 Ω sq(-1) and T = 82%). A flexible organic light emitting diode device is fabricated on the transparent conducting film to demonstrate its potential as a flexible copper nanowire electrode platform.

  10. Electrical Conductivity Characteristic of TiO2 Nanowires From Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azlishah Othman, Mohd; Faridah Amat, Noor; Hisham Ahmad, Badrul; Rajan, Jose

    2014-04-01

    One dimensional nanostructures of titanium dioxide (TiO2) were synthesized via hydrothermal method by mixing TiO2 as precursor in aqueous solution of NaOH as solvent. Then, heat and washing treatment was applied. Thus obtained wires had diameter ~15nm. TiO2 nanowires will be used as a network in solar cell such dye-sensitized solar cell in order to improve the performance of electron movement in the device. To improve the performance of electron movement, the characteristics of TiO2 nanowires have been analyses using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis, x-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis and brunauer emmett teller (BET) analysis. Finally, electrical conductivity of TiO2 nanowires was determined by measuring the resistance of the TiO2 nanowires paste on microscope glass.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Electrical and Thermal Conduction in Single Silver Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Longju; Xu, Shen; Lu, Meng; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the thermal and electrical transport in an individual silver nanowire is characterized down to 35 K for in-depth understanding of the strong structural defect induced electron scattering. The results indicate that, at room temperature, the electrical resistivity increases by around 4 folds from that of bulk silver. The Debye temperature (151 K) of the silver nanowire is found 36% lower than that (235 K) of bulk silver, confirming strong phonon softening. At room temperature, the thermal conductivity is reduced by 55% from that of bulk silver. This reduction becomes larger as the temperature goes down. To explain the opposite trends of thermal conductivity (κ) ~ temperature (T) of silver nanowire and bulk silver, a unified thermal resistivity () is used to elucidate the electron scattering mechanism. A large residual Θ is observed for silver nanowire while that of the bulk silver is almost zero. The same ~T trend proposes that the silver nanowire and bulk silver share the similar phonon-electron scattering mechanism for thermal transport. Due to phonon-assisted electron energy transfer across grain boundaries, the Lorenz number of the silver nanowire is found much larger than that of bulk silver and decreases with decreasing temperature. PMID:26035288

  12. Silver Nanowire Transparent Conductive Films with High Uniformity Fabricated via a Dynamic Heating Method.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yonggao; Chen, Chao; Jia, Dan; Li, Shuxin; Ji, Shulin; Ye, Changhui

    2016-04-20

    The uniformity of the sheet resistance of transparent conductive films is one of the most important quality factors for touch panel applications. However, the uniformity of silver nanowire transparent conductive films is far inferior to that of indium-doped tin oxide (ITO). Herein, we report a dynamic heating method using infrared light to achieve silver nanowire transparent conductive films with high uniformity. This method can overcome the coffee ring effect during the drying process and suppress the aggregation of silver nanowires in the film. A nonuniformity factor of the sheet resistance of the as-prepared silver nanowire transparent conductive films could be as low as 6.7% at an average sheet resistance of 35 Ω/sq and a light transmittance of 95% (at 550 nm), comparable to that of high-quality ITO film in the market. In addition, a mechanical study shows that the sheet resistance of the films has little change after 5000 bending cycles, and the film could be used in touch panels for human-machine interactive input. The highly uniform and mechanically stable silver nanowire transparent conductive films meet the requirement for many significant applications and could play a key role in the display market in a near future. PMID:27054546

  13. Microwave synthesis of branched silver nanowires and their use as fillers for high thermal conductivity polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Indira; Esquenazi, Gibran L.; Cardinal, Thomas; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2016-04-01

    We report a rapid synthesis approach to obtain branched Ag nanowires by microwave-stimulated polyvinylpyrrolidone-directed polyol-reduction of silver nitrate. Microwave exposure results in micrometer-long nanowires passivated with polyvinylpyrrolidone. Cooling the reaction mixture by interrupting microwave exposure promotes nanocrystal nucleation at low-surfactant coverage sites. The nascent nuclei grow into nanowire branches upon further microwave exposure. Dispersions of low fractions of the branched nanowires in polydimethylsiloxane yield up to 60% higher thermal conductivity than that obtained using unbranched nanowire fillers. Our findings should be useful for realizing nanocomposites with tailored thermal transport properties for applications.

  14. Highly Conductive, Air-Stable Silver Nanowire@Iongel Composite Films toward Flexible Transparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Weiwei; Liu, Hongliang; Chen, Yongzhen; Zheng, Meiling; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Kong, Xiangbin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xiqi; Kong, Xiangyu; Wang, Pengfei; Jiang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    A new type of flexible transparent electrode is designed, by employing wettability-induced selective electroless-welding of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks, together with a thin conductive iongel as the protective layer. The obtained electrode exhibits high optical transmittance, and excellent air-stability without sacrificing conductivity. PMID:27296551

  15. UV light emitting transparent conducting tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Chen, R.; Li, D. H.; Jiang, L.; Ye, J. C.; Ma, X. C.; Chen, X. D.; Xiong, Q. H.; Sun, H. D.; Wu, T.

    2011-05-01

    Multifunctional single crystalline tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires with tuned Sn doping levels are synthesized via a vapor transport method. The Sn concentration in the nanowires can reach 6.4 at.% at a synthesis temperature of 840 °C, significantly exceeding the Sn solubility in ITO bulks grown at comparable temperatures, which we attribute to the unique feature of the vapor-liquid-solid growth. As a promising transparent conducting oxide nanomaterial, layers of these ITO nanowires exhibit a sheet resistance as low as 6.4~\\Omega /\\square and measurements on individual nanowires give a resistivity of 2.4 × 10 - 4 Ω cm with an electron density up to 2.6 × 1020 cm - 3, while the optical transmittance in the visible regime can reach ~ 80%. Under the ultraviolet excitation the ITO nanowire samples emit blue light, which can be ascribed to transitions related to defect levels. Furthermore, a room temperature ultraviolet light emission is observed in these ITO nanowires for the first time, and the exciton-related radiative process is identified by using temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements.

  16. Alloy enhanced anisotropy in the thermal conductivity of SixGe1-x nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wu; Mingo, Natalio

    2013-08-01

    A strong dependence on crystalline orientation with a most conductive ⟨001⟩ growth direction is theoretically predicted for the thermal conductivity (κ) of SixGe1-x nanowires, even above room temperature and above 1 μm thickness. For instance, the room temperature κ of a 100 nm thick Si0.6Ge0.4 nanowire in the ⟨001⟩ direction is 16% higher than in the ⟨111⟩ direction. In contrast, the dependence for Si or Ge nanowires of the same diameter is much weaker at the same temperature, and ⟨111⟩ direction can be the most conductive one at relatively thin nanowires. In the low temperature limit, the anisotropy of κ can reach 87% at any alloy concentration. The anisotropy arises from the phonon focusing effect on the long mean free path phonons. The low frequency phonons focus in the ⟨001⟩ direction, while the intermediate frequency phonons focus in the ⟨111⟩ direction. The relative contribution to κ from the low frequency phonons is largely enhanced by alloying. Moreover, alloying eliminates the anisotropy caused by the intermediate frequency phonons. Our results imply that orientation has to be taken into account when engineering alloyed nanowire devices, such as thermoelectric modules, even if the corresponding bulk material is completely isotropic.

  17. Kondo-like zero-bias conductance anomaly in a three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungjae; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John A; Gu, Genda; Mason, Nadya

    2016-02-25

    Zero-bias anomalies in topological nanowires have recently captured significant attention, as they are possible signatures of Majorana modes. Yet there are many other possible origins of zero-bias peaks in nanowires--for example, weak localization, Andreev bound states, or the Kondo effect. Here, we discuss observations of differential-conductance peaks at zero-bias voltage in non-superconducting electronic transport through a 3D topological insulator (Bi(1.33)Sb(0.67))Se3 nanowire. The zero-bias conductance peaks show logarithmic temperature dependence and often linear splitting with magnetic fields, both of which are signatures of the Kondo effect in quantum dots. We characterize the zero-bias peaks and discuss their origin.

  18. Electrical characterization of HgTe nanowires using conductive atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, P.; Kongshaug, K. O.; Selvig, E.; Haakenaasen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Self-organized HgTe nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been characterized using conductive atomic force microscopy. As HgTe will degrade or evaporate at normal baking temperatures for electron beam lithography (EBL) resists, an alternative method was developed. Using low temperature optical lithography processes, large Au contacts were deposited on a sample covered with randomly oriented, lateral HgTe nanowires. Nanowires partly covered by the large electrodes were identified with a scanning electron microscope and then localized in the atomic force microscope (AFM). The conductive tip of the AFM was then used as a movable electrode to measure current-voltage curves at several locations on HgTe nanowires. The measurements revealed that polycrystalline nanowires had diffusive electron transport, with resistivities two orders of magnitude larger than that of an MBE-grown HgTe film. The difference can be explained by scattering at the rough surface walls and at the grain boundaries in the wires. The method can be a solution when EBL is not available or requires too high temperature, or when measurements at several positions along a wire are required.

  19. Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2016-05-01

    The formation and precise manipulation of nanoscale features by controlling macroscopic forces is essential to advancing nanotechnology. Toward this end, we report here a theoretical study on formation of nanowires with precisely controlled widths, starting from single-layer conducting islands on crystalline conducting substrates under the controlled action of macroscopic forcing provided by an externally applied electric field that drives island edge electromigration. Numerical simulations based on an experimentally validated model and supported by linear stability theory show that large-size islands undergo a current-induced fingering instability, leading to nanowire formation after finger growth. Depending on the substrate surface crystallographic orientation, necking instabilities after fingering lead to the formation of multiple parallel nanowires per island. In all cases, the axis of the formed nanowires is aligned with the direction of the externally applied electric field. The nanowires have constant widths, on the order of 10 nm, which can be tuned by controlling the externally applied electric field strength. Our findings have important implications for developing future lithography-free nanofabrication and nanoelectronic patterning techniques.

  20. Conductivity control of as-grown branched indium tin oxide nanowire networks.

    PubMed

    Laforge, J M; Cocker, T L; Beaudry, A L; Cui, K; Tucker, R T; Taschuk, M T; Hegmann, F A; Brett, M J

    2014-01-24

    Branched indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowire networks are promising candidates for transparent conductive oxide applications, such as optoelectronic electrodes, due to their high porosity. However, these branched networks also present new challenges in assessing conductivity. Conventional four-point probe techniques cannot separate the effect of porosity on the long-range conductivity from the intrinsic material conductivity. Here we compare the average nanoscale conductivity within the film measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to the film conductivity measured by four-point probe in a branched ITO nanowire network. Both techniques report conductivity increases with deposition flux rate from 0.5 to 3.0 nm s(-1), achieving a maximum of ~ 10 (Ω cm)(-1). Modeling the THz-TDS conductivity data using the Drude-Smith model allows us to distinguish between conductivity increases resulting from morphological changes and those resulting from the intrinsic properties of the ITO. In particular, the intrinsic material conductivity within the nanowires can be extracted, and is found to reach a maximum of ~ 3000 (Ω cm)(-1), comparable to bulk ITO. To determine the mechanism responsible for increasing conductivity with flux rate, we characterize dopant concentration and morphological changes (i.e., to branching behavior, nanowire diameter and nucleation layers). We propose that changes in the electron density, primarily due to changes in O-vacancy concentration at different flux rates, are responsible for the observed conductivity increase. This understanding will assist balancing structural and conductivity requirements in applications of transparent conductive oxide networks.

  1. Effects of pre-stress and surface stress on phonon thermal conductivity of rectangular Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linli; Ruan, Haihui

    2015-04-01

    This work investigates theoretically the phonon property and thermal conductivity of rectangular silicon nanowires under pre-stress and surface stress. In the framework of elasticity theory, the effects of spatial confinement are considered in the phonon dispersion relation of a stressed nanowire. The surface energy, which brings about the variation of the elastic modulus of nanowire and the influence on the phonon property, is then involved. Under a pre-stress field, the acoustoelastic effect gives rise to the change of phonon properties and thermal conductivity. Our numerical results demonstrate that the applied surface stress and pre-stress field can alter the phonon dispersion relation of a silicon nanowire significantly. The phonon energy increases if the surface stress is negative and the pre-stress is positive, and vice versa. The changes of phonon dispersion relation as well as the various phonon scattering rates lead to the variation of phonon thermal conductivity, which is the consequence of the surface stress and pre-stress fields. We further elaborate the size and temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductivity under different applied surface stresses and pre-stress fields and suggest using the strain engineering to tune the thermal performance of semiconductor nanostructures.

  2. The effect of the electron-phonon coupling on the thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenhui; Xiong, Bangguo; Zhang, Wenxing; Feng, Ji; Wang, Enge

    2012-07-25

    The thermal conductivity of free-standing silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with diameters from 1-3 nm has been studied by using the one-dimensional Boltzmann's transport equation. Our model explicitly accounts for the Umklapp scattering process and electron-phonon coupling effects in the calculation of the phonon scattering rates. The role of the electron-phonon coupling in the heat transport is relatively small for large silicon nanowires. It is found that the effect of the electron-phonon coupling on the thermal conduction is enhanced as the diameter of the silicon nanowires decreases. Electrons in the conduction band scatter low-energy phonons effectively where surface modes dominate, resulting in a smaller thermal conductivity. Neglecting the electron-phonon coupling leads to overestimation of the thermal transport for ultra-thin SiNWs. The detailed study of the phonon density of states from the surface atoms and central atoms shows a better understanding of the nontrivial size dependence of the heat transport in silicon nanowire.

  3. Thermal conductivity of semiconductor nanowires from micro to nano length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldovan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We study the influence of phonon boundary scattering on the transport of thermal energy in semiconductor nanowires from micro to nano length scales. We use a kinetic theory model based on the Boltzmann transport equation that accurately calculates the reduction of the phonon mean free paths by considering their directional dependence and the fundamental statistical definition of the mean free path. As a result, our model does not use phenomenological formulas to account for the reduction of the phonon mean free paths due to boundary scattering. The transport of thermal energy is also fully divided into that carried by different polarizations by separating phonon group velocities and relaxation times for transverse and longitudinal phonons. We study the correctness of using frequency independent versus frequency dependent models for describing the specularity of the nanowire boundary. We also examine the validity of the assumption that phonons in the semiconductor nanowire maintain their bulk phonon dispersion relations and that modifications to the dispersion relations due to phonon confinement effects can be neglected. The thermal conductivities of silicon nanowires are calculated for different length scales and temperatures and good agreement is obtained with experiments. The theoretical results in this paper can be used to understand and quantitatively predict heat transport in nanowires, which is critical for increasing the efficiency of thermoelectric and electronic devices.

  4. High frequency electromagnetic detection by nonlinear conduction modulation in graphene nanowire diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, M.; Thorsell, M.; Strupiński, W.; Rorsman, N.

    2015-10-01

    We present graphene nanowires implemented as dispersion free self switched microwave diode detectors. The microwave properties of the detectors are investigated using vector corrected large signal measurements in order to determine the detector responsivity and noise equivalent power (NEP) as a function of frequency, input power, and device geometry. We identify two distinct conductance nonlinearities which generate detector responsivity: an edge effect nonlinearity near zero bias due to lateral gating of the nanowire structures, and a velocity saturation nonlinearity which generates current compression at high power levels. The scaling study shows that detector responsivity obeys an exponential scaling law with respect to nanowire width, and a peak responsivity (NEP) of 250 V/W (50 pW/ √{ Hz } ) is observed in detectors of the smallest width. The results are promising as the devices exhibit responsivities which are comparable to state of the art self switched detectors in semiconductor technologies.

  5. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Minggang; Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli; Zheng, Minrui; Sow, Chorng-Haur; Thong, John T. L.; Li, Baowen

    2014-05-15

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 10{sup 3} Ω{sup −1}m{sup −1} to 1.46 × 10{sup 4} Ω{sup −1}m{sup −1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} to 1.22 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  6. Suppressed phase transition and giant ionic conductivity in La2Mo2O9 nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Luo, Jian; Godfrey, Andy; Ou, Gang; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Improving the ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes at low temperatures represents a major challenge and an opportunity for enabling a variety of solid-state ionic devices for energy conversion and storage, as well as for environmental protection. Here we report a giant ionic conductivity of 0.20 Scm−1, achieved at 500 °C, in the La2Mo2O9 nanowires with a bamboo-wire morphology, corresponding to a 1000-fold enhancement in conductivity over conventional bulk material. Stabilization of the high-temperature phase is observed to account for about a 10-fold increase in the conductivity. We further demonstrate that fast surface conduction in ∼3 nm thick, partially ordered, surface ‘amorphous' films, under strain on the curved surfaces of the nanowires (as a non-autonomous surface phase or complexion), contributes to an enhancement of the conductivity by another two orders of magnitude. Exemplified here by the study of the La2Mo2O9 nanowires, new possibilities for improvement of conductivity and for miniaturization of solid-state ionic devices by the careful use of one-dimensional nanomaterials can be envisioned. PMID:26380943

  7. Suppressed phase transition and giant ionic conductivity in La2Mo2O9 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Luo, Jian; Godfrey, Andy; Ou, Gang; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Improving the ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes at low temperatures represents a major challenge and an opportunity for enabling a variety of solid-state ionic devices for energy conversion and storage, as well as for environmental protection. Here we report a giant ionic conductivity of 0.20 Scm-1, achieved at 500 °C, in the La2Mo2O9 nanowires with a bamboo-wire morphology, corresponding to a 1000-fold enhancement in conductivity over conventional bulk material. Stabilization of the high-temperature phase is observed to account for about a 10-fold increase in the conductivity. We further demonstrate that fast surface conduction in ~3 nm thick, partially ordered, surface `amorphous' films, under strain on the curved surfaces of the nanowires (as a non-autonomous surface phase or complexion), contributes to an enhancement of the conductivity by another two orders of magnitude. Exemplified here by the study of the La2Mo2O9 nanowires, new possibilities for improvement of conductivity and for miniaturization of solid-state ionic devices by the careful use of one-dimensional nanomaterials can be envisioned.

  8. Conductivity and Dielectric Dispersion of Gram-Positive Bacterial Cells

    PubMed

    van der Wal A; Minor; Norde; Zehnder; Lyklema

    1997-02-01

    The conductivity of bacterial cell suspensions has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths and is interpreted in terms of their cell wall properties. The experimental data have been analyzed after improving the high kappaa double-layer theory of Fixman, by accounting for ionic mobility in the hydrodynamically stagnant layer, i.e., in the bacterial wall. Static conductivity and dielectric dispersion measurements both show that the counterions in the porous gel-like cell wall give rise to a considerable surface conductance. From a comparison of the mobile charge with the total cell wall charge it is inferred that the mobilities of the ions in the bacterial wall are of the same order but somewhat lower than those in the bulk electrolyte solution. The occurrence of surface conductance reduces the electrophoretic mobility in electrophoresis studies. If this effect is not taken into account, the zeta-potential will be underestimated, especially at low electrolyte concentrations.

  9. Conductivity and Dielectric Dispersion of Gram-Positive Bacterial Cells

    PubMed

    van der Wal A; Minor; Norde; Zehnder; Lyklema

    1997-02-01

    The conductivity of bacterial cell suspensions has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths and is interpreted in terms of their cell wall properties. The experimental data have been analyzed after improving the high kappaa double-layer theory of Fixman, by accounting for ionic mobility in the hydrodynamically stagnant layer, i.e., in the bacterial wall. Static conductivity and dielectric dispersion measurements both show that the counterions in the porous gel-like cell wall give rise to a considerable surface conductance. From a comparison of the mobile charge with the total cell wall charge it is inferred that the mobilities of the ions in the bacterial wall are of the same order but somewhat lower than those in the bulk electrolyte solution. The occurrence of surface conductance reduces the electrophoretic mobility in electrophoresis studies. If this effect is not taken into account, the zeta-potential will be underestimated, especially at low electrolyte concentrations. PMID:9056304

  10. Ultra-low Thermal Conductivity in Si/Ge Hierarchical Superlattice Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xin; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Pu; To, Albert C; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-11-16

    Due to interfacial phonon scattering and nanoscale size effect, silicon/germanium (Si/Ge) superlattice nanowire (SNW) can have very low thermal conductivity, which is very attractive for thermoelectrics. In this paper, we demonstrate using molecular dynamics simulations that the already low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge SNW can be further reduced by introducing hierarchical structure to form Si/Ge hierarchical superlattice nanowire (H-SNW). The structural hierarchy introduces defects to disrupt the periodicity of regular SNW and scatters coherent phonons, which are the key contributors to thermal transport in regular SNW. Our simulation results show that periodically arranged defects in Si/Ge H-SNW lead to a ~38% reduction of the already low thermal conductivity of regular Si/Ge SNW. By randomizing the arrangement of defects and imposing additional surface complexities to enhance phonon scattering, further reduction in thermal conductivity can be achieved. Compared to pure Si nanowire, the thermal conductivity reduction of Si/Ge H-SNW can be as large as ~95%. It is concluded that the hierarchical structuring is an effective way of reducing thermal conductivity significantly in SNW, which can be a promising path for improving the efficiency of Si/Ge-based SNW thermoelectrics.

  11. Ultra-low Thermal Conductivity in Si/Ge Hierarchical Superlattice Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xin; Wang, Lili; Yang, Xueming; Zhang, Pu; To, Albert C.; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Due to interfacial phonon scattering and nanoscale size effect, silicon/germanium (Si/Ge) superlattice nanowire (SNW) can have very low thermal conductivity, which is very attractive for thermoelectrics. In this paper, we demonstrate using molecular dynamics simulations that the already low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge SNW can be further reduced by introducing hierarchical structure to form Si/Ge hierarchical superlattice nanowire (H-SNW). The structural hierarchy introduces defects to disrupt the periodicity of regular SNW and scatters coherent phonons, which are the key contributors to thermal transport in regular SNW. Our simulation results show that periodically arranged defects in Si/Ge H-SNW lead to a ~38% reduction of the already low thermal conductivity of regular Si/Ge SNW. By randomizing the arrangement of defects and imposing additional surface complexities to enhance phonon scattering, further reduction in thermal conductivity can be achieved. Compared to pure Si nanowire, the thermal conductivity reduction of Si/Ge H-SNW can be as large as ~95%. It is concluded that the hierarchical structuring is an effective way of reducing thermal conductivity significantly in SNW, which can be a promising path for improving the efficiency of Si/Ge-based SNW thermoelectrics. PMID:26568511

  12. Impact of phonon-surface roughness scattering on thermal conductivity of thin si nanowires.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pierre; Aksamija, Zlatan; Pop, Eric; Ravaioli, Umberto

    2009-03-27

    We present a novel approach for computing the surface roughness-limited thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires with diameter D<100 nm. A frequency-dependent phonon scattering rate is computed from perturbation theory and related to a description of the surface through the root-mean-square roughness height Delta and autocovariance length L. Using a full phonon dispersion relation, we find a quadratic dependence of thermal conductivity on diameter and roughness as (D/Delta)(2). Computed results show excellent agreement with experimental data for a wide diameter and temperature range (25-350 K), and successfully predict the extraordinarily low thermal conductivity of 2 W m(-1) K-1 at room temperature in rough-etched 50 nm silicon nanowires. PMID:19392295

  13. Self-templated synthesis and thermal conductivity investigation for ultrathin perovskite oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Gautam G; Zhang, Genqiang; Qiu, Bo; Susoreny, Joseph A; Ruan, Xiulin; Wu, Yue

    2011-10-01

    The large thermal conductivity of bulk complex metal oxides such as SrTiO(3), NaCo(2)O(4), and Ca(3)Co(4)O(9) has set a barrier for the improvement of thermoelectric figure of merit and the applications of these materials in high temperature (≥1000 K) thermoelectric energy harvesting and solid-state cooling. Here, we present a self-templated synthesis approach to grow ultrathin SrTiO(3) nanowires with an average diameter of 6 nm in large quantity. The thermal conductivity of the bulk pellet made by compressing nanowire powder using spark plasma sintering shows a 64% reduction in thermal conductivity at 1000 K, which agrees well with theoretical modeling.

  14. Photoinduced conductivity of a porphyrin-gold composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Kilina, Svletana; Balatsky, Alexander; Kilin, Dmitri S; Prezhdo, Oleg; Tsemekhman, Kiril

    2009-01-01

    Negatively charged phosphine groups on the backbone of DNA are known to attract gold nanoclusters from a colloid, assembling the clusters at fixed intervals. Bridging these intervals with porphyrin-dye linkers forms an infinite conducting chain, a quantum wire whose carrier mobility can be enhanced by photoexcitation. The resulting nanoassembly can be used as a gate: a wire with a controllable conductivity. The electronic structure of the porphyrin-gold wire is studied here by density functional theory, and the conductivity of the system is determined as a function of the photoexcitation energy. Photoexcitations of the dye are found to enhance the wire conductivity by orders of magnitude.

  15. Quantum restricted effects on ballistic thermal conductance associated with six types of vibration modes in nanowire superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xin-Jun

    2011-08-01

    We study ballistic phonon transport and thermal conductance associated with six low-lying vibrational modes in a quadrate nanowire superlattice at low temperatures. The results show that the transmission rates of the six vibrational modes display periodic forbidden regions of frequencies and have different relations with geometrical details of the nanowire superlattice. The thermal conductances contributed from different vibrational modes show different characteristics. On the basis of the theoretical analysis and calculated simulation, quantum restricted effects on ballistic thermal conductance in the quadrate nanowire superlattice are revealed.

  16. Conductivity of ZnO nanowires, nanoparticles, and thin films using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jason B; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A

    2006-12-21

    The terahertz absorption coefficient, index of refraction, and conductivity of nanostructured ZnO have been determined using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy, a noncontact optical probe. ZnO properties were measured directly for thin films and were extracted from measurements of nanowire arrays and mesoporous nanoparticle films by applying Bruggeman effective medium theory to the composite samples. Annealing significantly reduces the intrinsic carrier concentration in the ZnO films and nanowires, which were grown by chemical bath deposition. The complex-valued, frequency-dependent photoconductivities for all morphologies were found to be similar at short pump-probe delay times. Fits using the Drude-Smith model show that films have the highest mobility, followed by nanowires and then nanoparticles, and that annealing the ZnO increases its mobility. Time constants for decay of photoinjected electron density in films are twice as long as those in nanowires and more than 5 times those for nanoparticles due to increased electron interaction with interfaces and grain boundaries in the smaller-grained materials. Implications for electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cells are discussed.

  17. Significant thermal conductivity reduction of silicon nanowire forests through discrete surface doping of germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ying; Hong, Guo; Raja, Shyamprasad N.; Zimmermann, Severin; Poulikakos, Dimos; Tiwari, Manish K.

    2015-03-02

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising materials for the realization of highly-efficient and cost effective thermoelectric devices. Reduction of the thermal conductivity of such materials is a necessary and viable pathway to achieve sufficiently high thermoelectric efficiencies, which are inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity. In this article, vertically aligned forests of SiNW and germanium (Ge)-doped SiNW with diameters around 100 nm have been fabricated, and their thermal conductivity has been measured. The results show that discrete surface doping of Ge on SiNW arrays can lead to 23% reduction in thermal conductivity at room temperature compared to uncoated SiNWs. Such reduction can be further enhanced to 44% following a thermal annealing step. By analyzing the binding energy changes of Ge-3d and Si-2p using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we demonstrate that surface doped Ge interacts strongly with Si, enhancing phonon scattering at the Si-Ge interface as has also been shown in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics studies of single nanowires. Overall, our results suggest a viable pathway to improve the energy conversion efficiency of nanowire-forest thermoelectric nanomaterials.

  18. Conductance oscillations of core-shell nanowires in transversal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolescu, Andrei; Nemnes, George Alexandru; Sitek, Anna; Rosdahl, Tomas Orn; Erlingsson, Sigurdur Ingi; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2016-05-01

    We analyze theoretically electronic transport through a core-shell nanowire in the presence of a transversal magnetic field. We calculate the conductance for a variable coupling between the nanowire and the attached leads and show how the snaking states, which are low-energy states localized along the lines of the vanishing radial component of the magnetic field, manifest their existence. In the strong-coupling regime they induce flux periodic, Aharonov-Bohm-like, conductance oscillations, which, by decreasing the coupling to the leads, evolve into well-resolved peaks. The flux periodic oscillations arise due to interference of the snaking states, which is a consequence of backscattering at either the contacts with leads or magnetic or potential barriers in the wire.

  19. Highly stretchable and conductive silver nanowire thin films formed by soldering nanomesh junctions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Liao, Ying-Chih

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been widely used for stretchable and foldable conductors due to their percolating network nanostructure. To enhance the mechanical strength of AgNW thin films under extreme stretching conditions, in this study, we utilize a simple chemical reaction to join AgNW network connections. Upon applying a reactive ink over AgNW thin films, silver nanoparticles are preferentially generated over the nanowire junctions and solder the nanomesh structures. The soldered nanostructure reinforces the conducting network and exhibits no obvious change in electrical conductivity in the stretching or rolling process with elongation strains up to 120%. Several examples are also demonstrated to show potential applications of this material in stretchable electronic devices. PMID:25139194

  20. On correlation between zero bias conductance peaks and topological invariants in semiconductor Rashba nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Amit; Sau, Jay

    The observed zero bias peak in tunneling conductance experiments on semiconductor Rashba nanowire is a signature of presence of Majorana zero modes. Characteristics of zero bias conductance peak (ZBCP) namely, height, width and peak splitting, are a function of microscopic parameters. Zero modes have finite splitting as a result of finiteness of the nanowire rendering the ground state only approximately topological i.e. zero modes are only approximately Majoranas. We calculate the scattering matrix topological invariant to quantify the quality of approximate Majorana modes and study its relation to observed characteristics of ZBCP. Furthermore we study the effect of dephasing on the topological invariant. Finally, we draw connection between the characteristics of the ZBCP and probability of observing non-Abelian statistics in proposed future experiments involving braiding of Majorana modes. Work is done in collaboration with Sankar Das Sarma and supported by LPS-MPO-CMTC, Microsoft Q, Univ. of Maryland startup grants and JQI-NSF-PFC.

  1. Kondo-like zero-bias conductance anomaly in a three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sungjae; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John A.; Gu, Genda; Mason, Nadya

    2016-01-01

    Zero-bias anomalies in topological nanowires have recently captured significant attention, as they are possible signatures of Majorana modes. Yet there are many other possible origins of zero-bias peaks in nanowires—for example, weak localization, Andreev bound states, or the Kondo effect. Here, we discuss observations of differential-conductance peaks at zero-bias voltage in non-superconducting electronic transport through a 3D topological insulator (Bi1.33Sb0.67)Se3 nanowire. The zero-bias conductance peaks show logarithmic temperature dependence and often linear splitting with magnetic fields, both of which are signatures of the Kondo effect in quantum dots. We characterize the zero-bias peaks and discuss their origin. PMID:26911258

  2. Kondo-like zero-bias conductance anomaly in a three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire

    DOE PAGES

    Cho, Sungjae; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John A.; Gu, Genda; Mason, Nadya

    2016-02-25

    Zero-bias anomalies in topological nanowires have recently captured significant attention, as they are possible signatures of Majorana modes. Yet there are many other possible origins of zero-bias peaks in nanowires—for example, weak localization, Andreev bound states, or the Kondo effect. Here, we discuss observations of differential-conductance peaks at zero-bias voltage in non-superconducting electronic transport through a 3D topological insulator (Bi1.33Sb0.67)Se3 nanowire. The zero-bias conductance peaks show logarithmic temperature dependence and often linear splitting with magnetic fields, both of which are signatures of the Kondo effect in quantum dots. As a result, we characterize the zero-bias peaks and discuss their origin.

  3. Kondo-like zero-bias conductance anomaly in a three-dimensional topological insulator nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungjae; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John A.; Gu, Genda; Mason, Nadya

    2016-02-01

    Zero-bias anomalies in topological nanowires have recently captured significant attention, as they are possible signatures of Majorana modes. Yet there are many other possible origins of zero-bias peaks in nanowires—for example, weak localization, Andreev bound states, or the Kondo effect. Here, we discuss observations of differential-conductance peaks at zero-bias voltage in non-superconducting electronic transport through a 3D topological insulator (Bi1.33Sb0.67)Se3 nanowire. The zero-bias conductance peaks show logarithmic temperature dependence and often linear splitting with magnetic fields, both of which are signatures of the Kondo effect in quantum dots. We characterize the zero-bias peaks and discuss their origin.

  4. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Copper Nanowires as Advanced Conductive Agents for Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong; Li, Xuan; Zhao, Xinyi; Feng, Jinkui; Qian, Yitai

    2015-09-01

    Copper nanowires (CuNW) are synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method and test as advanced conductive agents for lithium ion batteries. Anode prepared with CuNW and graphite show improved rate ability and excellent cycling stability even at high rate. AC-impedance of CuNW added electrode is much lower than that of electrodes containing carbon black only. This implies the CuNW could lower the electronical resistance. PMID:26716306

  5. Structural Basis for Metallic-Like Conductivity in Microbial Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Vargas, Madeline; Nevin, Kelly; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Martz, Eric; Tuominen, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Direct measurement of multiple physical properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili have demonstrated that they possess metallic-like conductivity, but several studies have suggested that metallic-like conductivity is unlikely based on the structures of the G. sulfurreducens pilus predicted from homology models. In order to further evaluate this discrepancy, pili were examined with synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction and rocking-curve X-ray diffraction. Both techniques revealed a periodic 3.2-Å spacing in conductive, wild-type G. sulfurreducens pili that was missing in the nonconductive pili of strain Aro5, which lack key aromatic acids required for conductivity. The intensity of the 3.2-Å peak increased 100-fold when the pH was shifted from 10.5 to 2, corresponding with a previously reported 100-fold increase in pilus conductivity with this pH change. These results suggest a clear structure-function correlation for metallic-like conductivity that can be attributed to overlapping π-orbitals of aromatic amino acids. A homology model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus was constructed with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus model as a template as an alternative to previous models, which were based on a Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus structure. This alternative model predicted that aromatic amino acids in G. sulfurreducens pili are packed within 3 to 4 Å, consistent with the experimental results. Thus, the predictions of homology modeling are highly sensitive to assumptions inherent in the model construction. The experimental results reported here further support the concept that the pili of G. sulfurreducens represent a novel class of electronically functional proteins in which aromatic amino acids promote long-distance electron transport. PMID:25736881

  6. Structural Basis for Metallic-Like Conductivity in Microbial Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Vargas, Madeline; Nevin, Kelly; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Martz, Eric; Tuominen, Mark T.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-03-03

    Direct measurement of multiple physical properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili have demonstrated that they possess metallic-like conductivity, but several studies have suggested that metallic-like conductivity is unlikely based on the structures of the G. sulfurreducens pilus predicted from homology models. In order to further evaluate this discrepancy, pili were examined with synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction and rocking-curve X-ray diffraction. Both techniques revealed a periodic 3.2-Å spacing in conductive, wild-type G. sulfurreducens pili that was missing in the nonconductive pili of strain Aro5, which lack key aromatic acids required for conductivity. The intensity of the 3.2-Å peak increased 100-fold when the pH was shifted from 10.5 to 2, corresponding with a previously reported 100-fold increase in pilus conductivity with this pH change. These results suggest a clear structure-function correlation for metallic-like conductivity that can be attributed to overlapping π-orbitals of aromatic amino acids. A homology model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus was constructed with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus model as a template as an alternative to previous models, which were based on a Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus structure. This alternative model predicted that aromatic amino acids in G. sulfurreducens pili are packed within 3 to 4 Å, consistent with the experimental results. Thus, the predictions of homology modeling are highly sensitive to assumptions inherent in the model construction. Finally, the experimental results reported here further support the concept that the pili of G. sulfurreducens represent a novel class of electronically functional proteins in which aromatic amino acids promote long-distance electron transport.

  7. Structural Basis for Metallic-Like Conductivity in Microbial Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Vargas, Madeline; Nevin, Kelly; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Martz, Eric; Tuominen, Mark T.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-03-03

    Direct measurement of multiple physical properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili have demonstrated that they possess metallic-like conductivity, but several studies have suggested that metallic-like conductivity is unlikely based on the structures of the G. sulfurreducens pilus predicted from homology models. In order to further evaluate this discrepancy, pili were examined with synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction and rocking-curve X-ray diffraction. Both techniques revealed a periodic 3.2-Å spacing in conductive, wild-type G. sulfurreducens pili that was missing in the nonconductive pili of strain Aro5, which lack key aromatic acids required for conductivity. The intensity of the 3.2-Å peak increased 100-fold when the pHmore » was shifted from 10.5 to 2, corresponding with a previously reported 100-fold increase in pilus conductivity with this pH change. These results suggest a clear structure-function correlation for metallic-like conductivity that can be attributed to overlapping π-orbitals of aromatic amino acids. A homology model of the G. sulfurreducens pilus was constructed with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus model as a template as an alternative to previous models, which were based on a Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilus structure. This alternative model predicted that aromatic amino acids in G. sulfurreducens pili are packed within 3 to 4 Å, consistent with the experimental results. Thus, the predictions of homology modeling are highly sensitive to assumptions inherent in the model construction. Finally, the experimental results reported here further support the concept that the pili of G. sulfurreducens represent a novel class of electronically functional proteins in which aromatic amino acids promote long-distance electron transport.« less

  8. Electrical Conductivity of Organic and Inorganic Nanowires Measured by Multi-probe Scanning Tunneling Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Masakazu

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998 [1], the authors and co-workers have developed multi-probe scanning tunneling microscopes (MPSTMs), in which two, three or four probes are operated independently. All probes of the MPSTMs can observe STM images independently, but the main role of the multiple probes is to be used as nanoscale electrodes that can contact any points selected in an observed STM image. It is therefore possible to measure electrical conductivity at the nanoscale through the multiple probes. By using MPSTMs and related methods, we measured the electrical conductivity of organic and inorganic nanowires, i.e., single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), erbium disilicide (ErSi2) metallic nanowires, and single polydiacetylene (PDA) molecular wires. For a SWCNT and an ErSi2 nanowire, ballistic conduction was observed at lengths less than about 500 and 20 nm, respectively, at room temperature. For a PDA molecular wire, polaron formation due to charge injection caused by applying a voltage to an STM tip placed close to the PDA molecular wire was observed, and when the voltage exceeded a critical value, the PDA molecular wire changed into a metallic state. [1] M. Aono, C.-S. Jiang, T. Nakayama, T. Okuda, S. Qiao, M. Sakurai, C. Thirstrup, Z.-H. Wu: Oyo Buturi (Applied Physics) 67, 1361 (1998) (in Japanese); A brief English abstract is available on INSPEC.

  9. Effective passivation of Ag nanowire-based flexible transparent conducting electrode by TiO2 nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Geon; Lee, Dongjun; Yoo, Jin Sun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-08-01

    Silver nanowire-based flexible transparent electrodes have critical problem, in spite of their excellent electrical and optical properties, that the electrical conductance and transparency degrade within several days in air because of oxidation of silver. To prevent the degradation of the silver nanowire, we encapsulated Ag-NWs with thin TiO2 barrier. Bar-coated silver nanowires on flexible polymer substrate were laminated at 120 °C, followed by atomic layer deposition of TiO2 nanoshell. With 20 nm of TiO2 nanoshells on silver nanowires, the transparent electrode keeps its electrical and optical properties over 2 months. Moreover, the TiO2-encapsulated silver nanowire-based transparent electrodes exhibit excellent bending durability.

  10. Visualizing One-Dimensional Electronic States and their Scattering in Semi-conducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beidenkopf, Haim; Reiner, Jonathan; Norris, Andrew; Nayak, Abhay Kumar; Avraham, Nurit; Shtrikman, Hadas

    One-dimensional electronic systems constitute a fascinating playground for the emergence of exotic electronic effects and phases, within and beyond the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid paradigm. More recently topological superconductivity and Majorana modes were added to that long list of phenomena. We report scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements conducted on pristine, epitaxialy grown InAs nanowires. We resolve the 1D electronic band structure manifested both via Van-Hove singularities in the local density-of-states, as well as by the quasi-particle interference patterns, induced by scattering from surface impurities. By studying the scattering of the one-dimensional electronic states off various scatterers, including crystallographic defects and the nanowire end, we identify new one-dimensional relaxation regimes and yet unexplored effects of interactions. Some of these may bear implications on the topological superconducting state and Majorana modes therein. The authors acknowledge support from the Israeli Science Foundation (ISF).

  11. The interplay between Arrhenius and hopping conduction mechanisms in a percolating nanowire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzi, A. L. R.; Chiquito, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the influence of different transport mechanisms on the conductance/resistance of devices based on percolating networks of semiconducting nanowires. We simulated systems such as random resistor networks where both Arrhenius and variable-range hopping mechanisms take place at the same time, and compared the results with experimental ones. Our assumption was that each mechanism represents only a fraction of the nanowires in the system and that the network resistance is given by the direct sum of the contribution of the mechanisms. An unexpected behavior observed in the experimental measurements led us to propose this approach, and the numerical results found in our simulations suggest that this model can explain the experiment.

  12. Approximate analytical models for phonon specific heat and ballistic thermal conductance of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Prasher, Ravi; Tong, Tao; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-01-01

    We introduce simple approximate analytical models for phonon specific heat and ballistic thermal conductance of nanowires. The analytical model is in excellent agreement with the detailed numerical calculations based on the solution of the elastic wave equation and is also in good agreement with the ballistic thermal conductance data by Schwab et al. (Nature 2000, 404, 974). Finally, we propose a demarcating criterion in terms of temperature, dimension, and material properties to capture the dimensional crossover from a three-dimensional (3D) bulk system to a one-dimensional (1D) system.

  13. Large scale, highly conductive and patterned transparent films of silver nanowires on arbitrary substrates and their application in touch screens.

    PubMed

    Madaria, Anuj R; Kumar, Akshay; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-06-17

    The application of silver nanowire films as transparent conductive electrodes has shown promising results recently. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a simple spray coating technique to obtain large scale, highly uniform and conductive silver nanowire films on arbitrary substrates. We also integrated a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-assisted contact transfer technique with spray coating, which allowed us to obtain large scale high quality patterned films of silver nanowires. The transparency and conductivity of the films was controlled by the volume of the dispersion used in spraying and the substrate area. We note that the optoelectrical property, σ(DC)/σ(Op), for various films fabricated was in the range 75-350, which is extremely high for transparent thin film compared to other candidate alternatives to doped metal oxide film. Using this method, we obtain silver nanowire films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate with a transparency of 85% and sheet resistance of 33 Ω/sq, which is comparable to that of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) on flexible substrates. In-depth analysis of the film shows a high performance using another commonly used figure-of-merit, Φ(TE). Also, Ag nanowire film/PET shows good mechanical flexibility and the application of such a conductive silver nanowire film as an electrode in a touch panel has been demonstrated. PMID:21508460

  14. Large scale, highly conductive and patterned transparent films of silver nanowires on arbitrary substrates and their application in touch screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madaria, Anuj R.; Kumar, Akshay; Zhou, Chongwu

    2011-06-01

    The application of silver nanowire films as transparent conductive electrodes has shown promising results recently. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a simple spray coating technique to obtain large scale, highly uniform and conductive silver nanowire films on arbitrary substrates. We also integrated a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-assisted contact transfer technique with spray coating, which allowed us to obtain large scale high quality patterned films of silver nanowires. The transparency and conductivity of the films was controlled by the volume of the dispersion used in spraying and the substrate area. We note that the optoelectrical property, σDC/σOp, for various films fabricated was in the range 75-350, which is extremely high for transparent thin film compared to other candidate alternatives to doped metal oxide film. Using this method, we obtain silver nanowire films on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate with a transparency of 85% and sheet resistance of 33 Ω/sq, which is comparable to that of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) on flexible substrates. In-depth analysis of the film shows a high performance using another commonly used figure-of-merit, ΦTE. Also, Ag nanowire film/PET shows good mechanical flexibility and the application of such a conductive silver nanowire film as an electrode in a touch panel has been demonstrated.

  15. Mn oxide-silver composite nanowires for improved thermal stability, SERS and electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mukul; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-07-14

    Redox transformation reaction between aqueous AgNO3 and Mn(CH3COO)2 at low temperature (∼80 °C) has been adopted for industrial-scale production of uniform Ag-MnOOH composite nanowires for the first time. Varying amounts of incorporated Ag in the composite retain the 1D morphology of the composite. Nanowires upon annealing evolve Ag-MnO2 nanocomposites, once again with the retention of the parental morphology. Just 4 % of silver incorporation in the composite demonstrates metal-like conducting performance from the corresponding semiconducting material. Transition of MnO2 to Mn2O3 to Mn3O4 takes place upon heat treatment in relation to successive increase in Ag concentrations in the nanowires. The composites offer resistance to the observed oxide transformation. This is evidenced from the progressive increase in transition temperature. In situ Raman, ex situ thermal and XRD analysis corroborate the fact. The composite with 12 % Ag offers resistance to the transformation of MnO2, which is also verified from laser heating. Importantly, Ag nanoparticle incorporation is proved to offer a thermally stable and better surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform than the individual components. Both the Ag-MnOOH and Ag-MnO2 nanocomposites with 8 atomic % Ag show the best SERS enhancement (enhancement factor ∼10(10)). The observed enhancement relates to charge transfer as well as electromagnetic effects. PMID:24891154

  16. Silver nanowires decorated with silver nanoparticles for low-haze flexible transparent conductive films

    PubMed Central

    Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Muhammed Ajmal, C.; Hee Kim, Kwang; Yang, Daejin; Roh, Jongwook; Cheol Park, Hyeon; Kwak, Chan; Choi, Jae-Young; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanowires have attracted much attention for use in flexible transparent conductive films (TCFs) due to their low sheet resistance and flexibility. However, the haze was too high for replacing indium-tin-oxide in high-quality display devices. Herein, we report flexible TCFs, which were prepared using a scalable bar-coating method, with a low sheet resistance (24.1 Ω/sq at 96.4% transmittance) and a haze (1.04%) that is comparable to that of indium-tin-oxide TCFs. To decrease the haze and maintain a low sheet resistance, small diameter silver nanowires (~20 nm) were functionalized with low-temperature surface-sintering silver nanoparticles (~5 nm) using bifunctional cysteamine. The silver nanowire-nanoparticle ink stability was excellent. The sheet resistance of the TCFs was decreased by 29.5% (from 34.2 to 24.1 Ω/sq) due to the functionalization at a low curing temperature of 85 °C. The TCFs were highly flexible and maintained their stability for more than 2 months and 10,000 bending cycles after coating with a protective layer. PMID:26575970

  17. Self-assembling of molecular nanowires for enhancing the conducting properties of discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji Hyun; Kim, Kyung Ho; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Park, Yung Woo; Kim, Youn Sang; Scalia, Giusy

    2015-08-01

    The self-organization of discotic liquid crystal molecules in columns has enormous interest for soft nanoelectronic applications. A great advantage of discotic liquid crystal is that defects can be self-annealed in contrast to typical organic materials. Through the overlap of molecular orbitals, the aromatic cores assemble into long range ordered one-dimensional structures. Very thin structured films can be obtained by spin-coating from solution and the resulting morphologies are strongly dependent on the interaction between discotics and solvent molecules. Toluene produces films formed by very long nanowires, spontaneously aligned along a common direction and over fairly large areas. These nanostructured films are a result of the interplay between liquid crystal self-organization and solvent driven assembly. The ordered nanowire structures exhibit improvement in the electrical properties compared to misaligned structures and even to pristine HAT5, deposited without the aid of solvent. In this study we show that the toluene-based deposition of discotic liquid crystals is advantageous because it allows a uniform coverage of the substrate, unlike pristine HAT5 but also thanks to the type of induced structures exhibiting one order of magnitude higher conductivity, in the aligned nanowire films, compared to bare HAT5 ones.

