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Sample records for conductivity ph dissolved

  1. DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

  2. Dissolved oxygen and pH relationships in northern Australian mangrove waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Boto, K.G.; Bunt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consistent, highly significant linear correlations (R2 greater than or equal to 0.8) between pH and dissolved oxygen levels have been found in northern Australian mangrove waterways. These properties seem to be influenced by dissolved organic matter, mainly polyphenolic compounds, present in the creeks and tidal channel waters.

  3. Dissolved Divalent Metal and pH Effects on Amino Acid Polymerization: A Thermodynamic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2017-03-01

    Polymerization of amino acids is a fundamentally important step for the chemical evolution of life. Nevertheless, its response to changing environmental conditions has not yet been well understood because of the lack of reliable quantitative information. For thermodynamics, detailed prediction over diverse combinations of temperature and pH has been made only for a few amino acid-peptide systems. This study used recently reported thermodynamic dataset for the polymerization of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" to its short peptides (di-glycine and tri-glycine) to examine chemical and structural characteristics of amino acids and peptides that control the temperature and pH dependence of polymerization. Results showed that the dependency is strongly controlled by the intramolecular distance between the amino and carboxyl groups in an amino acid structure, although the side-chain group role is minor. The polymerization behavior of Gly reported earlier in the literature is therefore expected to be a typical feature for those of α-amino acids. Equilibrium calculations were conducted to examine effects of dissolved metals as a function of pH on the monomer-polymer equilibria of Gly. Results showed that metals shift the equilibria toward the monomer side, particularly at neutral and alkaline pH. Metals that form weak interaction with Gly (e.g., Mg(2+)) have no noticeable influence on the polymerization, although strong interaction engenders significant decrease of the equilibrium concentrations of Gly peptides. Considering chemical and structural characteristics of Gly and Gly peptides that control their interactions with metals, it can be expected that similar responses to the addition of metals are applicable in the polymerization of neutral α-amino acids. Neutral and alkaline aqueous environments with dissolved metals having high affinity with neutral α-amino acids (e.g., Cu(2+)) are therefore not beneficial places for peptide bond formation on the primitive

  4. Dissolved Divalent Metal and pH Effects on Amino Acid Polymerization: A Thermodynamic Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2017-03-01

    Polymerization of amino acids is a fundamentally important step for the chemical evolution of life. Nevertheless, its response to changing environmental conditions has not yet been well understood because of the lack of reliable quantitative information. For thermodynamics, detailed prediction over diverse combinations of temperature and pH has been made only for a few amino acid-peptide systems. This study used recently reported thermodynamic dataset for the polymerization of the simplest amino acid "glycine (Gly)" to its short peptides (di-glycine and tri-glycine) to examine chemical and structural characteristics of amino acids and peptides that control the temperature and pH dependence of polymerization. Results showed that the dependency is strongly controlled by the intramolecular distance between the amino and carboxyl groups in an amino acid structure, although the side-chain group role is minor. The polymerization behavior of Gly reported earlier in the literature is therefore expected to be a typical feature for those of α-amino acids. Equilibrium calculations were conducted to examine effects of dissolved metals as a function of pH on the monomer-polymer equilibria of Gly. Results showed that metals shift the equilibria toward the monomer side, particularly at neutral and alkaline pH. Metals that form weak interaction with Gly (e.g., Mg2+) have no noticeable influence on the polymerization, although strong interaction engenders significant decrease of the equilibrium concentrations of Gly peptides. Considering chemical and structural characteristics of Gly and Gly peptides that control their interactions with metals, it can be expected that similar responses to the addition of metals are applicable in the polymerization of neutral α-amino acids. Neutral and alkaline aqueous environments with dissolved metals having high affinity with neutral α-amino acids (e.g., Cu2+) are therefore not beneficial places for peptide bond formation on the primitive

  5. Relative effect of temperature and pH on diel cycling of dissolved trace elements in prickly pear creek, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, C.A.; Nimick, D.A.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    Diel (24 hr) cycles in dissolved metal and As concentrations have been documented in many northern Rocky Mountain streams in the U.S.A. The cause(s) of the cycles are unknown, although temperature- and pH-dependent sorption reactions have been cited as likely causes. A light/dark experiment was conducted to isolate temperature and pH as variables affecting diel metal cycles in Prickly Pear Creek, Montana. Light and dark chambers containing sediment and a strand of macrophyte were placed in the stream to simulate instream temperature oscillations. Photosynthesis-induced pH changes were allowed to proceed in the light chambers while photosynthesis was prevented in the dark chambers. Water samples were collected periodically for 22 hr in late July 2001 from all chambers and the stream. In the stream, dissolved Zn concentrations increased by 300% from late afternoon to early morning, while dissolved As concentrations exhibited the opposite pattern, increasing 33% between early morning and late afternoon. Zn and As concentrations in the light chambers showed similar, though less pronounced, diel variations. Conversely, Zn and As concentrations in the dark chambers had no obvious diel variation, indicating that light, or light-induced reactions, caused the variation. Temperature oscillations were nearly identical between light and dark chambers, strongly suggesting that temperature was not controlling the diel variations. As expected, pH was negatively correlated (P < 0.01) with dissolved Zn concentrations and positively correlated with dissolved As concentrations in both the light and dark chambers. From these experiments, photosynthesis-induced pH changes were determined to be the major cause of the diel dissolved Zn and As cycles in Prickly Pear Creek. Further research is necessary in other streams to verify that this finding is consistent among streams having large differences in trace-element concentrations and mineralogy of channel substrate. ?? 2004 Kluwer

  6. pH measurement of low-conductivity waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    pH is an important and commonly measured parameter of precipitation and other natural waters. The various sources of errors in pH measurement were analyzed and procedures for improving the accuracy and precision of pH measurements in natural waters with conductivities of < 100 uS/cm at 25 C are suggested. Detailed procedures are given for the preparation of dilute sulfuric acid standards to evaluate the performance of pH electrodes in low conductivity waters. A daily check of the pH of dilute sulfuric acid standards and deionized water saturated with a gas mixture of low carbon dioxide at partial pressure (air) prior to the measurement of the pH of low conductivity waters is suggested. (Author 's abstract)

  7. THE EFFECT OF PH AND DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON ON THE PROPERTIES OF IRON COLLOIDAL SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Discolored water resulting from suspended iron particles is a relatively common drinking water consumer complaint. These particles result from the oxygenation of Fe(II), and this study shows that pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) have important effects on their properties....

  8. Effects of pH, dissolved organic matter, and salinity on ibuprofen sorption on sediment.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sanghwa; Shin, Won Sik; Kim, Hong Tae

    2016-11-01

    Ibuprofen is well known as one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in rivers. However, sorption of ibuprofen onto sediment has not been considered in spite of its high K ow (3.5). In this study, the effects of various environmental conditions such as pH (4, 5.3, and 7), the concentrations of dissolved organic matters (0 to 1.0 mM citrate and urea), salinity (0, 10, 20, and 30 part per thousand), and presence of other PPCP (salicylic acid) on ibuprofen sorption were investigated. Linear model mainly fitted the experimental data for analysis. The distribution coefficient (K d) in the linear model decreased from 6.76 at pH 4 to near zero at pH 7, indicating that neutral form of ibuprofen at pH below pKa (5.2) was easily sorbed onto the sediment whereas the sorption of anionic form at pH over pKa was not favorable. To investigate the effect of dissolved organic matters (DOMs) on ibuprofen sorption, citrate and urea were used as DOMs. As citrate concentration increased, the K d value decreased but urea did not interrupt the ibuprofen sorption. Citrate has three carboxyl functional groups which can attach easily ibuprofen and hinder its sorption onto sediment. Salinity also affected ibuprofen sorption due to decrease of the solubility of ibuprofen as salinity increased. In competitive sorption experiment, the addition of salicylic acid also led to enhance ibuprofen sorption. Conclusively, ibuprofen can be more easily sorbed onto the acidified sediments of river downstream, especially estuaries or near-shore environment with low DOM concentration.

  9. pH modeling for maximum dissolved organic matter removal by enhanced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiankun; Wang, Dongsheng; van Leeuwen, John; Zhao, Yanmei; Xing, Linan; Chow, Christopher W K

    2012-01-01

    Correlations between raw water characteristics and pH after enhanced coagulation to maximize dissolved organic matter (DOM) removal using four typical coagulants (FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and high performance polyaluminum chloride (HPAC)) without pH control were investigated. These correlations were analyzed on the basis of the raw water quality and the chemical and physical fractionations of DOM of thirteen Chinese source waters over three seasons. It was found that the final pH after enhanced coagulation for each of the four coagulants was influenced by the content of removable DOM (i.e. hydrophobic and higher apparent molecular weight (AMW) DOM), the alkalinity and the initial pH of raw water. A set of feed-forward semi-empirical models relating the final pH after enhanced coagulation for each of the four coagulants with the raw water characteristics were developed and optimized based on correlation analysis. The established models were preliminarily validated for prediction purposes, and it was found that the deviation between the predicted data and actual data was low. This result demonstrated the potential for the application of these models in practical operation of drinking water treatment plants.

  10. Versatile common instrumentation for optical detection of pH and dissolved oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, Neha; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2015-07-15

    The recent trend toward use of disposable and miniature bioreactors requires the use of appropriate sensors. pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) are often measured using optical chemical sensors due to their small form factor and convenience in use. These sensors are often interrogated using a specialized opto-electronic transducer that is designed around the optical sensor. In this contribution, we are presenting a new class of opto-electronic transducers that are usable with several different chemical sensors without the need to switch the optics or hardware when changing the type of the chemical sensor. This allows flexibility closer to the lab-grade devices while the size is closer to a dedicated sensor. This versatile instrumentation is capable of seamlessly switching between the pH and DO measurement modes and is capable of auto recognition of the sensor type. The principle of ratiometric fluorescence is used for pH measurements, and that of fluorescence lifetime for DO measurements. An approach to obtain identical calibrations between several devices is also presented. The described hardware constitutes common instrumentation for measuring either pH or DO and has been tested in actual bioprocesses. It has been found adequate for continuous bioprocess monitoring.

  11. Versatile common instrumentation for optical detection of pH and dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardesai, Neha; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2015-07-01

    The recent trend toward use of disposable and miniature bioreactors requires the use of appropriate sensors. pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) are often measured using optical chemical sensors due to their small form factor and convenience in use. These sensors are often interrogated using a specialized opto-electronic transducer that is designed around the optical sensor. In this contribution, we are presenting a new class of opto-electronic transducers that are usable with several different chemical sensors without the need to switch the optics or hardware when changing the type of the chemical sensor. This allows flexibility closer to the lab-grade devices while the size is closer to a dedicated sensor. This versatile instrumentation is capable of seamlessly switching between the pH and DO measurement modes and is capable of auto recognition of the sensor type. The principle of ratiometric fluorescence is used for pH measurements, and that of fluorescence lifetime for DO measurements. An approach to obtain identical calibrations between several devices is also presented. The described hardware constitutes common instrumentation for measuring either pH or DO and has been tested in actual bioprocesses. It has been found adequate for continuous bioprocess monitoring.

  12. Interactions Between Dissolved Oxygen, pH, and Temperature at Lake Merritt, Oakland, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, A.; Liang, J.; Mack, T.; Majors, A.; Ngilbus, K.; Pratt, D.; Unigarro, A.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Merritt is a saltwater tidal lagoon that forms a portion of a wildlife refuge in downtown Oakland, California. In the evening, a series of lamps strewn along its perimeter dubbed poetically a "Necklace of Lights" illuminates the night sky. By contrast, local residents describe the lake's water as having a foul odor, peculiar appearance, and being full of debris. Thus, our team has investigated many areas in and around Lake Merritt in the interest of assessing Lake Merritt's water quality. We made measurements of dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature at twelve sites along the edge of the lake and six additional locations throughout the open waters. We then used these measurements to formulate a water quality index (WQI) using guidelines provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.). Because we focus on three measures, our water quality index is weighted differently from the U.S.G.S. index. Our index is weighted as follows: 0.5 for dissolved oxygen, 0.3 for pH, and 0.2 for temperature. The index is based on a 100-point scale that allows us to compare sites and determine the relative quality of the water. In addition, we used a special device to create digital images of columns of sampled water, which were then analyzed to determine the degree of water coloration due to dissolved material and algae content. We then used results of this analysis technique to determine the relationship between the color profile and the physical and chemical characteristic of the water. We devised this new strategy to measure water turbidity because we could not use Secchi discs, given the shallowness of the lake. Overall, preliminary analysis of our data indicates that the WQIs tend to be higher near tidal gates, where the lake receives water from the San Francisco Bay via an inlet. These results raise the immediate concern that water is not effectively being circulated throughout the entire lake.

  13. Sulfamethazine Sorption to Soil: Vegetative Management, pH, and Dissolved Organic Matter Effects.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei; Goyne, Keith W; Anderson, Stephen H; Lin, Chung-Ho; Lerch, Robert N

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating veterinary antibiotic interactions with soil is important for assessing and mitigating possible environmental hazards. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of vegetative management, soil properties, and >1000 Da dissolved organic matter (DOM) on sulfamethazine (SMZ) behavior in soil. Sorption experiments were performed over a range of SMZ concentrations (2.5-50 μmol L) using samples from three soils (Armstrong, Huntington, and Menfro), each planted to one of three vegetation treatments: agroforestry buffers strips (ABS), grass buffer strips (GBS), and row crops (RC). Our results show that SMZ sorption isotherms are well fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model (log = 0.44-0.93; Freundlich nonlinearity parameter = 0.59-0.79). Further investigation of solid-to-solution distribution coefficients () demonstrated that vegetative management significantly ( < 0.05) influences SMZ sorption (ABS > GBS > RC). Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that organic carbon (OC) content, pH, and initial SMZ concentration were important properties controlling SMZ sorption. Study of the two most contrasting soils in our sample set revealed that increasing solution pH (pH 6.0-7.5) reduced SMZ sorption to the Armstrong GBS soil, but little pH effect was observed for the Huntington GBS soil containing 50% kaolinite in the clay fraction. The presence of DOM (150 mg L OC) had little significant effect on the Freundlich nonlinearity parameter; however, DOM slightly reduced SMZ values overall. Our results support the use of vegetative buffers to mitigate veterinary antibiotic loss from agroecosystems, provide guidance for properly managing vegetative buffer strips to increase SMZ sorption, and enhance understanding of SMZ sorption to soil.

  14. In situ measurements of dissolved oxygen, pH and redox potential of biocathode microenvironments using microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zejie; Deng, Huan; Chen, Lihui; Xiao, Yong; Zhao, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are the core component of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). To understand the polarization effects on biocathode performance of BES, dissolved oxygen concentrations, pHs and oxidation-reduction potentials of biofilm microenvironments were determined in situ. The results showed that lower polarization potentials resulted in the generation of larger currents and higher pH values, as well as the consumption of more oxygen. Oxidation-reduction potentials of biofilms were mainly affected by polarization potentials of the electrode rather than the concentration of dissolved oxygen or pH value, and its changes in the potentials corresponded to the electric field distribution of the electrode surface. The results demonstrated that a sufficient supply of dissolved oxygen and pH control of the biocathode are necessary to obtain optimal performance of BESs; a lower polarization potential endowed microorganisms with a higher electrochemical activity.

  15. Fertilization and pH effects on processes and mechanisms controlling dissolved inorganic phosphorus in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devau, Nicolas; Hinsinger, Philippe; Le Cadre, Edith; Colomb, Bruno; Gérard, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    We used of a set of mechanistic adsorption models (1-pK TPM, ion exchange and Nica-Donnan) within the framework of the component additive (CA) approach in an attempt to determine the effect of repeated massive application of inorganic P fertilizer on the processes and mechanisms controlling the concentration of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) in soils. We studied the surface layer of a Luvisol with markedly different total concentrations of inorganic P as the result of different P fertilizer history (i.e. massive or no application for 40 years). Soil pH was made to vary from acid to alkaline. Soil solutions were extracted with water and CaCl 2 (0.01 M). The occurrence of montmorillonite led us to determine the binding properties of P and Ca ions for this clay mineral. Satisfactory results were obtained using generic values for model parameters and soil-specific ones, which were either determined directly by measurements or estimated from the literature. We showed that adsorption largely controlled the variations of DIP concentration and that, because of kinetic constrains, only little Ca-phosphates may be precipitated under alkaline conditions, particularly in the P fertilized treatment. The mineral-P pool initially present in both P treatments did not dissolve significantly during the course of the experiments. The adsorption of Ca ions onto soil minerals also promoted adsorption of P ions through electrostatic interactions. The intensity of the mechanism was high under neutral to alkaline conditions. Changes in DIP concentration as a function of these environmental variables can be related to changes in the contribution of the various soil minerals to P adsorption. The extra P adsorbed in the fertilized treatment compared with the control treatment was mainly adsorbed onto illite. This clay mineral was the major P-fixing constituent from neutral to alkaline pH conditions, because the repulsion interactions between deprotonated hydroxyl surface sites and P

  16. Effects of pH, dissolved oxygen, and ionic strength on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in organic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Kreske, Audrey C; Bjornsdottir, Kristin; Breidt, Fred; Hassan, Hosni

    2008-12-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to survive in acidified vegetable products is of concern because of previously documented outbreaks associated with fruit juices. A study was conducted to determine the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in organic acids at pH values typical of acidified vegetable products (pH 3.2 and 3.7) under different dissolved oxygen conditions (< or = 0.05 and 5 mg/liter) and a range of ionic strengths (0.086 to 1.14). All solutions contained 20 mM gluconic acid, which was used as a noninhibitory low pH buffer to compare the individual acid effect to that of pH alone on the survival of E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 cells challenged in buffered solution with ca. 5-mg/liter dissolved oxygen (present in tap water) over a range of ionic strengths at pH 3.2 exhibited a decrease in survival over 6 h at 30 degrees C as the ionic strength was increased. Cells challenged in 40 mM protonated L-lactic and acetic acid solutions with ionic strength of 0.684 achieved a > 4.7-log CFU/ml reduction at pH 3.2. However, under oxygen-limiting conditions in an anaerobic chamber, with < or = 0.05-mg/ liter oxygen, E. coli O157:H7 cells showed < or = 1.55-log CFU/ml reduction regardless of pH, acid type, concentration, or ionic strength. Many acid and acidified foods are sold in hermetically sealed containers with oxygen-limiting conditions. Our results demonstrate that E. coli O157:H7 may survive better than previously expected from studies with acid solutions containing dissolved oxygen.

  17. DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER IN SOILS AND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

  18. Processes controlling dissolved oxygen and pH in the upper Willamette River basin, Oregon, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pogue, Ted R.; Anderson, Chauncey W.

    1995-01-01

    In July and August of 1994, the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) collected data to document the spatial extent and diel variability of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and pH levels in selected reaches of streams in the upper Willamette River Basin. These data were also collected to identify primary factors that control DO concentrations downstream from major point sources as well as to provide ODEQ with data to refine calibration of their steady-state DO and nutrient models for the upper Willamette River Basin. All of the reaches studied had diel variations in DO and pH. The magnitude of the diel variations in DO ranged from 0.2 to 3.9 milligrams per liter (7 to 50 percent-saturation units based on ambient water temperature and barometric pressure) and in pH from 0.3 to 1.4 units. However, of the reaches studied, only the Coast Fork Willamette River from river mile (RM) 21.7 to 12.5 and the Willamette River from RM 151 to 141.6 had field measured violations of State standards for DO and pH. DO concentration and pH in water depend on many factors. Data were collected to examine several major factors, including BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), carbonaceous BOD, nitrogenous BOD, and measures of photosynthetic activity. Of the four study reaches, only a short stretch of the Coast Fork Willamette River has potential for important levels of oxygen consumption from BOD or nitrification. Additionally, water-column primary-productivity measurements indicated that respiration and photosynthesis by free-floating algae did not explain the observed diel variations in DO in the study reaches. Results from a simple mathematical model incorporating measures of community respiration and net primary productivities indicated that periphyton are capable of producing a diel variation of the order of magnitude observed during the August study period. In the Willamette River near Peoria, the combined periphyton DO

  19. Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on the photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol in dissolved humic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dong; Huang, Bin; Bi, Tingting; Xiong, Dan; Pan, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    To probe the mechanisms responsible for pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) affecting the photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) in dissolved humic acid (HA) solution, EE2 aqueous solutions with pH values ranging from 3.0 to 11.0 and different DO conditions were irradiated by using a 300 W mercury lamp equipped with 290 nm light cutoff filters. In 5.0 mg L(-1) HA solutions (pH 8.0), EE2 was degraded at a rate of 0.0739 h(-1) which was about 4-fold faster than that in Milli-Q water. The degradation of EE2 was mainly caused by the oxidation of photogenerated reactive species (RS), and the contribution of direct photodegradation to EE2 degradation was always lower than 27%. Both the direct and indirect photodegradation of EE2 were closely dependent on the EE2 initial concentration, pH value and DO concentration. The photodegradation rate of EE2 decreased with increased initial concentration of EE2 due to the limitation of photon flux. With pH and DO increasing, the degradation rate of EE2 increased significantly due to the increase in the yields of excited EE2 and RS. Among the photogenerated RS, HO˙ and (3)HA* were determined to be the key contributors, and their global contribution to EE2 photodegradation was about 50%. Although HA could generate more (1)O2 than HO˙, the contribution of (1)O2 to EE2 degradation was lower than 13% due to its low reactivity towards EE2. This study could enlarge our knowledge on the photochemical behaviors of steroid estrogens in natural sunlit waters.

  20. Leachability and desorption of PCBs from soil and their dependency on pH and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Mustafa, Majid; Lundstedt, Staffan; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-11-15

    pH affects both soil-water partitioning coefficient (Kd) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), thereby influencing PCBs' leachability from contaminated soils. To explore these incompletely understood interactions, the leachability of 11 selected PCBs in a naturally aged soil was investigated in pH static leaching tests spanning a wide pH range (2 to 9). The K(d) was calculated for each of the PCBs, based on their observed concentrations in the soil and leachates obtained from each test. The concentration and composition of DOM in each leachate were also determined, the latter using FTIR spectroscopy. Correlations between the DOM's FTIR spectra and K(d) values were investigated by orthogonal projections to latent structures. The log K(d)-values varied among the PCB congeners and were most variable at low pH, but the values for all studied congeners decreased with increasing pH, by up to 3 log units (for PCB 187). In the pH 5-7 interval, an abrupt decrease in log K(d) values with increases in pH was observed, although the total organic carbon content remained relatively stable. The FTIR data indicate that fulvic and humic acids in DOM partially deprotonate as the pH rises from 5 to 7.

  1. The effect of iron content and dissolved O2 on dissolution rates of clinopyroxene at pH 5.8 and 25°C: Preliminary results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Drever, J.I.

    1996-01-01

    Dissolution experiments using augite (Mg0.87Ca0.85Fe0.19Na0.09Al0.03Si2O6) and diopside (Mg0.91Ca0.93Fe0.07Na0.03Al0.03Si2O6) were conducted in flow-through reactors (5-ml/h flow rate). A pH of 5.8 was maintained by bubbling pure CO2 through a solution of 0.01 M KHCO3 at 25°C. Two experiments were run for each pyroxene type. In one experiment dissolved O2 concentration in reactors was 0.6 (±0.1) ppm and in the second dissolved O2 was 1.5 (±0.1) ppm. After 60 days, augite dissolution rates (based on Si release) were approximately three times greater in the 1.5 ppm. dissolved O2 experiments than in the sealed experiments. In contrast, diopside dissolution rates were independent of dissolved O2 concentrations. Preliminary results from the augite experiments suggest that dissolution rate is directly related to oxidation of iron. This effect was not observed in experiments performed on iron-poor diopside. Additionally, dissolution rates of diopside were much slower than those of augite, again suggesting a relationship between Fe content, Fe oxidation and dissolution rates.

  2. Hyperosmotic Agents and Antibiotics Affect Dissolved Oxygen and pH Concentration Gradients in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kiamco, Mia Mae; Atci, Erhan; Mohamed, Abdelrhman; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2017-03-15

    Biofilms on wound surfaces are treated topically with hyperosmotic agents, such as medical-grade honey and cadexomer iodine; in some cases, these treatments are combined with antibiotics. Tissue repair requires oxygen, and a low pH is conducive to oxygen release from red blood cells and epithelialization. We investigated the variation of dissolved oxygen concentration and pH with biofilm depth and the variation in oxygen consumption rates when biofilms are challenged with medical-grade honey or cadexomer iodine combined with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. Dissolved oxygen and pH depth profiles in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were measured using microelectrodes. The presence of cadexomer iodine with vancomycin or ciprofloxacin on the surface of the biofilm permitted a measurable concentration of oxygen at greater biofilm depths (101.6 ± 27.3 μm, P = 0.02; and 155.5 ± 27.9 μm, P = 0.016, respectively) than in untreated controls (30.1 μm). Decreases in pH of ∼0.6 and ∼0.4 units were observed in biofilms challenged with medical-grade honey alone and combined with ciprofloxacin, respectively (P < 0.001 and 0.01, respectively); the number of bacteria recovered from biofilms was significantly reduced (1.26 log) by treatment with cadexomer iodine and ciprofloxacin (P = 0.002) compared to the untreated control. Combining cadexomer iodine and ciprofloxacin improved dissolved oxygen concentration and penetration depth into the biofilm, while medical-grade honey was associated with a lower pH; not all treatments established a bactericidal effect in the time frame used in the experiments.IMPORTANCE Reports about using hyperosmotic agents and antibiotics against wound biofilms focus mostly on killing bacteria, but the results of these treatments should additionally be considered in the context of how they affect physiologically important parameters, such as oxygen concentration and pH. We confirmed that the combination of a hyperosmotic agent and an antibiotic results

  3. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on nitrous oxide production rates in autotrophic partial nitrification granules.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Rathnayake M L D; Oshiki, Mamoru; Ishii, Satoshi; Segawa, Takahiro; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH on nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates and pathways in autotrophic partial nitrification (PN) granules were investigated at the granular level. N2O was primarily produced by betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, mainly Nitrosomonas europaea, in the oxic surface layer (<200μm) of the autotrophic PN granules. N2O production increased with increasing bulk DO concentration owing to activation of the ammonia (i.e., hydroxylamine) oxidation in this layer. The highest N2O emissions were observed at pH 7.5, although the ammonia oxidation rate was unchanged between pH 6.5 and 8.5. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in situ analyses of PN granules are essential to gaining insight into N2O emission mechanisms in a granule.

  4. B/Ca in coccoliths and relationship to calcification vesicle pH and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather; Langer, Gerald; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Kanamaru, Kinuyo

    2012-03-01

    Coccolithophorid algae are microscopic but prolific calcifiers in modern and ancient oceans. When the pH of seawater is modified, as may occur in the future due to ocean acidification, different species and strains of coccolithophorids have exhibited diverse calcification responses in laboratory culture. Since their biomineralization is a completely intracellular process, it is unclear why their response should be affected by extracellular seawater pH. Variations in the B/Ca in coccoliths are potential indicators of pH shifts in the intracellular coccolith vesicle where calcification occurs, because B/Ca in abiogenic calcites increases at higher pH due to the greater abundance of borate ions, the only B species incorporated into calcite. We used a SIMS ion probe to measure B/Ca of coccoliths from three different strains of Emiliania huxleyi and one strain of Coccolithus braarudii braarudii cultured under different seawater pH conditions to ascertain if the B/Ca can be used to elucidate how coccolithophorids respond to changing ocean pH. These data are interpreted with the aid of a conceptual model of cellular boron acquisition by coccolithophorids. Based on uptake in other plants, we infer that boron uptake by coccolithophorid cells is dominated by passive uptake of boric acid across the lipid bilayer. Subsequently, in the alkaline coccolith vesicle (C.V.), boron speciates according to the C.V. pH, and borate is incorporated into the coccolith. At increasing seawater pH, the relative abundance of the neutral boric acid in seawater decreases, lowering the potential B flux into the cell. Homeostasis or constant pH of the coccolith vesicle results in a decrease of the B/Ca in the coccolith with increasing seawater pH. In contrast, if coccolith vesicle pH increases with increasing seawater pH, then the B/Ca will increase as the fraction of borate in the coccolith vesicle increases. The coccolith B/Ca is also expected to depend inversely on the dissolved inorganic

  5. Specific Conductance and Dissolved-Solids Characteristics for the Green River and Muddy Creek, Wyoming, Water Years 1999-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Davidson, Seth L.

    2009-01-01

    Southwestern Wyoming is an area of diverse scenery, wildlife, and natural resources that is actively undergoing energy development. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to assess and enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale, while facilitating responsible energy development through local collaboration and partnerships. Water-quality monitoring has been conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on the Green River near Green River, Wyoming, and Muddy Creek near Baggs, Wyoming. This monitoring, which is being conducted in cooperation with State and other Federal agencies and as part of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, is in response to concerns about potentially increased dissolved solids in the Colorado River Basin as a result of energy development. Because of the need to provide real-time dissolved-solids concentrations for the Green River and Muddy Creek on the World Wide Web, the U.S. Geological Survey developed regression equations to estimate dissolved-solids concentrations on the basis of continuous specific conductance using relations between measured specific conductance and dissolved-solids concentrations. Specific conductance and dissolved-solids concentrations were less varied and generally lower for the Green River than for Muddy Creek. The median dissolved-solids concentration for the site on the Green River was 318 milligrams per liter, and the median concentration for the site on Muddy Creek was 943 milligrams per liter. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 187 to 594 milligrams per liter in samples collected from the Green River during water years 1999-2008. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 293 to 2,485 milligrams per liter in samples collected from Muddy Creek during water years 2006-08. The differences in dissolved-solids concentrations in samples collected from the Green River compared to samples collected from Muddy

  6. Novel probes for pH and dissolved oxygen measurements in cultivations from millilitre to benchtop scale.

    PubMed

    Demuth, Caspar; Varonier, Joel; Jossen, Valentin; Eibl, Regine; Eibl, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    pH value and the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) are key parameters to monitor and control cell growth in cultivation studies. Reliable, robust and accurate methods to measure these parameters in cultivation systems in real time guarantee high product yield and quality. This mini-review summarises the current state of the art of pH and DO sensors that are applied to bioprocesses from millilitre to benchtop scale by means of a short introduction on measuring principles and selected applications. Special emphasis is placed on single-use bioreactors, which have been increasingly employed in bioprocess development and production in recent years. Working principles, applications and the particular requirements of sensors in these cultivation systems are given. In such processes, optical sensors for pH and DO are often preferred to electrochemical probes, as they allow semi-invasive measurements and can be miniaturised to micrometre scale or lower. In addition, selected measuring principles of novel sensing technologies for pH and DO are discussed. These include solid-state sensors and miniaturised devices that are not yet commercially available, but show promising characteristics for possible use in bioprocesses in the near future.

  7. Marine microbial production of dimethylsulfide from dissolved dimethylsulfoniopropionate. Ph. D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ledyard, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) plays a central role in the transfer of sulfur from the ocean to the atmosphere and ultimately to land. The most abundant volatile organosulfur compound in seawater, DMS is believed to account for the bulk of the sea-to-air biogenic sulfur flux. DMS has also been implicated as the major precursor of submicron-sized sulfate aerosol over the ocean. This aerosol acts as an effective site for cloud droplet condensation suggesting a possibly important role for DMS in marine cloud formation. In the ocean, the precursor of DMS is presumed to be the zwitterionic sulfonium compound dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a common osmoticum in certain classes of marine algae. While some algae can cleave DMSP intracellularly to form DMS, correlation of DMS concentrations with indicators of algal productivity on a local scale is poor. This thesis focuses on an alternative pathway of DMS formation: microbial cleavage of dissolved (extracellular) DMSP. In laboratory studies, bacteria able to cleave DMSP to form DMS were isolated from seawater by a DMSP enrichment technique, and the kinetics of DMSP uptake and DMS production were examined closely in pure cultures of a bacterial isolate from the Sargasso Sea. The isolate could grow with both DMSP and acrylic acid, one of the products of DMSP cleavage, as the sole source of carbon and energy, and the enzyme catalyzing DMSP cleavage appeared to be induced by both of these compounds. Kinetic parameters were estimated for DMSP uptake and cleavage by whole cells. Comparison of the 16S rRNA sequence of this isolate with that of known eubacteria showed that it was most closely related to Erythrobacter longus, an aerobic, bacteriochlorophyll-containing member of the alpha proteobacteria.

  8. Effects of pH, Temperature, Dissolved Oxygen, and Flow Rate on Phosphorus Release Processes at the Sediment and Water Interface in Storm Sewer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Mingyi; Zhang, Xiaoran

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and flow rate on the phosphorus (P) release processes at the sediment and water interface in rainwater pipes were investigated. The sampling was conducted in a residential storm sewer of North Li Shi Road in Xi Cheng District of Beijing on August 3, 2011. The release rate of P increased with the increase of pH from 8 to 10. High temperature is favorable for the release of P. The concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in the overlying water increased as the concentration of DO decreased. With the increase of flow rate from 0.7 m s−1 to 1.1 m s−1, the concentration of TP in the overlying water increased and then tends to be stable. Among all the factors examined in the present study, the flow rate is the primary influence factor on P release. The cumulative amount of P release increased with the process of pipeline runoff in the rainfall events with high intensities and shorter durations. Feasible measures such as best management practices and low-impact development can be conducted to control the P release on urban sediments by slowing down the flow rate. PMID:24349823

  9. Rates of zinc and trace metal release from dissolving sphalerite at pH 2.0-4.0

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, M.R.; Gemery-Hill, P. A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Taylor, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    High-Fe and low-Fe sphalerite samples were reacted under controlled pH conditions to determine nonoxidative rates of release of Zn and trace metals from the solid-phase. The release (solubilization) of trace metals from dissolving sphalerite to the aqueous phase can be characterized by a kinetic distribution coefficient, (Dtr), which is defined as [(Rtr/X(tr)Sph)/(RZn/X(Zn) Sph)], where R is the trace metal or Zn release rate, and X is the mole fraction of the trace metal or Zn in sphalerite. This coefficient describes the relationship of the sphalerite dissolution rate to the trace metal mole fraction in the solid and its aqueous concentration. The distribution was used to determine some controls on metal release during the dissolution of sphalerite. Departures from the ideal Dtr of 1.0 suggest that some trace metals may be released via different pathways or that other processes (e.g., adsorption, solubility of trace minerals such as galena) affect the observed concentration of metals. Nonoxidative sphalerite dissolution (mediated by H+) is characterized by a "fast" stage in the first 24-30 h, followed by a "slow" stage for the remainder of the reaction. Over the pH range 2.0-4.0, and for similar extent of reaction (reaction time), sphalerite composition, and surface area, the rates of release of Zn, Fe, Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb from sphalerite generally increase with lower pH. Zinc and Fe exhibit the fastest rates of release, Mn and Pb have intermediate rates of release, and Cd and Cu show the slowest rates of release. The largest variations in metal release rates occur at pH 2.0. At pH 3.0 and 4.0, release rates show less variation and appear less dependent on the metal abundance in the solid. For the same extent of reaction (100 h), rates of Zn release range from 1.53 ?? 10-11 to 5.72 ?? 10-10 mol/m2/s; for Fe, the range is from 4.59 ?? 10-13 to 1.99 ?? 10-10 mol/m2/s. Trace metal release rates are generally 1-5 orders of magnitude slower than the Zn or Fe rates

  10. Evaluation of Total Dissolved Solids and Specific Conductance Water Quality Targets with Paired Single-Species and Mesocosm Community Exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated single-species exposures were conducted in parallel with 42 d mesocosm dosing studies that measured in-situ and whole community responses to different recipes of excess total dissolved solids (TDS). The studies were conducted with cultured species and native taxa from mo...

  11. Geochemistry of dissolved aluminum at low pH: Extent and significance of Al-Fe(III) coprecipitation below pH 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-España, Javier; Yusta, Iñaki; Gray, Jennifer; Burgos, William D.

    2016-02-01

    This work examines the geochemical behavior of dissolved aluminum in sulfate-rich acidic waters. Our observations were obtained during several years of geochemical and mineralogical research in the San Telmo acidic pit lake and other pit lakes of SW Spain. The work includes scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) of suspended mineral colloids found in deep lake waters. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) coupled to scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (STEM, HRTEM) revealed not only the presence and formation of discrete, sub-micron Al solids like alunite, but also the abundance and distribution of Al into Fe(III) phases typical of acid mine drainage, such as schwertmannite and jarosite, at a nanometric resolution. The main conclusion emerging from our work is that the fate and transport of Al at low pH (<4.0) can be largely influenced by adsorption on and/or coprecipitation with both schwertmannite and jarosite. Under the geochemical conditions studied (SO42- = 10-2 M, Fe(III) ∼ Al = 10-3 M), alunite formation may occur at pH > 3.3, as suggested by mineralogical observations and geochemical modelling. Below this pH, and contrary to the extended assumption, Al is not truly conservative, and in the presence of ferric iron, both metals may co-precipitate at a substantial extent to form either particles of Al-rich schwertmannite (containing up to ca. 8 at.% Al with [Fe/(Fe + Al)] = 0.77) and/or crystals of H3O+- to K+-jarosite (containing up to ca. 10 at.% Al with [Fe/(Fe + Al)] = 0.54). This Al incorporation seems to take place by adsorption on particle surfaces in schwertmannite and by atomic substitution for Fe3+ in jarosite. Alunite is also unstable at this low pH range with respect to jarosite, which may lead either to isomorphic transformation and/or to chemically zoned crystals with jarositic rims around previously formed alunite cores. As a whole, the compositional spectrum of the analyzed jarosites and alunites

  12. pH : a key control of the nature and distribution of dissolved organic matter and associated trace metals in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pédrot, M.; Dia, A.; Davranche, M.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter is ubiquitous at the Earth's surface and plays a prominent role in controlling metal speciation and mobility from soils to hydrosystems. Humic substances (HS) are usually considered to be the most reactive fraction of organic matter. Humic substances are relatively small and formed by chemically diverse organic molecules, bearing different functional groups that act as binding sites for cations and mineral surfaces. Among the different environmental physicochemical parameters controlling the metal speciation, pH is likely to be the most important one. Indeed, pH affect the dissociation of functional groups, and thus can influence the HS structure, their ability to complex metals, their solubility degree allowing the formation of aggregates at the mineral surface. In this context, soil/water interactions conducted through batch system experiments, were carried out with a wetland organic-rich soil to investigate the effect of pH on the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and associated trace elements. The pH was regulated between 4 and 7.5 using an automatic pH stat titrator. Ultrafiltration experiments were performed to separate the dissolved organic pool following decreasing pore sizes (30 kDa, 5 kDa and 2 kDa with 1 Da = 1 g.mol-1). The pH increase induced a significant DOC release, especially in heavy organic molecules (size >5 kDa) with a high aromaticity (>30 %). These were probably humic acids (HA). This HA release influenced (i) directly the trace element concentrations in soil solution since HA were enriched in several trace elements such as Th, REE, Y, U, Cr and Cu; and (ii) indirectly by the breaking of clay-humic complexes releasing Fe- and Al-rich nanoparticles associated with V, Pb and Ti. By contrast, at acid pH, most HS were complexed onto mineral surfaces. They also sequestered iron nanoparticles. Therefore, at low pH, most part of DOC molecules had a size < 5 kDa and lower aromaticity. Thus, the DOC was mostly composed

  13. Binding interactions of dissolved organic matter with iron and copper: Effects of source and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Y.; Jaffe, R.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter(DOM) fluxes from terrestrial to marine environments have increased as a result of anthropogenic activities and climate change, and DOM is known to facilitate the transport of both metals and trace organics. The nature and composition of DOM may influence its binding properties to metals and thus affect their mobility and fate in aquatic environments. Humic substances make up the majority of DOM in many aquatic ecosystems. Metals such as Fe and Cu are not only important as nutrients in aquatic systems, but also in controlling biogeochemical and ecotoxicological processes respectively. Thus, gaining a better understanding on the interaction of humic substances with Fe or Cu is important in the assessment of the bioavailability of such metals in aquatic systems. In this study, the binding processes of two different DOM samples (Suwanee River humic acid, SRHA and Nordic Lake fulvic acid, NLFA)with Fe(III) and Cu(II) were examined. With the assistance of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence (EEM) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), three humic-like components (C1, C2 and C4), and one microbial humic-like component (C3), were identified in the characterization of the samples. The quenching rates of C2 and C4 fluorescence in the presence of Cu were similar, which were slightly faster than that forC1. In contrast, the C3 fluorescence was significantly less affected by the addition of metals. In the presence of Fe, the most significant quenching was also observed for C2, and the behavior of C4 fluorescence was dependent on the pH value. Some differences in the fluorescence quenching were also observed between the two humic acid standards (one more higher-plant/terrestrially derived vs. the other more microbial/aquatic derived). In addition, pH had a significant effect on the metal binding with significantly lower quenching at lower pH values. Some variations where observed for the higher pH conditions particularly for Cu(II). A modified

  14. Adsorption of sulfonamides on reduced graphene oxides as affected by pH and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Shuguang; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-03-01

    With the significant increase in use and application of graphene and the frequent presence of sulfonamides (SAs) in water environments, their interactions have attracted extensive attention. In this study, adsorption of two selected SAs (sulfapyridine and sulfathiazole) by two reduced graphene oxides (rGO1 and rGO2) was examined as affected by pH and dissolved organic matter (DOM). Adsorption of SAs by rGOs was highly pH-dependent, and adsorption affinity of different SAs species followed the order of SA(0) > SA(+) > SA(-). The contribution of SA(0) to the overall adsorption was greater than its species fraction, implying the importance of the neutral species to adsorption. SAs adsorption isotherms at three selected pHs were in the order of pH 5.0 > pH 1.0 > pH 11.0, which was in accordance with the variation of site energy distribution analysis. Hydrophobic interaction, π-π EDA interaction and electrostatic interaction were the main mechanisms responsible for SAs adsorption by rGOs. Three representative natural DOMs including humic acid (HA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), and sodium alginate together with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) as a synthetic DOM were used to investigate their effect on SAs adsorption. The inhibition impact of DOM on SAs adsorption was lower for rGOs compared with carbon nanotubes and graphite, which might be attributed to the higher oxygen contents of rGOs. Also, the suppression effect of DOM generally followed an order of SDBS > HA ≥ BSA > alginate, indicating the importance role of DOM compositions. These results should be important for assessing the fate and transport of graphene and antibiotics in the environment.

  15. Impact of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, and polyphosphates for the initial stages of water corrosion of copper surfaces investigated by AFM and NEXAFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoscale studies at the early stages of the exposure of copper surfaces after systematic treatments in synthesized water solutions can provide useful information about corrosion processes. The corrosion and passivation of copper surfaces as influenced by pH, dissolved inorganic ...

  16. pH- and voltage-dependent conductances in toad skin.

    PubMed

    Lacaz-Vieira, F

    1995-11-01

    The present study focuses on two closely related topics on ion conductance in toad skins: (i) the interaction of apical protons with the apical voltage-dependent Cl(-)-activated channels of the mitochondria-rich cells, and (ii) the description and characterization of a novel subject, a voltage-dependent H(+)-activated conductance. The Cl- conductance (GCl) is activated by tissue hyperpolarization (which leads to apical membrane depolarization) and the presence of Cl- ions in the apical solution. Increasing apical proton concentration (from pH 8 to pH 4) impairs the process of activation of the Cl- conductive pathway, slowing the kinetics of It activation and reducing the steady-stage values of Gt and It. This effect is markedly voltage-dependent since no effect is seen at Vt = -100 mv and is fully present at -50 mV. The voltage-dependence of the pH effect suggests that the critical protonation sites of the apical Cl- channels are not freely exposed to the apical solution but dwell within the membrane electric field. An also coherent interpretation is that titration of apical proton binding sites affects the gating of the voltage-dependent Cl- channels, shifting the conductance-vs.-voltage curve to more negative clamping potentials. Tissue conductance in the absence of apical Cl- ions can be importantly affected by the pH of the apical solution (pHa), the effect being markedly dependent on the clamping potential. Generally speaking, the effect of rising apical proton concentration can be conspicuous at negative clamping potentials, while at positive potentials changes in tissue conductance were never observed. For a clamping potential of -100 mV, a turning point somewhere between pHa = 4 and pHa = 3 was observed. Apical acidification to pH 4 has no effect upon tissue conductance while apical acidification to pH 3 leads to a marked, slow and reversible increase of tissue conductance. A striking similitude exists between the voltage-dependent Cl(-)-gated conductance

  17. Biochar-induced changes in soil hydraulic conductivity and dissolved nutrient fluxes constrained by laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Rebecca T; Gallagher, Morgan E; Masiello, Caroline A; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent.

  18. Biochar-Induced Changes in Soil Hydraulic Conductivity and Dissolved Nutrient Fluxes Constrained by Laboratory Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Rebecca T.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    The addition of charcoal (or biochar) to soil has significant carbon sequestration and agronomic potential, making it important to determine how this potentially large anthropogenic carbon influx will alter ecosystem functions. We used column experiments to quantify how hydrologic and nutrient-retention characteristics of three soil materials differed with biochar amendment. We compared three homogeneous soil materials (sand, organic-rich topsoil, and clay-rich Hapludert) to provide a basic understanding of biochar-soil-water interactions. On average, biochar amendment decreased saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) by 92% in sand and 67% in organic soil, but increased K by 328% in clay-rich soil. The change in K for sand was not predicted by the accompanying physical changes to the soil mixture; the sand-biochar mixture was less dense and more porous than sand without biochar. We propose two hydrologic pathways that are potential drivers for this behavior: one through the interstitial biochar-sand space and a second through pores within the biochar grains themselves. This second pathway adds to the porosity of the soil mixture; however, it likely does not add to the effective soil K due to its tortuosity and smaller pore size. Therefore, the addition of biochar can increase or decrease soil drainage, and suggests that any potential improvement of water delivery to plants is dependent on soil type, biochar amendment rate, and biochar properties. Changes in dissolved carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes also differed; with biochar increasing the C flux from organic-poor sand, decreasing it from organic-rich soils, and retaining small amounts of soil-derived N. The aromaticity of C lost from sand and clay increased, suggesting lost C was biochar-derived; though the loss accounts for only 0.05% of added biochar-C. Thus, the direction and magnitude of hydraulic, C, and N changes associated with biochar amendments are soil type (composition and particle size) dependent

  19. Improved curdlan fermentation process based on optimization of dissolved oxygen combined with pH control and metabolic characterization of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Tao; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jian-Rong; English, Nike; Yu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    A significant problem in scale-down cultures, rarely studied for metabolic characterization and curdlan-producing Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31749, is the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) gradients combined with pH control. Constant DO, between 5% and 75%, was maintained during batch fermentations by manipulating the agitation with PID system. Fermentation, metabolic and kinetic characterization studies were conducted in a scale-down system. The curdlan yield, intracellular nucleotide levels and glucose conversion efficiency into curdlan were significantly affected by DO concentrations. The optimum DO concentrations for curdlan production were 45-60%. The average curdlan yield, curdlan productivity and glucose conversion efficiency into curdlan were enhanced by 80%, 66% and 32%, respectively, compared to that at 15% DO. No apparent difference in the gel strength of the resulting curdlan was detected. The comparison of curdlan biosynthesis and cellular nucleotide levels showed that curdlan production had positive relationship with intracellular levels of UTP, ADP, AMP, NAD(+), NADH and UDP-glucose. The curdlan productivity under 45% DO and 60% DO was different during 20-50 h. However, after 60 h curdlan productivity of both conditions was similar. On that basis, a simple and reproducible two-stage DO control process for curdlan production was developed. Curdlan production yield reached 42.8 g/l, an increase of 30% compared to that of the single agitation speed control process.

  20. Lack of correlation between turnover of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic carbon and differences in microbial community composition or growth across a soil pH gradient.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Johannes; Brookes, Philip C; Glanville, Helen C; Jones, David L

    2011-04-01

    We studied how soil pH (pHs 4 to 8) influenced the mineralization of low-molecular-weight (LMW)-dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds, and how this compared with differences in microbial community structure. The mineralization of LMW-DOC compounds was not systematically connected to differences in soil pH, consistent with soil respiration. In contrast, the microbial community compositions differed dramatically. This suggests that microbial community composition data will be of limited use in improving the predictive power of soil C models.

  1. Ensuring PhD development of responsible conduct of research behaviors: who's responsible?

    PubMed

    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    The importance of public confidence in scientific findings and trust in scientists cannot be overstated. Thus, it becomes critical for the scientific community to focus on enhancing the strategies used to educate future scientists on ethical research behaviors. What we are lacking is knowledge on how faculty members shape and develop ethical research standards with their students. We are presenting the results of a survey with 3,500 research faculty members. We believe this is the first report on how faculty work with and educate their PhD students on basic research standards. Specifically, we wanted to determine whether individual faculty members, who are advisors or mentors, differ in how they implemented components of responsible conduct of research (RCR) with their PhD students. Mentors were more likely than advisors or supervisors to report working with all of their PhDs, who graduated in the last 5 years, on the 17 recognized critical components of RCR training and research skill development. We also found about half of the faculty members believe RCR is an institutional responsibility versus a faculty responsibility. Less than a quarter have had opportunities to participate in faculty training to be a better mentor, advisor, or research teacher, and about one third of faculty did not or could not remember whether they had guidelines related to their responsibilities to PhD students. We discuss the implications of our findings and focus on ways that PhD research mentoring can be enhanced.

  2. Continuous-flow electrophoresis: Membrane-associated deviations of buffer pH and conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Mcguire, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    The deviations in buffer pH and conductivity which occur near the electrode membranes in continuous-flow electrophoresis were studied in the Beckman charged particle electrophoresis system and the Hanning FF-5 preparative electrophoresis instrument. The nature of the membranes separating the electrode compartments from the electrophoresis chamber, the electric field strength, and the flow rate of electrophoresis buffer were all found to influence the formation of the pH and conductivity gradients. Variations in electrode buffer flow rate and the time of electrophoresis were less important. The results obtained supported the hypothesis that a combination of Donnan membrane effects and the differing ionic mobilities in the electrophoresis buffer was responsible for the formation of the gradients. The significance of the results for the design and stable operation of continuous-flow electrophoresis apparatus was discussed.

  3. Rate of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation in acidic persulfate digested sample matrix for total dissolved phosphorus determination: importance of post-digestion pH adjustment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Jia-Zhong

    2008-10-19

    Acidic persulfate oxidation is one of the most common procedures used to digest dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in water samples for total dissolved phosphorus determination. It has been reported that the rates of phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue complex formation were significantly reduced in the digested sample matrix. This study revealed that the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation, not the slight change in pH, cause the slowdown of color formation. This effect can be remedied by adjusting digested samples pH to a near neural to decompose the intermediate products. No disturbing effects of chlorine on the phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation in seawater were observed. It is noted that the modification of mixed reagent recipe cannot provide near neutral pH for the decomposition of the intermediate products of persulfate oxidation. This study provides experimental evidence not only to support the recommendation made in APHA standard methods that the pH of the digested sample must be adjusted to within a narrow range of sample, but also to improve the understanding of role of residue from persulfate decomposition on the subsequent phosphoantimonylmolybdenum blue formation.

  4. An empirical method for estimating instream pre-mining pH and dissolved Cu concentration in catchments with acidic drainage and ferricrete

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, D.A.; Gurrieri, J.T.; Furniss, G.

    2009-01-01

    Methods for assessing natural background water quality of streams affected by historical mining are vigorously debated. An empirical method is proposed in which stream-specific estimation equations are generated from relationships between either pH or dissolved Cu concentration in stream water and the Fe/Cu concentration ratio in Fe-precipitates presently forming in the stream. The equations and Fe/Cu ratios for pre-mining deposits of alluvial ferricrete then were used to reconstruct estimated pre-mining longitudinal profiles for pH and dissolved Cu in three acidic streams in Montana, USA. Primary assumptions underlying the proposed method are that alluvial ferricretes and modern Fe-precipitates share a common origin, that the Cu content of Fe-precipitates remains constant during and after conversion to ferricrete, and that geochemical factors other than pH and dissolved Cu concentration play a lesser role in determining Fe/Cu ratios in Fe-precipitates. The method was evaluated by applying it in a fourth, naturally acidic stream unaffected by mining, where estimated pre-mining pH and Cu concentrations were similar to present-day values, and by demonstrating that inflows, particularly from unmined areas, had consistent effects on both the pre-mining and measured profiles of pH and Cu concentration. Using this method, it was estimated that mining has affected about 480 m of Daisy Creek, 1.8 km of Fisher Creek, and at least 1 km of Swift Gulch. Mean values of pH decreased by about 0.6 pH units to about 3.2 in Daisy Creek and by 1-1.5 pH units to about 3.5 in Fisher Creek. In Swift Gulch, mining appears to have decreased pH from about 5.5 to as low as 3.6. Dissolved Cu concentrations increased due to mining almost 40% in Daisy Creek to a mean of 11.7 mg/L and as much as 230% in Fisher Creek to 0.690 mg/L. Uncertainty in the fate of Cu during the conversion of Fe-precipitates to ferricrete translates to potential errors in pre-mining estimates of as much as 0.25 units

  5. Using Simulation in Nursing PhD Education: Facilitating Application of Responsible Conduct of Research Principles.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Margaret F; Supiano, Katherine; Wilson, Rebecca; Lassche, Madeline; Latendresse, Gwen

    Simulation is a standard clinical nursing educational approach; however, simulation is rarely used in nonclinical nursing education. In doctor of philosophy (PhD) programs, ethical content about responsible conduct of research (RCR) is traditionally didactic, presented early in the program of study. Ethics content merits review before students begin the dissertation phase; thus, the purpose of this project was to design and implement simulated scenarios to help students apply RCR principles prior to beginning independent research. Two scenarios were developed: (a) a potential protocol change discussed in a research team meeting and (b) an in-home data collection experience with an elderly participant and her daughter. Actors were trained faculty volunteers, playing roles outside their usual academic positions. Faculty facilitated scenarios by posing questions as cues related to desired learning outcomes as scenarios unfolded. Eleven nursing PhD students and 6 faculty participated. Debriefing facilitated discussion of RCR principles, common research quandaries, and suggested scenario revisions. Faculty, expert observation, and video-review showed that younger and less experienced students tried to give the "right" answer rather than implement RCR appropriate solutions. Students with more clinical experience had difficulty adopting the less familiar researcher role. Overall, simulation is a novel and useful way to enhance RCR content in PhD programs.

  6. The synergistic effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on N2O production in biological domestic wastewater treatment under nitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengzhang; Wang, Shuying; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Yue; He, Janzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas, which is produced during nitrifying and denitrifying processes. Some factors and mechanisms affecting N2O emission have been reported in previous literature, but wastewater biological nitrification is accompanied by a dynamic process of dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption and pH reduction, it is more meaningful to study the synergistic effects between DO and pH on N2O production. In this study, the synergistic effects between DO and pH on N2O production were investigated with real domestic wastewater. The results showed that high DO levels and a high pH could improve the oxidation ratio of NH4+-N and the production ratio of NO2--N, while effectively reducing the accumulation ratio of N2O. The NH4+-N was a prerequisite for nitrifier denitrification; when NH4+-N was oxidized completely, there would be no N2O production and an even higher concentration of NO2- The pH factor is shown to directly affect N2O emission, although free ammonia and free nitrous acid which changed with pH had no correlation with N2O emission. There were two reasons: (1) pH can influence the flow direction of electrons afforded by NH2OH oxidation; at high pH, electrons were mainly used for combining H+ and O2 (O2+4H++4e-=2H2O), the accumulation of NO2- cannot be a result of denitrification, and a higher DO can get more electrons to prefer NO2- and (2) NH4+ was the prerequisite for NH2OH oxidation, since NH2OH oxidation process was the way to provide electrons for nitrifier denitrification.

  7. Removal of cationic dye methylene blue by zero-valent iron: Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on removal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Kurokawa, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Moe; Takagi, Minoru; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Effects of pH and dissolved oxygen on mechanisms for decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of cationic dye methylene blue (MB) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) were systematically examined. Decolorization and TOC removal of MB by ZVI are attributed to the four potential mechanisms, i.e. reduction, degradation, precipitation and adsorption. The contributions of four mechanisms were quantified at pH 3.0, 6.0 and 10.0 in the oxic and anoxic systems. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal of MB were found at pH 6.0. The TOC removal efficiencies at pH 3.0 and 10.0 were 11.0 and 17.0%, respectively which were considerably lower as compared with 68.1% at pH 6.0. The adsorption, which was favorable at higher pH but was depressed by the passive layer formed on the ZVI surface at alkaline conditions, characterized the effects of pH on decolorization and TOC removal of MB. The efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal at pH 6.0 under the anoxic condition were 73.0 and 59.0%, respectively, which were comparable to 79.9 and 55.5% obtained under the oxic condition. In the oxic and anoxic conditions, however, the contributions of removal mechanisms were quite different. Although the adsorption dominated the decolorization and TOC removal under the oxic condition, the contribution of precipitation was largely superior to that of adsorption under the anoxic condition.

  8. Intracellular pH regulates basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances in colonic epithelial cells by modulating Ca2+ activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The role of intracellular pH as a modulator of basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances in epithelial cells was studied using digitonin- permeabilized colonic cell layers so that cytosolic pH could be clamped at specific values, while basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances were activated by stepwise increases in intracellular free Ca2+. Increasing the intracellular pH from 6.6 to 8.0 enhanced the sensitivity of both ionic conductances to intracellular Ca2+, but changing extracellular pH had no effect. Maximal K+ and Cl- currents activated by Ca2+ were not affected by changes in intracellular pH, suggesting that protons do not alter the conduction properties of the channels. Hill analysis of the Ca2+ activation process revealed that raising the cytosolic pH from 6.6 to 8.0 reduced the K1/2 for Ca2+ activation. In the absence of Ca2+, changes in intracellular pH did not have a significant effect on the basolateral K+ and Cl- conductances. These results are consistent with the notion that changes in cytosolic pH can modulate basolateral conductances by modifying the action of calcium, perhaps by acting at or near the activation site to provide a mechanism of variable "gain control." PMID:1719125

  9. Stability of nano-sized titanium dioxide in an aqueous environment: effects of pH, dissolved organic matter and divalent cations.

    PubMed

    Yang, X N; Cui, F Y

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide in the aquatic environment has a potential impact on the environment and human health. In this study, the impact of pH value, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and divalent cations (Ca(2+)) on the stability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in an aqueous environment was investigated in batch tests. The results showed that the particle size of nano-TiO2 was not sensitive to pH value but was inversely proportional to zeta potential. The nano-TiO2 becomes more stable with surface zeta potential, accompanied by small particle size and high dispersion. In the presence of DOM, the particle size was smaller and the stability of nano-TiO2 could be enhanced. This might be a synergistic effect of the ligand exchange and electrostatic force. Particle size increased with the addition of Ca(2+) and the stability decreased.

  10. Spatial models to predict ash pH and Electrical Conductivity distribution after a grassland fire in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerda, Artemi; Misiūnė, Ieva

    2015-04-01

    Fire mineralizes the organic matter, increasing the pH level and the amount of dissolved ions (Pereira et al., 2014). The degree of mineralization depends among other factors on fire temperature, burned specie, moisture content, and contact time. The impact of wildland fires it is assessed using the fire severity, an index used in the absence of direct measures (e.g temperature), important to estimate the fire effects in the ecosystems. This impact is observed through the loss of soil organic matter, crown volume, twig diameter, ash colour, among others (Keeley et al., 2009). The effects of fire are highly variable, especially at short spatial scales (Pereira et al., in press), due the different fuel conditions (e.g. moisture, specie distribution, flammability, connectivity, arrangement, etc). This variability poses important challenges to identify the best spatial predictor and have the most accurate spatial visualization of the data. Considering this, the test of several interpolation methods it is assumed to be relevant to have the most reliable map. The aims of this work are I) study the ash pH and Electrical Conductivity (EC) after a grassland fire according to ash colour and II) test several interpolation methods in order to identify the best spatial predictor of pH and EC distribution. The study area is located near Vilnius at 54.42° N and 25.26°E and 154 ma.s.l. After the fire it was designed a plot with a 27 x 9 m space grid. Samples were taken every 3 meters for a total of 40 (Pereira et al., 2013). Ash color was classified according to Úbeda et al. (2009). Ash pH and EC laboratory analysis were carried out according to Pereira et al. (2014). Previous to data comparison and modelling, normality and homogeneity were assessed with the Shapiro-wilk and Levene test. pH data respected the normality and homogeneity, while EC only followed the Gaussian distribution and the homogeneity criteria after a logarithmic transformation. Data spatial correlation was

  11. Control of protozoa contamination and lipid accumulation in Neochloris oleoabundans culture: Effects of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon.

    PubMed

    Peng, Licheng; Lan, Christopher Q; Zhang, Zisheng; Sarch, Cody; Laporte, Matt

    2015-12-01

    Combined effects of pH (i.e., 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5) and bicarbonate (i.e., 0, 80 and 160mM NaHCO3) on lipid accumulation and on biological contaminant viability in a protozoa-contaminated culture of the freshwater microalga Neochloris oleoabundans were studied. Cultures grown in the media containing 160mM NaHCO3 at pH 9.5 obtained the highest biomass concentration (DCWmax=1.32g/L), lipid content (LC=327mg/g), which corresponded to a lipid productivity of 56mg/(L·d), and the culture was protozoa free one day after inoculation. Other cultures, 160mM NaHCO3 at pH 8.5 (DCWmax=1.32g/L, LC=223mg/g), and 80mM NaHCO3 at pH 9.5 (DCWmax=1.25g/L, LC=264mg/g) could delay protozoan growth, but not inhibit it completely. These results suggest 160mM NaHCO3 or slightly above at pH levels of 8.5-9.5 may be used in outdoor cultivation processes of freshwater N. oleoabundans to control protozoa contamination while maintain a high lipid content.

  12. Changes in pH, dissolved organic matter and Cd species in the rhizosphere soils of Cd phytostabilizer Athyrium wardii (Hook.) Makino involved in Cd tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujin; Li, Tingxuan; Zhang, Xizhou; Yu, Haiying; Zheng, Zicheng; Wang, Yongdong; Hao, Xiaoqing; Pu, Yong

    2014-03-01

    Phytostabilization has great practical significance and flexibility in the ecological restoration of mining tailings and remediation of heavy metals polluted soils. However, potential use of metallophytes in phytostabilization is limited by a lack of knowledge of many basic plant processes. A mining ecotype (ME) Athyrium wardii, Pb/Cd phytostabilizer, and a non-mining ecotype (NME) A. wardii were grown in a pot experiment to investigate the chemical characteristics of the rhizosphere when exposed to the Cd polluted soils. Rhizobags were used to collect rhizosphere and bulk soils, separately. The results indicated that the ME A. wardii was more efficient in Cd accumulation in the root than NME after growing in Cd polluted soils for 50 days in a green house. Soil solution pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the rhizosphere of ME A. wardii were higher than in the bulk soil and initial values (before planting), whereas the increment in the ME A. wardii were greater than NME. Owing to the increasing of rhizosphere soil pH, exchangeable Cd significantly decreased, whereas the other Cd species were increased with increasing soil DOC values. It is assumed that the ME A. wardii was effective in stabilizing Cd from the mobile fraction to non-mobile fractions. Results from this study suggest that rhizosphere alkalinization and the exudation of high amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to reduce heavy metal mobility might be the two important mechanisms involved in the metal tolerance/accumulation of ME A. wardii.

  13. Quantification of the dissolved inorganic carbon species and of the pH of alkaline solutions exposed to CO2 under pressure: a novel approach by Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Beuvier, Thomas; Calvignac, Brice; Bardeau, Jean-François; Bulou, Alain; Boury, Frank; Gibaud, Alain

    2014-10-07

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) content of aqueous systems is a key function of the pH, of the total alkanility (TA), and of the partial pressure of CO2. However, common analytical techniques used to determine the DIC content in water are unable to operate under high CO2 pressure. Here, we propose to use Raman spectroscopy as a novel alternative to discriminate and quantitatively monitor the three dissolved inorganic carbon species CO2(aq), HCO3(-), and CO3(2-) of alkaline solutions under high CO2 pressure (from P = 0 to 250 bar at T = 40 °C). In addition, we demonstrate that the pH values can be extracted from the molalities of CO2(aq) and HCO3(-). The results are in very good agreement with those obtained from direct spectrophotometric measurements using colored indicators. This novel method presents the great advantage over high pressure conventional techniques of not using breakable electrodes or reference additives and appears of great interest especially in marine biogeochemistry, in carbon capture and storage and in material engineering under high CO2 pressure.

  14. Effect of overlying water pH, dissolved oxygen, salinity and sediment disturbances on metal release and sequestration from metal contaminated marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Clare A; Jolley, Dianne F; Simpson, Stuart L

    2007-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to examine the key variables affecting metal release and sequestration processes in marine sediments with metal concentrations in sediments reaching up to 86, 240, 700, and 3000 mg kg(-1) (dry weight) for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, respectively. The metal release and sequestration rates were affected to a much greater extent by changes in overlying water pH (5.5-8.0) and sediment disturbance (by physical mixing) than by changes in dissolved oxygen concentration (3-8 mg l(-1)) or salinity (15-45 practical salinity units). The physical disturbance of sediments was also found to release metals more rapidly than biological disturbance (bioturbation). The rate of oxidative precipitation of released iron and manganese increased as pH decreased and appeared to greatly influence the sequestration rate of released lead and zinc. Released metals were sequestered less rapidly in waters with lower dissolved oxygen concentrations. Sediments bioturbated by the benthic bivalve Tellina deltoidalis caused metal release from the pore waters and higher concentrations of iron and manganese in overlying waters than non-bioturbated sediments. During 21-day sediment exposures, T. deltoidalis accumulated significantly higher tissue concentrations of cadmium, lead and zinc from the metal contaminated sediments compared to controls. This study suggests that despite the fact that lead and zinc were most likely bound as sulfide phases in deeper sediments, the metals maintain their bioavailability because of the continued cycling between pore waters and surface sediments due to physical mixing and bioturbation.

  15. The combined effects of hardness, pH, and dissolved organic carbon on the chronic toxicity of Zn to D. magna: development of a surface response model.

    PubMed

    Heijerick, D G; Janssen, C R; De Coen, W M

    2003-02-01

    The effect of changes in pH, hardness, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the possible interactions among these parameters on the chronic toxicity of zinc to D. magna were investigated. Based on a Central Composite Design, models were developed that can explain the observed variation in EC(10) and EC(50) as a function of these toxicity modifying factors. All three parameters significantly altered the observed effect concentrations based on net reproductive rate. The largest differences in 21-day EC(10)s and EC(50)s caused by these factors were 10.1 and 4.9, respectively. An increase in pH and/or DOC decreased zinc toxicity. The significant interaction between pH and DOC on observed chronic Zn toxicity is in accordance with earlier reported increased sorption efficiency of Zn to humic substances at higher pH levels. Lowest Zn toxicity was observed in tests performed with moderately hard test media (between 200 and 300 mg/L as CaCO(3)). Lower or higher hardness of the test medium resulted in lower effect concentrations. Based on physico-chemical characteristics of the test media, developed models can be used to explain the variation between reported NOECs for Zn and may improve current environmental risk assessment procedures of metals.

  16. Carbon dioxide addition to microbial fuel cell cathodes maintains sustainable catholyte pH and improves anolyte pH, alkalinity, and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fornero, Jeffrey J; Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance contributes to BES potential losses and, therefore, power losses. Here, we report that adding carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas to the cathode, which creates a CO(2)/bicarbonate buffered catholyte system, can diminish microbial fuel cell (MFC) pH imbalances in contrast to the CO(2)/carbonate buffered catholyte system by Torres, Lee, and Rittmann [Environ. Sci. Technol. 2008, 42, 8773]. We operated an air-cathode and liquid-cathode MFC side-by-side. For the air-cathode MFC, CO(2) addition resulted in a stable catholyte film pH of 6.61 +/- 0.12 and a 152% increase in steady-state power density. By adding CO(2) to the liquid-cathode system, we sustained a steady catholyte pH (pH = 5.94 +/- 0.02) and a low pH imbalance (DeltapH = 0.65 +/- 0.18) over a 2-week period without external salt buffer addition. By migrating bicarbonate ions from the cathode to the anode (with an anion-exchange membrane), we increased the anolyte pH (DeltapH = 0.39 +/- 0.31), total alkalinity (494 +/- 6 to 582 +/- 6 as mg CaCO(3)/L), and conductivity (1.53 +/- 0.49 to 2.16 +/- 0.03 mS/cm) relative to the feed properties. We also verified with a phosphate-buffered MFC that our reaction rates were limited mainly by the reactor configuration rather than limitations due to the bicarbonate buffer.

  17. Effects of dissolved sulfide, pH, and temperature on growth and survival of marine hyperthermophilic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Karen G; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Molyneaux, Stephen J; Böer, Simone; Wirsen, Carl O; Atkins, Michael S; Teske, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    The ability of metabolically diverse hyperthermophilic archaea to withstand high temperatures, low pHs, high sulfide concentrations, and the absence of carbon and energy sources was investigated. Close relatives of our study organisms, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Archaeoglobus profundus, Thermococcus fumicolans, and Pyrococcus sp. strain GB-D, are commonly found in hydrothermal vent chimney walls and hot sediments and possibly deeper in the subsurface, where highly dynamic hydrothermal flow patterns and steep chemical and temperature gradients provide an ever-changing mosaic of microhabitats. These organisms (with the possible exception of Pyrococcus strain GB-D) tolerated greater extremes of low pH, high sulfide concentration, and high temperature when actively growing and metabolizing than when starved of carbon sources and electron donors/acceptors. Therefore these organisms must be actively metabolizing in the hydrothermal vent chimneys, sediments, and subsurface in order to withstand at least 24 h of exposure to extremes of pH, sulfide, and temperature that occur in these environments.

  18. Effects of pH, dissolved oxygen, and ionic strength on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in organic acid solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to survive in acidified vegetable products is of concern because of previously documented outbreaks associated with fruit juices. A study was conducted to determine the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in organic acids at pH values typical of acidified vegetable pr...

  19. Experimental investigations of the effect the electrical conductivity of medium has on the performance of pH meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, A. K.; Karashchuk, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Results from tests of pH meters carried out in ammonia media having low electric conductivity (less than 5.0 μS/cm) are presented. The check media for the tests were prepared in a special manner the use of which makes it possible to reproduce the pH value of solution with an error not exceeding ˜0.04pH in the range of electrical conductivities above 0.1 μS/cm. The instrument measurement error was determined at different electrical conductivities of medium. Different electrodes were tested, the majority of which were domestically produced ones intended for general industrial applications. Some results were also obtained for one dedicated electrode from a foreign manufacturer. The test results show that the instrument gives a biased pH value for such media. The bias has a random value, which nonetheless is stable in the majority of cases, depends on the electrical conductivity of medium being monitored, and may be quite essential for small electrical conductivities (0.5pH or more). A conclusion is drawn about the need to calibrate the instruments with respect to standard media having electrical conductivity close to that of the medium being monitored. Analytic relations characterizing the check media used fort tests (check solutions) are presented.

  20. Effect of dissolved organic matter on the stability of magnetite nanoparticles under different pH and ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Dong; Zevi, Yuniati; Kou, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, John; Wang, Xue-Jun; Jin, Yan

    2010-07-15

    Upon release of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the subsurface environment, their fate and transport and hence their potential environmental and public health impacts will largely depend on how stable these NPs are as suspended particles in the natural environment. In this study, we systematically examine the effect of humic acid (HA) on surface charge status and aggregation potential of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) NPs, selected as a model for metal oxide NPs, over a wide range of solution pH and ionic strength. Through zeta potential (ZP) measurements, we found that HA can adsorb to magnetite particles hence modifying their surface charge status. At low loadings, the presence of HA can induce a shift in the point zero of charge of due to partial neutralization of the positive charges on magnetite NPs. At high loadings, however, HA is capable of completely cover magnetite particles giving rise to a suspension ZP profile similar to its own (observed in presence of 20 mg L(-)(1) HA). These impacts on surface charge correspond well with the observed aggregation behaviors in the absence and presence of HA. From the dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements, fast aggregation, which is independent of solution chemistry, took place when the pH is close to the point zero charge (PZC) and the ionic strength is above the critical coagulation concentration (CCC). At high ionic strength, a small dose (2 mg L(-)(1)) of HA stabilized the NPs' suspension significantly. This stabilization effect is substantially enhanced with increasing HA concentration. The calculated DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) interaction energy profiles, using experimentally determined values of Hamaker constant, adequately support the experimental observations. The DLVO analysis further reveals the possible presence of secondary energy minima and the possibility of deaggregation of magnetite agglomerates. The complexation of HA-NPs and the HA effects on NPs aggregations were confirmed by atomic

  1. In situ optimization of pH for parts-per-billion electrochemical detection of dissolved hydrogen sulfide using boron doped diamond flow electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bitziou, Eleni; Joseph, Maxim B; Read, Tania L; Palmer, Nicola; Mollart, Tim; Newton, Mark E; Macpherson, Julie V

    2014-11-04

    A novel electrochemical approach to the direct detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), in aqueous solutions, covering a wide pH range (acid to alkali), is described. In brief, a dual band electrode device is employed, in a hydrodynamic flow cell, where the upstream electrode is used to controllably generate hydroxide ions (OH(-)), which flood the downstream detector electrode and provide the correct pH environment for complete conversion of H2S to the electrochemically detectable, sulfide (HS(-)) ion. All-diamond, coplanar conducting diamond band electrodes, insulated in diamond, were used due to their exceptional stability and robustness when applying extreme potentials, essential attributes for both local OH(-) generation via the reduction of water, and for in situ cleaning of the electrode, post oxidation of sulfide. Using a galvanostatic approach, it was demonstrated the pH locally could be modified by over five pH units, depending on the initial pH of the mobile phase and the applied current. Electrochemical detection limits of 13.6 ppb sulfide were achieved using flow injection amperometry. This approach which offers local control of the pH of the detector electrode in a solution, which is far from ideal for optimized detection of the analyte of interest, enhances the capabilities of online electrochemical detection systems.

  2. Tracing of γ-radiation-induced electrical conductivity and pH change of hexamethylenetetramine aqueous solutions and its applications.

    PubMed

    Sife-Eldeen, Kh A

    2013-04-01

    The interest in studying γ-radiation effects on hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) is due to its importance in nuclear fuel technology. The current study indicates that γ-radiation induces electrical conductivity (RIC) and pH changes in HMTA aqueous solutions. The effects of HMTA concentration, absorbed radiation dose, absorbed dose rate and storage time on RIC and pH changes were studied. HMTA aqueous solutions could be considered as a promising γ-radiation dosimeter, in both technical and medical fields.

  3. Dissolved organic carbon from the upper Rio Negro protects zebrafish (Danio rerio) against ionoregulatory disturbances caused by low pH exposure

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Rafael M.; Smith, D. Scott; Val, Adalberto L.; Wood, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    The so-called “blackwaters” of the Amazonian Rio Negro are rich in highly coloured dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but ion-poor and very acidic, conditions that would cause fatal ionoregulatory failure in most fish. However these blackwaters support 8% of the world’s ichthyofauna. We tested the hypothesis that native DOC provides protection against ionoregulatory dysfunction in this extreme environment. DOCs were isolated by reverse-osmosis from two Rio Negro sites. Physico-chemical characterization clearly indicated a terrigenous origin, with a high proportion of hydroxyl and phenolic sites, high chemical reactivity to protons, and unusual proteinaceous fluorescence. When tested using zebrafish (a model organism), Rio Negro DOC provided almost perfect protection against ionoregulatory disturbances associated with acute exposure to pH 4.0 in ion-poor water. DOC reduced diffusive losses of Na+ and Cl−, and promoted a remarkable stimulation of Na+ uptake that otherwise would have been completely inhibited. Additionally, prior acclimation to DOC at neutral pH reduced rates of branchial Na+ turnover, and provided similar protection against acid-induced ionoregulatory disturbances, even if the DOC was no longer present. These results reinforce the important roles that DOC molecules can play in the regulation of gill functions in freshwater fish, particularly in ion-poor, acidic blackwaters. PMID:26853589

  4. Substrate-immobilized electrospun TiO2 nanofibers for photocatalytic degradation of pharmaceuticals: The effects of pH and dissolved organic matter characteristics.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Sung Kyu; Cho, Kangwoo; Jeong, Boyoung; Lee, Jaesang; Lee, Yunho; Lee, Changha; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Hong, Seok Won

    2015-12-01

    A substrate-immobilized (SI) TiO2 nanofiber (NF) photocatalyst for multiple uses was prepared through electrospinning and hot pressing. The rate of furfuryl alcohol degradation under UV irradiation was found to be the highest when the anatase to rutile ratio was 70:30; the rate did not linearly increase as a function of the NF film thickness, mainly due to diffusion limitation. Even after eight repeated cycles, it showed only a marginal reduction in the photocatalytic activity for the degradation of cimetidine. The effects of pH and different organic matter characteristics on the photodegradation of cimetidine (CMT), propranolol (PRP), and carbamazepine (CBZ) were investigated. The pH-dependence of the photocatalytic degradation rates of PRP was explained by electrostatic interactions between the selected compounds and the surface of TiO2 NFs. The degradation rates of CMT showed the following order: deionized water > l-tyrosine > secondary wastewater effluent (effluent organic matter) > Suwannee River natural organic matter, demonstrating that the characteristics of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) can affect the photodegradation of CMT. Photodegradation of CBZ was affected by the presence of DOM, and no significant change was observed between different DOM characteristics. These findings suggest that the removal of CMT, PRP, and CBZ during photocatalytic oxidation using SI TiO2 NFs is affected by the presence of DOM and/or pH, which should be importantly considered for practical applications.

  5. Estimating time-variable aerobic respiration in the streambed by combining electrical conductivity and dissolved oxygen time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, Michael; Kurz, Marie J.; Trauth, Nico; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Musolff, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Aerobic respiration is an important component of in-stream metabolism. The larger part occurs in the streambed, where it is difficult to directly determine actual respiration rates. Existing methods for determining respiration are based on indirect estimates from whole-stream metabolism or provide time invariant results estimated from oxygen consumption measurements in enclosed chambers that do not account for the influence of hydrological changes. In this study we demonstrate a simple method for determining time-variable hyporheic respiration. We use a windowed cross-correlation approach for deriving time-variable travel times from the naturally changing electrical conductivity signal that is transferred into the sediment. By combining the results with continuous in situ dissolved oxygen measurements, variable oxygen consumption rate coefficients in the streambed are obtained. An empirical temperature relationship is derived and used for standardizing the respiration rate coefficients to isothermal conditions. For demonstrating the method, we compare two independent measurement spots in the streambed, which were located upstream and downstream of an in-stream gravel bar and thus exposed strongly diverse travel times. The derived respiration rate results are in accordance with findings of other stream studies. By comparing the travel time and respiration rate coefficient (i.e., Damköhler number) we estimate the contribution of each to the oxygen consumption in the streambed.

  6. The voltage-activated hydrogen ion conductance in rat alveolar epithelial cells is determined by the pH gradient

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Voltage-activated H+ currents were studied in rat alveolar epithelial cells using tight-seal whole-cell voltage clamp recording and highly buffered, EGTA-containing solutions. Under these conditions, the tail current reversal potential, Vrev, was close to the Nernst potential, EH, varying 52 mV/U pH over four delta pH units (delta pH = pHo - pHi). This result indicates that H+ channels are extremely selective, PH/PTMA > 10(7), and that both internal and external pH, pHi, and pHo, were well controlled. The H+ current amplitude was practically constant at any fixed delta pH, in spite of up to 100-fold symmetrical changes in H+ concentration. Thus, the rate-limiting step in H+ permeation is pH independent, must be localized to the channel (entry, permeation, or exit), and is not bulk diffusion limitation. The instantaneous current- voltage relationship exhibited distinct outward rectification at symmetrical pH, suggesting asymmetry in the permeation pathway. Sigmoid activation kinetics and biexponential decay of tail currents near threshold potentials indicate that H+ channels pass through at least two closed states before opening. The steady state H+ conductance, gH, as well as activation and deactivation kinetic parameters were all shifted along the voltage axis by approximately 40 mV/U pH by changes in pHi or pHo, with the exception of the fast component of tail currents which was shifted less if at all. The threshold potential at which H+ currents were detectably activated can be described empirically as approximately 20-40(pHo-pHi) mV. If internal and external protons regulate the voltage dependence of gH gating at separate sites, then they must be equally effective. A simpler interpretation is that gating is controlled by the pH gradient, delta pH. We propose a simple general model to account for the observed delta pH dependence. Protonation at an externally accessible site stabilizes the closed channel conformation. Deprotonation of this site permits a

  7. Selective recovery of dissolved Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn in acid mine drainage based on modeling to predict precipitation pH.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Min; Yoo, Jong-Chan; Ji, Sang-Woo; Yang, Jung-Seok; Baek, Kitae

    2015-02-01

    Mining activities have caused serious environmental problems including acid mine drainage (AMD), the dispersion of mine tailings and dust, and extensive mine waste. In particular, AMD contaminates soil and water downstream of mines and generally contains mainly valuable metals such as Cu, Zn, and Ni as well as Fe and Al. In this study, we investigated the selective recovery of Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, and Ni from AMD. First, the speciation of Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, and Ni as a function of the equilibrium solution pH was simulated by Visual MINTEQ. Based on the simulation results, the predicted pHs for the selective precipitation of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn/Ni were determined. And recovery yield of metals using simulation is over 99 %. Experiments using artificial AMD based on the simulation results confirmed the selective recovery of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn/Ni, and the recovery yields of Fe/Al/Cu/Zn and Fe/Al/Cu/Ni mixtures using Na2CO3 were 99.6/86.8/71.9/77.0 % and 99.2/85.7/73.3/86.1 %, respectively. After then, the simulation results were applied to an actual AMD for the selective recovery of metals, and the recovery yields of Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn using NaOH were 97.2, 74.9, 66.9, and 89.7 %, respectively. Based on the results, it was concluded that selective recovery of dissolved metals from AMD is possible by adjusting the solution pH using NaOH or Na2CO3 as neutralizing agents.