  18. Microstructured Hydrogel Templates for the Formation of Conductive Gold Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Wünnemann, Patrick; Noyong, Michael; Kreuels, Klaus; Brüx, Roland; Gordiichuk, Pavlo; van Rijn, Patrick; Plamper, Felix A; Simon, Ulrich; Böker, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Microstructured hydrogel allows for a new template-guided method to obtain conductive nanowire arrays on a large scale. To generate the template, an imprinting process is used in order to synthesize the hydrogel directly into the grooves of wrinkled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The resulting poly(N-vinylimidazole)-based hydrogel is defined by the PDMS stamp in pattern and size. Subsequently, tetrachloroaurate(III) ions from aqueous solution are coordinated within the humps of the N-vinylimidazole-containing polymer template and reduced by air plasma. After reduction and development of the gold, to achieve conductive wires, the extension perpendicular to the long axis (width) of the gold strings is considerably reduced compared to the dimension of the parental hydrogel wrinkles (from ≈1 μm down to 200-300 nm). At the same time, the wire-to-wire distance and the overall length of the wires is preserved. The PDMS templates and hydrogel structures are analyzed with scanning force microscopy (SFM) and the gold structures via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The conductivity measurements of the gold nanowires are performed in situ in the SEM, showing highly conductive gold leads. Hence, this method can be regarded as a facile nonlithographic top-down approach from micrometer-sized structures to nanometer-sized features. PMID:27386787

  19. Nanojunctions in conducting polypyrrole single nanowire made by focused electron beam: Charge transport characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Min Ho; Hong, Young Ki; Park, Dong Hyuk; Jo, Seong Gi; Joo, Jinsoo

    2011-07-15

    A focused electron (E)-beam with various doses was irradiated on the intended positions of conducting polypyrrole (PPy) single nanowire (NW) to fabricate nanojunctions. The current-voltage characteristics and their temperature dependence of the PPy single NW with nanojunctions were measured and analyzed. By increasing the E-beam dose and the number of nanojunctions, the current level of the single NW was dramatically decreased, and the conductance gap became more severe as the temperature decreased. The charge transport behavior varied from three-dimensional variable range hopping to fluctuation induced tunneling models, depending on the dose of focused E-beam. From micro-Raman spectra, the focused E-beam irradiation induced the de-doped states and conformational modification of polymer chains in the nanojunctions. The results suggest that the nanojunctions made by focused E-beam acted as a quasi-potential barrier for charge conduction in the conducting PPy single NW.

  20. Quantized thermal conductance of nanowires at room temperature due to Zenneck surface-phonon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Ordonez-Miranda, José; Tranchant, Laurent; Kim, Beomjoon; Chalopin, Yann; Antoni, Thomas; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-02-01

    Based on the Landauer formalism, we demonstrate that the thermal conductance due to the propagation of Zenneck surface-phonon polaritons along a polar nanowire is independent of the material characteristics and is given by π2kB2T/3h. The giant propagation length of these energy carriers establishes that this quantization holds not only for a temperature much smaller than 1 K, as is the case for electrons and phonons, but also for temperatures comparable to room temperature, which can significantly facilitate its observation and application in the thermal management of nanoscale electronics and photonics.

  1. Polar surface effects on the thermal conductivity of ZnO nanowires: a shell-like surface reconstruction-induced preserving mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-11-21

    We perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the effect of polar surfaces on the thermal transport in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires. We find that the thermal conductivity of nanowires with free polar (0001) surfaces is much higher than that of nanowires that have been stabilized with reduced charges on the polar (0001) surfaces, and also hexagonal nanowires without any transverse polar surface, where the reduced charge model has been proposed as a promising stabilization mechanism for the (0001) polar surfaces of ZnO nanowires. From normal mode analysis, we show that the higher thermal conductivity is due to the shell-like reconstruction that occurs for the free polar surfaces. This shell-like reconstruction suppresses twisting motion in the nanowires such that the bending phonon modes are not scattered by the other phonon modes, and this leads to substantially higher thermal conductivity of the ZnO nanowires with free polar surfaces. Furthermore, the auto-correlation function of the normal mode coordinate is utilized to extract the phonon lifetime, which leads to a concise explanation for the higher thermal conductivity of ZnO nanowires with free polar surfaces. Our work demonstrates that ZnO nanowires without polar surfaces, which exhibit low thermal conductivity, are more promising candidates for thermoelectric applications than nanowires with polar surfaces (and also high thermal conductivity).

  2. Highly conductive coaxial SnO(2)-In(2)O(3) heterostructured nanowires for Li ion battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Wan; Hwang, In-Sung; Kwon, S Joon; Kang, Hae-Yong; Park, Kyung-Soo; Choi, Young-Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Jae-Gwan

    2007-10-01

    Novel SnO(2)-In(2)O(3) heterostructured nanowires were produced via a thermal evaporation method, and their possible nucleation/growth mechanism is proposed. We found that the electronic conductivity of the individual SnO(2)-In(2)O(3) nanowires was 2 orders of magnitude better than that of the pure SnO(2) nanowires, due to the formation of Sn-doped In(2)O(3) caused by the incorporation of Sn into the In(2)O(3) lattice during the nucleation and growth of the In(2)O(3) shell nanostructures. This provides the SnO(2)-In(2)O(3) nanowires with an outstanding lithium storage capacity, making them suitable for promising Li ion battery electrodes.

  3. Prediction of reduced thermal conductivity in nano-engineered rough semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pierre N.; Aksamija, Zlatan; Pop, Eric; Ravaioli, Umberto

    2009-11-01

    We explore phonon decay processes necessary to the design of efficient rough semiconductor nanowire (NW) thermoelectric devices. A novel approach to surface roughness-limited thermal conductivity of Si, Ge, and GaAs NW with diameter D < 500 nm is presented. In particular, a frequency-dependent phonon scattering rate is computed from perturbation theory and related to a description of the surface through the root-mean-square roughness height Δ and autocovariance length L. Using a full phonon dispersion relation, the thermal conductivity varies quadratically with diameter and roughness as (D/Δ)2. Computed results are in agreement with experimental data, and predict remarkably low thermal conductivity below 1 W/m/K in rough-etched 56 nm Ge and GaAs NW at room temperature.

  4. Ag nanowire percolating network embedded in indium tin oxide nanoparticles for printable transparent conducting electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin-A; Kim, Han-Ki

    2014-02-17

    Solution-based printable transparent conducting electrodes consisting of Ag nanowire (NW) and indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated by simple brush painting at room temperature under atmospheric ambient conditions. Effectively embedding the Ag NW percolating network into the ITO NPs provided a conduction path, led to a metallic conduction behavior of the ITO NPs/Ag NW/ITO NPs multilayer and supplied electrons into the ITO NPs. The optimized ITO NPs/Ag NW/ITO NPs multilayer showed a sheet resistance of 16.57 Ω/sq and an optical transparency of 79.50% without post annealing. Based on high resolution transmission electron microscope analysis, we investigated the microstructure and interface structure of the ITO NPs/Ag NW/ITO NPs multilayer electrodes and suggested a possible mechanism to explain the low resistivity of the multilayers.

  5. Spray-Deposited Large-Area Copper Nanowire Transparent Conductive Electrodes and Their Uses for Touch Screen Applications.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsun-Chen; Chang, Yen-Chen; Lin, Yow; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Wei-Chung; Li, Guo-An; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2016-05-25

    Large-area conducting transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) were prepared by a fast, scalable, and low-cost spray deposition of copper nanowire (CuNW) dispersions. Thin, long, and pure copper nanowires were obtained via the seed-mediated growth in an organic solvent-based synthesis. The mean length and diameter of nanowires are, respectively, 37.7 μm and 46 nm, corresponding to a high-mean-aspect ratio of 790. These wires were spray-deposited onto a glass substrate to form a nanowire conducting network which function as a TCE. CuNW TCEs exhibit high-transparency and high-conductivity since their relatively long lengths are advantageous in lowering in the sheet resistance. For example, a 2 × 2 cm(2) transparent nanowire electrode exhibits transmittance of T = 90% with a sheet resistance as low as 52.7 Ω sq(-1). Large-area sizes (>50 cm(2)) of CuNW TCEs were also prepared by the spray coating method and assembled as resistive touch screens that can be integrated with a variety of devices, including LED lighting array, a computer, electric motors, and audio electronic devices, showing the capability to make diverse sizes and functionalities of CuNW TCEs by the reported method. PMID:27144911

  6. Spray-Deposited Large-Area Copper Nanowire Transparent Conductive Electrodes and Their Uses for Touch Screen Applications.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hsun-Chen; Chang, Yen-Chen; Lin, Yow; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Wei-Chung; Li, Guo-An; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2016-05-25

    Large-area conducting transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) were prepared by a fast, scalable, and low-cost spray deposition of copper nanowire (CuNW) dispersions. Thin, long, and pure copper nanowires were obtained via the seed-mediated growth in an organic solvent-based synthesis. The mean length and diameter of nanowires are, respectively, 37.7 μm and 46 nm, corresponding to a high-mean-aspect ratio of 790. These wires were spray-deposited onto a glass substrate to form a nanowire conducting network which function as a TCE. CuNW TCEs exhibit high-transparency and high-conductivity since their relatively long lengths are advantageous in lowering in the sheet resistance. For example, a 2 × 2 cm(2) transparent nanowire electrode exhibits transmittance of T = 90% with a sheet resistance as low as 52.7 Ω sq(-1). Large-area sizes (>50 cm(2)) of CuNW TCEs were also prepared by the spray coating method and assembled as resistive touch screens that can be integrated with a variety of devices, including LED lighting array, a computer, electric motors, and audio electronic devices, showing the capability to make diverse sizes and functionalities of CuNW TCEs by the reported method.

  7. Metal Nanowires: Synthesis, Processing, and Structure-Property Relationships in the Context of Flexible Transparent Conducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathmell, Aaron R.

    The demand for flat-panel televisions, e-readers, smart-phones, and touch-screens has been increasing over the past few years and will continue to increase for the foreseeable future. Each of these devices contains a transparent conductor, which is usually indium tin oxide (ITO) because of its high transparency and low sheet resistance. ITO films, however, are brittle, expensive, and difficult to deposit, and because of these problems, alternative transparent electrodes are being studied. One cheap and flexible alternative to ITO is films of randomly oriented copper nanowires. We have developed a synthesis to make long, thin, and well-dispersed copper nanowires that can be suspended in an ink and coated onto a substrate to make flexible transparent films. These films are then made conductive by annealing in a hydrogen atmosphere or by a solution processing technique that can be done in air at room temperature. The resulting flexible transparent conducting films display transparencies and sheet resistance values comparable to ITO. Since it is well known that copper oxidizes, we also developed a synthesis to coat the copper nanowires with a layer of nickel in solution. Our measurements indicated that copper nanowires would double their sheet resistance in 3 months, but the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowire films containing 20 mole% nickel will double in about 400 years. The addition of nickel to the copper nanowires also gave the film a more neutral grey appearance. The nickel coating can also be applied to the copper nanowires after the film is formed via an electroless plating method. To further optimize the properties of our transparent conductors we developed a framework to understand how the dimensions and area coverage of the nanowires affect the overall film properties. To quantify the effect of length on the sheet resistance and transmittance, wires with different lengths but the same diameter were synthesized to make transparent conducting films and

  8. How to infer non-Abelian statistics and topological visibility from tunneling conductance properties of realistic Majorana nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Sarma, S.; Nag, Amit; Sau, Jay D.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a simple conceptual question with respect to Majorana zero modes in semiconductor nanowires: can the measured nonideal values of the zero-bias-conductance-peak in the tunneling experiments be used as a characteristic to predict the underlying topological nature of the proximity induced nanowire superconductivity? In particular, we define and calculate the topological visibility, which is a variation of the topological invariant associated with the scattering matrix of the system as well as the zero-bias-conductance-peak heights in the tunneling measurements, in the presence of dissipative broadening, using precisely the same realistic nanowire parameters to connect the topological invariants with the zero-bias tunneling conductance values. This dissipative broadening is present in both (the existing) tunneling measurements and also (any future) braiding experiments as an inevitable consequence of a finite braiding time. The connection between the topological visibility and the conductance allows us to obtain the visibility of realistic braiding experiments in nanowires, and to conclude that the current experimentally accessible systems with nonideal zero-bias conductance peaks may indeed manifest (with rather low visibility) non-Abelian statistics for the Majorana zero modes. In general, we find that a large (small) superconducting gap (Majorana peak splitting) is essential for the manifestation of the non-Abelian braiding statistics, and in particular, a zero-bias conductance value of around half the ideal quantized Majorana value should be sufficient for the manifestation of non-Abelian statistics in experimental nanowires. Our work also establishes that as a matter of principle the topological transition associated with the emergence of Majorana zero modes in finite nanowires is always a crossover (akin to a quantum phase transition at finite temperature) requiring the presence of dissipative broadening (which must be larger than the Majorana energy

  9. Structural basis underlying the metallic-like conductivity of microbial nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Vargas, Madeline; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2014-03-01

    Microbial nanowires are electrically conductive proteinaceous pili nanofilaments secreted by Geobacter sulfurreducens. In contrast to current biochemical understanding that proteins are insulators, G. sulfurreducens pili show organic metallic-like conductivity. Pili also enable direct exchange of electrons among Geobacter co-cultures. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that aromatic amino acids confer conductivity to pili. In order to develop a structural understanding of the pili to probe the conduction mechanism at a molecular level, we employed three complementary structural methods - X-ray microdiffraction using synchrotron radiation, rocking curve X-ray diffraction, and electron diffraction. Studies performed with all these three methods revealed a 3.2 Å periodic spacing in wild-type G. sulfurreducens pili, expected for metal-like conductivity and a lack of such spacing in genetically modified non-conductive pili. Notably, both the peak intensity and the conductivity increased 100-fold with lowering the pH from pH 10.5 to pH 2, demonstrating a structure-function correlation in pili. We also reconstructed the three dimensional tertiary structure of pili with homology modeling, which further suggested the 3.2 Å spacing among aromatics associated with metal-like conductivity. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences and NSF-NSEC Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing grant no. CMMI-1025020.

  10. Copper Nanowires as Conductive Ink for Low-Cost Draw-On Electronics.

    PubMed

    Jason, Naveen Noah; Shen, Wei; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-08-01

    This work tackles the complicated problem of clump formation and entanglement of high aspect ratio copper nanowires, due to which a well dispersed solution for use as a true ink for drawable electronics has not been made until now. Through rheology studies even a hard to use material like copper nanowires was tailored to be made into a highly efficient conductive ink with only 2 vol % or 18.28 wt % loading which is far lower than existing nanoparticle based inks. This versatile ink can be applied onto various substrates such as paper, PET, PDMS and latex. By using the ink in a roller ball pen, a bending sensor device was simply drawn on paper, which demonstrated detection of various degrees of convex bending and was highly durable as shown in the 10,000 bending cycling test. A highly sensitive strain sensor which has a maximum gauge factor of 54.38 was also fabricated by simply painting the ink onto latex rubber strip using a paintbrush. Finally a complex conductive pattern depicting the Sydney Opera House was painted on paper to demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the ink. The use of Cu NWs is highly economical in terms of the conductive filler loading in the ink and the cost of copper itself as compared to other metal NPs, CNT, and graphene-based inks. The demonstrated e-ink, devices, and facile device fabrication methods push the field one step closer to truly creating cheap and highly reliable skin like devices "on the fly". PMID:26161620

  11. Enhancement of Thermoelectric Performance by Reducing Phonon Thermal Conductance in Multiple Core-shell Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of multiple core-shell nanowires are investigated by using nonequilibrium Green's function method and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the thermoelectric performance of multiple core-shell NWs can be improved observably with the increase of shell number compared with the single component NWs due to the significant reduction of phonon thermal conductance. The ZT value of multiple core-shell NWs can reach three times greater than that of the single component GaSb NWs at room temperature. Moreover, the ZT values of both the core-shell NWs and single component NWs are increased with the increasing temperature, but the ZT value of core-shell NWs increases more slowly than that of single component NWs. These results show that the single component NWs is suitable as thermoelectric material at much high temperature, but the multiple core-shell NWs is more suitable as thermoelectric material at room temperature. PMID:25413874

  12. Disorder-free localization around the conduction band edge of crossing and kinked silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Keleş, Ümit; Çakan, Aslı; Bulutay, Ceyhun

    2015-02-14

    We explore ballistic regime quantum transport characteristics of oxide-embedded crossing and kinked silicon nanowires (NWs) within a large-scale empirical pseudopotential electronic structure framework, coupled to the Kubo-Greenwood transport analysis. A real-space wave function study is undertaken and the outcomes are interpreted together with the findings of ballistic transport calculations. This reveals that ballistic transport edge lies tens to hundreds of millielectron volts above the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, with a substantial number of localized states appearing in between, as well as above the former. We show that these localized states are not due to the oxide interface, but rather core silicon-derived. They manifest the wave nature of electrons brought to foreground by the reflections originating from NW junctions and bends. Hence, we show that the crossings and kinks of even ultraclean Si NWs possess a conduction band tail without a recourse to atomistic disorder.

  13. Highly conductive and flexible silver nanowire-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Lee, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Youngu

    2014-01-01

    We successfully fabricated silver nanowire (AgNW)-based microelectrodes on various substrates such as a glass and polydimethylsiloxane by using a photolithographic process for the first time. The AgNW-based microelectrodes exhibited excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility. We also demonstrated the direct transfer process of AgNW-based microelectrodes from a glass to a biocompatible polyacrylamide-based hydrogel. The AgNW-based microelectrodes on the biocompatible hydrogel showed excellent electrical performance. Furthermore, they showed great mechanical flexibility as well as superior stability under wet conditions. We anticipate that the AgNW-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel substrates can be a promising platform for realization of practical bioelectronics devices.

  14. Influence of electromechanical coupling and electron irradiation on the conductivity of individual ZnO nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huifeng; Huang, Yunhua; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yue

    2011-03-01

    We reported the electrical properties of individual ZnO nanowire (NW) with length 20 μm and diameter 100 nm, which prepared by thermal evaporation process. The individual ZnO NW was connected to the tungsten tips with typical metal-semiconductor-metal model, and the current-voltage curves were measured in a nano-manipulation and measurement system. The results indicated that the conductivity of the individual ZnO NW was decreased for inflicting an additional force on ZnO NW from tungsten tip. Moreover, the rectifier characteristics of ZnO NW were affected with the electron beam turning on or off in the chamber of scanning electron microscope.

  15. Preparation of conductive gold nanowires in confined environment of gold-filled polymer nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mitschang, Fabian; Langner, Markus; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Greiner, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Continuous conductive gold nanofibers are prepared via the "tubes by fiber templates" process. First, poly(l-lactide) (PLLA)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with over 60 wt% gold are synthesized and characterized, including gel permeation chromatography coupled with a diode array detector. Subsequent electrospinning of these AuNP with template PLLA results in composite nanofibers featuring a high gold content of 57 wt%. Highly homogeneous gold nanowires are obtained after chemical vapor deposition of 345 nm of poly(p-xylylene) (PPX) onto the composite fibers followed by pyrolysis of the polymers at 1050 °C. The corresponding heat-induced transition from continuous gold-loaded polymer tubes to smooth gold nanofibers is studied by transmission electron microscopy and helium ion microscopy using both secondary electrons and Rutherford backscattered ions.

  16. Highly conductive and flexible silver nanowire-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Lee, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Youngu

    2014-01-01

    We successfully fabricated silver nanowire (AgNW)-based microelectrodes on various substrates such as a glass and polydimethylsiloxane by using a photolithographic process for the first time. The AgNW-based microelectrodes exhibited excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility. We also demonstrated the direct transfer process of AgNW-based microelectrodes from a glass to a biocompatible polyacrylamide-based hydrogel. The AgNW-based microelectrodes on the biocompatible hydrogel showed excellent electrical performance. Furthermore, they showed great mechanical flexibility as well as superior stability under wet conditions. We anticipate that the AgNW-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel substrates can be a promising platform for realization of practical bioelectronics devices. PMID:25347028

  17. Electrically conductive nano graphite-filled bacterial cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Erbas Kiziltas, Esra; Kiziltas, Alper; Rhodes, Kevin; Emanetoglu, Nuri W; Blumentritt, Melanie; Gardner, Douglas J

    2016-01-20

    A unique three dimensional (3D) porous structured bacterial cellulose (BC) can act as a supporting material to deposit the nanofillers in order to create advanced BC-based functional nanomaterials for various technological applications. In this study, novel nanocomposites comprised of BC with exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared using a simple particle impregnation strategy to enhance the thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the BC. The flake-shaped xGnP particles were well dispersed and formed a continuous network throughout the BC matrix. The temperature at 10% weight loss, thermal stability and residual ash content of the nanocomposites increased at higher xGnP loadings. The electrical conductivity of the composites increased with increasing xGnP loading (attaining values 0.75 S/cm with the addition of 2 wt.% of xGnP). The enhanced conductive and thermal properties of the BC-xGnP nanocomposites will broaden applications (biosensors, tissue engineering, etc.) of BC and xGnP.

  18. Electrically conductive nano graphite-filled bacterial cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Erbas Kiziltas, Esra; Kiziltas, Alper; Rhodes, Kevin; Emanetoglu, Nuri W; Blumentritt, Melanie; Gardner, Douglas J

    2016-01-20

    A unique three dimensional (3D) porous structured bacterial cellulose (BC) can act as a supporting material to deposit the nanofillers in order to create advanced BC-based functional nanomaterials for various technological applications. In this study, novel nanocomposites comprised of BC with exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared using a simple particle impregnation strategy to enhance the thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the BC. The flake-shaped xGnP particles were well dispersed and formed a continuous network throughout the BC matrix. The temperature at 10% weight loss, thermal stability and residual ash content of the nanocomposites increased at higher xGnP loadings. The electrical conductivity of the composites increased with increasing xGnP loading (attaining values 0.75 S/cm with the addition of 2 wt.% of xGnP). The enhanced conductive and thermal properties of the BC-xGnP nanocomposites will broaden applications (biosensors, tissue engineering, etc.) of BC and xGnP. PMID:26572457

  19. Enhancement of the electrical properties of silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes by atomic layer deposition coating with zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Quang; Tran, Duc-Huy; Ngoc Phan, Vu; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Nguyen, Duy-Cuong

    2016-08-19

    Transparent conductive electrodes for applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes are important components and require low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Herein, we report an enhancement of the electrical properties of silver (Ag) nanowire networks by coating with zinc oxide using the atomic layer deposition technique. A strong decrease in the sheet resistance of Ag nanowires, namely from 20-40 Ω/□ to 7-15 Ω/□, was observed after coating with ZnO. Ag nanowire electrodes coated with 200-cycle ZnO by atomic layer deposition show the best quality, with a sheet resistance of 11 Ω/□ and transmittance of 75%.

  20. Enhancement of the electrical properties of silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes by atomic layer deposition coating with zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Quang; Tran, Duc-Huy; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Nguyen, Duy-Cuong

    2016-08-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes for applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes are important components and require low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Herein, we report an enhancement of the electrical properties of silver (Ag) nanowire networks by coating with zinc oxide using the atomic layer deposition technique. A strong decrease in the sheet resistance of Ag nanowires, namely from 20-40 Ω/□ to 7-15 Ω/□, was observed after coating with ZnO. Ag nanowire electrodes coated with 200-cycle ZnO by atomic layer deposition show the best quality, with a sheet resistance of 11 Ω/□ and transmittance of 75%.

  1. Enhancement of the electrical properties of silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes by atomic layer deposition coating with zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Quang; Tran, Duc-Huy; Phan, Vu Ngoc; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Nguyen, Duy-Cuong

    2016-08-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes for applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes are important components and require low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Herein, we report an enhancement of the electrical properties of silver (Ag) nanowire networks by coating with zinc oxide using the atomic layer deposition technique. A strong decrease in the sheet resistance of Ag nanowires, namely from 20–40 Ω/□ to 7–15 Ω/□, was observed after coating with ZnO. Ag nanowire electrodes coated with 200-cycle ZnO by atomic layer deposition show the best quality, with a sheet resistance of 11 Ω/□ and transmittance of 75%.

  2. In situ fabrication of highly conductive metal nanowire networks with high transmittance from deep-ultraviolet to near-infrared.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chunxiong; Yang, Jie; Gao, Hao; Li, Faming; Yao, Yingfang; Yang, Bo; Fu, Gao; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Yu, Tao; Qin, Yiqiang; Liu, Jianguo; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-03-24

    We have developed a facile and compatible method to in situ fabricate uniform metal nanowire networks on substrates. The as-fabricated metal nanowire networks show low sheet resistance and high transmittance (2.2 Ω sq(-1) at T = 91.1%), which is equivalent to that of the state-of-the-art metal nanowire networks. We demonstrated that the transmittance of the metal networks becomes homogeneous from deep-ultraviolet (200 nm) to near-infrared (2000 nm) when the size of the wire spacing increases to micrometer size. Theoretical and experimental analyses indicated that we can improve the conductivity of the metal networks as well as keep their transmittance by increasing the thickness of the metal films. We also carried out durability tests to demonstrate our as-fabricated metal networks having good flexibility and strong adhesion. PMID:25738309

  3. Enhancement of the electrical properties of silver nanowire transparent conductive electrodes by atomic layer deposition coating with zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh-Tuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Quang; Tran, Duc-Huy; Ngoc Phan, Vu; Duong, Thanh-Tung; Nguyen, Duy-Cuong

    2016-08-19

    Transparent conductive electrodes for applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes are important components and require low sheet resistance and high transmittance. Herein, we report an enhancement of the electrical properties of silver (Ag) nanowire networks by coating with zinc oxide using the atomic layer deposition technique. A strong decrease in the sheet resistance of Ag nanowires, namely from 20-40 Ω/□ to 7-15 Ω/□, was observed after coating with ZnO. Ag nanowire electrodes coated with 200-cycle ZnO by atomic layer deposition show the best quality, with a sheet resistance of 11 Ω/□ and transmittance of 75%. PMID:27378668

  4. Hydrogen-incorporated ZnO nanowire films: stable and high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Ajay; Aslam, M.

    2013-12-01

    Post-growth hydrogen annealing treatment of highly oriented ZnO nanowire (NW) films (ZnO : H) results in high electrical conductivity (3.7 × 103 S m-1) and fully suppressed defect emission at room temperature. The formation of hydrogen-related vacancy complexes is responsible for the suppression of vacancies ( V_{o}^{+} and V_{o}^{2+} ), leading to a reduction in defect-based emission. ZnO : H NW films show five orders larger stable electrical conductance with a four-fold increment in carrier mobility (7-28 cm2 V-1 s-1). As compared with pristine NWs, the carrier concentration in ZnO : H NW films increases from 1015 to 1019 cm-3, which is in the range of commercial transparent conducting oxides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses reveal stable OH bond formation, which strongly supports the prediction of H doping. These films offer a promising conducting oxide platform for photovoltaic applications.

  5. Correlative infrared–electron nanoscopy reveals the local structure–conductivity relationship in zinc oxide nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Stiegler, J.M.; Tena-Zaera, R.; Idigoras, O.; Chuvilin, A.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution characterization methods play a key role in the development, analysis and optimization of nanoscale materials and devices. Because of the various material properties, only a combination of different characterization techniques provides a comprehensive understanding of complex functional materials. Here we introduce correlative infrared–electron nanoscopy, a novel method yielding transmission electron microscope and infrared near-field images of one and the same nanostructure. While transmission electron microscopy provides structural information up to the atomic level, infrared near-field imaging yields nanoscale maps of chemical composition and conductivity. We demonstrate the method's potential by studying the relation between conductivity and crystal structure in ZnO nanowire cross-sections. The combination of infrared conductivity maps and the local crystal structure reveals a radial free-carrier gradient, which inversely correlates to the density of extended crystalline defects. Our method opens new avenues for studying the local interplay between structure, conductivity and chemical composition in widely different material systems. PMID:23072801

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation overcoming the finite size effects of thermal conductivity of bulk silicon and silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chaofeng; Xu, Ji; Ge, Wei; Li, Jinghai

    2016-05-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation has been a powerful tool for studying the thermophysical properties of bulk silicon and silicon nanowires. Nevertheless, usually limited by the capacity and capability of computational resources, the traditional longitudinal and transverse simulation sizes are evidently restricted in a narrow range much less than the experimental scales, which seriously hinders the exploration of the thermal properties. In this research, based on a powerful and efficient molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method, the computation of thermal conductivity beyond the known Casimir size limits is realized. The longitudinal dimensions of the simulations significantly exceed the micrometer scale. More importantly, the lateral characteristic sizes are much larger than 10 nanometers, explicitly comparable with the silicon nanowires fabricated and measured experimentally, whereas the traditional simulation size is several nanometers. The powerful virtual experimental measurement provided in our simulations achieves the direct prediction of the thermal conductivity of bulk silicon and real-scale silicon nanowires, and delineates the complete longitudinal size dependence of their thermal conductivities, especially at the elusive mesoscopic scale. Furthermore, the presented measurement paves an exciting and promising way to explore in depth the thermophysical properties of other bulk covalent solids and their low-dimensional structures, such as nanowires and nanosheets.

  7. Silver Nanowire-IZO-Conducting Polymer Hybrids for Flexible and Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Ho Jun; Kim, Se Jung; Hwang, Ju Hyun; Shim, Yong Sub; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) has been considered as a promising material for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. However, despite the advantages of AgNWs, some of their intrinsic drawbacks, such as large surface roughness and poor interconnection between wires, limit their practical application in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Herein, we report a high-performance AgNW-based hybrid electrode composed of indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) and poly (3,4-ethylenediowythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) [PEDOT:PSS]. The IZO layer protects the underlying AgNWs from oxidation and corrosion and tightly fuses the wires together and to the substrate. The PEDOT:PSS effectively reduces surface roughness and increases the hybrid films’ transmittance. The fabricated electrodes exhibited a low sheet resistance of 5.9 Ωsq‑1 with high transmittance of 86% at 550 nm. The optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the AgNW-based hybrid films were investigated in detail to determine the structure-property relations, and whether optical or electrical properties could be controlled with variation in each layer’s thickness to satisfy different requirements for different applications. Flexible OLEDs (f-OLEDs) were successfully fabricated on the hybrid electrodes to prove their applicability; their performance was even better than those on commercial indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes.

  8. Silver Nanowire-IZO-Conducting Polymer Hybrids for Flexible and Transparent Conductive Electrodes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ho Jun; Kim, Se Jung; Hwang, Ju Hyun; Shim, Yong Sub; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed silver nanowire (AgNW) has been considered as a promising material for next-generation flexible transparent conductive electrodes. However, despite the advantages of AgNWs, some of their intrinsic drawbacks, such as large surface roughness and poor interconnection between wires, limit their practical application in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Herein, we report a high-performance AgNW-based hybrid electrode composed of indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) and poly (3,4-ethylenediowythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) [PEDOT:PSS]. The IZO layer protects the underlying AgNWs from oxidation and corrosion and tightly fuses the wires together and to the substrate. The PEDOT:PSS effectively reduces surface roughness and increases the hybrid films’ transmittance. The fabricated electrodes exhibited a low sheet resistance of 5.9 Ωsq−1 with high transmittance of 86% at 550 nm. The optical, electrical, and mechanical properties of the AgNW-based hybrid films were investigated in detail to determine the structure-property relations, and whether optical or electrical properties could be controlled with variation in each layer’s thickness to satisfy different requirements for different applications. Flexible OLEDs (f-OLEDs) were successfully fabricated on the hybrid electrodes to prove their applicability; their performance was even better than those on commercial indium doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. PMID:27703182

  9. Observation of room-temperature ballistic thermal conduction persisting over 8.3 µm in SiGe nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tzu-Kan; Chang, Hsu-Kai; Liou, Sz-Chian; Chu, Ming-Wen; Lee, Si-Chen; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2013-07-01

    In ballistic thermal conduction, the wave characteristics of phonons allow the transmission of energy without dissipation. However, the observation of ballistic heat transport at room temperature is challenging because of the short phonon mean free path. Here we show that ballistic thermal conduction persisting over 8.3 µm can be observed in SiGe nanowires with low thermal conductivity for a wide range of structural variations and alloy concentrations. We find that an unexpectedly low percentage (~0.04%) of phonons carry out the heat conduction process in SiGe nanowires, and that the ballistic phonons display properties including non-additive thermal resistances in series, unconventional contact thermal resistance, and unusual robustness against external perturbations. These results, obtained in a model semiconductor, could enable wave-engineering of phonons and help to realize heat waveguides, terahertz phononic crystals and quantum phononic/thermoelectric devices ready to be integrated into existing silicon-based electronics.

  10. Carbon Nanotube/Cu Nanowires/Epoxy Composite Mats with Improved Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yajuan; Cao, Wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Hongyuan; Wang, Miao; Wei, Hanxing; Hu, Dongmei; Chen, Minghai; Li, Qingwen

    2015-04-01

    Polymer composites with carbon nanofillers have been regarded as a promising candidate for electronic package materials. The challenge for such materials is to increase the electrical and thermal conductivity of the composites. Herein, we reported an epoxy composite film with high thermal and electrical conductivity that were prepared by loading high volume fraction of well-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, around 50 nm in diameter, 1-10 µm in length) and copper nanowires (Cu NWs, 60-70 nm in diameter, 1-5 µm in length) in epoxy matrix. The MWCNT-Cu NW hybrid mats were prepared by a vacuum filtration method with an optimum Cu NW content of 50 wt%. The hybrid mats was then impregnated by epoxy solution to prepare epoxy composite films. The epoxy was modified by the toughening agent to make the composite films tough and flexible. The loading fraction of MWCNTs and Cu NWs was tuned by controlling the viscosity of epoxy solution. A remarkable synergetic effect between the MWCNTs and Cu NWs in improving the electrical and thermal conductivity of epoxy composites was demonstrated. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites with 42.5 wt% epoxy was 1500 S/m, and the thermal conductivity was 2.83 W/m K, which was 10.1 times of the neat epoxy. Its thermal resistance was as low as 1% of the pure epoxy. And the mechanical properties of composites were also investigated. These robust and flexible nanocomposites showed prospective applications as thermal interface materials (TIMs) in the electronic industry.

  11. Self-aligned nanoforest in silicon nanowire for sensitive conductance modulation.

    PubMed

    Seol, Myeong-Lok; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Choi, Ji-Min; Choi, Sung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2012-11-14

    A self-aligned and localized nanoforest structure is constructed in a top-down fabricated silicon nanowire (SiNW). The surface-to-volume ratio (SVR) of the SiNW is enhanced due to the local nanoforest formation. The conductance modulation property of the SiNWs, which is an important characteristic in sensor and charge transfer based applications, can be largely enhanced. For the selective modification of the channel region, localized Joule-heating and subsequent metal-assisted chemical etching (mac-etch) are employed. The nanoforest is formed only in the channel region without misalignment due to the self-aligned process of Joule-heating. The modified SiNW is applied to a porphyrin-silicon hybrid device to verify the enhanced conductance modulation. The charge transfer efficiency between the porphyrin and the SiNW, which is caused by external optical excitation, is clearly increased compared to the initial SiNW. The effect of the local nanoforest formation is enhanced when longer etching times and larger widths are used. PMID:23066892

  12. Nanoscale Chemical and Electrical Stabilities of Graphene-covered Silver Nanowire Networks for Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Heon; Choi, Woon Ih; Kim, Kwang Hee; Yang, Dae Jin; Heo, Sung; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid structure of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) covered with graphene (Gr) shows synergetic effects on the performance of transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). However, these effects have been mainly observed via large-scale characterization, and precise analysis at the nanoscale level remains inadequate. Here, we present the nanoscale verification and visualization of the improved chemical and electrical stabilities of Gr-covered AgNW networks using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering technique. Specifically by transferring island Gr on top of the AgNW network, we were able to create samples in which both covered and uncovered AgNWs are simultaneously accessible to various surface-characterization techniques. Furthermore, our ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation elucidated the specific mechanistic pathway and a strong propensity for AgNW sulfidation, even in the presence of ambient oxidant gases. PMID:27620453

  13. Carbon Nanotube Networks Reinforced by Silver Nanowires with Improved Optical Transparency and Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martine, Patricia; Fakhimi, Azin; Lin, Ling; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2015-03-01

    We have fabricated highly transparent and conductive free-standing nanocomposite thin film electrodes by adding silver nanowires (AgNWs) to dry-spun Multiwall Carbon Nanotube (MWNT) aerogels. This nanocomposite exhibits desirable properties such as high optical transmittance, excellent flexibility and enhanced electrical conductivity. The incorporation of the AgNWs to the MWNT aerogels was accomplished by using a spray coating method. The optical transparency and sheet resistance of the nanocomposite was tuned by adjusting the concentration of AgNWs, back pressure and nozzle distance of the spray gun to the MWNT aerogel during deposition. As the solvent evaporated, the aerogel MWNT bundles densified via surface tension which caused the MWNT bundles to collapse. This adjustable process was responsible in forming well defined apertures that increased the nanocomposite's transmittance up to 90 percent. Via AgNWs percolation and random interconnections between separate MWNT bundles in the aerogel matrix, the sheet resistance decreased from 1 K ohm/sq to less than 100 ohm/sq. Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute

  14. Nanoscale Chemical and Electrical Stabilities of Graphene-covered Silver Nanowire Networks for Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Heon; Choi, Woon Ih; Kim, Kwang Hee; Yang, Dae Jin; Heo, Sung; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid structure of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) covered with graphene (Gr) shows synergetic effects on the performance of transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). However, these effects have been mainly observed via large-scale characterization, and precise analysis at the nanoscale level remains inadequate. Here, we present the nanoscale verification and visualization of the improved chemical and electrical stabilities of Gr-covered AgNW networks using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering technique. Specifically by transferring island Gr on top of the AgNW network, we were able to create samples in which both covered and uncovered AgNWs are simultaneously accessible to various surface-characterization techniques. Furthermore, our ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation elucidated the specific mechanistic pathway and a strong propensity for AgNW sulfidation, even in the presence of ambient oxidant gases.

  15. Nanoscale Chemical and Electrical Stabilities of Graphene-covered Silver Nanowire Networks for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Heon; Choi, Woon Ih; Kim, Kwang Hee; Yang, Dae Jin; Heo, Sung; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid structure of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) covered with graphene (Gr) shows synergetic effects on the performance of transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). However, these effects have been mainly observed via large-scale characterization, and precise analysis at the nanoscale level remains inadequate. Here, we present the nanoscale verification and visualization of the improved chemical and electrical stabilities of Gr-covered AgNW networks using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering technique. Specifically by transferring island Gr on top of the AgNW network, we were able to create samples in which both covered and uncovered AgNWs are simultaneously accessible to various surface-characterization techniques. Furthermore, our ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation elucidated the specific mechanistic pathway and a strong propensity for AgNW sulfidation, even in the presence of ambient oxidant gases. PMID:27620453

  16. Nanoscale Chemical and Electrical Stabilities of Graphene-covered Silver Nanowire Networks for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Heon; Choi, Woon Ih; Kim, Kwang Hee; Yang, Dae Jin; Heo, Sung; Yun, Dong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid structure of Ag nanowires (AgNWs) covered with graphene (Gr) shows synergetic effects on the performance of transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs). However, these effects have been mainly observed via large-scale characterization, and precise analysis at the nanoscale level remains inadequate. Here, we present the nanoscale verification and visualization of the improved chemical and electrical stabilities of Gr-covered AgNW networks using conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) sputtering technique. Specifically by transferring island Gr on top of the AgNW network, we were able to create samples in which both covered and uncovered AgNWs are simultaneously accessible to various surface-characterization techniques. Furthermore, our ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation elucidated the specific mechanistic pathway and a strong propensity for AgNW sulfidation, even in the presence of ambient oxidant gases.

  17. Continuous Patterning of Copper Nanowire-Based Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Use in Flexible Electronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhaoyang; Lee, Hyungjin; Kang, Dongwoo; Kwon, Sin; Choi, Young-Man; Kim, Inhyuk; Kim, Kwang-Young; Lee, Youngu; Woo, Kyoohee; Moon, Jooho

    2016-08-23

    Simple, low-cost and scalable patterning methods for Cu nanowire (NW)-based flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are essential for the widespread use of Cu NW FTCEs in numerous flexible optoelectronic devices, wearable devices, and electronic skins. In this paper, continuous patterning for Cu NW FTCEs via a combination of selective intense pulsed light (IPL) and roll-to-roll (R2R) wiping process was explored. The development of continuous R2R patterning could be achieved because there was significant difference in adhesion properties between NWs and substrates depending on whether Cu NW coated area was irradiated by IPL or not. Using a custom-built, R2R-based wiping apparatus, it was confirmed that nonirradiated NWs could be clearly removed out without any damage on irradiated NWs strongly adhered to the substrate, resulting in continuous production of low-cost Cu NW FTCE patterns. In addition, the variations in microscale pattern size by varying IPL process parameters/the mask aperture sizes were investigated, and possible factors affecting on developed pattern size were meticulously examined. Finally, the successful implementation of the patterned Cu NW FTCEs into a phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PhOLED) and a flexible transparent conductive heater (TCH) were demonstrated, verifying the applicability of the patterned FTCEs. It is believed that our study is the key step toward realizing the practical use of NW FTCEs in various flexible electronic devices. PMID:27434639

  18. Highly efficient flexible optoelectronic devices using metal nanowire-conducting polymer composite transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eui Dae; Nam, Yun Seok; Seo, Houn; Lee, Bo Ram; Yu, Jae Choul; Lee, Sang Yun; Kim, Ju-Young; Park, Jang-Ung; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of the electrical, optical, mechanical, and surface morphological properties of composite nanostrutures based on silver nanowires (AgNW) and PEDOT:PSS conducting polymer for the use as flexible and transparent electrodes. Compared to ITO or the single material of AgNW or PEDOT:PSS, the AgNW/PEDOT:PSS composite electrode showed high electrical conductivity with a low sheet resistance of 26.8 Ω/sq at 91% transmittance (at 550 nm), improves surface smoothness, and enhances mechanical properties assisted by an amphiphilic fluoro-surfactant. The polymeric light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSCs) using the AgNW/PEDOT:PSS composite electrode showed higher device performances than those with AgNW and PEDOT:PSS electrodes and excellent flexibility under bending test. These results indicates that the AgNW/PEDOT:PSS composite presented is a good candidate as next-generation transparent elelctrodes for applications into flexible optoelectronic devices. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Tunable p-type conductivity and transport properties of AlN nanowires via Mg doping.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong-Bing; Bo, Xiang-Hui; Xu, Jun; Cao, Yu-Lin; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Song, Hai-Sheng; Liu, Chao-Ping; Hung, Tak-Fu; Zhang, Wen-Jun; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Bello, Igor; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2011-05-24

    Arrays of well-aligned AlN nanowires (NWs) with tunable p-type conductivity were synthesized on Si(111) substrates using bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (Cp(2)Mg) vapor as a doping source by chemical vapor deposition. The Mg-doped AlN NWs are single-crystalline and grow along the [001] direction. Gate-voltage-dependent transport measurements on field-effect transistors constructed from individual NWs revealed the transition from n-type conductivity in the undoped AlN NWs to p-type conductivity in the Mg-doped NWs. By adjusting the doping gas flow rate (0-10 sccm), the conductivity of AlN NWs can be tuned over 7 orders of magnitude from (3.8-8.5) × 10(-6) Ω(-1) cm(-1) for the undoped sample to 15.6-24.4 Ω(-1) cm(-1) for the Mg-doped AlN NWs. Hole concentration as high as 4.7 × 10(19) cm(-3) was achieved for the heaviest doping. In addition, the maximum hole mobility (∼6.4 cm(2)/V s) in p-type AlN NWs is much higher than that of Mg-doped AlN films (∼1.0 cm(2)/V s). (2) The realization of p-type AlN NWs with tunable electrical transport properties may open great potential in developing practical nanodevices such as deep-UV light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. PMID:21480640

  20. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire Mg2SixSn1-x alloys from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wu; Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Stewart, Derek A.; Mingo, Natalio

    2012-11-01

    The lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of the thermoelectric materials, Mg2Si, Mg2Sn, and their alloys, are calculated for bulk and nanowires, without adjustable parameters. We find good agreement with bulk experimental results. For large nanowire diameters, size effects are stronger for the alloy than for the pure compounds. For example, in 200 nm diameter nanowires κ is lower than its bulk value by 30%, 20%, and 20% for Mg2Si0.6Sn0.4, Mg2Si, and Mg2Sn, respectively. For nanowires less than 20 nm thick, the relative decrease surpasses 50%, and it becomes larger in the pure compounds than in the alloy. At room temperature, κ of Mg2SixSn1-x is less sensitive to nanostructuring size effects than SixGe1-x, but more sensitive than PbTexSe1-x. This suggests that further improvement of Mg2SixSn1-x as a nontoxic thermoelectric may be possible.

  1. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire Mg₂SixSn1–x alloys from first principles

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Wu; Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Stewart, Derek A.; Mingo, Natalio

    2012-11-29

    The lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of the thermoelectric materials, Mg₂Si, Mg₂Sn, and their alloys, are calculated for bulk and nanowires, without adjustable parameters. We find good agreement with bulk experimental results. For large nanowire diameters, size effects are stronger for the alloy than for the pure compounds. For example, in 200 nm diameter nanowires κ is lower than its bulk value by 30%, 20%, and 20% for Mg₂Si₀.₆Sn₀.₄, Mg₂Si, and Mg₂Sn, respectively. For nanowires less than 20 nm thick, the relative decrease surpasses 50%, and it becomes larger in the pure compounds than in the alloy. At room temperature, κmore » of Mg₂SixSn1–x is less sensitive to nanostructuring size effects than SixGe1–x, but more sensitive than PbTexSe1–x. This suggests that further improvement of Mg₂SixSn1–x as a nontoxic thermoelectric may be possible.« less

  2. Effect of Ag nanowire addition into nanoparticle paste on the conductivity of Ag patterns printed by gravure offset method.

    PubMed

    Ok, Ki-Hun; Lee, Chan-Jae; Kwak, Min-Gi; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Kim, Kwang-Seok; Jung, Seung-Boo; Kim, Jong-Woong

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on the effect of Ag nanowire addition into a commercial Ag nanopaste and the printability evaluation of the mixed paste by the gravure offset printing methodology. Ag nanowires were synthesized by a modified polyol method, and a small amount of them was added into a commercial metallic paste based on Ag nanoparticles of 50 nm in diameter. Two annealing temperatures were selected for comparison, and electrical conductivity was measured by four point probe method. As a result, the hybrid mixture could be printed by the gravure offset method for patterning fine lines up to 15 μm width with sharp edges and scarce spreading. The addition of the Ag nanowires was significantly efficient for enhancement of electrical conductivity of the printed lines annealed at a low temperature (150 degrees C), while the effect was somewhat diluted in case of high temperature annealing (200 degrees C). The experimental results were discussed with the conduction mechanism in the printed conductive circuits with a schematic description of the electron flows in the printed lines.

  3. Investigation of optimal silver nanowires film as conductive wires for LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, I. C.; Yang, T. L.; Pan, C. T.; Chen, Y. C.; Hung, K. H.

    2015-03-01

    In the study, the Polyol reduction process was used to fabricate silver nanowires (AgNWs). In the experiment, the ratio of PVP/Ag, silver seed, AgNO3 and the amount of ethylene glycol (EG) were adopted to design orthogonal array with a constant temperature and heating time and the synthesis parameters of AgNWs were obtained. Therefore, the optimal AgNWs solution was obtained, followed by centrifuging to obtain AgNWs which were used to fabricate AgNWs film. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscope (FTIR), Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and four-point probe were used to measure the sheet resistant and transmittance of AgNWs film. Moreover, the AgNWs film was adopted to be the conductive wires of LED. From the experiment results, the synthesis parameter of 15ml EG, 0.01g AgCl, ratio 2 of PVP/Ag and 0.22g AgNO3 could be used to fabricate optimal AgNWs with 45nm average diameter, 5μm average length and aspect ratio of 110. The sheet resistance and transmittance of film fabricated by centrifuged AgNWs was 0.1252 Ω/sq and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, the luminance of LED with conductive wires made of AgNWs film was better than that made of commercial silver plastic. In the future, the AgNWs film can be broadly applied to the conductive films of touch electric products, LCD display and solar panels.