  8. Economic process to co-produce poly(ε-l-lysine) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) by a pH and dissolved oxygen control strategy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaoxian; Feng, Xiaohai; Sun, Zhuzhen; Cao, Changhong; Li, Sha; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Zongqi; Bo, Fangfang; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study tended to apply biorefinery of indigenous microbes to the fermentation of target-product generation through a novel control strategy. A novel strategy for co-producing two valuable homopoly(amino acid)s, poly(ε-l-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(l-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP), was developed by controlling pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations in Streptomyces albulus PD-1 fermentation. The production of ε-PL and PDAP got 29.4 and 9.6gL(-1), respectively, via fed-batch cultivation in a 5L bioreactor. What is more, the highest production yield (21.8%) of similar production systems was achieved by using this novel strategy. To consider the economic-feasibility, large-scale production in a 1t fermentor was also implemented, which would increase the gross profit of 54,243.5USD from one fed-batch bioprocess. This type of fermentation, which produces multiple commercial products from a unified process is attractive, because it will improve the utilization rate of raw materials, enhance production value and enrich product variety.

  9. Soil pH and electrical conductivity are key edaphic factors shaping bacterial communities of greenhouse soils in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Myeong; Roh, An-Sung; Choi, Seung-Chul; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Moon-Tae; Ahn, Byung-Koo; Kim, Sun-Kuk; Lee, Young-Han; Joa, Jae-Ho; Kang, Seong-Soo; Lee, Shin Ae; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Song, Jaekyeong; Weon, Hang-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    Soil microorganisms play an essential role in soil ecosystem processes such as organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling, and plant nutrient availability. The land use for greenhouse cultivation has been increasing continuously, which involves an intensive input of agricultural materials to enhance productivity; however, relatively little is known about bacterial communities in greenhouse soils. To assess the effects of environmental factors on the soil bacterial diversity and community composition, a total of 187 greenhouse soil samples collected across Korea were subjected to bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis. A total of 11,865 operational taxonomic units at a 97% similarity cutoff level were detected from 847,560 sequences. Among nine soil factors evaluated; pH, electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+)), available P2O5, organic matter, and NO3-N, soil pH was most strongly correlated with bacterial richness (polynomial regression, pH: R(2) = 0.1683, P < 0.001) and diversity (pH: R(2) = 0.1765, P < 0.001). Community dissimilarities (Bray-Curtis distance) were positively correlated with Euclidean distance for pH and EC (Mantel test, pH: r = 0.2672, P < 0.001; EC: r = 0.1473, P < 0.001). Among dominant phyla (> 1%), the relative abundances of Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were also more strongly correlated with pH and EC values, compared with other soil cation contents, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+). Our results suggest that, despite the heterogeneity of various environmental variables, the bacterial communities of the intensively cultivated greenhouse soils were particularly influenced by soil pH and EC. These findings therefore shed light on the soil microbial ecology of greenhouse cultivation, which should be helpful for devising effective management strategies to enhance soil microbial diversity and improving crop productivity.

  10. Systems Characterization of Temperature, Ph and Electrical Conductivity in Aerobic Biodegradation of Wheat Biomass at Differing Mixing Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, M.; Trotman, A.; Aglan, H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to observe and relate the rate of mixing to pH and electrical conductivity in an aerobic, continuously stirred bioreactor. The objective is to use data collected from successive experiments as a means of a system characterization. Tests were conducted to obtain these data using a continuously stirred 20 L Cytostir glass reaction vessel as a bioreactor operated without built-in temperature or pH control. The tests were conducted on the lab bench at ambient temperatures. The substrate in the bioreactor was ground wheat biomass obtained from the Biomass Production Chamber at NASA Kennedy Space Center. In this study, the data reflect characteristics of the native (uninoculated) systems as well as inoculated systems. In the native systems, it was found that pi levels became stable after approximately 2 to 3 days. The electrical conductivity levels for the native systems tended to decrease over time. In contrast, ion activity was increased after the introduction of bacteria into the system. This could be correlated with the release of nutrients, due to the activity of the bacteria. Also, there were slight increases in pH in the inoculated system, a result which is expected for a system with no active pr controls. The data will be used to test a mathematical model in an automated system.

  11. An on-line optimisation of a SBR cycle for carbon and nitrogen removal based on on-line pH and Our: the role of dissolved oxygen control.

    PubMed

    Puig, S; Corominas, Ll; Traore, A; Colomer, J; Balaguer, M D; Colprim, J

    2006-01-01

    A pilot plant sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was applied in a wastewater treatment plant treating urban wastewater focused on carbon and nitrogen removal. From an initial predefined step-feed cycle definition, the evolution of the on-line monitored pH and calculated oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were analysed in terms of knowledge extraction. First, the aerobic phases of the SBR cycle were operated using an On/Off dissolved oxygen (DO) control strategy that concluded with a sinusoidal pH profile that made detecting the "ammonia valley" difficult. After changing to fuzzy logic control of the dissolved oxygen and by adding an air flow meter to the pilot plant, the pH evolution and on-line calculated OUR showed a clearer trend during the aerobic phases. Finally, a proposed algorithm for adjusting the aerobic phases of the SBR for carbon and ammonia removal is presented and discussed.

  12. Summary statistics and graphical comparisons of specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen data, Buffalo Bayou, Houston, Texas, April 1986-March 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, D.W.; Paul, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Buffalo Bayou is the major stream that drains the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area. The U.S. Geological Survey has provided specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen data to the City of Houston for three sites along a 7.7-mile reach of Buffalo Bayou since 1986. Summary statistics and graphical comparisons of the data show substantial variability in the properties during 1986-91. Specific conductance ranged from about 100 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius at each of the three sites to 17,100 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius at the most downstream site, at the headwaters of the Houston Ship Channel. Water temperatures ranged from 5 to 33 degrees Celsius. Temperatures were very similar at the two upstream sites and slightly warmer at the most downstream site. Dissolved oxygen ranged from zero at the most downstream site to 11.7 milligrams per liter at the most upstream site.

  13. Effect of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon, time, and particle size on metals release from mine drainage impacted streambed sediments.

    PubMed

    Butler, Barbara A

    2009-03-01

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) input to a stream typically results in the stream having a reduced pH, increased concentrations of metals and salts, and decreased biological productivity. Removal and/or treatment of these AMD sources is desired to return the impacted stream(s) to initial conditions, or at least to conditions suitable for restoration of the aquatic ecosystem. Some expected changes in the water chemistry of the stream following removal of AMD input include an increase in pH, a decrease in ionic strength, and an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations from increased biological activity in the absence of toxic metals concentrations. These changes in water chemistry may cause the existing contaminated bed sediments to become a source of metals to the stream water. Streambed sediments, collected from North Fork Clear Creek (NFCC), Colorado, currently impacted by AMD, were assessed for the effects of pH, ionic strength, DOC concentration, time, and particle size on metals release using a factorial design. The design included two levels for each chemical parameter (ionic strength = 40 and 80% lower than ambient; pH = 6 and 8; and DOC = 1 and 3 mg/l higher than ambient), ten sampling times (from zero to 48 h), and two size fractions of sediments (63 microm < or = x < 2 mm and < 63 microm). Greater concentrations of metals were released from the smaller sized sediments compared with the larger, with the exception of Cu. A mild acid digestion (0.6M HCl) evaluated the amount of each metal that could be removed easily from each of the sediment size fractions. Release of all metals over all time points, treatments, and from both sediment sizes was less than 1% of the extractable concentrations, with the exception of Mn, which ranged from 4 to 7% from the smaller sized sediment. Greater percentages of the 0.6M HCl-extractable concentrations of Cu, Fe, and Zn were released from the larger sized sediment, while this was true for release of Cd and Mn from

  14. Sorption-desorption and transport of trimethoprim and sulfonamide antibiotics in agricultural soil: effect of soil type, dissolved organic matter, and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lei; Lin, Shuang-Shuang; Dai, Chao-Meng; Shi, Lu; Zhou, Xue-Fei

    2014-05-01

    Use of animal manure is a main source of veterinary pharmaceuticals (VPs) in soil and groundwater through a series of migration processes. The sorption-desorption and transport of four commonly used VPs including trimethoprim (TMP), sulfapyridine, sulfameter, and sulfadimethoxine were investigated in three soil layers taken from an agricultural field in Chongming Island China and two types of aqueous solution (0.01 M CaCl2 solution and wastewater treatment plant effluent). Results from sorption-desorption experiments showed that the sorption behavior of selected VPs conformed to the Freundlich isotherm equation. TMP exhibited higher distribution coefficients (K d = 6.73-9.21) than other sulfonamides (K d = 0.03-0.47), indicating a much stronger adsorption capacity of TMP. The percentage of desorption for TMP in a range of 8-12 % is not so high to be considered significant. Low pH (dissolved organic matter might affect their sorption behavior. Column studies indicated that the transport of VPs in the soil column was mainly influenced by sorption capacity. The weakly adsorbed sulfonamides had a high recovery rate (63.6-98.0 %) in the leachate, while the recovery rate of TMP was only 4.2-10.4 %. The sulfonamides and TMP exhibited stronger retaining capacity in 20-80 cm and 0-20 cm soil samples, respectively. The transport of VPs was slightly higher in the columns leached by WWTP effluent than by CaCl2 solution (0.01 M) due to their sorption interactions.

  15. An analytical relationship between the magnetospheric potential drop and the ionospheric conductance. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis the author derives an analytical relationship between the Earth`s magnetospheric potential drop and the ionospheric conductance by adopting a simple two-dimensional model of a magnetic field draping around the tail magnetopause. Two methods are used: (1) matching currents through the tail magnetopause and the Earth`s ionosphere in analogy with the Alfven wing at the Jovian satellite, Io; and (2) minimizing the total power that the solar wind loses to the Earth`s magnetosphere. The author finds, in both cases, the magnetospheric conductance, Sigma(sub is), and compares this result to the revised result of the numerical model of Fedder and Lyon and to the conclusions of Hill et al. and Hill. Considering the derived proportionality factor as a `magnetosheath conductance`, Sigma(sub msh), the author determines that the high-latitude tail magnetospheric `driver` acts as a current generator as opposed to a voltage generator.

  16. Relations of borehole resistivity to the horizontal hydraulic conductivity and dissolved-soils concentration in water of clastic coastal plain aquifers in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Smith, Winston G.

    1994-01-01

    Aquifer bulk resistivity and grain-surface resistivity (inverse of grain-surface conductance) were tested as geoelectrical analogs to the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of clastic, freshwater aquifers in the Southeastern United States. Bulk resistivity was also tested as a geoelectrical analog for dissolved-solids concentrations in aquifer water. Bulk resistivity was defined as the average resistivity across a contributing interval measured by the long-normal (64-inch) or induction log. Grain-surface resistivity was empirically defined as the difference between aquifer bulk resistivity and aquifer water resistivity (computed from specific conductance). Sources of data were borehole geophysical logs and results of water-quality and aquifer-test analyses related to unconsolidated sands and clayey sands at more than a hundred sites in seven Southeastern States. Waterbearing units were composed of sediments ranging from the Late Cretaceous to middle Eocene. All bivariate data were related using the logarithmic regression model Y=AX B. Aquifer bulk resistivity and grain-surface resistivity were moderately correlated to horizontal hydraulic conductivity (70 and 72 percent correlation coefficients, respectively). Apparent formation factor, defined as the ratio of aquifer bulk resistivity to aquifer water resistivity, was shown to be poorly correlated with horizontal hydraulic conductivity (38 percent correlation coefficient). Aquifer bulk resistivity was shown to be highly correlated with dissolved-solids concentration and aquifer water resistivity (88 and 93 percent correlation coefficients, respectively). Regression models using bulk resistivity and aquifer water resistivity as independent variables were applied at four locations in South Carolina and Louisiana to predict dissolved-solids concentrations in aquifer water. Absolute mean error of prediction was 20 and 6 percent, respectively. A regression model using bulk resistivity to predict horizontal hydraulic

  17. Continuous pH, electrical conductivity and temperature measurement at Plynlimon: towards an integrated, reliable and low maintenance instrument system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, P.; Evans, J. G.

    Water quality data for the Nant Tanilwyth stream, Plynlimon (an acidic upland stream, the waters of which are of such low ionic strength that measurement is difficult), has been recorded using a new integrated field instrument system. The negligible drift of the pH electrode allows the system to operate for extended periods (months) without re-calibration, whilst maintaining a standard deviation of 0.19 pH units between its readings and laboratory reference measurements. Conductivity measurements, although within the sensor manufacturer's specification, did not provide meaningful readings at conductivities below 50 μS cm-1. Using the pH data as a surrogate tracer, a high temporal resolution estimate of the stream dynamics, in terms of the contributions of groundwater and soil-water is presented; the dependence of these relative proportions on instantaneous flow and antecedent conditions is shown. It is concluded that, whilst improvements in instrumentation have been made, greater accuracy is still desirable for some scientific applications and ways forward are described.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte pH and Improves Anolyte pH, Alkalinity, and Conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical system (BES) pH imbalances develop due to anodic proton-generating oxidation reactions and cathodic hydroxide-ion-generating reduction reactions. Until now, workers added unsustainable buffers to reduce the pH difference between the anode and cathode because the pH imbalance cont...

  19. Rapid solidification of high-conductivity copper alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Theodore Atlas

    1989-01-01

    The main objective was to develop improved copper alloys of high strength and high thermal and electric conductivity. Chill block melt spinning was used to produce binary alloys of Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr, and ternary alloys of Cu-Cr-Ag. By quenching from the liquid state, up to 5 atomic percent of Cr and Zr were retained in metastable extended solid solution during the rapid solidification process. Eutectic solidification was avoided and the full strengthening benefits of the large volume fraction of precipitates were realized by subsequent aging treatment. The very low solid solubility of Cr and Zr in Cu result in a high conductivity Cu matrix strengthened by second phase precipitates. Tensile properties on as-cast and aged ribbons were measured at room and elevated temperatures. Precipitate coarsening of Cr in Cu was studied by changes in electrical resistance during aging. X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameter and the degree of supersaturation of the matrix. The microstructures were characterized by optical and electron microscopy.

  20. Quantifying the impact of daily and seasonal variation in sap pH on xylem dissolved inorganic carbon estimates in plum trees.

    PubMed

    Erda, F G; Bloemen, J; Steppe, K

    2014-01-01

    In studies on internal CO2 transport, average xylem sap pH (pH(x)) is one of the factors used for calculation of the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon in the xylem sap ([CO2 *]). Lack of detailed pH(x) measurements at high temporal resolution could be a potential source of error when evaluating [CO2*] dynamics. In this experiment, we performed continuous measurements of CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and stem temperature (T(stem)), complemented with pH(x) measurements at 30-min intervals during the day at various stages of the growing season (Day of the Year (DOY): 86 (late winter), 128 (mid-spring) and 155 (early summer)) on a plum tree (Prunus domestica L. cv. Reine Claude d'Oullins). We used the recorded pH(x) to calculate [CO2*] based on T(stem) and the corresponding measured [CO2]. No statistically significant difference was found between mean [CO2*] calculated with instantaneous pH(x) and daily average pH(x). However, using an average pH(x) value from a different part of the growing season than the measurements of [CO2] and T(stem) to estimate [CO2*] led to a statistically significant error. The error varied between 3.25 ± 0.01% under-estimation and 3.97 ± 0.01% over-estimation, relative to the true [CO2*] data. Measured pH(x) did not show a significant daily variation, unlike [CO2], which increased during the day and declined at night. As the growing season progressed, daily average [CO2] (3.4%, 5.3%, 7.4%) increased and average pH(x) (5.43, 5.29, 5.20) decreased. Increase in [CO2] will increase its solubility in xylem sap according to Henry's law, and the dissociation of [CO2*] will negatively affect pH(x). Our results are the first quantifying the error in [CO2*] due to the interaction between [CO2] and pH(x) on a seasonal time scale. We found significant changes in pH(x) across the growing season, but overall the effect on the calculation of [CO2*] remained within an error range of 4%. However, it is possible that the error could be more

  1. Effect of pH on the electrical properties and conducting mechanism of SnO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periathai, R. Sudha; Abarna, S.; Hirankumar, G.; Jeyakumaran, N.; Prithivikumaran, N.

    2017-03-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles have attracted more interests because of their size-dependent optical and electrical properties.SnO2 is an oxygen-deficient n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.6 eV (300 K). It has many remarkable applications as sensors, catalysts, transparent conducting electrodes, anode material for rechargeable Li- ion batteries and optoelectronic devices. In the present work, the role of pH in determining the electrical and dielectric properties of SnO2 nanoparticles has been studied as a function of temperature ranging from Room temperature (RT) to 114 °C in the frequency range of 7 MHz to 50 mHz using impedance spectroscopic technique. The non linear behavior observed in the thermal dependence of the conductance of SnO2 nanoparticles is explained by means of the surface property of SnO2 nanoparticles where proton hopping mechanism is dealt with. Jonscher's power law has been fitted for the conductance spectra and the frequency exponent ("s" value) gives an insight about the ac conducting mechanism. The temperature dependence of electrical relaxation phenomenon in the material has been observed. The complex electric modulus analysis indicates the possibility of hopping conduction mechanism in the system with non-exponential type of conductivity relaxation.

  2. Effect of external and internal pH changes on K and Cl conductances in the muscle fiber membrane of a giant barnacle.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, S; Gruener, R; Hayashi, H; Sakata, H; Grinnell, A D

    1968-11-01

    The membrane potential and conductance of the giant muscle fiber of a barnacle (Balanus nubilus Darwin) were analyzed in relation to changes in the external (3.5-10.0) and the internal (4.7-9.6) pH, under various experimental conditions. A sharp increase in membrane conductance, associated with a large increase in conductance to Cl ions, was observed when the external pH was lowered to values below 5.0. The ratio of Cl to K conductance in normal barnacle saline is between (1/6)-1/7 at pH 7.7, whereas at pH 4.0 the ratio is about 6-9. The behavior of the membrane in response to pH changes in a Cl-depleted muscle fiber shows that the K conductance decreases with decreasing external pH for the whole range of pH examined. A steep increase in Cl conductance is also observed when the internal pH of the fiber is lowered below 5.0. The K to Cl conductance ratio increases with increasing internal pH in a manner very similar to that found when the external pH is raised above 5.0. These facts suggest that the membrane is amphoteric with positive and negative fixed charge groups having dissociation constants such that at pH greater than 5, negative groups predominate and cations permeate more easily than anions, while at lower pH positive groups predominate, facilitating the passage of anions through the membrane.

  3. New Secondary Batteries Utilizing Electronically Conductive Polypyrrole Cathode. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeu, Taewhan

    1991-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the dynamic behavior in electronically conducting polypyrroles and to provide guidance toward designs of new secondary batteries based on these polymers, two mathematical models are developed; one for the potentiostatically controlled switching behavior of polypyrrole film, and one for the galvanostatically controlled charge/discharge behavior of lithium/polypyrrole secondary battery cell. The first model is used to predict the profiles of electrolyte concentrations, charge states, and electrochemical potentials within the thin polypyrrole film during switching process as functions of applied potential and position. Thus, the detailed mechanisms of charge transport and electrochemical reaction can be understood. Sensitivity analysis is performed for independent parameters, describing the physical and electrochemical characteristic of polypyrrole film, to verify their influences on the model performance. The values of independent parameters are estimated by comparing model predictions with experimental data obtained from identical conditions. The second model is used to predict the profiles of electrolyte concentrations, charge state, and electrochemical potentials within the battery system during charge and discharge processes as functions of time and position. Energy and power densities are estimated from model predictions and compared with existing battery systems. The independent design criteria on the charge and discharge performance of the cell are provided by studying the effects of design parameters.

  4. In-line application of electric field in capillary separation systems: Joule heating, pH and conductivity.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Björn O; Skuland, Inger Lill; Marlin, Nicola D; Andersson, Magnus B O; Blomberg, Lars G

    2008-03-15

    This study concerns the technique electric field-assisted capillary liquid chromatography. In this technique, an electric field is applied over the separation capillary in order to provide an additional selectivity. In this technique, the electric field is applied in-line in the separation capillary and here the electric current is the factor limiting the magnitude of applied electric field. The influence of Joule heating and other factors on the current in such systems has been investigated. The temperature in the capillary was first measured within a standard CE set-up, as function of effect per unit of length. Then the same cooling system was applied to an in-line set-up, to replicate the conditions between the two systems, and thus the temperature. Thus Joule heating effects could then be calculated within the in-line system. It was found that for systems applying an electric field in line, the direct influence from Joule heating was only relatively small. The pH in the capillary was measured in the in-line set-up using cresol red/TRIS solutions as pH probe. Significant changes in pH were observed and the results suggested that electrolysis of water is the dominant electrode reaction in the in-line system. In summary, the observed conductivity change in in-line systems was found to be mainly due to the pH change by hydrolysis of water, but primarily not due the temperature change in the capillary column.

  5. The relationship of metals, bifenthrin, physical habitat metrics, grain size, total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen and conductivity to Hyalella sp. abundance in urban California streams.

    PubMed

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between Hyalella sp. abundance in four urban California streams and the following parameters: (1) 8 bulk metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, and Zn) and their associated sediment Threshold Effect Levels (TELs); (2) bifenthrin sediment concentrations; (3) 10 habitat metrics and total score; (4) grain size (% sand, silt and clay); (5) Total Organic Carbon (TOC); (6) dissolved oxygen; and (7) conductivity. California stream data used for this study were collected from Kirker Creek (2006 and 2007), Pleasant Grove Creek (2006, 2007 and 2008), Salinas streams (2009 and 2010) and Arcade Creek (2009 and 2010). Hyalella abundance in the four California streams generally declined when metals concentrations were elevated beyond the TELs. There was also a statistically significant negative relationship between Hyalella abundance and % silt for these 4 California streams as Hyalella were generally not present in silt areas. No statistically significant relationships were reported between Hyalella abundance and metals concentrations, bifenthrin concentrations, habitat metrics, % sand, % clay, TOC, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. The results from this study highlight the complexity of assessing which factors are responsible for determining the abundance of amphipods, such as Hyalella sp., in the natural environment.

  6. Fluctuation of dissolved heavy metal concentrations in the leachate from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in commercial scale landfill bioreactors: The effect of pH and associated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Xie, S; Ma, Y; Strong, P J; Clarke, W P

    2015-12-15

    Heavy metals present in landfill leachate have infrequently been related to complete anaerobic degradation municipal solid waste (MSW) due to discrete ages of deposited MSW layers and leachate channelling in landfills. In this study, anaerobic digestion of MSW was performed in two enclosed 1000 tonne bioreactors using a unique flood and drain process. Leachates were characterised in terms of pH, soluble chemical oxygen demand, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), ammonium nitrogen and heavy metals over the entire course of digestion. All parameters, including pH, fluctuated during acidogenesis, acetogenesis and methanogenesis, which strongly impacted on the dynamics of dissolved heavy metal concentrations. The simulation of dissolution and precipitation processes indicated that metal sulphide precipitation was not a factor as metal concentrations exceeded solubility limits. The correlation of pH and dissolved heavy metal concentrations indicated that other, mechanisms were involved in the homogenised conditions within the bioreactors. Beside dissolution and precipitation, the main processes most likely involved in metal distributions were adsorption (Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb and Cd), complexation (Cr) or combinations of both process (As and Co).

  7. Soil pH effects on the interactions between dissolved zinc, non-nano- and nano-ZnO with soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Read, Daniel S; Matzke, Marianne; Gweon, Hyun S; Newbold, Lindsay K; Heggelund, Laura; Ortiz, Maria Diez; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David; Svendsen, Claus

    2016-03-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are used in an array of products and processes, ranging from personal care products to antifouling paints, textiles, food additives, antibacterial agents and environmental remediation processes. Soils are an environment likely to be exposed to manmade nanoparticles due to the practice of applying sewage sludge as a fertiliser or as an organic soil improver. However, understanding on the interactions between soil properties, nanoparticles and the organisms that live within soil is lacking, especially with regards to soil bacterial communities. We studied the effects of nanoparticulate, non-nanoparticulate and ionic zinc (in the form of zinc chloride) on the composition of bacterial communities in soil with a modified pH range (from pH 4.5 to pH 7.2). We observed strong pH-dependent effects on the interaction between bacterial communities and all forms of zinc, with the largest changes in bacterial community composition occurring in soils with low and medium pH levels (pH 4.8 and 5.9). The high pH soil (pH 7.2) was less susceptible to the effects of zinc exposure. At the highest doses of zinc (2500 mg/kg dw soil), both nano and non-nano particulate zinc applications elicited a similar response in the soil bacterial community, and this differed significantly to the ionic zinc salt treatment. The results highlight the importance of considering soil pH in nanotoxicology studies, although further work is needed to determine the exact mechanisms controlling the toxicity and fate and interactions of nanoparticles with soil microbial communities.

  8. An evaluation of in-situ measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, and pH in low ionic strength streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey for continuous measurement of water temperature, specific conductance, and pH in four low ionic strength streams in the Catskill Mountains of New York was evaluated through a calculation of their bias, precision, and accuracy and by comparison with laboratory measurements of specific conductance and pH on samples collected concurrently. Results indicate that the mini-monitor measurements of specific conductance and pH in an acidic stream (acid-neutralizing capacity always less than 0) agreed with laboratory measurements well enough that the minimonitors can be used to supplement laboratory measurements (mean difference in pH was 0.02 pH unit and mean difference in specific conductance was 0.72 ??S cm-1. This mean difference was 0.32 ??S cm-1 if the minimonitor data were adjusted by the bias). In less acidic streams (two streams in which the acid-neutralizing capacity was always greater than 0 and one in which the acid-neutralizing capacity was greater than 0 except during high flows), there was poor agreement between laboratory and minimonitor measurements of specific conductance at high flows and pH at all flows. The water-temperature probes measured with sufficiently small bias (-0.1 ??C) and adequate precision (??0.70 ??C) for use with most applications.

  9. Soil pH effects on the comparative toxicity of dissolved zinc, non-nano and nano ZnO to the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Heggelund, Laura R; Diez-Ortiz, Maria; Lofts, Stephen; Lahive, Elma; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Cedergreen, Nina; Spurgeon, David; Svendsen, Claus

    2014-08-01

    To determine how soil properties influence nanoparticle (NP) fate, bioavailability and toxicity, this study compared the toxicity of nano zinc oxide (ZnO NPs), non-nano ZnO and ionic ZnCl2 to the earthworm Eisenia fetida in a natural soil at three pH levels. NP characterisation indicated that reaction with the soil media greatly controls ZnO properties. Three main conclusions were drawn. First that Zn toxicity, especially for reproduction, was influenced by pH for all Zn forms. This can be linked to the influence of pH on Zn dissolution. Secondly, that ZnO fate, toxicity and bioaccumulation were similar (including relationships with pH) for both ZnO forms, indicating the absence of NP-specific effects. Finally, earthworm Zn concentrations were higher in worms exposed to ZnO compared to ZnCl2, despite the greater toxicity of the ionic form. This observation suggests the importance of considering the relationship between uptake and toxicity in nanotoxicology studies.

  10. EFFECT OF pH, IONIC STRENGTH, DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON, TIME, AND PARTICLE SIZE ON METALS RELEASE FROM MINE DRAINAGE IMPACTED STREAMBED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) input to a stream typically results in the stream having a reduced pH, increased concentrations of metals and salts, and decreased biological productivity. Removal and/or treatment of these AMD sources is desired to return the impacted stream(s) to initi...

  11. A monitor for continuous measurement of temperature, pH, and conductance of wet precipitation: Preliminary results from the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a continuous wet-only precipitation monitor designed by the U.S. Geological Survey to record variations in rainfall temperature, pH, and specific conductance at 1-min intervals over the course of storms. Initial sampling in the Adirondack Mountains showed that rainfall acidity varied over the course of summer storms, with low initial pH values increasing as storm intensity increased.This report describes a continuous wet-only precipitation monitor designed by the U.S. Geological Survey to record variations in rainfall temperature, pH, and specific conductance at 1-min intervals over the course of storms. Initial sampling in the Adirondack Mountains showed that rainfall acidity varied over the course of summer storms, with low initial pH values increasing as storm intensity increased.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling---Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktinol, Eduardo

    Due to the complex nature of the subprocesses involved in nucleate boiling, it has not been possible to develop comprehensive models or correlations despite decades of accumulated data and analysis. Complications such as the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid further confound attempts at modeling nucleate boiling. Moreover, existing empirical correlations may not be suitable for new applications, especially with regards to varying gravity level. More recently, numerical simulations of the boiling process have proven to be capable of reliably predicting bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer by showing excellent agreement with experimental data. However, most simulations decouple the solid substrate by assuming constant wall temperature. In the present study complete numerical simulations of the boiling process are performed---including conjugate transient conduction in the solid substrate and the effects of dissolved gas in the liquid at different levels of gravity. Finite difference schemes are used to discretize the governing equations in the liquid, vapor, and solid phases. The interface between liquid and vapor phases is tracked by a level set method. An iterative procedure is used at the interface between the solid and fluid phases. Near the three-phase contact line, temperatures in the solid are observed to fluctuate significantly over short periods. The results show good agreement with the data available in the literature. The results also show that waiting and growth periods can be related directly to wall superheat. The functional relationship between waiting period and wall superheat is found to agree well with empirical correlations reported in the literature. For the case of a single bubble in subcooled nucleate boiling, the presence of dissolved gas in the liquid is found to cause noncondensables to accumulate at the top of the bubble where most condensation occurs. This results in reduced local saturation temperature and condensation rates

  13. A mathematical model of pH, based on the total stoichiometric concentration of acids, bases and ampholytes dissolved in water.

    PubMed

    Mioni, Roberto; Mioni, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    In chemistry and in acid-base physiology, the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation plays a pivotal role in studying the behaviour of the buffer solutions. However, it seems that the general function to calculate the valence of acids, bases and ampholytes, N = f(pH), at any pH, has only been provided by Kildeberg. This equation can be applied to strong acids and bases, pluriprotic weak acids, bases and ampholytes, with an arbitrary number of acid strength constants, pKA, including water. By differentiating this function with respect to pH, we obtain the general equation for the buffer value. In addition, by integrating the titration curve, TA, proposed by Kildeberg, and calculating its Legendre transform, we obtain the Gibbs free energy of pH (or pOH)-dependent titratable acid. Starting from the law of electroneutrality and applying suitable simplifications, it is possible to calculate the pH of the buffer solutions by numerical methods, available in software packages such as Excel. The concept of buffer capacity has also been clarified by Urbansky, but, at variance with our approach, not in an organic manner. In fact, for each set of monobasic, dibasic, tribasic acids, etc., various equations are presented which independently fit each individual acid-base category. Consequently, with the increase in acid groups (pKA), the equations become more and more difficult, both in practice and in theory. Some examples are proposed to highlight the boundary that exists between acid-base physiology and the thermodynamic concepts of energy, chemical potential, amount of substance and acid resistance.

  14. Electrolytic dissolver

    DOEpatents

    Wheelwright, E.J.; Fox, R.D.

    1975-08-26

    This patent related to an electrolytic dissolver wherein dissolution occurs by solution contact including a vessel of electrically insulative material, a fixed first electrode, a movable second electrode, means for insulating the electrodes from the material to be dissolved while permitting a free flow of electrolyte therebetween, means for passing a direct current between the electrodes and means for circulating electrolyte through the dissolver. (auth)

  15. Influence of pH, inorganic anions, and dissolved organic matter on the photolysis of antimicrobial triclocarban in aqueous systems under simulated sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shi-Ling; Wang, Xi-Kui; Jiang, Wen-Qiang; Zhao, Ru-Song; Shen, Ting-Ting; Wang, Chen; Wang, Xia

    2015-04-01

    The photolysis of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in aqueous systems under simulated sunlight irradiation was studied. The effects of several abiotic parameters, including solution pH, initial TCC concentration, presence of natural organic matter, and most common inorganic anions in surface waters, were investigated. The results show that the photolysis of TCC followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The TCC photolysis rate constant increased with increasing solution pH and decreasing the initial TCC concentration. Compared with the TCC photolysis in pure water, the presence of aqueous bicarbonate, nitrate, humic acids, and its sodium salt decreased the TCC photolysis rate, but fulvic acid increased the TCC photolysis rate. The electron spin resonance and reactive oxygen species scavenging experiments indicated that TCC may undergo two different types of phototransformation reactions: direct photolysis and energy transfer to generate (1)O2. The main degradation products were tentatively identified by gas chromatography interfaced with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and a possible degradation pathway was also proposed.

  16. Linkage of iron elution and dissolved oxygen consumption with removal of organic pollutants by nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effects of pH on iron dissolution and formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Nanae; Suzuki, Moe; Kurosu, Shunji; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The iron elution and dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption in organic pollutant removal by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was examined in the range of solution pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Their behaviors were linked with the removal of organic pollutant through the dissolution of iron and the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer affected strongly by solution pH and DO. As an example of organic pollutants, azo-dye Orange II was chosen in this study. The chemical composition analyses before and after reaction confirmed the corrosion of nZVI into ions, the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer on nZVI surface and the adsorption of the pollutant and its intermediates. The complete decolorization of Orange II with nZVI was accomplished very quickly. On the other hand, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal was considerably slow and the maximum TOC removal was around 40% obtained at pH 9.0. The reductive cleavage of azo-bond by emitted electrons more readily took place as compared with the cleavage of aromatic rings of Orange II leading to the degradation to smaller molecules and subsequently the mineralization. A reaction kinetic model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood/Eley-Rideal approach was developed to elucidate mechanisms for organic pollutant removal controlled by the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer, the progress of which could be characterized by considering the dynamic concentration changes in Fe(2+) and DO. The dynamic profiles of Orange II removal linked with Fe(2+) and DO could be reasonably simulated in the range of pH from 3.0 to 9.0.

  17. K[subscript a] and K[subscript b] from pH and Conductivity Measurements: A General Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; Moehring, Michael; Arthasery, Phyllis; Barlag, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The acid ionization constant, K[subscript a], of acetic acid and the base ionization constant, K[subscript b], of ammonia are determined easily and rapidly using a datalogger, a pH sensor, and a conductivity sensor. To decrease sample preparation time and to minimize waste, sequential aliquots of a concentrated standard are added to a known volume…

  18. Significant different conductivities of the two grades of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate), Clevios P and Clevios PH1000, arising from different molecular weights.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yijie; Ouyang, Jianyong

    2012-08-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is promising to be the next-generation transparent electrode of optoelectronic devices. This paper reports the differences between two commercially available grades of PEDOT:PSS: Clevios P and Clevios PH1000. The as-prepared PEDOT:PSS films from Clevios P and Clevios PH1000 solutions have close conductivities of 0.2-0.35 S cm(-1). Their conductivities can be enhanced to 171 and 1164 S cm(-1), respectively, through a treatment with hydrofluoroacetone trihydrate (HFA). The differences between Clevios P and Clevios PH1000 were studied by various characterizations on PEDOT:PSS aqueous solutions and PEDOT:PSS films. The gel particles are larger in Clevios PH1000 solution than in Clevios P solution as revealed by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy of pyrene in these solutions. These results suggest that PEDOT of Clevios PH1000 has a higher average molecular weight than that of Clevios P. The difference in the molecular weight of PEDOT for the two grades of PEDOT:PSS is confirmed by the characterizations on their polymer films, including atomic force microscopy and temperature dependences of the resistances of as-prepared and HFA-treated PEDOT:PSS films. The different molecular weights of PEDOT also gives rise to significant differences in the electrochemical behaviors of the two grades of PEDOT:PSS, as revealed by the cyclic voltammetry, in situ UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy and potentiostatic transient measurements.

  19. Indicators: Conductivity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conductivity is a measure of the ability of water to pass an electrical current. Because dissolved salts and other inorganic chemicals conduct electrical current, conductivity increases as salinity increases.

  20. The electrical conductivity of the Earth's upper mantle as estimated from satellite measured magnetic field variations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didwall, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Low latitude magnetic field variations (magnetic storms) caused by large fluctuations in the equatorial ring current were derived from magnetic field magnitude data obtained by OGO 2, 4, and 6 satellites over an almost 5 year period. Analysis procedures consisted of (1) separating the disturbance field into internal and external parts relative to the surface of the Earth; (2) estimating the response function which related to the internally generated magnetic field variations to the external variations due to the ring current; and (3) interpreting the estimated response function using theoretical response functions for known conductivity profiles. Special consideration is given to possible ocean effects. A temperature profile is proposed using conductivity temperature data for single crystal olivine. The resulting temperature profile is reasonable for depths below 150-200 km, but is too high for shallower depths. Apparently, conductivity is not controlled solely by olivine at shallow depths.

  1. The Bulk Lunar Electrical Conductivity. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report; [from Explorer 35 satellite and the Apollo 12 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavy, Donald Lucien

    1975-01-01

    The electrical conductivity structure was studied of a spherically layered moon consistent with the very low frequency magnetic data collected on the lunar surface and by Explorer 35. In order to obtain good agreement with the lunar surface magnetometer observations, the inclusion of a void cavity behind the moon requires a conductivity at shallow depths higher than that of models having the solar wind impinging on all sides. By varying only the source parameters, a conductivity model can be found that yields a good fit to both the tangential response upstream and the radial response downstream. This model also satisfies the dark side tangential response in the frequency range above 0.006 Hz, but the few data points presently available below this range do not seem to agree with the theory.

  2. Phase equilibria in subseafloor hydrothermal systems: A review of the role of redox, temperature, pH and dissolved Cl on the chemistry of hot spring fluids at mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Ding, Kang

    Time series measurements of the chemistry of hot spring fluids at mid-ocean ridges (MOR) have revealed steady state concentrations of dissolved species that indicate solubility control by mineral phases in subseafloor reaction zones [Campbell et al., 1988a; Bowers et al., 1988; Butterfield et al. 1994]. That MOR hot spring fluids have relatively low measured pH values (3.1 to 3.9), and are variably depleted in Mg and SO4, while enriched in Ca, K, and Si [Von Damm, 1990] relative to seawater, is entirely consistent with heterogeneous equilibria involving feldspar, chlorite, epidote ± quartz and NaCl fluids at temperatures in the vicinity of 375-400°C [Seyfried et al., 1991]. The high concentrations of so-called "soluble" elements, such as Li, Rb, Cs, and B [Von Damm et al., 1985; Spivack and Edmond, 1987], however, require an abundance of fresh rock (basalt/diabase) relative to the mass of seawater (i.e., low fluid/rock ratio). That these elements also fall to reveal significant compositional changes in fluids from specific hot springs sampled several times over a six year period [Campbell et al., 1985a; Butterfield et al. 1994; Butterfield and Massoth 1994] indicates a non-static and expanding reaction zone caused by penetration of seawater into previously unaltered portions of a solidified magma chamber. Although most vent fluids reveal short term stability [Campbell et al. 1988a; Butterfield and Massoth 1994], this is not always the case, as evidenced by the temporal evolution of the composition of vent fluids at the North Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge [Butterfield et al. 1991; Butterfield and Massoth, 1994], and at 9-10degN EPR [Von Damm et al. 1991].

  3. Feasible metabolisms in high pH springs of the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Cardace, Dawn; Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R.; Woycheese, Kristin M.; Arcilla, Carlo A.

    2015-01-01

    A field campaign targeting high pH, H2-, and CH4-emitting serpentinite-associated springs in the Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites of the Philippines was conducted in 2012-2013, and enabled description of several springs sourced in altered pillow basalts, gabbros, and peridotites. We combine field observations of pH, temperature, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and oxidation-reduction potential with analyses of major ions, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and dissolved gas phases in order to model the activities of selected phases important to microbial metabolism, and to rank feasible metabolic reactions based on energy yield. We document changing geochemical inventories in these springs between sampling years, and examine how the environment supports or prevents the function of certain microbial metabolisms. In all, this geochemistry-based assessment of feasible metabolisms indicates methane cycling, hydrogen oxidation, some iron and sulfur metabolisms, and ammonia oxidation are feasible reactions in this continental site of serpentinization. PMID:25713561

  4. cAMP/protein kinase A activates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator for ATP release from rat skeletal muscle during low pH or contractions.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jie; Lu, Lin; Cai, Weisong; Ballard, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is involved in ATP release from skeletal muscle at low pH. These experiments investigate the signal transduction mechanism linking pH depression to CFTR activation and ATP release, and evaluate whether CFTR is involved in ATP release from contracting muscle. Lactic acid treatment elevated interstitial ATP of buffer-perfused muscle and extracellular ATP of L6 myocytes: this ATP release was abolished by the non-specific CFTR inhibitor, glibenclamide, or the specific CFTR inhibitor, CFTR(inh)-172, suggesting that CFTR was involved, and by inhibition of lactic acid entry to cells, indicating that intracellular pH depression was required. Muscle contractions significantly elevated interstitial ATP, but CFTR(inh)-172 abolished the increase. The cAMP/PKA pathway was involved in the signal transduction pathway for CFTR-regulated ATP release from muscle: forskolin increased CFTR phosphorylation and stimulated ATP release from muscle or myocytes; lactic acid increased intracellular cAMP, pCREB and PKA activity, whereas IBMX enhanced ATP release from myocytes. Inhibition of PKA with KT5720 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced ATP release from muscle. Inhibition of either the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE) with amiloride or the Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger (NCX) with SN6 or KB-R7943 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced release of ATP from muscle, suggesting that these exchange proteins may be involved in the activation of CFTR. Our data suggest that CFTR-regulated release contributes to ATP release from contracting muscle in vivo, and that cAMP and PKA are involved in the activation of CFTR during muscle contractions or acidosis; NHE and NCX may be involved in the signal transduction pathway.

  5. Improvement of chemical monitoring of water-chemistry conditions at thermal power stations based on electric conductivity and pH measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, A. B.; Larin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    The increased requirements to the quality of the water heat conductor for working superhigh (SHP) and supercritical (SCP) pressure power plants and promising units, including combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) units and power plants with ultrasupercritical parameters (USCPs), can largely be satisfied through specific electric conductivity and pH measurements for cooled heat conductor samples combined with calculations of ionic equilibria and indirect measurements of several specified and diagnostic parameters. The possibility of calculating the ammonia and chloride concentrations and the total concentration of hardness and sodium cations in the feed water of drum-type boilers and the phosphate and salt contents in boiler water was demonstrated. An equation for evaluating the content of potentially acid substances in the feed water of monotube boilers was suggested. The potential of the developed procedure for evaluating the state of waterchemistry conditions (WCCs) in power plants with CCGT units was shown.

  6. Investigation of a fiber optic surface plasmon spectroscopy in conjunction with conductivity as an in situ method for simultaneously monitoring changes in dissolved organic carbon and salinity in coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Chang; Cramer, Jeffrey A; Booksh, Karl S

    2011-10-21

    A combination surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and conductivity sensor array was developed and implemented to demonstrate the ability to differentiate among changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and salinity in coastal water. The array is capable of achieving sufficient spatial and temporal data density to better understand the cycling and fate of terrestrial DOC in coastal areas. DOC is the second largest source of bioreactive carbon in the environment and plays a key role in mediating microbial activity and generation of atmospheric CO(2). In the coastal areas, the salinity is also an important property in many applications, such as leak detection for landfill liners, saltwater intrusion to drinking water, marine environment monitoring, and seasonal climate prediction. Conductivity sensors are the industry standard for determining salinity in ocean systems. However, both conductivity and refractive index sensors, such as SPR spectroscopy based sensors, respond to salinity and DOC levels. To demonstrate the capability of the SPR sensor and a conductivity sensor to collect complimentary data useful in discrimination of salinity and DOC in coastal zone water, conductivity, SPR, and temperature data were collected during passage from the Juan de Fuca ridge area returning to the University of Washington docks.

  7. Overexpression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in NIH 3T3 cells lowers membrane potential and intracellular pH and confers a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L Y; Stutts, M J; Hoffman, M M; Roepe, P D

    1995-01-01

    Because of the similarities between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, recent observations of decreased plasma membrane electrical potential (delta psi) in cells overexpressing either MDR protein or the CFTR, and the effects of delta psi on passive diffusion of chemotherapeutic drugs, we have analyzed chemotherapeutic drug resistance for NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing different levels of functional CFTR. Three separate clones not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs exhibit resistance to doxorubicin, vincristine, and colchicine that is similar to MDR transfectants not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs. Two other clones expressing lower levels of CFTR are less resistant. As shown previously these clones exhibit decreased plasma membrane delta psi similar to MDR transfectants, but four of five exhibit mildly acidified intracellular pH in contrast to MDR transfectants, which are in general alkaline. Thus the MDR protein and CFTR-mediated MDR phenotypes are distinctly different. Selection of two separate CFTR clones on either doxorubicin or vincristine substantially increases the observed MDR and leads to increased CFTR (but not measurable MDR or MRP) mRNA expression. CFTR overexpressors also exhibit a decreased rate of 3H -vinblastine uptake. These data reveal a new and previously unrecognized consequence of CFTR expression, and are consistent with the hypothesis that membrane depolarization is an important determinant of tumor cell MDR. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:8519988

  8. Isotope fractionation during oxidation of tetravalent uranium by dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangli; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.

    2015-02-01

    We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate isotopic fractionations during oxidation of tetravalent uranium, U(IV), by dissolved oxygen. In hydrochloric acid media with the U(IV) dissolved, the δ238U value of the remaining U(IV) increased as the extent of oxidation increased. The δ238U value of the product U(VI) paralleled, but was offset to 1.1 ± 0.2‰ lower than the remaining U(IV). In contrast, oxidation of solid U(IV) by dissolved oxygen in 20 mM NaHCO3 solution at pH = 9.4 caused only a weak fractionation (∼0.1‰ to 0.3‰), with δ238U being higher in the dissolved U(VI) relative to the solid U(IV). We suggest that isotope fractionation during oxidation of solid U(IV) is inhibited by a "rind effect", where the surface layer of the solid U(IV) must be completely oxidized before the next layer is exposed to oxidant. The necessity of complete conversion of each layer results in minimal isotopic effect. The weak shift in δ238U of U(VI) is attributed to adsorption of part of the product U(VI) to the solid U(IV) surfaces.

  9. Disposable all-solid-state pH and glucose sensors based on conductive polymer covered hierarchical AuZn oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Cho, Seong Je; Cho, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Bok; Kim, Min-Yeong; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-05-15

    Poly(terthiophene benzoic acid) (pTBA) layered-AuZn alloy oxide (AuZnOx) deposited on the screen printed carbon electrode (pTBA/AuZnOx/SPCE) was prepared to create a disposable all-solid-state pH sensor at first. Further, FAD-glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the pTBA/AuZnOx/SPCE to fabricate a glucose sensor. The characterizations of the sensor probe reveal that AuZnOx forms a homogeneous hierarchical structure, and that the polymerized pTBA layer on the alloy oxide surface captures GOx covalently. The benzoic acid group of pTBA coated on the probe layer synergetically improved the pH response of the alloy oxide and provide chemical binding sites to enzyme, which resulted in a Nernstian behavior (59.2 ± 0.5 mV/pH) in the pH range of 2-13. The experimental parameters affecting the glucose analysis were studied in terms of pH, temperature, humidity, and interferences. The sensor exhibited a fast response time <1s and a dynamic range between 30 and 500 mg/dL glucose with a detection limit of 17.23 ± 0.32 mg/dL. The reliabilities of the disposable pH and glucose sensors were examined for biological samples.

  10. Irrigation water acidification to neutralize alkalinity for nursery crop production: Substrate pH, electrical conductivity, and nutrient concentrations; and plant nutrition and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liming agents (LA) in irrigation water, typically associated with carbonates and bicarbonates of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), contribute to water alkalinity. Repeated application of LA to container crops can cause media-solution pH to rise overtime, that uncorrected, can lead to a nutrient avail...

  11. Quality-assurance results for field pH and specific-conductance measurements, and for laboratory analysis, National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network; January 1980-September 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Brooks, M.H.; Malo, B.A.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Five intersite comparison studies for the field determination of pH and specific conductance, using simulated-precipitation samples, were conducted by the U.S.G.S. for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network. These comparisons were performed to estimate the precision of pH and specific conductance determinations made by sampling-site operators. Simulated-precipitation samples were prepared from nitric acid and deionized water. The estimated standard deviation for site-operator determination of pH was 0.25 for pH values ranging from 3.79 to 4.64; the estimated standard deviation for specific conductance was 4.6 microsiemens/cm at 25 C for specific-conductance values ranging from 10.4 to 59.0 microsiemens/cm at 25 C. Performance-audit samples with known analyte concentrations were prepared by the U.S.G.S.and distributed to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program 's Central Analytical Laboratory. The differences between the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and national Trends Network-reported analyte concentrations and known analyte concentrations were calculated, and the bias and precision were determined. For 1983, concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride were biased at the 99% confidence limit; concentrations of potassium and sulfate were unbiased at the 99% confidence limit. Four analytical laboratories routinely analyzing precipitation were evaluated in their analysis of identical natural- and simulated precipitation samples. Analyte bias for each laboratory was examined using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple-range test on data produced by these laboratories, from the analysis of identical simulated-precipitation samples. Analyte precision for each laboratory has been estimated by calculating a pooled variance for each analyte. Interlaboratory comparability results may be used to normalize natural-precipitation chemistry data obtained from two or more of these laboratories. (Author

  12. Enhanced dissolution of cinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravichandran, Mahalingam; Aiken, George R.; Reddy, Michael M.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    1998-01-01

    Organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades caused a dramatic increase in mercury release (up to 35 μM total dissolved mercury) from cinnabar (HgS), a solid with limited solubility. Hydrophobic (a mixture of both humic and fulvic) acids dissolved more mercury than hydrophilic acids and other nonacid fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cinnabar dissolution by isolated organic matter and natural water samples was inhibited by cations such as Ca2+. Dissolution was independent of oxygen content in experimental solutions. Dissolution experiments conducted in DI water (pH = 6.0) had no detectable (<2.5 nM) dissolved mercury. The presence of various inorganic (chloride, sulfate, or sulfide) and organic ligands (salicylic acid, acetic acid, EDTA, or cysteine) did not enhance the dissolution of mercury from the mineral. Aromatic carbon content in the isolates (determined by 13C NMR) correlated positively with enhanced cinnabar dissolution. ζ-potential measurements indicated sorption of negatively charged organic matter to the negatively charged cinnabar (pHpzc = 4.0) at pH 6.0. Possible mechanisms of dissolution include surface complexation of mercury and oxidation of surface sulfur species by the organic matter.

  13. Dissolver vessel bottom assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kilian, Douglas C.

    1976-01-01

    An improved bottom assembly is provided for a nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing dissolver vessel wherein fuel elements are dissolved as the initial step in recovering fissile material from spent fuel rods. A shock-absorbing crash plate with a convex upper surface is disposed at the bottom of the dissolver vessel so as to provide an annular space between the crash plate and the dissolver vessel wall. A sparging ring is disposed within the annular space to enable a fluid discharged from the sparging ring to agitate the solids which deposit on the bottom of the dissolver vessel and accumulate in the annular space. An inlet tangential to the annular space permits a fluid pumped into the annular space through the inlet to flush these solids from the dissolver vessel through tangential outlets oppositely facing the inlet. The sparging ring is protected against damage from the impact of fuel elements being charged to the dissolver vessel by making the crash plate of such a diameter that the width of the annular space between the crash plate and the vessel wall is less than the diameter of the fuel elements.

  14. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of cell biologist Don Francis Petersen, Ph.D., conducted November 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report is a transcript of an interview of Dr. Don Francis Petersen by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Petersen was selected for this interview because of his long research career at Los Alamos and his knowledge of the Atomic Energy Commission`s biomedical program. Dr. Petersen did not personally conduct research on human subjects. After a brief biographical sketch Dr. Petersen discusses his remembrances of the early use of radionuclides as biological tracers, aspects of nuclear weapons testing in the 1940`s and 1950`s including fallout studies, the means by which research projects were approved, use of humans in the whole-body counter, and the Health Division Biomedical responsibilities.

  15. A finite element model of conduction, convection, and phase change near a solid/melt interface. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterna, Larry A.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed understanding of heat transfer and fluid flow is required for many aerospace thermal systems. These systems often include phase change and operate over a range of accelerations or effective gravitational fields. An approach to analyzing such systems is presented which requires the simultaneous solution of the conservation laws of energy, momentum, and mass, as well as an equation of state. The variable property form of the governing equations are developed in two-dimensional Cartesian coordinates for a Newtonian fluid. A numerical procedure for solving the governing equations is presented and implemented in a computer program. The Galerkin form of the finite element method is used to solve the spatial variation of the field variables, along with the implicit Crank-Nicolson time marching algorithm. Quadratic Langrangian elements are used for the internal energy and the two components of velocity. Linear Lagrangian elements are used for the pressure. The location of the solid/liquid interface as well as the temperatures are determined form the calculated internal energy and pressure. This approach is quite general in that it can describe heat transfer without phase change, phase change with a sharp interface, and phase change without an interface. Analytical results from this model are compared to those of other researchers studying transient conduction, convection, and phase change and are found to be in good agreement. The numerical procedure presented requires significant computer resources, but this is not unusual when compared to similar studies by other researchers. Several methods are suggested to reduce the computational times.

  16. Monitoring pH and ORP in a SHARON reactor.

    PubMed

    Claros, J; Serralta, J; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Aguado, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the valuable information provided by the on-line measurements of pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) in a continuous single high ammonia removal over nitrite (SHARON) reactor. A laboratory-scale SHARON reactor equipped with pH, ORP, electric conductivity and dissolved oxygen (DO) probes has been operated for more than one year. Nitrogen removal over nitrite has been achieved by adding methanol at the beginning of anoxic stages. Time evolution of pH and ORP along each cycle allows identifying the decrease in nitritation rate when ammonia is consumed during the aerobic phase and the end of the denitrification process during the anoxic phase. Therefore, monitoring pH and ORP can be used to develop a real-time control system aimed at optimizing the length of both aerobic and anoxic stages. Real-time control of methanol addition can be carried out by using the information provided by these probes: excessive methanol addition in the anoxic stage is clearly detected in the ORP profile of the following aerobic phase, while a deficit of methanol is detected in both pH and ORP profiles of that anoxic phase. Moreover, other valuable information such as the amount of ammonia nitrified, failures in DO measurements, excessive stirring during the anoxic stage and methanol dosage in the aerobic phase was also provided by the pH and ORP profiles.

  17. Miniaturization of cytotoxicity tests for concentration range-finding studies prior to conducting the pH 6.7 Syrian hamster embryo cell-transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Plöttner, Sabine; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-08-15

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell-transformation assay (SHE assay) is a promising alternative method to animal testing for the identification of potential carcinogens in vitro. Prior to conducting the SHE assay the appropriate concentration range for each test chemical must be established, with a maximum concentration causing approximately 50% cytotoxicity. Concentration range-finding is done in separate experiments, which are similar to the final SHE assay but with less replicates and more concentrations. Here we present an alternative for the cytotoxicity testing by miniaturization of the test procedure by use of 24-well plates and surpluses from feeder-cell preparations as target cells. In addition, we integrated the photometry-based neutral red (NR) assay. For validation of the assay, incubations with dimethyl sulf-oxide, p-phenylenediamine-2HCl, aniline, o-toluidine-HCl, 2,4-diaminotoluene, and 2-naphthylamine were carried out in the miniaturized approach and compared with the standard procedure in terms of calculating the relative plating efficiencies (RPEs). To directly compare both methods, concentrations that produced 50% cytotoxicity (IC50) were calculated. Excellent associations were observed between the number of colonies and NR uptake. For all test substances a concentration-dependent, concomitant decrease of NR uptake in the miniaturized approach and RPEs in the standard test was observed after a 7-day incubation. The results from both test setups showed a comparable order of magnitude and the IC50 values differed by a factor <2 (1.4-1.9), depending on the substance in question. Overall, the miniaturized approach should be considered an improved alternative for cytotoxicity testing in the SHE assay, as it saves valuable SHE cells and speeds-up the time, to obtain test results more rapidly.

  18. Characterizing and quantilying controls on arsenic solubility over a pH range of 1-11 in a uranium mill-scale experiment.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Brett I; Hendry, M Jim

    2005-07-01

    A mill-scale hydrometallurgical experiment (2700 m3 of effluent treated/day) was conducted for three months at the Rabbit Lake uranium mine site located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, to determine the controls on the solubility of dissolved arsenic over a pH range of 1-11 and to develop a thermodynamic database for the dominant mineralogical controls on arsenic in the mill and the resulting mill tailings. The arsenic concentrations in the mill ranged from 526 mg/L at pH 1.0 (initial) to 1.34 mg/L at pH 10.8 (final discharge). Geochemical modeling of the chemistry data shows that arsenic solubility is controlled by the formation of scorodite (FeAsO4-2H2O) from pH 2.4 to pH 3.1, with 99.8% of dissolved arsenic precipitated as scorodite. Model results show that scorodite is unstable (releasing arsenic back in to solution) above pH 3.1 and arsenic adsorption to the surface of 2-line ferrihydrite is the dominant controlling factor in the solubility of arsenic from pH 3.2 to pH 11.0, with 99.8% of dissolved arsenic removed from solution via this mechanism. Finally, model results show -0.2% of the total dissolved arsenic adsorbs to the surface of amorphous aluminum hydroxide from pH 5.0 to pH 8.0. Minor alterations to the thermodynamic properties of arsenite and arsenate adsorption to 2-line ferrihydrite allowed the fit between measured mill-scale and modeled concentrations for the pH range of 3.2-11.0 to be optimized.

  19. Associations between benthic flora and diel changes in dissolved arsenic, phosphorus, and related physico-chemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, James S.

    1992-01-01

    Diel relationships between physical and chemical parameters and biomass were examined along a 57-km reach of Whitewood Creek, South Dakota, between 29 August and 2 September 1988. A time lag of ∼3-6 h for fluctuations in soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations (ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 μM at the downstream sites) relative to dissolved arsenic (ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 μM as arsenate (pentavalent arsenic)) was consistent with our laboratory studies (reported elsewhere) showing preferential cell sorption of orthophosphate over arsenate by creek periphyton. The potential biological effects on SRP diel fluctuations contrasts with abiotic sorption controls for dissolved arsenate (a chemically similar anion). Cycles for pH, like water temperature cycles, lagged irradiance cycles by 1-3 h. Like pH, the amplitude of dissolved arsenic diel cycles was greatest at the site with most abundant biomass. Diel fluctuations in specific conductance (an indicator of groundwater inputs at elevated conductivity relative to the water column) were out of phase with both SRP and dissolved arsenic concentrations suggesting that groundwater was not the direct source of these solutes.

  20. Precipitation strengthened high strength, high conductivity Cu-Cr-Nb alloys produced by chill block melt spinning. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary M.

    1989-01-01

    A series of Cu-based alloys containing 2 to 10 a/o Cr and 1 to 5 a/o Nb were produced by chill block melt spinning (CBMS). The melt spun ribbons were consolidated and hot rolled to sheet to produce a supersaturated Cu-Cr-Nb solid solution from which the high melting point intermetallic compound Cr2Nb could be precipitated to strengthen the Cu matrix. The results show that the materials possess electrical conductivities in excess of 90 percent that of pure Cu at 200 C and above. The strengths of the Cu-Cr-Nb alloys were much greater than Cu, Cu-0.6 Cr, NARloy-A, and NARloy-Z in the as-melt spun condition. The strengths of the consolidated materials were less than Cu-Cr and Cu-Cr-Zr below 500 C and 600 C respectively, but were significantly better above these temperatures. The strengths of the consolidated materials were greater than NARloy-Z, at all temperatures. The GLIDCOP possessed similar strength levels up to 750 C when the strength of the Cu-Cr-Nb alloys begins to degrade. The long term stability of the Cu-Cr-Nb alloys was measured by the microhardness of aged samples and the growth of precipitates. The microhardness measurements indicate that the alloys overage rapidly, but do not suffer much loss in strength between 10 and 100 hours which confirms the results of the electrical resistivity measurements taken during the aging of the alloys at 500 C. The loss in strength from peak strength levels is significant, but the strength remains exceptionally good. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the as-melt spun samples revealed that Cr2Nb precipitates formed in the liquid Cu during the chill block melt spinning, indicating a very strong driving force for the formation of the precipitates. The TEM of the aged and consolidated materials indicates that the precipitates coarsen considerably, but remain in the submicron range.

  1. Diel variations in stream chemistry and isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon, upper Clark Fork River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Stephen R.; Gammons, Christopher H.; Poulson, Simon R.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Many rivers undergo diel (24-h) concentration fluctuations of pH, dissolved gases, trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A study conducted in 1994 documented such behavior in the upper Clark Fork River, Montana, a stream whose headwaters have been severely impacted by historic metal mining, milling, and smelting. The purpose of the present investigation was to expand on these earlier findings by conducting simultaneous diel samplings at two sites on the upper Clark Fork River separated by 2.5 h of stream travel time. By monitoring two stations, it was possible to more closely examine the processes that control temporal and spatial gradients in stream chemistry. Another objective was to examine diel changes in the δ13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC) and their relationship to biological activity in the stream. The most important findings of this study include: (1) concentrations of dissolved and particulate heavy metals increased during the night and decreased during the day, in agreement with previous work; (2) these changes were positively correlated to diel changes in pH, dissolved O2, and water temperature; (3) dissolved concentrations increased during the night at the lower site, but showed the opposite behavior at the upper site; and (4) diel changes in δ13C-DIC were noted at both sites, although the timing and magnitudes of the cycles differed. Hypotheses to explain the first two observations include: cyclic co-precipitation of divalent metals with carbonate minerals; pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of metal cations onto the streambed and suspended particles; or photosynthetically enhanced oxidation and removal of Fe and Mn oxides at biofilm surfaces during the daytime. The latter model explains the majority of the field observations, including night-time increases in particulate forms of Fe and other elements.

  2. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify.

  3. Indicators: Dissolved Oxygen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is the amount of oxygen that is present in water. It is an important measure of water quality as it indicates a water body's ability to support aquatic life. Water bodies receive oxygen from the atmosphere and from aquatic plants.

  4. Relating dissolved organic matter fluorescence to functional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, E.; Baker, A.; Thacker, S.; Gondar, D.

    2007-12-01

    The fluorescence excitation emission matrix properties of dissolved organic matter from three rivers and one lake in NW England are analysed. Sites are sampled in duplicate and for some sites seasonally to cover variations in dissolved organic matter composition, river flow, and carbon isotopic (13C, 14C) variability. Results are compared to the functional properties of the dissolved organic matter, the functional assays provide quantitative information on light absorption, fluorescence, photochemical fading, pH buffering, copper binding, benzo[a]pyrene binding, hydrophilicity and adsorption to alumina. Fluorescence characterization of the dissolved organic matter samples demonstrates that peak C fluorescence emission wavelength, the ratio of peak T to peak C fluorescence intensity, and the fluorescence : absorbance ratio best differentiate different dissolved organic matter samples. These parameters correspond to dissolved organic matter aromaticity, the ratio of labile to recalcitrant organic matter, and dissolved organic matter molecular weight. Peak C fluorescence emission wavelength, the ratio of peak T to peak C fluorescence intensity, and the fluorescence : absorbance ratio fluorescence parameters also have strong correlations with several of the functional assays, in particular the extinction coefficients, benzo(a)pyrene binding and alumina adsorption, and buffering capacity. In many cases, regression equations with a correlation coefficient >0.9 are obtained, suggesting that dissolved organic matter functional character can be predicted from DOM fluorescence properties. For one site, the relationship between dissolved organic matter source, fluorescence, function and carbon isotopic composition is discussed.

  5. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  6. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  7. [Dynamic change of dissolved iron in wetland soil solutions responding to freeze-thaw cycles].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-fei; Wang, Guo-ping; Lü, Xian-guo; Zou, Yuan-chun; Jiang, Ming

    2010-05-01

    The effects of five freeze-thaw cycles on the dynamic change of dissolved iron in three typical wetland soils (humus marsh soil in Carex lasiocarpa community, meadow marsh soil in Cares meyeriarna community, and meadow albic soil in Calamagrostis angustifolia community)of Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, was analyzed through in-situ soil column simulation. One freeze-thaw cycle was conducted as freezing at -10 degrees C for 1 d and then thawing at 5 degrees C for 7 d. The thermostatically incubated soils at 5 degrees C were controls. The results showed that most pH and Eh values increased after the first freeze-thaw cycle, and then decreased after the subsequent cycles. 84.4% of the pH values of freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than that of control, while 82.2% of the Eh values of freeze-thaw treated soils were greater than that of control. Most of the dissolved iron in all soil solutions were Fe3+ ions and colloids, and the reduction of these Fe3+ species were inhibited. The concentrations of Fe2, Fe3+, and total dissolved iron (TFe) of the freeze-thaw treated soils were all smaller than that of controls, with the means of (0.62 +/- 0.08) mg x L(-1) and (1.25 +/- 0.16) mg x L(-1), respectively. The variation trends of pH, Eh, and dissolved iron in the humus marsh soil were significantly different from that in the meadow albic soil. The trends in the meadow marsh soil, as the transitional soil type, were more similar to the meadow albic soil for pH, while more similar to the humus marsh soil for Eh and dissolved iron. Among the three soils, the difference between freeze-thaw treated columns and controls of the second layer were all smaller than that of the third and fourth layer, which indicated that the effect of freeze-thaw cycles were more significant for the upper annular wetland soil layers than the lower layers.

  8. Optimal Soil Eh, pH, and Water Management for Simultaneously Minimizing Arsenic and Cadmium Concentrations in Rice Grains.

    PubMed

    Honma, Toshimitsu; Ohba, Hirotomo; Kaneko-Kadokura, Ayako; Makino, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Ken; Katou, Hidetaka

    2016-04-19

    Arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) concentrations in rice grains are a human health concern. We conducted field experiments to investigate optimal conditions of Eh and pH in soil for simultaneously decreasing As and Cd accumulation in rice. Water managements in the experiments, which included continuous flooding and intermittent irrigation with different intervals after midseason drainage, exerted striking effects on the dissolved As and Cd concentrations in soil through changes in Eh, pH, and dissolved Fe(II) concentrations in the soil. Intermittent irrigation with three-day flooding and five-day drainage was found to be effective for simultaneously decreasing the accumulation of As and Cd in grain. The grain As and Cd concentrations were, respectively, linearly related to the average dissolved As and Cd concentrations during the 3 weeks after heading. We propose a new indicator for expressing the degree to which a decrease in the dissolved As or Cd concentration is compromised by the increase in the other. For minimizing the trade-off relationship between As and Cd in rice grains in the field investigated, water management strategies should target the realization of optimal soil Eh of -73 mV and pH of 6.2 during the 3 weeks after heading.

  9. Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Lake Chabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, D.; Pica, R.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen levels are crucial in every aquatic ecosystem; it allows for the fish to breathe and it is the best indicator of water quality. Lake Chabot is the main backup water source for Castro Valley, making it crucial that the lake stays in good health. Last year, research determined that the water in Lake Chabot was of good quality and not eutrophic. This year, an experiment was conducted using Lake Chabot's dissolved oxygen levels to ensure the quality of the water and to support the findings of the previous team. After testing three specifically chosen sites at the lake using a dissolved oxygen meter, results showed that the oxygen levels in the lake were within the healthy range. It was then determined that Lake Chabot is a suitable backup water source and it continues to remain a healthy habitat.

  10. Effect of Dissolved Organic Matter on Basalt Weathering Rates under Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsova, K.; Steefel, C. I.; Chorover, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Rock weathering is an important aspect of soil formation that is tightly coupled to the progressive colonization of grain surfaces by microorganisms and plant tissue, both of which are associated with the exudation of complexing ligands and reducing equivalents that are incorporated into dissolved organic matter. As part of a larger hillslope experimental study being designed for Biosphere 2 (Oracle, AZ), we seek to determine how the presence and concentration of dissolved organic matter affects the incongruent dissolution rates of basaltic tuff. Saturated flow column experiments are being conducted using plant-derived soluble organic matter solutions of variable concentrations, and comparisons are being made to experiments conducted with malic acid, a low-molecular weight organic acid commonly exuded into the rhizosphere. Dissolved organic matter was extracted from Ponderosa Pine forest floor and was characterized for aqueous geochemical parameters (pH, EC, ion balance, DOC/TN) and also for DOC composition (UV-Vis, FTIR spectroscopy). Column effluents are being analyzed for major and trace cations, anions, silica and organic solutes. Dissolution rates of primary minerals and precipitation rates of secondary phases will be estimated by fitting the data to a numerical reactive transport model, CrunchFlow2007. At the end of the fluid flow experiment, column materials will be analyzed for biogeochemical composition to detect preferential dissolution of specific phases, the precipitation of new ones, and to monitor the associated formation of biofilms. The influence of organic solutions on weathering patterns of basalt will be discussed.

  11. Dissolved oxygen: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senn, David; Downing-Kunz, Maureen; Novick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration serves as an important indicator of estuarine habitat condition, because all aquatic macro-organisms require some minimum DO level to survive and prosper. The instantaneous DO concentration, measured at a specific location in the water column, results from a balance between multiple processes that add or remove oxygen (Figure 6.1): primary production produces O2; aerobic respiration in the water column and sediments consumes O2; abiotic or microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions utilize O2 as an oxidant (e.g., oxidation of ammonium, sulfide, and ferrous iron); O2 exchange occurs across the air:water interface in response to under- or oversaturated DO concentrations in the water column; and water currents and turbulent mixing transport DO into and out of zones in the water column. If the oxygen loss rate exceeds the oxygen production or input rate, DO concentration decreases. When DO losses exceed production or input over a prolonged enough period of time, hypoxia ((<2-3 mg/L) or anoxia can develop. Persistent hypoxia or anoxia causes stress or death in aquatic organism populations, or for organisms that can escape a hypoxic or anoxic area, the loss of habitat. In addition, sulfide, which is toxic to aquatic organisms and causes odor problems, escapes from sediments under low oxygen conditions. Low dissolved oxygen is a common aquatic ecosystem response to elevated organic

  12. Using water chemistry time series to model dissolved inorganic carbon dynamics in the western Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Waldron, Susan; Newton, Jason

    2013-04-01

    Two small streams (New Colpita and Main Trail) and two rivers (Tambopata and La Torre), in the Tambopata National Reserve, Madre de Dios, Peru, were sampled for water chemistry (conductivity, pH and dissolved oxygen) and hydrology (stage height and flow velocity). In the small streams water chemistry and hydrology variables were logged at 15 minute intervals from Feb 2011 to November 2012. Water samples were collected from all four channels during field campaigns spanning different seasons and targeting the hydrological extremes. All the samples were analysed for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration and δ13C (sample size ranging from 77 to 172 depending on the drainage system) and a smaller subset for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations. Strong positive relationships were found between conductivity and both DIC concentration and δ13C in the New Colpita stream and the La Torre river. In Tambopata river the trends were less clear and in the Main Trail stream there was very little change in DIC and isotopic composition. The conductivity data was used to model continuous DIC time series for the New Colpita stream. The modelled DIC data agreed well with the measurements; the concordance correlation coefficients between predicted and measured data were 0.91 and 0.87 for mM-DIC and δ13C-DIC, respectively. The predictions of δ13C-DIC were improved when calendar month was included in the model, which indicates seasonal differences in the δ13C-DIC conductivity relationship. At present, continuous DIC sampling still requires expensive instrumentation. Therefore, modelling DIC from a proxy variable which can be monitored continuously with ease and at relatively low cost, such as conductivity, provides a powerful alternative method of DIC determination.

  13. Chemical characterization of dissolvable tobacco products promoted to reduce harm.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Christina L; Conder, Paige A; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-03-23

    In 2009, the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. released a line of dissolvable tobacco products that are marketed as an alternative to smoking in places where smoking is prohibited. These products are currently available in Indianapolis, IN, Columbus, OH, and Portland, OR. This paper describes the chemical characterization of four such products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The dissolvable tobacco products were extracted and prepared by ultrasonic extraction using acetone, trimethylsilyl derivatization, and headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME). The following compounds were identified in the dissolvables using either ultrasonic extractions or trimethylsilyl derivatization: nicotine, ethyl citrate, palmitic acid, stearic acid, sorbitol, glycerol, and xylitol. The following compounds were identified in the dissolvables using headspace SPME: nicotine, ethyl citrate, cinnamaldehyde, coumarin, vanillin, and carvone. With the exception of nicotine, the compounds identified thus far in the dissolvables are either flavoring compounds or binders. The concentration of free nicotine in the dissolvables was determined from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and by measuring the pH and nicotine concentration by GC-MS. The results presented here are the first to reveal the complexity of dissolvable tobacco products and may be used to assess potential oral health effects.

  14. Method of synthesis of proton conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando Henry; Einsla, Melinda Lou; Mukundan, Rangachary

    2010-06-15

    A method of producing a proton conducting material, comprising adding a pyrophosphate salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved pyrophosphate salt; adding an inorganic acid salt to a solvent to produce a dissolved inorganic acid salt; adding the dissolved inorganic acid salt to the dissolved pyrophosphate salt to produce a mixture; substantially evaporating the solvent from the mixture to produce a precipitate; and calcining the precipitate at a temperature of from about 400.degree. C. to about 1200.degree. C.

  15. Enhanced dissolution of cinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    1998-11-01

    Organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades caused a dramatic increase in mercury release from cinnabar (HgS), a solid with limited solubility. Hydrophobic (a mixture of both humic and fulvic) acids dissolved more mercury than hydrophilic acids and other nonacid fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cinnabar dissolution by isolated organic matter and natural water samples was inhibited by cations such as Ca{sup 2+}. Dissolution was independent of oxygen content in experimental solutions. Dissolution experiments conducted in Dl water had no detectable dissolved mercury. The presence of various inorganic (chloride, sulfate, or sulfide) and organic ligands (salicylic acid, acetic acid, EDTA, or cysteine) did not enhance the dissolution of mercury from the mineral. Aromatic carbon content in the isolates correlated positively with enhanced cinnabar dissolution. {zeta}-potential measurements indicated sorption of negatively charged organic matter to the negatively charged cinnabar at pH 6.0. Possible mechanisms of dissolution include surface complexation of mercury and oxidation of surface sulfur species by the organic matter.

  16. The composition and degradability of upland dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Catherine; Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess controls on the degradability of DOM in stream water, samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were collected every month for a period of 24 months from an upland, peat-covered catchment in northern England. Each month the degradability of the DOM was assessed by exposing river water to light for up to 24 hours, and the change in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water was measured. To provide context for the analysis of DOM and its degradability, samples of peat, vegetation, and litter were also taken from the same catchment and analysed. The organic matter samples were analysed by several methods including: elemental analysis (CHN and O), bomb calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, pyrolysis GC/MS, ICP-OES, stable isotope analysis (13C and 15N) and 13C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The water samples were analysed for pH, conductivity, absorbance at 400nm, anions, cations, particulate organic carbon (POC) and DOC concentrations. River flow conditions and meteorology were also recorded at the site and included in the analysis of the composition and degradability of DOM. The results of multiple regression models showed that the rates of DOC degradation were affected by the N-alkyl, O-alkyl, aldehyde and aromatic relative intensities, gross heat, OR and C:N. Of these, the N-alkyl relative intensity had the greatest influence, and this in turn was found to be dependent on the rainfall and soil temperature in the week before sampling.

  17. Effect of Leaf Litter Diversity on Dissolved Organic Matter Export in a Deciduous Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe*, A.; Eißfeller, V.; Langenbruch, C.; Seven, J.; Gleixner, G.

    2012-04-01

    We investigated sources and fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils in order to understand the effect of tree diversity on below ground processes. We established a leaf litter exchange experiment in the National Park Hainich (Thuringia, Germany) in December 2008. Labeled (13C) and unlabeled leaf litter of beach (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) were exposed to study the decomposition process. Soil water was collected biweekly with glass suction plates (1 μm pore size, UMS, Munich, Germany) in 5 cm soil depth and pH, conductivity, DOC and anions (Cl-, NO3-, NO2-, PO43-, SO42-, F-) were determined. The 13DOC values were measured using high performance liquid chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC-IRMS). The values of conductivity and pH in the soil water indicate slower decomposition processes for leaf litter of beech in comparison to ash leaf litter. The conductivity was correlated with the Cl- ion during the first spring, which suggests the export of carbon due to leaching processes. However during the summer the conductivity correlated with the NO3- ions, which indicates mineralization as driving process. Surprisingly, the contribution of litter 13C into the dissolved carbon pool was very low. The highest contribution with up to 8.6% DOC labeled by ash litter derived carbon was found in the first 3 month of application. However, in the mean only 1.2% and 2.6% of DOC was labeled by carbon of the beech and ash litter, respectively. This represents in total only up to 0.41% of labeled litter carbon that was added. The higher percentages of ash litter derived 13C in DOM of soil water compared to beech indicates a positive effect of litter quality on decomposition. However, we did not find a faster decomposition or higher ash litter derived carbon export in mixed (ash and beech litter) treatments, which would indicate food selection or biodiversity effects.

  18. The Effects of Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) on Fluorescent Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. H.; Gabor, R. S.; SanClements, M.; McKnight, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Located in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado, the catchments drained by the headwaters of the Snake River are dominated by metal- and sulfide-rich bedrock. The breakdown of these minerals results in acidic metal-rich waters in the Snake (pH ~3) that persist until the confluence with Deer Creek (pH ~7). Previous research has been conducted examining the interactions of acid-rock drainage (ARD) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), but the effects of ARD on DOM production is not as well understood. In a synoptic study, samples of creek water were collected at evenly spaced intervals along the length of a tributary to the Snake River which drains an area with ARD. At each sampling location, water samples were collected and pH, conductivity, and temperature were measured. Water samples were analyzed for metal chemistry, and the DOM was analyzed with UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The character of the DOM was described using PARAFAC and index calculations. This work demonstrates that the introduction of acid and dissolved metal species has notable effects on DOM composition. Preliminary data suggests that the introduction of acid drainage is responsible for the formation of a fluorophore not accounted for in the Cory and McKnight PARAFAC model. Both high concentrations of heavy metals (e.g. zinc) and the novel fluorophore are present downstream from a mining site, which indicates it as a possible source of both species. The data suggest a link between the introduction of fluorophores in acidic waters and acidophile populations at the source of the acid rock drainage.

  19. Dissociation energies of PH and PH+.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, R. R.; Nazeer Ahammed, Y.; Srinivasa Rao, A.; Rao, T. V. R.

    1995-12-01

    Dissociation energies for the ground electronic states of diatomic PH and PH+ are determined by fitting empirical potential functions to the respective RKRV curves using correlation coefficients. The estimated ground state dissociation energies of PH and PH+ are 3.10 and 3.20 eV respectively by the curve fitting procedure using the Lippincott potential function. The computed values are in good agreement with experimental values.

  20. Method for dissolving plutonium dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Tallent, Othar K.

    1978-01-01

    The fluoride-catalyzed, non-oxidative dissolution of plutonium dioxide in HNO.sub.3 is significantly enhanced in rate by oxidizing dissolved plutonium ions. It is believed that the oxidation of dissolved plutonium releases fluoride ions from a soluble plutonium-fluoride complex for further catalytic action.