  4. Silver Nanowire Transparent Conductive Electrodes for High-Efficiency III-Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Munsik; Jin, Won-Yong; Jun Jeong, Hyeon; Jeong, Mun Seok; Kang, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been successfully demonstrated to function as next-generation transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) in organic semiconductor devices owing to their figures of merit, including high optical transmittance, low sheet resistance, flexibility, and low-cost processing. In this article, high-quality, solution-processed AgNWs with an excellent optical transmittance of 96.5% at 450 nm and a low sheet resistance of 11.7 Ω/sq were demonstrated as TCEs in inorganic III-nitride LEDs. The transmission line model applied to the AgNW contact to p-GaN showed that near ohmic contact with a specific contact resistance of ~10−3 Ωcm2 was obtained. The contact resistance had a strong bias-voltage (or current-density) dependence: namely, field-enhanced ohmic contact. LEDs fabricated with AgNW electrodes exhibited a 56% reduction in series resistance, 56.5% brighter output power, a 67.5% reduction in efficiency droop, and a approximately 30% longer current spreading length compared to LEDs fabricated with reference TCEs. In addition to the cost reduction, the observed improvements in device performance suggest that the AgNWs are promising for application as next-generation TCEs, to realise brighter, larger-area, cost-competitive inorganic III-nitride light emitters. PMID:26333768

  5. Silver Nanowire Transparent Conductive Electrodes for High-Efficiency III-Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Munsik; Jin, Won-Yong; Jeong, Hyeon Jun; Jeong, Mun Seok; Kang, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been successfully demonstrated to function as next-generation transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) in organic semiconductor devices owing to their figures of merit, including high optical transmittance, low sheet resistance, flexibility, and low-cost processing. In this article, high-quality, solution-processed AgNWs with an excellent optical transmittance of 96.5% at 450 nm and a low sheet resistance of 11.7 Ω/sq were demonstrated as TCEs in inorganic III-nitride LEDs. The transmission line model applied to the AgNW contact to p-GaN showed that near ohmic contact with a specific contact resistance of ~10(-3) Ωcm(2) was obtained. The contact resistance had a strong bias-voltage (or current-density) dependence: namely, field-enhanced ohmic contact. LEDs fabricated with AgNW electrodes exhibited a 56% reduction in series resistance, 56.5% brighter output power, a 67.5% reduction in efficiency droop, and a approximately 30% longer current spreading length compared to LEDs fabricated with reference TCEs. In addition to the cost reduction, the observed improvements in device performance suggest that the AgNWs are promising for application as next-generation TCEs, to realise brighter, larger-area, cost-competitive inorganic III-nitride light emitters.

  6. Copper nanowire-graphene core-shell nanostructure for highly stable transparent conducting electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Youngu

    2015-03-24

    A copper nanowire-graphene (CuNW-G) core-shell nanostructure was successfully synthesized using a low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at temperatures as low as 400 °C for the first time. The CuNW-G core-shell nanostructure was systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. A transparent conducting electrode (TCE) based on the CuNW-G core-shell nanostructure exhibited excellent optical and electrical properties compared to a conventional indium tin oxide TCE. Moreover, it showed remarkable thermal oxidation and chemical stability because of the tight encapsulation of the CuNW with gas-impermeable graphene shells. The potential suitability of CuNW-G TCE was demonstrated by fabricating bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. We anticipate that the CuNW-G core-shell nanostructure can be used as an alternative to conventional TCE materials for emerging optoelectronic devices such as flexible solar cells, displays, and touch panels.

  7. Silver nanowires for transparent conductive electrode to GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Gyu-Jae; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Han, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Nam; Jin, Won-Yong; Kang, Jae-Wook

    2015-01-19

    Transparent, conductive, and uniform Ag nanowires (NWs) were introduced to improve the optical performance of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by a spin-coating technique. The Ag NWs acted as a current spreading layer, exhibiting high transmittance and low sheet resistance, and ultimately leading to high performance GaN-based LEDs with an ultra large size of 5 × 5 mm{sup 2}. Compared to the transmittance of conventional LEDs without Ag NWs, the relative transmittance of LEDs with Ag NWs was approximately 90% of the overall wavelength region. However, the electroluminescence (EL) intensity of LED with Ag NWs was much higher than that of conventional LEDs without Ag NWs for injection current above 45 mA. In addition, the EL full width at half maximum of LEDs with Ag NWs was much lower than that of conventional LEDs without Ag NWs. Based on these results, we believe that the enhanced optical performance of ultra large LEDs was due to an increase in the current spreading effect.

  8. Silver Nanowire Transparent Conductive Electrodes for High-Efficiency III-Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Munsik; Jin, Won-Yong; Jun Jeong, Hyeon; Jeong, Mun Seok; Kang, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-09-01

    Silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been successfully demonstrated to function as next-generation transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) in organic semiconductor devices owing to their figures of merit, including high optical transmittance, low sheet resistance, flexibility, and low-cost processing. In this article, high-quality, solution-processed AgNWs with an excellent optical transmittance of 96.5% at 450 nm and a low sheet resistance of 11.7 Ω/sq were demonstrated as TCEs in inorganic III-nitride LEDs. The transmission line model applied to the AgNW contact to p-GaN showed that near ohmic contact with a specific contact resistance of ~10-3 Ωcm2 was obtained. The contact resistance had a strong bias-voltage (or current-density) dependence: namely, field-enhanced ohmic contact. LEDs fabricated with AgNW electrodes exhibited a 56% reduction in series resistance, 56.5% brighter output power, a 67.5% reduction in efficiency droop, and a approximately 30% longer current spreading length compared to LEDs fabricated with reference TCEs. In addition to the cost reduction, the observed improvements in device performance suggest that the AgNWs are promising for application as next-generation TCEs, to realise brighter, larger-area, cost-competitive inorganic III-nitride light emitters.

  9. Copper nanowire-graphene core-shell nanostructure for highly stable transparent conducting electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Youngu

    2015-03-24

    A copper nanowire-graphene (CuNW-G) core-shell nanostructure was successfully synthesized using a low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at temperatures as low as 400 °C for the first time. The CuNW-G core-shell nanostructure was systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. A transparent conducting electrode (TCE) based on the CuNW-G core-shell nanostructure exhibited excellent optical and electrical properties compared to a conventional indium tin oxide TCE. Moreover, it showed remarkable thermal oxidation and chemical stability because of the tight encapsulation of the CuNW with gas-impermeable graphene shells. The potential suitability of CuNW-G TCE was demonstrated by fabricating bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. We anticipate that the CuNW-G core-shell nanostructure can be used as an alternative to conventional TCE materials for emerging optoelectronic devices such as flexible solar cells, displays, and touch panels. PMID:25712446

  10. Very long Ag nanowire synthesis and its application in a highly transparent, conductive and flexible metal electrode touch panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeeThese Two Authors Contributed Equally To This Article., Jinhwan; Lee, Phillip; Lee, Hyungman; Lee, Dongjin; Lee, Seung Seob; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2012-09-01

    The future electronics will be soft, flexible and even stretchable to be more human friendly in the form of wearable computers. However, conventional electronic materials are usually brittle. Recently, carbon based materials are intensively investigated as a good candidate for flexible electronics but with limited mechanical and electrical performances. Metal is still the best material for electronics with great electrical properties but with poor transparency and mechanical performance. Here we present a simple approach to develop a synthesis method for very long metallic nanowires and apply them as new types of high performance flexible and transparent metal conductors as an alternative to carbon nanotubes, graphene and short nanowire based flexible transparent conductors and indium tin oxide based brittle transparent conductors. We found that very long metallic nanowire network conductors combined with a low temperature laser nano-welding process enabled superior transparent flexible conductors with high transmittance and high electrical conductivity. Further, we demonstrated highly flexible metal conductor LED circuits and transparent touch panels. The highly flexible and transparent metal conductors can be mounted on any non-planar surfaces and applied for various opto-electronics and ultimately for future wearable electronics.The future electronics will be soft, flexible and even stretchable to be more human friendly in the form of wearable computers. However, conventional electronic materials are usually brittle. Recently, carbon based materials are intensively investigated as a good candidate for flexible electronics but with limited mechanical and electrical performances. Metal is still the best material for electronics with great electrical properties but with poor transparency and mechanical performance. Here we present a simple approach to develop a synthesis method for very long metallic nanowires and apply them as new types of high performance

  11. Impact of surface bond-order loss on phonon dispersion relations and thermal conductivity of cylindrical Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au Yeung, T. C.; Gu, M. X.; Sun, Chang Q.; Chen, George C. K.; Wong, D. W. K.; Nosik, V.

    2006-10-01

    The effect of bond-order loss of atoms in the surface skin on the thermal conductivity in cylindrical silicon nanowires has been investigated based on the isotropic elastic continuum model. The frequency change of torsional, longitudinal, and flexural modes of phonon vibration have been examined with a core-shell cylindrical rod structure. Results suggest that the thermal conductivity of the wire increases significantly due to the effect of surface bond-order loss that modifies the Young’s modulus in the surface atomic shells, yet atoms in the core region remain as they are in the bulk.

  12. Facile synthesis of SnO2 nanocrystals coated conducting polymer nanowires for enhanced lithium storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhijia; Zhang, Shichao; Jiang, Tao; Wu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Lan; Fang, Hua

    2012-12-01

    SnO2 nanoparticles uniformly decorated polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires are synthesized by a facile two-step electrochemical reaction method: electropolymerization and electrodeposition. The nanostructured SnO2-PPy hybrids show porous reticular morphology and homogenous distributions. The reticular SnO2-PPy nanowires can increase the electrode/electrolyte interface and accommodate the volume variation of SnO2. When applied as anode materials for lithium ion batteries, the unique nanostructured hybrids deliver meaningfully improved Li+ storage performance with the first reversible capacity of 690 mAh g-1. This facile synthesis procedure can also be simply grafted to other inorganic-organic hybrid composites.

  13. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-01-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process. PMID:27553755

  14. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-01-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process. PMID:27553755

  15. Welding of silver nanowire networks via flash white light and UV-C irradiation for highly conductive and reliable transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wan-Ho; Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-08-01

    In this work, silver nanowire inks with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) binders were coated on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates and welded via flash white light and ultraviolet C (UV-C) irradiation to produce highly conductive transparent electrodes. The coated silver nanowire films were firmly welded and embedded into PET substrate successfully at room temperature and under ambient conditions using an in-house flash white light welding system and UV-C irradiation. The effects of light irradiation conditions (light energy, irradiation time, pulse duration, and pulse number) on the silver nanowire networks were studied and optimized. Bending fatigue tests were also conducted to characterize the reliability of the welded transparent conductive silver nanowire films. The surfaces of the welded silver nanowire films were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the transmittance of the structures was measured using a spectrophotometer. From the results, a highly conductive and transparent silver nanowire film with excellent reliability could be achieved at room temperature under ambient conditions via the combined flash white light and UV-C irradiation welding process.

  16. Very long Ag nanowire synthesis and its application in a highly transparent, conductive and flexible metal electrode touch panel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinhwan; Lee, Phillip; Lee, Hyungman; Lee, Dongjin; Lee, Seung Seob; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2012-10-21

    The future electronics will be soft, flexible and even stretchable to be more human friendly in the form of wearable computers. However, conventional electronic materials are usually brittle. Recently, carbon based materials are intensively investigated as a good candidate for flexible electronics but with limited mechanical and electrical performances. Metal is still the best material for electronics with great electrical properties but with poor transparency and mechanical performance. Here we present a simple approach to develop a synthesis method for very long metallic nanowires and apply them as new types of high performance flexible and transparent metal conductors as an alternative to carbon nanotubes, graphene and short nanowire based flexible transparent conductors and indium tin oxide based brittle transparent conductors. We found that very long metallic nanowire network conductors combined with a low temperature laser nano-welding process enabled superior transparent flexible conductors with high transmittance and high electrical conductivity. Further, we demonstrated highly flexible metal conductor LED circuits and transparent touch panels. The highly flexible and transparent metal conductors can be mounted on any non-planar surfaces and applied for various opto-electronics and ultimately for future wearable electronics. PMID:22952107

  17. Polypyrrole-encapsulated vanadium pentoxide nanowires on a conductive substrate for electrode in aqueous rechargeable lithium battery.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chaowei; Fang, Dong; Cao, Yunhe; Li, Guangzhong; Luo, Zhiping; Zhou, Qunhua; Xiong, Chuanxi; Xu, Weilin

    2015-02-01

    Precursors of ammonium vanadium bronze (NH4V4O10) nanowires assembled on a conductive substrate were prepared by a hydrothermal method. After calcination at 360°C, the NH4V4O10 precursor transformed to vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) nanowires, which presented a high initial capacity of 135.0mA h g(-1) at a current density of 50mA g(-1) in 5M LiNO3 aqueous solution; while the specific capacity faded quickly over 50 cycles. By coating the surface of V2O5 nanowires with water-insoluble polypyrrole (PPy), the formed nanocomposite electrode exhibited a specific discharge capacity of 89.9mA h g(-1) at 50mA g(-1) (after 100 cycles). A V2O5@PPy //LiMn2O4 rechargeable lithium battery exhibited an initial discharge capacity of 95.2mA h g(-1); and after 100 cycles, a specific discharge capacity of 81.5mA h g(-1) could retain at 100mA g(-1).

  18. Phosphorous doped ZnO nanowires: acceptor-related cathodoluminescence and p-type conducting FET-characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, B. Q.; Lorenz, M.; von Wenckstern, H.; Czekalla, C.; Brandt, M.; Lenzner, J.; Benndorf, G.; Biehne, G.; Grundmann, M.

    2008-02-01

    Phosphorous-doped ZnO (ZnO:P) nanowires were prepared by a high-pressure pulsed laser deposition process. To extend the size range of available wires, μm-thick ZnO:P microwires were grown additionally by a direct carbothermal deposition process. Low-temperature cathodoluminescence of single ZnO:P nanowires grown by both processes exhibit characteristic phosphorus acceptor-related peaks: neutral acceptor-bound exciton emission ((A 0, X), 3.356 eV), free-electron to neutral-acceptor emission ((e, A 0), 3.314 eV), and donor-to-acceptor pair emission (DAP, ~3.24 and ~3.04 eV). This proves that stable phosphorus acceptor levels have been induced into the ZnO:P nano- and microwires. From the quantitative evaluation of the spectroscopic features we deduct an acceptor binding energy of 122 meV. The ZnO:P microwires were used as channels in bottom-gate field effect transistors (FET) built on Si substrates with SiO II gate oxide. The electrical FET-characteristics of several wires show reproducibly clear qualitative indication for p-type conductivity for variation of gate voltage. This behavior is opposite to that of nominally undoped, n-type conducting wires investigated for comparison. The p-type conductivity was found to be stable over more than six months.

  19. Physical model for the exotic ultraviolet photo-conductivity of ZnO nanowire films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yue-Wu; Ren, Shou-Tian; Qu, Shi-Liang; Wang, Qiang

    2013-11-01

    Employing a simple and efficient method of electro-chemical anodization, ZnO nanowire films are fabricated on Zn foil, and an ultraviolet (UV) sensor prototype is formed for investigating the electronic transport through back-to-back double junctions. The UV (365 nm) responses of surface-contacted ZnO film are provided by I—V measurement, along with the current evolution process by on/off of UV illumination. In this paper, the back-to-back metal—seconductor—metal (M—S—M) model is used to explain the electronic transport of a ZnO nanowire film based structure. A thermionic-field electron emission mechanism is employed to fit and explain the as-observed UV sensitive electronic transport properties of ZnO film with surface-modulation by oxygen and water molecular coverage.

  20. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  1. Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2014-07-21

    To date, there is no experimental characterization of thermal conductivity of semiconductor polymeric individual nanowires embedded in a matrix. This work reports on scanning thermal microscopy measurements in a 3ω configuration to determine how the thermal conductivity of individual nanowires made of a model conjugated polymer (P3HT) is modified when decreasing their diameters. We observe a reduction of thermal conductivity, from λNW = 2.29 ± 0.15 W K(-1) m(-1) to λNW = 0.5 ± 0.24 W K(-1) m(-1), when the diameter of nanowires is reduced from 350 nm to 120 nm, which correlates with the polymer crystal orientation measured by WAXS. Through this work, the foundations for future polymer thermal transport engineering are presented. PMID:24933655

  2. Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2014-07-21

    To date, there is no experimental characterization of thermal conductivity of semiconductor polymeric individual nanowires embedded in a matrix. This work reports on scanning thermal microscopy measurements in a 3ω configuration to determine how the thermal conductivity of individual nanowires made of a model conjugated polymer (P3HT) is modified when decreasing their diameters. We observe a reduction of thermal conductivity, from λNW = 2.29 ± 0.15 W K(-1) m(-1) to λNW = 0.5 ± 0.24 W K(-1) m(-1), when the diameter of nanowires is reduced from 350 nm to 120 nm, which correlates with the polymer crystal orientation measured by WAXS. Through this work, the foundations for future polymer thermal transport engineering are presented.

  3. Paper-based silver-nanowire electronic circuits with outstanding electrical conductivity and extreme bending stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Gui-Wen; Xiao, Hong-Mei; Fu, Shao-Yun

    2014-07-01

    Here a facile, green and efficient printing-filtration-press (PFP) technique is reported for room-temperature (RT) mass-production of low-cost, environmentally friendly, high performance paper-based electronic circuits. The as-prepared silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) are uniformly deposited at RT on a pre-printed paper substrate to form high quality circuits via vacuum filtration and pressing. The PFP circuit exhibits more excellent electrical property and bending stability compared with other flexible circuits made by existing techniques. Furthermore, practical applications of the PFP circuits are demonstrated.Here a facile, green and efficient printing-filtration-press (PFP) technique is reported for room-temperature (RT) mass-production of low-cost, environmentally friendly, high performance paper-based electronic circuits. The as-prepared silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) are uniformly deposited at RT on a pre-printed paper substrate to form high quality circuits via vacuum filtration and pressing. The PFP circuit exhibits more excellent electrical property and bending stability compared with other flexible circuits made by existing techniques. Furthermore, practical applications of the PFP circuits are demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Video of rolling tests; video of the PFP circuit used as flexible cable in a cell phone; video of the application of the circuit as a RFID tag; a detailed method for synthesizing silver nanowires; details of the PFP technique; folding tests for the circuits; air humidity test for the circuit. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00846d

  4. Paper-based silver-nanowire electronic circuits with outstanding electrical conductivity and extreme bending stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gui-Wen; Xiao, Hong-Mei; Fu, Shao-Yun

    2014-08-01

    Here a facile, green and efficient printing-filtration-press (PFP) technique is reported for room-temperature (RT) mass-production of low-cost, environmentally friendly, high performance paper-based electronic circuits. The as-prepared silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) are uniformly deposited at RT on a pre-printed paper substrate to form high quality circuits via vacuum filtration and pressing. The PFP circuit exhibits more excellent electrical property and bending stability compared with other flexible circuits made by existing techniques. Furthermore, practical applications of the PFP circuits are demonstrated.

  5. A solution-processed molybdenum oxide treated silver nanowire network: a highly conductive transparent conducting electrode with superior mechanical and hole injection properties.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung-Hao; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Kang, Hao-Wei; Chi, Wei-Jung; Chang, Jung-Hung; Wu, Chih-I; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-03-14

    We demonstrate the fabrication of solution-processed MoOx-treated (s-MoOx) silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) utilizing low-temperature (sub-100 °C) processes. The s-MoOx aggregates around the AgNW and forms gauze-like MoOx thin films between the mesh, which can effectively lower the sheet resistance by more than two orders of magnitude. Notably, these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs exhibit a combination of several promising characteristics, such as a high and broad transmittance across a wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm, transmission of up to 96.8%, a low sheet resistance of 29.8 ohm sq(-1), a low haze value of 0.90%, better mechanical properties against bending and adhesion tests, and preferable gap states for efficient hole injection in optoelectronic applications. By utilizing these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs as the anode in ITO-free organic light emitting diodes, promising performance of 29.2 lm W(-1) and 10.3% external quantum efficiency are demonstrated. The versatile, multi-functional s-MoOx treatment presented here paves the way for the use of low-temperature, solution-processed MoOx as both a nanowire linker and a hole injection interfacial layer for future flexible optoelectronic devices.

  6. Hybrid transparent conductive electrodes with copper nanowires embedded in a zinc oxide matrix and protected by reduced graphene oxide platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaozhao; Mankowski, Trent; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Shikoh, Ali Sehpar; Touati, Farid; Benammar, Mohieddine A.; Mansuripur, Masud; Falco, Charles M.

    2016-02-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes (TCE) were fabricated by combining three emerging nano-materials: copper nanowires (CuNWs), zinc oxide (ZnO) nano-particulate thin films, and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) platelets. Whereas CuNWs are responsible for essentially all of the electrical conductivity of our thin-film TCEs, the ZnO matrix embeds and strengthens the CuNW network in its adhesion to the substrate, while the rGO platelets provide a protective overcoat for the composite electrode, thereby improving its stability in hot and humid environments. Our CuNW/ZnO/rGO hybrid electrodes deposited on glass substrates have low sheet resistance (Rs ˜ 20 Ω/sq) and fairly high optical transmittance (T550 ˜ 79%). In addition, our hybrid TCEs are mechanically strong and able to withstand multiple scotch-tape peel tests. Finally, these TCEs can be fabricated on rigid glass as well as flexible plastic substrates.

  7. Characterization of atomic force microscopy written conducting nanowires at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, M.; Li, D.; Liu, W.; Fête, A.; Gariglio, S.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2016-02-01

    The realization of conducting nanostructures at the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 is an important step towards the realization of devices and the investigation of exotic physical regimes. We present here a detailed study of the conducting nanowires realized using the atomic force microscopy writing technique. By comparing experiments with numerical simulations, we show that these wires reproduce the ideal case of nanoconducting channels defined in an insulating background very well and that the tip bias is a powerful knob to modulate the size of these structures. We also discuss the role of the air humidity that is found to be a crucial parameter to set the size of the tip-sample effective interaction area.

  8. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire InAs, AlN, and BeO polymorphs from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wu; Mingo, Natalio

    2013-11-14

    We compute the thermal conductivity of the alternative zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) phases of InAs, AlN, and BeO. The bulk thermal conductivity of the ZB phase of BeO is predicted to be even higher than that of its WZ phase (the highest amongst all ceramics used in electronic technology). Our calculations agree well with the available experimental measurements for bulk ZB InAs, WZ AlN, WZ BeO, and WZ and ZB InAs nanowires, and we provide predictions for the remaining cases. The predicted good thermal conductor ZB BeO might have interesting applications in improved heat sinks for high performance semiconductor electronics.

  9. Silver nanowire based flexible electrodes with improved properties: High conductivity, transparency, adhesion and low haze

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran Kumar, A.B.V.; Wan Bae, Chang; Piao, Longhai Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract illustrates the schematic representation of the main drawbacks and rectifications for AgNWs based transparent electrodes. - Highlights: • Films exhibited low sheet resistance and optical properties with R{sub s} ≤ 30 Ω/□ and T ≥ 90%. • We decreased haze to 2% by controlling AgNWs length, diameter, and concentration. • We achieved good adhesion for AgNWs on PET film. • There is no significant change in resistance in the bending angle from 0° to 180°, and on twisting. - Abstract: Recent work has been focusing on solution processable transparent electrodes for various applications including solar cells and displays. As well as, the research aims majorly at silver nanowires (AgNWs) to replace ITO. We enhance the transparent electrode performance as a function of optical and mechanical properties with low sheet resistance, by controlling the AgNWs accept ratios, ink composition, and processing conditions. The nanowire network of transparent films agrees with the 2D percolation law. The film transmittance values at 550 nm are coping with a reference ITO film. Sheet resistance and haze values are suitable for flexible electronic applications. We fabricate transparent flexible film using a low-cost processing technique.

  10. Nanowire-based detector

    DOEpatents

    Berggren, Karl K; Hu, Xiaolong; Masciarelli, Daniele

    2014-06-24

    Systems, articles, and methods are provided related to nanowire-based detectors, which can be used for light detection in, for example, single-photon detectors. In one aspect, a variety of detectors are provided, for example one including an electrically superconductive nanowire or nanowires constructed and arranged to interact with photons to produce a detectable signal. In another aspect, fabrication methods are provided, including techniques to precisely reproduce patterns in subsequently formed layers of material using a relatively small number of fabrication steps. By precisely reproducing patterns in multiple material layers, one can form electrically insulating materials and electrically conductive materials in shapes such that incoming photons are redirected toward a nearby electrically superconductive materials (e.g., electrically superconductive nanowire(s)). For example, one or more resonance structures (e.g., comprising an electrically insulating material), which can trap electromagnetic radiation within its boundaries, can be positioned proximate the nanowire(s). The resonance structure can include, at its boundaries, electrically conductive material positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire such that light that would otherwise be transmitted through the sensor is redirected toward the nanowire(s) and detected. In addition, electrically conductive material can be positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire (e.g. at the aperture of the resonant structure), such that light is directed by scattering from this structure into the nanowire.

  11. Parity independence of the zero-bias conductance peak in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot hybrid device

    PubMed Central

    Deng, M. T.; Yu, C. L.; Huang, G. Y.; Larsson, M.; Caroff, P.; Xu, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the signatures of Majorana fermions in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot-topological superconductor hybrid device by charge transport measurements. At zero magnetic field, well-defined Coulomb diamonds and the Kondo effect are observed. Under the application of a finite, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a zero-bias conductance peak structure is observed. It is found that the zero-bias conductance peak is present in many consecutive Coulomb diamonds, irrespective of the even-odd parity of the quasi-particle occupation number in the quantum dot. In addition, we find that the zero-bias conductance peak is in most cases accompanied by two differential conductance peaks, forming a triple-peak structure, and the separation between the two side peaks in bias voltage shows oscillations closely correlated to the background Coulomb conductance oscillations of the device. The observed zero-bias conductance peak and the associated triple-peak structure are in line with Majorana fermion physics in such a hybrid topological system. PMID:25434375

  12. Nanoscale current spreading analysis in solution-processed graphene oxide/silver nanowire transparent electrodes via conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph E.; Perumal, Ajay; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We use conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) to study the origin of long-range conductivity in model transparent conductive electrodes composed of networks of reduced graphene oxide (rGOX) and silver nanowires (AgNWs), with nanoscale spatial resolution. Pristine networks of rGOX (1-3 monolayers-thick) and AgNWs exhibit sheet resistances of ˜100-1000 kΩ/□ and 100-900 Ω/□, respectively. When the materials are deposited sequentially to form bilayer rGOX/AgNW electrodes and thermally annealed at 200 °C, the sheet resistance reduces by up to 36% as compared to pristine AgNW networks. CAFM was used to analyze the current spreading in both systems in order to identify the nanoscale phenomena responsible for this effect. For rGOX networks, the low intra-flake conductivity and the inter-flake contact resistance is found to dominate the macroscopic sheet resistance, while for AgNW networks the latter is determined by the density of the inter-AgNW junctions and their associated resistance. In the case of the bilayer rGOX/AgNWs' networks, rGOX flakes are found to form conductive "bridges" between AgNWs. We show that these additional nanoscopic electrical connections are responsible for the enhanced macroscopic conductivity of the bilayer rGOX/AgNW electrodes. Finally, the critical role of thermal annealing on the formation of these nanoscopic connections is discussed.

  13. Parity independence of the zero-bias conductance peak in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot hybrid device.

    PubMed

    Deng, M T; Yu, C L; Huang, G Y; Larsson, M; Caroff, P; Xu, H Q

    2014-01-01

    We explore the signatures of Majorana fermions in a nanowire based topological superconductor-quantum dot-topological superconductor hybrid device by charge transport measurements. At zero magnetic field, well-defined Coulomb diamonds and the Kondo effect are observed. Under the application of a finite, sufficiently strong magnetic field, a zero-bias conductance peak structure is observed. It is found that the zero-bias conductance peak is present in many consecutive Coulomb diamonds, irrespective of the even-odd parity of the quasi-particle occupation number in the quantum dot. In addition, we find that the zero-bias conductance peak is in most cases accompanied by two differential conductance peaks, forming a triple-peak structure, and the separation between the two side peaks in bias voltage shows oscillations closely correlated to the background Coulomb conductance oscillations of the device. The observed zero-bias conductance peak and the associated triple-peak structure are in line with Majorana fermion physics in such a hybrid topological system.

  14. Fully solution-processed semitransparent organic solar cells with a silver nanowire cathode and a conducting polymer anode.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jong Hyuk; Joe, Sung-yoon; Pang, Christina; Lee, Kyung Moon; Jeong, Huiseong; Park, Ji-Yong; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; de Mello, John C; Lee, Soonil

    2014-03-25

    We report the fabrication of efficient indium-tin-oxide-free organic solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM). All layers of the devices from the lowermost silver nanowire cathode to the uppermost conducting polymer anode are deposited from solution and processed at plastic-compatible temperatures<200 °C. Owing to the absence of an opaque metal electrode, the devices are semitransparent with potential applications in power-generating windows and tandem-cells. The measured power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 2.3 and 2.0% under cathode- and anode-side illumination, respectively, match previously reported PCE values for equivalent semitransparent organic solar cells using indium tin oxide. PMID:24533638

  15. High-reproducibility, flexible conductive patterns fabricated with silver nanowire by drop or fit-to-flow method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    An unusual strategy was designed to fabricate conductive patterns with high reproducibility for flexible electronics by drop or fit-to-flow method. Silver nanowire (SNW) ink with surface tension of 36.9 mN/m and viscosity of 13.8 mPa s at 20°C was prepared and characterized using a field emission transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer, thermogravimetric analyzer, scanning electron microscope, and four-point probe. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) pattern as template was fabricated by spin coating (500 rpm), baking at 80°C for 3 h, and laser cutting. The prepared SNW ink can flow along the trench of the PDMS pattern spontaneously, especially after plasma treatment with oxygen, and show a low resistivity of 12.9 μΩ cm after sintering at 125°C for 30 min. In addition, an antenna pattern was also prepared to prove the feasibility of the approach. PMID:23537333

  16. AlGaInP LED with low-speed spin-coating silver nanowires as transparent conductive layer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xia; Guo, Chun Wei; Wang, Cheng; Li, Chong; Sun, Xiao Ming

    2014-12-01

    The low-speed spin-coating method was developed to prepare uniform and interconnected silver nanowires (AgNWs) film with the transmittance of 95% and sheet resistance of 20Ω/sq on glass, which was comparable to ITO. The fitting value of σ dc/σ op of 299.3 was attributed to the spin-coating process. Advantages of this solution-processed AgNW film on AlGaInP light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as transparent conductive layer were explored. The optical output power enhanced 100%, and the wavelength redshift decreased from 12 to 3 nm, which indicated the AgNW films prepared by low-speed spin-coating possessed attractive features for large-scale TCL applications in optoelectronic devices. PMID:26089002

  17. Microbial nanowires for bioenergy applications.

    PubMed

    Malvankar, Nikhil S; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-06-01

    Microbial nanowires are electrically conductive filaments that facilitate long-range extracellular electron transfer. The model for electron transport along Shewanella oneidensis nanowires is electron hopping/tunneling between cytochromes adorning the filaments. Geobacter sulfurreducens nanowires are comprised of pili that have metal-like conductivity attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. The nanowires of Geobacter species have been implicated in direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET), which may be an important mode of syntrophy in the conversion of organic wastes to methane. Nanowire networks confer conductivity to Geobacter biofilms converting organic compounds to electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and increasing nanowire production is the only genetic manipulation shown to yield strains with improved current-producing capabilities. Introducing nanowires, or nanowire mimetics, might improve other bioenergy strategies that rely on extracellular electron exchange, such as microbial electrosynthesis. Similarities between microbial nanowires and synthetic conducting polymers suggest additional energy-related applications.

  18. Correlation Between Heterogeneous Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and Impacts on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2002-10-28

    In granular porous media, bacterial transport is often modeled using the advection-dispersion transport equation, modified to account for interactions between the bacteria and grain surfaces (attachment and detachment) using a linear kinetic reaction model. In this paper we examine the relationships among the parameters of the above model in the context of bacterial transport for bioaugmentation. In this context, we wish to quantify the distance to which significant concentrations of bacteria can be transported, as well as the uniformity with which they can be distributed within the subsurface. Because kinetic detachment rates (Kr) are typically much smaller than corresponding attachment rates (Kf), the attachment rate exerts primary control on the distance of bacterial transport. Hydraulic conductivity (K) also plays a significant role because of its direct relationship to the advective velocity and its typically high degree of spatial variability at field scales. Because Kf is related to the velocity, grain size, and porosity of the medium, as is K, we expect that there exists correlation between these two parameters. Previous investigators have assumed a form of correlation between Kf and ln(K) based in part on reparameterization of clean-bed filtration equations in terms of published relations between grain size, effective porosity, and ln(K). The hypotheses examined here are that (1) field-scale relationships between K and Kf can be developed by combining a number of theoretical and empirical results in the context of a heterogeneous aquifer flow model (following a similar approach to previous investigators with some extensions), and (2) correlation between K and Kf will enhance the distance of field-scale bacterial transport in granular aquifers. We test these hypotheses using detailed numerical models and observations of field-scale bacterial transport in a shallow sandy aquifer within the South Oyster Site near Oyster, Virginia, USA.

  19. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  20. Correction: Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2015-03-01

    Correction for 'Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials' by Miguel Muñoz Rojo et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 7858-7865. PMID:25668105

  1. Correction: Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2015-03-01

    Correction for 'Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials' by Miguel Muñoz Rojo et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 7858-7865.

  2. A solution-processed molybdenum oxide treated silver nanowire network: a highly conductive transparent conducting electrode with superior mechanical and hole injection properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jung-Hao; Chiang, Kai-Ming; Kang, Hao-Wei; Chi, Wei-Jung; Chang, Jung-Hung; Wu, Chih-I.; Lin, Hao-Wu

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of solution-processed MoOx-treated (s-MoOx) silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) utilizing low-temperature (sub-100 °C) processes. The s-MoOx aggregates around the AgNW and forms gauze-like MoOx thin films between the mesh, which can effectively lower the sheet resistance by more than two orders of magnitude. Notably, these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs exhibit a combination of several promising characteristics, such as a high and broad transmittance across a wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm, transmission of up to 96.8%, a low sheet resistance of 29.8 ohm sq-1, a low haze value of 0.90%, better mechanical properties against bending and adhesion tests, and preferable gap states for efficient hole injection in optoelectronic applications. By utilizing these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs as the anode in ITO-free organic light emitting diodes, promising performance of 29.2 lm W-1 and 10.3% external quantum efficiency are demonstrated. The versatile, multi-functional s-MoOx treatment presented here paves the way for the use of low-temperature, solution-processed MoOx as both a nanowire linker and a hole injection interfacial layer for future flexible optoelectronic devices.We demonstrate the fabrication of solution-processed MoOx-treated (s-MoOx) silver nanowire (AgNW) transparent conductive electrodes (TCEs) utilizing low-temperature (sub-100 °C) processes. The s-MoOx aggregates around the AgNW and forms gauze-like MoOx thin films between the mesh, which can effectively lower the sheet resistance by more than two orders of magnitude. Notably, these s-MoOx-treated AgNW TCEs exhibit a combination of several promising characteristics, such as a high and broad transmittance across a wavelength range of 400 to 1000 nm, transmission of up to 96.8%, a low sheet resistance of 29.8 ohm sq-1, a low haze value of 0.90%, better mechanical properties against bending and adhesion tests, and preferable gap states for efficient hole

  3. Correlation Between Bacterial Attachment Rate Coefficients and Hydraulic Conductivity and its Effect on Field-Scale Bacterial Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Dong, Hailiang; Xie, YuLong

    2007-06-01

    It has been widely observed in field experiments that the apparent rate of bacterial attachment, particularly as parameterized by the collision efficiency in filtration-based models, decreases with transport distance (i.e., exhibits scale-dependency). This effect has previously been attributed to microbial heterogeneity; that is, variability in cell-surface properties within a single monoclonal population. We demonstrate that this effect could also be interpreted as a field-scale manifestation of local-scale correlation between physical heterogeneity (hydraulic conductivity variability) and reaction heterogeneity (attachment rate coefficient variability). A field-scale model of bacterial transport developed for the South Oyster field research site located near Oyster, Virginia, and observations from field experiments performed at that site, are used as the basis for this study. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of bacterial transport were performed under four alternative scenarios: 1) homogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) and attachment rate coefficient (Kf), 2) heterogeneous K, homogeneous Kf, 3) heterogeneous K and Kf with local correlation based on empirical and theoretical relationships, and 4) heterogeneous K and Kf without local correlation. The results of the 3D simulations were analyzed using 1D model approximations following conventional methods of field data analysis. An apparent decrease with transport distance of effective collision efficiency was observed only in the case where the local properties were both heterogeneous and correlated. This effect was observed despite the fact that the local collision efficiency was specified as a constant in the 3D model, and can therefore be interpreted as a scale effect associated with the local correlated heterogeneity as manifested at the field scale.

  4. Quadrature conductivity: A quantitative indicator of bacterial abundance in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Zhang; Andre Revil; Yoshiko Fujita; Junko Munakata-Marr; George Redden

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT The abundance and growth stages of bacteria in subsurface porous media affect the concentrations and distributions of charged species within the solid-solution interfaces. Therefore, spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements can be used to monitor changes in bacterial biomass and growth stage. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the SIP response of bacteria present in a porous material. Bacterial cell surfaces possess an electric double layer and therefore become polarized in an electric field. We performed SIP measurements over the frequency range of 0.1–1 kHz on cell suspensions alone and cell suspensions mixed with sand at four pore water conductivities. We used Zymomonas mobilis at four different cell densities (in- cluding the background). The quadrature conductivity spectra exhibited two peaks, one around 0.05–0.10 Hz and the other around 1–10 Hz. Because SIP measurements on bacterial suspensions are typically made at frequencies greater than 1 Hz, these peaks have not been previously reported. In the bac-terial suspensions in growth medium, the quadrature conduc-tivity at peak I was linearly proportional to the density of the bacteria. For the case of the suspensions mixed with sands, we observed that peak II presented a smaller increase in the quadrature conductivity with the cell density. A comparison of the experiments with and without sand grains illustrated the effect of the porous medium on the overall quadrature con- ductivity response (decrease in the amplitude and shift of the peaks to the lower frequencies). Our results indicate that for a given porous medium, time-lapse SIP has potential for mon- itoring changes in bacterial abundance within porous media.

  5. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire Mg₂SixSn1–x alloys from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wu; Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Stewart, Derek A.; Mingo, Natalio

    2012-11-29

    The lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of the thermoelectric materials, Mg₂Si, Mg₂Sn, and their alloys, are calculated for bulk and nanowires, without adjustable parameters. We find good agreement with bulk experimental results. For large nanowire diameters, size effects are stronger for the alloy than for the pure compounds. For example, in 200 nm diameter nanowires κ is lower than its bulk value by 30%, 20%, and 20% for Mg₂Si₀.₆Sn₀.₄, Mg₂Si, and Mg₂Sn, respectively. For nanowires less than 20 nm thick, the relative decrease surpasses 50%, and it becomes larger in the pure compounds than in the alloy. At room temperature, κ of Mg₂SixSn1–x is less sensitive to nanostructuring size effects than SixGe1–x, but more sensitive than PbTexSe1–x. This suggests that further improvement of Mg₂SixSn1–x as a nontoxic thermoelectric may be possible.

  6. Study of Schottky contact between Au and NiO nanowire by conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM): The case of surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yidong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, NiO nanowires have been synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction of NiCl2 with Na2C2O4 in the presence of ethylene glycol at 180 °C for 12 h, then calcinated at 400 °C for 2 h. The NiO nanowires were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The resulting current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the NiO nanowires exhibited a clear rectifying behavior. This rectify behavior was attributed to the formation of a Schottky contact between Au coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and NiO nanowires (nano-M/SC) which was dominated by the surface states in NiO itself. Photo-assisted conductive AFM (PC-AFM) was used to demonstrate how the I-V characteristics are influenced by the surface states. Our I-V results also showed that the nano-M/SCs had a good photoelectric switching effect at reverse bias.

  7. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs. PMID:27387274

  8. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S.; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs.

  9. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-07-08

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs.

  10. Hybrid transparent conductive film on flexible glass formed by hot-pressing graphene on a silver nanowire mesh.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong Lai; Ghosh, Dhriti Sundar; Mkhitaryan, Vahagn; Pruneri, Valerio

    2013-11-27

    Polycrystalline graphene and metallic nanowires (NWs) have been proposed to replace indium tin oxide (ITO), the most widely used transparent electrode (TE) film on the market. However, the trade-off between optical transparency (Topt) and electrical sheet resistance (Rs) of these materials taken alone makes them difficult to compete with ITO. In this paper, we show that, by hot-press transfer of graphene monolayer on Ag NWs, the resulting combined structure benefits from the synergy of the two materials, giving a Topt-Rs trade-off better than that expected by simply adding the single material contributions Ag NWs bridge any interruption in transferred graphene, while graphene lowers the contact resistance among neighboring NWs and provides local conductivity in the uncovered regions in-between NWs. The hot-pressing not only allows graphene transfer but also compacts the NWs joints, thus reducing contact resistance. The dependence on the initial NW concentration of the effects produced by the hot press process on its own and the graphene transfer using hot press was investigated and indicates that a low concentration is more suitable for the proposed geometry. A TE film with Topt of 90% and Rs of 14 Ω/sq is demonstrated, also on a flexible glass substrate about 140 μm thick, a very attractive platform for efficient flexible electronic and photonic devices. PMID:24164641

  11. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S.; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs. PMID:27387274

  12. Gold nanoparticles and polyethylene glycols functionalized conducting polyaniline nanowires for ultrasensitive and low fouling immunosensing of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hui, Ni; Sun, Xiaotian; Song, Zhiling; Niu, Shuyan; Luo, Xiliang

    2016-12-15

    An ultrasensitive biosensor for alpha-fetoprotein was developed based on electrochemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) nanowires, which were functionalized with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polyethylene glycols (PEG). The prepared PEG/AuNPs/PANI composite, combining the electrical conductivity of the AuNPs/PANI with the robust antifouling ability of PEG, offered an ideal substrate for the development of low fouling electrochemical biosensors. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a well-known hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker, was used as a model analyte, and its antibody was immobilized on the PEG/AuNPs/PANI for the construction of the AFP immunosensor. Using the redox current of PANI as the sensing signal, in addition to the good biocompatibility of PEG/AuNPs and the anti-biofouling property of PEG, the developed immunosensor showed improved biosensing performances, such as wide linear range and ultralow detection limit (0.007pgmL(-1)). More importantly, it is label-free, reagentless and low fouling, making it capable of assaying AFP in real serum samples without suffering from significant interference or biofouling.

  13. Silicon Nanowire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamins, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    Metal-catalyzed, self-assembled, one-dimensional semiconductor nanowires are being considered as possible device elements to augment and supplant conventional electronics and to extend the use of CMOS beyond the physical and economic limits of conventional technology. Such nanowires can create nanostructures without the complexity and cost of extremely fine scale lithography. The well-known and controllable properties of silicon make silicon nanowires especially attractive. Easy integration with conventional electronics will aid their acceptance and incorporation. For example, connections can be formed to both ends of a nanowire by growing it laterally from a vertical surface formed by etching the top silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator structure into isolated electrodes. Field-effect structures are one class of devices that can be readily built in silicon nanowires. Because the ratio of surface to volume in a thin nanowire is high, conduction through the nanowire is very sensitive to surface conditions, making it effective as the channel of a field-effect transistor or as the transducing element of a gas or chemical sensor. As the nanowire diameter decreases, a greater fraction of the mobile charge can be modulated by a given external charge, increasing the sensitivity. Having the gate of a nanowire transistor completely surround the nanowire also enhances the sensitivity. For a field-effect sensor to be effective, the charge must be physically close to the nanowire so that the majority of the compensating charge is induced in the nanowire and so that ions in solution do not screen the charge. Because only induced charge is being sensed, a coating that selectively binds the target species should be added to the nanowire surface to distinguish between different species in the analyte. The nanowire work at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories was supported in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  14. The effect of driven electron-phonon coupling on the electronic conductance of a polar nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Mardaani, Mohammad Rabani, Hassan; Esmaili, Esmat; Shariati, Ashrafalsadat

    2015-08-07

    A semi-classical model is proposed to explore the effect of electron-phonon coupling on the coherent electronic transport of a polar chain which is confined between two rigid leads in the presence of an external electric field. To this end, we construct the model by means of Green's function technique within the nearest neighbor tight-binding and harmonic approximations. For a time-periodic electric field, the atomic displacements from the equilibrium positions are obtained precisely. The result is then used to compute the electronic transport properties of the chain within the Peierls-type model. The numerical results indicate that the conductance of the system shows interesting behavior in some special frequencies. For each special frequency, there is an electronic quasi-state in which the scattering of electrons by vibrating atoms reaches maximum. The system electronic conductance decreases dramatically at the strong electron-phonon couplings and low electron energies. In the presence of damping forces, the electron-phonon interaction has a less significant effect on the conductance.

  15. Development of Hierarchical Polymer@Pd Nanowire-Network: Synthesis and Application as Highly Active Recyclable Catalyst and Printable Conductive Ink.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sajjad Husain; Ochiai, Bungo

    2016-06-01

    A facile one-pot approach for preparing hierarchical nanowire-networks of hollow polymer@Pd nanospheres is reported. First, polymer@Pd hollow nanospheres were produced through metal-complexation-induced phase separation with functionalized graft copolymers and subsequent self-assembly of PdNPs. The nanospheres hierarchically assembled into the nanowire-network upon drying. The Pd nanowire-network served as an active catalyst for Mizoroki-Heck and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. As low as 500 μmol % Pd was sufficient for quantitative reactions, and the origin of the high activity is ascribed to the highly active sites originating from high-index facets, kinks, and coalesced structures. The catalyst can be recycled via simple filtration and washing, maintaining its high activity owing to the micrometer-sized hierarchical structure of the nanomaterial. The polymer@Pd nanosphere also served as a printable conductive ink for a translucent grid pattern with excellent horizontal conductivity (7.5×10(5) S m(-1)). PMID:27551657

  16. Composites of Polyindole nanowires within Silicate and Aluminosilicate hosts with distinct conductive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez, J. M.; Gómez Costa, M. B.; Anunziata, O. A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured silicate SBA-15 and aluminosilicate AlSBA-15 were synthesized in order to prepare polyindole composites. The Silica mesoporous materials were prepared by sol- gel method and alumination using post-synthesis technique and analysed by different methods (XRD, BET, TEM, and FTIR). Polyindole/host composites were prepared by in situ oxidative polymerization of pre-adsorbed indole, employing Cl3Fe as oxidant. TG, FTIR, BET, XRD, SEM and TEM were used to characterize the resulting composites. These studies show that the porous structures of the materials are preserved after polymerization, and polyindole is found within the porous channels. The composites have an electrical conductivity range between values higher than those of the pure chemically synthesized polyindole, close to those of the pure electrochemically synthesized polymer and lower than those of the pure chemically synthesized polymer, in the order of 10-8 S/cm.