  1. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region. PMID:26729101

  2. Dissolved Oxygen and Sulfide Define the Boundaries of Thermophilic Microbial Iron Mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial iron cycling can be found in hot springs throughout Yellowstone National Park, where the process is often visibly apparent as red iron oxyhydroxide staining. We measured rates of microbial and abiotic iron oxidation and reduction in systems ranging from pH 2 to 6 and 40° to 90°C. Measurements of numerous solutes, including oxygen, sulfide, and iron, were also made on outflow channels of springs containing apparent iron metabolism. In all cases, > 16 μM dissolved oxygen was required for visible iron oxidation products to occur. Oxygen concentrations below this level do not necessarily preclude microbial iron oxidation coupled to oxygen, only the accumulation of oxidation products. Kinetics experiments conducted at these iron mats suggest that the rate of microbial iron oxidation falls below the rate of microbial reduction when dissolved oxygen falls below this concentration. In outflow channels, this is often visibly apparent as a sharp boundary between the presence and lack of red iron oxidation products. Locations with changing temperature, pH, flow rate and other factors experience changing oxygen concentrations, which causes the boundary to shift from year to year. The boundaries of iron mats are also influenced in several locations by the concentration of total dissolved sulfide. Experiments with enrichment cultures and field observations show that sulfide is not toxic to iron oxidizers, but rather inhibits the accumulation of dissolved oxygen. Microbial and abiotic sulfide oxidation, leading to visible sulfur precipitation, together with degassing of hydrogen sulfide, contribute to keeping oxygen levels low. Typically, only where sulfide concentrations fall below 20 μM are iron mats able to form. Enrichment cultures of iron oxidizers, however, grow easily at levels exceeding 100 μM sulfide. Only a handful of field locations appear to have simultaneous sulfur and iron precipitation zones. Formation of iron oxidation mats occurs at highly

  3. Abiotic Synthesis of Methane Under Alkaline Hydrothermal Conditions: the Effect of pH in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Qi, F.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    Abiotic formation of methane in hydrothermal reaction zones at mid-ocean ridges likely occurs by Fischer-Tropsch catalytic processes involving reaction of CO2-bearing fluids with mineral surfaces. The elevated concentrations of dissolved methane and low molecular weight hydrocarbons observed in high temperature vent fluids issuing from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems, in particular, suggest that Fe and Cr-bearing mineral phases attribute as catalysts, enhancing abiotic production of alkanes. The chemi-adsorption of dissolved CO2 on the catalytic mineral surface, however, might be influenced by a pH dependent surface electron charge developed within the mineral-fluid interface. Thus, a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the role of pH on rates of carbon reduction in fluids coexisting with Fe-oxides at 390 degree C and 400 bars. At two distinct pH conditions, acidic (pH = 5) and alkaline (pH = 8.8), the abiotic production of isotopically labelled CH4(aq) was monitored during FeO reaction with aqueous NaCl-NaHCO3-H2-bearing fluid (0.56 mol/kg NaCl, 0.03 mol/kg NaH13CO3). Despite the lower H2(aq) concentrations (120 mmol/kg) in the high pH system, concentrations of abiogenic methane attained values of 195 umol/kg and 120 umol/kg respectively, suggesting enhanced catalytic properties of mineral under moderately high pH. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), performed on unreacted and final solid products, reveal the significantly greater abundances of alkyl (C-C-) groups on the surface of FeO oxidized at elevated pH, in comparison with mineral reacted at low pH conditions. Thus, enhanced adsorption of dissolved CO2 and the resulting Fischer-Tropsch formation of alkyl groups likely contributes to methane production observed at alkaline conditions. Introducing the effect of pH in the Fischer-Tropsch mechanism of alkane formation has important implications for the recently discovered Lost City ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal system, where elevated pH

  4. Artificial neural network modeling of dissolved oxygen in reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    The water quality of reservoirs is one of the key factors in the operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in water column is essential for microorganisms and a significant indicator of the state of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, two artificial neural network (ANN) models including back propagation neural network (BPNN) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approaches and multilinear regression (MLR) model were developed to estimate the DO concentration in the Feitsui Reservoir of northern Taiwan. The input variables of the neural network are determined as water temperature, pH, conductivity, turbidity, suspended solids, total hardness, total alkalinity, and ammonium nitrogen. The performance of the ANN models and MLR model was assessed through the mean absolute error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient computed from the measured and model-simulated DO values. The results reveal that ANN estimation performances were superior to those of MLR. Comparing to the BPNN and ANFIS models through the performance criteria, the ANFIS model is better than the BPNN model for predicting the DO values. Study results show that the neural network particularly using ANFIS model is able to predict the DO concentrations with reasonable accuracy, suggesting that the neural network is a valuable tool for reservoir management in Taiwan.

  5. Extraction of nickel from nickel limonite ore using dissolved gaseous SO2 - air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulandari, Winny; Soerawidjaja, Tatang Hernas; Joshua, Stephen; Isradi, Hashfi Rijal

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a method of extracting nickel from nickel limonite by using dissolved SO2-air in ambient pressure. This method has been reported in the literature to be having advantages of a high selectivity of nickel towards iron, and can be conducted at ambient condition. The purpose of this study is to determine the good condition of nickel extraction from limonite ore by conducting pre-treatment and varying temperature and pH. The experiments were carried out in a five-neck reactor and comprised of three steps: pre-treatment of sample by pre-heating at 650 °C, leaching of the pre-treated sample, and analysis. The leaching solution was analyzed by using AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectrometer) method to determine the concentration of nickel and iron in the solution. The operating parameters included the acidity pH level of 3, 4, or 5 and the temperature of 30, 55, and 80 °C. The leaching was carried out up to 180 min. The mineralogical analysis of the ore was conducted by using XRD (X-Ray Diffraction) analysis. It is found that the good condition was obtained at pH 3, temperature of 80 °C, and 180 min leaching time, with nickel leaching efficiency of 21% from original nickel content. The selectivity nickel towards iron, defined by the extracted nickel (%) divided by extracted iron (%), has been found up to 2743. This method shows that nickel extraction can be carried out at very mild condition, including low temperature, atmospheric pressure and low pH.

  6. Productivity Estimation of Hypersaline Microbial Mat Communities - Diurnal Cycles of Dissolved Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Less, G.; Cohen, Y.; Luz, B.; Lazar, B.

    2002-05-01

    Hypersaline microbial mat communities (MMC) are the modern equivalents of the Archean stromatolities, the first photosynthetic organisms on Earth. An estimate of their oxygen production rate is important to the understanding of oxygen evolution on Earth ca. 2 b.y.b.p. Here we use the diurnal cycle of dissolved oxygen, O2/Ar ratio and the isotopic composition of dissolved oxygen to calculate net and gross primary productivity of MMC growing in a large scale (80 m2) experimental pan. The pan is inoculated with MMC taken from the Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt and filled with 90\\permil evaporated Red Sea water brine up to a depth of ca. 0.25 m. It is equipped with computerized flow through system that is programmed to pump pan water at selected time intervals into a sampling cell fitted with dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity and temperature sensors connected to a datalogger. Manual brine samples were taken for calibrating the sensors, mass spectrometric analyses and for measurements of additional relevant parameters. Dissolved oxygen concentrations fluctuate during the diurnal cycle being highly supersaturated except for the end of the night. The O2 curve varies seasonally and has a typical "shark fin" shape due to the MMC metabolic response to the shape of the diurnal light curve. The dissolved oxygen data were fitted to a smooth curve that its time derivative (dO2 /dt) is defined as: Z dO2 /dt=GP-R-k(O2(meas)- O2(sat)) where z is the depth (m); GP and R are the MMC gross production and respiration (mol m-2 d-1), respectively; k is the gas exchange coefficient (m d-1); O2(meas) and O2(sat) (mol L-1) are the measured and equilibrium dissolved oxygen concentrations, respectively. The high resolution sampling of the automated system produces O2 curves that enable the calculation of smooth and reliable time derivatives. The calculations yield net production values that vary between 1,000 10-6 to -100 10-6 mol O2 m-2 h-1 and day respiration rates between 60 10-6 to 30 10

  7. In situ removal of dissolved and suspended contaminants from a eutrophic pond using hybrid sand-filter.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Joshi, Umid Man; Ping, Han; Reuben, Sheela; Burger, David F

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in situ hybrid sand filters were designed to remove dissolved and suspended contaminants from eutrophic pond. Currently, there are no attempts made to eradicate dissolved as well as suspended contaminants from eutrophic water system in a single step. Monitoring studies revealed that examined pond contain high chlorophyll-a content (101.8 μg L(-1)), turbidity (39.5 NTU) and total dissolved solids concentration (0.04 g L(-1)). Samples were further exposed to extensive water quality analysis, which include examining physicochemical parameters (pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, turbidity and chlorophyll-a), metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Ni) and anions (NO3, NO2, PO4, SO4, Cl, F and Br). To tackle pollutants, filtration system was designed to comprise of several components including fine sand, coarse sand/sorbent mix and gravel from top to bottom loaded in fiberglass tanks. All the filters (activated carbon, Sargassum and zeolite) completely removed algal biomass and showed potential to decrease pH during entire operational period of 20 h at 120 L h(-1). To examine the efficiency of filters in adverse conditions, the pond water was spiked with heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Ni). Of the different filter systems, Sargassum-loaded filter performed exceedingly well with concentrations of heavy metals never exceeded the Environmental protection agency regulations for freshwater limits during total operational period. The total uptake capacities at the end of the fifth event were 24.9, 20.5, 0.58, 5.2, 0.091 and 2.8 mg/kg for Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb, respectively.

  8. The Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistlethwayte, D.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment in environmental chemistry which serves to determine the dissolved oxygen concentration in both fresh and saline water. Applications of the method at the undergraduate and secondary school levels are recommended. (CC)

  9. METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Slotin, L.A.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use of about 1 or 2 percent of perchioric acid based on the weight of the nitric acid used, reduces the time of dissolution of uranium by a factor of about 100.

  10. Formulation development and evaluation of fast dissolving film of telmisartan.

    PubMed

    Londhe, Vaishali Y; Umalkar, Kashmira B

    2012-03-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of concern not just in the elderly but also in the youngsters. An effort was made to formulate a fast dissolving film containing telmisartan which is used in the treatment of hypertension with a view to improve the onset of action, therapeutic efficacy, patient compliance and convenience. The major challenge in formulation of oral films of telmisatran is that it shows very less solubility in the pH range of 3-9. Various film forming agents and polyhydric alcohols were evaluated for optimizing composition of fast dissolving films. Fast dissolving films using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, sorbitol, menthol and an alkalizer were formulated using solvent casting method. Optimized formulations were evaluated for their weight, thickness, folding endurance, appearance, tensile strength, disintegration time and dissolution profile.

  11. Formulation Development and Evaluation of Fast Dissolving Film of Telmisartan

    PubMed Central

    Londhe, Vaishali Y.; Umalkar, Kashmira B.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of concern not just in the elderly but also in the youngsters. An effort was made to formulate a fast dissolving film containing telmisartan which is used in the treatment of hypertension with a view to improve the onset of action, therapeutic efficacy, patient compliance and convenience. The major challenge in formulation of oral films of telmisatran is that it shows very less solubility in the pH range of 3–9. Various film forming agents and polyhydric alcohols were evaluated for optimizing composition of fast dissolving films. Fast dissolving films using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, sorbitol, menthol and an alkalizer were formulated using solvent casting method. Optimized formulations were evaluated for their weight, thickness, folding endurance, appearance, tensile strength, disintegration time and dissolution profile. PMID:23325992

  12. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  13. The seasonal influence on the spatial distribution of dissolved selected metals in Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamau, Joseph Nyingi; Gachanja, Anthony; Ngila, Catherine; Kazungu, Johnson Michael; Zhai, Mingzhe

    Lake Naivasha is the only freshwater Lake in Rift Valley, in Kenya. It lies in a fertile semi-arid basin. The Lake has no surface water outlet and is presumed to be under stress. Dissolved metals are directly taken up by bacteria, algae, plants, and planktonic and benthic organisms. Dissolved metals can also adsorb to particulate matter in water column and enter aquatic organisms through various routes. Cadmium, copper, lead and zinc may bioaccumulate within lower organisms, yet they do not biomagnify up the food chain as do mercury and selenium. This study reports on the levels and distribution of dissolved heavy metals and investigates the influence of physicochemical parameters on metal mobilization. The bioavailability of selected metals was investigated by relating the levels of dissolved metals to that in fish. Water abstraction for irrigation and domestic use, compounded with organic matter inflow will affect physicochemical parameters and hence influences the mobilization of heavy metals. Dissolved Zn correlated highly with sediment pH (r = 0.67) indicating that dissolution increases with increase in pH. In addition, the fact that the pH also correlated positively with organic matter r = 0.50, Eh r = 0.63, temperature r = 0.56 and dissolved oxygen r = 56, would suggest that organic bound Zn contributed significantly to the concentration of dissolved Zn. In situ flux experiments indicated that the fringing papyrus reeds located along the shores of Lake Naivasha provided sites for metal immobilization due to their coprecipitation on redox sensitive.

  14. Online dissolved methane and total dissolved sulfide measurement in sewers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Sharma, Keshab R; Fluggen, Markus; O'Halloran, Kelly; Murthy, Sudhir; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies using short-term manual sampling of sewage followed by off-line laboratory gas chromatography (GC) measurement have shown that a substantial amount of dissolved methane is produced in sewer systems. However, only limited data has been acquired to date due to the low frequency and short span of this method, which cannot capture the dynamic variations of in-sewer dissolved methane concentrations. In this study, a newly developed online measuring device was used to monitor dissolved methane concentrations at the end of a rising main sewer network, over two periods of three weeks each, in summer and early winter, respectively. This device uses an online gas-phase methane sensor to measure methane under equilibrium conditions after being stripped from the sewage. The data are then converted to liquid-phase methane concentrations according to Henry's Law. The detection limit and range are suitable for sewer application and can be adjusted by varying the ratio of liquid-to-gas phase volume settings. The measurement presented good linearity (R² > 0.95) during field application, when compared to off-line measurements. The overall data set showed a wide variation in dissolved methane concentration of 5-15 mg/L in summer and 3.5-12 mg/L in winter, resulting in a significant average daily production of 24.6 and 19.0 kg-CH₄/d, respectively, from the network with a daily average sewage flow of 2840 m³/day. The dissolved methane concentration demonstrated a clear diurnal pattern coinciding with flow and sulfide fluctuation, implying a relationship with the wastewater hydraulic retention time (HRT). The total dissolved sulfide (TDS) concentration in sewers can be determined simultaneously with the same principle.

  15. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO[sub x] emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO[sub x] fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO[sub x] emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO[sub 2] which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  16. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2} which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  17. Dynamics of Planktonic Prokaryotes and Dissolved Carbon in a Subtropical Coastal Lake

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Maria Luiza S.; Tonetta, Denise; Dalpaz, Larissa; Antônio, Regina V.; Petrucio, Maurício M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand the dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes in a subtropical lake and its relationship with carbon, we conducted water sampling through four 48-h periods in Peri Lake for 1 year. Planktonic prokaryotes were characterized by the abundance and biomass of heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and of cyanobacteria (coccoid and filamentous cells). During all samplings, we measured wind speed, water temperature (WT), pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), precipitation, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and carbon dioxide (CO2). DOC was higher in the summer (average = 465 μM – WT = 27°C) and lower in the winter (average = 235 μM – WT = 17°C), with no significant variability throughout the daily cycles. CO2 concentrations presented a different pattern, with a minimum in the warm waters of the summer period (8.31 μM) and a maximum in the spring (37.13 μM). Daily trends were observed for pH, DO, WT, and CO2. At an annual scale, both biological and physical-chemical controls were important regulators of CO2. HB abundance and biomass were higher in the winter sampling (5.60 × 109 cells L−1 and 20.83 μmol C L−1) and lower in the summer (1.87 × 109 cells L−1 and 3.95 μmol C L−1). Filamentous cyanobacteria (0.23 × 108–0.68 × 108 filaments L−1) produced up to 167.16 μmol C L−1 as biomass (during the warmer period), whereas coccoid cyanobacteria contributed only 0.38 μmol C L−1. Precipitation, temperature, and the biomass of HB were the main regulators of CO2 concentrations. Temperature had a negative effect on the concentration of CO2, which may be indirectly attributed to high heterotroph activity in the autumn and winter periods. DOC was positively correlated with the abundance of total cyanobacteria and negatively with HB. Thus, planktonic prokaryotes have played an important role in the dynamics of both dissolved inorganic and organic carbon in

  18. Dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes and dissolved carbon in a subtropical coastal lake.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Maria Luiza S; Tonetta, Denise; Dalpaz, Larissa; Antônio, Regina V; Petrucio, Maurício M

    2013-01-01

    To understand the dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes in a subtropical lake and its relationship with carbon, we conducted water sampling through four 48-h periods in Peri Lake for 1 year. Planktonic prokaryotes were characterized by the abundance and biomass of heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and of cyanobacteria (coccoid and filamentous cells). During all samplings, we measured wind speed, water temperature (WT), pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), precipitation, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and carbon dioxide (CO2). DOC was higher in the summer (average = 465 μM - WT = 27°C) and lower in the winter (average = 235 μM - WT = 17°C), with no significant variability throughout the daily cycles. CO2 concentrations presented a different pattern, with a minimum in the warm waters of the summer period (8.31 μM) and a maximum in the spring (37.13 μM). Daily trends were observed for pH, DO, WT, and CO2. At an annual scale, both biological and physical-chemical controls were important regulators of CO2. HB abundance and biomass were higher in the winter sampling (5.60 × 10(9) cells L(-1) and 20.83 μmol C L(-1)) and lower in the summer (1.87 × 10(9) cells L(-1) and 3.95 μmol C L(-1)). Filamentous cyanobacteria (0.23 × 10(8)-0.68 × 10(8) filaments L(-1)) produced up to 167.16 μmol C L(-1) as biomass (during the warmer period), whereas coccoid cyanobacteria contributed only 0.38 μmol C L(-1). Precipitation, temperature, and the biomass of HB were the main regulators of CO2 concentrations. Temperature had a negative effect on the concentration of CO2, which may be indirectly attributed to high heterotroph activity in the autumn and winter periods. DOC was positively correlated with the abundance of total cyanobacteria and negatively with HB. Thus, planktonic prokaryotes have played an important role in the dynamics of both dissolved inorganic and organic carbon in

  19. Reducing Emissions from Uranium Dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. The trays are steam coil heated. The process has operated satisfactorily, with few difficulties, for decades. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. Because NO{sub x} is hazardous, fumes should be suppressed whenever the electric blower system is inoperable. Because the tray dissolving process has worked well for decades, as much of the current capital equipment and operating procedures as possible were preserved. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2}, which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  20. Dissolved Organic Carbon Dynamics in Precipitation of Central Pennsylvania as Influenced by Climatic Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iavorivska, L.; Boyer, E. W.; Grimm, J.; Fuentes, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is ubiquitous in atmospheric water, plays an important role in cloud formation processes, and contributes to organic acidity of precipitation. Rain and snow deposited to the landscape is a source of acidity and nutrient enrichment to ecosystems and water bodies. Despite the significance of DOC to a plethora of ecosystem processes, knowledge about its contributions via precipitation remains limited. In this research project, we are quantifying temporal variations in the sources and concentrations of organic carbon in precipitation in the central Pennsylvania. Here, we present results of a study focusing on the dynamic variability of DOC in rainwater, at multiple time scales, at two sites located in the Appalachian Plateau Region. Sequential sampling during stormflow events at the first site, the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, was conducted to address event-scale variability in rainfall DOC concentrations and is explored in the context of the types and the origins of the storms. Weekly sampling over many years at the second site, the Leading Ridge Experimental watershed, was conducted to address relationships among emissions sources, seasonal variability in storm tracks, antecedent atmospheric moisture conditions, and the temporal variability in DOC responses. In addition to DOC, other chemical analyses were conducted on the rainwater samples, including dissolved inorganic carbon, forms of nitrogen, major cations and anions, trace elements, water isotopes, pH and conductivity. These ancillary data, along with meteorological back trajectory analyses, help to identify sources and origins of DOC in the rainwater of central Pennsylvania over short and long time scales.

  1. Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of dissolved organic matter fractions from secondary effluent by fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liangliang; Wang, Kun; Zhao, Qingliang; Xie, Chunmei; Qiu, Wei; Jia, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash was used as a low-cost adsorbent for removing dissolved organic matter (DOM) in secondary effluent. Batch experiments were conducted under various adsorbent dosages, pH, contact time, temperatures and DOM fractional characteristics. Under the optimum conditions of fly ash dosage of 15 g/L, temperature of 303 K and contact time of 180 min, a removal of 22.5% of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), 23.7% of UV-254, 25.9% of the trihalomethanes precursors in secondary effluent was obtained. The adsorption of DOM fractions onto fly ash all followed the pseudo second-order kinetic model, and the hydrophilic fraction adsorption by fly ash also fitted the intraparticle diffusion model quite well. Freundlich and Langmuir models were applicable to the fly ash adsorption and their constants were evaluated. The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorptions revealed that fly ash was more effective in adsorbing hydrophilic fraction than the acidic fractions. Structure changes of the DOM fractions after fly ash adsorption were also characterized via spectrum analyzing. Those mechanisms presented critical step toward improved efficiencies of fly ash adsorption via further surface-modification.

  2. Spatial Variability of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Headwater Wetlands in Central Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert-Eberhardt, A. J.; Wardrop, D.; Boyer, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is known to be of an important factor in many microbially mediated biochemical processes, such as denitrification, that occur in wetlands. The spatial variability of DOC within a wetland could impact the microbes that fuel these processes, which in turn can affect the ecosystem services provided by wetlands. However, the amount of spatial variability of DOC in wetlands is generally unknown. Furthermore, it is unknown how disturbance to wetlands can affect spatial variability of DOC. Previous research in central Pennsylvania headwater wetland soils has shown that wetlands with increased human disturbance had decreased heterogeneity in soil biochemistry. To address groundwater chemical variability 20 monitoring wells were installed in a random pattern in a 400 meter squared plot in a low-disturbance headwater wetland and a high-disturbance headwater wetland in central Pennsylvania. Water samples from these wells will be analyzed for DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon, nitrate, ammonia, and sulfate concentrations, as well as pH, conductivity, and temperature on a seasonal basis. It is hypothesized that there will be greater spatial variability of groundwater chemistry in the low disturbance wetland than the high disturbance wetland. This poster will present the initial data concerning DOC spatial variability in both the low and high impact headwater wetlands.

  3. The Added Value of a PhD in Medicine--PhD Students' Perceptions of Acquired Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Henrika; Lindblom-Ylänne, Sari; Lonka, Kristi; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    PhD in the field of medicine is more common than in any other domain. Many medical doctors are driven towards PhD, but also students with other backgrounds (usually MSc) are conducting a PhD in medical schools. Higher education has invested a lot in developing generic and research competences. Still little is known about how PhD students…

  4. pH. Agricultural Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale. Dept. of Agricultural Education and Mechanization.

    This lesson plan is intended for use in conducting classes on the effect of pH on plant growth. Presented first are an attention step/problem statement and a series of questions and answers designed to convey general information about soil pH and its effect on plants. The following topics are among those discussed: acidity and alkalinity; the…

  5. Dissolved heavy metal determination and ecotoxicological assessment: a case study of the corumbataí river (são paulo, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Aparecida Maranho, Lucineide; Teresinha Maranho, Leila; Grossi Botelho, Rafael; Luiz Tornisielo, Valdemar

    2014-09-29

    The aim of this one-year study (August 2009 to July 2010) was to evaluate the Corumbataí River water polluted by anthropogenic sources and see how it affects the reproduction of the microcrustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia (Richard, 1984) in laboratory conditions over seven days of exposure to water samples collected monthly at six different locations. We determined the concentrations of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd), as well as physicochemical parameters such as dissolved oxygen, conductivity, water temperature, and pH. Dissolved oxygen and conductivity demonstrated anthropogenic influence, as dissolved oxygen concentration decreased and conductivity increased from the upstream to the downstream stretch of the river. The effects on C. dubia were observed in the months with high precipitation, but the toxicity cannot be associated with any particular contaminant. Heavy metal levels kept well below the limit values. Zn and Pb had the highest concentrations in the water during the sampling period, probably due to the industrial and agricultural influence. However, these levels do not seem to be associated with precipitation, which suggests that their primary source was industry. Physicochemical parameters, the ecotoxicological assay, and determination of heavy metals proved to be efficient tools to evaluate aquatic environments.

  6. Cu Binding to Iron Oxide-Organic Matter Coprecipitates in Solid and Dissolved Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Koenigsmark, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that Cu is released from wetlands following storm events. Assymetrical field flow field fractionation (AF4) analyses as well as total and dissolved metal concentration measurements suggest iron oxide-organic matter complexes control Cu retention and release. Coprecipitation products of Fe oxide and organic matter were prepared under conditions similar to the wetland to assess Cu partitioning to and availability from solid phases that settle from solution as well as phases remaining suspended. Cu coprecipitation and sorption to organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca2+, glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. Suspended Fe oxide-organic matter coprecipitates were assessed using AF4 coupled to online TOC analysis and ICP-MS. In laboratory prepared samples, Cu was observed in a mixture of small 1-5 nm colloids of Fe oxide-organic matter precipitates, but the majority was observed in larger organic matter colloids and were not UV absorbing, suggesting more aliphatic carbon materials. In field samples, up to 60% of the dissolved Cu

  7. A field control release test for assessing plausibility of dissolved CO2 measurements for CO2 leakage detection in a shallow aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Delgado, J.; Philips, S. B.; Mickler, P. J.; Guzman, N.

    2013-12-01

    Detecting Co2 leakage signals in the shallow aquifer is one of the most changing issues because of high variability in groundwater chemistry and also interactions among CO2, aquifer materials and groundwater. This study presents a novel technology for detecting CO2 leakage by measuring dissolved CO2 in groundwater using an optical CO2 sensor. The control release test was conducted in the field laboratory, Brackenridge Field Lab where shallow aquifer is unconfined with bedrock at the depth of 6 m below surface. Several groundwater wells were drilled and screened at depths from 3 m to 6 m. Fiber optic distributed sensors for dissolved CO2 monitoring were installed in a well bore and connected to a computer for automatically measuring dissolved CO2 gas in groundwater for every 30 seconds. CO2 gas was bubbled into a well bore for about two hours and then was stopped. In addition, Nabr solution was added to the wellbore and Br was used as a tracer. Groundwater samples were collected periodically from the well for measuring groundwater pH, titrating alkalinity and analyzing DIC and concentrations of major ions. A reactive transport model by considering water-rock-CO2 interactions was used to simulate the control release test. Both field and modeling results show that dissolved CO2 measurements with an optical Co2 sensor can be used for detecting CO2 leakage in groundwater.

  8. Dissolved gas - the hidden saboteur

    SciTech Connect

    Magorien, V.G.

    1993-12-31

    Almost all hydraulic power components, to properly perform their tasks, rely on one basic, physical property, i.e., the incompressibility of the working fluid. Unfortunately, a frequently overlooked fluid property which frustrates this requirement is its ability to absorb, i.e., dissolve, store and give off gas. The gas is, most often but not always, air. This property is a complex one because it is a function not only of the fluid`s chemical make-up but temperature, pressure, exposed area, depth and time. In its relationshiop to aircraft landing-gear, where energy is absorbed hydraulically, this multi-faceted fluid property can be detrimental in two ways: dynamically, i.e., loss of energy absorption ability and statically, i.e., improper aircraft attitude on the ground. The pupose of this paper is to bring an awareness to this property by presenting: (1) examples of these manifestations with some empirical and practical solutions to them, (2) illustrations of this normally `hidden saboteur` at work, (3) Henry`s Dissolved Gas Law, (4) room-temperature, saturated values of dissolved gas for a number of different working fluids, (5) a description of the instrument used to obtain them, (6) some `missing elements` of the Dissolved Gas Law pertaining to absoption, (7) how static and dynamic conditions effect gas absorption and (8) some recommended solutions to prevent becoming a victim of this `hidden saboteur`

  9. Dissolving pulp from jute stick.

    PubMed

    Matin, Mhafuza; Rahaman, M Mostafizur; Nayeem, Jannatun; Sarkar, Mamon; Jahan, M Sarwar

    2015-01-22

    Jute stick is woody portion of jute plant, which remain as leftover after extracting bast fibre. Presently, it is being used for fencing in the rural area. In this investigation, biorefinery concept was initiated in producing dissolving pulp from jute stick by pre-hydrolysis kraft process. At 170°C for 1h of pre-hydrolysis, 70% of hemicelluloses was dissolved with negligible loss of α-cellulose. At this condition, 75% of dissolved sugars in the pre-hydrolysis liquor were in the oligomeric form. The pre-hydrolysed jute stick was subsequently pulped by kraft process with the variation of active alkali. The pulp yield was 36.2% with kappa number 18.5 at the conditions of 16% active alkali for 2h of cooking at 170°C. Final pulp was produced with 92% α-cellulose and 89% brightness after D0EpD1EpD1 bleaching. The produced dissolving pulp can be used in rayon production.

  10. Influence of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter, colloids, and cations on nanofiltration of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Sadmani, A H M Anwar; Andrews, Robert C; Bagley, David M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the rejection of selected pharmaceutically active (PhAC) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) when using nanofiltration as a function of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM), colloidal particles, cations and their interactions. Lake Ontario water served as a source of natural DOM and colloidal particles. PhAC/EDC rejection experiments were conducted using raw Lake Ontario water and Lake Ontario water that was pre-treated with either ultrafiltration to remove colloidal particles, or fluidized ion exchange resins to remove DOM. Additionally, the concentration of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Na(+)) in the raw and pre-treated water matrices was varied. While ionic PhACs and EDCs exhibited high rejections from all the water matrices examined, neutral compounds were most effectively rejected in water containing DOM and no colloids, and least effectively rejected from colloid-containing water with increased cations but no DOM. The presence of DOM significantly improved compound rejection and the increase in cation concentration significantly decreased rejection. The presence of colloids had comparatively little effect except to mitigate the impact of increased cation concentration, apparently providing some cation-buffering capacity. The sequence in which constituents are removed from waters during treatment may significantly impact PhAC and EDC removal, especially of neutral compounds.

  11. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  12. Erosion patterns on dissolving blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Patterns in nature are shaped under water flows and wind action, and the understanding of their morphodynamics goes through the identification of the physical mechanisms at play. When a dissoluble body is exposed to a water flow, typical patterns with scallop-like shapes may appear [1,2]. These shapes are observed on the walls of underground rivers or icebergs. We experimentally study the erosion of dissolving bodies made of salt, caramel or ice into water solutions without external flow. The dissolving mixture, which is created at the solid/liquid interface, undergoes a buoyancy-driven instability comparable to a Rayleigh-Bénard instability so that the dissolving front destabilizes into filaments. This mechanism yields to spatial variations of solute concentration and to differential dissolution of the dissolving block. We first observe longitudinal stripes with a well defined wavelength, which evolve towards chevrons and scallops that interact and move again the dissolving current. Thanks to a careful analysis of the competing physical mechanisms, we propose scaling laws, which account for the characteristic lengths and times of the early regime in experiments. The long-term evolution of patterns is understood qualitatively. A close related mechanism has been proposed to explain structures observed on the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes [3] and we suggest that our experiments are analogous and explain the scallop-like patterns on iceberg walls. [1] P. Meakin and B. Jamtveit, Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems, Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 659-694 (2010). [2] P.N. Blumberg and R.L. Curl, Experimental and theoretical studies of dissolution roughness, J. Fluid Mech. 65, 735-751 (1974). [3] L. Solari and G. Parker, Morphodynamic modelling of the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes, J.G.R. 118, 1432-1442 (2013).

  13. Use of iron salts to control dissolved sulfide in trunk sewers

    SciTech Connect

    Padival, N.A.; Kimbell, W.A.; Redner, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    Sewer headspace H{sub 2}S reduction by precipitating dissolved sulfide in wastewater was investigated using iron salt (FeCl{sub 3} and FeCl{sub 2}). Full-scale experiments were conducted in a 40-km (25 mi) sewer with an average flow of 8.7 m{sup 3}/s (200 mgd). Results were sensitive to total Fe dosages and Fe(III)/Fe(II) blend ratios injected. A concentration of 16 mg/L total Fe and a blend ratio of 1.9:1 [Fe(III):Fe(II)] reduced dissolved sulfide levels by 97%. Total sulfide and headspace H{sub 2}S were reduced by 63% and 79%, respectively. Liquid and gas-phase sulfide reductions were largely due to the effective precipitation of sulfide with Fe(III) and Fe(II) and the limited volatilization of H{sub 2}S, respectively. Oxidation of sulfide in the presence of Fe(II) and minute amounts of O{sub 2} may have occurred. A combination of Fe(III) and Fe(II) proved more effective than either salt alone. By using excess Fe(III), dissolved sulfide can be reduced to undetectable levels. No specific relation between the concentration of Fe or Fe(III)/Fe(II) blend ratio and sewer crown pH was inferred. Iron salts may retard crown corrosion rates by precipitating free sulfide and reducing its release to the sewer headspace as H{sub 2}S. A mechanism to inhibit certain responsible bacteria was not established in the 40-km (25 mi) sewer.

  14. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  15. Fiber-optic dissolved oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide sensors using fluorophores encapsulated in sol gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeog-Chan

    Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved CO2 sensing using thin films of fluorophores encapsulated in sol-gel matrices were made and tested. The DO/O2 sensor used ruthenium(II) tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) perchlorate (Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2) as the oxygen sensitive fluorophore and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) sol-gel as the encapsulating matrix material. For the DCO2 sensor, 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) co-doped with sodium bicarbonate was used as the DCO2 sensitive fluorophore-chemical system and diisobutoxy-alumino triethoxysilane (ASE) sol-gel was used as the encapsulating matrix material. It was found that oxygen quenches the excited state Ru(Ph2Phen)Cl 2 by diffusing through the MTMS matrix. Continuous excitation of Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2 during MTMS drying resulted in long, single exponential lifetimes of the metal complex and increased sensor sensitivity. When the sensor was field tested, it was found to have an excellent match compared to conventional titration method for determining dissolved oxygen concentrations and had fast response times. It was determined that this sensor measured the vapor pressure of oxygen rather than the absolute concentration of dissolved oxygen. For DCO2 sensing, it was found that the dynamic response of the senor could be tuned by varying the HPTS to NaHCO3 ratios. The sensor had fast response times compared to other fiber optic DCO 2 sensors reported which typically have response times of minutes.

  16. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  17. Uranium Isotope Fractionation during Oxidation of Dissolved U(iv) and Synthetic Solid UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Johnson, T. M.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    U isotopes (238U/235U) show promise as a tool for environmental monitoring of U contamination as well as a proxy for paleo-redox conditions. However, the isotopic fractionation mechanisms of U are still poorly understood. In groundwater systems, U(VI), a mobile contaminant, can be reduced to immobile U(IV) and thus remediated. Previous work shows that 238U/235U of the remaining U(VI) changes with the extent of reduction. Therefore, U(VI) isotope composition in groundwater can potentially be used to detect and perhaps quantify the extent of reduction. However, knowing if isotopic fractionation occurs during U(IV) oxidation is equally important. First, the reduced U(IV) (either solid or as dissolved organic complexes) potentially can be reoxidized to U(VI). If isotope fractionation occurs during oxidation, it would complicate the use of U isotope composition as a monitoring technique. Further, in natural weathering processes, U(IV) minerals are oxidized to form dissolved U(VI), which is carried to rivers and eventually to the ocean and deposited in marine sediments. The weathering cycle is thus sensitive to redox conditions, meaning the sedimentary U isotope record may serve as a paleoredox indicator, provided U isotope fractionation during oxidation and reduction are well known. We conducted experiments oxidizing 2 different U(IV) species by O2 and measuring isotopic fractionation factors. In one experiment, dissolved U(IV) in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1) was oxidized by entrained air. As oxidation proceeds at pH 1, the remaining dissolved U(IV) becomes progressively enriched in 238U in a linear trend, while the product U(VI) paralleled, but was offset to 1.0‰ lighter in 238U/235U. This linear progression of both remaining reactant and product suggests equilibrium fractionation during oxidation of dissolved U(IV) by O2. A second experiment oxidized synthetic, solid UO2 (in 20 mM NaHCO3, pH 7) with entrained air. The oxidative fractionation is very weak in this case with

  18. Bromide, Chloride, and Sulfate Concentrations, and Specific Conductance, Lake Texoma, Texas and Oklahoma, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Dallas Water Utilities Division, collected water-quality data from 11 sites on Lake Texoma, a reservoir on the Texas-Oklahoma border, during April 2007-September 2008. At 10 of the sites, physical properties (depth, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity) were measured and samples were collected for analysis of selected dissolved constituents (bromide, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate); at one site, only physical properties were measured. The primary constituent of interest was bromide. Bromate can form when ozone is used to disinfect raw water containing bromide, and bromate is a suspected human carcinogen. Chloride and sulfate were of secondary interest. Only the analytical results for bromide, chloride, sulfate, and measured specific conductance are discussed in this report. Median dissolved bromide concentrations ranged from 0.28 to 0.60 milligrams per liter. The largest median dissolved bromide concentration (0.60 milligram per liter at site 11) was from the Red River arm of Lake Texoma. Dissolved bromide concentrations generally were larger in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma than in the Washita arm of the lake. Median dissolved chloride concentrations were largest in the Red River arm of Lake Texoma at site 11 (431 milligrams per liter) and smallest at site 8 (122 milligrams per liter) in the Washita arm. At site 11 in the Red River arm, the mean and median chloride concentrations exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level of 300 milligrams per liter for chloride established by the 'Texas Surface Water Quality Standards' for surface-water bodies designated for the public water supply use. Median dissolved sulfate concentrations ranged from 182 milligrams per liter at site 4 in the Big Mineral arm to 246 milligrams per liter at site 11 in the Red River arm. None of the mean or median sulfate concentrations

  19. Dissolving mechanism of strain P17 on insoluble phosphorus of yellow-brown soil

    PubMed Central

    Chuan-qing, Zhong; Guang-xiang, Cao; Wei-yi, Huang; Xing-she, Luan; Yi-fei, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Strain P17 was a bacterial strain identified as Bacillus megaterium isolated from ground accumulating phosphate rock powder. The fermentation broth of strain P17 and the yellow-brown soil from Nanjing Agricultural University garden were collected to conduct this study. The simulation of fixed insoluble phosphorous forms after applying calcium superphosphate into yellow-brown soil was performed in pots, while available P and total P of soil were extremely positive correlative with those of groundwater. Then the dissolving effect of strain P17 on insoluble P of yellow-brown soil was studied. Results showed that Bacillus megaterium strain P17 had notable solubilizing effect on insoluble phosphates formed when too much water-soluble phosphorous fertilizer used. During 100 days after inoculation, strain P17 was dominant. Until the 120th day, compared with water addition, available P of strain P17 inoculation treated soil increased by 3 times with calcium superphosphate addition. Besides available P, pH, activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase and population of P-solubilizing microbes were detected respectively. P-solubilizing mechanism of P-solubilizing bacteria strain P17 seems to be a synergetic effect of pH decrease, organic acids, phosphatase, etc. PMID:25477929

  20. Dissolving mechanism of strain P17 on insoluble phosphorus of yellow-brown soil.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chuan-qing; Cao, Guang-xiang; Huang, Wei-yi; Luan, Xing-she; Yang, Yi-fei

    2014-01-01

    Strain P17 was a bacterial strain identified as Bacillus megaterium isolated from ground accumulating phosphate rock powder. The fermentation broth of strain P17 and the yellow-brown soil from Nanjing Agricultural University garden were collected to conduct this study. The simulation of fixed insoluble phosphorous forms after applying calcium superphosphate into yellow-brown soil was performed in pots, while available P and total P of soil were extremely positive correlative with those of groundwater. Then the dissolving effect of strain P17 on insoluble P of yellow-brown soil was studied. Results showed that Bacillus megaterium strain P17 had notable solubilizing effect on insoluble phosphates formed when too much water-soluble phosphorous fertilizer used. During 100 days after inoculation, strain P17 was dominant. Until the 120th day, compared with water addition, available P of strain P17 inoculation treated soil increased by 3 times with calcium superphosphate addition. Besides available P, pH, activity of acid and alkaline phosphatase and population of P-solubilizing microbes were detected respectively. P-solubilizing mechanism of P-solubilizing bacteria strain P17 seems to be a synergetic effect of pH decrease, organic acids, phosphatase, etc.

  1. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies.

  2. Azomethine H colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.R.; Erdmann, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    An automated colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water is described. The boron is complexed with azomethine H, which is readily available as the condensation product of H acid (8-amino-1-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid) and salicylaldehyde. The absorbance of the yellow complex formed is then measured colorimetrically at 410 nm. Interference effects from other dissolved species are minimized by the addition of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA); however, iron, zinc, and bicarbonate interfere at concentrations above 400 ??g/L, 2000 ??g/L, and 200 mg/L, respectively. The bicarbonate interference can be eliminated by careful acidification of the sample with concentrated HCl to a pH between 5 and 6. Thirty samples per hour can be routinely analyzed over the range of from 10 to 400 ??g/L, boron.