  17. Modeling the electrical conduction in DNA nanowires: charge transfer and lattice fluctuation theories.

    PubMed

    Behnia, S; Fathizadeh, S

    2015-02-01

    An analytical approach is proposed for the investigation of the conductivity properties of DNA. The charge mobility of DNA is studied based on an extended Peyrard-Bishop-Holstein model when the charge carrier is also subjected to an external electrical field. We have obtained the values of some of the system parameters, such as the electron-lattice coupling constant, by using the mean Lyapunov exponent method. On the other hand, the electrical current operator is calculated directly from the lattice operators. Also, we have studied Landauer resistance behavior with respect to the external field, which could serve as the interface between chaos theory tools and electronic concepts. We have examined the effect of two types of electrical fields (dc and ac) and variation of the field frequency on the current flowing through DNA. A study of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic diagram reveals regions with a (quasi-)Ohmic property and other regions with negative differential resistance (NDR). NDR is a phenomenon that has been observed experimentally in DNA at room temperature. We have tried to study the affected agents in charge transfer phenomena in DNA to better design nanostructures.

  18. Large-scale synthesis of well-dispersed copper nanowires in an electric pressure cooker and their application in transparent and conductive networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenjie; Chen, Yanyan; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel large-scale synthetic method for well-separated copper nanowires (CuNWs) in a commercial electric pressure cooker under mild reaction conditions. CuNWs (∼2.1 g) can be prepared in a batch with the cost of $4.20/g. Well-dispersed polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped CuNWs were obtained via a ligand-exchange method. The transparent and conductive CuNW networks with excellent electrical conductivity and high optical transmittance (30 Ω/□ at 86% transmittance, respectively) were fabricated by a spin-coating process.

  19. Controlled electrodeposition of bismuth nanocatalysts for the solution-liquid-solid synthesis of CdSe nanowires on transparent conductive substrates.

    PubMed

    Reim, Natalia; Littig, Alexander; Behn, Dino; Mews, Alf

    2013-12-11

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been directly grown on transparent conductive substrates via the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) approach using electrodeposited bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) as catalyst. Bi NPs were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces from a bismuth trichloride solution using potentiostatic double-pulse techniques. The size and density of electrodeposited Bi NPs were controlled by the pulse parameters. Since the NW diameter is governed by the dimension of the Bi catalyst, the electrodeposition is a reliable method to synthesize nanowires directly on substrates with a desired size and density. We show that the density can be adjusted from individual NWs on several square micrometer to very dense NW networks. The diameter can be controlled between thick nanowires above 100 nm to very thin NW of 7 nm in diameter, which is well below the respective exciton dimension. Hence, especially the thinnest NWs exhibit diameter-dependent photoluminescence energies as a result of quantum confinement effects in the radial dimension.

  20. Controlled electrodeposition of bismuth nanocatalysts for the solution-liquid-solid synthesis of CdSe nanowires on transparent conductive substrates.

    PubMed

    Reim, Natalia; Littig, Alexander; Behn, Dino; Mews, Alf

    2013-12-11

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been directly grown on transparent conductive substrates via the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) approach using electrodeposited bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) as catalyst. Bi NPs were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces from a bismuth trichloride solution using potentiostatic double-pulse techniques. The size and density of electrodeposited Bi NPs were controlled by the pulse parameters. Since the NW diameter is governed by the dimension of the Bi catalyst, the electrodeposition is a reliable method to synthesize nanowires directly on substrates with a desired size and density. We show that the density can be adjusted from individual NWs on several square micrometer to very dense NW networks. The diameter can be controlled between thick nanowires above 100 nm to very thin NW of 7 nm in diameter, which is well below the respective exciton dimension. Hence, especially the thinnest NWs exhibit diameter-dependent photoluminescence energies as a result of quantum confinement effects in the radial dimension. PMID:24245969

  1. Ion Conductivity of the Bacterial Translocation Channel SecYEG Engaged in Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Knyazev, Denis G.; Winter, Lukas; Bauer, Benedikt W.; Siligan, Christine; Pohl, Peter

    2014-01-01

    While engaged in protein transport, the bacterial translocon SecYEG must maintain the membrane barrier to small ions. The preservation of the proton motif force was attributed to (i) cation exclusion, (ii) engulfment of the nascent chain by the hydrophobic pore ring, and (iii) a half-helix partly plugging the channel. In contrast, we show here that preservation of the proton motif force is due to a voltage-driven conformational change. Preprotein or signal peptide binding to the purified and reconstituted SecYEG results in large cation and anion conductivities only when the membrane potential is small. Physiological values of membrane potential close the activated channel. This voltage-dependent closure is not dependent on the presence of the plug domain and is not affected by mutation of 3 of the 6 constriction residues to glycines. Cellular ion homeostasis is not challenged by the small remaining leak conductance. PMID:25016015

  2. Conduction mechanisms in P(VDF-TrFE)/gold nanowire composites: tunnelling and thermally-activated hopping process near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Laavanya; Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2016-08-01

    High-aspect ratio gold nanowires were dispersed in a P(VDF-TrFE) matrix to form conducting polymer composites. The composites were found to follow a percolation law, with a low percolation threshold of 2.2%vol and attaining a conductivity value of 100 S m‑1. The temperature and frequency dependence of the composites were studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Tunnelling was found to be the main charge transport mechanism at temperatures below ‑100 °C and a thermally-activated hopping mechanism was determined to be responsible for conduction at temperatures above ‑100 °C. The correlated barrier hopping model was found to be the best fit to explain the conduction mechanisms in the composites.

  3. Conduction mechanisms in P(VDF-TrFE)/gold nanowire composites: tunnelling and thermally-activated hopping process near the percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Laavanya; Lonjon, Antoine; Demont, Philippe; Dantras, Eric; Lacabanne, Colette

    2016-08-01

    High-aspect ratio gold nanowires were dispersed in a P(VDF-TrFE) matrix to form conducting polymer composites. The composites were found to follow a percolation law, with a low percolation threshold of 2.2%vol and attaining a conductivity value of 100 S m-1. The temperature and frequency dependence of the composites were studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Tunnelling was found to be the main charge transport mechanism at temperatures below -100 °C and a thermally-activated hopping mechanism was determined to be responsible for conduction at temperatures above -100 °C. The correlated barrier hopping model was found to be the best fit to explain the conduction mechanisms in the composites.

  4. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  5. Silver Nanowires Binding with Sputtered ZnO to Fabricate Highly Conductive and Thermally Stable Transparent Electrode for Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjeet; Rana, Tanka R; Kim, SeongYeon; Kim, Kihwan; Yun, Jae Ho; Kim, JunHo

    2016-05-25

    Silver nanowire (AgNW) film has been demonstrated as excellent and low cost transparent electrode in organic solar cells as an alternative to replace scarce and expensive indium tin oxide (ITO). However, the low contact area and weak adhesion with low-lying surface as well as junction resistance between nanowires have limited the applications of AgNW film to thin film solar cells. To resolve this problem, we fabricated AgNW film as transparent conductive electrode (TCE) by binding with a thin layer of sputtered ZnO (40 nm) which not only increased contact area with low-lying surface in thin film solar cell but also improved conductivity by connecting AgNWs at the junction. The TCE thus fabricated exhibited transparency and sheet resistance of 92% and 20Ω/□, respectively. Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study revealed the enhancement of current collection vertically and laterally through AgNWs after coating with ZnO thin film. The CuInGaSe2 solar cell with TCE of our AgNW(ZnO) demonstrated the maximum power conversion efficiency of 13.5% with improved parameters in comparison to solar cell fabricated with conventional ITO as TCE. PMID:27149372

  6. Silver Nanowires Binding with Sputtered ZnO to Fabricate Highly Conductive and Thermally Stable Transparent Electrode for Solar Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjeet; Rana, Tanka R; Kim, SeongYeon; Kim, Kihwan; Yun, Jae Ho; Kim, JunHo

    2016-05-25

    Silver nanowire (AgNW) film has been demonstrated as excellent and low cost transparent electrode in organic solar cells as an alternative to replace scarce and expensive indium tin oxide (ITO). However, the low contact area and weak adhesion with low-lying surface as well as junction resistance between nanowires have limited the applications of AgNW film to thin film solar cells. To resolve this problem, we fabricated AgNW film as transparent conductive electrode (TCE) by binding with a thin layer of sputtered ZnO (40 nm) which not only increased contact area with low-lying surface in thin film solar cell but also improved conductivity by connecting AgNWs at the junction. The TCE thus fabricated exhibited transparency and sheet resistance of 92% and 20Ω/□, respectively. Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) study revealed the enhancement of current collection vertically and laterally through AgNWs after coating with ZnO thin film. The CuInGaSe2 solar cell with TCE of our AgNW(ZnO) demonstrated the maximum power conversion efficiency of 13.5% with improved parameters in comparison to solar cell fabricated with conventional ITO as TCE.

  7. Development of palladium nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chuanding

    Inherent limitations of traditional lithography have prompted the search for means of achieving self-assembly of nano-scale structures and networks for the next generation of electronic and photonic devices. The nanowire, the basic building block of a nanocircuit, has recently become the focus of intense research. Reports on nanowire synthesis and assembly have appeared in the scientific literature, which include Vapor-Liquid-Solid mechanism, template-based electrochemical fabrication, solvothermal or wet chemistry, and assembly by fluid alignment or microchannel networks. An ideal approach for practical application of nanowires would circumvent technical and economic constraints of templating. Here we report on the self-assembly of highly-ordered metallic nanowires directly from a palladium acetate solution under an applied alternating current (AC) electric field of relatively high intensity and frequency. DNA-templated nanowires are first presented here. DNA molecules were stretched and positioned by electric field, followed by metallization by palladium acetate solution. Palladium nanowire arrays have been found to grow directly between microelectrodes without any template, under an alternating electric field of relatively high intensity and frequency. The wires grew spontaneously along the direction of the electric field and have high uniformity and conductivity. Single 75 nm-diameter palladium nanowires have also been self-assembled from aqueous solution at predefined locations between 15 mum-gap electrodes built on a SiO2 substrate. Nanowire assembly was initiated by application an electric field, and it occurred only along the direction of field lines where the field is strongest. Related metals did not support single nanowire assembly under comparable conditions. Current-limiting circuits for controlled nanowire synthesis, electric field simulation, and growth mechanism were studied. The simple and straightforward approach to nanowire assembly outlined here

  8. Nanowire Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Erik C.; Brongersma, Mark L.; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-08-01

    The nanowire geometry provides potential advantages over planar wafer-based or thin-film solar cells in every step of the photoconversion process. These advantages include reduced reflection, extreme light trapping, improved band gap tuning, facile strain relaxation, and increased defect tolerance. These benefits are not expected to increase the maximum efficiency above standard limits; instead, they reduce the quantity and quality of material necessary to approach those limits, allowing for substantial cost reductions. Additionally, nanowires provide opportunities to fabricate complex single-crystalline semiconductor devices directly on low-cost substrates and electrodes such as aluminum foil, stainless steel, and conductive glass, addressing another major cost in current photovoltaic technology. This review describes nanowire solar cell synthesis and fabrication, important characterization techniques unique to nanowire systems, and advantages of the nanowire geometry.

  9. Using Reactive Transport Modeling to Understand Changes in Electrical Conductivity Associated with Bacterial Growth and Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regberg, A. B.; Singha, K.; Picardal, F.; Brantley, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Previous research has linked measured changes in the bulk electrical conductivity (σb) of water-saturated sediments to the respiration and growth of anaerobic bacteria. If the mechanism causing this signal is understood and characterized it could be used to identify and monitor zones of bacterial activity in the subsurface. The 1-D reactive transport model PHREEQC was used to understand σb signals by modeling chemical gradients within two column reactors and corresponding changes in effluent chemistry. The flow-through column reactors were packed with Fe(III)-bearing sediment from Oyster, VA and inoculated with an environmental consortia of microorganisms. Influent in the first reactor was amended with 1mM Na-acetate to encourage the growth of iron-reducing bacteria. Influent in the second reactor was amended with 0.1mM Na-Acetate and 2mM NaNO3 to encourage the growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria. While effluent concentrations of acetate, Fe(II), NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ remained at steady state, we measured a 3-fold increase (0.055 S/m - 0.2 S/m) in σb in the iron-reducing column and a 10-fold increase in σb (0.07 S/m - 0.8 S/m) in the nitrate-reducing column over 198 days. The ionic strength in both reactors remained constant through time indicating that the measured increases in σb were not caused by changing effluent concentrations. PHREEQC successfully matched the measured changes in effluent concentrations for both columns when the reaction database was modified in the following manner. For the iron-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing the rate of iron reduction, the rate of bacterial growth, and the production of methane were added to the reaction database. Additionally, surface adsorption and cation exchange reactions were added so that the model was consistent with measured effluent chemistry. For the nitrate-reducing column, kinetic expressions governing nitrate reduction and bacterial growth were added to the reaction database. Additionally

  10. Excess conductivity analysis in YBa2Cu3O7-d added with SiO2 nanoparticles and nanowires: Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, A. L.; Almessiere, M. A.; Salem, M. Ben; Azzouz, F. Ben

    2016-07-01

    The effect of nanosized silicon oxide nanoparticles (denoted NP-SiO2) and nanowires (denoted NW-SiO2) additions during the final processing stage on electrical fluctuation conductivity of polycrystalline YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123 for brevity) in the mean field region has been reported. Series of samples were synthesized in air using a standard solid-state reaction technique by adding nanosized entities up to 0.5 wt.%. Phases, microstructure and superconductivity properties have been systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrical measurements. TEM investigations show the presence of inhomogeneities embedded in the superconducting matrix along with the presence of columnar defects in the case of SiO2 nanoparticles added samples, however nanowires tend to agglomerate by entangling with each other in the intergrain regions. The fluctuation conductivity was analyzed as a function of reduced temperature using the Aslamazov-Larkin model. Using the Lawrence-Doniach equations, the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) number (NG) and equations, the coherence length, the effective layer thickness, the lower critical field Bc1(0), the upper critical field Bc2(0) and the critical current density Jc(0) were estimated. It was found that the addition of an optimum concentration of SiO2 nanomaterials, that depends on the shape, effectively controlled the microstructure, the grains coupling and hence improved the physical properties of Y-123 compound.

  11. Excess conductivity analysis in YBa2Cu3O7‑d added with SiO2 nanoparticles and nanowires: Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, A. L.; Almessiere, M. A.; Salem, M. Ben; Azzouz, F. Ben

    2016-07-01

    The effect of nanosized silicon oxide nanoparticles (denoted NP-SiO2) and nanowires (denoted NW-SiO2) additions during the final processing stage on electrical fluctuation conductivity of polycrystalline YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123 for brevity) in the mean field region has been reported. Series of samples were synthesized in air using a standard solid-state reaction technique by adding nanosized entities up to 0.5 wt.%. Phases, microstructure and superconductivity properties have been systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrical measurements. TEM investigations show the presence of inhomogeneities embedded in the superconducting matrix along with the presence of columnar defects in the case of SiO2 nanoparticles added samples, however nanowires tend to agglomerate by entangling with each other in the intergrain regions. The fluctuation conductivity was analyzed as a function of reduced temperature using the Aslamazov-Larkin model. Using the Lawrence-Doniach equations, the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) number (NG) and equations, the coherence length, the effective layer thickness, the lower critical field Bc1(0), the upper critical field Bc2(0) and the critical current density Jc(0) were estimated. It was found that the addition of an optimum concentration of SiO2 nanomaterials, that depends on the shape, effectively controlled the microstructure, the grains coupling and hence improved the physical properties of Y-123 compound.

  12. Switchable photoluminescence liquid crystal coated bacterial cellulose films with conductive response.

    PubMed

    Tercjak, Agnieszka; Gutierrez, Junkal; Barud, Hernane S; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2016-06-01

    Three different low molecular weight nematic liquid crystals (LCs) were used to impregnate bacterial cellulose (BC) film. This simple fabrication pathway allows to obtain highly transparent BC based films. The coating of BC film with different liquid crystals changed transmittance spectra in ultraviolet-visible region and allows to design UVC and UVB shielding materials. Atomic force microscopy results confirmed that liquid crystals coated BC films maintain highly interconnected three-dimensional network characteristic of BC film and simultaneously, transversal cross-section scanning electron microscopy images indicated penetration of liquid crystals through the three-dimensional network of BC nanofibers. Investigated BC films maintain nematic liquid crystal properties being switchable photoluminiscence as a function of temperature during repeatable heating/cooling cycles. Conductive response of the liquid crystal coated BC films was proved by tunneling atomic force microscopy measurement. Moreover, liquid crystal coated BC films maintain thermal stability and mechanical properties of the BC film. Designed thermoresponsive materials possessed interesting optical and conductive properties opening a novel simple pathway of fabrication liquid crystal coated BC films with tuneable properties. PMID:27083359

  13. Switchable photoluminescence liquid crystal coated bacterial cellulose films with conductive response.

    PubMed

    Tercjak, Agnieszka; Gutierrez, Junkal; Barud, Hernane S; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2016-06-01

    Three different low molecular weight nematic liquid crystals (LCs) were used to impregnate bacterial cellulose (BC) film. This simple fabrication pathway allows to obtain highly transparent BC based films. The coating of BC film with different liquid crystals changed transmittance spectra in ultraviolet-visible region and allows to design UVC and UVB shielding materials. Atomic force microscopy results confirmed that liquid crystals coated BC films maintain highly interconnected three-dimensional network characteristic of BC film and simultaneously, transversal cross-section scanning electron microscopy images indicated penetration of liquid crystals through the three-dimensional network of BC nanofibers. Investigated BC films maintain nematic liquid crystal properties being switchable photoluminiscence as a function of temperature during repeatable heating/cooling cycles. Conductive response of the liquid crystal coated BC films was proved by tunneling atomic force microscopy measurement. Moreover, liquid crystal coated BC films maintain thermal stability and mechanical properties of the BC film. Designed thermoresponsive materials possessed interesting optical and conductive properties opening a novel simple pathway of fabrication liquid crystal coated BC films with tuneable properties.

  14. Splitting of the zero-bias conductance peak as smoking gun evidence for the existence of the Majorana mode in a superconductor-semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Sarma, S.; Sau, Jay D.; Stanescu, Tudor D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations of a zero-bias conductance peak in tunneling transport measurements in superconductor-semiconductor nanowire devices provide evidence for the predicted zero-energy Majorana modes, but not the conclusive proof of their existence. We establish that direct observation of a splitting of the zero-bias conductance peak can serve as the smoking gun evidence for the existence of the Majorana mode. We show that the splitting has an oscillatory dependence on the Zeeman field (chemical potential) at fixed chemical potential (Zeeman field). By contrast, when the density is constant rather than the chemical potential—the likely situation in the current experimental setups—the splitting oscillations are generically suppressed. Our theory predicts the conditions under which the splitting oscillations can serve as the smoking gun for the experimental confirmation of the elusive Majorana mode.

  15. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns.

    PubMed Central

    Vandevivere, P; Baveye, P

    1992-01-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HCsat) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only one strain, the slime producer, had a large impact on the HCsat. The production of exopolymers had no effect on either cell multiplication within or movement through the sand columns. Therefore, the HCsat reduction observed with the slime producer was tentatively attributed to the obstruction of flow channels with slime. Compared with the results with Arthrobacter sp. strain AK19 used in a previous study, there was a 100-fold increase in detachment from the solid substratum and movement through the sand of the strains used in this study. All strains induced severe clogging when they colonized the inlet chamber of the columns. Under these conditions, the inlet end was covered by a confluent mat with an extremely low HCsat. Images PMID:1622240

  16. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns

    SciTech Connect

    Vandevivere, P.; Baveye, P. )

    1992-05-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HC[sub sat]) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only one strain, the slime producer, had a large impact on the HC[sub sat]. The production of exopolymers had no effect on either cell multiplication within or movement through the sand columns. Therefore, the HC[sub sat] reduction observed with the slime producer was tentatively attributed to the obstruction of flow channels with slime. Compared with the results with Arthrobacter sp. strain AK19 used in a previous study, there was a 100-fold increase in detachment from the solid substratum and movement through the sand of the strains used in this study. All strains induced severe clogging when they colonized the inlet chamber of the columns. Under these conditions, the inlet end was covered by a confluent mat with an extremely low HC[sub sat].

  17. Surface passivation of tellurium-doped GaAs nanowires by GaP: Effect on electrical conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Darbandi, A.; Salehzadeh, O.; Watkins, S. P.; Kuyanov, P.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2014-06-21

    We report on the surface passivation of Au-assisted Te-doped GaAs nanowires (NWs) grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The electrical properties of individual free standing NWs were assessed using a tungsten nano-probe inside a scanning electron microscope. The diameter independent apparent resistivity of both strained and relaxed passivated NWs suggests the unpinning of the Fermi level and reduction of sidewalls surface states density. Similar current-voltage properties were observed for partially axially relaxed GaAs/GaP NWs. This indicates a negligible contribution of misfit dislocations in the charge transport properties of the NWs. Low temperature micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) measurements were also carried out for both uncapped and passivated GaAs NWs. The improvement of the integrated (μ-PL) intensity for GaAs/GaP NWs further confirms the effect of passivation.

  18. High performance of carbon nanotubes/silver nanowires-PET hybrid flexible transparent conductive films via facile pressing-transfer technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To obtain low sheet resistance, high optical transmittance, small open spaces in conductive networks, and enhanced adhesion of flexible transparent conductive films, a carbon nanotube (CNT)/silver nanowire (AgNW)-PET hybrid film was fabricated by mechanical pressing-transfer process at room temperature. The morphology and structure were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), the optical transmittance and sheet resistance were tested by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) spectrophotometer and four-point probe technique, and the adhesion was also measured by 3M sticky tape. The results indicate that in this hybrid nanostructure, AgNWs form the main conductive networks and CNTs as assistant conductive networks are filled in the open spaces of AgNWs networks. The sheet resistance of the hybrid films can reach approximately 20.9 to 53.9 Ω/□ with the optical transmittance of approximately 84% to 91%. The second mechanical pressing step can greatly reduce the surface roughness of the hybrid film and enhance the adhesion force between CNTs, AgNWs, and PET substrate. This process is hopeful for large-scale production of high-end flexible transparent conductive films. PMID:25386105

  19. Electrochemically Grown Single Nanowire Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Penner, Reginald; Bangar, Mangesh; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.

    2004-01-01

    We report a fabrication technique that is potentially capable of producing arrays of individually addressable nanowire sensors with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. The concept has been demonstrated with electrodeposition of palladium wires with 75 nm to 350 nm widths. We have also fabricated single and double conducting polymer nanowires (polyaniline and polypyrrole) with 100nm and 200nm widths using electrochemical direct growth. Using single Pd nanowires, we have also demonstrated hydrogen sensing. It is envisioned that these are the first steps towards nanowire sensor arrays capable of simultaneously detecting multiple chemical species.

  20. Reduced Joule heating in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonard, François

    2011-03-01

    The temperature distribution in nanowires due to Joule heating is studied analytically using a continuum model and a Green's function approach. We show that the temperatures reached in nanowires can be much lower than that predicted by bulk models of Joule heating, due to heat loss at the nanowire surface that is important at nanoscopic dimensions, even when the thermal conductivity of the environment is relatively low. In addition, we find that the maximum temperature in the nanowire scales weakly with length, in contrast to the bulk system. A simple criterion is presented to assess the importance of these effects. The results have implications for the experimental measurements of nanowire thermal properties, for thermoelectric applications, and for controlling thermal effects in nanowire electronic devices.

  1. Rapid synthesis of ultra-long silver nanowires for tailor-made transparent conductive electrodes: proof of concept in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Andrés, Luis; Menéndez, María Fe; Gómez, David; Martínez, Ana Luisa; Bristow, Noel; Kettle, Jeffrey Paul; Menéndez, Armando; Ruiz, Bernardino

    2015-07-01

    Rapid synthesis of ultralong silver nanowires (AgNWs) has been obtained using a one-pot polyol-mediated synthetic procedure. The AgNWs have been prepared from the base materials in less than one hour with nanowire lengths reaching 195 μm, which represents the quickest synthesis and one of the highest reported aspect ratios to date. These results have been achieved through a joint analysis of all reaction parameters, which represents a clear progress beyond the state of the art. Dispersions of the AgNWs have been used to prepare thin, flexible, transparent and conducting films using spray coating. Due to the higher aspect ratio, an improved electrical percolation network is observed. This allows a low sheet resistance (RS = 20.2 Ω/sq), whilst maintaining high optical film transparency (T = 94.7%), driving to the highest reported figure-of-merit (FoM = 338). Owing to the light-scattering influence of the AgNWs, the density of the AgNW network can also be varied to enable controllability of the optical haze through the sample. Based on the identification of the optimal haze value, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have been fabricated using the AgNWs as the transparent electrode and have been benchmarked against indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. Overall, the performance of OPVs made using AgNWs sees a small decrease in power conversion efficiency (PCE), primarily due to a fall in open-circuit voltage (50 mV). This work indicates that AgNWs can provide a low cost, rapid and roll-to-roll compatible alternative to ITO in OPVs, with only a small compromise in PCE needed.

  2. Rapid synthesis of ultra-long silver nanowires for tailor-made transparent conductive electrodes: proof of concept in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    José Andrés, Luis; Fe Menéndez, María; Gómez, David; Luisa Martínez, Ana; Bristow, Noel; Paul Kettle, Jeffrey; Menéndez, Armando; Ruiz, Bernardino

    2015-07-01

    Rapid synthesis of ultralong silver nanowires (AgNWs) has been obtained using a one-pot polyol-mediated synthetic procedure. The AgNWs have been prepared from the base materials in less than one hour with nanowire lengths reaching 195 μm, which represents the quickest synthesis and one of the highest reported aspect ratios to date. These results have been achieved through a joint analysis of all reaction parameters, which represents a clear progress beyond the state of the art. Dispersions of the AgNWs have been used to prepare thin, flexible, transparent and conducting films using spray coating. Due to the higher aspect ratio, an improved electrical percolation network is observed. This allows a low sheet resistance (RS = 20.2 Ω/sq), whilst maintaining high optical film transparency (T = 94.7%), driving to the highest reported figure-of-merit (FoM = 338). Owing to the light-scattering influence of the AgNWs, the density of the AgNW network can also be varied to enable controllability of the optical haze through the sample. Based on the identification of the optimal haze value, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have been fabricated using the AgNWs as the transparent electrode and have been benchmarked against indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. Overall, the performance of OPVs made using AgNWs sees a small decrease in power conversion efficiency (PCE), primarily due to a fall in open-circuit voltage (50 mV). This work indicates that AgNWs can provide a low cost, rapid and roll-to-roll compatible alternative to ITO in OPVs, with only a small compromise in PCE needed. PMID:26056864

  3. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  4. Thermal conductivity measurements of single-crystalline bismuth nanowires by the four-point-probe 3-ω technique at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yong; Kim, Gil-Sung; Lee, Mi-Ri; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Wan-Doo; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2013-05-10

    We have successfully investigated the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-crystalline bismuth nanowires (BiNWs) with [110] growth direction, via a straightforward and powerful four-point-probe 3-ω technique in the temperature range 10-280 K. The BiNWs, which are well known as the most effective material for thermoelectric (TE) device applications, were synthesized by compressive thermal stress on a SiO2/Si substrate at 250-270 °C for 10 h. To understand the thermal transport mechanism of BiNWs, we present three kinds of experimental technique as follows, (i) a manipulation of a single BiNW by an Omni-probe in a focused ion beam (FIB), (ii) a suspended bridge structure integrating a four-point-probe chip by micro-fabrication to minimize the thermal loss to the substrate, and (iii) a simple 3-ω technique system setup. We found that the thermal transport of BiNWs is highly affected by boundary scattering of both phonons and electrons as the dominant heat carriers. The thermal conductivity of a single BiNW (d ~ 123 nm) was estimated to be ~2.9 W m(-1) K(-1) at 280 K, implying lower values compared to the thermal conductivity of the bulk (~11 W m(-1) K(-1) at 280 K). It was noted that this reduction in the thermal conductivity of the BiNWs could be due to strongly enhanced phonon-boundary scattering at the surface of the BiNWs. Furthermore, we present temperature-dependent (10-280 K) thermal conductivity of the BiNWs using the 3-ω technique.

  5. Coaxial CoMoO4 nanowire arrays with chemically integrated conductive coating for high-performance flexible all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yaping; Liu, Borui; Liu, Qi; Wang, Jun; Li, Zhanshuang; Jing, Xiaoyan; Liu, Lianhe

    2015-09-01

    Flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors have offered promising applications as novel energy storage devices based on their merits, such as small size, low cost, light weight and high wearability for high-performance portable electronics. However, one major challenge to make flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors depends on the improvement of electrode materials with higher electrical conductivity properties and longer cycling stability. In this article, we put forward a simple strategy to in situ synthesize 1D CoMoO4 nanowires (NWs), using highly conductive CC and an electrically conductive PPy wrapping layer on CoMoO4 NW arrays for high performance electrode materials. The results show that the CoMoO4/PPy hybrid NW electrode exhibits a high areal specific capacitance of ca. 1.34 F cm-2 at a current density of 2 mA cm-2, which is remarkably better than the corresponding values for a pure CoMoO4 NW electrode of 0.7 F cm-2. An excellent cycling performance of nanocomposites of up to 95.2% (ca. 1.12 F cm-2) is achieved after 2000 cycles compared to pristine CoMoO4 NWs. In addition, we fabricate flexible all-solid-state ASC which can be cycled reversibly in the voltage range of 0-1.7 V, and exhibits a maximum energy density of 104.7 W h kg-1 (3.522 mW h cm-3), demonstrating great potential for practical applications in flexible energy storage electronics.Flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors have offered promising applications as novel energy storage devices based on their merits, such as small size, low cost, light weight and high wearability for high-performance portable electronics. However, one major challenge to make flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors depends on the improvement of electrode materials with higher electrical conductivity properties and longer cycling stability. In this article, we put forward a simple strategy to in situ synthesize 1D CoMoO4 nanowires (NWs), using highly conductive CC and an electrically conductive PPy wrapping layer on

  6. Nanowire Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borshchevsky, Alexander; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Herman, Jennifer; Ryan, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Nanowire thermoelectric devices, now under development, are intended to take miniaturization a step beyond the prior state of the art to exploit the potential advantages afforded by shrinking some device features to approximately molecular dimensions (of the order of 10 nm). The development of nanowire-based thermoelectric devices could lead to novel power-generating, cooling, and sensing devices that operate at relatively low currents and high voltages. Recent work on the theory of thermoelectric devices has led to the expectation that the performance of such a device could be enhanced if the diameter of the wires could be reduced to a point where quantum confinement effects increase charge-carrier mobility (thereby increasing the Seebeck coefficient) and reduce thermal conductivity. In addition, even in the absence of these effects, the large aspect ratios (length of the order of tens of microns diameter of the order of tens of nanometers) of nanowires would be conducive to the maintenance of large temperature differences at small heat fluxes. The predicted net effect of reducing diameters to the order of tens of nanometers would be to increase its efficiency by a factor of .3. Nanowires made of thermoelectric materials and devices that comprise arrays of such nanowires can be fabricated by electrochemical growth of the thermoelectric materials in templates that contain suitably dimensioned pores (10 to 100 nm in diameter and 1 to 100 microns long). The nanowires can then be contacted in bundles to form devices that look similar to conventional thermoelectric devices, except that a production version may contain nearly a billion elements (wires) per square centimeter, instead of fewer than a hundred as in a conventional bulk thermoelectric device or fewer than 100,000 as in a microdevice. It is not yet possible to form contacts with individual nanowires. Therefore, in fabricating a nanowire thermoelectric device, one forms contacts on nanowires in bundles of the

  7. High-performance flexible Ag nanowire electrode with low-temperature atomic-layer-deposition fabrication of conductive-bridging ZnO film.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ya-Hui; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Tao, Ye; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    As material for flexible transparent electrodes for organic photoelectric devices, the silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been widely studied. In this work, we propose a hybrid flexible anode with photopolymer substrate, which is composed of spin-coating-processed AgNW meshes and of zinc oxide (ZnO) prepared by low-temperature (60°C) atomic layer deposition. ZnO effectively fills in the voids of the AgNW mesh electrode, which is thus able to contact to the device all over the active area, to allow for efficient charge extraction/injection. Furthermore, ZnO grown by low temperature mainly relies on hole conduction to make the anode play a better role. Hole-only devices are fabricated to certify the functionality of the low-temperature ZnO film. Finally, we confirm that the ZnO film grown at a low temperature bring a significant contribution to the performance of the modified AgNW anode.

  8. High-performance flexible Ag nanowire electrode with low-temperature atomic-layer-deposition fabrication of conductive-bridging ZnO film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ya-Hui; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Tao, Ye; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Yi

    2015-02-01

    As material for flexible transparent electrodes for organic photoelectric devices, the silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been widely studied. In this work, we propose a hybrid flexible anode with photopolymer substrate, which is composed of spin-coating-processed AgNW meshes and of zinc oxide (ZnO) prepared by low-temperature (60°C) atomic layer deposition. ZnO effectively fills in the voids of the AgNW mesh electrode, which is thus able to contact to the device all over the active area, to allow for efficient charge extraction/injection. Furthermore, ZnO grown by low temperature mainly relies on hole conduction to make the anode play a better role. Hole-only devices are fabricated to certify the functionality of the low-temperature ZnO film. Finally, we confirm that the ZnO film grown at a low temperature bring a significant contribution to the performance of the modified AgNW anode.

  9. Distortions of the coulomb blockade conductance line in scanning gate measurements of inas nanowire based quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. A.; Volk, Ch.; Winden, A.; Hardtdegen, H.; Schaepers, Th.

    2013-01-15

    We performed measurements at helium temperatures of the electronic transport in the linear regime in an InAs quantum wire in the presence of a charged tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) at low electron concentration. We show that at certain concentration of electrons, only two closely placed quantum dots, both in the Coulomb blockade regime, govern conductance of the whole wire. Under this condition, two types of peculiarities-wobbling and splitting-arise in the behavior of the lines of the conductance peaks of Coulomb blockade. These peculiarities are measured in quantum-wire-based structures for the first time. We explain both peculiarities as an interplay of the conductance of two quantum dots present in the wire. Detailed modeling of wobbling behavior made in the framework of the orthodox theory of Coulomb blockade demonstrates good agreement with the obtained experimental data.

  10. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10‑4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed.

  11. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10−4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed. PMID:27713527

  12. Energetic and spatial parameters for gating of the bacterial large conductance mechanosensitive channel, MscL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Sigurdson, W. J.; Kung, C.; Sachs, F.

    1999-01-01

    MscL is multimeric protein that forms a large conductance mechanosensitive channel in the inner membrane of Escherichia coli. Since MscL is gated by tension transmitted through the lipid bilayer, we have been able to measure its gating parameters as a function of absolute tension. Using purified MscL reconstituted in liposomes, we recorded single channel currents and varied the pressure gradient (P) to vary the tension (T). The tension was calculated from P and the radius of curvature was obtained using video microscopy of the patch. The probability of being open (Po) has a steep sigmoidal dependence on T, with a midpoint (T1/2) of 11.8 dyn/cm. The maximal slope sensitivity of Po/Pc was 0.63 dyn/cm per e-fold. Assuming a Boltzmann distribution, the energy difference between the closed and fully open states in the unstressed membrane was DeltaE = 18.6 kBT. If the mechanosensitivity arises from tension acting on a change of in-plane area (DeltaA), the free energy, TDeltaA, would correspond to DeltaA = 6.5 nm2. MscL is not a binary channel, but has four conducting states and a closed state. Most transition rates are independent of tension, but the rate-limiting step to opening is the transition between the closed state and the lowest conductance substate. This transition thus involves the greatest DeltaA. When summed over all transitions, the in-plane area change from closed to fully open was 6 nm2, agreeing with the value obtained in the two-state analysis. Assuming a cylindrical channel, the dimensions of the (fully open) pore were comparable to DeltaA. Thus, the tension dependence of channel gating is primarily one of increasing the external channel area to accommodate the pore of the smallest conducting state. The higher conducting states appear to involve conformational changes internal to the channel that don't involve changes in area.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of cadmium telluride nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Maxwell C.; Yoo, Bong Young; Rheem, Young Woo; Bozhilov, Krassimir N.; Chen, Wilfred; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.

    2008-08-01

    CdTe nanowires with controlled composition were cathodically electrodeposited using track-etched polycarbonate membrane as scaffolds and their material and electrical properties were systematically investigated. As-deposited CdTe nanowires show nanocrystalline cubic phase structures with grain sizes of up to 60 nm. The dark-field images of nanowires reveal that the crystallinity of nanowires was greatly improved from nanocrystalline to a few single crystals within nanowires upon annealing at 200 °C for 6 h in a reducing environment (5% H2+95% N2). For electrical characterization, a single CdTe nanowire was assembled across microfabricated gold electrodes using the drop-casting method. In addition to an increase in grain size, the electrical resistivity of an annealed single nanowire (a few 105 Ω cm) was one order of magnitude greater than in an as-deposited nanowire, indicating that crystallinity of nanowires improved and defects within nanowires were reduced during annealing. By controlling the dopants levels (e.g. Te content of nanowires), the resistivity of nanowires was varied from 104 to 100 Ω cm. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of nanowires indicated the presence of Schottky barriers at both ends of the Au/CdTe interface. Temperature-dependent I-V measurements show that the electron transport mode was determined by a thermally activated component at T>-50 °C and a temperature-independent component below -50 °C. Under optical illumination, the single CdTe nanowire exhibited enhanced conductance.

  14. Metal ion effects on hydraulic conductivity of bacterial cellulose-pectin composites used as plant cell wall analogs.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brigid A; Kopittke, Peter M; Wehr, J Bernhard; Blamey, F Pax C; Menzies, Neal W

    2010-02-01

    Low concentrations of some trace metals markedly reduce root elongation rate and cause ruptures to root rhizodermal and outer cortical cells in the elongation zone. The interactions between the trace metals and plant components responsible for these effects are not well understood but may be linked to changes in water uptake, cell turgor and cell wall extensibility. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Al, La, Cu, Gd, Sc and Ru on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of bacterial cellulose (BC)-pectin composites, used as plant cell wall analogs. Hydraulic conductivity was reduced to approximately 30% of the initial flow rate by 39 microM Al and 0.6 microM Cu, approximately 40% by 4.6 microM La, 3 microM Sc and 4.4 microM Ru and approximately 55% by 3.4 microM Gd. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed changes in the ultrastructure of the composites. The results suggest that trace metal binding decreases the hydraulic conductivity through changes in pectin porosity. The experiment illustrates the importance of metal interactions with pectin, and the implications of such an interaction in plant metal toxicity and in normal cell wall processes. PMID:20053181

  15. Possible Dynamically Gated Conductance along Heme Wires in Bacterial Multiheme Cytochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2014-07-24

    The staggered cross decaheme configuration of electron transfer co-factors in the outer-membrane cytochrome MtrF may serve as a prototype for conformationally-gated multi-heme electron transport. Derived from the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis, the staggered cross configuration reveals intersecting c-type octaheme and tetraheme “wires” containing thermodynamic “hills” and “valleys”, suggesting that the protein structure may include a dynamical mechanism for conductance and pathway switching depending on enzymatic functional need. Recent molecular simulations have established the pair-wise electronic couplings, redox potentials, and reorganization energies to predict the maximum conductance along the various heme wire pathways by sequential hopping of a single electron (PNAS (2014) 11,611-616). Here, we expand this information with classical molecular and statistical mechanics calculations of large-amplitude protein dynamics in MtrF, to address its potential to modulate pathway conductance, including assessment of the effect of the total charge state. Explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of fully oxidized and fully reduced MtrF employing ten independent 50-ns simulations at 300 K and 1 atm showed that reduced MtrF is more expanded and explores more conformational space than oxidized MtrF, and that heme reduction leads to increased heme solvent exposure. The slowest mode of collective decaheme motion is 90% similar between the oxidized and reduced states, and consists primarily of inter-heme separation with minor rotational contributions. The frequency of this motion is 1.7×107 s 1 for fully-oxidized and fully-reduced MtrF, respectively, slower than the downhill electron transfer rates between stacked heme pairs at the octaheme termini and faster than the electron transfer rates between parallel hemes in the tetraheme chain. This implies that MtrF uses slow conformational fluctuations to modulate electron flow along the octaheme pathway

  16. Possible dynamically gated conductance along heme wires in bacterial multiheme cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dayle M A; Rosso, Kevin M

    2014-07-24

    The staggered cross decaheme configuration of electron transfer cofactors in the outer-membrane cytochrome MtrF serves as a prototype for conformationally gated multiheme electron transport. Derived from the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis, the staggered cross configuration reveals intersecting c-type octaheme and tetraheme "wires" containing thermodynamic "hills" and "valleys" (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2014, 11, 611-616), suggesting that the protein structure may include a dynamical mechanism for conductance and pathway switching depending on enzymatic functional need. Here, we applied classical molecular and statistical mechanics calculations of large-amplitude protein dynamics in MtrF, to address its potential to modulate pathway conductance, including assessment of the effect of the total charge state. Explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of fully oxidized and fully reduced MtrF showed that the slowest mode of collective decaheme motion is 90% similar between the oxidized and reduced states and consists primarily of interheme separation with minor rotational contributions. The frequency of this motion is 1.7 × 10(7) s(-1), both for fully oxidized and fully reduced MtrF, slower than the downhill electron transfer rates between stacked heme pairs at the octaheme termini and faster than the electron transfer rates between parallel hemes in the tetraheme chain. This implies that MtrF uses slow conformational fluctuations to modulate electron flow along the octaheme pathway, apparently for the purpose of increasing the residence time of electrons on lowest potential hemes 4 and 9. This apparent gating mechanism should increase the success rate of electron transfer from MtrF to low potential environmental acceptors via these two solvent-exposed hemes.

  17. Synthesis of silver nanowires using hydrothermal technique for flexible transparent electrode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijila, C. V. Mary; Rahman, K. K. Arsina; Parvathy, N. S.; Jayaraj, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    Transparent conducting films are becoming increasingly interesting because of their applications in electronics industry such as their use in solar energy applications. In this work silver nanowires were synthesized using solvothermal method by reducing silver nitrate and adding sodium chloride for assembling silver into nanowires. Absorption spectra of nanowires in the form of a dispersion in deionized water, AFM and SEM images confirm the nanowire formation. Solution of nanowire was coated over PET films to obtain transparent conducting films.

  18. Stoichiometry of the large conductance bacterial mechanosensitive channel of E. coli. A biochemical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukharev, S. I.; Schroeder, M. J.; McCaslin, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    both double and triple tandems form channels of normal conductance implies that the pentameric assembly is to some degree independent of the number of subunit repeats in the polypeptide precursor. The channel is thus a pentameric core with the 'extra' subunits left out of the functional complex. From sedimentation equilibrium and size-exclusion chromatography, we also conclude that MscL complexes are not in a dynamic equilibrium with monomers, but are pre-assembled; and thus, their gating properties must result from changes in the conformation of the entire complex induced by the mechanical stress.

  19. Electrochemically grown single-nanowire sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Penner, Reginald M.; Bangar, Mangesh; Mulchandani, Ashok; Myung, Nosang V.

    2004-12-01

    We report a fabrication technique that is potentially capable of producing arrays of individually addressable nanowire sensors with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. The concept has been demonstrated with electrodeposition of palladium wires with 75 nm to 350 nm widths. We have also fabricated single and double conducting polymer nanowires (polyaniline and polypyrrole) with 100nm and 200nm widths using electrochemical direct growth. Using single Pd nanowires, we have also demonstrated hydrogen sensing. It is envisioned that these are the first steps towards nanowire sensor arrays capable of simultaneously detecting multiple chemical species.

  20. Bacterial cellulose composites: Synthetic strategies and multiple applications in bio-medical and electro-conductive fields.

    PubMed

    Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Shaukat; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Park, Joong Kon

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), owing to its pure nature and impressive physicochemical properties, including high mechanical strength, crystallinity, porous fibrous structure, and liquid absorbing capabilities, has emerged as an advanced biomaterial. To match the market demand and economic values, BC has been produced through a number of synthetic routes, leading to slightly different structural features and physical appearance. Chemical nature, porous geometry, and 3D fibrous structure of BC make it an ideal material for composites synthesis that successfully overcome certain deficiencies of pure BC. In this review, we have focused various strategies developed for synthesizing BC and BC composites. Reinforcement materials including nanoparticles and polymers have enhanced the antimicrobial, conducting, magnetic, biocompatible, and mechanical properties of BC. Both pure BC and its composites have shown impressive applications in medical fields and in the development of optoelectronic devices. Herein, we have given a special attention to discuss its applications in the medical and electronic fields. In conclusion, BC and BC composites have realistic potential to be used in future development of medical devices, artificial organs and electronic and conducting materials. The contents discussed herein will provide an eye-catching theme to the researchers concerned with practical applications of BC and BC composites.

  1. Nanostructured bacterial cellulose-poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) composite membranes with high storage modulus and protonic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gadim, Tiago D O; Figueiredo, Andrea G P R; Rosero-Navarro, Nataly C; Vilela, Carla; Gamelas, José A F; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R; Figueiredo, Filipe M L

    2014-05-28

    The present study reports the development of a new generation of bio-based nanocomposite proton exchange membranes based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and poly(4-styrene sulfonic acid) (PSSA), produced by in situ free radical polymerization of sodium 4-styrenesulfonate using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, followed by conversion of the ensuing polymer into the acidic form. The BC nanofibrilar network endows the composite membranes with excellent mechanical properties at least up to 140 °C, a temperature where either pure PSSA or Nafion are soft, as shown by dynamic mechanical analysis. The large concentration of sulfonic acid groups in PSSA is responsible for the high ionic exchange capacity of the composite membranes, reaching 2.25 mmol g(-1) for a composite with 83 wt % PSSA/PEGDA. The through-plane protonic conductivity of the best membrane is in excess of 0.1 S cm(-1) at 94 °C and 98% relative humidity (RH), decreasing to 0.042 S cm(-1) at 60% RH. These values are comparable or even higher than those of ionomers such as Nafion or polyelectrolytes such as PSSA. This combination of electric and viscoelastic properties with low cost underlines the potential of these nanocomposites as a bio-based alternative to other polymer membranes for application in fuel cells, redox flow batteries, or other devices requiring functional proton conducting elements, such as sensors and actuators.

  2. Phase coherent transport in InSb nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huijun; Yusuf Günel, Hacı; Blömers, Christian; Weis, Karl; Chi, Junhong; Grace Lu, Jia; Liu, Jie; Grützmacher, Detlev; Schäpers, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Comprehensive electrical transport studies are performed on InSb nanowires by varying temperature, gate voltage, and magnetic field. The 3-dimensional bulk conduction is found to dominate in the nanowire channel after investigating a large number of nanowires with different diameters, which show approximately a linear relation between the conductance normalized to the length and the wire cross section. At low temperatures, universal conductance fluctuations are observed. From the amplitude and the correlation voltage of the conductance fluctuations, the phase-coherence length in InSb nanowires is determined at various temperatures.

  3. Phase coherent transport in hollow InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, T.; Rosien, M.; Haas, F.; Rieger, T.; Lepsa, M. I.; Lüth, H.; Grützmacher, D.; Schäpers, Th.; Demarina, N.

    2014-09-15

    Hollow InAs nanowires are produced from GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires by wet chemical etching of the GaAs core. At room temperature, the resistivity of several nanowires is measured before and after removal of the GaAs core. The observed change in resistivity is explained by simulating the electronic states in both structures. At cryogenic temperatures, quantum transport in hollow InAs nanowires is studied. Flux periodic conductance oscillations are observed when the magnetic field is oriented parallel to the nanowire axis.