  3. Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

    2007-06-25

    Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated

  4. Determination of dissolved aluminum in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A technique has been modified for determination of a wide range of concentrations of dissolved aluminum (Al) in water and has been tested. In this technique, aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline at pH 8.3 to minimize interferences, then extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The extract is analyzed colorimetrically at 395 nm. This technique is used to analyze two forms of monomeric Al, nonlabile (organic complexes) and labile (free, Al, Al sulfate, fluoride and hydroxide complexes). A detection limit 2 ug/L is possible with 25-ml samples and 10-ml extracts. The detection limit can be decreased by increasing the volume of the sample and (or) decreasing the volume of the methyl isobutyl ketone extract. The analytical uncertainty of this method is approximately + or - 5 percent. The standard addition technique provides a recovery test for this technique and ensures precision in samples of low Al concentrations. The average percentage recovery of the added Al plus the amount originally present was 99 percent. Data obtained from analyses of filtered standard solutions indicated that Al is adsorbed on various types of filters. However, the relationship between Al concentrations and adsorption remains linear. A test on standard solutions also indicated that Al is not adsorbed on nitric acid-washed polyethylene and polypropylene bottle wells. (USGS)

  5. Fluvial dissolved inorganic C dynamics in the Western Amazonian basin: where does this carbon come from?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, S.; Vihermaa, L. E.; Newton, J.; Krusche, A.; Salimon, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Amazon river and tributaries constitute globally a significant freshwater body and thus a source of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Aquatic carbon dioxide may originate from biological or physicochemical reprocessing of allochthonous dissolved, particulate or inorganic C (ecosystem-derived C, EDC) or it may derive from groundwater inputs of dissolved inorganic C through lithological weathering by soil-derived organic acids or by the dissolution of atmospheric carbon dioxide (minerogenic-derived C, MDC). In addition to quantifying and scaling catchment source import and export terms, accurate budgeting requires additional source differentiation. The significance of MDC is not usually considered by those assessing carbon dioxide efflux, yet differentiating MDC from EDC is crucial. For example, MDC should be less directly affected than EDC by future climatic change, becoming proportionally more important to fluvial carbon dioxide efflux in drought episodes. We are measuring the stable carbon isotopic ratio of dissolved inorganic C to determine the relative importance of MDC and EDC to total C loads in the Tambopata basin in Western Peru. This is an area little studied for C cycling, but important as the soils here are more nutrient rich than the remainder of the Amazon basin which is more studied. Our field station is in the Tambopata national park and since 2010 we have sampled four different river systems which vary in size and drainage characteristics: the Tambopata, (CA ~14,000 km sq.; ~30% of its in the Andes Mountains); La Torre (~2000 km sq.), New Colpita and Main Trail (both < 2 km sq. forest drainage but Main Trail only active in the wet season). Additionally the pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, water temperature and stage height have been monitored in these drainage systems where possible by logging at 15 minute intervals. Our data shows that there are statistically significant differences in carbon isotopic composition (ranging from -14 to -29 ‰) and

  6. Impact of solids retention time on dissolved organic nitrogen and its biodegradability in treated wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and its biodegradability in treated wastewater have recently gained attention because DON potentially causes oxygen depletion and/or eutrophication in receiving waters. Laboratory scale chemostat experiments were conducted at 9 different solids retention times (SRTs)...

  7. Recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Hansell, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exhibits a spectrum of reactivity, from very fast turnover of the most bioavailable forms in the surface ocean to long-lived materials circulating within the ocean abyss. These disparate reactivities group DOC by fractions with distinctive functions in the cycling of carbon, ranging from support of the microbial loop to involvement in the biological pump to a hypothesized major source/sink of atmospheric CO(2) driving paleoclimate variability. Here, the major fractions constituting the global ocean's recalcitrant DOC pool are quantitatively and qualitatively characterized with reference to their roles in carbon biogeochemistry. A nomenclature for the fractions is proposed based on those roles.

  8. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  9. The toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles to Lemna minor (L.) is predominantly caused by dissolved Zn.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; O'Halloran, John; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2016-05-01

    Nano-ZnO particles have been reported to be toxic to many aquatic organisms, although it is debated whether this is caused by nanoparticles per sé, or rather dissolved Zn. This study investigated the role of dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity to Lemna minor. The technical approach was based on modulating nano-ZnO dissolution by either modifying the pH of the growth medium and/or surface coating of nano-ZnO, and measuring resulting impacts on L. minor growth and physiology. Results show rapid and total dissolution of nano-ZnO in the medium (pH 4.5). Quantitatively similar toxic effects were found when L. minor was exposed to nano-ZnO or the "dissolved Zn equivalent of dissolved nano-ZnO". The conclusion that nano-ZnO toxicity is primarily caused by dissolved Zn was further supported by the observation that phytotoxicity was absent on medium with higher pH-values (>7), where dissolution of nano-ZnO almost ceased. Similarly, the reduced toxicity of coated nano-ZnO, which displays a slower Zn dissolution, is also consistent with a major role for dissolved Zn in nano-ZnO toxicity.

  10. Contaminant removal and hydraulic conductivity of laboratory rain garden systems for stormwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Good, J F; O'Sullivan, A D; Wicke, D; Cochrane, T A

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of substrate composition on stormwater treatment and hydraulic effectiveness, mesocosm-scale (180 L, 0.17 m(2)) laboratory rain gardens were established. Saturated (constant head) hydraulic conductivity was determined before and after contaminant (Cu, Zn, Pb and nutrients) removal experiments on three rain garden systems with various proportions of organic topsoil. The system with only topsoil had the lowest saturated hydraulic conductivity (160-164 mm/h) and poorest metal removal efficiency (Cu ≤ 69.0% and Zn ≤ 71.4%). Systems with sand and a sand-topsoil mix demonstrated good metal removal (Cu up to 83.3%, Zn up to 94.5%, Pb up to 97.3%) with adequate hydraulic conductivity (sand: 800-805 mm/h, sand-topsoil: 290-302 mm/h). Total metal amounts in the effluent were <50% of influent amounts for all experiments, with the exception of Cu removal in the topsoil-only system, which was negligible due to high dissolved fraction. Metal removal was greater when effluent pH was elevated (up to 7.38) provided by the calcareous sand in two of the systems, whereas the topsoil-only system lacked an alkaline source. Organic topsoil, a typical component in rain garden systems, influenced pH, resulting in poorer treatment due to higher dissolved metal fractions.

  11. Erosion Patterns on Dissolving Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Polizzi, Stefano; Berhanu, Michael; Derr, Julien; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    The shaping of landscapes results from water or wind erosional processes. Here we focus on dissolution processes. We perform laboratory experiments on hard caramel bodies, which dissolve on a short timescale, compared to geological material such as limestone. We highlight the spontaneous appearance of a dissolution pattern with no external flow. When a tilted hard caramel block dissolves, the syrup (denser than water) sinks in the bath and induces a flow, which results in a pattern on the bottom of the block. First parallel stripes appear, which evolve to transversal scallops in about one hour. The whole pattern moves upstream at a slow velocity. The stripes appearance is due to a buoyancy-driven instability. By varying the density and the viscosity of the bath, we show that the initial wavelengths of the pattern are in agreement with those given by the solutal Rayleigh-Benard number. Later pattern evolution to scallops results from complex interactions between the flow and the topography. Finally we emphasize that similar mechanism of patterns formation can occur in the dissolution of minerals like salt, but also in the shaping of the bottom face of melting icebergs in the cold seas.

  12. Bench-scale evaluation of ferrous iron oxidation kinetics in drinking water: effect of corrosion control and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion control strategies are important for many utilities in maintaining water quality from the water treatment plant to the customers' tap. In drinking water with low alkalinity, water quality can become significantly degraded in iron-based pipes if water utilities are not diligent in maintaining proper corrosion control. This article reports on experiments conducted in bicarbonate buffered (5 mg-C/L) synthetic water to determine the effects of corrosion control (pH and phosphate) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate constants of the Fe(II) oxidation process. A factorial design approach elucidated that pH (P = 0.007, contribution: 42.5%) and phosphate (P = 0.025, contribution: 22.7%) were the statistically significant factors in the Fe(II) oxidation process at a 95% confidence level. The comprehensive study revealed a significant dependency relationship between the Fe(II) oxidation rate constants (k) and phosphate-to- Fe(II) mole ratio. At pH 6.5, the optimum mole ratio was found to be 0.3 to reduce the k values. Conversely, the k values were observed to increase for the phosphate-to- Fe(II) mole ratio > 1. The factorial design approach revealed that chlorine and DOM for the designated dosages did not cause a statistically significant (α = 0.05, P > 0.05)change in rate constants. However, an increment of the chlorine to ferrous iron mole ratio by a factor of ∼ 2.5 resulted in an increase k values by a factor of ∼ 10. This study conclusively demonstrated that the lowest Fe(II) oxidation rate constant was obtained under low pH conditions (pH ≤ 6.5), with chlorine doses less than 2.2 mg/L and with a phosphate-to-Fe(II) mole ratio ≈ 0.3 in the iron water systems.

  13. Size and Chemical Affinity Fractionated Dissolved Cadmium, Copper and Nickel in Gulf of Mexico Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Warnken, K. W.; Santschi, P. H.

    2008-12-01

    Dissolved trace metals Cd, Cu, and Ni in the surface waters of Gulf of Mexico exhibit distinct chemical reactivity and physical size distributions when using cross-flow ultrafiltration and ion exchange methods during a field survey conducted in May 2006. Variations of total dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters were found across the salinity gradient, which ranged as follows; Cd: 87-187 pM; Cu: 1.4-18.3nM; and Ni: 2.6-18.8nM. Dissolved Cd was predominantly present as a truly dissolved (97%) and cationic-labile fraction (94%) in the surface waters. The anionic-organic metal fractions accounted for just 3±1 % on average for Cd, 24% for Cu, and 9% for Ni. The dissolved inert metal fractions, on average, were 31% of total dissolved Cu and 29% of total dissolved Ni concentrations. Small but noticeable amounts (6%) of dissolved inert Cd fractions were also present. Some fractions of the total dissolved Cu (17%) and Ni (8%) could be adsorbed by both cation and anion exchange resins, suggesting binding to zwitterionic molecules. Despite evidence that partitioning among chemically and physically defined species is dynamic, mixing between freshwater and seawater end-members across the Mississippi River plume produced linear mixing curves, while trace metal concentrations determined within warm core and cold core rings in the Gulf of Mexico maintained significantly different concentrations and species distributions.

  14. Method of dissolving metal oxides with di- or polyphosphonic acid and a redundant

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1996-01-01

    A method of dissolving metal oxides using a mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  15. Ocean warming-acidification synergism undermines dissolved organic matter assembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Anaya, Jesse M; Chen, Eric Y-T; Farr, Erik; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors--warming and acidification--threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C) is sufficient to slow--even hinder--the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2), and disperse existing gels (35°C). We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming-acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected.

  16. Ocean Warming–Acidification Synergism Undermines Dissolved Organic Matter Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Anaya, Jesse M.; Chen, Eric Y-T; Farr, Erik; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors—warming and acidification—threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C) is sufficient to slow— even hinder—the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2), and disperse existing gels (35°C). We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming–acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected. PMID:25714090

  17. Seasonality of Diel Cycles of Dissolved Trace-Metal Concentrations in a Rocky Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimick, D. A.; Cleasby, T. E.; McCleskey, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Substantial diel (24-hour) cycles in dissolved (0.1-μ m filtration) metal concentrations were observed during summer low flow, winter low flow, and snowmelt runoff in Prickly Pear Creek in southwestern Montana. The stream was alkaline (pH of 7.65-9.06), and dissolved metal concentrations were relatively low (1.8-7.1 μ g/L for As, 18-57 μ g/L for Mn, and 12-123 μ g/L for Zn). The metals are derived from abandoned mine lands in the stream's headwaters; As also is derived from geothermal sources. During seven diel sampling episodes, each lasting 34-61.5 hours, concentrations of dissolved Mn and Zn increased from minimum values in the afternoon to maximum values shortly after sunrise. The timing of diel cycles of dissolved As concentrations exhibited the inverse pattern. The magnitude of concentration increases during individual 24-hour periods ranged from 17-152% for Mn and 70-500% for Zn, and correlated positively with the magnitude of diel increases of pH and temperature, indicating that geochemical processes involving reactive inorganic and organic surfaces on and in the streambed probably control these diel metal cycles. Diel increases of As concentrations (17-55%) were proportionally smaller and less variable among the seasonal sampling episodes than for Mn and Zn, and they correlated poorly with diel increases of pH and temperature. Streamflow among the seven sampling episodes ranged from 0.35-3.3 m3/s. The timing of minimum and maximum values of diel streamflow cycles was inconsistent among sampling episodes and had little relation to the timing of metal concentration cycles, indicating that hydrological processes are not a primary control of diel metal cycles. Diel cycles of dissolved metal concentrations may occur at any time of year and during various hydrologic conditions in all streams with dissolved metals and neutral to alkaline pH.

  18. The pH of Enceladus' ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, Christopher R.; Baross, John A.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2015-08-01

    Saturn's moon, Enceladus, is a geologically active waterworld. The prevailing paradigm is that there is a subsurface ocean that erupts to the surface, which leads to the formation of a plume of vapor and ice above the south polar region. The chemistry of the ocean is just beginning to be understood, but is of profound geochemical and astrobiological interest. Here, we determine the pH of the ocean using a thermodynamic model of carbonate speciation. Observational data from the Cassini spacecraft are used to make a chemical model of ocean water on Enceladus. The model suggests that Enceladus' ocean is a Na-Cl-CO3 solution with an alkaline pH of ∼11-12. The dominance of aqueous NaCl is a feature that Enceladus' ocean shares with terrestrial seawater, but the ubiquity of dissolved Na2CO3 suggests that soda lakes are more analogous to the Enceladus ocean. The high pH implies that the hydroxide ion should be relatively abundant, while divalent metals should be present at low concentrations owing to buffering by carbonates and phyllosilicates on the ocean floor. Carboxyl groups in dissolved organic species would be negatively charged, while amino groups would exist predominately in the neutral form. Knowledge of the pH improves our understanding of geochemical processes in Enceladus' ocean. The high pH is interpreted to be a key consequence of serpentinization of chondritic rock, as predicted by prior geochemical reaction path models; although degassing of CO2 from the ocean may also play a role depending on the efficiency of mixing processes in the ocean. Serpentinization leads to the generation of H2, a geochemical fuel that can support both abiotic and biological synthesis of organic molecules such as those that have been detected in Enceladus' plume. Serpentinization and H2 generation should have occurred on Enceladus, like on the parent bodies of aqueously altered meteorites; but it is unknown whether these critical processes are still taking place, or if

  19. Dissolved platinum in rainwater, river water and seawater around Tokyo Bay and Otsuchi Bay in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashio, Asami Suzuki; Obata, Hajime; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tsutsumi, Makoto; Ferrer i Santos, Antoni; Gamo, Toshitaka

    2016-10-01

    Platinum, among the rarest elements in the earth's crust, is now widely used in various products such as catalytic converters in automobiles and anticancer drugs. Consequently, the concentration of Pt in urban aquatic environments might be increasing. However, little is known about the distributions and geochemical cycles of Pt in aquatic environments because its overall concentration remains low. In this study, we examined dissolved Pt in river water and seawater around Tokyo Bay and Otsuchi Bay (Iwate Prefecture, Japan) and rainwater in the Tokyo area. To determine sub-picomolar levels of dissolved Pt, we used isotope-dilution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after column preconcentration with an anion exchange resin. We observed seasonal variation in the dissolved Pt concentrations in Tokyo rainwater in 2002; higher concentrations were found from January to March, which might be related to the pH of rainwaters. At the source of the Arakawa River in the greater Tokyo area, the dissolved Pt concentration was found to be similar to that in rainwater. Further downstream, the dissolved Pt concentration increased sharply, which seemingly reflects the anthropogenic input of Pt into the river. In a rural area in Japan (Otsuchi Bay), the dissolved Pt concentrations were lower than in Tokyo Bay. In this area, a sharp increase in dissolved Pt concentrations was observed in a high salinity region. Contrasting Pt distribution patterns between urban and rural areas indicate that strong anthropogenic Pt sources exist in urban estuaries and that geochemical processes within estuaries affect the Pt distribution.

  20. METHOD OF DISSOLVING REFRACTORY ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Helton, D.M.; Savolainen, J.K.

    1963-04-23

    This patent relates to the dissolution of alloys of uranium with zirconium, thorium, molybdenum, or niobium. The alloy is contacted with an anhydrous solution of mercuric chloride in a low-molecular-weight monohydric alcohol to produce a mercury-containing alcohol slurry. The slurry is then converted to an aqueous system by adding water and driving off the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry is electrolyzed in the presence of a mercury cathode to remove the mercury and produce a uranium-bearing aqueous solution. This process is useful for dissolving irradiated nuclear reactor fuels for radiochemical reprocessing by solvent extraction. In addition, zirconium-alloy cladding is selectively removed from uranium dioxide fuel compacts by this means. (AEC)

  1. Fast dissolving paracetamol/caffeine nanofibers prepared by electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Illangakoon, U Eranka; Gill, Hardyal; Shearman, Gemma C; Parhizkar, Maryam; Mahalingam, Sunthar; Chatterton, Nicholas P; Williams, Gareth R

    2014-12-30

    A series of polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers loaded with paracetamol (PCM) and caffeine (CAF) was fabricated by electrospinning and explored as potential oral fast-dissolving films. The fibers take the form of uniform cylinders with smooth surfaces, and contain the drugs in the amorphous form. Drug-polymer intermolecular interactions were evidenced by infrared spectroscopy and molecular modeling. The properties of the fiber mats were found to be highly appropriate for the preparation of oral fast dissolving films: their thickness is around 120-130 μm, and the pH after dissolution in deionized water lies in the range of 6.7-7.2. Except at the highest drug loading, the folding endurance of the fibers was found to be >20 times. A flavoring agent can easily be incorporated into the formulation. The fiber mats are all seen to disintegrate completely within 0.5s when added to simulated saliva solution. They release their drug cargo within around 150s in a dissolution test, and to undergo much more rapid dissolution than is seen for the pure drugs. The data reported herein clearly demonstrate that electrospun PCM/CAF fibers comprise excellent candidates for oral fast-dissolving films, which could be particularly useful for children and patients with swallowing difficulties.

  2. [Effects of particle-sizes, pH and organic matter on adsorption and desorption of mercury to sediments in the Songhua River].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Yan, Bai-Xing; Zhang, Feng-Song; Lu, Yong-Zheng; Wang, Li-Xia

    2010-10-01

    The present study aims to further reveal the environmental behavior of mercury on sediments surface. Effects of particle-sizes, pH and concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on mercury adsorption and desorption to the surface of sediments in the Songhua River were investigated by simulation experiments. A distinct variety of absorption ability among sediments with different particle-sizes was observed. Under this experimental condition, the absorption ability increased inversely with particle-size of sediments. In all absorption systems, mercury adsorption was enhanced when pH increased from 3.5 to 4.5, while mercury adsorption was inhibited significantly with the increasing of pH when pH values were above 4.5. With the increasing of pH values, the desorption of mercury presented a decreasing-increasing trend, the minimum desorption occurred at pH 5. Citric acid inhibited the mercury adsorption, and the intensity was correlated with mercury concentrations. Effects of citric acid on desorption of mercury were also apparently. With the increasing of citric acid concentrations, its effect on desorption presented a trend as enhanced-inhibited-steadied. Therefore, the above factors affected the mercury adsorption and desorption obviously, and it was necessary to take these factors into consideration in conducting the rivers' mercury control and dealing with a sudden pollution incident.

  3. PhD Students' Work Conditions and Study Environment in University- and Industry-Based PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolmos, A.; Kofoed, L. B.; Du, X. Y.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 10 years, new models of funding and training PhD students have been established in Denmark in order to integrate industry into the entire PhD education. Several programmes have been conducted where it is possible to co-finance PhD scholarships or to become an employee as an industrial PhD in a company. An important question is what…

  4. Fractionation of residual Al in natural water treatment from reservoir with poly-aluminum-silicate-chloride (PASiC): effect of OH/Al, Si/Al molar ratios and initial pH.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhonglian; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Yaqin; Yue, Qinyan

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum fractionation study was conducted for a surface reservoir water treatment to understand the performance of poly-aluminum-silicate-chloride (PASiC) in terms of the residual Al fractions as a function of initial pH. The coagulation performance expressed as turbidity and organic matter removal was established as supporting data. Some extra data were evaluated in terms of the residual Al ratio of the composite PASiC coagulant. The main residual Al sources were the Al fractions derived from the use of PASiC. The turbidity and organic matter removal ability was optimal at initial pH 6.00-7.00, while the concentrations of various residual Al species and the residual Al ratio of PASiC were minimal at an initial pH range of 7.00-8.00. Under the conditions of OH/Al molar ratio = 2.00 and Si/Al molar ratio = 0.05, PASiC had superior coagulation performance and comparatively low residual Al concentrations. The Al fraction in the composite PASiC coagulant seldom remained under such conditions. Experimental data also indicated that the suspended (filterable) Al fraction was the dominant species, and organic-bound or organo-Al complex Al was considered to be the major species of dissolved Al in water treated by PASiC coagulation. Additionally, the dissolved inorganic monomeric Al species dominated the dissolved monomeric Al fraction.

  5. Seasonal changes of rock magnetic parameters and dissolved iron in the Hiroshima Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, N.; Amano, Y.; Ishikawa, N.

    2013-12-01

    Frequent outbreaks of red tide caused by dinoflagellate blooms have been reported since 1970 in the Hiroshima bay. Iron is an essential element for dinoflagellates, and is supplied as bivalent or trivalent ions and iron compounds from lands to sea. For damage predictions of red tide, it is important to research the distribution of iron in the bay. In order to investigate the distribution and mode of iron in sediments, suspended solids (SS), and bottom water in the Hiroshima Bay, rock magnetic and geochemical analyses are performed. Sediments of 5 cm in depth and overlying bottom water were taken at three sites in the bay every month. The sediment samples were composed of clayey silt. We measured dissolved iron concentration in bottom waters filtered above 0.45 um grains. The contents of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in the sediments are measured. The rock magnetic measurements (magnetic susceptibility, NRM, ARM, IRM, HIRM, S-0.3T, magnetic hysteresis, and high temperature magnetometry) of the sediments and SS are conducted. Concentration dependent rock magnetic parameters of the sediments and SS show relatively high values during spring at the near estuary site. It indicates that relatively larger amount of terrigenous materials are supplied in this season. Magnetic grain size decreases during summer, while iron concentration increases in the bottom waters. Data of oceanographic observations at these sites showed that the temperature of the bottom water increased, whereas DO and pH values decreased during summer. The presence of magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (Fe2O3) were recognized in all analyzed samples, whereas greigite (Fe3S4) appeared during summer. The contents of sulfur in the sediments also increase in this period. It is implied that magnetite and hematite were dissolved, and greigite was formed associated with the proceeding of the anoxic condition during summer. It is suggested that irons moves between sediments and bottom water corresponding to seasonal

  6. Application of dissolvable layered double hydroxides as sorbent in dispersive solid-phase extraction and extraction by co-precipitation for the determination of aromatic acid anions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Lee, Hian Kee

    2013-08-06

    Three types of magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides were synthesized and employed as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents to extract several aromatic acids (protocatechuic acid, mandelic acid, phthalic acid, benzoic acid, and salicylic acid) from aqueous samples. An interesting feature of these sorbents is that they dissolve when the pH of the solution is lower than 4. Thus, the analyte elution step, as needed in conventional sorbent-based extraction, was obviated by dissolving the sorbent in acid after extraction and separation from the sample solution. The extract was then directly injected into a high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection system for analysis. In the key adsorption process, both dispersive SPE and co-precipitation extraction with the sorbents were conducted and experimental parameters such as pH, temperature, and extraction time were optimized. The results showed that both extraction methods provided low limits of detection (0.03-1.47 μg/L) and good linearity (r(2) > 0.9903). The optimized extraction conditions were applied to human urine and sports drink samples. This new and interesting extraction approach was demonstrated to be a fast and efficient procedure for the extraction of organic anions from aqueous samples.

  7. Quantification and characterization of dissolved organic nitrogen in wastewater effluents by electrodialysis treatment followed by size-exclusion chromatography with nitrogen detection.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kangmin; Lee, Yunho; Traber, Jacqueline; von Gunten, Urs

    2013-09-15

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) can act as a precursor of nitrogenous disinfection byproducts during oxidative water treatment. Quantification and characterization of DON are still challenging for waters with high concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, including ammonia, nitrate and nitrite) relative to total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) due to the cumulative analytical errors of independently measured nitrogen species (i.e., DON = TDN - NO2(-) - NO3(-) - NH4(+)/NH3) and interference of DIN species to TDN quantification. In this study, a novel electrodialysis (ED)-based treatment for selective DIN removal was developed and optimized with respect to type of ion-exchange membrane, sample pH, and ED duration. The optimized ED method was then coupled with size-exclusion chromatography with organic carbon, UV, and nitrogen detection (SEC-OCD-ND) for advanced DON analysis in wastewater effluents. Among the tested ion-exchange membranes, the PC-AR anion- and CMT cation-exchange membranes showed the lowest DOC loss (1-7%) during ED treatment of a wastewater effluent at ambient pH (8.0). A good correlation was found between the decrease of the DIN/TDN ratio and conductivity. Therefore, conductivity has been adopted as a convenient way to determine the optimal duration of the ED treatment. In the pH range of 7.0-8.3, ED treatment of various wastewater effluents with the PC-AR/CMT membranes showed that the relative residual conductivity could be reduced to less than 0.50 (DIN removal >90%; DIN/TDN ratio ≤ 0.60) with lower DOC losses (6%) than the previous dialysis and nanofiltration methods (DOC loss >10%). In addition, the ED method is shorter (0.5 h) than the previous methods (>1-24 h). The relative residual conductivity was further reduced to ≈ 0.20 (DIN removal >95%; DIN/TDN ratio ≤ 0.35) by increasing the ED duration to 0.7 h (DOC loss = 8%) for analysis by SEC-OCD-ND, which provided new information on distribution and ratio of organic carbon and

  8. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  9. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  10. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  11. Nitrate and dissolved nitrous oxide in groundwater within cropped fields and riparian buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-G.; Isenhart, T. M.; Parkin, T. B.; Schultz, R. C.; Loynachan, T. E.

    2009-01-01

    Transport and fate of dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) in groundwater and its significance to nitrogen dynamics within agro-ecosystems are poorly known in spite of significant potential of N2O to global warming and ozone depletion. Increasing denitrification in riparian buffers may trade a reduction in nitrate (NO3-) transport to surface waters for increased N2O emissions resulting from denitrification-produced N2O dissolved in groundwater being emitted into the air when groundwater flows into a stream or a river. This study quantifies the transport and fate of NO3- and dissolved N2O moving from crop fields through riparian buffers, assesses whether groundwater exported from crop fields and riparian buffers is a significant source of dissolved N2O emissions, and evaluates the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology to estimate dissolved N2O emission. We measured concentrations of NO3-; chloride (Cl-); pH; dissolved N2O, dissolved oxygen (DO), and organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater under a multi-species riparian buffer, a cool-season grass filter, and adjacent crop fields located in the Bear Creek watershed in central Iowa, USA. In both the multi-species riparian buffer and the cool-season grass filter, concentrations of dissolved N2O in the groundwater did not change as it passed through the sites, even when the concentrations of groundwater NO3- were decreased by 50% and 59%, respectively, over the same periods. The fraction of N lost to leaching and runoff (0.05) and the modified N2O emission factor, [ratio of dissolved N2O flux to N input (0.00002)] determined for the cropped fields indicate that the current IPCC methodology overestimates dissolved N2O flux in the sites. A low ratio between dissolved N2O flux and soil N2O emission (0.0003) was estimated in the cropped fields. These results suggest that the riparian buffers established adjacent to crop fields for water quality functions (enhanced denitrification) decreased NO3- and were not a

  12. Investigating Students' Understanding of the Dissolving Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified several student misconceptions regarding the process of dissolving ionic compounds in water. The present study used multiple-choice questions whose distractors were derived from these misconceptions to assess students' understanding of the dissolving process at the symbolic and particulate levels. The…

  13. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  14. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  15. Speciation of dissolved copper within an active hydrothermal edifice on the Lucky Strike vent field (MAR, 37 degrees N).

    PubMed

    Sarradin, Pierre-Marie; Waeles, Matthieu; Bernagout, Solène; Le Gall, Christian; Sarrazin, Jozée; Riso, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of different fractions of dissolved copper (after filtration at 0.45 microm) along the cold part of the hydrothermal fluid-seawater mixing zone on the Tour Eiffel edifice (MAR). Dissolved copper was analyzed by stripping chronopotentiometry (SCP) after chromatographic C(18) extraction. Levels of total dissolved copper (0.03 to 5.15 microM) are much higher than those reported for deep-sea oceanic waters but in accordance with data previously obtained in this area. Speciation measurements show that the hydrophobic organic fraction (C(18)Cu) is very low (2+/-1%). Dissolved copper is present mainly as inorganic and hydrophilic organic complexes (nonC(18)Cu). The distribution of copper along the pH gradient shows the same pattern for each fraction. Copper concentrations increase from pH 5.6 to 6.5 and then remain relatively constant at pH>6.5. Concentrations of oxygen and total sulphides demonstrate that the copper anomaly corresponds to the transition between suboxic and oxic waters. The increase of dissolved copper should correspond to the oxidative redissolution of copper sulphide particles formed in the vicinity of the fluid exit. The presence of such a secondary dissolved copper source, associated with the accumulation of metal sulphide particles, could play a significant role in the distribution of fauna in the different habitats available at vents.

  16. Variation of ocean pH in the Indonesia waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Mutiara Rachmat; Setiawan, Agus; Safitri, Mediana

    2015-09-01

    The variation of ocean acidity (pH) in the Indonesia waters is strongly influenced by monsoon. Since the climate change tends to potentially change monsoonal variation over the Indonesian region, it will give also implication to the ocean pH variation. Moreover, changes of ocean pH will give effects to the marine lifes and their environment. In order to investigate this issue, we tried to calculate monthly variation of sea surface pH in the Indonesia waters based on monthly average temperature and salinity over past 18 years data. Temperature and salinity data used in this study were taken from the hydrodynamic model of Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM), while alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were from World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA 2009). Algorithm from Ocean Carbon Model Intercomparison Project-version.3 (OCMIP-3) was used to calculate the pH. The estimation results indicate that pH variation in the Indonesia waters changes insignificantly over 18 years. El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) contribute to physical changes of seawater, but did not affect the pH significantly. The average pH of seawater is higher during northwest monsoon than during southeast monsoon.

  17. [Impact of Rocky Desertification Treatment on Underground Water Chemistry and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Isotope in Karst Areas].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi-zhen; Xiong, Kang-ning; Lan, Jia-cheng; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Long

    2015-05-01

    Five springs representing different land-use types and different karst rocky desertification treatment models were chosen at the Huajiang Karst Rocky Desertification Treatment Demonstration Site in Guanling-Zhenfeng Counties in Guizhou, to analyze the features of underground water chemistry and dissolved inorganic carbon isotopes (δ13C(DIC)) and reveal the effect of rocky desertification treatment on karstification and water quality. It was found that, the underground water type of the research area was HCO3-Ca; the water quality of the springs which were relatively less affected by human activities including Shuijingwan Spring (SJW) , Gebei Spring (GB), and Maojiawan Spring (MJW) was better than those relatively more affected by human activities including Diaojing Spring (DJ) and Tanjiazhai Spring (TJZ) , the main ion concentrations and electrical conductivity of which were higher; pH, SIc and pCO2 were sensitive to land-use types and rocky desertification treatment, which could be shown by the higher pH and SIc and lower pCO2 in MJW than those in the other four springs; (Ca(2+) + Mg2+)/HCO(3-) of SJW, MJW and GB were nearly 1:1, dominated by carbonate rock weathering by carbon acid, while the (Ca(2+) + Mg2+) of DJ and TJZ was much higher than HCO3-, suggesting that sulfate and nitrate might also dissolve carbonate rock because of the agricultural activities; δ13C(DIC) was lighter in wet season because of the higher biological activities; the average δ13C(DIC) was in the order of DJ (-12.79 per thousand) < SJW (-12.48 per thousand) < GB (-10.76 per thousand)) < MJW (-10.30 per thousand) < TJZ (-6.70 per thousand), which demonstrated that δ13C(DIC) would be heavier after rocky desertification and lighter after the rocky desertification are treated and controlled.

  18. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  19. Dynamics and Biodegradability of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in a Severely Polluted River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisover, Mikhail; Laor, Yael; Saadi, Ibrahim; Lado, Marcos; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda

    2010-05-01

    The 70-kilometer long Kishon River is one of Israel's largest rivers. Its annual discharge may vary substantially, e.g. between 47 and 10 million m3. The lower section of the river has been severely polluted for dozens of years, by industrial effluents containing heavy metals, radionuclides, nutrients, and diverse organic contaminants. The total volume of effluents discharged from the plants into the river stream may contribute as much as 30% of the total water volume. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and specifically its chromophoric components (CDOM) including humic-like and proteinous substances may form water-soluble complexes with multiple organic and inorganic pollutants and, thus, enhance their release from the sediments and their mobility. The volatility of pollutants, their bioavailability, toxicity and potential to undergo bio-, abiotic and photodegradation may be affected by interactions with CDOM. Therefore, the dynamics of CDOM is important for understanding the fate of pollutants in aquatic environments. In this study, we intended (i) to characterize the seasonal and spatial variability of CDOM at the most contaminated lower section of the Kishon River and (ii) to assess the impact of biodegradation, dilution by seawater and contribution of discharged effluents on the overall dynamics of DOM and CDOM. For this purpose, water was sampled during 11 months at 8 locations distributed along Lower Kishon River. Samples were characterized for concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV- absorbance at 254 nm, electrical-conductivity, pH, concentration of dissolved oxygen and excitation emission matrices (EEM) of fluorescence. Parallel factor analysis of EEM enabled quantifying two major groups of riverine fluorescent CDOM: humic-like substances and components spectrally similar to those associated with phytoplankton productivity. CDOM (including fluorescent matter and components absorbing light at 254 nm) was found resistant to biodegradation by

  20. Use of a Ferrous Sulfate - Sodium Dithionite Blend to Treat a Dissolved Phase Cr(VI) Plume

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of a combination of sodium dithionite and ferrous sulfate in creating an in situ redox zone for treatment of a dissolved phase Cr(VI) plume at a former industrial site. The reductant blend was injected into the path of a dissolved ...

  1. [Porewater Dissolved Methane in Cyperus malaccensis Marshes Along Salinity Gradient in the Minjiang River Estuary].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Zhang, Zi-chuan; Du, Wei-ning; Huang, Jia-fang; Tong, Chuan

    2015-10-01

    Physicochemical properties of soil and dissolved methane concentrations of porewater in the sediments of the Cyperus malaccensis marshes along a salinity gradient in the Minjiang River estuary were evaluated, and the spatial-temporal characteristics and main impact factors were discussed. The average concentrations of dissolved methane in porewater were 331.18, 299.94 and 638.58 μmol x L(-1), respectively in the Shanyutan, Bianfuzhou and Xiayangzhou wetlands in summer. In the winter, they were 9.04, 266.67 and 322.68 μmol x L(-1), respectively. The dissolved methane concentration in porewater was higher in summer than those in winter (P < 0.05). Overall, the concentrations of dissolved methane in porewatdr showed an increasing trend from brackish to freshwater marshes. Multivariate statistics analysis showed that the concentrations of dissolved methane in porewater was positively correlated with soils temperature and DOC (P < 0.05), but negatively correlated with soils pH, salinity, and the concentrations of porewater SO4(2-) and Cl-. Spatial-temporal distribution of porewater dissolved methane in estuarine marshes represents a final result of multiple factors, including soil physicochemical properties and hydrodynamic condition.

  2. Effects of pH and stress intensity on crack growth rate in Alloy 600 in lithiated + borated water at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z.; McIlree, A.R.

    1992-12-31

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on Alloy 600. Constant load tests were conducted at 330 and 350{degrees}C in solutions containing dissolved hydrogen, boric acid (0 < B < 1200 ppm) and lithium hydroxide (0 < Li < 10 ppm). In the PWR working conditions range, that is, 6.9 < pH < 7.4 (or 0.5 ppm < Li < 3.5), there is little effect of the solution pH on the intergranular crack growth rate (IGSCC). However, there is a strong influence of the stress intensity on the IGSCC. K{sub ISCC} {approx} 5-10 MPa{radical}m. Dissolution plays an important role in the IGSCC process.

  3. Laboratory and marine study of photoluminescent sensors of oxygen dissolved in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. L.; Konovalov, B. V.; Mosharov, V. E.; Radchenko, V. N.; Khanaev, S. A.; Khlebnikov, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    The laboratory and marine study of photoluminescent sensors developed at the TsAGI has been conducted to create a highly sensitivity gauge of the oxygen dissolved in seawater. The advantages of the photoluminescent gauge over the electrochemical ones are the following: zero sensitivity to electromagnetic fields, the pH of the water, and the hydrogen sulphide and ions of heavy metals in the water; zero oxygen consumption; and no need for the water to be pumped through the device. A breadboard model of the photoluminescent gauge with LED excitation of the luminescence has been built. The laboratory tests of the model demonstrated the accuracy of the gauge to be as high as 0.05 ml/1 in air at a response time of 0.3 s for 63% relaxation. Comparative field tests of the breadboard model and the SBE 43 electrochemical oxygen gauge (Sea-Bird Electronics Corp.) have shown good agreement of the estimates of the oxygen content in the water and clarified the prospects of model’s performance improvement.

  4. Reactive solute transport in streams. 2. Simulation of a pH modification experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.; Chapra, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We present an application of an equilibrium-based solute transport model to a pH-modification experiment conducted on the Snake River, an acidic, metal-rich stream located in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. During the experiment, instream pH decreased from 4.2 to 3.2, causing a marked increase in dissolved iron concentrations. Model application requires specification of several parameters that are estimated using tracer techniques, mass balance calculations, and geochemical data. Two basic questions are addressed through model application: (1) What are the processes responsible for the observed increase in dissolved iron concentrations? (2) Can the identified processes be represented within the equilibrium-based transport model? Simulation results indicate that the increase in iron was due to the dissolution of hydrous iron oxides and the photoreduction of ferric iron. Dissolution from the streambed is represented by considering a trace compartment consisting of freshly precipitated hydrous iron oxide and an abundant compartment consisting of aged precipitates that are less soluble. Spatial variability in the solubility of hydrous iron oxide is attributed to heterogeneity in the streambed sediments, temperature effects, and/or variability in the effects of photoreduction. Solubility products estimated via simulation fall within a narrow range (pK(sp) from 40.2 to 40.8) relative to the 6 order of magnitude variation reported for laboratory experiments (pK(sp) from 37.3 to 43.3). Results also support the use of an equilibrium-based transport model as the predominate features of the iron and p H profiles are reproduced. The model provides a valuable tool for quantifying the nature and extent of pH- dependent processes within the context of hydrologic transport.

  5. Peak distortion in the column liquid chromatographic determination of omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, T; Collijn, E; Tivert, A M; Rosén, L

    1991-11-22

    Injection of a sample containing omeprazole dissolved in borax buffer (pH 9.2) into a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic system consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6) as the mobile phase and a C18 surface-modified silica as the solid phase resulted under special conditions in split peaks of omeprazole. The degree of peak split and the retention time of omeprazole varied with the concentration of borax in the sample solution and the ionic strength of the mobile phase buffer as well as with the column used. Borax is eluted from the column in a broad zone starting from the void volume of the column. The retention is probably due to the presence of polyborate ions. The size of the zone varies with the concentration of borax in the sample injected. In the borax zone the pH is increased compared with the pH of the mobile phase, and when omeprazole (a weak acid) is co-eluting in the borax zone its retention is affected. In the front part and in the back part of the borax zone, pH gradients are formed, and these gradients can induce the peak splitting. When the dissolving medium is changed to a phosphate buffer or an ammonium buffer at pH 9 no peak distortion of omeprazole is observed.

  6. Purging dissolved oxygen by nitrogen bubble aeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We apply aeration with nitrogen microbubbles to water in order to see whether oxygen gas originally dissolved in the water at one atmosphere is purged by the aeration. The concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) is detected by a commercial DO meter. To detect the dissolved nitrogen (DN) level, we observe the growth of millimetre-sized bubbles nucleated at glass surfaces in contact with the aerated water and compare it with the Epstein-Plesset theory that accounts for DO/DN diffusions and the presence of the glass surfaces. Comparisons between the experiment and the theory suggest that the DO in the water are effectively purged by the aeration.