  4. Failure of silver nanowire transparent electrodes under current flow

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes have received much attention as a replacement for indium tin oxide, particularly in organic solar cells. In this paper, we show that when silver nanowire electrodes conduct current at levels encountered in organic solar cells, the electrodes can fail in as little as 2 days. Electrode failure is caused by Joule heating which causes the nanowires to breakup and thus create an electrical discontinuity in the nanowire film. More heat is created, and thus failure occurs sooner, in more resistive electrodes and at higher current densities. Suggestions to improve the stability of silver nanowire electrodes are given. PMID:23680014

  5. Nanowires for thermal energy conversion and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renkun

    This dissertation presents the application of nanowires in two aspects of thermal energy conversion and management: (i) silicon (Si) nanowires as efficient and scalable thermoelectric materials due to the reduced thermal conductivity (k), and (ii) Si and copper (Cu) nanowire arrays for enhanced phase change heat transfer including boiling and evaporation and their applications in thermal management of microelectronics. In the first half of the thesis (chapter 2 and 3), we describe thermal and thermoelectric measurements of individual Si nanowires for studying phonon transport properties and their potential application in thermoelectrics. A theoretical model based on coherent phonon scattering was developed to explain the experiemental data, which suggests that phonon-boundary scattering is highly frequency dependent. For low frequency (long wavelength) phonons, the transport is nearly ballistic, whereas high frequency or short wavelength phonons scatter diffusively at nanowire boundary. The competition between the two phonon transmission regimes results in the unusual linear behavior of the thermal conductance of thin VLS Si nanowires at low temperature. Next, the thermal conductivity of EE Si nanowires, which have much rougher surface compared to VLS nanowires, was measured and found to be five-eight times lower than that of VLS counterparts with similar diameters. The substantial reduction in k is presumably due to the higher surface roughness, since both types of nanowires have single crystalline cores. In particular, for ˜ 50 nm EE Si nanowires etched from 0.1 O-cm B-doped p-Si <111> (˜2 x 1017 cm-3 dopant concentration), the k is around 1.6 Wm-1K-1 and the kL is ˜1.2 Wm-1 K-1 at room temperature, approaching that of amorphous Si. The single nanowire measurements show the great promise of using Si nanowire arrays as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials. As the second focus of the thesis (chapter 4 and 5), nanowire arrays were used for enhanced

  6. Transparent nanowire network electrode for textured semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinwei; Pei, Ke; Sun, Tianyi; Wang, Yaohui; Zhang, Linghai; Peng, Weijin; Lin, Qinggeng; Giersig, Michael; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Wang, Yang

    2013-03-11

    This work presents an inexpensive and easily manufacturable, highly conductive and transparent nanowire network electrode for textured semiconductors. It is based on lines of silver nanoparticles transformed into a nanowire network by microwave or furnace sintering. The nanonetwork electrode on crystalline silicon is demonstrated experimentally, with the nanoparticles self-assembling in the valleys between the pyramids of the textured surface. Optical experiments show that this conductive nanowire network electrode can be essentially 'invisible' when covered with the conventional anti-reflection coating (ARC), and thus could be employed in photovoltaic applications.

  7. Multilevel correlations in the biological phosphorus removal process: From bacterial enrichment to conductivity-based metabolic batch tests and polyphosphatase assays.

    PubMed

    Weissbrodt, David G; Maillard, Julien; Brovelli, Alessandro; Chabrelie, Alexandre; May, Jonathan; Holliger, Christof

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater relies on the preferential selection of active polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in the underlying bacterial community continuum. Efficient management of the bacterial resource requires understanding of population dynamics as well as availability of bioanalytical methods for rapid and regular assessment of relative abundances of active PAOs and their glycogen-accumulating competitors (GAO). A systems approach was adopted here toward the investigation of multilevel correlations from the EBPR bioprocess to the bacterial community, metabolic, and enzymatic levels. Two anaerobic-aerobic sequencing-batch reactors were operated to enrich activated sludge in PAOs and GAOs affiliating with "Candidati Accumulibacter and Competibacter phosphates", respectively. Bacterial selection was optimized by dynamic control of the organic loading rate and the anaerobic contact time. The distinct core bacteriomes mainly comprised populations related to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, and Chloroflexi in the PAO enrichment and of Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Sphingobacteria in the GAO enrichment. An anaerobic metabolic batch test based on electrical conductivity evolution and a polyphosphatase enzymatic assay were developed for rapid and low-cost assessment of the active PAO fraction and dephosphatation potential of activated sludge. Linear correlations were obtained between the PAO fraction, biomass specific rate of conductivity increase under anaerobic conditions, and polyphosphate-hydrolyzing activity of PAO/GAO mixtures. The correlations between PAO/GAO ratios, metabolic activities, and conductivity profiles were confirmed by simulations with a mathematical model developed in the aqueous geochemistry software PHREEQC.

  8. Multilevel correlations in the biological phosphorus removal process: From bacterial enrichment to conductivity-based metabolic batch tests and polyphosphatase assays.

    PubMed

    Weissbrodt, David G; Maillard, Julien; Brovelli, Alessandro; Chabrelie, Alexandre; May, Jonathan; Holliger, Christof

    2014-12-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater relies on the preferential selection of active polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in the underlying bacterial community continuum. Efficient management of the bacterial resource requires understanding of population dynamics as well as availability of bioanalytical methods for rapid and regular assessment of relative abundances of active PAOs and their glycogen-accumulating competitors (GAO). A systems approach was adopted here toward the investigation of multilevel correlations from the EBPR bioprocess to the bacterial community, metabolic, and enzymatic levels. Two anaerobic-aerobic sequencing-batch reactors were operated to enrich activated sludge in PAOs and GAOs affiliating with "Candidati Accumulibacter and Competibacter phosphates", respectively. Bacterial selection was optimized by dynamic control of the organic loading rate and the anaerobic contact time. The distinct core bacteriomes mainly comprised populations related to the classes Betaproteobacteria, Cytophagia, and Chloroflexi in the PAO enrichment and of Gammaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Sphingobacteria in the GAO enrichment. An anaerobic metabolic batch test based on electrical conductivity evolution and a polyphosphatase enzymatic assay were developed for rapid and low-cost assessment of the active PAO fraction and dephosphatation potential of activated sludge. Linear correlations were obtained between the PAO fraction, biomass specific rate of conductivity increase under anaerobic conditions, and polyphosphate-hydrolyzing activity of PAO/GAO mixtures. The correlations between PAO/GAO ratios, metabolic activities, and conductivity profiles were confirmed by simulations with a mathematical model developed in the aqueous geochemistry software PHREEQC. PMID:24975745

  9. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  10. Electrodeposited germanium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mahenderkar, Naveen K; Liu, Ying-Chau; Koza, Jakub A; Switzer, Jay A

    2014-09-23

    Germanium (Ge) is a group IV semiconductor with superior electronic properties compared with silicon, such as larger carrier mobilities and smaller effective masses. It is also a candidate anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Here, a simple, one-step method is introduced to electrodeposit dense arrays of Ge nanowires onto indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates from aqueous solution. The electrochemical reduction of ITO produces In nanoparticles that act as a reduction site for aqueous Ge(IV) species, and as a solvent for the crystallization of Ge nanowires. Nanowires deposited at 95 °C have an average diameter of 100 nm, whereas those deposited at room temperature have an average diameter of 35 nm. Both optical absorption and Raman spectroscopy suggest that the electrodeposited Ge is degenerate. The material has an indirect bandgap of 0.90-0.92 eV, compared with a value of 0.67 eV for bulk, intrinsic Ge. The blue shift is attributed to the Moss-Burstein effect, because the material is a p-type degenerate semiconductor. On the basis of the magnitude of the blue shift, the hole concentration is estimated to be 8 × 10(19) cm(-3). This corresponds to an In impurity concentration of about 0.2 atom %. The resistivity of the wires is estimated to be 4 × 10(-5) Ω·cm. The high conductivity of the wires should make them ideal for lithium-ion battery applications. PMID:25157832

  11. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihuan; Nabet, Bahram

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in "volumetric modes,"which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry-Perot (FP), and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD) simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width), tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal), core-shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs) form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption) and downward transitions (emission) of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this "rate management" scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  12. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  13. Phonon Engineering in Isotopically Disordered Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Givan, U; Senz, S; Bergeron, A; Francoeur, S; de la Mata, M; Arbiol, J; Sekiguchi, T; Itoh, K M; Isheim, D; Seidman, D N; Moutanabbir, O

    2015-06-10

    The introduction of stable isotopes in the fabrication of semiconductor nanowires provides an additional degree of freedom to manipulate their basic properties, design an entirely new class of devices, and highlight subtle but important nanoscale and quantum phenomena. With this perspective, we report on phonon engineering in metal-catalyzed silicon nanowires with tailor-made isotopic compositions grown using isotopically enriched silane precursors (28)SiH4, (29)SiH4, and (30)SiH4 with purity better than 99.9%. More specifically, isotopically mixed nanowires (28)Si(x)(30)Si(1-x) with a composition close to the highest mass disorder (x ∼ 0.5) were investigated. The effect of mass disorder on the phonon behavior was elucidated and compared to that in isotopically pure (29)Si nanowires having a similar reduced mass. We found that the disorder-induced enhancement in phonon scattering in isotopically mixed nanowires is unexpectedly much more significant than in bulk crystals of close isotopic compositions. This effect is explained by a nonuniform distribution of (28)Si and (30)Si isotopes in the grown isotopically mixed nanowires with local compositions ranging from x = ∼0.25 to 0.70. Moreover, we also observed that upon heating, phonons in (28)Si(x)(30)Si(1-x) nanowires behave remarkably differently from those in (29)Si nanowires suggesting a reduced thermal conductivity induced by mass disorder. Using Raman nanothermometry, we found that the thermal conductivity of isotopically mixed (28)Si(x)(30)Si(1-x) nanowires is ∼30% lower than that of isotopically pure (29)Si nanowires in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  14. Novel nanowire heterostructures for nanoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising candidates for future nanoelectronic devices. Integration of functional materials into nanowires in the form of nanowire heterostructures can give them unique properties and novel device applications. This thesis deals with the synthesis, characterization and electronic application of core/shell nanowire heterostructures. First, a novel approach to the core/shell heterostructure, namely the atomic layer deposition (ALD) is introduced to deposit high-dielectric-constant (high-k) oxide, perovskite oxide and metal. The excellent conformality of ALD allows these materials to form uniform shells on semiconductor nanowire cores. The electrical and magnetic properties of Si/ZrO2/Ni core/shell/shell nanowires are further investigated, which shows metallic conductivity and axial alignment in a magnetic field. Next, we study the performance of semiconductor/high-k-oxide core/shell nanowires as nanowire field effect transistors (NW-FETs). The fabrication strategies are first evaluated. Then high-performance NW-FET devices with large ON/OFF ratio, sharp switching and low leakage current are demonstrated. These devices show significant gate enhancement compared to the back-gated devices and are promising to outperform state-of-the-art planar MOSFETs fabricated with top-down methods. Subsequently, a charge-trapping nanowire (CTNW) with semiconductor/multidielectric core/shell heterostructure is demonstrated. Charge-trapping in the nanowire heterostructure gives it memory function with large ON/OFF ratio and reliable switching. Charge-trapping also defines the gate response of the CTNW-FET, making it a programmable logic unit. Furthermore, the application of the CTNW heterostructure in neuromorphic circuit is investigated. CTNWs are then built into crossbar array architecture to carry out complex functions. Programming different active node patterns into the array allows it to carry out different logic operations such as XOR, adder

  15. Can antimonide-based nanowires form wurtzite crystal structure?

    PubMed

    Gorji Ghalamestani, Sepideh; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2016-02-01

    The epitaxial growth of antimonide-based nanowires has become an attractive subject due to their interesting properties required for various applications such as long-wavelength IR detectors. The studies conducted on antimonide-based nanowires indicate that they preferentially crystallize in the zinc blende (ZB) crystal structure rather than wurtzite (WZ), which is common in other III-V nanowire materials. Also, with the addition of small amounts of antimony to arsenide- and phosphide-based nanowires grown under conditions otherwise leading to WZ structure, the crystal structure of the resulting ternary nanowires favors the ZB phase. Therefore, the formation of antimonide-based nanowires with the WZ phase presents fundamental challenges and is yet to be explored, but is particularly interesting for understanding the nanowire crystal phase in general. In this study, we examine the formation of Au-seeded InSb and GaSb nanowires under various growth conditions using metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. We address the possibility of forming other phases than ZB such as WZ and 4H in binary nanowires and demonstrate the controlled formation of WZ InSb nanowires. We further discuss the fundamental aspects of WZ growth in Au-seeded antimonide-based nanowires. PMID:26763161

  16. Solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire anodes for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ian E.; Rathmell, Aaron R.; Yan, Liang; Ye, Shengrong; Flowers, Patrick F.; You, Wei; Wiley, Benjamin J.

    2014-05-01

    This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%.This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01024h

  17. Inquisition of Microcystis aeruginosa and Synechocystis nanowires: characterization and modelling.

    PubMed

    Sure, Sandeep; Torriero, Angel A J; Gaur, Aditya; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Tripathi, Chandrakant; Adholeya, Alok; Ackland, M Leigh; Kochar, Mandira

    2015-11-01

    Identification of extracellular conductive pilus-like structures (PLS) i.e. microbial nanowires has spurred great interest among scientists due to their potential applications in the fields of biogeochemistry, bioelectronics, bioremediation etc. Using conductive atomic force microscopy, we identified microbial nanowires in Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 which is an aerobic, photosynthetic microorganism. We also confirmed the earlier finding that Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 produces microbial nanowires. In contrast to the use of highly instrumented continuous flow reactors for Synechocystis reported earlier, we identified simple and optimum culture conditions which allow increased production of nanowires in both test cyanobacteria. Production of these nanowires in Synechocystis and Microcystis were found to be sensitive to the availability of carbon source and light intensity. These structures seem to be proteinaceous in nature and their diameter was found to be 4.5-7 and 8.5-11 nm in Synechocystis and M. aeruginosa, respectively. Characterization of Synechocystis nanowires by transmission electron microscopy and biochemical techniques confirmed that they are type IV pili (TFP) while nanowires in M. aeruginosa were found to be similar to an unnamed protein (GenBank : CAO90693.1). Modelling studies of the Synechocystis TFP subunit i.e. PilA1 indicated that strategically placed aromatic amino acids may be involved in electron transfer through these nanowires. This study identifies PLS from Microcystis which can act as nanowires and supports the earlier hypothesis that microbial nanowires are widespread in nature and play diverse roles.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Felter, T.; Quong, A.

    2000-03-01

    With the dimensions of components in microelectronic circuits shrinking, the phenomena associated with electronic conduction through wires and with device operation can be expected to change. For example, as the length of electrical conductors is reduced, ballistic transport will become the main mode of conduction. Sufficient reduction in the cross sectional area of conductors can lead to quantum confinement effects. Prior knowledge of the phenomena associated with decreasing size should help guide the designers of future, smaller devices in terms of geometry and materials. However, prior knowledge requires the availability of sufficiently small nanowires for experiments. To date, the smallest nanowires that have been fabricated and investigated had diameters of 8 nm. We propose to extend the investigation of these size-related phenomena by synthesizing, using a novel version of nuclear, or ion, track lithography and characterizing, physically and electrically, nanowires with diameters D of 1 to 5 nm and lengths L of 2 to 250 nm. Thus, by varying the dimensions of the nanowires, we will be able to determine experimentally when the ideas of macroscopic conductance break down and the conductance becomes dominated by quantum and ballistic effects. In our approach the nature of the small-diameter nanostructure formed can be controlled: Nanowires are formed when L/D is large, and quantum dots are formed when both L and D are small. Theoretical calculations will be performed to both guide and understand the experimental studies. We have examined several aspects of this challenging problem and generated some promising results, but the project was not extended for the second year as planned. Thus, we did not have sufficient resources to complete the proof of concept.

  19. Photocurrent enhancement of an individual gallium nitride nanowire decorated with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, Jency Pricilla; Sargent, Meredith; McIlroy, David N.

    2011-03-01

    Variation in electron transport properties of individual n-type gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire and gold decorated gallium nitride (Au-GaN) nanowire were studied with respect to laser exposure of different wavelength and intensity. Single nanowire devices were manufactured by photolithography process in nanotechnology cleanroom, were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). A drop in electrical conductivity of Au-GaN nanowire was observed relative to bare GaN nanowire. Under laser illumination, we noticed an enhancement in photocurrent in Au-GaN nanowire, which increased with increase in excitation power at ambient conditions. We present a comparative study of the opto-electrical behavior of bare GaN nanowire vs Au-GaN nanowire and explain the IV characteristics and FET characteristics with respect to the length and diameter of nanowire. USDA, UI-BANTech.

  20. Electronic transport properties of ultra-thin Ni and Ni-C nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leining; Wu, Weikang; Zhou, Yi; Ren, Hongru; Dong, Jichen; Li, Hui

    2016-02-21

    The structures and electronic transport properties of ultra-thin Ni and Ni-C nanowires obtained from carbon nanotube (CNT) templates are theoretically investigated. C atoms tend to locate at the central positions of nanowires and are surrounded by Ni atoms. Spin polarization at the Fermi level is not responsible for the spin filtration of these nanowires. Increasing C concentration can improve the resistance of nanowires by abating the number of electronic transmission channels and the coupling of electron orbitals between Ni atoms. Moreover, with the increase of diameter, the conductance of these nanowires increases as well. This study is helpful for guiding the synthesis of nanowires with desired applications. PMID:26818090

  1. A spray-coating process for highly conductive silver nanowire networks as the transparent top-electrode for small molecule organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Selzer, Franz; Weiss, Nelli; Kneppe, David; Bormann, Ludwig; Sachse, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Leo, Karl; Müller-Meskamp, Lars

    2015-02-14

    We present a novel top-electrode spray-coating process for the solution-based deposition of silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto vacuum-processed small molecule organic electronic solar cells. The process is compatible with organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic light emitting thin film transistors (OLETs) as well. By modifying commonly synthesized AgNWs with a perfluorinated methacrylate, we are able to disperse these wires in a highly fluorinated solvent. This solvent does not dissolve most organic materials, enabling a top spray-coating process for sensitive small molecule and polymer-based devices. The optimized preparation of the novel AgNW dispersion and spray-coating at only 30 °C leads to high performance electrodes directly after the deposition, exhibiting a sheet resistance of 10.0 Ω □(-1) at 87.4% transparency (80.0% with substrate). By spraying our novel AgNW dispersion in air onto the vacuum-processed organic p-i-n type solar cells, we obtain working solar cells with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.23%, compared to the air exposed reference devices employing thermally evaporated thin metal layers as the top-electrode.

  2. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K. PMID:26698787

  3. Photoluminescence of etched SiC nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Polite D., Jr.; Rich, Ryan; Zerda, T. W.

    2010-10-01

    SiC nanowires were produced from carbon nanotubes and nanosize silicon powder in a tube furnace at temperatures between 1100^oC and 1350^oC. SiC nanowires had average diameter of 30 nm and very narrow size distribution. The compound possesses a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, and excellent wear resistance. The surface of the SiC nanowires after formation is covered by an amorphous layer. The composition of that layer is not fully understood, but it is believed that in addition to amorphous SiC it contains various carbon and silicon compounds, and SiO2. The objective of the research was to modify the surface structure of these SiC nanowires. Modification of the surface was done using the wet etching method. The etched nanowires were then analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence (PL). FTIR and TEM analysis provided valid proof that the SiC nanowires were successfully etched. Also, the PL results showed that the SiC nanowire core did possess a fluorescent signal.

  4. Silicon nanowire Esaki diodes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Heinz; Bessire, Cedric; Björk, Mikael T; Schenk, Andreas; Riel, Heike

    2012-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon nanowire tunnel diodes. The silicon nanowires were grown on p-type Si substrates using Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth and in situ n-type doping. Electrical measurements reveal Esaki diode characteristics with peak current densities of 3.6 kA/cm(2), peak-to-valley current ratios of up to 4.3, and reverse current densities of up to 300 kA/cm(2) at 0.5 V reverse bias. Strain-dependent current-voltage (I-V) measurements exhibit a decrease of the peak tunnel current with uniaxial tensile stress and an increase of 48% for 1.3 GPa compressive stress along the <111> growth direction, revealing the strain dependence of the Si band structure and thus the tunnel barrier. The contributions of phonons to the indirect tunneling process were probed by conductance measurements at 4.2 K. These measurements show phonon peaks at energies corresponding to the transverse acoustical and transverse optical phonons. In addition, the low-temperature conductance measurements were extended to higher biases to identify potential impurity states in the band gap. The results demonstrate that the most likely impurity, namely, Au from the catalyst particle, is not detectable, a finding that is also supported by the excellent device properties of the Esaki diodes reported here.

  5. Electrical breakdown of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiong; Sun, Hongyu; Dai, Sheng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    Instantaneous electrical breakdown measurements of GaN and Ag nanowires are performed by an in situ transmission electron microscopy method. Our results directly reveal the mechanism that typical thermally heated semiconductor nanowires break at the midpoint, while metallic nanowires breakdown near the two ends due to the stress induced by electromigration. The different breakdown mechanisms for the nanowires are caused by the different thermal and electrical properties of the materials.

  6. A spray-coating process for highly conductive silver nanowire networks as the transparent top-electrode for small molecule organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Franz; Weiß, Nelli; Kneppe, David; Bormann, Ludwig; Sachse, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Leo, Karl; Müller-Meskamp, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel top-electrode spray-coating process for the solution-based deposition of silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto vacuum-processed small molecule organic electronic solar cells. The process is compatible with organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic light emitting thin film transistors (OLETs) as well. By modifying commonly synthesized AgNWs with a perfluorinated methacrylate, we are able to disperse these wires in a highly fluorinated solvent. This solvent does not dissolve most organic materials, enabling a top spray-coating process for sensitive small molecule and polymer-based devices. The optimized preparation of the novel AgNW dispersion and spray-coating at only 30 °C leads to high performance electrodes directly after the deposition, exhibiting a sheet resistance of 10.0 Ω □-1 at 87.4% transparency (80.0% with substrate). By spraying our novel AgNW dispersion in air onto the vacuum-processed organic p-i-n type solar cells, we obtain working solar cells with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.23%, compared to the air exposed reference devices employing thermally evaporated thin metal layers as the top-electrode.We present a novel top-electrode spray-coating process for the solution-based deposition of silver nanowires (AgNWs) onto vacuum-processed small molecule organic electronic solar cells. The process is compatible with organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic light emitting thin film transistors (OLETs) as well. By modifying commonly synthesized AgNWs with a perfluorinated methacrylate, we are able to disperse these wires in a highly fluorinated solvent. This solvent does not dissolve most organic materials, enabling a top spray-coating process for sensitive small molecule and polymer-based devices. The optimized preparation of the novel AgNW dispersion and spray-coating at only 30 °C leads to high performance electrodes directly after the deposition, exhibiting a sheet resistance of 10.0 Ω □-1 at 87

  7. Tunable electric and magnetic properties of CoxZn1-xS nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Yen; Chen, Lih-Juann; Mai, Wenjie; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2008-12-01

    We report the growth of ZnS nanowires doped with cobalt using a one-step thermal evaporation method. The magnetism of the nanowires was maintained at room temperature, and the saturated magnetization increased with cobalt contents. Current-voltage measurements of a single nanowire showed not only a linear relationship, which implies Ohmic contacts of nanowire devices, but also tunable conductivities by doping concentration.

  8. Ultrafine Metal-Organic Right Square Prism Shaped Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Otake, Ken-Ichi; Otsubo, Kazuya; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-23

    We report the structural design and control of electronic states of a new series of ultrafine metal-organic right square prism-shaped nanowires. These nanowires have a very small inner diameter of about 2.0 Å, which is larger than hydrogen and similar to xenon atomic diameters. The electronic states of nanowires can be widely controlled by substitution of structural components. Moreover, the platinum homometallic nanowire shows a 100 times higher proton conductivity than a palladium/platinum heterometallic one depending on the electronic states.

  9. Ultrafine Metal-Organic Right Square Prism Shaped Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Otake, Ken-Ichi; Otsubo, Kazuya; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-23

    We report the structural design and control of electronic states of a new series of ultrafine metal-organic right square prism-shaped nanowires. These nanowires have a very small inner diameter of about 2.0 Å, which is larger than hydrogen and similar to xenon atomic diameters. The electronic states of nanowires can be widely controlled by substitution of structural components. Moreover, the platinum homometallic nanowire shows a 100 times higher proton conductivity than a palladium/platinum heterometallic one depending on the electronic states. PMID:27080935

  10. Free-Standing Vertical Gold Nanowires from Template Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Joong

    2005-03-01

    Gold nanowires are electrochemically grown in a track-etched polycarbonate membrane inside a Teflon cell containing gold plating solution. Using this method we have grown gold nanowires with diameters in the range of 20 - 200 nm and lengths on the order of 1 - 10 um. By controlling the membrane-dissolving process, we can deposit randomly oriented nanowires with the length in the plane of a substrate, or we can leave the nanowires vertically free-standing with one end still attached to a conducting base. We are currently exploring the vertical configuration in order to study the physics of individual nanowires or groups of nanowires. Quantities of interest include the cantilever mechanical resonance frequencies and the mechanical quality factor.

  11. Solution processed semiconductor alloy nanowire arrays for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimpi, Paresh R.

    In this dissertation, we use ZnO nanowire as a model system to investigate the potential of solution routes for bandgap engineering in semiconductor nanowires. Excitingly, successful Mg-alloying into ZnO nanowire arrays has been achieved using a two-step sequential hydrothermal method at low temperature (<155°C) without using post-annealing process. Evidently, both room temperature and 40 K photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy revealed enhanced and blue-shifted near-band-edge ultraviolet (NBE UV) emission in the Mg-alloyed ZnO (ZnMgO) nanowire arrays, compared with ZnO nanowires. The specific template of densely packed ZnO nanowires is found to be instrumental in achieving the Mg alloying in low temperature solution process. By optimizing the density of ZnO nanowires and precursor concentration, 8-10 at.% of Mg content has been achieved in ZnMgO nanowires. Post-annealing treatment is conducted in oxygen-rich and oxygen-deficient environment at different temperatures and time durations on silicon and quartz substrates in order to study the structural and optical property evolution in ZnMgO nanowire arrays. Vacuum annealed ZnMgO nanowires on both substrates retained their hexagonal structures and PL results showed the enhanced but red-shifted NBE UV emission compared to ZnO nanowires with visible emission nearly suppressed, suggesting the reduced defects concentration and improvement in crystallinity of the nanowires. On the contrast, for ambient annealed ZnMgO nanowires on silicon substrate, as the annealing temperature increased from 400°C to 900°C, intensity of visible emission peak across blue-green-yellow-red band (˜400-660 nm) increased whereas intensity of NBE UV peak decreased and completely got quenched. This might be due to interface diffusion of oxidized Si (SiOx) and formation of (Zn,Mg)1.7SiO4 epitaxially overcoated around individual ZnMgO nanowire. On the other hand, ambient annealed ZnMgO nanowires grown on quartz showed a ˜6-10 nm blue-shift in

  12. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance in Rough Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renkun; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Diaz Delgado, Raul; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C.; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-03-01

    Due to the disparity between electron (<10 nm) and phonon ( ˜100 nm) mean free paths in silicon, nanostructured Si could effectively block phonon transport by boundary scattering while maintaining electron transport, thereby enhancing thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT. Here we report the wafer-scale electrochemical synthesis and thermoelectric characterization of rough Si nanowires with enhanced ZT, relative to the bulk material. Single nanowire measurements show that their electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient are similar to those of bulk Si with similar dopant concentration. Thin nanowires, however, exhibit a 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity (k), yielding a large ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials.

  13. Electrospun metallic nanowires: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Abdullah; Singh Lalia, Boor; Hashaikeh, Raed; Khraisheh, Marwan

    2013-11-01

    Metals are known to have unique thermal, mechanical, electrical, and catalytic properties. On the other hand, metallic nanowires are promising materials for variety of applications such as transparent conductive film for photovoltaic devices, electrodes for batteries, as well as nano-reinforcement for composite materials. Whereas varieties of methods have been explored to synthesize metal nanowires with different characteristics, electrospinning has also been found to be successful for that purpose. Even though electrospinning of polymeric nanofibers is a well-established field, there are several challenges that need to be overcome to use the electrospinning technique for the fabrication of metallic nanowires. These challenges are mainly related to the multi-steps fabrication process and its relation to the structure evolution of the nanowires. In addition to reviewing the literature, this article identifies promising avenues for further research in this area with particular emphasis on the applications that nonwoven metal wires confined in a nano-scale can open.

  14. Thermoelectric Properties of Higher Manganese Silicide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Arden; Higgins, Jeremy; Zhou, Feng; Jin, Song; Shi, Li

    2009-03-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) have a relatively high thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of about 0.7. HMS nanowires have been synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition method. In this work, the thermoelectric properties of individual HMS nanowires are measured and analyzed to determine the role of size effects on electron and phonon transport as well as potential ZT enhancement. Measurements of Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity were performed using both suspended and substrate-based microdevices. Results show that the Seebeck coefficient of two as-synthesized 60 nm diameter nanowires between 300-400K is about 25-50% lower than that of single crystal bulk parallel to the c-axis, while the electrical conductivity values are about 25% lower than bulk single crystal in the same direction. The thermal conductivity of one 60 nm diameter nanowire at room temperature was found to be four times smaller than the bulk value along the c-axis. The large reduction in thermal conductivity and small to moderate impact on electrical transport may lead to HMS nanowires with enhanced ZT.

  15. Fabrication of multilayer nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasveer; Singh, Avtar; Kumar, Davinder; Thakur, Anup; Kaur, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Multilayer nanowires were fabricated by potentiostate ectrodeposition template synthesis method into the pores of polycarbonate membrane. In present work layer by layer deposition of two different metals Ni and Cu in polycarbonate membrane having pore size of 600 nm were carried out. It is found that the growth of nanowires is not constant, it varies with deposition time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to study the morphology of fabricated multilayer nanowires. An energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) results confirm the composition of multilayer nanowires. The result shows that multilayer nanowires formed is dense.

  16. Encoding Active Device Elements at Nanowire Tips.

    PubMed

    No, You-Shin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mankin, Max N; Day, Robert W; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2016-07-13

    Semiconductor nanowires and other one-dimensional materials are attractive for highly sensitive and spatially confined electrical and optical signal detection in biological and physical systems, although it has been difficult to localize active electronic or optoelectronic device function at one end of such one-dimensional structures. Here we report a new nanowire structure in which the material and dopant are modulated specifically at only one end of nanowires to encode an active two-terminal device element. We present a general bottom-up synthetic scheme for these tip-modulated nanowires and illustrate this with the synthesis of nanoscale p-n junctions. Electron microscopy imaging verifies the designed p-Si nanowire core with SiO2 insulating inner shell and n-Si outer shell with clean p-Si/n-Si tip junction. Electrical transport measurements with independent contacts to the p-Si core and n-Si shell exhibited a current rectification behavior through the tip and no detectable current through the SiO2 shell. Electrical measurements also exhibited an n-type response in conductance versus water-gate voltage with pulsed gate experiments yielding a temporal resolution of at least 0.1 ms and ∼90% device sensitivity localized to within 0.5 μm from the nanowire p-n tip. In addition, photocurrent experiments showed an open-circuit voltage of 0.75 V at illumination power of ∼28.1 μW, exhibited linear dependence of photocurrent with respect to incident illumination power with an estimated responsivity up to ∼0.22 A/W, and revealed localized photocurrent generation at the nanowire tip. The tip-modulated concept was further extended to a top-down/bottom-up hybrid approach that enabled large-scale production of vertical tip-modulated nanowires with a final synthetic yield of >75% with >4300 nanowires. Vertical tip-modulated nanowires were fabricated into >50 individually addressable nanowire device arrays showing diode-like current-voltage characteristics. These tip

  17. Phonon Trapping in Pearl-Necklace-Shaped Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunyang; Tai, Guoan; Zhou, Jianxin; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-12-22

    A pearl-necklace-shaped silicon nanowire, in contrast to a smooth nanowire, presents a much lower thermal conductivity due to the phonon trapping effect. By precisely controlling the pearl size and density, this reduction can be more than 70% for the structures designed in the study, which provides a unique approach for designing high-performance nanoscale thermoelectric devices. PMID:26577864

  18. Phonon Trapping in Pearl-Necklace-Shaped Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunyang; Tai, Guoan; Zhou, Jianxin; Guo, Wanlin

    2015-12-22

    A pearl-necklace-shaped silicon nanowire, in contrast to a smooth nanowire, presents a much lower thermal conductivity due to the phonon trapping effect. By precisely controlling the pearl size and density, this reduction can be more than 70% for the structures designed in the study, which provides a unique approach for designing high-performance nanoscale thermoelectric devices.

  19. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: DNA nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun; Cheng, Chuanding; Gonela, Ravikanth; Suryanarayanan, Shivashankar; Anabathula, Sathish; Dai, Kun; Haynie, Donald T.

    2006-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has been a key building block in nanotechnology since the earliest work on what is now called DNA-templated self-assembly (Alivisatos et al 1996 Nature 382 609; Mirkin et al 1996 Nature 382 607; Braun et al 1998 Nature 391 775). A range of different nanoparticles and nanoclusters have been assembled on single DNA molecules for a variety of purposes (Braun et al 1998 Nature 391 775; Richter et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 536; Park et al 2002 Science 295 1503; Mirkin 2000 Inorg. Chem. 39 2258; Keren et al 2003 Science 302 1380). Electrically conductive silver (Braun et al 1998 Nature 391 775) and palladium (Richter et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 536) nanowires, for example, have been fabricated by DNA templating for the development of interconnection of nanoelectric elements, and field effect transistors have been built by assembly of a single carbon nanotube and DNA-templated nanowires (Keren et al 2003 Science 302 1380). DNA is well suited for nanowire assembly because of its size, well organized structure, and exquisite molecular-recognition-ability-specific base pairing. This property has been used to detect nucleic acids (Park et al 2002 Science 295 1503) and anthrax (Mirkin 2000 Inorg. Chem. 39 2258) with high sensitivity and specificity. Molecular recognition can also be used to localize nanowires in electronics. Various methods, for example molecular combing, electrophoretic stretching, and hydrodynamic stretching, have been developed to orient DNA molecules on a solid support. This review focuses on methods used to manipulate and metallize DNA in nanowire fabrication. A novel approach based on a single-stranded DNA template and molecular recognition is also discussed.

  1. Semiconductor nanowires and nanowire heterostructures: Fundamental transport phenomena and application in nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jie

    Semiconductor nanowires are emerging among the most promising family of materials to impact future electronics owing to the highly controlled growth, which has enabled predictable variation of structure and composition on multiple length scales. This thesis presents study on two critical scientific areas: understanding the potentially unique nature of 1D electrical transport in nanowires and corresponding enhancements in device performance. First, we describe using solid state reaction to transform single crystal silicon nanowires into metallic nickel silicide nanowires, which possess low resistivity and high current density. NiSi/Si nanowire heterostructures were also created with atomically sharp metal/semiconductor interface and shown to enable FETs with outstanding performance. Next we will focus on exploring the unique physics of 1D transport. Inspired by band structure engineering in planar 2D electron gas systems, we have designed and synthesized undoped Ge/Si core/shell nanowire heterostructures using the CVD method. Transport measurements on individual nanowire confirmed the formation of a hole gas and an absence of Schottky barrier at the metal contacts. Significantly, conductance quantization was observed at low temperature suggestive of ballistic transport through discrete 1D subbands. This 1D hole gas has created a new platform for studies in low-dimensional physics. Here we show studies of mesoscopic Josephson junctions using Ge/Si core/shell nanowires with superconducting contacts, which exhibit a dissipationless supercurrent. A systematic investigation of the multiple Andreev reflection phenomena as well as supercurrent quantization from quantum confinement effect in the narrow nanowire channel will be presented. Furthermore, we have utilized the 1D hole gas and incorporated high-kappa dielectrics using atomic layer deposition and metal top-gate to fabricate high performance Ge/Si nanowire FETs with scaled transconductance and on-current values 3

  2. Stoichiometry dependent electron transport and gas sensing properties of indium oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gali, Pradeep; Sapkota, Gopal; Syllaios, A J; Littler, Chris; Philipose, U

    2013-06-01

    The effect of stoichiometry of single crystalline In2O3 nanowires on electrical transport and gas sensing was investigated. The nanowires were synthesized by vapor phase transport and had diameters ranging from 80 to 100 nm and lengths between 10 and 20 μm, with a growth direction of [001]. Transport measurements revealed n-type conduction, attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the crystal lattice. As-grown In2O3 nanowires were shown to have a carrier concentration of ≈5 × 10(17) cm(-3), while nanowires that were annealed in wet O2 showed a reduced carrier concentration of less than 10(16) cm(-3). Temperature dependent conductivity measurements on the as-grown nanowires and analysis of the thermally activated Arrhenius conduction for the temperature range of 77-350 K yielded an activation energy of 0.12 eV. This is explained on the basis of carrier exchange that occurs between the surface states and the bulk of the nanowire, resulting in a depleted surface layer of thickness of the order of the Debye length (LD), estimated to be about 3-4 nm for the as-grown nanowires and about 10 times higher for the more stoichiometric nanowires. Significant changes in the electrical conductance of individual In2O3 nanowires were also observed within several seconds of exposure to NH3 and O2 gas molecules at room temperature, thus demonstrating the potential use of In2O3 nanowires as efficient miniaturized chemical sensors. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the nanowire channel conductance, and a simple energy band diagram is used to explain the change in conductivity when gas molecules adsorbed on the nanowire surface influence its electrical properties. Less stoichiometric nanowires were found to be more sensitive to oxidizing gases while more stoichiometric nanowires showed significantly enhanced response to reducing gases.

  3. Silicon Nanowire Fabric as a Lithium Ion Battery Electrode Material

    SciTech Connect

    Chockla, Aaron M.; Harris, Justin T.; Akhavan, Vahid A.; Bogart, Timothy D.; Holmberg, Vincent C.; Steinhagen, Chet; Mullins, C. Buddie; Stevenson, Keith J.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2011-11-09

    A nonwoven fabric with paperlike qualities composed of silicon nanowires is reported. The nanowires, made by the supercritical-fluid–liquid–solid process, are crystalline, range in diameter from 10 to 50 nm with an average length of >100 μm, and are coated with a thin chemisorbed polyphenylsilane shell. About 90% of the nanowire fabric volume is void space. Thermal annealing of the nanowire fabric in a reducing environment converts the polyphenylsilane coating to a carbonaceous layer that significantly increases the electrical conductivity of the material. This makes the nanowire fabric useful as a self-supporting, mechanically flexible, high-energy-storage anode material in a lithium ion battery. Anode capacities of more than 800 mA h g{sup –1} were achieved without the addition of conductive carbon or binder.

  4. Growth of silver nanowires on GaAs wafers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang

    2011-05-01

    Silver (Ag) nanowires with chemically clean surfaces have been directly grown on semi-insulating gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers through a simple solution/solid interfacial reaction (SSIR) between the GaAs wafers themselves and aqueous solutions of silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) at room temperature. The success in synthesis of Ag nanowires mainly benefits from the low concentration of surface electrons in the semi-insulating GaAs wafers that can lead to the formation of a low-density of nuclei that facilitate their anisotropic growth into nanowires. The resulting Ag nanowires exhibit rough surfaces and reasonably good electric conductivity. These characteristics are beneficial to sensing applications based on single-nanowire surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and possible surface-adsorption-induced conductivity variation.

  5. Nanoconstruction by welding individual metallic nanowires together using nanoscale solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Cullis, A. G.; Inkson, B. J.

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a new bottom-up nanowelding technique enabling building blocks to be assembled and welded together into complex 3D nanostructures using nanovolumes of metal solder. The building blocks of gold nanowires, (Co72Pt28/Pt)n multilayer nanowires, and nanosolder Sn99Au1 alloy nanowires were successfully fabricated by a template technique. Individual metallic nanowires were picked up and assembled together. Conductive nanocircuits were then welded together using similar or dissimilar nanosolder material. At the weld sites, nanoscale volumes of a chosen metal are deposited using nanosolder of a sacrificial nanowire, which ensures that the nanoobjects to be bonded retain their structural integrity. The whole nanowelding process is clean, controllable and reliable, and ensures both mechanically strong and electrically conductive contacts.

  6. Computational nanomechanics and thermal transport in nanotubes and nanowires.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Deepak; Makeev, Maxim A; Menon, Madhu; Osman, Mohamed

    2008-07-01

    Representative results of computer simulation and/or modeling studies of the nanomechanical and thermal transport properties of an individual carbon nanotube, silicon nanowire, and silicon carbide nanowire systems have been reviewed and compared with available experimental observations. The investigated nanomechanical properties include different elastic moduli of carbon nanotubes, silicon nanowires, and silicon carbide nanowires, all obtained within their elastic limits. Moreover, atomistic mechanisms of elastic to plastic transition under external stresses and yielding of carbon nanotubes under experimentally feasible temperature and strain rate conditions are discussed in detail. The simulation and/or modeling results on thermal properties, presented in this work, include vibrational modes, thermal conductivity and heat pulse transport through single carbon nanotubes, and thermal conductivity of silicon nanowires. PMID:19051922

  7. From nanodiamond to nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, A.; Materials Science Division

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the fabrication and characterization of semiconductor and metallic nanowires are proving very successful in meeting the high expectations of nanotechnologists. Although the nanoscience surrounding sp{sup 3} bonded carbon nanotubes has continued to flourish over recent years the successful synthesis of the sp{sup 3} analogue, diamond nanowires, has been limited. This prompts questions as to whether diamond nanowires are fundamentally unstable. By applying knowledge obtained from examining the structural transformations in nanodiamond, a framework for analyzing the structure and stability of diamond nanowires may be established. One possible framework will be discussed here, supported by results of ab initio density functional theory calculations used to study the structural relaxation of nanodiamond and diamond nanowires. The results show that the structural stability and electronic properties of diamond nanowires are dependent on the surface morphology, crystallographic direction of the principal axis, and the degree of surface hydrogenation.

  8. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  9. Direct electrical transport measurement on a single thermoelectric nanowire embedded in an alumina template.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedim, Meriam; Cagnon, Laurent; Garagnon, Christophe; Serradeil, Valerie; Bourgault, Daniel

    2016-04-28

    Electrical conductivity is a key parameter to increase the performance of thermoelectric materials. However, the measurement of such performance remains complex for 1D structures, involving tedious processing. In this study, we present a non-destructive, rapid and easy approach for the characterization of electrical conductivity of Bi2Te3 based single nanowires. By controlling the nanowire overgrowth, each nanowire emerges in the form of a micrometric hemisphere constituting a unique contact zone for direct nanoprobing. As nanowires need no preliminary preparation and remain in their template during measurement, we avoid oxidation effects and time-consuming processing. Electrical transport results show a low nanowire resistivity for compact nanowires obtained at low overpotential. Such values are comparable to bulk materials and thin films. This method not only confirmed its reliability, but it could also be adopted for other semiconducting or metallic electrodeposited nanowires. PMID:27086560

  10. First-principles study of structural & electronic properties of pyramidal silicon nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariwala, Pinank; Singh, Deobrat; Sonvane, Y. A.; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the stable structural and electronic properties of Silicon (Si) nanowires having different cross-sections with 5-7 Si atoms per unit cell. These properties of the studied Si nanowires were significantly changed from those of diamond bulk Si structure. The binding energy increases as increasing atoms number per unit cell in different SiNWs structures. All the nanowires structures are behave like metallic rather than semiconductor in bulk systems. In general, the number of conduction channels increases when the nanowire becomes thicker. The density of charge revealed delocalized metallic bonding for all studied Si nanowires.

  11. Elastic properties of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Alexandre F.; Malta, C. P.; Galva~O, Douglas S.

    2006-05-01

    We present a model to study Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the composite material of amorphous nanowires. It is an extension of the model derived by two of us [da Fonseca and Galva~o, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 175502 (2004)] to study the elastic properties of amorphous nanosprings. The model is based on twisting and tensioning a straight nanowire and we propose an experimental setup to obtain the elastic parameters of the nanowire. We used the Kirchhoff rod model to obtain the expressions for the elastic constants of the nanowire.

  12. Superconducting qubits with semiconductor nanowire Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, K. D.; Larsen, T. W.; Kuemmeth, F.; Jespersen, T. S.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Marcus, C. M.

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting transmon qubits are a promising basis for a scalable quantum information processor. The recent development of semiconducting InAs nanowires with in situ molecular beam epitaxy-grown Al contacts presents new possibilities for building hybrid superconductor/semiconductor devices using precise bottom up fabrication techniques. Here, we take advantage of these high quality materials to develop superconducting qubits with superconductor-normal-superconductor Josephson junctions (JJs) where the normal element is an InAs semiconductor nanowire. We have fabricated transmon qubits in which the conventional Al-Al2O3-Al JJs are replaced by a single gate-tunable nanowire JJ. Using spectroscopy to probe the qubit we observe fluctuations in its level splitting with gate voltage that are consistent with universal conductance fluctuations in the nanowire's normal state conductance. Our gate-tunable nanowire transmons may enable new means of control for large scale qubit architectures and hybrid topological quantum computing schemes. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation and the European Commission.

  13. Efficient Capture and Isolation of Tumor-Related Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Cancer Patients Using Electroactive Conducting Polymer Nanowire Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, SeungHyun; Lee, HyungJae; Bae, Kieun; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is currently recognized as a key non-invasive biomarker for cancer diagnosis and progression and therapeutic efficacy monitoring. Because cfDNA has been detected in patients with diverse types of cancers, the use of efficient strategies to isolate cfDNA not only provides valuable insights into tumour biology, but also offers the potential for developing new cancer-specific targets. However, the challenges associated with conventional cfDNA extraction methods prevent their further clinical applications. Here, we developed a nanostructured conductive polymer platform for the efficient capture and release of circulating cfDNA and demonstrated its potential clinical utility using unprocessed plasma samples from patients with breast and lung cancers. Our results confirmed that the platform's enhanced efficiency allows tumor-specific circulating cfDNA to be recovered at high yield and purity. PMID:27162553

  14. Electrically Controlling and Monitoring InP Nanowire Growth from Solution.

    PubMed

    Dorn, August; Allen, Peter M; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2009-10-27

    Indium phosphide nanowires are of significant technological interest for applications ranging from single junction solar cells to high speed electronics. However, the efficient placement and integration of nanowires into devices remains a significant challenge. Here we extend the technique of electrically controlled solution-liquid-solid (EC-SLS) catalytic nanowire growth to indium phosphide. We are able to control the amount of nanowire growth by varying the bias voltage between the electrodes in solution, and to monitor nanowire bridging across the electrodes by recording the conductivity as a function of growth time. The as-grown indium phosphide nanowires exhibit n-type conductivity as was determined by the in situ integration of nanowires into a field effect transistor geometry. The ability to monitor nanowire growth and electrically control nanowire placement are valuable tools for fabricating nanowire devices. The EC-SLS process has the potential to aid in the fabrication of nanowire devices that could find applications in nanoelectronics, and as electrodes in solar cells and batteries.

  15. One-step synthesis of vertically aligned anatase thornbush-like TiO2 nanowire arrays on transparent conducting oxides for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dong Kyu; Chi, Won Seok; Ahn, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Harim; Kim, Jong Hak

    2013-08-01

    Herein, we report a facile synthesis of high-density anatase-phase vertically aligned thornbush-like TiO2 nanowires (TBWs) on transparent conducting oxide glasses. Morphologically controllable TBW arrays of 9 μm in length are generated through a one-step hydrothermal reaction at 200 °C over 11 h using potassium titanium oxide oxalate dehydrate, diethylene glycol (DEG), and water. The TBWs consist of a large number of nanoplates or nanorods, as confirmed by SEM and TEM imaging. The morphologies of TBWs are controllable by adjusting DEG/water ratios. TBW diameters gradually decrease from 600 (TBW600) to 400 (TBW400) to 200 nm (TBW200) and morphologies change from nanoplates to nanorods with an increase in DEG content. TBWs are utilized as photoanodes for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (qssDSSCs) and solid-state DSSCs (ssDSSCs). The energy-conversion efficiency of qssDSSCs is in the order: TBW200 (5.2%)>TBW400 (4.5%)>TBW600 (3.4%). These results can be attributed to the different surface areas, light-scattering effects, and charge transport rates, as confirmed by dye-loading measurements, reflectance spectroscopy, and incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy/intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy analyses. TBW200 is further treated with a graft-copolymer-directed organized mesoporous TiO2 to increase the surface area and interconnectivity of TBWs. As a result, the energy-conversion efficiency of the ssDSSC increases to 6.7% at 100 mW cm(-2) , which is among the highest values for N719-dye-based ssDSSCs.

  16. Reliable Fabrication of Metal Contacts on Silicon Nanowire Forests.

    PubMed

    Dimaggio, Elisabetta; Pennelli, Giovanni

    2016-07-13

    We present a technique for the fabrication of an electrical (and thermal) contact on the top ends of a large number of vertical silicon nanowires, which are fabricated perpendicularly to a silicon wafer (silicon nanowire forest). The technique is based on electrochemical deposition of copper and has been developed on silicon nanowire forests, fabricated by metal assisted chemical etching. We demonstrate that copper grows selectively only on the top end of the silicon nanowires, forming a layer onto the top of the forest. The presence of a predeposited metal seed is fundamental for the selective growth, meanwhile the process is very strong with respect to other parameters, such as concentration of the electrolytic solution and current density, used during the metal deposition. Typical I-V characteristics of top-to-bottom conduction through silicon nanowire forests with different n-doping are shown and discussed. PMID:27351210

  17. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-04-01

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear "super-Joule" self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors.

  18. Electrochemical fountain pen nanofabrication of vertically grown platinum nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryavanshi, Abhijit P.; Yu, Min-Feng

    2007-03-01

    Local electrochemical deposition of freestanding platinum nanowires was demonstrated with a new approach—electrochemical fountain pen nanofabrication (ec-FPN). The ec-FPN exploits the meniscus formed between an electrolyte-filled nanopipette ('the fountain pen') and a conductive substrate to serve as a confined electrochemical cell for reducing and depositing metal ions. Freestanding Pt nanowires were continuously grown off the substrate by moving the nanopipette away from the substrate while maintaining a stable meniscus between the nanopipette and the nanowire growth front. High quality and high aspect-ratio polycrystalline Pt nanowires with diameter of ~150 nm and length over 30 µm were locally grown with ec-FPN. The ec-FPN technique is shown to be an efficient and clean technique for localized fabrication of a variety of vertically grown metal nanowires and can potentially be used for fabricating freeform 3D nanostructures.

  19. Fabrication of graphitic nanowire structure by electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kazuyuki; Enoki, Toshiaki

    2007-12-01

    The graphitic nanowire structure was fabricated by local graphitization induced by direct electron-beam irradiation or the annealing treatment of wire-shaped nano-sized pattern, where glassy carbon film was used as the precursor materials. The direct irradiation of the 50 keV electron beam hardly causes the local graphitization of the sample, while the annealing of nanowire-patterned glassy carbon with 50 nm width successfully gives graphitic nanowire structure. The electrical conductivity of the fabricated nanowire structure shows metallic temperature dependence. However, the graphitic domain size of the wire was found to be very small (ca. 5 nm) by using Raman spectroscopy and the magnetoresistance. Higher temperature annealing is expected to improve the crystallinity of the graphitic nanowire.

  20. Super-Joule heating in graphene and silver nanowire network

    SciTech Connect

    Maize, Kerry; Das, Suprem R.; Sadeque, Sajia; Mohammed, Amr M. S.; Shakouri, Ali E-mail: alam@purdue.edu; Janes, David B.; Alam, Muhammad A. E-mail: alam@purdue.edu

    2015-04-06

    Transistors, sensors, and transparent conductors based on randomly assembled nanowire networks rely on multi-component percolation for unique and distinctive applications in flexible electronics, biochemical sensing, and solar cells. While conduction models for 1-D and 1-D/2-D networks have been developed, typically assuming linear electronic transport and self-heating, the model has not been validated by direct high-resolution characterization of coupled electronic pathways and thermal response. In this letter, we show the occurrence of nonlinear “super-Joule” self-heating at the transport bottlenecks in networks of silver nanowires and silver nanowire/single layer graphene hybrid using high resolution thermoreflectance (TR) imaging. TR images at the microscopic self-heating hotspots within nanowire network and nanowire/graphene hybrid network devices with submicron spatial resolution are used to infer electrical current pathways. The results encourage a fundamental reevaluation of transport models for network-based percolating conductors.

  1. Reliable Fabrication of Metal Contacts on Silicon Nanowire Forests.

    PubMed

    Dimaggio, Elisabetta; Pennelli, Giovanni

    2016-07-13

    We present a technique for the fabrication of an electrical (and thermal) contact on the top ends of a large number of vertical silicon nanowires, which are fabricated perpendicularly to a silicon wafer (silicon nanowire forest). The technique is based on electrochemical deposition of copper and has been developed on silicon nanowire forests, fabricated by metal assisted chemical etching. We demonstrate that copper grows selectively only on the top end of the silicon nanowires, forming a layer onto the top of the forest. The presence of a predeposited metal seed is fundamental for the selective growth, meanwhile the process is very strong with respect to other parameters, such as concentration of the electrolytic solution and current density, used during the metal deposition. Typical I-V characteristics of top-to-bottom conduction through silicon nanowire forests with different n-doping are shown and discussed.

  2. Structural characterization of nanowires and nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Catherine Rose

    Nanowires, which have diameter less than a few hundred nanometers and high aspect ratios, may have the same properties as their corresponding bulk materials, or may exhibit unique properties due to their confined dimensions and increased surface to volume ratios. They are a popular field of technological investigation in applications that depend on the transport of charge carriers, because of expectations that microcircuit miniaturization will lead to the next boom in the electronics industry. In this work, the high spatial resolution afforded by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study nanowires formed by electrochemical deposition into porous alumina templates. The goal is to determine the effect of the synthesis and subsequent processing on the microstructure and crystallinity of the wires. A thorough understanding of the microstructural features of a material is vital for optimizing its performance in a desired application. Two material systems were studied in this work. The first is bismuth telluride (Bi 2Te3), which is used in thermoelectric applications. The second is metallic copper, the electrochemical deposition of which is of interest for interconnects in semiconductor devices. The first part of this work utilized TEM to obtain a thorough characterization of the microstructural features of individual Bi2Te3 nanowires following release from the templates. As deposited, the nanowires are fine grained and exhibit significant lattice strain. Annealing increases the grain size and dislocations are created to accommodate the lattice strain. The degree of these microstructural changes depends on the thermal treatment. However, no differences were seen in the nanowire microstructure as a function of the synthetic parameters. The second part of this work utilized a modified dark field TEM technique in order to obtain a spatially resolved, semi-quantitative understanding of the evolution of preferred orientation as a function of the electrochemical

  3. NANOWIRE CATHODE MATERIAL FOR LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect

    John Olson, PhD

    2004-07-21

    This project involved the synthesis of nanowire ã-MnO2 and characterization as cathode material for high-power lithium-ion batteries for EV and HEV applications. The nanowire synthesis involved the edge site decoration nanowire synthesis developed by Dr. Reginald Penner at UC Irvine (a key collaborator in this project). Figure 1 is an SEM image showing ã-MnO2 nanowires electrodeposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes. This technique is unique to other nanowire template synthesis techniques in that it produces long (>500 um) nanowires which could reduce or eliminate the need for conductive additives due to intertwining of fibers. Nanowire cathode for lithium-ion batteries with surface areas 100 times greater than conventional materials can enable higher power batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The synthesis of the ã-MnO2 nanowires was successfully achieved. However, it was not found possible to co-intercalate lithium directly in the nanowire synthesis. Based on input from proposal reviewers, the scope of the project was altered to attempt the conversion into spinel LiMn2O4 nanowire cathode material by solid state reaction of the ã-MnO2 nanowires with LiNO3 at elevated temperatures. Attempts to perform the conversion on the graphite template were unsuccessful due to degradation of the graphite apparently caused by oxidative attack by LiNO3. Emphasis then shifted to quantitative removal of the nanowires from the graphite, followed by the solid state reaction. Attempts to quantitatively remove the nanowires by several techniques were unsatisfactory due to co-removal of excess graphite or poor harvesting of nanowires. Intercalation of lithium into ã-MnO2 electrodeposited onto graphite was demonstrated, showing a partial demonstration of the ã-MnO2 material as a lithium-ion battery cathode material. Assuming the issues of nanowires removal can be solved, the technique does offer potential for creating

  4. Nanocrystalline nanowires: I. Structure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Philip B

    2007-01-01

    Geometric constructions of possible atomic arrangements are suggested for inorganic nanowires. These are fragments of bulk crystals, and can be called "nanocrystalline" nanowires (NCNW). To minimize surface polarity, nearly one-dimensional formula units, oriented along the growth axis, generate NCNWs by translation and rotation.

  5. Metallic nanowire networks

    DOEpatents

    Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A.

    2012-11-06

    A metallic nanowire network synthesized using chemical reduction of a metal ion source by a reducing agent in the presence of a soft template comprising a tubular inverse micellar network. The network of interconnected polycrystalline nanowires has a very high surface-area/volume ratio, which makes it highly suitable for use in catalytic applications.

  6. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  7. Features of transport in ultrathin gold nanowire structures.

    PubMed

    Pud, Sergii; Kisner, Alexandre; Heggen, Marc; Belaineh, Dagmawi; Temirov, Ruslan; Simon, Ulrich; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Mourzina, Yulia; Vitusevich, Svetlana

    2013-03-25

    The origin of the interface formation appearing due to the realization of contacts to ultrathin gold nanowire devices is revealed. Such interfaces play an important role in transport mechanisms in nanowire structures and can determine the electrical and operating parameters of a nanodevice. Based on experimental results, the specific electrical properties of bundles of ultrathin gold nanowires fabricated by wet chemical synthesis and subsequently assembled and contacted with gold electrodes are reported. It is demonstrated that these properties are strongly affected by the monolayers of organic molecules inevitably present on the surface of the nanowires due to synthetic conditions. In particular, such layers form a potential barrier to tunneling of the electrons from contacts to the nanowires. The electric transport behavior of the investigated nanowire structures in the temperature range from 500 mK to 300 K obeys the model of thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling conduction through the nanowire-metal electrode molecular junction. Application of this model allows calculation of the parameters of the molecular potential barrier. The formation of such a molecular barrier is verified by scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements performed using a supporting graphene layer. These findings are important for designing novel nanodevices for molecular electronics on the basis of ultrathin nanowires.

  8. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  9. Effects of length dispersity and film fabrication on the sheet resistance of copper nanowire transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchert, James W.; Stewart, Ian E.; Ye, Shengrong; Rathmell, Aaron R.; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Winey, Karen I.

    2015-08-01

    Development of thin-film transparent conductors (TC) based on percolating networks of metal nanowires has leaped forward in recent years, owing to the improvement of nanowire synthetic methods and modeling efforts by several research groups. While silver nanowires are the first commercially viable iteration of this technology, systems based on copper nanowires are not far behind. Here we present an analysis of TCs composed of copper nanowire networks on sheets of polyethylene terephthalate that have been treated with various oxide-removing post treatments to improve conductivity. A pseudo-2D rod network modeling approach has been modified to include lognormal distributions in length that more closely reflect experimental data collected from the nanowire TCs. In our analysis, we find that the copper nanowire TCs are capable of achieving comparable electrical performance to silver nanowire TCs with similar dimensions. Lastly, we present a method for more accurately determining the nanowire area coverage in a TC over a large area using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) to directly measure the metal content in the TCs. These developments will aid research and industry groups alike in the characterization of nanowire based TCs.Development of thin-film transparent conductors (TC) based on percolating networks of metal nanowires has leaped forward in recent years, owing to the improvement of nanowire synthetic methods and modeling efforts by several research groups. While silver nanowires are the first commercially viable iteration of this technology, systems based on copper nanowires are not far behind. Here we present an analysis of TCs composed of copper nanowire networks on sheets of polyethylene terephthalate that have been treated with various oxide-removing post treatments to improve conductivity. A pseudo-2D rod network modeling approach has been modified to include lognormal distributions in length that more closely reflect experimental data collected

  10. The Electrodeposition of Lead Telluride Nanowires for Thermoelectric Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Peter

    The electrodeposition of PbTe nanowires for thermoelectric applications is presented in this thesis. The Pb-Te electrochemical system was investigated to determine the optimal conditions for deposition. It was found that citric acid complexed tellurium in solution shifting its reduction potential cathodically. The shift in reduction potential led to the deposition of pure PbTe without any observable excess tellurium. Nanowires of PbTe were doped p-type and n-type through the addition of thallium and indium to the plating solution. Indium-doped nanowire arrays showed a linear relation between lattice parameter and atomic percent indium confirming successful incorporation. The lattice parameter trend in thallium-doped nanowire arrays was linear only after annealing. In the case of thallium doping, thallium tellurides were formed, which upon annealing formed a solid solution with PbTe. The results of the thallium doping study led to the investigation of the Tl-Te electrochemical system. Cyclic voltammagrams were used to determine the deposition mechanism of TlTe and Tl5Te3. Thin films and nanowire arrays of these compounds were deposited. This was the first study of the electrochemical Tl-Te system and the first report of the electrodeposition of TlTe and Tl5Te3. Thermoelectric measurements were conducted on thin films and nanowire arrays of PbTe. The Seebeck coefficient and resistivity of PbTe thin film were measured. Results from thin films were complicated by the Pt substrate on which PbTe was deposited. Subtracting the effects of the Pt layer suggested PbTe thin films could have a large zT, however further work is needed to confirm this result. Resistivity measurements on nanowire arrays were also conducted. Despite efforts to minimize the oxidation of PbTe nanowires, good electrical contacts could not be created. The resistivity of nanowire arrays were orders of magnitude higher than expected. As a result of their low conductivity, the thermoelectric efficiency

  11. Printing nanotube/nanowire for flexible microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2014-04-01

    Printing has become an emerging manufacturing technology for mechanics, electronics, and consumer products. Additionally, both nanotubes and nanowires have recently been used as materials for sensors and electrodes due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties. Printed electrodes and conductive traces particularly offer versatility of fabricating low-cost, disposable, and flexible electrical devices and microsystems. While various printing methods such as screen printing have been conventional methods for printing conductive traces and electrodes, inkjet printing has recently attracted great attention due to its unique advantages including no template requirement, rapid printing at low cost, on-demand printing capability, and precise control of the printed material. Computer generated conductive traces or electrode patterns can simply be printed on a thin film substrate with proper conductive ink consisting of nanotubes or nanowires. However, in order to develop nanotube or nanowire ink, there are a few challenges that need to be addressed. The most difficult obstacle to overcome is that of nanotube/nanowire dispersion within a solution. Other challenges include adjusting surface tension and controlling viscosity of the ink as well as treating the surface of the printing substrate. In an attempt to pave the way for nanomaterial inkjet printing, we present a method for preparing carbon nanotube ink as well as its printing technique. A fully printed electrochemical sensor using inkjet-printed carbon nanotube electrodes is also demonstrated as an example of the possibilities for this technology.

  12. Templated Synthesis of Uniform Perovskite Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Michael J; O'Brien, Matthew N; Hedderick, Konrad R; Mason, Jarad A; Ross, Michael B; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-08-17

    While the chemical composition of semiconducting metal halide perovskites can be precisely controlled in thin films for photovoltaic devices, the synthesis of perovskite nanostructures with tunable dimensions and composition has not been realized. Here, we describe the templated synthesis of uniform perovskite nanowires with controlled diameter (50-200 nm). Importantly, by providing three examples (CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3PbBr3, and Cs2SnI6), we show that this process is composition general and results in oriented nanowire arrays on transparent conductive substrates. PMID:27501464

  13. Nanotubes, Nanowires, and Nanocantilevers in Biosensor Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-03-08

    In this chapter, the reviews on biosensor development based on 1-D nanomaterials, CNTs, semiconducting nanowires, and some cantilevers will be introduced. The emphasis of this review will be placed on CNTs and electrochemical/electronic biosensor developments. Section 2 of this chapter gives a detailed description of carbon nanotubes-based biosensor development, from fabrication of carbon nanotubes, the strategies for construction of carbon nanotube based biosensors to their bioapplications. In the section of the applications of CNTs based biosensors, various detection principles, e. g. electrochemical, electronic, and optical method, and their applications are reviewed in detail. Section 3 introduces the method for synthesis of semiconducting nanowires, e.g. silicon nanowires, conducting polymer nanowires and metal oxide nanowires and their applications in DNA and proteins sensing. Section 4 simply describes the development for nanocantilevers based biosensors and their application in DNA and protein diagnosis. Each section starts from a brief introduction and then goes into details. Finally in the Conclusion section, the development of 1-D nanomaterials based biosensor development is summarized.

  14. Geometrically induced electron-electron interaction in semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N.; Rezvani, S. J.; Favre, L.; Berbezier, I.; Fretto, M.; Boarino, L.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of a structurally induced doping compensation mechanism in doped semiconductor nanowires that results from the reduced size geometry. This kind of compensation can significantly affect the electronic transport properties of the doped nanowires. We demonstrate that in a crystalline n-type doped Ge wire, compensated by the acceptor-like localized surface states, strong electron-electron interactions occur. Variable range hopping conduction detected in these nanowires is directly generated from strong interactions, exhibiting an unusual large Coulomb gap in the density of states of wires.

  15. Semiconductor Nanowires: What's Next?

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Peidong; Yan, Ruoxue; Fardy, Melissa

    2010-04-28

    In this perspective, we take a critical look at the research progress within the nanowire community for the past decade. We discuss issues on the discovery of fundamentally new phenomena versus performance benchmarking for many of the nanowire applications. We also notice that both the bottom-up and top-down approaches have played important roles in advancing our fundamental understanding of this new class of nanostructures. Finally we attempt to look into the future and offer our personal opinions on what the future trends will be in nanowire research.

  16. Polaronic transport and current blockades in epitaxial silicide nanowires and nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Violeta; Zhang, X-G; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Menard, Laurent D; Kent, P R C; Woodson, Michael E; Ramsey, J Michael; Li, An-Ping; Weitering, Hanno H

    2013-08-14

    Crystalline micrometer-long YSi2 nanowires with cross sections as small as 1 × 0.5 nm(2) can be grown on the Si(001) surface. Their extreme aspect ratios make electron conduction within these nanowires almost ideally one-dimensional, while their compatibility with the silicon platform suggests application as metallic interconnect in Si-based nanoelectronic devices. Here we combine bottom-up epitaxial wire synthesis in ultrahigh vacuum with top-down miniaturization of the electrical measurement probes to elucidate the electronic conduction mechanism of both individual wires and arrays of nanowires. Temperature-dependent transport through individual nanowires is indicative of thermally assisted tunneling of small polarons between atomic-scale defect centers. In-depth analysis of complex wire networks emphasize significant electronic crosstalk between the nanowires due to the long-range Coulomb fields associated with polaronic charge fluctuations. This work establishes a semiquantitative correlation between the density and distributions of atomic-scale defects and resulting current-voltage characteristics of nanoscale network devices. PMID:23902411

  17. Polaronic transport and current blockades in epitaxial silicide nanowires and nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Violeta; Zhang, X-G; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Menard, Laurent D; Kent, P R C; Woodson, Michael E; Ramsey, J Michael; Li, An-Ping; Weitering, Hanno H

    2013-08-14

    Crystalline micrometer-long YSi2 nanowires with cross sections as small as 1 × 0.5 nm(2) can be grown on the Si(001) surface. Their extreme aspect ratios make electron conduction within these nanowires almost ideally one-dimensional, while their compatibility with the silicon platform suggests application as metallic interconnect in Si-based nanoelectronic devices. Here we combine bottom-up epitaxial wire synthesis in ultrahigh vacuum with top-down miniaturization of the electrical measurement probes to elucidate the electronic conduction mechanism of both individual wires and arrays of nanowires. Temperature-dependent transport through individual nanowires is indicative of thermally assisted tunneling of small polarons between atomic-scale defect centers. In-depth analysis of complex wire networks emphasize significant electronic crosstalk between the nanowires due to the long-range Coulomb fields associated with polaronic charge fluctuations. This work establishes a semiquantitative correlation between the density and distributions of atomic-scale defects and resulting current-voltage characteristics of nanoscale network devices.

  18. Partial spin polarization of a conductance in a bi-layer In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As heterostructure based nanowire for the rectangular and the smooth lateral confinement potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-03-01

    We simulate the electron transport in a vertical bi-layer nanowire in order to study an influence of the lateral confinement's shape on a spin polarization of wire's conductance. The active part of considered quantum wire constitutes a double inverted heterojunction In0.52 Al0.48 As / In0.53 Ga0.47 As which nanostructure can be fabricated in molecular beam epitaxy process while the lateral confinement potential can be finally formed by means of cleaved overgrowth or surface oxidization methods giving the desired rectangular and smooth lateral confinement. In calculations we take into account interaction between charge carriers using DFT within local spin density approximation. We show that if the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wire axis, the pseudogaps are opened in energy dispersion relation E (k) what in conjunction with spin Zeeman shift of spin-up and spin-down subbands may enhance the spin polarization of conductance with reference to a single layer wire. For nanowire with rectangular lateral confinement potential we found that the electron density has two maximums localized at wire edges in each layers. This modificates strongly all magnetosubbands giving up to four energy minimums in lowest subband and considerably diminishes widths of pseudogaps what translates into low maximal spin polarization of conductance, not exceeding 40%. This drawback is absent in wire with smooth lateral confinement. However, in order to gain a large spin polarization simultaneous tuning of magnetic field as well as the Fermi energies in both layers of nanowire are required.

  19. Effective electrode length enhances electrical activation of nanowire networks: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Jessamyn A; Ritter, Carlos; Bellew, Allen T; McCarthy, Eoin K; Ferreira, Mauro S; Boland, John J

    2014-09-23

    Networks comprised of randomly oriented overlapping nanowires offer the possibility of simple fabrication on a variety of substrates, in contrast with the precise placement required for devices with single or aligned nanowires. Metal nanowires typically have a coating of surfactant or oxide that prevents aggregation, but also prevents electrical connection. Prohibitively high voltages can be required to electrically activate nanowire networks, and even after activation many nanowire junctions remain nonconducting. Nonelectrical activation methods can enhance conductivity but destroy the memristive behavior of the junctions that comprise the network. We show through both simulation and experiment that electrical stimulation, microstructured electrode geometry, and feature scaling can all be used to manipulate the connectivity and thus electrical conductivity of networks of silver nanowires with a nonconducting polymer coating. More generally, these results describe a strategy to integrate nanomaterials into controllable, adaptive macroscale materials.

  20. Formation of stable nanowires from ferromagnetic metals using 2-butyne-1,4-diol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Shinichi; Kiguchi, Manabu; Murakoshi, Kei

    2007-01-01

    We mechanically fabricated Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires showing conductance quantization under electrochemical potential control. The effects of 2-butyne-1,4-diol and saccharin on the stability of the nanowires were investigated by measuring the conductance and the stretched length of the nanowires. Nanowires of these ferromagnetic metals were stabilized by adding 2-butyne-1,4-diol. In Co, a monoatomic contact was stretched 0.4 nm in length, indicating the formation of a highly stable monoatomic contact of ferromagnetic metals. The improved stability of the nanowires could originate from specific adsorption of organic molecules on the contacts. Mechanical properties of these metals were considered to explain the origin of the metal-dependent stability of the nanowires.

  1. A force sensor using nanowire arrays to understand biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasana K.; Cavalli, Alessandro; Pelegati, Vitor B.; Murillo, Duber M.; Souza, Alessandra A.; Cesar, Carlos L.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the cellular signaling and function at the nano-bio interface can pave the way towards developing next-generation smart diagnostic tools. From this perspective, limited reports detail so far the cellular and subcellular forces exerted by bacterial cells during the interaction with abiotic materials. Nanowire arrays with high aspect ratio have been used to detect such small forces. In this regard, live force measurements were performed ex-vivo during the interaction of Xylella fastidiosa bacterial cells with InP nanowire arrays. The influence of nanowire array topography and surface chemistry on the response and motion of bacterial cells was studied in detail. The nanowire arrays were also functionalized with different cell adhesive promoters, such as amines and XadA1, an afimbrial protein of X.fastidiosa. By employing the well-defined InP nanowire arrays platform, and single cell confocal imaging system, we were able to trace the bacterial growth pattern, and show that their initial attachment locations are strongly influenced by the surface chemistry and nanoscale surface topography. In addition, we measure the cellular forces down to few nanonewton range using these nanowire arrays. In case of nanowire functionalized with XadA1, the force exerted by vertically and horizontally attached single bacteria on the nanowire is in average 14% and 26% higher than for the pristine array, respectively. These results provide an excellent basis for live-cell force measurements as well as unravel the range of forces involved during the early stages of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

  2. Porous silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Hailong; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2011-10-01

    In this mini-review, we summarize recent progress in the synthesis, properties and applications of a new type of one-dimensional nanostructures-single crystalline porous silicon nanowires. The growth of porous silicon nanowires starting from both p- and n-type Si wafers with a variety of dopant concentrations can be achieved through either one-step or two-step reactions. The mechanistic studies indicate the dopant concentration of Si wafers, oxidizer concentration, etching time and temperature can affect the morphology of the as-etched silicon nanowires. The porous silicon nanowires are both optically and electronically active and have been explored for potential applications in diverse areas including photocatalysis, lithium ion batteries, gas sensors and drug delivery.

  3. Phonon Engineering of ZnO nanowires with controlled chemical doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohorquez-Ballen, Jaime; Jayasekera, Thushari

    2013-03-01

    Using the first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated electronic and dynamical properties of ZnO nanowires in [001] direction with different diameters in the presence of impurities such as Mg, Al, and Ga. As the impurity concentration is varied, electrical and thermal conductivities of nanowires change. In this way, nanowires can be engineered to reduce the thermal transport, such that their thermoelectric properties can be enhanced.

  4. Quantum confinement of excitons in wurtzite InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemasiri, K.; Jackson, H. E.; Smith, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Paiman, S.; Gao, Q.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2015-05-01

    Exciton resonances are observed in photocurrent spectra of 80 nm wurtzite InP nanowire devices at low temperatures, which correspond to transitions between the A, B, and C valence bands and the lower conduction band. Photocurrent spectra for 30 nm WZ nanowires exhibit shifts of the exciton resonances to higher energy, which are consistent with finite element calculations of wavefunctions of the confined electrons and holes for the various bands.

  5. Quantum confinement of excitons in wurtzite InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Pemasiri, K.; Jackson, H. E.; Smith, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Paiman, S.; Gao, Q.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2015-05-21

    Exciton resonances are observed in photocurrent spectra of 80 nm wurtzite InP nanowire devices at low temperatures, which correspond to transitions between the A, B, and C valence bands and the lower conduction band. Photocurrent spectra for 30 nm WZ nanowires exhibit shifts of the exciton resonances to higher energy, which are consistent with finite element calculations of wavefunctions of the confined electrons and holes for the various bands.

  6. Packaging of an iron-gallium (Galfenol) nanowire acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rupal; McCluskey, F. Patrick; Flatau, Alison B.; Stadler, Bethanie J. H.

    2007-04-01

    Packaging is a key issue for the effective working of an iron-gallium (Galfenol) nanowire acoustic sensor for underwater applications. The nanowire acoustic sensor incorporates cilia-like nanowires made of galfenol, a magnetostrictive material, which responds by changing magnetic flux flowing through it due to bending stress induced by the incoming acoustic waves. This stress induced change in the magnetic flux density is detected by a GMR sensor. An effective package should provide a suitably protective environment to these nanowires, while allowing sound waves to reach the nanowires with a minimum level of attenuation. A bio-inspired MEMS package has been designed, analogous to a human-ear cochlea for the nanowire acoustic sensor. In this paper, the process sequence for fabrication of the package is presented. Unlike other microphones, the nanoacoustic sensor has been enclosed in a cavity to allow free movement of the nanowires in a fluid medium. The package also ensures resisting ingression of sea water and salt ions to prevent the corrosion of sensor components. The effect of package material on sensor performance was investigated by conducting experiments on acoustic impedance and attenuation characteristics, and salt water absorption properties. The package filled with silicone oil and molded with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is observed to outperform other packages at all frequencies by minimizing attenuation of the acoustic waves.

  7. Transport properties of bismuth nano-wire systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Ying, J. Y.; Heremans, J.

    1998-03-01

    Ultra-fine Bi nano-wires (10--120 nm diameter) with packing density as high as 7×10^10/cm^2 were fabricated by pressure injecting molten Bi into the evacuated channels of an anodic alumina template. The resulting Bi nano-wires are shown to be single crystals (with the same structure as bulk Bi) and all the nano-wires are similarly oriented. The small effective mass of Bi, high anisotropy of its Fermi surface, and the high aspect ratio (length/diameter) of Bi nano-wires make this an excellent system for studying quantum confinement effects in a one-dimensional (1D) electron gas. Transport properties, such as electrical conductivity, magnetoresistance and thermoelectric power, are investigated for both Bi nano-wire arrays and free-standing Bi nano-wires with various wire diameters (10-120 nm) and Te doping concentrations (0.025-0.5 at.%), and at various temperatures and magnetic fields. A theoretical model based on the basic band structure of bulk Bi, suitably modified for the 1D situation, explains the many unusual effects that are observed. Strong evidence is provided for an interesting quantum confinement-induced semimetal to semiconductor transition in such Bi nano-wires.

  8. Variation in electrical properties of gamma irradiated cadmium selenate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Rana, Pallavi; Narula, Chetna; Panchal, Suresh; Choudhary, Ritika

    2016-07-01

    Preparation of low-dimensional materials attracts more and more interest in the last few years, mainly due to the wide field of potential commercial applications ranging from life sciences, medicine and biotechnology to communication and electronics. One-dimensional systems are the smallest dimension structures that can be used for efficient transport of electrons and thus expected to be critical to the function and integration of nanoscale devices. Nanowires with well controlled morphology and extremely high aspect ratio can be obtained by replicating a nanoporous polymer ion-track membrane with cylindrical pores of controlled dimensions. With this technique, materials can be deposited within the pores of the membrane by electrochemical reduction of the desired ion. In the present study, cadmium selenate nanowires were synthesized potentiostatically via template method. These synthesized nanowires were then exposed to gamma rays by using a 60Co source at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. Structural, morphological, electrical and elemental characterizations were made in order to analyze the effect of gamma irradiation on the synthesized nanowires. I-V measurements of cadmium selenate nanowires, before and after irradiation were made with the help of Keithley 2400 source meter and Ecopia probe station. A significant change in the electrical conductivity of cadmium selenate nanowires was found after gamma irradiation. The crystallography of the synthesized nanowires was also studied using a Rigaku X-ray diffractrometer equipped with Cu-Kα radiation. XRD patterns of irradiated samples showed no variation in the peak positions or phase change.

  9. Experimental investigation of electron transport properties of gallium nitride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motayed, Abhishek; Davydov, Albert V.; Mohammad, S. N.; Melngailis, John

    2008-07-01

    We report transport properties of gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires grown using direct reaction of ammonia and gallium vapor. Reliable devices, such as four-terminal resistivity measuring structures and field-effect transistors, were realized by dielectrophoretically aligning the nanowires on an oxidized silicon substrate and subsequently applying standard microfabrication techniques. Room-temperature resistivity in the range of (1.0-6.2)×10-2 Ω cm was obtained for the nanowires with diameters ranging from 200 to 90 nm. Temperature-dependent resistivity and mobility measurements indicated the possible sources for the n-type conductivity and high background charge carrier concentration in these nanowires. Specific contact resistance in the range of 5.0×10-5 Ω cm2 was extracted for Ti/Al/Ti/Au metal contacts to GaN nanowires. Significant reduction in the activation energy of the dopants at low temperatures (<200 K) was observed in the temperature-dependent resistivity measurement of these nanowires, which is linked to the onset of degeneracy. Temperature-dependent field-effect mobility measurements indicated that the ionized impurity scattering is the dominant mechanism in these nanowires at all temperatures.

  10. Assembling silver nanowires using optoelectronic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuailong; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steve L.

    2016-03-01

    Light patterned dielectrophoresis or optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has been proved to be an effective micromanipulation technology for cell separation, cell sorting and control of cell interactions. Apart from being useful for cell biology experiments, the capability of moving small objects accurately also makes OET an attractive technology for other micromanipulation applications. In particular, OET has the potential to be used for efficiently and accurately assembling small optoelectronic/electronic components into circuits. This approach could produce a step change in the size of the smallest components that are routinely assembled; down from the current smallest standard component size of 400×200 μm (0402 metric) to components a few microns across and even nanostructured components. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of OET to manipulate conductive silver nanowires into different patterns. The silver nanowires (typical diameter: 60 nm; typical length: 10 μm) were suspended in a 15 mS/m solution of KCL in water and manipulated by positive dielectrophoresis force generated by OET. A proof-of-concept demonstration was also made to prove the feasibility of using OET to manipulate silver nanowires to form a 150-μm-long conductive path between two isolated electrodes. It can be seen that the resistance between two electrodes was effectively brought down to around 700 Ω after the silver nanowires were assembled and the solution evaporated. Future work in this area will focus on increasing the conductivity of these tracks, encapsulating the assembled silver nanowires to prevent silver oxidation and provide mechanical protection, which can be achieved via 3D printing and inkjet printing technology.

  11. Nanowire Electron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian; Bronikowsky, Michael; Wong, Eric; VonAllmen, Paul; Oyafuso, Fablano

    2009-01-01

    Nanowire electron scattering spectroscopy (NESS) has been proposed as the basis of a class of ultra-small, ultralow-power sensors that could be used to detect and identify chemical compounds present in extremely small quantities. State-of-the-art nanowire chemical sensors have already been demonstrated to be capable of detecting a variety of compounds in femtomolar quantities. However, to date, chemically specific sensing of molecules using these sensors has required the use of chemically functionalized nanowires with receptors tailored to individual molecules of interest. While potentially effective, this functionalization requires labor-intensive treatment of many nanowires to sense a broad spectrum of molecules. In contrast, NESS would eliminate the need for chemical functionalization of nanowires and would enable the use of the same sensor to detect and identify multiple compounds. NESS is analogous to Raman spectroscopy, the main difference being that in NESS, one would utilize inelastic scattering of electrons instead of photons to determine molecular vibrational energy levels. More specifically, in NESS, one would exploit inelastic scattering of electrons by low-lying vibrational quantum states of molecules attached to a nanowire or nanotube.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy to probe working nanowire gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangmingyue

    This study is dedicated to the implementing of Electron-Beam-Induced Current (EBIC) microscopy to study the behavior of metal oxide semiconducting (MOS) nanowire (NW) gas sensor in situ under exposure to different environment. First, we reported the development of a single nanowire gas sensor compatible with an environmental cell. The major component of the device we use in this study is a single SnO2 nanowire attached to an electron transparent SiN membrane (50-100 nm thick), which was used for mounting nanowire working electrodes and surface imaging of NW. First the NW's conductivity is investigated in different temperatures. Higher temperature is proved to cause higher conductivity of NW. We also found that often the Schottky barrier is formed at the nanowire's contacts with Au and Au/Cr electrodes. Then NW's responses to gas and electron beam (from SEM) are analyzed quantitatively by current measurement. Electron-Beam-Induced Current technique was introduced for the first time to characterize the conductivity behavior of the nanowire during the gas sensing process. Resistive contrast was observed in the EBIC image.

  13. A review on germanium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Pei, Li Z; Cai, Zheng Y

    2012-01-01

    Ge nanowires exhibit wide application potential in the fields of nanoscale devices due to their excellently optical and electrical properties. This article reviews the recent progress and patents of Ge nanowires. The recent progress and patents for the synthesis of Ge nanowires using chemical vapor deposition, laser ablation, thermal evaporation, template method and supercritical fluid-liquid-solid method are demonstrated. Amorphous germanium oxide layer and defects existing in Ge nanowires result in poor Ohmic contact between Ge nanowires and electrodes. Therefore, Ge nanowires should be passivated in order to deposit connecting electrodes before applied in nanoelectronic devices. The experimental progress and patents on the application of Ge nanowires as field effect transistors, lithium batteries, photoresistors, memory cell and fluid sensors are discussed. Finally, the future development of Ge nanowires for the synthesis and practical application is also discussed.

  14. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)—a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula. PMID:27307081

  15. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide.

    PubMed

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H Q

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)-a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula. PMID:27307081

  16. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)—a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula.

  17. Electronic Structures of Free-Standing Nanowires made from Indirect Bandgap Semiconductor Gallium Phosphide.

    PubMed

    Liao, Gaohua; Luo, Ning; Chen, Ke-Qiu; Xu, H Q

    2016-06-16

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures of freestanding nanowires made from gallium phosphide (GaP)-a III-V semiconductor with an indirect bulk bandgap. We consider [001]-oriented GaP nanowires with square and rectangular cross sections, and [111]-oriented GaP nanowires with hexagonal cross sections. Based on tight binding models, both the band structures and wave functions of the nanowires are calculated. For the [001]-oriented GaP nanowires, the bands show anti-crossing structures, while the bands of the [111]-oriented nanowires display crossing structures. Two minima are observed in the conduction bands, while the maximum of the valence bands is always at the Γ-point. Using double group theory, we analyze the symmetry properties of the lowest conduction band states and highest valence band states of GaP nanowires with different sizes and directions. The band state wave functions of the lowest conduction bands and the highest valence bands of the nanowires are evaluated by spatial probability distributions. For practical use, we fit the confinement energies of the electrons and holes in the nanowires to obtain an empirical formula.

  18. Catalyst patterning for nanowire devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Cassell, Alan M. (Inventor); Han, Jie (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Nanowire devices may be provided that are based on carbon nanotubes or single-crystal semiconductor nanowires. The nanowire devices may be formed on a substrate. Catalyst sites may be formed on the substrate. The catalyst sites may be formed using lithography, thin metal layers that form individual catalyst sites when heated, collapsible porous catalyst-filled microscopic spheres, microscopic spheres that serve as masks for catalyst deposition, electrochemical deposition techniques, and catalyst inks. Nanowires may be grown from the catalyst sites.

  19. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  20. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  1. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires for hermetic packaging of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Artin; Whalen, John J; Weiland, James D; Mansfeld, Florian

    2012-01-01

    An electrodeposition technique was applied for fabrication of dense platinum-iridium alloy nanowires as interconnect structures in hermetic microelectronic packaging to be used in implantable devices. Vertically aligned arrays of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires with controllable length and a diameter of about 200 nm were fabricated using a cyclic potential technique from a novel electrodeposition bath in nanoporous aluminum oxide templates. Ti/Au thin films were sputter deposited on one side of the alumina membranes to form a base material for electrodeposition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and the chemical composition of the nanowires, respectively. SEM micrographs revealed that the electrodeposited nanowires have dense and compact structures. EDS analysis showed a 60:40% platinum-iridium nanowire composition. Deposition rates were estimated by determining nanowire length as a function of deposition time. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images revealed that the nanowires have a nanocrystalline structure with grain sizes ranging from 3 nm to 5 nm. Helium leak tests performed using a helium leak detector showed leak rates as low as 1 × 10(-11) mbar L s(-1) indicating that dense nanowires were electrodeposited inside the nanoporous membranes. Comparison of electrical measurements on platinum and platinum-iridium nanowires revealed that platinum-iridium nanowires have improved electrical conductivity.

  2. Materialization of single multicomposite nanowire: entrapment of ZnO nanoparticles in polyaniline nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present materialization of single multicomposite nanowire (SMNW)-entrapped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) via an electrochemical growth method, which is a newly developed fabrication method to grow a single nanowire between a pair of pre-patterned electrodes. Entrapment of ZnO NPs was controlled via different conditions of SMNW fabrication such as an applied potential and mixture ratio of NPs and aniline solution. The controlled concentration of ZnO NP results in changes in the physical properties of the SMNWs, as shown in transmission electron microscopy images. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity and elasticity of SMNWs show improvement over those of pure polyaniline nanowire. The new nano-multicomposite material showed synergistic effects on mechanical and electrical properties, with logarithmical change and saturation increasing ZnO NP concentration. PMID:21711928

  3. Ultra-long metal nanowire arrays on solid substrate with strong bonding

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-long metal nanowire arrays with large circular area up to 25 mm in diameter were obtained by direct electrodeposition on metalized Si and glass substrates via a template-based method. Nanowires with uniform length up to 30 μm were obtained. Combining this deposition process with lithography technology, micrometre-sized patterned metal nanowire array pads were successfully fabricated on a glass substrate. Good adhesion between the patterned nanowire array pads and the substrate was confirmed using scanning acoustic microscopy characterization. A pull-off tensile test showed strong bonding between the nanowires and the substrate. Conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) measurements showed that approximately 95% of the nanowires were electrically connected with the substrate, demonstrating its viability to use as high-density interconnect. PMID:21906311

  4. The concentration effect of capping agent for synthesis of silver nanowire by using the polyol method

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jian-Yang; Hsueh, Yu-Lee; Huang, Jung-Jie

    2014-06-01

    Silver nanowires were synthesized by the polyol method employing ethylene glycol, Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and silver nitrate (AgNO{sub 3}) as the precursors. Most of the studies used metal salts (PtCl{sub 2}, NaCl) as seed precursor to synthesize the silver nanowires. In the study, the metal salts were not used and the concentration of capping agent was changed to observe the aspect ratio of silver nanowires. The experimental results showed that controlling synthesis temperature, Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) molecular weight, reactant concentrations, and addition rates of AgNO{sub 3} affects the growth characteristics of silver nanowires. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometry, and X-ray diffractometry were employed to characterize the silver nanowires. As increasing the concentration of PVP, the silver nanowire diameter widened and resulted in a smaller aspect ratio. We successfully prepared silver nanowires (diameter: 170 nm, length: 20 μm). The silver nanowire thin film suspension showed high transmittance, low sheet resistance, and may be used for transparent conductive film applications. - Graphical abstract: The FE-SEM image shows that nanostructures with considerable quantities of silver nanowires can also be produced when the PVP (Mw=360 K)/AgNO{sub 3} molar ratio was 2.5. - Highlights: • The polyol method was used to synthesize of silver nanowire. • The metal seed precursors were not used before synthesizing the silver nanowires. • The silver nanowire diameter and length was 170 nm and 20 μm, respectively. • Silver nanowire film with high transmittance (>85%) and low sheet resistance (<110 Ω/sq)

  5. Microchip for the Measurement of Seebeck Coefficients of Single Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völklein, F.; Schmitt, M.; Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.

    2009-07-01

    Bismuth nanowires were electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Micromachining and microlithography were employed to realize a newly developed microchip for Seebeck coefficient measurements on individual nanowires. By anisotropic etching of a (100) Si wafer, an 800-nm-thick SiO2/Si3N4 membrane was prepared in the chip center. The low thermal conductivity of the membrane is crucial to obtain the required temperature difference Δ T along the nanowire. The wire is electrically contacted to thin metal pads which are patterned by a new method of microscopic exposure of photoresist and a lift-off process. A Δ T between the two pairs of contact pads, located on the membrane, is established by a thin-film heater. Applying the known Seebeck coefficient of a reference film, the temperature difference at this gap is determined. Using Δ T and the measured Seebeck voltage U of the nanowire, its Seebeck coefficient can be calculated.

  6. Electron propagation along a nanowire : a study in chattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, K.; Sumpter, B. G.; Noid, D. W.; Gray, S. K.; Yang, C.-Y.; Chemistry; ORNL

    1998-12-01

    Recent fabrication techniques have made it possible to create wires of submicron diameters, as small as a few tens of nanometers, and lengths of hundreds of microns. These nanowires have properties, including electrical conductivities, that differ greatly from the properties of the bulk material. It is necessary to simulate these characteristics of nanowires in an efficient and predictive fashion. While these structures are small on the scale of everyday objects, they still consist of thousands, if not millions, of nuclei and electrons, and hence a full a priori quantum mechanical treatment of these nanowires is not likely to be available in the near future. In this contribution, we present an efficient new approach for the simulation of electron transport along a nanowire. We see that our classical simulations, in which we have propagated one hundred thousand trajectories, result in chaotic scattering, that is chattering, of the electron.

  7. Personal thermal management by metallic nanowire-coated textile.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, Xiaoge; Liu, Chong; Xie, Xing; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Welch, Alex J; Zhao, Tom; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-14

    Heating consumes large amount of energy and is a primary source of greenhouse gas emission. Although energy-efficient buildings are developing quickly based on improving insulation and design, a large portion of energy continues to be wasted on heating empty space and nonhuman objects. Here, we demonstrate a system of personal thermal management using metallic nanowire-embedded cloth that can reduce this waste. The metallic nanowires form a conductive network that not only is highly thermal insulating because it reflects human body infrared radiation but also allows Joule heating to complement the passive insulation. The breathability and durability of the original cloth is not sacrificed because of the nanowires' porous structure. This nanowire cloth can efficiently warm human bodies and save hundreds of watts per person as compared to traditional indoor heaters.

  8. Personal thermal management by metallic nanowire-coated textile.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, Xiaoge; Liu, Chong; Xie, Xing; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Welch, Alex J; Zhao, Tom; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-14

    Heating consumes large amount of energy and is a primary source of greenhouse gas emission. Although energy-efficient buildings are developing quickly based on improving insulation and design, a large portion of energy continues to be wasted on heating empty space and nonhuman objects. Here, we demonstrate a system of personal thermal management using metallic nanowire-embedded cloth that can reduce this waste. The metallic nanowires form a conductive network that not only is highly thermal insulating because it reflects human body infrared radiation but also allows Joule heating to complement the passive insulation. The breathability and durability of the original cloth is not sacrificed because of the nanowires' porous structure. This nanowire cloth can efficiently warm human bodies and save hundreds of watts per person as compared to traditional indoor heaters. PMID:25434959

  9. Lithium Ion Battery Performance of Silicon Nanowires With Carbon Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Oka, Daichi; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2013-12-06

    Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have emerged as a leading candidate for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes. However, the low electrical conductivity of Si requires the use of conductive additives in the anode film. Here we report a solution-based synthesis of Si nanowires with a conductive carbon skin. Without any conductive additive, the Si nanowire electrodes exhibited capacities of over 2000 mA h g-1 for 100 cycles when cycled at C/10 and over 1200 mA h g-1 when cycled more rapidly at 1C against Li metal.. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that the carbon skin performs dual roles: it speeds lithiation of the Si nanowires significantly, while also constraining the final volume expansion. The present work sheds light on ways to optimize lithium battery performance by smartly tailoring the nanostructure of composition of materials based on silicon and carbon.

  10. First-principles study of the electronic properties of wurtzite, zinc-blende, and twinned InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengfeng; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei

    2010-12-17

    The electronic properties of zinc blende, wurtzite, and rotationally twinned InP nanowires were studied using first-principles calculations. The results show that all the simulated nanowires exhibit a semiconducting character, and the band gap decreases with increasing the nanowire size. The band gap difference between the zinc blende, wurtzite, and twinned InP nanowires and a bulk InP can be described by several formulas proportional to the diameter of nanowires. The valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) originate mainly from the p-orbitals of the P atoms and s-orbitals of the In atoms at the core regions of the nanowires, respectively. The hexagonal (2H) stacking inside the cubic (3C) stacking has no effect on the electronic properties of thin InP nanowires.