  7. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  8. Tracing solid waste leachate in groundwater using δ13 C from dissolved inorganic carbon.

    PubMed

    Haarstad, Ketil; Mæhlum, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Tracers can be used to monitor emissions of leachate from landfills in order to detect hydrological pathways and to evaluate environmental pollution. We investigated the stable carbon isotope ratio (δ(13)C-Σ CO (2)) in dissolved inorganic carbon and tritium ((3)H) in water, in addition to the tracers of pollution commonly found in relatively high concentrations in leachate, such as chloride (Cl), organic matter (COD), nitrogen (total and NH(4)-N), iron (Fe), electrical conductivity (EC) and pH. The sampling was performed at seven landfills in the south-eastern part of Norway during a period of 5 years. The objective was to evaluate the potential for tracing leachate in the environment with emphasis on groundwater pollution. By measuring the δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) in leachates, groundwaters and surface waters, the influence of leachate can be identified. The value of δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) varied from-5.5 to 25.9 ‰ in leachate, from-25.4 to 14.7 ‰ in groundwater and from-19.7 to-13.1 ‰ in creeks. A comparison of the carbon isotope ratio with COD, EC and the concentrations of total and NH (4)-N, Cl and Fe showed that δ(13)C-Σ CO (2) is a good tracer for leachate due to higher sensitivity compared to other parameters. The mean concentrations of all the studied parameters were higher in the leachate samples; however, only the carbon isotope ratio showed significant differences between all the groups with strong and middle pollution and samples with low pollution, showing that it can be used as a convenient tracer for leachate in groundwater and surface water. The carbon isotope ratio showed strong correlation between nitrogen, EC and bicarbonate, but not with pH. Tritium was only sporadically found in measureable concentrations and is not considered as a suitable tracer at the sampled locations.

  9. Fast Dissolving Sublingual Films of Ondansetron Hydrochloride: Effect of Additives on in vitro Drug Release and Mucosal Permeation.

    PubMed

    Koland, M; Sandeep, Vp; Charyulu, Nr

    2010-07-01

    Ondansetron hydrochloride, a 5 HT3 antagonist is a powerful antiemetic drug which has oral bioavailability of 60% due to hepatic first pass metabolism and has a short half-life of 5 h. To overcome the above draw back, the present study was carried out to formulate and evaluate fast dissolving films of ondansetron hydrochloride for sublingual administration. The films were prepared from polymers such as polyvinylalcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, Carbopol 934P in different ratios by solvent casting method. Propylene glycol or PEG 400 as plasticizers and mannitol or sodium saccharin as sweeteners were also included. The IR spectral studies showed no interaction between drug and polymer or with other additives. Satisfactory results were obtained when subjected to physico-chemical tests such as uniformity of weight, thickness, surface pH, folding endurance, uniformity of drug content, swelling index, bioadhesive strength, and tensile strength. Films were also subjected to in vitro drug release studies by using USP dissolution apparatus. Ex vivo drug permeation studies were carried out using porcine membrane model. In vitro release studies indicated 81-96% release within 7 min and 66-80% within 7 min during ex vivo studies. Drug permeation of 66-77% was observed through porcine mucosa within 40 min. Higher percentage of drug release was observed from films containing the sweeteners. The stability studies conducted for a period of 8 weeks showed no appreciable change in drug content, surface pH, and in vitro drug release.

  10. Fast Dissolving Sublingual Films of Ondansetron Hydrochloride: Effect of Additives on in vitro Drug Release and Mucosal Permeation

    PubMed Central

    Koland, M; Sandeep, VP; Charyulu, NR

    2010-01-01

    Ondansetron hydrochloride, a 5 HT3 antagonist is a powerful antiemetic drug which has oral bioavailability of 60% due to hepatic first pass metabolism and has a short half-life of 5 h. To overcome the above draw back, the present study was carried out to formulate and evaluate fast dissolving films of ondansetron hydrochloride for sublingual administration. The films were prepared from polymers such as polyvinylalcohol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, Carbopol 934P in different ratios by solvent casting method. Propylene glycol or PEG 400 as plasticizers and mannitol or sodium saccharin as sweeteners were also included. The IR spectral studies showed no interaction between drug and polymer or with other additives. Satisfactory results were obtained when subjected to physico-chemical tests such as uniformity of weight, thickness, surface pH, folding endurance, uniformity of drug content, swelling index, bioadhesive strength, and tensile strength. Films were also subjected to in vitro drug release studies by using USP dissolution apparatus. Ex vivo drug permeation studies were carried out using porcine membrane model. In vitro release studies indicated 81–96% release within 7 min and 66–80% within 7 min during ex vivo studies. Drug permeation of 66–77% was observed through porcine mucosa within 40 min. Higher percentage of drug release was observed from films containing the sweeteners. The stability studies conducted for a period of 8 weeks showed no appreciable change in drug content, surface pH, and in vitro drug release. PMID:21042474

  11. COMMUNITY SCALE STREAM TAXA SENSITIVITIES TO DIFFERENT COMPOSITIONS OF EXCESS TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model stream chronic dosing studies (42 d) were conducted with three total dissolved solids (TDS) recipes. The recipes differed in composition of major ions. Community scale emergence was compared with single-species responses conducted simultaneously using the whole effluent tox...

  12. Effect of pH values on surface modification and solubility of phosphate bioglass-ceramics in the CaO-P 2O 5-Na 2O-SrO-ZnO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Cai, Shu; Zhang, Wenjuang; Xu, Guohua; Zhou, Wei

    2009-08-01

    The bioactive glass-ceramics in the CaO-P 2O 5-Na 2O-SrO-ZnO system were synthesized by the sol-gel technique, and then chemically treated at different pH values to study the solubility and surface modification. Samples sintered at 650 °C for 4 h consisted of the crystalline phase β-Ca 2P 2O 7 and the glass matrix. After soaking in the solution at pH 1.0, the residual glass matrix on the surface appeared entirely dissolved and no new phase could be detected. Whereas at pH 3.0, web-like layer exhibiting peaks corresponding to CaP 2O 6 was formed and covered the entire surface of the sample. When conducted at pH 10.0, only part of the glass matrix was dissolved and a new phase Ca 4P 6O 19 was precipitated, forming the petaline layer. The chemical treatment can easily change the surface morphologies and phase composition of this bioactive glass-ceramics. The higher level of surface roughness resulting from the new-formed layer would improve the interface bonding and benefit for cell adhesion.

  13. Dissolved Trace Metals in the Tay Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, R. E.; Balls, P. W.

    1997-04-01

    Dissolved trace metals have been studied over an annual cycle in the relatively pristine Tay estuary (Scotland). The absence of a major anthropogenic signal has enabled some of the more subtle natural processes controlling trace metal distributions to be identified. Concentration ranges of dissolved metals in the Tay are similar to, or lower than, those observed in more industrialized estuaries. All metals behave non-conservatively in the Tay. Interactions with biogenic and detrital particulate phases are important in controlling dissolved trace metal concentrations. The degradation of organic matter appears to be particularly important for Cu. Removal of dissolved metals was observed in the turbidity maximum zone; a simple model was used to demonstrate that this could be accounted for by adsorption onto suspended particulate matter. At high salinity, coincident peaks of all six metals with ammonia and phosphate are attributed to sewage inputs from Dundee at the mouth of the estuary.

  14. V838 Monocerotis Dissolve Sequence of Epochs

    NASA Video Gallery

    A dissolve sequence of eight images taken by Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys shows a CAT-scan-like probe of the three-dimensional structure of the shells of dust surrounding the aging star V83...

  15. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Liu, C.

    1996-04-09

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN), succinnonitrile (CH{sub 2}CN){sub 2}, and tetraglyme (CH{sub 3}--O--CH{sub 2}--CH{sub 2}--O--){sub 2} (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg{sup +2} cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100 C conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone. 2 figs.

  16. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte having exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature, and comprising the lithium salts selected from the group consisting of the thiocyanate, iodide, bromide, chloride, perchlorate, acetate, tetrafluoroborate, perfluoromethane sulfonate, perfluoromethane sulfonamide, tetrahaloaluminate, and heptahaloaluminate salts of lithium, with or without a magnesium-salt selected from the group consisting of the perchlorate and acetate salts of magnesium. Certain of the latter embodiments may also contain molecular additives from the group of acetonitrile (CH.sub.3 CN) succinnonitrile (CH.sub.2 CN).sub.2, and tetraglyme (CH.sub.3 --O--CH.sub.2 --CH.sub.2 --O--).sub.2 (or like solvents) solvated to a Mg.sup.+2 cation to lower the freezing point of the electrolyte below room temperature. Other particularly useful embodiments contain up to about 40, but preferably not more than about 25, mol percent of a long chain polyether polymer dissolved in the lithium salts to provide an elastic or rubbery solid electrolyte of high ambient temperature conductivity and exceptional 100.degree. C. conductivity. Another embodiment contains up to about but not more than 10 mol percent of a molecular solvent such as acetone.

  17. Cowles Dissolver Fire Involving IR Flare Mix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    fluoroethylene (PTFE), and a fluoroelastomer binder dissolved in acetone. Hexane is used to precipitate the binder and wash the mix. During the wash...ethylene (PTFE), and a fluoroelastomer binder. The fluoroelastomer binder is dissolved in acetone before the mix is made. The PTFE and magnesium...the binder precipitates on the surface of the suspended particles. The solids are allowed to settle and the liquid is siphoned from the mix bowl

  18. Photoproduction of dissolved organic carbon and inorganic nutrients from resuspended lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Peifang; Zhang, Nannan; Wang, Chao; Ao, Yanhui

    2016-11-01

    Sediments exposed to simulated solar radiation can serve as an important source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to surrounding waters. However, it is still unclear if dissolved nutrients can be photoproduced from lake sedimentary organic matter. In this study, a series of laboratory-based experiments was conducted to address the photoproduction of dissolved inorganic nutrients and DOC from resuspended Taihu Lake sediments. Dissolved inorganic nutrients and DOC were photoproduced after 8-h irradiation. The released NH4(+), NOx(-), and DOC levels ranged from 3.57 to 12.14, 1.43 to 6.43, and 24.17 to 69.17 μmol L(-1), respectively. The variation in the amount released indicated that sediment source had an effect on DOC and nutrient photorelease. More DOC and nutrients were released from higher concentration suspensions. However, due to the light absorption by suspended sediment, less DOC and nutrients were released from per gram of suspended sediment in high concentration suspensions. The decrease in DOC and increase in dissolved inorganic nitrogen during the last 2-h irradiation indicated that the photoproduction of inorganic nutrients proceeded via direct photodissolution of suspended sediments and subsequent photodegradation of the produced dissolved organic matter. Our results demonstrated that the photoproduction flux of NH4(+) and NOx(-) accounts for 12.3 and 6.5 % of wet deposition, respectively, which suggest that the photodissolution of suspended sediment could be a potential source of DOC and dissolved nutrients in shallow water ecosystems.

  19. Influence of dissolved organic substances in groundwater on sorption behavior of americium and neptunium

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwaters typically contain dissolved organic carbon consisting largely of high molecular weight compounds of humic and fulvic acids. To evaluate whether these dissolved organic substances can enhance the tranport of radionuclides through the groundwater system, experiments were conducted to examine the sorption of americium and neptunium onto crushed basalt in the presence of dissolved humic- and fulvic-acid organic carbon introduced into synthetic groundwater. The partitioning experiments with synthetic groundwater show that increasing the concentration of either humic or fulvic acid in the water has a significant inhibiting effect on sorption of both americium and neptunium. At 22/sup 0/C, adsorption of these radionuclides, as measured by distribution ratios (the ratio of nuclide sorbed onto the solid to nuclide in solution at the end of the experiment), decreased by 25% to 50% by addition of as little as 1 mg/L dissolved organic carbon and by one to two orders of magnitude by addition of 100 to 200 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. Distribution ratios measured in solutions reacted at 90/sup 0/C similarly decreased with the addition of dissolved organic carbon but generally ranged from one to two orders of magnitude higher than those determined in the 22/sup 0/C experiment. These results suggest that organic carbon dissolved in deep groundwaters may significantly enhance the mobility of radionuclides of americium and neptunium. 23 references, 5 figures, 11 tables.

  20. Feasibility Study for Evaluating Cumulative Exposure of Downstream Migrant Juvenile Salmonids to Total Dissolved Gas. Final Report 1996.

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C.Scott; Dauble, Dennis D.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1997-11-01

    A feasibility study was initiated to determine if downstream migrant salmonids could be monitored to determine potential relationships between total dissolved gas (TDG) exposure and signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT). The primary objectives were to: (1) establish logistical requirements for in-river monitoring of TDG exposure, including net pen design, deployment, and navigation constraints; (2) resolve uncertainties associated with effects of the net pen on fish behavior; (3) test the accuracy and precision of in-river monitoring equipment used to measure fish distribution and water quality; and (4) determine the application of hydrologic/flow models to predictions of TDG exposure. In-river measurements included water velocity, boat position, and selected water quality parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, depth, conductivity). Fish distribution within the net pen was monitored using scanning sonar, and a split-beam echo sounder was used to evaluate vertical distribution of fish m in the river adjacent to the net pen. Three test drifts were conducted from late July through late August. The studies demonstrated that it was feasible to assemble and deploy a large net pen for mobile monitoring of TDG exposure. Accurate monitoring of vertical and lateral distribution of smolts was performed, and diel differences in behavior were documented. Further, the fish sounded in response to researcher activity on the perimeter platform. Thus, in-transit monitoring for GBT or mortality would affect fish depth distribution and exposure to TDG. Principal recommendations for future studies are directed at improving maneuverability of the net pen in adverse weather conditions and applying new acoustics technology to simultaneously collect fish distribution data from within and outside of the pen. 6 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Sequestration of Dissolved CO2 in the Oriskany Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, R.M.; Allen, D.E.; McCarthy-Jones, J.R.; Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee

    2008-04-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at temperatures of 22 and 75 °C and pressures between 100 and 450 bar. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (Chem. Geol. 2003, 193, 257-271). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated. The capacity for the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 was calculated using results of the solubility models, estimation of the density of CO2 saturated brine, and available geographic information system (GIS) information on the formation depth and thickness. Results indicate that the Oriskany formation can hold approximately 0.36 gigatonnes of dissolved CO2 if the full basin is considered. When only the region where supercritical CO2 can exist (temperatures greater than 31° C and pressures greater than 74 bar) is considered, the capacity of the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 is 0.31 gigatonnes. The capacity estimate considering the potential to sequester free-phase supercritical CO2 if brine were displaced from formation pore space is 8.8 gigatonnes in the Oriskany formation.

  2. Sequestration of dissolved CO2 in the Oriskany formation.

    PubMed

    Dilmore, Robert M; Allen, Douglas E; Jones, J Richard McCarthy; Hedges, Sheila W; Soong, Yee

    2008-04-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at temperatures of 22 and 75 degrees C and pressures between 100 and 450 bar. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (Chem. Geol. 2003, 193, 257-271). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated. The capacity for the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 was calculated using results of the solubility models, estimation of the density of CO2 saturated brine, and available geographic information system (GIS) information on the formation depth and thickness. Results indicate that the Oriskany formation can hold approximately 0.36 gigatonnes of dissolved CO2 if the full basin is considered. When only the region where supercritical CO2 can exist (temperatures greaterthan 31 degrees C and pressures greaterthan 74 bar) is considered, the capacity of the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 is 0.31 gigatonnes. The capacity estimate considering the potential to sequester free-phase supercritical CO2 if brine were displaced from formation pore space is 8.8 gigatonnes in the Oriskany formation.

  3. The precipitation of indium at elevated pH in a stream influenced by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Hussain, Fatima A; Hemond, Harold F; Sacco, Sarah A; Shine, James P; Runkel, Robert L; Walton-Day, Katherine; Kimball, Briant A

    2017-01-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics and has uses in important energy technologies such as photovoltaic cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). One significant flux of indium to the environment is from lead, zinc, copper, and tin mining and smelting, but little is known about its aqueous behavior after it is mobilized. In this study, we use Mineral Creek, a headwater stream in southwestern Colorado severely affected by heavy metal contamination as a result of acid mine drainage, as a natural laboratory to study the aqueous behavior of indium. At the existing pH of ~3, indium concentrations are 6-29μg/L (10,000× those found in natural rivers), and are completely filterable through a 0.45μm filter. During a pH modification experiment, the pH of the system was raised to >8, and >99% of the indium became associated with the suspended solid phase (i.e. does not pass through a 0.45μm filter). To determine the mechanism of removal of indium from the filterable and likely primarily dissolved phase, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine an upper bound for a sorption constant to iron oxides, and used this, along with other published thermodynamic constants, to model the partitioning of indium in Mineral Creek. Modeling results suggest that the removal of indium from the filterable phase is consistent with precipitation of indium hydroxide from a dissolved phase. This work demonstrates that nonferrous mining processes can be a significant source of indium to the environment, and provides critical information about the aqueous behavior of indium.

  4. The precipitation of indium at elevated pH in a stream influenced by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Sarah Jane O.; Hussain, Fatima A.; Hemond, Harold F.; Sacco, Sarah A.; Shine, James P.; Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Kimball, Briant A.

    2017-01-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics and has uses in important energy technologies such as photovoltaic cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). One significant flux of indium to the environment is from lead, zinc, copper, and tin mining and smelting, but little is known about its aqueous behavior after it is mobilized. In this study, we use Mineral Creek, a headwater stream in southwestern Colorado severely affected by heavy metal contamination as a result of acid mine drainage, as a natural laboratory to study the aqueous behavior of indium. At the existing pH of ~ 3, indium concentrations are 6–29 μg/L (10,000 × those found in natural rivers), and are completely filterable through a 0.45 μm filter. During a pH modification experiment, the pH of the system was raised to > 8, and > 99% of the indium became associated with the suspended solid phase (i.e. does not pass through a 0.45 μm filter). To determine the mechanism of removal of indium from the filterable and likely primarily dissolved phase, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine an upper bound for a sorption constant to iron oxides, and used this, along with other published thermodynamic constants, to model the partitioning of indium in Mineral Creek. Modeling results suggest that the removal of indium from the filterable phase is consistent with precipitation of indium hydroxide from a dissolved phase. This work demonstrates that nonferrous mining processes can be a significant source of indium to the environment, and provides critical information about the aqueous behavior of indium.

  5. Fluorescence sensors for trace monitoring of dissolved ammonia.

    PubMed

    Waich, Kerstin; Mayr, Torsten; Klimant, Ingo

    2008-10-19

    Even though monitoring of dissolved ammonia is acutely important for environmental studies, fish farms and for industrial surveillance, no system for the performance of online measurements at the concentrations needed exists so far. For many applications it is necessary to detect dissolved ammonia concentrations at sub mg/l-levels, because ammonia is reported to be toxic for aquatic organisms above 25 microg/l. We present new ammonia sensitive materials consisting of fluorescent pH indicators embedded into different cellulose esters. The low pK(a) value of the indicators and the high solubility of ammonia in the cellulose polymers lead to detection limits below 1 microg/l and a dynamic range between 5 and 1000 microg/l. Response times at these trace concentration levels are in the order of 20-30 min. The sensors are suitable for fresh and sea water monitoring by an additional silicon layer preventing the interference of protons and salinity. The fluorescent indicators Eosin ethylester and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein methylester (DCF) were investigated to achieve sensors with a dynamic range matching the target concentrations. Sensors with improved performance were obtained by employing cellulose ester nanospheres with incorporated Eosin ethylester. The simple sensor design has a high potential to be applied in miniaturized optical measurement system for online ammonia detection.

  6. Geochemical Data for Upper Mineral Creek, Colorado, Under Existing Ambient Conditions and During an Experimental pH Modification, August 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.; Steiger, Judy I.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Mineral Creek, an acid mine drainage stream in south-western Colorado, was the subject of a water-quality study that employed a paired synoptic approach. Under the paired synoptic approach, two synoptic sampling campaigns were conducted on the same study reach. The initial synoptic campaign, conducted August 22, 2005, documented stream-water quality under existing ambient conditions. A second synoptic campaign, conducted August 24, 2005, documented stream-water quality during a pH-modification experiment that elevated the pH of Mineral Creek. The experimental pH modification was designed to determine the potential reductions in dissolved constituent concentrations that would result from the implementation of an active treatment system for acid mine drainage. During both synoptic sampling campaigns, a solution containing lithium bromide was injected continuously to allow for the calculation of streamflow using the tracer-dilution method. Synoptic water-quality samples were collected from 30 stream sites and 11 inflow locations along the 2-kilometer study reach. Data from the study provide spatial profiles of pH, concentration, and streamflow under both existing and experimentally-altered conditions. This report presents the data obtained August 21-24, 2005, as well as the methods used for sample collection and data analysis.

  7. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  8. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  9. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  10. Simultaneous E. coli inactivation and NOM degradation in river water via photo-Fenton process at natural pH in solar CPC reactor. A new way for enhancing solar disinfection of natural water.

    PubMed

    Moncayo-Lasso, Alejandro; Sanabria, Janeth; Pulgarin, César; Benítez, Norberto

    2009-09-01

    Bacteria inactivation and natural organic matter oxidation in river water was simultaneously conducted via photo-Fenton reaction at "natural" pH ( approximately 6.5) containing 0.6 mg L(-1) of Fe(3+) and 10 mg L(-1) of H(2)O(2). The experiments were carried out by using a solar compound parabolic collector on river water previously filtered by a slow sand filtration system and voluntarily spiked with Escherichia coli. Fifty five percent of 5.3 mg L(-1) of dissolved organic carbon was mineralized whereas total disinfection was observed without re-growth after 24h in the dark.

  11. Effects of dissolved oxygen concentration on biodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Shaler, T A; Klecka, G M

    1986-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to examine the effects of dissolved oxygen concentration on the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by an enrichment culture of 2,4-D-utilizing bacteria. A modified Monod equation was found to describe the relationship between the specific growth rate and the concentrations of both the organic substrate and dissolved oxygen. Values for the maximum specific growth rate, yield, and Monod coefficient for growth on 2,4-D were 0.09 h-1, 0.14 g/g, and 0.6 mg/liter, respectively. The half-saturation constant for dissolved oxygen was estimated to be 1.2 mg/liter. These results suggest that dissolved oxygen concentrations below 1 mg/liter may be rate limiting for the biodegradation of chlorinated aromatic compounds such as 2,4-D, which have a requirement for molecular oxygen as a cosubstrate for metabolism. PMID:3729394

  12. Contribution of dissolved sulfates and sulfites in hydrogen sulfide emission from stagnant water bodies in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, K I A; Dissanayake, D P; Mahanama, K R R

    2003-08-01

    Accumulation of sulfur-containing compounds and their bacterial mediated reductions have led to the emission of pungent odors from stagnant water bodies. This study is focused on the contribution of inorganic sulfur compounds in the emission of hydrogen sulfide. The measured dissolved oxygen levels have demonstrated good negative correlations with the dissolved sulfide levels implying the oxygen deficiency is the key for the reduction of sulfate ion and sulfite ion to sulfide ion. Particularly, the dissolved molar fractions of sulfide from the total dissolved sulfur compounds (sulfates, sulfites and sulfides) have a very good correlation with the dissolved oxygen for the stagnant water bodies except the artificially aerated prawn farms. For the stagnant water bodies with significant correlations, linear regressions are reported for them to be utilized in estimating one component of the regression from the measurement of the other. The measured data were further utilized to estimate the levels of hydrogen sulfide gas. The pH of the water bodies has confined much of the dissolved sulfides in the form of bisulfide ion and they can be easily escaped to the atmosphere upon acidification due to industrial discharges and/or acidic precipitations. The estimated levels of hydrogen sulfide just above the water surface were plotted for the most polluted stagnant water body in Sri Lanka for the pH range of 5-10 and temperature range of 25-35 degrees C.

  13. The PhD Viva: A Space for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the viva experiences of 87 social science PhD graduates from three Irish higher education institutions through a questionnaire that assessed outcome, preparation, conduct and post-viva. The majority were awarded their PhD with minor corrections, considered their viva as a summative assessment, and emphasised its purpose as…

  14. The Importance of Having a Ph.D., Career Advice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A presentation on the importance of having a PhD to motivate Initiative to Maximize Student Diversity Program (IMSD) undergrads towards conducting research, pursuing careers in the biomedical field, applying to grad school, and getting a Ph.D., based upon ARS scientist's experiences as a student, a ...

  15. Characterization of hydraulic conductivity of the alluvium and basin fill, Pinal Creek Basin near Globe, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angeroth, Cory E.

    2002-01-01

    Acidic waters containing elevated concentrations of dissolved metals have contaminated the regional aquifer in the Pinal Creek Basin, which is in Gila County, Arizona, about 100 kilometers east of Phoenix. The aquifer is made up of two geologic units: unconsolidated stream alluvium and consolidated basin fill. To better understand how contaminants are transported through these units, a better understanding of the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and processes that affect it within the aquifer is needed. Slug tests were done in September 1997 and October 1998 on 9 wells finished in the basin fill and 14 wells finished in the stream alluvium. Data from the tests were analyzed by using either the Bouwer and Rice (1976) method, or by using an extension to the method developed by Springer and Gellhar (1991). Both methods are applicable for unconfined aquifers and partially penetrating wells. The results of the analyses show wide variability within and between the two geologic units. Hydraulic conductivity estimates ranged from 0.5 to 250 meters per day for the basin fill and from 3 to 200 meters per day for the stream alluvium. Results of the slug tests also show a correlation coefficient of 0.83 between the hydraulic conductivity and the pH of the ground water. The areas of highest hydraulic conductivity coincide with the areas of lowest pH, and the areas of lowest hydraulic conductivity coincide with the areas of highest pH, suggesting that the acidic water is increasing the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer by dissolution of carbonate minerals.

  16. Technical description of parameters influencing the pH value of suspension absorbent used in flue gas desulfurization systems.

    PubMed

    Głomba, Michał

    2010-08-01

    As a result of the large limestone deposits available in Poland, the low cost of reagent acquisition for the largescale technological use and relatively well-documented processes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies based on limestone sorbent slurry, wet scrubbing desulfurization is a method of choice in Poland for flue gas treatment in energy production facilities, including power plants and industrial systems. The efficiency of FGD using the above method depends on several technological and kinetic parameters, particularly on the pH value of the sorbent (i.e., ground limestone suspended in water). Consequently, many studies in Poland and abroad address the impact of various parameters on the pH value of the sorbent suspension, such as the average diameter of sorbent particles (related to the limestone pulverization degree), sorbent quality (in terms of pure calcium carbonate [CaCO3] content of the sorbent material), stoichiometric surfeit of CaCO3 in relation to sulfur dioxide (SO2) absorbed from flue gas circulating in the absorption node, time of absorption slurry retention in the absorber tank, chlorine ion concentration in sorbent slurry, and concentration of dissolved metal salts (Na, K, Mg, Fe, Al, and others). This study discusses the results of laboratory-scale tests conducted to establish the effect of the above parameters on the pH value of limestone slurry circulating in the SO2 absorption node. On the basis of the test results, a correlation equation was postulated to help maintain the desirable pH value at the design phase of the wet FGD process. The postulated equation displays good coincidence between calculated pH values and those obtained using laboratory measurements.

  17. Seasonality of diel cycles of dissolved trace-metal concentrations in a Rocky Mountain stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, D.A.; Cleasby, T.E.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Substantial diel (24-h) cycles in dissolved (0.1-??m filtration) metal concentrations were observed during summer low flow, winter low flow, and snowmelt runoff in Prickly Pear Creek, Montana. During seven diel sampling episodes lasting 34-61.5 h, dissolved Mn and Zn concentrations increased from afternoon minimum values to maximum values shortly after sunrise. Dissolved As concentrations exhibited the inverse timing. The magnitude of diel concentration increases varied in the range 17-152% for Mn and 70-500% for Zn. Diel increases of As concentrations (17-55%) were less variable. The timing of minimum and maximum values of diel streamflow cycles was inconsistent among sampling episodes and had little relation to the timing of metal concentration cycles, suggesting that geochemical rather than hydrological processes are the primary control of diel metal cycles. Diel cycles of dissolved metal concentrations should be assumed to occur at any time of year in any stream with dissolved metals and neutral to alkaline pH. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  18. Targeted, needle-free vaccinations in skin using multilayered, densely-packed dissolving microprojection arrays.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Anthony P; Prow, Tarl W; Crichton, Michael L; Chen, Xianfeng; Fernando, Germain J P; Kendall, Mark A F

    2010-08-16

    Targeting of vaccines to abundant immune cell populations within our outer thin skin layers using miniaturized devices-much thinner than a needle and syringe, could improve the efficacy of vaccines (and other immunotherapies). To meet this goal, a densely packed dissolving microprojection array (dissolving Nanopatch) is designed, achieving functional miniaturization by 1) formulating small microneedles (two orders of magnitude smaller than a standard needle and syringe) and 2) multiple layering of the payload within microprojections with tight tolerances (of the order of a micrometer). The formulation method is suitable to many vaccines because it is without harsh or complex chemical processes, and it is performed at low temperatures and at a neutral pH. When the formulated dNPs are applied to skin, consistent and robust penetration is achieved, rapidly targeting the skin strata of interest (<5 min; significantly faster than larger dissolving microneedles that have been previously reported). Resultant diffusion is significantly enhanced within the dermis compared with the epidermis. Using two different antigens (ovalbumin and a commercial trivalent influenza vaccine [Fluvax2008]), the administration of these dissolving patches generate robust systemic immune responses in a mouse model. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of successful vaccination with any form of dissolving microneedles. The patches made by this method therefore have the potential for pain-free, needle-free, and effective vaccination in humans.

  19. Meet EPA Biologist Mitch Kostich, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA biologist, Mitch Kostich, Ph.D., conducts research to identify risks from exposures to chemical contaminants in water. His research uses technologies to prioritize contaminants in the environment based on the potential risks they pose to life

  20. Meet EPA Scientist Jeff Szabo, Ph.D.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA scientist Jeff Szabo, Ph.D., has worked for the EPA’s National Homeland Security Research Center since 2005. He conducts and manages water security research projects at EPA’s Test and Evaluation facility.

  1. ADDING REALISM TO NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLVING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-15

    Two new criticality modeling approaches have greatly increased the efficiency of dissolver operations in H-Canyon. The first new approach takes credit for the linear, physical distribution of the mass throughout the entire length of the fuel assembly. This distribution of mass is referred to as the linear density. Crediting the linear density of the fuel bundles results in using lower fissile concentrations, which allows higher masses to be charged to the dissolver. Also, this approach takes credit for the fact that only part of the fissile mass is wetted at a time. There are multiple assemblies stacked on top of each other in a bundle. On average, only 50-75% of the mass (the bottom two or three assemblies) is wetted at a time. This means that only 50-75% (depending on operating level) of the mass is moderated and is contributing to the reactivity of the system. The second new approach takes credit for the progression of the dissolving process. Previously, dissolving analysis looked at a snapshot in time where the same fissile material existed both in the wells and in the bulk solution at the same time. The second new approach models multiple consecutive phases that simulate the fissile material moving from a high concentration in the wells to a low concentration in the bulk solution. This approach is more realistic and allows higher fissile masses to be charged to the dissolver.

  2. Escherichia coli K-12 survives anaerobic exposure at pH 2 without RpoS, Gad, or hydrogenases, but shows sensitivity to autoclaved broth products.

    PubMed

    Riggins, Daniel P; Narvaez, Maria J; Martinez, Keith A; Harden, Mark M; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria survive exposure to extreme acid (pH 2 or lower) in gastric fluid. Aerated cultures survive via regulons expressing glutamate decarboxylase (Gad, activated by RpoS), cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (Cfa) and others. But extreme-acid survival is rarely tested under low oxygen, a condition found in the stomach and the intestinal tract. We observed survival of E. coli K-12 W3110 at pH 1.2-pH 2.0, conducting all manipulations (overnight culture at pH 5.5, extreme-acid exposure, dilution and plating) in a glove box excluding oxygen (10% H2, 5% CO2, balance N2). With dissolved O2 concentrations maintained below 6 µM, survival at pH 2 required Cfa but did not require GadC, RpoS, or hydrogenases. Extreme-acid survival in broth (containing tryptone and yeast extract) was diminished in media that had been autoclaved compared to media that had been filtered. The effect of autoclaved media on extreme-acid survival was most pronounced when oxygen was excluded. Exposure to H2O2 during extreme-acid treatment increased the death rate slightly for W3110 and to a greater extent for the rpoS deletion strain. Survival at pH 2 was increased in strains lacking the anaerobic regulator fnr. During anaerobic growth at pH 5.5, strains deleted for fnr showed enhanced transcription of acid-survival genes gadB, cfa, and hdeA, as well as catalase (katE). We show that E. coli cultured under oxygen exclusion (<6 µM O2) requires mechanisms different from those of aerated cultures. Extreme acid survival is more sensitive to autoclave products under oxygen exclusion.

  3. User's manual for estimation of dissolved-solids concentrations and loads in surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebermann, T.D.; Middelburg, R.F.; Irvine, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved solids in surface water are an important indicator of overall water quality. Ordinarily, dissolved-solids concentrations and loads are estimated by indirect methods that are based on periodic chemical analyses. Three computer programs , FLAGIT, DVCOND, and SLOAD, were developed to provide a consistent and accurate method of estimating dissolved-solids concentrations and loads. FLAGIT retrieves daily values of specific conductance and discharge and periodic water quality analyses from the U.S. Geologic Survey 's National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System data base, deletes incomplete data, and flags possible data errors. DVCOND fills in missing daily values of specific conductance, when appropriate, by linear interpolation. Using water quality data, SLOAD computes 3 yr moving regressions of dissolved-solids loads as a function of specific conductance and discharge. SLOAD then applies the regression coefficients to the daily values data to estimate daily dissolved-solids loads that are summed by month and by year. Separate regressions are used to estimate the mass fractions of six major ions. The theoretical basis and underlying assumptions of the procedures are presented, with documentation of the programs and their use. (USGS)

  4. Toxicity identification evaluation of metal-contaminated sediments using an artificial pore water containing dissolved organic carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, A.M.; Watzin, M.C.

    1999-03-01

    Recent investigations of sediment-associated pollutants in Lake Champlain indicated significant contamination with As, Mn, and Ni in Outer Malletts Bay, Vermont, US. Ceriodaphnia dubia exposed to sediment pore water from several sites in Outer Malletts Bay showed repeatable, acute mortality at only one site. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was conducted on pore water to determine the contaminants causing mortality at this site. Unlike most TIE applications, the dilution water used in these tests was formulated to match the hardness, alkalinity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved organic carbon content of the pore water. Results from phase 1 of the TIE indicated that divalent metals may be responsible for toxicity. Phase 2 results revealed levels of Mn above LC50 values. Spiking experiments employed in phase 3 confirmed Mn as the principal toxicant in sediment pore water. The formulated pore water worked well and helped ensure that toxicant behavior was influenced primarily by each TIE manipulation and not by physical and chemical differences between the dilution and site water. Although the Mn toxicity at this site may be the result of its unique geomorphology, this situation underscores the need to look broadly for potential toxicants when evaluating contaminated sites.

  5. Understanding Non-Traditional PhD Students Habitus--Implications for PhD Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Devika

    2015-01-01

    Against the background of vast changes in doctoral education and the emergence of non-traditional doctoral programmes, this paper investigates the habitus of non-traditional PhD students at a South African university. Bourdieu's conceptual tool of habitus informed the study. In-depth and open-ended interviews were conducted with 10 non-traditional…

  6. Coral calcifying fluid pH is modulated by seawater carbonate chemistry not solely seawater pH.

    PubMed

    Comeau, S; Tambutté, E; Carpenter, R C; Edmunds, P J; Evensen, N R; Allemand, D; Ferrier-Pagès, C; Tambutté, S; Venn, A A

    2017-01-25

    Reef coral calcification depends on regulation of pH in the internal calcifying fluid (CF) in which the coral skeleton forms. However, little is known about calcifying fluid pH (pHCF) regulation, despite its importance in determining the response of corals to ocean acidification. Here, we investigate pHCF in the coral Stylophora pistillata in seawater maintained at constant pH with manipulated carbonate chemistry to alter dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and therefore total alkalinity (AT). We also investigate the intracellular pH of calcifying cells, photosynthesis, respiration and calcification rates under the same conditions. Our results show that despite constant pH in the surrounding seawater, pHCF is sensitive to shifts in carbonate chemistry associated with changes in [DIC] and [AT], revealing that seawater pH is not the sole driver of pHCF Notably, when we synthesize our results with published data, we identify linear relationships of pHCF with the seawater [DIC]/[H(+)] ratio, [AT]/ [H(+)] ratio and [[Formula: see text

  7. Appropriate Conduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Lullo, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Many years ago when the author assumed the role of assistant principal for school climate, discipline, and attendance, he inherited many school policies and guidelines that were outdated, unfair, and without merit in the current school climate. Because the school conduct code had not been revised since the school opened in 1960, many of the…

  8. Inorganic Carbon Accumulation and Photosynthesis in a Blue-green Alga as a Function of External pH 1

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, John R.; Colman, Brian

    1981-01-01

    The blue-green alga Coccochloris peniocystis photosynthesizes optimally over the pH range of 7.0 to 10.0, but the O2-evolution rate is inhibited below pH 7.0 and ceases below pH 5.25. Measurement of the inorganic carbon pool in this alga in the light, using the silicone-fluid filtration technique demonstrated that the rate of accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon remained relatively constant over a wide pH range. At external dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.56 to 0.89 millimolar the internal concentration after 30 seconds illumination was greater than 3.5 millimolar over the entire pH range. Intracellular pH measured in the light using [14C]5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione and [14C]methylamine dropped from pH 7.6 at an external pH of 7.0 to pH 6.6 at an external pH of 5.25. Above an external pH of 7.0 the intracellular pH rose gradually to pH 7.9 at an external pH 10.0. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity of cell-free algal extracts exhibited optimal activity at pH 7.5 to 7.8 but was inactive below pH 6.5. It is suggested that the inability of Coccochloris to maintain its intracellular pH when in an acidic environment restricts its photosynthetic capacity by a direct pH effect on the principal CO2 fixing enzyme. PMID:16661792

  9. A Quantitative Evaluation of Dissolved Oxygen Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, Barbara S.

    1971-01-01

    The implications of the presence of dissolved oxygen in water are discussed in terms of its deleterious or beneficial effects, depending on the functional consequences to those affected, e.g., the industrialist, the oceanographer, and the ecologist. The paper is devoted primarily to an examination of the performance of five commercially available dissolved oxygen meters. The design of each is briefly reviewed and ease or difficulty of use in the field described. Specifically, the evaluation program treated a number of parameters and user considerations including an initial check and trial calibration for each instrument and a discussion of the measurement methodology employed. Detailed test results are given relating to the effects of primary power variation, water-flow sensitivity, response time, relative accuracy of dissolved-oxygen readout, temperature accuracy (for those instruments which included this feature), error and repeatability, stability, pressure and other environmental effects, and test results obtained in the field. Overall instrument performance is summarized comparatively by chart.

  10. Dissolved mineral species precipitation during coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaran, P.; Liu, D.

    1995-12-31

    Beneficiation by froth flotation, which exploits the difference in surface properties of minerals, has been a promising method for coal cleaning.However, dissolved mineral species present in coal flotation systems can interact with particles and other species leading to drastic effects on flotation. Particularly, precipitation or adsorption of such species on the particles can alter their surface properties and thus influence the efficiency of coal cleaning. In this work, the bulk and surface precipitation of the dissolved mineral species present in Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was investigated under controlled experimental conditions. Changes in the surface properties of coal due to the precipitation were monitored by following zeta potential. Solution potential data were used to elucidate the mechanism of the precipitation. The effect of the precipitation of the dissolved species on the floatability of coal was found to be marked.

  11. Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, George W.; Givens, Edwin N.; Skinner, Ronald W.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

  12. Mechanism of dissolved water in jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Zong, Zhimin; Hu, Jianqiang; Ma, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Dissolved water content is an important performance index of jet fuel quality. The excess water content in jet fuel directly affects the quality of fuel and the normal operation of the flight equipment, even severely endangering the flight safety. Many factors would affect the water content in jet fuel. In this paper, considering the effects of internal and external factors on the dissolved water content in No. 3 jet fuel, such as toluene content, environmental temperature, humidity, and anti-icing agent concentration, by Karl Fischer electrometric titration using a trace moisture analyzer. A model was developed to evaluate the dissolved water content under different conditions. The model provides an effective reference for the accurate and efficient determination of jet fuel moisture content.