  11. A novel WS2 nanowire-nanoflake hybrid material synthesized from WO3 nanowires in sulfur vapor

    PubMed Central

    Asres, Georgies Alene; Dombovari, Aron; Sipola, Teemu; Puskás, Robert; Kukovecz, Akos; Kónya, Zoltán; Popov, Alexey; Lin, Jhih-Fong; Lorite, Gabriela S.; Mohl, Melinda; Toth, Geza; Lloyd Spetz, Anita; Kordas, Krisztian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, WS2 nanowire-nanoflake hybrids are synthesized by the sulfurization of hydrothermally grown WO3 nanowires. The influence of temperature on the formation of products is optimized to grow WS2 nanowires covered with nanoflakes. Current-voltage and resistance-temperature measurements carried out on random networks of the nanostructures show nonlinear characteristics and negative temperature coefficient of resistance indicating that the hybrids are of semiconducting nature. Bottom gated field effect transistor structures based on random networks of the hybrids show only minor modulation of the channel conductance upon applied gate voltage, which indicates poor electrical transport between the nanowires in the random films. On the other hand, the photo response of channel current holds promise for cost-efficient solution process fabrication of photodetector devices working in the visible spectral range. PMID:27180902

  12. A novel WS2 nanowire-nanoflake hybrid material synthesized from WO3 nanowires in sulfur vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asres, Georgies Alene; Dombovari, Aron; Sipola, Teemu; Puskás, Robert; Kukovecz, Akos; Kónya, Zoltán; Popov, Alexey; Lin, Jhih-Fong; Lorite, Gabriela S.; Mohl, Melinda; Toth, Geza; Lloyd Spetz, Anita; Kordas, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    In this work, WS2 nanowire-nanoflake hybrids are synthesized by the sulfurization of hydrothermally grown WO3 nanowires. The influence of temperature on the formation of products is optimized to grow WS2 nanowires covered with nanoflakes. Current-voltage and resistance-temperature measurements carried out on random networks of the nanostructures show nonlinear characteristics and negative temperature coefficient of resistance indicating that the hybrids are of semiconducting nature. Bottom gated field effect transistor structures based on random networks of the hybrids show only minor modulation of the channel conductance upon applied gate voltage, which indicates poor electrical transport between the nanowires in the random films. On the other hand, the photo response of channel current holds promise for cost-efficient solution process fabrication of photodetector devices working in the visible spectral range.

  13. Enhancement of electrical and thermomechanical properties of silver nanowire composites by the introduction of nonconductive nanoparticles: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seungwoong; Cho, Hyun W; Lim, Soonho; Kim, Daeheum; Kim, Heesuk; Sung, Bong J

    2013-01-22

    Electrically conductive polymer nanocomposites have been applied extensively in many fields to develop the next generation of devices. Large amounts of conductive nanofillers in polymer matrices are, however, often required for a sufficiently high electrical conductivity, which in turn deteriorates the desired thermomechanical properties. We illustrate a novel but facile strategy to improve the electrical conductivity and the thermomechanical property of silver nanowire/polymer nanocomposites. We find that one may increase the electrical conductivity of silver nanowire/polymer nanocomposites by up to about 8 orders of magnitude by introducing silica nanoparticles with nanocomposites. The electrical percolation threshold volume fraction of silver nanowires decreases from 0.12 to 0.02. Thermomechanical properties also improve as silica nanoparticles are introduced. We carry out extensive Monte Carlo simulations to elucidate the effects of silica nanoparticles at a molecular level and find that van der Waals attractive interaction between silica nanoparticles and silver nanowires dominates over the depletion-induced interaction between silver nanowires, thus improving the dispersion of silver nanowires. Without silica nanoparticles, silver nanowires tend to aggregate, which is why additional silver nanowires are required for a desired electrical conductivity. On the other hand, with silica nanoparticles mixed, the electrical percolating network is likely to form at a smaller volume fraction of silver nanowires.

  14. Polyelectrolyte multilayers impart healability to highly electrically conductive films.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Chen, Shanshan; Wu, Mengchun; Sun, Junqi

    2012-08-28

    Healable, electrically conductive films are fabricated by depositing Ag nanowires on water-enabled healable polyelectrolyte multilayers. The easily achieved healability of the polyelectrolyte multilayers is successfully imparted to the Ag nanowire layer. These films conveniently restore electrical conductivity lost as a result of damage by cuts several tens of micrometers wide when water is dropped on the cuts. PMID:22807199

  15. Heat transmission between a profiled nanowire and a thermal bath

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Christophe; Heron, Jean-Savin; Fournier, Thierry; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2014-07-28

    Thermal transport through profiled and abrupt contacts between a nanowire and a reservoir has been investigated by thermal conductance measurements. It is demonstrated that above 1 K the transmission coefficients are identical between abrupt and profiled junctions. This shows that the thermal transport is principally governed by the nanowire itself rather than by the resistance of the thermal contact. These results are perfectly compatible with the previous theoretical models. The thermal conductance measured at sub-Kelvin temperatures is discussed in relation to the universal value of the quantum of thermal conductance.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Park, Jinsung; Yoon, Gwonchan; Song, Jiseok; Jee, Sang-Won; Lee, Jung-Ho; Na, Sungsoo; Kwon, Taeyun; Eom, Kilho

    2009-10-27

    Nanowires have been taken much attention as a nanoscale building block, which can perform the excellent mechanical function as an electromechanical device. Here, we have performed atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments of silicon nanowires in order to investigate the mechanical properties of silicon nanowires. It is shown that stiffness of nanowires is well described by Hertz theory and that elastic modulus of silicon nanowires with various diameters from ~100 to ~600 nm is close to that of bulk silicon. This implies that the elastic modulus of silicon nanowires is independent of their diameters if the diameter is larger than 100 nm. This supports that finite size effect (due to surface effect) does not play a role on elastic behavior of silicon nanowires with diameter of >100 nm.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires have been taken much attention as a nanoscale building block, which can perform the excellent mechanical function as an electromechanical device. Here, we have performed atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments of silicon nanowires in order to investigate the mechanical properties of silicon nanowires. It is shown that stiffness of nanowires is well described by Hertz theory and that elastic modulus of silicon nanowires with various diameters from ~100 to ~600 nm is close to that of bulk silicon. This implies that the elastic modulus of silicon nanowires is independent of their diameters if the diameter is larger than 100 nm. This supports that finite size effect (due to surface effect) does not play a role on elastic behavior of silicon nanowires with diameter of >100 nm. PMID:20652130

  18. Piezoresistive boron doped diamond nanowire

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Wang, Xinpeng

    2016-09-13

    A UNCD nanowire comprises a first end electrically coupled to a first contact pad which is disposed on a substrate. A second end is electrically coupled to a second contact pad also disposed on the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is doped with a dopant and disposed over the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is movable between a first configuration in which no force is exerted on the UNCD nanowire and a second configuration in which the UNCD nanowire bends about the first end and the second end in response to a force. The UNCD nanowire has a first resistance in the first configuration and a second resistance in the second configuration which is different from the first resistance. The UNCD nanowire is structured to have a gauge factor of at least about 70, for example, in the range of about 70 to about 1,800.

  19. Atomistic modeling of metallic nanowires in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hoon; Lee, Sunhee; Weber, Bent; Mahapatra, Suddhasatta; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2013-08-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) lithography has recently demonstrated the ultimate in device scaling with buried, conducting nanowires just a few atoms wide and the realization of single atom transistors, where a single P atom has been placed inside a transistor architecture with atomic precision accuracy. Despite the dimensions of the critical parts of these devices being defined by a small number of P atoms, the device electronic properties are influenced by the surrounding 104 to 106 Si atoms. Such effects are hard to capture with most modeling approaches, and prior to this work no theory existed that could explore the realistic size of the complete device in which both dopant disorder and placement are important. This work presents a comprehensive study of the electronic and transport properties of ultra-thin (<10 nm wide) monolayer highly P δ-doped Si (Si:P) nanowires in a fully atomistic self-consistent tight-binding approach. This atomistic approach covering large device volumes allows for a systematic study of disorder on the physical properties of the nanowires. Excellent quantitative agreement is observed with recent resistance measurements of STM-patterned nanowires [Weber et al., Science, 2012, 335, 64], confirming the presence of metallic behavior at the scaling limit. At high doping densities the channel resistance is shown to be insensitive to the exact channel dopant placement highlighting their future use as metallic interconnects. This work presents the first theoretical study of Si:P nanowires that are realistically extended and disordered, providing a strong theoretical foundation for the design and understanding of atomic-scale electronics.Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) lithography has recently demonstrated the ultimate in device scaling with buried, conducting nanowires just a few atoms wide and the realization of single atom transistors, where a single P atom has been placed inside a transistor architecture with atomic precision

  20. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-10

    Approximately 90 per cent of the world's power is generated by heat engines that use fossil fuel combustion as a heat source and typically operate at 30-40 per cent efficiency, such that roughly 15 terawatts of heat is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric modules could potentially convert part of this low-grade waste heat to electricity. Their efficiency depends on the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of their material components, which is a function of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and absolute temperature. Over the past five decades it has been challenging to increase ZT > 1, since the parameters of ZT are generally interdependent. While nanostructured thermoelectric materials can increase ZT > 1 (refs 2-4), the materials (Bi, Te, Pb, Sb, and Ag) and processes used are not often easy to scale to practically useful dimensions. Here we report the electrochemical synthesis of large-area, wafer-scale arrays of rough Si nanowires that are 20-300 nm in diameter. These nanowires have Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity values that are the same as doped bulk Si, but those with diameters of about 50 nm exhibit 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity, yielding ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. For such nanowires, the lattice contribution to thermal conductivity approaches the amorphous limit for Si, which cannot be explained by current theories. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, by greatly reducing thermal conductivity without much affecting the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials.

  1. Single-nanowire photoelectrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yude; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Tang, Jinyao; Fu, Anthony; Kornienko, Nikolay; Kong, Qiao; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemistry is one of several promising approaches for the realization of efficient solar-to-fuel conversion. Recent work has shown that photoelectrodes made of semiconductor nano-/microwire arrays can have better photoelectrochemical performance than their planar counterparts because of their unique properties, such as high surface area. Although considerable research effort has focused on studying wire arrays, the inhomogeneity in the geometry, doping, defects and catalyst loading present in such arrays can obscure the link between these properties and the photoelectrochemical performance of the wires, and correlating performance with the specific properties of individual wires is difficult because of ensemble averaging. Here, we show that a single-nanowire-based photoelectrode platform can be used to reliably probe the current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of individual nanowires. We find that the photovoltage output of ensemble array samples can be limited by poorly performing individual wires, which highlights the importance of improving nanowire homogeneity within an array. Furthermore, the platform allows the flux of photogenerated electrons to be quantified as a function of the lengths and diameters of individual nanowires, and we find that the flux over the entire nanowire surface (7–30 electrons nm–2 s–1) is significantly reduced as compared with that of a planar analogue (∼1,200 electrons nm–2 s–1). Such characterization of the photogenerated carrier flux at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface is essential for designing nanowire photoelectrodes that match the activity of their loaded electrocatalysts.

  2. Single-nanowire photoelectrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yude; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Tang, Jinyao; Fu, Anthony; Kornienko, Nikolay; Kong, Qiao; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemistry is one of several promising approaches for the realization of efficient solar-to-fuel conversion. Recent work has shown that photoelectrodes made of semiconductor nano-/microwire arrays can have better photoelectrochemical performance than their planar counterparts because of their unique properties, such as high surface area. Although considerable research effort has focused on studying wire arrays, the inhomogeneity in the geometry, doping, defects and catalyst loading present in such arrays can obscure the link between these properties and the photoelectrochemical performance of the wires, and correlating performance with the specific properties of individual wires is difficult because of ensemble averaging. Here, we show that a single-nanowire-based photoelectrode platform can be used to reliably probe the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of individual nanowires. We find that the photovoltage output of ensemble array samples can be limited by poorly performing individual wires, which highlights the importance of improving nanowire homogeneity within an array. Furthermore, the platform allows the flux of photogenerated electrons to be quantified as a function of the lengths and diameters of individual nanowires, and we find that the flux over the entire nanowire surface (7-30 electrons nm-2 s-1) is significantly reduced as compared with that of a planar analogue (˜1,200 electrons nm-2 s-1). Such characterization of the photogenerated carrier flux at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface is essential for designing nanowire photoelectrodes that match the activity of their loaded electrocatalysts.

  3. Single-nanowire photoelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yude; Liu, Chong; Brittman, Sarah; Tang, Jinyao; Fu, Anthony; Kornienko, Nikolay; Kong, Qiao; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectrochemistry is one of several promising approaches for the realization of efficient solar-to-fuel conversion. Recent work has shown that photoelectrodes made of semiconductor nano-/microwire arrays can have better photoelectrochemical performance than their planar counterparts because of their unique properties, such as high surface area. Although considerable research effort has focused on studying wire arrays, the inhomogeneity in the geometry, doping, defects and catalyst loading present in such arrays can obscure the link between these properties and the photoelectrochemical performance of the wires, and correlating performance with the specific properties of individual wires is difficult because of ensemble averaging. Here, we show that a single-nanowire-based photoelectrode platform can be used to reliably probe the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of individual nanowires. We find that the photovoltage output of ensemble array samples can be limited by poorly performing individual wires, which highlights the importance of improving nanowire homogeneity within an array. Furthermore, the platform allows the flux of photogenerated electrons to be quantified as a function of the lengths and diameters of individual nanowires, and we find that the flux over the entire nanowire surface (7-30 electrons nm(-2) s(-1)) is significantly reduced as compared with that of a planar analogue (∼1,200 electrons nm(-2) s(-1)). Such characterization of the photogenerated carrier flux at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface is essential for designing nanowire photoelectrodes that match the activity of their loaded electrocatalysts. PMID:27018660

  4. Thermoelectric Properties of Nanowires with a Graphitic Shell.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Woon; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kim, Byung Sung; Lee, Jae Hyun; Kim, Hee Goo; Jang, Hyeon Sik; Hwang, Sung Woo; Choi, Byoung Lyong; Whang, Dongmok

    2015-07-20

    A thermoelectric device that can generate electricity from waste heat can play an important role in a global energy solution. However, the strongly correlated thermoelectric properties have remained a major hurdle for the highly efficient conversion of thermoelectric energy. Herein, the electrical and thermal properties of Si and SiO2 nanowires with few-layer graphitic shells are demonstrated; these structures exhibit enhanced electrical properties but no increase in thermal conductivity. The main path of the phonons through the structures is the core nanowire, which has a large cross-sectional area relative to that of the graphitic shell layer. However, the electrical conductivities of the nanowires with shell structures are high because of the good electrical conductivity of the graphitic shell, despite its small cross-sectional area. PMID:25939904

  5. Metallic Nanowire Interconnections for Integrated Circuit Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Hou Tee (Inventor); Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for fabricating an electrical interconnect between two or more electrical components. A conductive layer is provided on a substarte and a thin, patterned catalyst array is deposited on an exposed surface of the conductive layer. A gas or vapor of a metallic precursor of a metal nanowire (MeNW) is provided around the catalyst array, and MeNWs grow between the conductive layer and the catalyst array. The catalyst array and a portion of each of the MeNWs are removed to provide exposed ends of the MeNWs.

  6. Sn-seeded GaAs nanowires grown by MOVPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rong; Vainorius, Neimantas; Jacobsson, Daniel; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A.

    2016-05-01

    It has previously been reported that in situ formed Sn nanoparticles can successfully initiate GaAs nanowire growth with a self-assembled radial p-n junction composed of a Sn-doped n-type core and a C-doped p-type shell. In this paper, we investigate the effect of fundamental growth parameters on the morphology and crystal structure of Sn-seeded GaAs nanowires. We show that growth can be achieved in a broad temperature window by changing the TMGa precursor flow simultaneously with decreasing temperature to prevent nanowire kinking at low temperatures. We find that changes in the supply of both AsH3 and TMGa can lead to nanowire kinking and that the formation of twin planes is closely related to a low V/III ratio. From PL results, we observe an increase of the average luminescence energy induced by heavy doping which shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band. Furthermore, the doping level of Sn and C is dependent on both the temperature and the V/III ratio. These results indicate that using Sn as the seed particle for nanowire growth is quite different from traditionally used Au in for example growth conditions and resulting nanowire properties. Thus, it is very interesting to explore alternative metal seed particles with controllable introduction of other impurities.

  7. Sn-seeded GaAs nanowires grown by MOVPE.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rong; Vainorius, Neimantas; Jacobsson, Daniel; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2016-05-27

    It has previously been reported that in situ formed Sn nanoparticles can successfully initiate GaAs nanowire growth with a self-assembled radial p-n junction composed of a Sn-doped n-type core and a C-doped p-type shell. In this paper, we investigate the effect of fundamental growth parameters on the morphology and crystal structure of Sn-seeded GaAs nanowires. We show that growth can be achieved in a broad temperature window by changing the TMGa precursor flow simultaneously with decreasing temperature to prevent nanowire kinking at low temperatures. We find that changes in the supply of both AsH3 and TMGa can lead to nanowire kinking and that the formation of twin planes is closely related to a low V/III ratio. From PL results, we observe an increase of the average luminescence energy induced by heavy doping which shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band. Furthermore, the doping level of Sn and C is dependent on both the temperature and the V/III ratio. These results indicate that using Sn as the seed particle for nanowire growth is quite different from traditionally used Au in for example growth conditions and resulting nanowire properties. Thus, it is very interesting to explore alternative metal seed particles with controllable introduction of other impurities. PMID:27087548

  8. Coherent electron transport in InAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourribes, Marion J. L.; Isakov, Ivan; Panfilova, Marina; Ercolani, Daniele; Giazotto, Francesco; Sorba, Lucia; Warburton, Paul A.

    2013-03-01

    Indium arsenide nanowires are of special interest since they exhibit high mobility, strong spin-orbit coupling and form ohmic contacts with metals which make them good candidates for the observation of Majorana fermions in semiconductor/superconductor hybrid systems. InAs nanowires have already been used as Josephson elements in superconducting devices. Here we report our low-temperature experiments on InAs nanowires grown by two methods: (i) gold-catalyzed chemical beam epitaxy on InAs (111) substrates; (ii) catalyst-free molecular beam epitaxy on Si (111) substrates. Contacts to the nanowires are defined by e-beam lithography. Before metallization of the contacts, the nanowire surface is deoxidized by an in situ sputter-cleaning process leading to a specific contact resistance of 9 . 8 ×10-9 Ω .cm2. These highly transparent contacts allowed the observation of proximity-induced superconductivity in InAs nanowires connected with Nb contacts. The critical current was tuned by changing the gate voltage. Both magnetic-field-dependent and gate-voltage-dependent measurements of universal conductance fluctuations were performed to extract information on the electron phase coherence.

  9. Proteins and peptides as biological nanowires: towards biosensing devices.

    PubMed

    Domigan, Laura J

    2013-01-01

    The current landscape of nanotechnology is such that attention is being given to those materials that self-assemble, as a mode of "bottom-up" fabrication of nanomaterials. The field of nanotubes and nanowires has long been dominated by carbon nanotubes and inorganic materials. However in more recent years, the search for materials with desirable properties, such as self-assembly, has unsurprisingly led to the biological world, where functional nanoscale biomolecular assemblies are in abundance.Potential has been seen for a number of these assemblies to be translated into functional nanomaterials. The early days of bionanotechnology saw a lot of attention given to DNA molecules as nanowires, and proteins and peptides have now also been seen to have promise in this area. With most of the biological structures investigated having low conductivity in the native state, the use of biomolecules as templates for the formation of metallic and semiconductor nanowires has been the direction taken.This chapter will discuss the use of various biomolecules and biomolecular assemblies as nanowires, with a particular emphasis on proteins, beginning with an introduction into the field of nanotubes and nanowires. Many applications are now recognized for nanowires, but for brevity, this chapter will focus solely on their use as biosensors, using glucose sensors as a case study.

  10. Sn-seeded GaAs nanowires grown by MOVPE.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rong; Vainorius, Neimantas; Jacobsson, Daniel; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Lehmann, Sebastian; Dick, Kimberly A

    2016-05-27

    It has previously been reported that in situ formed Sn nanoparticles can successfully initiate GaAs nanowire growth with a self-assembled radial p-n junction composed of a Sn-doped n-type core and a C-doped p-type shell. In this paper, we investigate the effect of fundamental growth parameters on the morphology and crystal structure of Sn-seeded GaAs nanowires. We show that growth can be achieved in a broad temperature window by changing the TMGa precursor flow simultaneously with decreasing temperature to prevent nanowire kinking at low temperatures. We find that changes in the supply of both AsH3 and TMGa can lead to nanowire kinking and that the formation of twin planes is closely related to a low V/III ratio. From PL results, we observe an increase of the average luminescence energy induced by heavy doping which shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band. Furthermore, the doping level of Sn and C is dependent on both the temperature and the V/III ratio. These results indicate that using Sn as the seed particle for nanowire growth is quite different from traditionally used Au in for example growth conditions and resulting nanowire properties. Thus, it is very interesting to explore alternative metal seed particles with controllable introduction of other impurities.

  11. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  12. Highly transparent Au-coated Ag nanowire transparent electrode with reduction in haze.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taegeon; Canlier, Ali; Cho, Changsoon; Rozyyev, Vepa; Lee, Jung-Yong; Han, Seung Min

    2014-08-27

    Ag nanowire transparent electrode has excellent transmittance and sheet resistance, yet its optical haze still needs to be improved in order for it to be suitable for display applications. Ag nanowires are known to have high haze because of the geometry of the nanowire and the high light scattering characteristic of the Ag. In this study, a Au-coated Ag nanowire structure was proposed to reduce the haze, where a thin layer of Au was coated on the surface of the Ag nanowires using a mild [Au(en)2]Cl3 galvanic displacement reaction. The mild galvanic exchange allowed for a thin layer of Au coating on the Ag nanowires with minimal truncation of the nanowire, where the average length and the diameter were 13.0 μm and 60 nm, respectively. The Au-coated Ag nanowires were suspended in methanol and then electrostatically sprayed on a flexible polycarbonate substrate that revealed a clear reduction in haze with a 2-4% increase in total transmittance, sheet resistance ranges of 80-90%, and 8.8-36.8 Ohm/sq. Finite difference time domain simulations were conducted for Au-coated Ag nanowires that indicated a significant reduction in the average scattering from 1 to 0.69 for Au layer thicknesses of 0-10 nm.

  13. Study of electronic transport in gamma ray exposed nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlawat, Devender Chauhan, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A sharp decline in the I–V characteristics of Cu (and Cd) nanowires was experimentally observed after the gamma ray exposure of nanowires. Irradiation induced transformations in the granular properties and the resonance state of electron–phonon coupling beyond a particular value of external field may be accountable for observed shape of I–V characteristics in gamma ray exposed nanowires. - Highlights: • Cu and Cd nanowires were synthesized by technique of electrodeposition in templates. • The nanowires were exposed to different doses of gamma ray photons. • A sharp decline in the current in I–V characteristics (IVC) was observed. • Structural deviation in terms of granular orientations was also analysed. • The electron–phonon coupling may be responsible for observed sharp decline in IVC. - Abstract: One dimensional nanostructures provide the most restricted and narrow channel for the transport of charge carriers and therefore 1D structures preserve their significance from the viewpoint of electronic devices. The net radiation effect on nanomaterials is expected to be more (due to their increased reactivity and lesser bulk volume) than their bulk counterparts. Radiation often modifies the structure and simultaneously the other physical properties of materials. In this manner, the irradiation phenomenon could be counted as a strong criterion to induce changes in the structural and electrical properties of nanowires. We have studied the effect of gamma rays on the electronic flow through Cu and Cd nanowires by plotting their I–V characteristics (IVC). The IVC of gamma ray exposed nanowires was found to be a combination of the linear and nonlinear regions and a decreasing pattern in the electrical conductivity (calculated from the linear portion of IVC) was observed as we increased the dose of gamma rays.

  14. SiC Nanowires with Tunable Hydrophobicity/Hydrophilicity and Their Application as Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhong; Zhai, Famin; Liu, Meng; Hou, Xinmei; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2016-06-14

    In this paper, several methods including HF, NaOH, TEOS, and PVP treatment were adopted to modify the wettability of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires switching from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The phase and microstructure investigated by XRD, FT-IR, XPS, TGA, SEM, and TEM demonstrated SiC nanowires switching from hydrophobic to hydrophilic due to the surface-tethered hydrophilic layer as well as increasing interspace between nanowires. Besides this, SiC nanowires with hydrophilicity may effectively improve the thermal conductivity of a fluid. The thermal conductivity of aqueous SiC nanowires after TEOS treatment with just 0.3 vol % was remarkably improved up to ca. 13.0%. PMID:27223246

  15. Self-assembled nanowire array capacitors: capacitance and interface state profile.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiliang; Xiong, Hao D; Liang, Xuelei; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Diefeng; Ioannou, Dimitris E; Baumgart, Helmut; Richter, Curt A

    2014-04-01

    Direct characterization of the capacitance and interface states is very important for understanding the electronic properties of a nanowire transistor. However, the capacitance of a single nanowire is too small to precisely measure. In this work we have fabricated metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors based on a large array of self-assembled Si nanowires. The capacitance and conductance of the nanowire array capacitors are directly measured and the interface state profile is determined by using the conductance method. We demonstrate that the nanowire array capacitor is an effective platform for studying the electronic properties of nanoscale interfaces. This approach provides a useful and efficient metrology for the study of the physics and device properties of nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor structures.

  16. Deposition and post-processing techniques for transparent conductive films

    DOEpatents

    Christoforo, Mark Greyson; Mehra, Saahil; Salleo, Alberto; Peumans, Peter

    2015-01-13

    In one embodiment, a method is provided for fabrication of a semitransparent conductive mesh. A first solution having conductive nanowires suspended therein and a second solution having nanoparticles suspended therein are sprayed toward a substrate, the spraying forming a mist. The mist is processed, while on the substrate, to provide a semitransparent conductive material in the form of a mesh having the conductive nanowires and nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are configured and arranged to direct light passing through the mesh. Connections between the nanowires provide conductivity through the mesh.

  17. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D.S.

    2010-06-02

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.

  18. The electronic properties of microbial nanowires: An STM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veazey, Josh; Steidl, Becky; Reguera, Gemma; Tessmer, Stuart

    2009-03-01

    Geobacter species of bacteria present the prospect of an interesting physical system through the expression of pili that act as electrically conductive nanowires. These nanowires serve the biological role of transporting metabolically generated electrons outside the cell body to electron acceptors in the organism's native environment. We have performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on Geobacter sulferreducens in an effort to elucidate the mechanism of conductivity. Understanding this system may lead to the enhancement in the effectiveness of Geobacter species' roles in microbial fuel cells and the bioremediation of hazardous waste, such as uranium and petroleum.

  19. Controlled synthesis of Mn₂O₃ nanowires by hydrothermal method and their bactericidal and cytotoxic impact: a promising future material.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M Shamshi; Amna, Touseef; Pandeya, Dipendra Raj; Hamza, A M; Bing, Yang You; Kim, Hyun-Chel; Khil, Myung-Seob

    2012-07-01

    Mn₂O₃ nanowires with diameter ~70 nm were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method using Mn(II) nitrate as precursor. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques were employed to study structural features and chemical composition of the synthesized nanowires. A biological evaluation of the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of Mn₂O₃ nanowires was carried out using Escherichia coli and mouse myoblast C₂C₁₂ cells as model organism and cell lines, respectively. The antibacterial activity and the acting mechanism of Mn₂O₃ nanowires were investigated by using growth inhibition studies and analyzing the morphology of the bacterial cells following the treatment with nanowires. These results suggest that the pH is critical factor affecting the morphology and production of the Mn₂O₃ nanowires. Method developed in the present study provided optimum production of Mn₂O₃ nanowires at pH ~ 9. The Mn₂O₃ nanowires showed significant antibacterial activity against the E. coli strain, and the lowest concentration of Mn₂O₃ nanowires solution inhibiting the growth of E. coli was found to be 12.5 μg/ml. TEM analysis demonstrated that the exposure of the selected microbial strains to the nanowires led to disruption of the cell membranes and leakage of the internal contents. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity results showed that the inhibition of C₂C₁₂ increases with the increase in concentration of Mn₂O₃ nanowires. Our results for the first time highlight the cytotoxic and bactericidal potential of Mn₂O₃ nanowires which can be utilized for various biomedical applications.

  20. Nanowires and nanoribbons formed by methylphosphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Archanjo, B S; Carvalho, L A S; Rassa, M; Miquita, D R; de Oliveira, F A C; Cançado, L G; Agero, U; Plentz, F; Cury, L A; Gonzalez, J C; Moreira, R L; Paniago, R; Magalhães-Paniago, R; Neves, B R A

    2007-09-01

    The production and physical properties of nanowires and nanoribbons formed by methylphosphonic acid (MPA)--CH3PO(OH)2--were investigated. These structures are formed on an aluminum coated substrate when immersed in an ethanolic solution of MPA for several days. A careful investigation of the growth conditions resulted in a narrow window of solution concentrations and temperatures for the successful development of nanowires and nanoribbons. Several different techniques were employed to characterize these nanostructures: (1) Photoluminescence experiments showed a strong emission at 2.3 eV (green), which is visible to the naked eye; (2) X-ray diffraction experiments indicated a significant cristalinity, in agreement with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) morphology images, which show organized nano-scale wires and ribbons, (furthermore, AFM-Phase and TEM images also suggest that nanoribbons are formed by well-aligned nanowires); (3) Conductive-AFM experiments revealed an intermediary conductivity for these structures (10(-1)/Ohm x m), which is similar to some intrinsic semiconductors and; (4) finally, Infrared, Raman, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopies produced information about the contents, structure, and composition of both wires and ribbons. PMID:18019131

  1. Silicon nanowire field effect transistor for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu

    Detection and recognition of chemical ions and biological molecules are important in basic science as well as in pharmacology and medicine. Nanotechnology has made it possible to greatly enhance detection sensitivity through the use of nanowires, nanotubes, nanocrystals, nanocantilevers, and quantum dots as sensing platforms. In this work silicon nanowires are used as the conductance channel between the source and drain of a FET (field effect transistor) device and the biomolecular binding on the surface of nanowire modifies the conductance like a change in gate voltage. Due to the high surface-to-volume ratio and unique character of the silicon nanowires, this device has significant advantages in real-time, label-free and highly sensitive detection of a wide range of species, including proteins, nucleic acids and other small molecules. Here we present a biosensor fabricated from CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) compatible top-down methods including electron beam lithography. This method enables scalable manufacturing of multiple sensor arrays with high efficiency. In a systematic study of the device characteristics with different wire widths, we have found the sensitivity of the device increases when wire width decreases. By operating the device in appropriate bias region, the sensitivity of the device can be improved without doping or high temperature annealing. Not only can this device be used to detect the concentration of proteins and metabolites like urea or glucose, but also dynamic information like the dissociation constant can be extracted from the measurement. The device is also used to detect the clinically related cancer antigen CA 15.3 and shows potential application in cancer studies.

  2. Quantum charge fluctuations of a proximitized nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutchyn, Roman M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [Nature (London) 531, 206 (2016), 10.1038/nature17162], we consider charging of a nanowire which is proximitized by a superconductor and connected to a normal-state lead by a single-channel junction. The charge Q of the nanowire is controlled by gate voltage e Ng/C . A finite conductance of the contact allows for quantum charge fluctuations, making the function Q (Ng) continuous. It depends on the relation between the superconducting gap Δ and the effective charging energy EC*. The latter is determined by the junction conductance in addition to the geometrical capacitance of the proximitized nanowire. We investigate Q (Ng) at zero magnetic field B and at fields exceeding the critical value Bc corresponding to the topological phase transition [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 077001 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.077001; Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 177002 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.177002]. Unlike the case of Δ =0 , the function Q (Ng) is analytic even in the limit of negligible level spacing in the nanowire. At B =0 and Δ >EC* , the maxima of d Q /d Ng are smeared by 2 e fluctuations described by a single-channel "charge Kondo" physics, whereas the B =0 ,Δ

  3. Laser Processed Silver Nanowire Network Transparent Electrodes for Novel Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spechler, Joshua Allen

    Silver nanowire network transparent conducting layers are poised to make headway into a space previously dominated by transparent conducting oxides due to the promise of a flexible, scaleable, lab-atmosphere processable alternative. However, there are many challenges standing in the way between research scale use and consumer technology scale adaptation of this technology. In this thesis we will explore many, and overcome a few of these challenges. We will address the poor conductivity at the narrow nanowire-nanowire junction points in the network by developing a laser based process to weld nanowires together on a microscopic scale. We address the need for a comparative metric for transparent conductors in general, by taking a device level rather than a component level view of these layers. We also address the mechanical, physical, and thermal limitations to the silver nanowire networks by making composites from materials including a colorless polyimide and titania sol-gel. Additionally, we verify our findings by integrating these processes into devices. Studying a hybrid organic/inorganic heterojunction photovoltaic device we show the benefits of a laser processed electrode. Green phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes fabricated on a solution phase processed silver nanowire based electrode show favorable device metrics compared to a conductive oxide electrode based control. The work in this thesis is intended to push the adoption of silver nanowire networks to further allow new device architectures, and thereby new device applications.

  4. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown. PMID:24113712

  5. Thermal and transport properties of a single nickel nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Min-Nan; Chen, Yang-Yuan; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Yang, Tzong-Jer; Lee, P. C.; Harutyunyan, S. R.; Chen, C. D.; Lai, S. J.

    2008-03-01

    Starting with a 100 nm nickel film grown on a Si3N4/Si substrate by thermal evaporator, a suspended nickel nanowire (Ni-NW) was fabricated through e-beam lithography and etching processes. The Ni-NW was a part of 4-probes circuit which is designed for electrical, thermal and thermopower measurements. The resistivity (ρ) and thermal conductivity (κ) of a single nickel nanowire have been measured in the temperature range from 4 to 300 K by 4-probes method and the self-heating-3φ technique. At 300 K the thermal conductivity of nanowire is ˜ 20% of the bulk, it diminishes to lower value as temperature decreases, the consequence is opposite to that in the bulk in which it decreases with temperature increase. The result might be explained by the restriction of mean free paths of electron/phonon--phonon interactions due to the grain boundaries. The small relative resistivity ratio (RRR ˜ 2) confirms the polycrystalline characteristic of the nanowire. The thermopower (Seedbeck coefficient S) was also investigated by temperature gradient built up between two ends of the nanowire. The figure of merit ZT=S^2σ/κ in the one-dimension specimen will be discussed.

  6. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown.

  7. Synthesis of Ultrathin Copper Nanowires Using Tris(trimethylsilyl)silane for High-Performance and Low-Haze Transparent Conductors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fan; Yu, Yi; Dou, Letian; Sun, Jianwei; Yang, Qin; Schildknecht, Christian; Schierle-Arndt, Kerstin; Yang, Peidong

    2015-11-11

    Colloidal metal nanowire based transparent conductors are excellent candidates to replace indium-tin-oxide (ITO) owing to their outstanding balance between transparency and conductivity, flexibility, and solution-processability. Copper stands out as a promising material candidate due to its high intrinsic conductivity and earth abundance. Here, we report a new synthetic approach, using tris(trimethylsilyl)silane as a mild reducing reagent, for synthesizing high-quality, ultrathin, and monodispersed copper nanowires, with an average diameter of 17.5 nm and a mean length of 17 μm. A study of the growth mechanism using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the copper nanowires adopt a five-fold twinned structure and evolve from decahedral nanoseeds. Fabricated transparent conducting films exhibit excellent transparency and conductivity. An additional advantage of our nanowire transparent conductors is highlighted through reduced optical haze factors (forward light scattering) due to the small nanowire diameter.

  8. Indium tin oxide nanowires grown by one-step thermal evaporation-deposition process at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haibo; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Niu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Duan; Li, Jinzhu; Cai, Le; Zhou, Weiya; Xie, Sishen

    2013-02-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO), as one of the most important transparent conducting oxide, is widely used in electro-optical field. We have developed a simple one-step method to synthesize ITO nanowires at low temperature of 600 degrees C. In detail, mixtures of InN nanowires and SnO powder, with the molar ratio of 10:1, have been used as precursors for the thermal evaporation-deposition of ITO nanowires on silicon/quartz slices. During the growth process, the evaporation temperature is maintained at 600 degrees C, which favors the decomposition of InN and oxidation of In, with a limited incorporation of Sn in the resulting compound (In:Sn approximately 11:1 in atomic ratio). As far as we know, this is the lowest growth temperature reported on the thermal deposition of ITO nanowires. The diameters of the nanowires are about 120 nm and the lengths are up to tens of micrometers. XRD characterization indicates the high crystallization of the nanowires. HRTEM results show the nanowires grow along the [200] direction. The transmittance of the nanowire film on quartz slice is more than 75% in the visible region. Based on photolithography and lift-off techniques, four-terminal measurement was utilized to test the resistivity of individual nanowire (6.11 x 10(-4) omega x cm). The high crystallization quality, good transmittance and low resistivity make as-grown ITO nanowires a promising candidate as transparent electrodes of nanoscale devices. PMID:23646624

  9. A comprehensive study of thermoelectric and transport properties of β-silicon carbide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Valentín, L. A.; Betancourt, J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Pettes, M. T.; Shi, L.; Soszyński, M.; Huczko, A.

    2013-11-14

    The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical and thermal conductivities of individual β-silicon carbide nanowires produced by combustion in a calorimetric bomb were studied using a suspended micro-resistance thermometry device that allows four-point probe measurements to be conducted on each nanowire. Additionally, crystal structure and growth direction for each measured nanowire was directly obtained by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The Fermi level, the carrier concentration, and mobility of each nanostructure were determined using a combination of Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity measurements, energy band structure and transport theory calculations. The temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities of the nanowires was explained in terms of contributions from boundary, impurity, and defect scattering.

  10. A comprehensive study of thermoelectric and transport properties of β-silicon carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentín, L. A.; Betancourt, J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Pettes, M. T.; Shi, L.; Soszyński, M.; Huczko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical and thermal conductivities of individual β-silicon carbide nanowires produced by combustion in a calorimetric bomb were studied using a suspended micro-resistance thermometry device that allows four-point probe measurements to be conducted on each nanowire. Additionally, crystal structure and growth direction for each measured nanowire was directly obtained by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The Fermi level, the carrier concentration, and mobility of each nanostructure were determined using a combination of Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity measurements, energy band structure and transport theory calculations. The temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities of the nanowires was explained in terms of contributions from boundary, impurity, and defect scattering.

  11. Controllable template synthesis of superconducting Zn nanowires with different microstructures by electrochemical deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Guo; Tian, Ming-Liang; Kumar, Nitesh; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2005-07-01

    A systematic study was conducted on the fabrication, structural characterization, and transport properties of Zn nanowires with diameters between 40 and 100 nm. Zinc nanowires were fabricated by electrodepositing Zn into commercially available polycarbonate (PC) or anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. By controlling the electrodeposition process, we found that the nanowires can be single-crystal, polycrystalline Zn, crystalline Zn/nanocrystalline ZnO composites, or entirely ZnO. The microstructure and chemistry was characterized by using transmission electron microscopy. Transport studies on single-crystal or polycrystalline Zn nanowire arrays embedded inside the membrane showed that the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is insensitive to the nanowire diameter and morphology. The superconductivity shows a clear crossover from bulklike to quasi-1D behavior, as evidenced by residual low-temperature resistance, when the diameter of the wires is reduced to 70 nm (20 times smaller than the bulk coherence length). PMID:16178219

  12. Ultrasonic processing of SbSI nanowires for their application to gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Mistewicz, K; Nowak, M; Wrzalik, R; Śleziona, J; Wieczorek, J; Guiseppi-Elie, A

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic processing has been applied to create durable electrical contacts between antimony sulfoiodide (SbSI) nanowires and Au microelectrodes on glass substrate. After DC electric field alignment of SbSI nanowires between the microelectrodes, the sample was irradiated with ultrasound using chromium copper alloy sonotrode ended with silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal. The SEM and AFM investigations have showed that the ends of SbSI nanowires have been well compacted and bonded with microelectrodes. Ultrasonic processing has caused 420% increase of DC electric conductance of the junctions between Au microelectrodes and SbSI nanowires. The fabricated structures of SbSI nanowires bonded to Au microelectrodes are useful e.g. as nitrous oxide (N2O) gas sensors. These low power devices can operate at room temperature and do not require heating system for recovery. PMID:27065469

  13. Improved efficiency of hybrid organic photovoltaics by pulsed laser sintering of silver nanowire network transparent electrode.

    PubMed

    Spechler, Joshua A; Nagamatsu, Ken A; Sturm, James C; Arnold, Craig B

    2015-05-20

    In this Research Article, we demonstrate pulsed laser processing of a silver nanowire network transparent conductor on top of an otherwise complete solar cell. The macroscopic pulsed laser irradiation serves to sinter nanowire-nanowire junctions on the nanoscale, leading to a much more conductive electrode. We fabricate hybrid silicon/organic heterojunction photovoltaic devices, which have ITO-free, solution processed, and laser processed transparent electrodes. Furthermore, devices which have high resistive losses show up to a 35% increase in power conversion efficiency after laser processing. We perform this study over a range of laser fluences, and a range of nanowire area coverage to investigate the sintering mechanism of nanowires inside of a device stack. The increase in device performance is modeled using a simple photovoltaic diode approach and compares favorably to the experimental data.

  14. Synthesis of Fe Doped ZnO Nanowire Arrays that Detect Formaldehyde Gas.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoo Sang; Seo, Hyo Won; Kim, Su Hyo; Kim, Young Keun

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their chemical and thermal stability and doping effects on providing electrons to the conduction band, doped ZnO nanowires have generated interest for use in electronic devices. Here we report hydrothermally grown Fe-doped ZnO nanowires and their gas-sensing properties. The synthesized nanowires have a high crystallinity and are 60 nm in diameter and 1.7 μm in length. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to understand the doping effects on the microstructures and gas sensing properties. When the Fe-doped ZnO nanowire arrays were evaluated for gas sensing, responses were recorded through changes in temperature and gas concentration. Gas sensors consisting of ZnO nanowires doped with 3-5 at.% Fe showed optimum formaldehyde (HCHO) sensing performance at each working temperature.

  15. Synthesis of Fe Doped ZnO Nanowire Arrays that Detect Formaldehyde Gas.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yoo Sang; Seo, Hyo Won; Kim, Su Hyo; Kim, Young Keun

    2016-05-01

    Owing to their chemical and thermal stability and doping effects on providing electrons to the conduction band, doped ZnO nanowires have generated interest for use in electronic devices. Here we report hydrothermally grown Fe-doped ZnO nanowires and their gas-sensing properties. The synthesized nanowires have a high crystallinity and are 60 nm in diameter and 1.7 μm in length. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to understand the doping effects on the microstructures and gas sensing properties. When the Fe-doped ZnO nanowire arrays were evaluated for gas sensing, responses were recorded through changes in temperature and gas concentration. Gas sensors consisting of ZnO nanowires doped with 3-5 at.% Fe showed optimum formaldehyde (HCHO) sensing performance at each working temperature. PMID:27483827

  16. Nanowire liquid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian Yu; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Niu, Jun Jie; Kushima, Akihiro; Qian, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Li; Mao, Scott X.; Li, Ju

    2013-04-01

    The ability to form tiny droplets of liquids and control their movements is important in printing or patterning, chemical reactions and biological assays. So far, such nanofluidic capabilities have principally used components such as channels, nozzles or tubes, where a solid encloses the transported liquid. Here, we show that liquids can flow along the outer surface of solid nanowires at a scale of attolitres per second and the process can be directly imaged with in situ transmission electron microscopy. Microscopy videos show that an ionic liquid can be pumped along tin dioxide, silicon or zinc oxide nanowires as a thin precursor film or as beads riding on the precursor film. Theoretical analysis suggests there is a critical film thickness of ~10 nm below which the liquid flows as a flat film and above which it flows as discrete beads. This critical thickness is the result of intermolecular forces between solid and liquid, which compete with liquid surface energy and Rayleigh-Plateau instability.

  17. Flexible transparent PES/silver nanowires/PET sandwich-structured film for high-efficiency electromagnetic interference shielding.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingjun; Gao, Jiefeng; Dong, Yucheng; Li, Kai; Shan, Guangcun; Yang, Shiliu; Li, Robert Kwok-Yiu

    2012-05-01

    We have developed a kind of high-yield synthesis strategy for silver nanowires by a two-step injection polyol method. Silver nanowires and polyethylene oxide (PEO) (M(w) = 900,000) were prepared in a homogeneous-coating ink. Wet composite films with different thicknesses were fabricated on a PET substrate by drawn-down rod-coating technology. Silver nanowires on PET substrates present a homogeneous distribution under the assistance of PEO. Then PEO was thermally removed in situ at a relatively low temperature attributed to its special thermal behavior under atmospheric conditions. As-prepared metallic nanowire films on PET substrates show excellent stability and a good combination of conductivity and light transmission. A layer of transparent poly(ethersulfones) (PESs) was further coated on silver nanowire networks by the same coating method to prevent the shedding and corrosion of silver nanowires. Sandwich-structured flexible transparent films were obtained and displayed excellent electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness.

  18. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Z.; Zhao, S.; Woo, S. Y.; Bugnet, M.; Djavid, M.; Liu, X.; Kang, J.; Kong, X.; Ji, W.; Guo, H.; Liu, Z.; Botton, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the detailed molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of Al(Ga)N nanowire heterostructures on Si and their applications for deep ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lasers. The nanowires are formed under nitrogen-rich conditions without using any metal catalyst. Compared to conventional epilayers, Mg-dopant incorporation is significantly enhanced in nearly strain- and defect-free Al(Ga)N nanowire structures, leading to efficient p-type conduction. The resulting Al(Ga)N nanowire LEDs exhibit excellent performance, including a turn-on voltage of ∼5.5 V for an AlN nanowire LED operating at 207 nm. The design, fabrication, and performance of an electrically injected AlGaN nanowire laser operating in the UV-B band is also presented.

  19. Raman spectroscopy and electrical properties of InAs nanowires with local oxidation enabled by substrate micro-trenches and laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanta, R.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygård, J.; Jespersen, T. S.; Madsen, M. H.; Liao, Z.; Vosch, T.

    2015-12-14

    The thermal gradients along indium arsenide nanowires were engineered by a combination of fabricated micro-trenches in the supporting substrate and focused laser irradiation. This allowed local spatial control of thermally activated oxidation reactions of the nanowire on the scale of the diffraction limit. The locality of the oxidation was detected by micro-Raman mapping, and the results were found to be consistent with numerical simulations of the temperature profile. Applying the technique to nanowires in electrical devices the locally oxidized nanowires remained conducting with a lower conductance as expected for an effectively thinner conducting core.

  20. Raman spectroscopy and electrical properties of InAs nanowires with local oxidation enabled by substrate micro-trenches and laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanta, R.; Madsen, M. H.; Liao, Z.; Krogstrup, P.; Vosch, T.; Nygârd, J.; Jespersen, T. S.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal gradients along indium arsenide nanowires were engineered by a combination of fabricated micro-trenches in the supporting substrate and focused laser irradiation. This allowed local spatial control of thermally activated oxidation reactions of the nanowire on the scale of the diffraction limit. The locality of the oxidation was detected by micro-Raman mapping, and the results were found to be consistent with numerical simulations of the temperature profile. Applying the technique to nanowires in electrical devices the locally oxidized nanowires remained conducting with a lower conductance as expected for an effectively thinner conducting core.

  1. Nanowire heating by optical electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roder, Paden B; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Davis, E James

    2012-11-20

    The dissipative absorption of electromagnetic energy by 1D nanoscale structures at optical frequencies is applicable to several important phenomena, including biomedical photothermal theranostics, nanoscale photovoltaic materials, atmospheric aerosols, and integrated photonic devices. Closed-form analytical calculations are presented for the temperature rise within infinite circular cylinders with nanometer-scale diameters (nanowires) that are irradiated at right angles by a continuous-wave laser source polarized along the nanowire's axis. Solutions for the heat source are compared to both numerical finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and well-known Mie scattering cross sections for infinite cylinders. The analysis predicts that the maximum temperature increase is affected not only by the cylinder's composition and porosity but also by morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) that lead to significant spikes in the local temperature at particular diameters. Furthermore, silicon nanowires with high thermal conductivities are observed to exhibit extremely uniform internal temperatures during electromagnetic heating to 1 part in 10(6), including cases where there are substantial fluctuations of the internal electric-field source term that generates the Joule heating. For a highly absorbing material such as carbon, much higher temperatures are predicted, the internal temperature distribution is nonuniform, and MDRs are not encountered. PMID:23061375

  2. Scanning probe microscopy of protein nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Kathleen Ann

    The bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens grows electrically-conductive pili, which act as protein nanowires, in order to transfer electrons from the cell to electron acceptors in its environment when direct charge transfer through the cell membrane is not feasible. Understanding the electronic structure of the pili can provide insight into fundamental processes of electron transfer in biological systems. This study investigated the electronic structure of these protein nanowires using the toolbox of scanning probe microscopy, specifically scanning tunneling microscopy and point tunneling spectroscopy. These measurements were performed at 77 K and at room temperature. The measured data are compared to theoretical calculations. Density of states measurements using tunneling spectroscopy show that these pili act as narrow-gap biological semiconductors at 77 K. The onset of nonzero density of states remains within the metabolically-relevant voltage range. At room temperature, spectroscopy of the pili retains a gap-like structure, but this pseudogap is raised to a nonzero density of states at even the smallest applied voltages. These pilus nanowires also exhibit a distinct spatial dependence of the density of states across the breadth of the pili.

  3. Nanowire heating by optical electromagnetic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Roder, Paden B; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Davis, E James

    2012-11-20

    The dissipative absorption of electromagnetic energy by 1D nanoscale structures at optical frequencies is applicable to several important phenomena, including biomedical photothermal theranostics, nanoscale photovoltaic materials, atmospheric aerosols, and integrated photonic devices. Closed-form analytical calculations are presented for the temperature rise within infinite circular cylinders with nanometer-scale diameters (nanowires) that are irradiated at right angles by a continuous-wave laser source polarized along the nanowire's axis. Solutions for the heat source are compared to both numerical finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations and well-known Mie scattering cross sections for infinite cylinders. The analysis predicts that the maximum temperature increase is affected not only by the cylinder's composition and porosity but also by morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) that lead to significant spikes in the local temperature at particular diameters. Furthermore, silicon nanowires with high thermal conductivities are observed to exhibit extremely uniform internal temperatures during electromagnetic heating to 1 part in 10(6), including cases where there are substantial fluctuations of the internal electric-field source term that generates the Joule heating. For a highly absorbing material such as carbon, much higher temperatures are predicted, the internal temperature distribution is nonuniform, and MDRs are not encountered.

  4. Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Timothy D.; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2014-10-30

    Silicon (Si) has a very high lithium storage capacity and is being explored as a negative electrode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Si nanowires can exhibit relatively stable performance for many cycles of charging; however, conductive carbon must often be added to the electrode layer to improve the rate capability due to the relatively low electrical conductivity of Si. The added carbon lowers the capacity of the electrode. Here, we show that the rate capability of Si in LIBs can be substantially enhanced by incorporating tin (Sn) into Si nanowires. The solubility of Sn in Si is very low (0.015 at%); yet, Sn used as a seed for supercritical fluid–liquid–solid (SFLS) growth can be trapped in Si nanowires with relatively high concentration (10 at%). Such Sn-containing Si nanowires and no added conductive carbon in the electrode layer, could be cycled in LIBs with high capacity (*1000 mA h g*1 over 100 cycles) at a current density of 2.8 A g*1 (1 C). Capacities exceeding that of graphite could still be reached at cycle rates as high as 2 C. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that lithiation occurs five times faster in Si nanowires with significant amounts of Sn than in the Si nanowires without Sn, and twice as fast as in nanowires that were coated with carbon.

  5. Diameter-dependent thermoelectric figure of merit in single-crystalline Bi nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmin; Lee, Seunghyun; Brovman, Yuri M.; Kim, Philip; Lee, Wooyoung

    2015-03-01

    The diameter-dependent thermoelectric properties of individual single-crystalline Bi nanowires grown by the on-film formation of nanowires method have been investigated. The electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the nanowire diameter using an individual nanowire device. The thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) calculated from the measured thermoelectric properties shows an increase from the bulk value to a maximum value of 0.28 at 109 nm-diameter, followed by a decrease upon further decreasing the diameter. This non-monotonic diameter dependence of ZT in Bi nanowires reveals simultaneous positive and negative contributions to the thermoelectric efficiency, driven by the change in intrinsic properties, which originates from the diameter-dependent classical and quantum size effects.The diameter-dependent thermoelectric properties of individual single-crystalline Bi nanowires grown by the on-film formation of nanowires method have been investigated. The electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity were measured as functions of the nanowire diameter using an individual nanowire device. The thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) calculated from the measured thermoelectric properties shows an increase from the bulk value to a maximum value of 0.28 at 109 nm-diameter, followed by a decrease upon further decreasing the diameter. This non-monotonic diameter dependence of ZT in Bi nanowires reveals simultaneous positive and negative contributions to the thermoelectric efficiency, driven by the change in intrinsic properties, which originates from the diameter-dependent classical and quantum size effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06412g

  6. Single-Nanowire Electrochemical Probe Detection for Internally Optimized Mechanism of Porous Graphene in Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Yan, Mengyu; Wang, Xuanpeng; Han, Chunhua; He, Liang; Wei, Xiujuan; Niu, Chaojiang; Zhao, Kangning; Tian, Xiaocong; Wei, Qiulong; Li, Zijia; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has been widely used to enhance the performance of energy storage devices due to its high conductivity, large surface area, and excellent mechanical flexibility. However, it is still unclear how graphene influences the electrochemical performance and reaction mechanisms of electrode materials. The single-nanowire electrochemical probe is an effective tool to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions in situ. Here, pure MnO2 nanowires, reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires, and porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires are employed to investigate the capacitance, ion diffusion coefficient, and charge storage mechanisms in single-nanowire electrochemical devices. The porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire delivers an areal capacitance of 104 nF/μm(2), which is 4.0 and 2.8 times as high as those of reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire and MnO2 nanowire, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. It is demonstrated that the reduced graphene oxide wrapping around the MnO2 nanowire greatly increases the electronic conductivity of the active materials, but decreases the ion diffusion coefficient because of the shielding effect of graphene. By creating pores in the graphene, the ion diffusion coefficient is recovered without degradation of the electron transport rate, which significantly improves the capacitance. Such single-nanowire electrochemical probes, which can detect electrochemical processes and behavior in situ, can also be fabricated with other active materials for energy storage and other applications in related fields.

  7. Single-Nanowire Electrochemical Probe Detection for Internally Optimized Mechanism of Porous Graphene in Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Yan, Mengyu; Wang, Xuanpeng; Han, Chunhua; He, Liang; Wei, Xiujuan; Niu, Chaojiang; Zhao, Kangning; Tian, Xiaocong; Wei, Qiulong; Li, Zijia; Mai, Liqiang

    2016-03-01

    Graphene has been widely used to enhance the performance of energy storage devices due to its high conductivity, large surface area, and excellent mechanical flexibility. However, it is still unclear how graphene influences the electrochemical performance and reaction mechanisms of electrode materials. The single-nanowire electrochemical probe is an effective tool to explore the intrinsic mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions in situ. Here, pure MnO2 nanowires, reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires, and porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowires are employed to investigate the capacitance, ion diffusion coefficient, and charge storage mechanisms in single-nanowire electrochemical devices. The porous graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire delivers an areal capacitance of 104 nF/μm(2), which is 4.0 and 2.8 times as high as those of reduced graphene oxide/MnO2 wire-in-scroll nanowire and MnO2 nanowire, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. It is demonstrated that the reduced graphene oxide wrapping around the MnO2 nanowire greatly increases the electronic conductivity of the active materials, but decreases the ion diffusion coefficient because of the shielding effect of graphene. By creating pores in the graphene, the ion diffusion coefficient is recovered without degradation of the electron transport rate, which significantly improves the capacitance. Such single-nanowire electrochemical probes, which can detect electrochemical processes and behavior in situ, can also be fabricated with other active materials for energy storage and other applications in related fields. PMID:26882441

  8. Electrospinning of superconducting YBCO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Edgar A.; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Quintero, Pedro A.; Meisel, Mark W.; Nino, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) nanowires with critical transition temperature Tc = 91.7 K were synthesized by an electrospinning process with the use of sol-gel precursors. A homogeneous polymeric solution containing Y, Ba, and Cu acetates was electrospun, resulting in collections of randomly oriented nanowires as well as bundles of aligned nanowires. Fully crystallized YBCO nanowires were obtained after calcination at temperatures as low as 820 °C. The morphology, microstructure, and crystal structure were investigated, and the diameters of the polycrystalline nanowires varied between 120 and 550 nm depending on the viscosity of the precursors. Thinner individual wires, with diameters in the 50-80 nm range, were synthesized with a single grain structure across the entire wire cross-section.

  9. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-01-01

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells. PMID:26607742

  10. Polypyrrole Nanowires Generation Using Chemical Synthesis Through Ion Track Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Chakarvarti, S. K.

    Polypyrrole nanocylinders were produced by non-galvanically (chemically) synthesizing polypyrrole within the pores of nanoporous polycarbonate ion track-etched membranes. The morphology of the nanowires was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of the nanocylinders was calculated by leaving the nanocylinders fixed in the insulating template membrane and evaluating the transmembrane resistance.

  11. Diameter Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Individual SnTe Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, E. Z.; Li, Z.; Martinez, J.; Sinitsyn, N.; Htoon, H.; Li, N.; Swartzentruber, B.; Hollingsworth, J.; Wang, J.; Zhang, S. X.

    2015-03-01

    Tin telluride (SnTe), a newly discovered topological crystalline insulator, has recently been suggested to be a promising thermoelectric material. In this work, we report on a systematic study of the thermoelectric properties of individual single-crystalline SnTe nanowires with different diameters. Measurements of thermopower, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were carried out on the same nanowires over a temperature range of 25 - 300 K. While the electrical conductivity does not show a strong diameter dependence, we found that the thermopower increases by a factor of two when the nanowire diameter is decreased from 913 nm to 218 nm. The thermal conductivity of the measured NWs is lower than that of the bulk SnTe, which may be attributed to the enhanced phonon - surface boundary scattering and phonon-defect scattering. We further calculated the temperature dependent figure of merit ZT for each individual nanowire. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science by Los Alamos National Laboratory (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Sandia National Laboratories (Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000). We acknowledge support by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  12. Flash nano-welding: investigation and control of the photothermal response of ultrathin bismuth sulfide nanowire films.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jordan W; Lawson, Gregor; O'Brien, Paul; Klenkler, Richard; Helander, Michael G; Petrov, Srebri; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Kherani, Nazir P; Adronov, Alex; Ozin, Geoffery

    2010-10-15

    Ultrathin Bi₂S₃ nanowires undergo a pronounced photothermal response to irradiation from a commercial camera flash. Controlled nano-welding was shown by using single walled carbon nanotube mats as an electrically and thermally conductive substrate. The resulting welded nanowire film is denser and has significantly lower resistance than unflashed bilayer films.

  13. Integrated chemical and biological systems in nanowire structures towards nano-scale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rose M.

    Nanowires composed of metal and conducting polymers with integrated proteins and chemical systems have been investigated as building blocks for next-generation nano-scale sensors and assemblies. These nanowires were fabricated by combining chemical and electrochemical methods of synthesis of gold and conducting polymers in nanopores of anodized alumina membranes. Polymer nanowires were synthesized from buffer solutions as a mean to promote a biocompatible environment for the incorporation of proteins. A variety of proteins were incorporated into the polymer matrix by entrapment during polymerization that imparted the polymer material with biological functionality. Another class of composite nanowires containing electro-active conducting polymer junctions was developed for applications in chemical sensor arrays. The methodologies described in this thesis provide an inexpensive and straightforward approach to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles incorporating a variety of biological and inorganic species that can be integrated to current microelectronic technologies for the development of nano-scale sensor arrays.

  14. Optical Sensing with Simultaneous Electrochemical Control in Metal Nanowire Arrays

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Robert; Fraschina, Corrado; Sannomiya, Takumi; Auzelyte, Vaida; Vörös, Janos

    2010-01-01

    This work explores the alternative use of noble metal nanowire systems in large-scale array configurations to exploit both the nanowires’ conductive nature and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The first known nanowire-based system has been constructed, with which optical signals are influenced by the simultaneous application of electrochemical potentials. Optical characterization of nanowire arrays was performed by measuring the bulk refractive index sensitivity and the limit of detection. The formation of an electrical double layer was controlled in NaCl solutions to study the effect of local refractive index changes on the spectral response. Resonance peak shifts of over 4 nm, a bulk refractive index sensitivity up to 115 nm/RIU and a limit of detection as low as 4.5 × 10−4 RIU were obtained for gold nanowire arrays. Simulations with the Multiple Multipole Program (MMP) confirm such bulk refractive index sensitivities. Initial experiments demonstrated successful optical biosensing using a novel form of particle-based nanowire arrays. In addition, the formation of an ionic layer (Stern-layer) upon applying an electrochemical potential was also monitored by the shift of the plasmon resonance. PMID:22163441

  15. Magnetic Phenomena and Ballistic Transport in Monatomic Transition Metal Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio

    2004-03-01

    I will address the general issue of possible magnetism in ultimately thin, vacuum suspended monatomic transition metal nanowires, and of its eventual consequences on ballistic conductance. First I will show, based on zero-temperature electronic structure calculations, that magnetism will generally occur in 4d nanowires made of Rh, Ru, and Pd, and also in 5d nanowires made of Pt,Os as well as of Ir under stress [1]. Magnetization magnitudes obtained are stress dependent, and roughly in the order of 1/2 Bohr magneton per atom at zero stress. This apparent resurgence of Hund's rule magnetism, usually quenched in these transition metals in bulk, can be attributed to d-band narrowing in the nanowire, accompanied by a slightly more effective emptying of the d-bands in favor of s-bands than in the bulk metal. In addition Pd exemplifies a case where 1-dimensional band edge singularities represent the factor that triggers awake an otherwise dormant Hund's rule magnetism. Analysis of the band structures of the wires indicates that the onset of magnetism should generally reduce, although not by much, the number of conducting bands crossing the Fermi level. This in turn suggests that ballistic conductance through the wires should also be affected by magnetism, at least at zero temperature. Conductance calculations based on an extension of the complex band structure method to ultrasoft pseudopotentials [2] are presently under way, to describe that. A discussion of the expected nanowire conductance in connection with experimental data will also be given, particularly in connection with fractional conductance peaks recently reported. We show that magnetization reversals inside the nanowire[3] could in principle lead to fractional conductance. However, some such fractional peaks were seen at room temperature and zero field [4], where nanowire magnetism seems unlikely to survive. Their origin is disputed [5] and remains unclear at the moment. Work done in collaboration with A

  16. Hot-rolling nanowire transparent electrodes for surface roughness minimization.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Khaligh, Hadi; Goldthorpe, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes are a promising alternative to transparent conductive oxides. However, their surface roughness presents a problem for their integration into devices with thin layers such as organic electronic devices. In this paper, hot rollers are used to soften plastic substrates with heat and mechanically press the nanowires into the substrate surface. By doing so, the root-mean-square surface roughness is reduced to 7 nm and the maximum peak-to-valley value is 30 nm, making the electrodes suitable for typical organic devices. This simple process requires no additional materials, which results in a higher transparency, and is compatible with roll-to-roll fabrication processes. In addition, the adhesion of the nanowires to the substrate significantly increases.

  17. Silver nanowire array-polymer composite as thermal interface material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ju; Munari, Alessio; Dalton, Eric; Mathewson, Alan; Razeeb, Kafil M.

    2009-12-01

    Silver nanowire arrays embedded inside polycarbonate templates are investigated as a viable thermal interface material for electronic cooling applications. The composite shows an average thermal diffusivity value of 1.89×10-5 m2 s-1, which resulted in an intrinsic thermal conductivity of 30.3 W m-1 K-1. The nanowires' protrusion from the film surface enables it to conform to the surface roughness to make a better thermal contact. This resulted in a 61% reduction in thermal impedance when compared with blank polymer. An ˜30 nm Au film on the top of the composite was found to act as a heat spreader, reducing the thermal impedance further by 35%. A contact impedance model was employed to compare the contact impedance of aligned silver nanowire-polymer composites with that of aligned carbon nanotubes, which showed that the Young's modulus of the composite is the defining factor in the overall thermal impedance of these composites.

  18. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Genlik, Sevim Polat; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-10-28

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm(-2). Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs. PMID:27651222

  19. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Polat Genlik, Sevim; Emrah Unalan, Husnu

    2016-10-01

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm-2. Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs.

  20. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Genlik, Sevim Polat; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-10-28

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm(-2). Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs.

  1. III-Nitride Nanowire Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key gure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical con nement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve singlemode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode op eration. The rst method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-o condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter e ciency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, speci cally a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip that emit

  2. III-nitride nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jeremy Benjamin

    In recent years there has been a tremendous interest in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Among these devices are semiconductor nanowires whose diameters range from 10-100 nm. To date, nanowires have been grown using many semiconducting material systems and have been utilized as light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells. Nanowires possess a relatively large index contrast relative to their dielectric environment and can be used as lasers. A key figure of merit that allows for nanowire lasing is the relatively high optical confinement factor. In this work, I discuss the optical characterization of 3 types of III-nitride nanowire laser devices. Two devices were designed to reduce the number of lasing modes to achieve single-mode operation. The third device implements low-group velocity mode lasing with a photonic crystal constructed of an array of nanowires. Single-mode operation is necessary in any application where high beam quality and single frequency operation is required. III-Nitride nanowire lasers typically operate in a combined multi-longitudinal and multi-transverse mode state. Two schemes are introduced here for controlling the optical modes and achieving single-mode operation. The first method involves reducing the diameter of individual nanowires to the cut-off condition, where only one optical mode propagates in the wire. The second method employs distributed feedback (DFB) to achieve single-mode lasing by placing individual GaN nanowires onto substrates with etched gratings. The nanowire-grating substrate acted as a distributed feedback mirror producing single mode operation at 370 nm with a mode suppression ratio (MSR) of 17 dB. The usage of lasers for solid state lighting has the potential to further reduce U.S. lighting energy usage through an increase in emitter efficiency. Advances in nanowire fabrication, specifically a two-step top-down approach, have allowed for the demonstration of a multi-color array of lasers on a single chip

  3. Electrical limit of silver nanowire electrodes: Direct measurement of the nanowire junction resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Franz; Floresca, Carlo; Kneppe, David; Bormann, Ludwig; Sachse, Christoph; Weiß, Nelli; Eychmüller, Alexander; Amassian, Aram; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Leo, Karl

    2016-04-01

    We measure basic network parameters of silver nanowire (AgNW) networks commonly used as transparent conducting electrodes in organic optoelectronic devices. By means of four point probing with nanoprobes, the wire-to-wire junction resistance and the resistance of single nanowires are measured. The resistance RNW of a single nanowire shows a value of RNW=(4.96 ±0.18 ) Ω/μm . The junction resistance RJ differs for annealed and non-annealed NW networks, exhibiting values of RJ=(25.2 ±1.9 ) Ω (annealed) and RJ=(529 ±239 ) Ω (non-annealed), respectively. Our simulation achieves a good agreement between the measured network parameters and the sheet resistance RS of the entire network. Extrapolating RJ to zero, our study show that we are close to the electrical limit of the conductivity of our AgNW system: We obtain a possible RS reduction by only ≈20 % (common RS≈10 Ω/sq ). Therefore, we expect further performance improvements in AgNW systems mainly by increasing NW length or by utilizing novel network geometries.

  4. Nanowires as Building Blocks to Fabricate Flexible Thermoelectric Fabric: The Case of Copper Telluride Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chongjian; Dun, Chaochao; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Ke; Shi, Zhongqi; Carroll, David L; Liu, Guiwu; Qiao, Guanjun

    2015-09-30

    A general approach to fabricate nanowires based inorganic/organic composite flexible thermoelectric fabric using a simple and efficacious five-step vacuum filtration process is proposed. As an excellent example, the performance of freestanding flexible thermoelectric thin film using copper telluride nanowires/polyvinylidene fluoride (Cu1.75Te NWs/PVDF = 2:1) as building block is demonstrated. By burying the Cu1.75Te NWs into the PVDF polymer agent, the flexible fabric exhibits room-temperature Seebeck coefficient and electric conductivity of 9.6 μV/K and 2490 S/cm, respectively, resulting in a power factor of 23 μW/(mK(2)) that is comparable to the bulk counterpart. Furthermore, this NW-based flexible fabric can endure hundreds of cycles of bending tests without significant performance degradation. PMID:26376703

  5. Thermal Transport in Silicon Nanowires at High Temperature up to 700 K.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Woochul; Lim, Jongwoo; Yu, Yi; Kong, Qiao; Urban, Jeffrey J; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-13

    Thermal transport in silicon nanowires has captured the attention of scientists for understanding phonon transport at the nanoscale, and the thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) reported in rough nanowires has inspired engineers to develop cost-effective waste heat recovery systems. Thermoelectric generators composed of silicon target high-temperature applications due to improved efficiency beyond 550 K. However, there have been no studies of thermal transport in silicon nanowires beyond room temperature. High-temperature measurements also enable studies of unanswered questions regarding the impact of surface boundaries and varying mode contributions as the highest vibrational modes are activated (Debye temperature of silicon is 645 K). Here, we develop a technique to investigate thermal transport in nanowires up to 700 K. Our thermal conductivity measurements on smooth silicon nanowires show the classical diameter dependence from 40 to 120 nm. In conjunction with Boltzmann transport equation, we also probe an increasing contribution of high-frequency phonons (optical phonons) in smooth silicon nanowires as the diameter decreases and the temperature increases. Thermal conductivity of rough silicon nanowires is significantly reduced throughout the temperature range, demonstrating a potential for efficient thermoelectric generation (e.g., ZT = 1 at 700 K).

  6. Thermal Transport in Silicon Nanowires at High Temperature up to 700 K.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Woochul; Lim, Jongwoo; Yu, Yi; Kong, Qiao; Urban, Jeffrey J; Yang, Peidong

    2016-07-13

    Thermal transport in silicon nanowires has captured the attention of scientists for understanding phonon transport at the nanoscale, and the thermoelectric figure-of-merit (ZT) reported in rough nanowires has inspired engineers to develop cost-effective waste heat recovery systems. Thermoelectric generators composed of silicon target high-temperature applications due to improved efficiency beyond 550 K. However, there have been no studies of thermal transport in silicon nanowires beyond room temperature. High-temperature measurements also enable studies of unanswered questions regarding the impact of surface boundaries and varying mode contributions as the highest vibrational modes are activated (Debye temperature of silicon is 645 K). Here, we develop a technique to investigate thermal transport in nanowires up to 700 K. Our thermal conductivity measurements on smooth silicon nanowires show the classical diameter dependence from 40 to 120 nm. In conjunction with Boltzmann transport equation, we also probe an increasing contribution of high-frequency phonons (optical phonons) in smooth silicon nanowires as the diameter decreases and the temperature increases. Thermal conductivity of rough silicon nanowires is significantly reduced throughout the temperature range, demonstrating a potential for efficient thermoelectric generation (e.g., ZT = 1 at 700 K). PMID:27243378

  7. Nonequilibrium microstructures for Ag-Ni nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajesh K; Srivastava, Chandan

    2015-04-01

    This work illustrates that a variety of nanowire microstructures can be obtained either by controlling the nanowire formation kinetics or by suitable thermal processing of as-deposited nanowires with nonequilibrium metastable microstructure. In the present work, 200-nm diameter Ag-Ni nanowires with similar compositions, but with significantly different microstructures, were electrodeposited. A 15 mA deposition current produced nanowires in which Ag-rich crystalline nanoparticles were embedded in a Ni-rich amorphous matrix. A 3 mA deposition current produced nanowires in which an Ag-rich crystalline phase formed a backbone-like configuration in the axial region of the nanowire, whereas the peripheral region contained Ni-rich nanocrystalline and amorphous phases. Isothermal annealing of the nanowires illustrated a phase evolution pathway that was extremely sensitive to the initial nanowire microstructure.

  8. Catalyzed oxidation for nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Kaiping; Sun, Ke; Huang, Bo; Dillon, Shen J.

    2014-04-01

    A simple, low-cost and scalable route to substrate-supported nanowire growth is reported based on catalyzed oxidation. The process shares common features with popular catalyzed nanowire growth techniques such as vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid (VSS), or vapor-quasi-solid (VQS) that use catalyst nanoparticles to direct the deposition of reactants from the vapor phase. Catalyzed oxidation for nanowire growth (CONG) utilizes catalyzed anion (e.g. O2) reduction from the vapor phase and metal (e.g. Fe) oxidation from the substrate to produce oxide nanowires (e.g. Fe3O4). The approach represents a new class of nanowire growth methodology that may be applied to a broad range of systems. CONG does not require expensive chemical vapor deposition or physical vapor deposition equipment and can be implemented at intermediate temperatures (400-600 °C) in a standard laboratory furnace. This work also demonstrates a passive approach to catalyst deposition that allows the process to be implemented simply with no lithography or physical vapor deposition steps. This effort validates the general approach by synthesizing MnO, Fe3O4, WO3, MgO, TiO2, ZnO, ReO3, and NiO nanowires via CONG. The process produces single crystalline nanowires that can be grown to high aspect ratio and as high-density nanowire forests. Applications of the as-grown Fe3O4 and ReO3 nanowires for lithium ion battery systems are demonstrated to display high areal energy density and power.

  9. Catalyzed oxidation for nanowire growth.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kaiping; Sun, Ke; Huang, Bo; Dillon, Shen J

    2014-04-11

    A simple, low-cost and scalable route to substrate-supported nanowire growth is reported based on catalyzed oxidation. The process shares common features with popular catalyzed nanowire growth techniques such as vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid-solid (VSS), or vapor-quasi-solid (VQS) that use catalyst nanoparticles to direct the deposition of reactants from the vapor phase. Catalyzed oxidation for nanowire growth (CONG) utilizes catalyzed anion (e.g. O2) reduction from the vapor phase and metal (e.g. Fe) oxidation from the substrate to produce oxide nanowires (e.g. Fe3O4). The approach represents a new class of nanowire growth methodology that may be applied to a broad range of systems. CONG does not require expensive chemical vapor deposition or physical vapor deposition equipment and can be implemented at intermediate temperatures (400-600 °C) in a standard laboratory furnace. This work also demonstrates a passive approach to catalyst deposition that allows the process to be implemented simply with no lithography or physical vapor deposition steps. This effort validates the general approach by synthesizing MnO, Fe3O4, WO3, MgO, TiO2, ZnO, ReO3, and NiO nanowires via CONG. The process produces single crystalline nanowires that can be grown to high aspect ratio and as high-density nanowire forests. Applications of the as-grown Fe3O4 and ReO3 nanowires for lithium ion battery systems are demonstrated to display high areal energy density and power.

  10. Structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Tsybeskov, L.; Kamins, T. I.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2015-12-21

    Detailed studies of the structural and optical properties of axial silicon-germanium nanowire heterojunctions show that despite the 4.2% lattice mismatch between Si and Ge they can be grown without a significant density of structural defects. The lattice mismatch induced strain is partially relieved due to spontaneous SiGe intermixing at the heterointerface during growth and lateral expansion of the Ge segment of the nanowire. The mismatch in Ge and Si coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity of Si/Ge nanowire heterojunctions are proposed to be responsible for the thermally induced stress detected under intense laser radiation in photoluminescence and Raman scattering measurements.

  11. Transition of Resistive Switching to Bidirectional Diode in Cu2O/Cu Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok-kee; Shin, Ho Sun; Song, Jae Yong

    2012-08-01

    Cu2O/Cu nanowires of about 2 µm length were electrodeposited within anodized aluminum oxide templates in an aqueous acidic solution using template-assisted pulse-reverse electrolysis. In the virgin state, reversible copper filaments were formed by using the copper ions driven by an electric field towards the cathode. Initially, the resistive switching dominated the electrical characteristics of the Cu2O/Cu nanowires due to the low-resistance reversible copper filaments. After the permanent breakup of the copper filaments under the high current density, the Cu2O/Cu nanowire showed bipolar exponential characteristics, which was attributed to mixed ionic and electronic conduction.

  12. Anomalous Modulation of a Zero-Bias Peak in a Hybrid Nanowire-Superconductor Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Van Harlingen, D. J.; Mohseni, P. K.; Jung, K.; Li, X.

    2013-03-01

    We report on transport measurements of an InAs nanowire coupled to niobium nitride leads at high magnetic fields. We observe a zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) in the differential conductance of the nanowire for certain ranges of magnetic field and chemical potential. The ZBA can oscillate in width with either the magnetic field or chemical potential; it can even split and re-form. We discuss how our results relate to recent predictions of hybridizing Majorana fermions in semiconducting nanowires, while considering more mundane explanations.

  13. Nanocrystalline nanowires: III. Electrons.

    PubMed

    Allen, Philip B

    2007-05-01

    Nanocrystalline nanowires (NCNW) are fragments of bulk crystals that are infinite in only one direction and typically have some rotational symmetry around this direction. Electron eigenstates belonging to the symmetry labels (k,m) (wavevector and rotational quantum number) are discussed. The rotational quantum number simplifies discussion of optical properties. For m not equal 0, the +/-m degeneracy allows orbital magnetism. The simplest sensible model which is more complex than a one-dimensional chain is solved. Methods are suggested for incorporating rotational symmetry into preexisting codes with three-dimensional translations.

  14. Nanocrystalline nanowires: 2. Phonons.

    PubMed

    Allen, Philip B

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nanowires (NCNW) are fragments of bulk crystals that are infinite in only one direction. A construction is given for calculating eigenstates belonging to the symmetry labels (k,m) (wavevector and rotational quantum number). Vibrational harmonic eigenstates are worked out explicitly for a simple model, illustrating the general results: the LA mode has m=0, while with sufficient rotational symmetry, the TA branch is doubly degenerate, has m=+/-1, and has quadratic dispersion with k for k less than the reciprocal diameter of the NCNW. The twiston branch (a fourth Goldstone boson) is an acoustic m=0 branch, additional to the LA and two TA branches.

  15. Nanoantennas for nanowire photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Alisafaee, Hossein; Fiddy, Michael A.

    2014-09-15

    We consider the use of plasmonic nanoantenna elements, hemispherical and cylindrical, for application in semiconductor nanowire (NW) vertical arrays. Using Mie theory and a finite element method, scattering and absorption efficiencies are obtained for the desired enhancement of interaction with light in the NWs. We find an optimal mixture of nanoantennae for efficient scattering of solar spectrum in the NW array. Spectral radiation patterns of scattered light are computed, and, for representing the total response of the nanoantenna-equipped NWs to the solar AM1.5G spectrum, the weighted average of scattering patterns for unpolarized normal incidence is obtained showing an advantageous overall directivity toward the NWs.

  16. Schottky barrier heights at the interfaces between pure-phase InAs nanowires and metal contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Boyong; Huang, Shaoyun; Wang, Jiyin; Pan, Dong; Zhao, Jianghua; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding of the Schottky barriers formed at metal contact-InAs nanowire interfaces is of great importance for the development of high-performance InAs nanowire nanoelectronic and quantum devices. Here, we report a systematical study of InAs nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) and the Schottky barrier heights formed at the contact-nanowire interfaces. The InAs nanowires employed are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are high material quality single crystals, and the devices are made by directly contacting the nanowires with a series of metals of different work functions. The fabricated InAs nanowire FET devices are characterized by electrical measurements at different temperatures and the Schottky barrier heights are extracted from the measured temperature and gate-voltage dependences of the channel current. We show that although the work functions of the contact metals are widely spread, the Schottky barrier heights are determined to be distributed over 35-55 meV, showing a weak but not negligible dependence on the metals. The deduced Fermi level in the InAs nanowire channels is found to be in the band gap and very close to the conduction band. The physical origin of the results is discussed in terms of Fermi level pinning by the surface states of the InAs nanowires and a shift in pinned Fermi level induced by the metal-related interface states.

  17. Biocompatible and Antibacterial SnO2 Nanowire Films Synthesized by E-Beam Evaporation Method.

    PubMed

    Prasad, R G S V; Phani, A R; Rao, K N; Kumar, R Rakesh; Prasad, S; Prabhakara, G; Sheeja, M S; Salins, C P; Endrino, J L; Raju, D B

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the biocompatibility and antibacterial activities of novel SnO2 nanowire coatings prepared by electron-beam (E-Beam) evaporation process at low temperatures were studied. The nanowire coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity and cell proliferation assays suggested that the SnO2 nanowire coatings were nontoxic and promoted the proliferation of C2C12 and L929 cells (> 90% viability). Cellular activities, cell adhesion, and lactate dehydrogenase activities were consistent with the superior biocompatibility of the nanowire materials. Notably, the nanowire coating showed potent antibacterial activity against six different bacterial strains. The antibacterial activity of the SnO2 material was attributed to the photocatalytic nature of SnO2. The antibacterial activity and biocompatibility of the newly developed SnO2 nanowire coatings may enable their use as coating materials for biomedical implants. PMID:26353584

  18. Terahertz sensing using ferroelectric nanowires.

    PubMed

    Herchig, R; Schultz, Kimberly; McCash, Kevin; Ponomareva, I

    2013-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the interaction of ferroelectric nanowires with terahertz (THz) Gaussian-shaped pulses of electric field. The computational data indicate the existence of two interaction scenarios that are associated with 'lossless' and dissipative, or 'lossy', interaction mechanisms. A thermodynamical approach is used to analyze the computational data for a wide range of THz pulses. The analysis establishes the foundation for understanding the nanowires' response to the THz pulses and reveals the potential of ferroelectric nanowires to function as nanoscale sensors of THz radiation. Various aspects of this THz nanosensing are analyzed and discussed.

  19. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  20. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Thomas

    2014-10-06

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  1. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  2. Electronic and thermal transport study of sinusoidally corrugated nanowires aiming to improve thermoelectric efficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Martin, P N; Ravaioli, U

    2016-01-22

    Improvement of thermoelectric efficiency has been very challenging in the solid-state industry due to the interplay among transport coefficients which measure the efficiency. In this work, we modulate the geometry of nanowires to interrupt thermal transport with causing only a minimal impact on electronic transport properties, thereby maximizing the thermoelectric power generation. As it is essential to scrutinize comprehensively both electronic and thermal transport behaviors for nano-scale thermoelectric devices, we investigate the Seebeck coefficient, the electrical conductance, and the thermal conductivity of sinusoidally corrugated silicon nanowires and eventually look into an enhancement of the thermoelectric figure-of-merit [Formula: see text] from the modulated nanowires over typical straight nanowires. A loss in the electronic transport coefficient is calculated with the recursive Green function along with the Landauer formalism, and the thermal transport is simulated with the molecular dynamics. In contrast to a small influence on the thermopower and the electrical conductance of the geometry-modulated nanowires, a large reduction of the thermal conductivity yields an enhancement of the efficiency by 10% to 35% from the typical nanowires. We find that this approach can be easily extended to various structures and materials as we consider the geometrical modulation as a sole source of perturbation to the system.

  3. Geometry dependent I-V characteristics of silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ng, Man-Fai; Shen, Lei; Zhou, Liping; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Tan, Vincent B C

    2008-11-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of small-diameter hydrogenated and pristine silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are calculated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. We show that the I-V characteristics depend strongly on length, growth orientation, and surface modification of the SiNWs. In particular, a length of 3 nm is suggested for the nanowires to retrieve its intrinsic conducting properties from the influences of both the electrodes and metal/semiconductor mismatched surface contact; surface reconstruction would enhance the conductance in hydrogenated SiNW, which is explained by the extra conducting eigenchannel found in the transmission spectrum, suggesting possible surface conducting channel. Discussions with available experimental data are given.

  4. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  5. Carrier dynamics in Si nanowires fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Zhu, Li-Guo; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xuejin; Shan, Jie; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2012-09-25

    Silicon nanowire arrays fabricated by metal-assisted wet chemical etching have emerged as a promising architecture for solar energy harvesting applications. Here we investigate the dynamics and transport properties of photoexcited carriers in nanowires derived from an intrinsic silicon wafer using the terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. Both the dynamics and the pump fluence dependence of the photoinduced complex conductivity spectra up to several THz were measured. The photoinduced conductivity spectra follow a Lorentz dependence, arising from surface plasmon resonances in nanowires. The carrier lifetime was observed to approach 0.7 ns, which is limited primarily by surface trapping. The intrinsic carrier mobility was found to be ~1000 cm(2)/(V · s). Compared to other silicon nanostructures, these relative high values observed for both the carrier lifetime and mobility are the consequences of high crystallinity and surface quality of the nanowires fabricated by the metal-assisted wet chemical etching method. PMID:22891641

  6. Carrier dynamics in Si nanowires fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Zhu, Li-Guo; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xuejin; Shan, Jie; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2012-09-25

    Silicon nanowire arrays fabricated by metal-assisted wet chemical etching have emerged as a promising architecture for solar energy harvesting applications. Here we investigate the dynamics and transport properties of photoexcited carriers in nanowires derived from an intrinsic silicon wafer using the terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. Both the dynamics and the pump fluence dependence of the photoinduced complex conductivity spectra up to several THz were measured. The photoinduced conductivity spectra follow a Lorentz dependence, arising from surface plasmon resonances in nanowires. The carrier lifetime was observed to approach 0.7 ns, which is limited primarily by surface trapping. The intrinsic carrier mobility was found to be ~1000 cm(2)/(V · s). Compared to other silicon nanostructures, these relative high values observed for both the carrier lifetime and mobility are the consequences of high crystallinity and surface quality of the nanowires fabricated by the metal-assisted wet chemical etching method.

  7. Tunable electrical and mechanical responses of PDMS and polypyrrole nanowire composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ping; Lin, Xi; Zhang, Xin

    2013-05-01

    A generic experimental procedure is presented in this work to enhance the electrical responses of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through incorporation of conducting polymer nanowires, while maintaining the desirable mechanical flexibility of PDMS. The conducting polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires are synthesized using a template method. The dielectric constants of the composites are characterized by impedance measurements, and the effect of nanowire concentration is investigated by the percolation theory. Using a continuous hyperbolic tangent function, critical volume fraction is estimated to be 9.6 vol%, at which an 85-fold enhancement in the dielectric constants is achieved. The viscoelastic properties of the composites are characterized by the stress relaxation nanoindentation tests, and the effect of nanowire concentration on the elastic modulus of composites is found to deviate significantly from the Wang-Pyrz model at the critical volume fraction. The tunable multifunctionality of PDMS composites that possess significantly enhanced electrical and moderate viscoelastic responses is desirable for many sensing and actuation applications.

  8. Supramolecular Organic Nanowires as Plasmonic Interconnects.

    PubMed

    Armao, Joseph J; Domoto, Yuya; Umehara, Teruhiko; Maaloum, Mounir; Contal, Christophe; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Decher, Gero; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-02-23

    Metallic nanostructures are able to interact with an incident electromagnetic field at subwavelength scales by plasmon resonance which involves the collective oscillation of conduction electrons localized at their surfaces. Among several possible applications of this phenomenon, the theoretical prediction is that optical circuits connecting multiple plasmonic elements will surpass classical electronic circuits at nanoscale because of their much faster light-based information processing. However, the placement and coupling of metallic elements smaller than optical wavelengths currently remain a formidable challenge by top-down manipulations. Here, we show that organic supramolecular triarylamine nanowires of ≈1 nm in diameter are able to act as plasmonic waveguides. Their self-assembly into plasmonic interconnects between arrays of gold nanoparticles leads to the bottom-up construction of basic optical nanocircuits. When the resonance modes of these metallic nanoparticles are coupled through the organic nanowires, the optical conductivity of the plasmonic layer dramatically increases from 259 to 4271 Ω(-1)·cm(-1). We explain this effect by the coupling of a hot electron/hole pair in the nanoparticle antenna with the half-filled polaronic band of the organic nanowire. We also demonstrate that the whole hybrid system can be described by using the abstraction of the lumped circuit theory, with a far field optical response which depends on the number of interconnects. Overall, our supramolecular bottom-up approach opens the possibility to implement processable, soft, and low cost organic plasmonic interconnects into a large number of applications going from sensing to metamaterials and information technologies.

  9. Supramolecular Organic Nanowires as Plasmonic Interconnects.

    PubMed

    Armao, Joseph J; Domoto, Yuya; Umehara, Teruhiko; Maaloum, Mounir; Contal, Christophe; Fuks, Gad; Moulin, Emilie; Decher, Gero; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2016-02-23

    Metallic nanostructures are able to interact with an incident electromagnetic field at subwavelength scales by plasmon resonance which involves the collective oscillation of conduction electrons localized at their surfaces. Among several possible applications of this phenomenon, the theoretical prediction is that optical circuits connecting multiple plasmonic elements will surpass classical electronic circuits at nanoscale because of their much faster light-based information processing. However, the placement and coupling of metallic elements smaller than optical wavelengths currently remain a formidable challenge by top-down manipulations. Here, we show that organic supramolecular triarylamine nanowires of ≈1 nm in diameter are able to act as plasmonic waveguides. Their self-assembly into plasmonic interconnects between arrays of gold nanoparticles leads to the bottom-up construction of basic optical nanocircuits. When the resonance modes of these metallic nanoparticles are coupled through the organic nanowires, the optical conductivity of the plasmonic layer dramatically increases from 259 to 4271 Ω(-1)·cm(-1). We explain this effect by the coupling of a hot electron/hole pair in the nanoparticle antenna with the half-filled polaronic band of the organic nanowire. We also demonstrate that the whole hybrid system can be described by using the abstraction of the lumped circuit theory, with a far field optical response which depends on the number of interconnects. Overall, our supramolecular bottom-up approach opens the possibility to implement processable, soft, and low cost organic plasmonic interconnects into a large number of applications going from sensing to metamaterials and information technologies. PMID:26814600

  10. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander S.; Peteu, Serban F.; Ly, James V.; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Thompson, Mark E.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  11. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  12. Surface Passivation of Germanium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Hemant; Sun, Shiyu; Pianetta, Piero; Chidsey, Chirstopher E.D.; McIntyre, Paul C.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-13

    The surface of single crystal, cold-wall CVD-grown germanium nanowires was studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SR-PES) and also by conventional XPS. The as-grown germanium nanowires seem to be hydrogen terminated. Exposure to laboratory atmosphere leads to germanium oxide growth with oxidation states of Ge{sup 1+}, Ge{sup 2+}, Ge{sup 3+}, while exposure to UV light leads to a predominance of the Ge{sup 4+} oxidation state. Most of the surface oxide could be removed readily by aqueous HF treatment which putatively leaves the nanowire surface hydrogen terminated with limited stability in air. Alternatively, chlorine termination could be achieved by aq. HCl treatment of the native oxide-coated nanowires. Chlorine termination was found to be relatively more stable than the HF-last hydrogen termination.

  13. Thermoelectric characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires, synthesized via catalytic growth and post-annealing.

    PubMed

    Hamdou, Bacel; Kimling, Johannes; Dorn, August; Pippel, Eckhard; Rostek, Raimar; Woias, Peter; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2013-01-11

    Bi(2) Te(3) nanowires are of significant interest for two fields: nanostructured thermoelectrics and topological insulators. The vapor-liquid-solid method is employed in combination with annealing in a Te atmosphere, to obtain single-crystalline Bi(2) Te(3) nanowires with reproducible electronic transport properties (electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient) that are close to those of intrinsic bulk Bi(2) Te(3) .

  14. Double Path Interference and Magnetic Oscillations in Cooper Pair Transport through a Single Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Mironov, S V; Mel'nikov, A S; Buzdin, A I

    2015-06-01

    We show that the critical current of the Josephson junction consisting of superconducting electrodes coupled through a nanowire with two conductive channels can reveal the multiperiodic magnetic oscillations. The multiperiodicity originates from the quantum mechanical interference between the channels affected by both the strong spin-orbit coupling and the Zeeman interaction. This minimal two-channel model is shown to explain the complicated interference phenomena observed recently in Josephson transport through Bi nanowires. PMID:26196639

  15. Ballistic modeling of InAs nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Kristofer; Lind, Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the intrinsic performance of InAs nanowire transistors is evaluated in the ballistic limit. A self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson solver is utilized in the cylindrical geometry, while accounting for conduction band non-parabolicity. The transistor characteristics are derived from simulations of ballistic transport within the nanowire. Using this approach, the performance is calculated for a continuous range of nanowire diameters and the transport properties are mapped. A transconductance exceeding 4S /mm is predicted at a gate overdrive of 0.5V and it is shown that the performance is improved with scaling. Furthermore, the influence from including self-consistency and non-parabolicity in the band structure simulations is quantified. It is demonstrated that the effective mass approximation underestimates the transistor performance due to the highly non-parabolic conduction band in InAs. Neglecting self-consistency severely overestimates the device performance, especially for thick nanowires. The error introduced by both of these approximations gets increasingly worse under high bias conditions.

  16. Topological insulator Bi2Te3 nanowire field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Luis A.; Zhang, Genqiang; Wu, Yue; Chen, Yong P.

    2012-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has been studied extensively as one of the best thermoelectric materials and recently shown to be a prototype topological insulator with nontrivial conducting surface states. We have grown Bi2Te3 nanowires by a two-step solution phase reaction and characterized their material and structural properties by XRD, TEM, XPS and EDS. We fabricate both backgated (on SiO2/Si) and top-gated (with ALD high-k gate dielectric such as Al2O3 or HfO2) field effect devices on such nanowires with diameters ˜50nm. Ambipolar field effect and a resistance modulation of up to 600% at low temperatures have been observed. The 4-terminal resistance shows insulating behavior (increasing with decreasing temperature) from 300 K to 50K, then saturates in a plateau for temperatures below 50K, consistent with the presence of metallic surface state. Aharonov--Bohm (AB) oscillations are observed in the magneto-resistance with a magnetic field parallel to the nanowire, providing further evidence of the presence of surface state conduction Finally, a prominent weak anti-localization (WAL) feature that weakens with increasing magnetic field and/or temperature is observed in the magneto-resistance with a magnetic field perpendicular to the nanowire.

  17. Fabrication and Electrical Characterization of Zinc Oxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daqing; Lee, Chun-Hong; Berven, Chris; Katkanant, Vanvilai

    2009-03-01

    One dimensional semiconducting zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have drawn attractive attentions in the past years. The unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties of ZnO nanowires make them broaden applications ranging from light emitting diode and lasers, solar cells, photodetectors, electron transporters and transistors, to piezoelectric generators. In our research, two-terminal current-voltage (I-V) measurements were conducted to determine the electrical conductivity alternation of the ZnO nanowires under laser irradiation, and various gaseous surroundings. The I-V curves at the temperature ranged from 150 to 300 K were recorded in vacuum. The Arrhenius plot shows perfect linear relation between I and 1/T. The donor lever of the semiconducting nanowire is about 326 meV. We observed that the current increased 50% with laser on in comparison to that with it off; it raised by a factor of four under ambient reductive gas CO. In addition, the I-V behaviors were found to be reversible with those various environments. Further studies on the possible nano- devices such as optical switches and chemical sensors are undergoing.

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN coremore » of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.« less

  19. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T.; Martinez, Julio A.

    2015-11-25

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN core of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. As a result, selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.

  20. Enhanced thermoelectric transport in modulation-doped GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires.

    PubMed

    Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Pan, Wei; Wang, George T; Martinez, Julio A

    2016-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of unintentionally n-doped core GaN/AlGaN core/shell N-face nanowires are reported. We found that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is consistent with thermally activated carriers with two distinctive donor energies. The Seebeck coefficient of GaN/AlGaN nanowires is more than twice as large as that for the GaN nanowires alone. However, an outer layer of GaN deposited onto the GaN/AlGaN core/shell nanowires decreases the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity remains the same. We attribute these observations to the formation of an electron gas channel within the heavily-doped GaN core of the GaN/AlGaN nanowires. The room-temperature thermoelectric power factor for the GaN/AlGaN nanowires can be four times higher than the GaN nanowires. Selective doping in bandgap engineered core/shell nanowires is proposed for enhancing the thermoelectric power.