  13. Dissolved carbon dynamics in large boreal rivers from eastern Canada following their impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helie, J.; Rosa, E.; Lalonde, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2009-12-01

    The carbon cycling in Canadian boreal environments is the focus of a growing number of investigations mainly because of the importance of hydropower and its potential in the area. Here, we document the behaviour of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon as well as particulate organic carbon (DIC-DOC-POC henceforth) in 5 impounded and 2 pristine river systems (respectively: La Grande 3400 m 3s-1, Eastmain 990 m3s-1, St. Lawrence 12 100 m3s-1, Ottawa 1950 m3s-1, Nelson 2370 m3s-1; Great Whales 680 m3s-1 and Koksoak 1895 m3s-1) river systems. These major rivers were sampled monthly at their outlet for one year except at the St. Lawrence River that has been sampled since June of 1997 on a bi-weekly basis. Complementary synoptic surveys were undertaken in August 2008 on the La Grande and Great Whales Rivers. When sampling, water temperature, pH, alkalinity and specific conductivity were measured. Samples were collected for the analysis of i) major ions concentrations; ii) δ13C and concentration of DIC, DOC and POC); iii) δ18O and δ2H of the water molecule; and iv) U series and Sr isotopes. In all the sampled river systems, POC concentrations were at least an order of magnitude smaller than the dissolved forms. Rivers draining carbonates bedrocks (St.Lawrence and Nelson Rivers) present higher concentrations and δ13C-DIC values linked to carbonate dissolution in soils. Conversely, rivers draining silicate-rich watersheds present lower δ13C- DIC values linked to the production of an isotopically light CO2 through oxidation of organic matter in soils and that of soil-derived DOC along river courses. However, isotopic composition of DIC in impounded rivers draining silicate catchments indicate significant CO2 degassing and some isotopic exchange with atmospheric CO2 in reservoirs. A relatively strong relationship is observed between pCO2 and δ13C-DIC across the studied river systems suggesting a continuum between the production of CO2 through DOM oxidation and CO2

  14. Formulation and Evaluation of Fast Dissolving Film for Salbutamol Sulphate.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suneel; Hingawe, Nilesh; Shah, Keyur; Patil, Arun

    2015-01-23

    The present study was aimed to formulate stable, readily dispersible and quick release taste masked fast dis solving film of Salbutamol sulphate by utilizing fast dissolving drug delivery techno logy. This avoids the use of expensive and non-conventional equipments like freeze dryer or spray dryers. It also avoids the time consuming conventional pro cesses like compression and costly polymers. The optimized films were evaluated for film thickness, folding endurance, disintegration time, dissolution time and drug content. The in -vitro dissolution studies were carried out in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and simulated salivary fluid (pH 6.8). The prepared films were found to be uniform and flexible and more than 90% of the drug was found to be released from the film within 8 min which is a desirable characteristic for fast abso rp tion. FT-IR and DSC studies revealed that there was no interaction between drug and excipients used and the drug was stable in the formulation. The in - vivo disintegration time and taste evaluation studies were carried out in h u man volunteers. These results revealed that there was no bitter taste; no irritation and good mouth feel of o p timized batch.

  15. In situ spectrophotometric measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liua, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Adornato, Lori; Yates, Kimberly K.; Kaltenbacher, Eric; Ding, Xiaoling; Yang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous in situ sensors are needed to document the effects of today’s rapid ocean uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (e.g., ocean acidification). General environmental conditions (e.g., biofouling, turbidity) and carbon-specific conditions (e.g., wide diel variations) present significant challenges to acquiring long-term measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) with satisfactory accuracy and resolution. SEAS-DIC is a new in situ instrument designed to provide calibrated, high-frequency, long-term measurements of DIC in marine and fresh waters. Sample water is first acidified to convert all DIC to carbon dioxide (CO2). The sample and a known reagent solution are then equilibrated across a gas-permeable membrane. Spectrophotometric measurement of reagent pH can thereby determine the sample DIC over a wide dynamic range, with inherent calibration provided by the pH indicator’s molecular characteristics. Field trials indicate that SEAS-DIC performs well in biofouling and turbid waters, with a DIC accuracy and precision of ∼2 μmol kg–1 and a measurement rate of approximately once per minute. The acidic reagent protects the sensor cell from biofouling, and the gas-permeable membrane excludes particulates from the optical path. This instrument, the first spectrophotometric system capable of automated in situ DIC measurements, positions DIC to become a key parameter for in situ CO2-system characterizations.

  16. Influence of dissolved organic matter on dissolved vanadium speciation in the Churchill River estuary (Manitoba, Canada).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong Xiang; Mangal, Vaughn; Guéguen, Céline

    2016-07-01

    Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices were used to investigate the temporal and spatial changes in vanadium (V) speciation in the Churchill estuary system (Manitoba). Thirty-six DGT sets and 95 discrete water samples were collected at 8 river and 3 estuary sites during spring freshet and summer base flow. Dissolved V concentration in the Churchill River at summer base flow was approximately 5 times higher than those during the spring high flow (27.3 ± 18.9 nM vs 4.8 ± 3.5 nM). DGT-labile V showed an opposite trend with greater values found during the spring high flow (2.6 ± 1.8 nM vs 1.4 ± 0.3 nM). Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) conducted on 95 excitation-emission matrix spectra validated four humic-like (C1C4) and one protein-like (C5) fluorescent components. Significant positive relationship was found between protein-like DOM and DGT-labile V (r = 0.53, p < 0.05), indicating that protein-like DOM possibly affected the DGT-labile V concentration in Churchill River. Sediment leachates were enriched in DGT-labile V and protein-like DOM, which can be readily released when river sediment began to thaw during spring freshet.

  17. Removal of dissolved organic matter by anion exchange: Effect of dissolved organic matter properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, T.H.; Singer, P.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2008-01-01

    Ten isolates of aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) were evaluated to determine the effect that chemical properties of the DOM, such as charge density, aromaticity, and molecular weight, have on DOM removal by anion exchange. The DOM isolates were characterized asterrestrial, microbial, or intermediate humic substances or transphilic acids. All anion exchange experiments were conducted using a magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin. The charge density of the DOM isolates, determined by direct potentiometric titration, was fundamental to quantifying the stoichiometry of the anion exchange mechanism. The results clearly show that all DOM isolates were removed by anion exchange; however, differences among the DOM isolates did influence their removal by MIEX resin. In particular, MIEX resin had the greatest affinity for DOM with high charge density and the least affinity for DOM with low charge density and low aromaticity. This work illustrates that the chemical characteristics of DOM and solution conditions must be considered when evaluating anion exchange treatment for the removal of DOM. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  18. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  19. Understanding and modelling the variability in Dissolved Organic Carbon concentrations in catchment drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Martin; Waldron, Susan; Scott, Marian; Drew, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of dynamic natural habitats could be improved through the deployment of automated sensor technology. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations, [DOC], are of interest to water companies as purification removes this pool and currently in environmental science, due in part to rising DOC levels and also as respiration of this C pool can lead to an increased CO2 efflux. Manual sampling of catchment drainage systems has revealed seasonal patterns in DOC (Williams, P.J.L., 1995) and that hydrological events export most DOC(Raymond, P.A. and J.E. Saiers, 2010). However, manual sampling precludes detailed characterisation of the dynamic fluctuation of DOC over shorter but important time periods e.g. immediately prior to an event; the transition from base flow to a surface run-off dominated system as surface flow pathways defrost. Such insight is only gained through deployment of continuous-monitoring equipment. Since autumn 2010 we have deployed an S::CAN Spectrolyser (which from absorbance gives a measurement of [DOC]) in a 7.5 kilometre squared peaty catchment draining Europe's largest windfarm, Whitelee. Since autumn 2011, we have an almost complete time series of [DOC] every 30. Here [DOC] has ranged from 12.2 to 58.4 mg/l C and during event flow DOC had a maximum variation of 23.5 mg/l within a single day. Simultaneously with the Spectrolyser, we have logged stage height, pH and conductivity using an In-Situ Inc MD Troll 9000. Generally there is an inverse relationship between [DOC] and both pH and conductivity, but a positive relationship (albeit with seasonal differences) with [DOC] and stage height, from which we can infer hydrological changes in the source of the DOC. Here, in addition to presenting the time series of the data, and a more accurate export budget estimate, I will explore statistical methods for the handling of large datasets. Trends in the data of such large and dynamic data sets are challenging to model. Simple relationships with stage

  20. Peer reviewed: Characterizing aquatic dissolved organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Whether it causes aesthetic concerns such as color, taste, and odor; leads to the binding and transport of organic and inorganic contaminants; produces undesirable disinfection byproducts; provides sources and sinks for carbon; or mediates photochemical processes, the nature and properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water are topics of significant environmental interest. DOM is also a major reactant in and product of biogeochemical processes in which the material serves as a carbon and energy source for biota and controls levels of dissolved oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, numerous trace metals, and acidity.

  1. Energy separations for the electronic states of PH -2,PH 2 and PH +2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-03-01

    All-electron complete-active space multi-configuration self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) calculations in conjunction with large P(13s10p3d2flg/7s6p3d2flg) and H (10s5p1d/8s5p1d) basis sets are made on the electronic states of PH -2, PH 2 and PH +2. We compute the adiabatic electron affinities of PH 2 and PH. The 3B 1-X 1A 1, 1B 1-X 1A 1 energy separations of PH +2 and the 2A 1-X 2B 1 energy separation of PH 2 are computed.

  2. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  3. Long term patterns in dissolved organic carbon, major elements and trace metals in boreal headwater catchments: Trends, mechanisms and heterogeneity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oni, Stephen; Futter, Martyn; Bishop, Kevin; Kohler, Stephan; Ottosson-Lofvenius, Mikael; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2013-04-01

    The effects of climate change are currently apparent in the boreal landscape of northern Sweden. Warmer temperature and declining acid deposition are affecting runoff chemistry. These effects are mediated by landscape type. Markedly different responses are observed in streams draining forest and mire landscape elements. Here, we assess long-term water quality time-series from three nested headwater streams draining upland forest (C2), peat/mire (C4) and mixed (C7) (forest and mire) catchments. Temporal trends in weather and runoff (1981-2008); dissolved organic carbon concentration [DOC] (1993-2010) and other water quality parameters (1987-2011) were assessed. Historically, sulfate deposition is low in the region and is further declining. There was no significant annual trend in precipitation or runoff but a significant monotonic increasing trend existed in air temperature and length of growing season. Stream [DOC] was positively correlated with some trace metals (copper, iron and zinc) and negatively with several other chemical parameters (e.g. sulfate, conductivity, calcium). Both sulfate and conductivity showed declining trends, while a significant increase was observed in pH during winter and spring. Calcium and magnesium showed monotonic decreasing trends. The declining trajectories of stream base cation and sulfate concentrations during other times of the year were not accompanied by changes in pH and alkalinity. Water temperature increased significantly both annually and in most months while iron and DOC concentrations showed significant increases in autumn months. Though all streams showed significant positive trends in [DOC] in autumn, only C2 had a significant annual increasing trend. There was also a shift in the magnitude of variability in spring [DOC] and increasing trend of summer baseflow [DOC] in C2 and C7.

  4. Long term patterns in dissolved organic carbon, major elements and trace metals in boreal headwater catchments: trends, mechanisms and heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oni, S. K.; Futter, M. N.; Bishop, K.; Köhler, S. J.; Ottosson-Löfvenius, M.; Laudon, H.

    2012-12-01

    The boreal landscape is a complex, spatio-temporally varying mosaic of forest and mire landscape elements that control surface water hydrology and chemistry. Here, we assess long-term water quality time-series from three nested headwater streams draining upland forest (C2), peat/mire (C4) and mixed (C7) (forest and mire) catchments. Temporal trends in weather and runoff (1981-2008); dissolved organic carbon concentration [DOC] (1993-2010) and other water quality parameters (1987-2011) were assessed. There was no significant annual trend in precipitation or runoff but a significant monotonic increasing trend existed in air temperature and length of growing season. Stream [DOC] was positively correlated with some trace metals (copper, iron and zinc) and negatively with several other chemical parameters (e.g. sulfate, conductivity, calcium). Both sulfate and conductivity showed declining trends, while a significant increase was observed in pH during winter and spring. Calcium and magnesium showed monotonic decreasing trends. The declining trajectories of stream base cation and sulfate concentrations during other times of the year were not accompanied by changes in pH and alkalinity. Water temperature increased significantly both annually and in most months while iron and DOC concentrations showed significant increases in autumn months. Though all streams showed significant positive trends in [DOC] in autumn, only C2 had a significant annual increasing trend. There was also a shift in the magnitude of variability in spring [DOC] and increasing trend of summer baseflow [DOC] in C2 and C7.

  5. Dissolved carbon and nitrogen quantity and quality at natural, drained and re-wetted bog sites in Lower Saxony (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Freibauer, Annette

    2013-04-01

    5 % of Germany's land area is covered with peatlands. Due to the large carbon and nitrogen stocks, changes in peatland hydrology for agricultural use have a huge impact on C and N cycling in the peatland and on the export to the atmosphere and adjacent ecosystems. Nonetheless, only a few studies focussed on the impact of drainage and re-wetting on C and N cycling in German raised bogs. Four study sites in the "Ahlenmoor" near Cuxhaven (Northwestern Germany) were chosen. This bog has a deep, medium to weakly decomposed peat layer. The sites represent a gradient of the groundwater level combined with land use differences (intensive and extensive grassland, natural site, re-wetted peat-cutting area). The mean annual groundwater level decreases from the natural and re-wetted sites (near surface) to the extensive grassland (30 cm below surface) and, finally, the intensive grassland (56 cm). The "Peeper" technique (dialysis sampler) was used to measure soil water chemistry in a high spatial resolution. At each site, three peepers (0-60 cm, 12 chambers each) collected soil water samples via diffusion. Monthly sampling was conducted from February 2012 till November 2012. The soil water solution was analysed for pH, EC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), NH4+, NO3- and SUVA(280). Samples taken in November 2012 were additionally analysed for dissolved CO2, CH4 and N2O. Average DOC concentrations ranged from 211 to 41 mg/L and decreased in order intensive > extensive grassland > re-wetted = natural site. After 10 years of restoration, the re-wetted and the natural site show similar DOC concentrations. Average SUVA(280) values of 3.7 to 3.3 L/(mg m) were higher at the grassland sites than at the re-wetted and the natural site. This indicates a distinct increase in aromaticity of DOC in grassland sites as a result of more intense humification of the upper peat layer. In contrast to mineral soils, SUVA(280) remained constant with depth at our sites

  6. Seasonal and regional variability in dissolved and particulate iron fluxes via glacial runoff along the West Greenland coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquette, K.; Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Harrold, Z.; Liu, L.; Dieser, M.; Cameron, K. A.; Christner, B. C.; Junge, K.

    2012-12-01

    Subglacial weathering, due to biogeochemical and physical weathering processes, can affect the chemical evolution of subglacial waters and release dissolved and particulate iron via glacial runoff. Iron is a growth limiting nutrient and plays a critical role in the biogeochemical cycles of coastal and marine waters. More recently, dissolved and colloidal iron derived from subglacial sources have been considered an important contributor of Fe fluxes to the ocean; however, their dependency on lithology, grain size, and microbial activity is not well understood. This study characterizes the solute chemistry, in particular iron mineralogy and dissolved iron concentrations, released from beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), from two locations along the West Greenland coast, Thule (76°N, 68°W) and Kangerlussuaq (67°N, 50°W). We hypothesize that the subglacial lithology has a control on Fe fluxes from the GrIS to coastal and marine systems. The underlying bedrock in Thule is the Precambrian Dundas and Narssarssuk sedimentary formations which include sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The bedrock in Kangerlussuaq is dominated by Archean granodioritic gneiss and amphibolite within the Nagssugtoqidian Orogen. Supra and subglacial meltwater samples were collected directly in front of the Ice Sheet over an entire melt season in 2011 (North River, Thule) and 2012 (Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua River, Kangerlussuaq). In situ parameters such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and electrical conductivity were recorded in order to interpret meltwater chemistry. Dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) species were fixed immediately and analyzed within 24 hours after sampling in the field laboratory using a spectrophotometer and 10 cm cell. Total dissolved iron (FeT) of different size fractions (<0.22 and <0.05 μm) of iron were determined back in the home laboratory using reaction cell ICP MS. Preliminary results demonstrate that subglacial meltwater of North River has average Fe

  7. Spectral studies of pH dye films for detection of toxic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Wieslaw; Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Golubkov, Sergei P.; Borsuk, Pavel S.

    1993-09-01

    The molecular absorption spectra of pH dyes, employed for ammonia sensing are investigated. Differences of absorption spectra of Bromothymol Blue and Bromocresol Purple dyes, dissolved in water and entrapped in Polymethylphenylsiloxane film are discussed. Correspondence of dye-films absorption bands shape to the Gauss distribution shape in the spectral region of light source emission band was determined.

  8. Export of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen from drained and re-wetted bog sites in Lower Saxony (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Freibauer, Annette

    2014-05-01

    Today, nearly all peatlands in Germany are drained for agriculture, forestry and peat cutting. The export of dissolved organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) may be important for the overall C and N balances and affects downstream ecosystems. While drainage generally increases solute losses, there is nearly no C and N export data of raised bogs in Germany which can be used to evaluate both the impact of drainage associated with intensive land use and the re-wetting of peat cutting sites. In the "Ahlenmoor" (North-Western Germany), four sampling points were chosen. Three sampling points represent a deeply drained intensively used grassland at various scales ranging from a drainage pipe (DP, 0.08 ha) and a drainage ditch (DD, 6.8 ha) to a collector ditch (CD, 20 ha). The fourth sampling point (RW) is a former peat cutting site (23 ha) re-wetted 10 years ago. At this site, polder technique was used to establish water tables at the soil surface. Sampling and discharge measurements were conducted bi-weekly from June 2011 to June 2013. Water table levels were recorded with automatic pressure sensors, and rating curves between discharge and water levels were used to calculate continuous discharge values. Samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), sulphate (SO42-), pH, electric conductivity (EC) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA). The discharge did not vary strongly between the sampling points and was slightly lower in the second year. Concentrations of all measured solutes were higher at the intensive grassland (DP, DD and CD) than at the re-wetted site. Surprisingly, SUVA showed no difference between all sites, while the DOC to DON ratio was narrower at DP, DD and CD than at RW. This indicates an export of more degraded dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the drained area. At the grassland sites, no statistical differences were found between the three scales

  9. Dissolved-oxygen regimen of the Willamette River, Oregon, under conditions of basinwide secondary treatment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, Walter G.; McKenzie, S.W.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Evaluation of planning alternatives for maintaining desirable dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rickert, David A.; Rinella, F.A.; Hines, W.G.; McKenzie, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Steady-state dissolved oxygen model of the Willamette River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Stuart W.; Hines, W.G.; Rickert, D.A.; Rinella, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    For nearly half a century the Willamette River in Oregon experienced severe dissolved-oxygen problems related to large loads of organically rich waste waters from industries and municipalities. Since the mid-1950 's dissolved oxygen quality has gradually improved owing to low-flow augmentation, the achievement of basinwide secondary treatment, and the use of other waste-management practices. As a result, summer dissolved-oxygen levels have increased, salmon runs have returned, and the overall effort is widely regarded as a singular water-quality success. To document the improved dissolved-oxygen regimen, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted intensive studies of the Willamette during the summer low-flow seasons of 1973 and 1974. During each summer the mean daily dissolved-oxygen levels were found to be higher than 5 milligrams per liter throughout the river. Because of the basinwide secondary treatment, carbonaceous deoxygenation rates were low. In addition, almost half of the biochemical oxygen demand entering the Willamette was from diffuse (nonpoint) sources rather than outfalls. These results indicated that point-source biochemical oxygen demand was no longer the primary cause of dissolved-oxygen depletion. Instead, the major causes of deoxygenation were nitrification in a shallow ' surface active ' reach below Salem and an anomalous oxygen demand (believed to be primarily of benthal origin) in Portland Harbor. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. The chemistry of iron, aluminum, and dissolved organic material in three acidic, metal-enriched, mountain streams, as controlled by watershed and in-stream processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, Kenneth E.

    1990-01-01

    Several studies were conducted in three acidic, metal-enriched, mountain streams, and the results are discussed together in this paper to provide a synthesis of watershed and in-stream processes controlling Fe, Al, and DOC (dissolved organic carbon) concentrations. One of the streams, the Snake River, is naturally acidic; the other two, Peru Creek and St. Kevin Gulch, receive acid mine drainage. Analysis of stream water chemistry data for the acidic headwaters of the Snake River shows that some trace metal solutes (Al, Mn, Zn) are correlated with major ions, indicating that watershed processes control their concentrations. Once in the stream, biogeochemical processes can control transport if they occur over time scales comparable to those for hydrologic transport. Examples of the following in-stream reactions are presented: (1) photoreduction and dissolution of hydrous iron oxides in response to an experimental decrease in stream pH, (2) precipitation of Al at three stream confluences, and (3) sorption of dissolved organic material by hydrous iron and aluminum oxides in a stream confluence. The extent of these reactions is evaluated using conservative tracers and a transport model that includes storage in the substream zone.

  13. Hearing Protection for Bone-Conducted Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-123 14 - 1 Hearing Protection for Bone-Conducted Sound Anthony J. Dietz, Ph.D. B. Scott May, Ph.D., Darin A. Knaus, Ph.D., Harold P...R.L., Fogler , J. L. and McElhaney, J. H., “Driving Point Impedance Characteristics of the Head,” J. Biomechanics, Vol. 4, 1971, pp. 127–139. [9

  14. Water quality and dissolved inorganic fluxes of N, P, SO₄, and K of a small catchment river in the Southwestern Coast of India.

    PubMed

    Padmalal, D; Remya, S I; Jyothi, S Jissy; Baijulal, B; Babu, K N; Baiju, R S

    2012-03-01

    The southwestern coast of India is drained by many small rivers with lengths less than 250 km and catchment areas less than 6,500 km(2). These rivers are perennial and are also the major drinking water sources in the region. But, the fast pace of urbanization, industrialization, fertilizer intensive agricultural activities and rise in pilgrim tourism in the past four to five decades have imposed marked changes in water quality and solute fluxes of many of these rivers. The problems have aggravated further due to leaching of ionic constituents from the organic-rich (peaty) impervious sub-surface layers that are exposed due to channel incision resulting from indiscriminate instream mining for construction-grade sand and gravel. In this context, an attempt has been made here to evaluate the water quality and the net nutrient flux of one of the important rivers in the southwestern coast of India, the Manimala river which has a length of about 90 km and catchment area of 847 km(2). The river exhibits seasonal variation in most of the water quality parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, total dissolved solids, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, HCO(3), NO(2)-N, NO(3)-N, P[Formula: see text], P[Formula: see text], chloride, SO(4), and SiO(2)). Except for NO(3)-N and SiO(2), all the other parameters are generally enriched in non-monsoon (December-May) samples than that of monsoon (June-November). The flux estimation reveals that the Manimala river transports an amount of 2,308 t y(-1) of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, 87 t y(-1) dissolved inorganic phosphorus, and 9246 t y(-1) of SO(4), and 1984 t y(-1) K into the receiving coastal waters. These together constitute about 23% of the total dissolved fluxes transported by the Manimala river. Based on the study, a set of mitigation measures are also suggested to improve the overall water quality of small catchment rivers of the densely populated tropics in general and the south western coast in particular.

  15. The Effective Diffusion Coefficient of Dissolved Oxygen and Oxidation Rate of Pyrite by Dissolved Oxygen in Compacted Purified and Crude Sodium Bentonites in Carbonate Buffered Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Manaka, Mitsuo

    2003-09-15

    Immediately after the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the oxygen initially existing in the repository is expected to strongly affect the redox condition of the near field. The oxygen dissolves in the groundwater, is transported by diffusion through it, and is consumed by the oxidation of pyrite as an impurity in bentonite. To assess the influence of the oxygen, this study was conducted to estimate the diffusion of dissolved oxygen (DO) and the rate of pyrite oxidation by DO in compacted purified and crude sodium bentonites (SBs) in more detail than the Manaka et al. study. The effective diffusion coefficient (De) of DO in the compacted purified SB was measured in low ionic strength solution (carbonate buffered solution with pH {approx} 9) using the electrochemical method. The empirical equation between De value of DO and dry density (0.5 x 10{sup 3}-1.8 x 10{sup 3} kg m{sup -3}) of purified SB was obtained as follows:De{sub DO}{sup Kunipia-F} = 8.2 {+-} 1.5 x 10{sup -10}x exp(-2.6 {+-} 0.2 x10{sup -3}{rho},where De{sub DO}{sup Kunipia-F} is the De of DO in compacted purified SB (Kunipia F) (m{sup 2} s{sup -1}) and {rho} is the dry density of the SB (kg m{sup -3}).On the other hand, the De value of DO in the compacted crude SB was estimated using the relationship between De values of tritiated water in compacted purified and crude SBs. The empirical equation between the De value of DO and dry density (0.5 x 10{sup 3}-1.8 x 10{sup 3} kg m{sup -3}) of crude SB was derived as follows:De{sub DO}{sup Kunigel-V1} = 2.04 x 10{sup -9} exp(-2.6 x 10{sup -3}{rho}),where De{sub DO}{sup Kunigel-V1} is the De of DO in compacted crude SB (Kunigel V1) (m{sup 2} s{sup -1}) and {rho} is the dry density of the SB (kg m{sup -3}).The rates of pyrite oxidation by DO were estimated from the experimental data in pyrite-purified SB systems using the obtained De values of DO. The relation between rate constant (k') of pyrite oxidation by DO and dry density ({rho}) of

  16. Eutrophication and acidification: Do they induce changes in the dissolved organic matter dynamics in the coastal Mediterranean Sea?

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Fran L; Nieto-Cid, Mar; Borrull, Encarna; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles; Sala, Maria Montserrat; Pinhassi, Jarone; Gasol, Josep M; Marrasé, Cèlia

    2016-09-01

    Two mesocosms experiments were conducted in winter 2010 and summer 2011 to examine how increased pCO2 and/or nutrient concentrations potentially perturbate dissolved organic matter dynamics in natural microbial assemblages. The fluorescence signals of protein- and humic-like compounds were used as a proxy for labile and non-labile material, respectively, while the evolution of bacterial populations, chlorophyll a (Chl a) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were used as a proxy for biological activity. For both seasons, the presence of elevated pCO2 did not cause any significant change in the DOC dynamics (p-value<0.05). The conditions that showed the greatest changes in prokaryote abundances and Chl a content were those amended with nutrients, regardless of the change in pH. The temporal evolution of fluorophores and optical indices revealed that the degree of humification of the organic molecules and their molecular weight changed significantly in the nutrient-amended treatment. The generation of protein-like compounds was paired to increases in the prokaryote abundance, being higher in the nutrient-amended tanks than in the control. Different patterns in the magnitude and direction of the generation of humic-like molecules suggested that these changes depended on initial microbial populations and the availability of extra nutrient inputs. Based on our results, it is expected that in the future projected coastal scenarios the eutrophication processes will favor the transformations of labile and recalcitrant carbon regardless of changes in pCO2.

  17. Humic Acid Complexation of Th, Hf and Zr in Ligand Competition Experiments: Metal Loading and Ph Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The mobility of metals in soils and subsurface aquifers is strongly affected by sorption and complexation with dissolved organic matter, oxyhydroxides, clay minerals, and inorganic ligands. Humic substances (HS) are organic macromolecules with functional groups that have a strong affinity for binding metals, such as actinides. Thorium, often studied as an analog for tetravalent actinides, has also been shown to strongly associate with dissolved and colloidal HS in natural waters. The effects of HS on the mobilization dynamics of actinides are of particular interest in risk assessment of nuclear waste repositories. Here, we present conditional equilibrium binding constants (Kc, MHA) of thorium, hafnium, and zirconium-humic acid complexes from ligand competition experiments using capillary electrophoresis coupled with ICP-MS (CE- ICP-MS). Equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange (EDLE) experiments using size exclusion via a 1000 Damembrane were also performed to validate the CE-ICP-MS analysis. Experiments were performed at pH 3.5-7 with solutions containing one tetravalent metal (Th, Hf, or Zr), Elliot soil humic acid (EHA) or Pahokee peat humic acid (PHA), and EDTA. CE-ICP-MS and EDLE experiments yielded nearly identical binding constants for the metal- humic acid complexes, indicating that both methods are appropriate for examining metal speciation at conditions lower than neutral pH. We find that tetravalent metals form strong complexes with humic acids, with Kc, MHA several orders of magnitude above REE-humic complexes. Experiments were conducted at a range of dissolved HA concentrations to examine the effect of [HA]/[Th] molar ratio on Kc, MHA. At low metal loading conditions (i.e. elevated [HA]/[Th] ratios) the ThHA binding constant reached values that were not affected by the relative abundance of humic acid and thorium. The importance of [HA]/[Th] molar ratios on constraining the equilibrium of MHA complexation is apparent when our estimated Kc, MHA values

  18. Dissolved metals and associated constituents in abandoned coal-mine discharges, Pennsylvania, USA. Part 2: Geochemical controls on constituent concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Water-quality data for discharges from 140 abandoned mines in the Anthracite and Bituminous Coalfields of Pennsylvania reveal complex relations among the pH and dissolved solute concentrations that can be explained with geochemical equilibrium models. Observed values of pH ranged from 2.7 to 7.3 in the coal-mine discharges (CMD). Generally, flow rates were smaller and solute concentrations were greater for low-pH CMD samples; pH typically increased with flow rate. Although the frequency distribution of pH was similar for the anthracite and bituminous discharges, the bituminous discharges had smaller median flow rates; greater concentrations of SO4, Fe, Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni and Sr; comparable concentrations of Mn, Cd, Zn and Se; and smaller concentrations of Ba and Pb than anthracite discharges with the same pH values. The observed relations between the pH and constituent concentrations can be attributed to (1) dilution of acidic water by near-neutral or alkaline ground water; (2) solubility control of Al, Fe, Mn, Ba and Sr by hydroxide, sulfate, and/or carbonate minerals; and (3) aqueous SO4-complexation and surface-complexation (adsorption) reactions. The formation of AlSO4+ and AlHSO42 + complexes adds to the total dissolved Al concentration at equilibrium with Al(OH)3 and/or Al hydroxysulfate phases and can account for 10-20 times greater concentrations of dissolved Al in SO4-laden bituminous discharges compared to anthracite discharges at pH of 5. Sulfate complexation can also account for 10-30 times greater concentrations of dissolved FeIII concentrations at equilibrium with Fe(OH)3 and/or schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)4.5(SO4)1.75) at pH of 3-5. In contrast, lower Ba concentrations in bituminous discharges indicate that elevated SO4 concentrations in these CMD sources could limit Ba concentrations by the precipitation of barite (BaSO4). Coprecipitation of Sr with barite could limit concentrations of this element. However, concentrations of dissolved Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn

  19. Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Rachael Miller

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

  20. Dissolving Microneedles for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    Microfabrication technology has been adapted to produce micron-scale needles as a safer and painless alternative to hypodermic needle injection, especially for protein biotherapeutics and vaccines. This study presents a design that encapsulates molecules within microneedles that dissolve within the skin for bolus or sustained delivery and leave behind no biohazardous sharp medical waste. A fabrication process was developed based on casting a viscous aqueous solution during centrifugation to fill a micro-fabricated mold with biocompatible carboxymethylcellulose or amylopectin formulations. This process encapsulated sulforhodamine B, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme; lysozyme was shown to retain full enzymatic activity after encapsulation and to remain 96% active after storage for two months at room temperature. Microneedles were also shown to be strong enough to insert into cadaver skin and then to dissolve within minutes. Bolus delivery was achieved by encapsulating molecules just within microneedle shafts. For the first time, sustained delivery over hours to days was achieved by encapsulating molecules within the microneedle backing, which served as a controlled release reservoir that delivered molecules by a combination of swelling the backing with interstitial fluid drawn out of the skin and molecule diffusion into the skin via channels formed by dissolved microneedles. We conclude that dissolving microneedles can be designed to gently encapsulate molecules, insert into skin, and enable bolus or sustained release delivery. PMID:18261792

  1. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  2. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Dissolved Oxygen - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the dissolved oxygen module, when to list dissolved oxygen as a candidate cause, ways to measure dissolved oxygen, simple and detailed conceptual model diagrams for dissolved oxygen, references for the dissolved oxygen module.

  3. Community-Level Effects of Excess Total Dissolved Solids Doses Using Model Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Model stream chronic dosing studies (42 days) were conducted with four different total dissolved solids (TDS) recipes. The recipes differed in their relative dominance of major ions. One was made from sodium and calcium chloride salts only. Another was similar to the first, but a...

  4. Kaolinite dissolution and precipitation kinetics at 22oC and pH 4

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, Carl; Yang, L.; Steefel, C.I.

    2008-04-01

    Dissolution and precipitation rates of low defect Georgia kaolinite (KGa-1b) as a function of Gibbs free energy of reaction (or reaction affinity) were measured at 22 C and pH 4 in continuously stirred flowthrough reactors. Steady state dissolution experiments showed slightly incongruent dissolution, with a Si/Al ratio of about 1.12 that is attributed to the re-adsorption of Al on to the kaolinite surface. No inhibition of the kaolinite dissolution rate was apparent when dissolved aluminum was varied from 0 and 60 {micro}M. The relationship between dissolution rates and the reaction affinity can be described well by a Transition State Theory (TST) rate formulation with a Temkin coefficient of 2 R{sub diss} (mol/m{sup 2}s) = 1.15 x 10{sup -13} [1-exp(-{Delta}G/2RT)]. Stopping of flow in a close to equilibrium dissolution experiment yielded a solubility constant for kaolinite at 22 C of 10{sup 7.57}. Experiments on the precipitation kinetics of kaolinite showed a more complex behavior. One conducted using kaolinite seed that had previously undergone extensive dissolution under far from equilibrium conditions for 5 months showed a quasi-steady state precipitation rate for 105 hours that was compatible with the TST expression above. After this initial period, however, precipitation rates decreased by an order of magnitude, and like other precipitation experiments conducted at higher supersaturation and without kaolinite seed subjected to extensive prior dissolution, could not be described with the TST law. The initial quasi-steady state rate is interpreted as growth on activated sites created by the dissolution process, but this reversible growth mechanism could not be maintained once these sites were filled. Long-term precipitation rates showed a linear dependence on solution saturation state that is generally consistent with a two dimensional nucleation growth mechanism following the equation R{sub ppt}(mol/m{sup 2}s) = 3.38 x 10{sup -14} exp[- 181776/T{sup 2} 1n

  5. The pH Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  6. [Geochemical distribution of dissolved bismuth in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Dan; Song, Jin-Ming; Wu, Bin; Li, Xue-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Occurrence level, geochemical distribution of dissolved bismuth and its coupling relationship to eco-environment were investigated in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea to explore the source and influencing factors. The results showed that the concentration of dissolved bismuth was within the range of 0-0. 029 microg x L(-1) at the surface and 0.001-0.189 microg x L(-1) at the bottom, with the averages of 0.008 and 0.016 microg x L(-1), respectively. Horizontally, low value of dissolved bismuth exhibited the bidirectional extension feature, indicating that it could trace the path of Changjiang Diluted Water. High value of dissolved bismuth was observed where the Subei Costal Current and Yellow Sea Warm Current flowed and the Changjiang Diluted Water and Zhejiang-Fujian Coastal Current met, suggesting that it was controlled by the cycle of current system. Vertically, the coastal water was fully mixed by water convection and eddy mixing, and was divided from the stratified water by strong tidal front, which blocked the transport of dissolved bismuth to the open sea. Thus, the concentration in front area was significantly higher than that in the open sea. Diurnal variation of dissolved bismuth was related to the hydrodynamic conditions (tide, suspension and thermocline) instead of the environmental factors (temperature and salinity). Positive relationship to SPM (suspended particulate matter) clarified that bismuth was prone to release from solid phase to liquid phase. Furthermore, conditions with temperature ranging 22-27 degrees C, salinity ranging 28-31 and pH ranging 7.9-8.1 were shown to be optimal for the release process.

  7. Geochemical behaviour of dissolved trace elements in a monsoon-dominated tropical river basin, Southwestern India.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthy, G P; Balakrishna, K; Tripti, M; Audry, Stéphane; Riotte, Jean; Braun, J J; Udaya Shankar, H N

    2014-04-01

    The study presents a 3-year time series data on dissolved trace elements and rare earth elements (REEs) in a monsoon-dominated river basin, the Nethravati River in tropical Southwestern India. The river basin lies on the metamorphic transition boundary which separates the Peninsular Gneiss and Southern Granulitic province belonging to Archean and Tertiary-Quaternary period (Western Dharwar Craton). The basin lithology is mainly composed of granite gneiss, charnockite and metasediment. This study highlights the importance of time series data for better estimation of metal fluxes and to understand the geochemical behaviour of metals in a river basin. The dissolved trace elements show seasonality in the river water metal concentrations forming two distinct groups of metals. First group is composed of heavy metals and minor elements that show higher concentrations during dry season and lesser concentrations during the monsoon season. Second group is composed of metals belonging to lanthanides and actinides with higher concentration in the monsoon and lower concentrations during the dry season. Although the metal concentration of both the groups appears to be controlled by the discharge, there are important biogeochemical processes affecting their concentration. This includes redox reactions (for Fe, Mn, As, Mo, Ba and Ce) and pH-mediated adsorption/desorption reactions (for Ni, Co, Cr, Cu and REEs). The abundance of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides as a result of redox processes could be driving the geochemical redistribution of metals in the river water. There is a Ce anomaly (Ce/Ce*) at different time periods, both negative and positive, in case of dissolved phase, whereas there is positive anomaly in the particulate and bed sediments. The Ce anomaly correlates with the variations in the dissolved oxygen indicating the redistribution of Ce between particulate and dissolved phase under acidic to neutral pH and lower concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. Unlike other

  8. Pumping-induced ebullition: a unified and simplified method for measuring multiple dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Browne, Bryant A

    2004-11-01

    The incorporation of multiple dissolved gas measurements in biogeochemical studies remains a difficult and expensive challenge. Incompatibilities in collection, handling, and storage procedures generally force the application of multiple sampling procedures for multiple gases. This paper introduces the concept and application of pumping-induced ebullition (PIE), a unified approach for routine measurement of multiple dissolved gases in natural waters and establishes a new platform for development of in situ real-time dissolved gas monitoring tools. Ebullition (spontaneous formation of bubbles) is induced by pumping a water sample through a narrow-diametertube (a "restrictor") to decrease hydrostatic pressure (PH) below total dissolved gas pressure (PT). Buoyancy is used to trap bubbles within a collection tower where gas accumulates rapidly (1 mL/min) to support multiple chemical analyses. Providing for field collection of an essentially unlimited and unified volume of gas sample, PIE afforded accurate and precise measurements of major (N2, 02, Ar), trace (CO2, N20, CH4) and ultratrace (CFC11, CFC12, CFC113, SF6) dissolved gases in Wisconsin groundwater, revealing interrelationships between denitrification, apparent recharge age-dates, and historical land use. Compared to conventional approaches, PIE eliminates multiple gas-specific sampling methods, reduces data computations, simplifies laboratory instrumentation, and avoids aqueous production and consumption of biogenic gases during sample storage. A lake depth profile for CO2 demonstrates PIE's flexibility as an in situ real-time platform for dissolved gas measurements. The apparent departures of some gases (SF6, H2, N2O, CO2) from solubility equilibrium behavior warrant further confirmation and theoretical investigation.

  9. Updated determination of particulate and dissolved thorium-234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, Alan P.

    The determination of particulate and dissolved 234Th is similar to the procedure of Anderson and Fleer [1982]. Samples are collected using 30 L Niskin bottles with Teflon- or epoxy-coated internal springs. On deck, the sample is pumped with a delrin impeller pump through a 0.45 μm pore size 147-mm diameter Millipore filter and into a pre-rinsed 6 gallon plastic cubitainer held in a plastic milk crate. An in-line plastic water meter records volumes in gallons. The particulate sample filter is folded twice and stored in a polyethylene sample bag. To the ˜20 L filtered sample is added: 30 mL reagent grade 16 N HNO3; 500 mL 230Th tracer of ˜30 dpm mL-l and 5 mL 50 mg mL-l iron carrier previously cleaned by extraction into isopropyl ether from an 8 M HCl solution and back-extracted into 0.1 M HCl. The acidified sample is allowed to equilibrate for from one day to a maximum of several days. The sample is weighed on a Heathkit digital scale and the pH is adjusted to approximately 8 with about 40 mL 10 M NH4OH to precipitate iron hydroxide, which carries the thorium and uranium from the solution. The precipitate is allowed to settle for 12 to 24 hours. The supernate is drawn off, and the precipitate is spun down in a centrifuge tube to about an 8 mL volume. The precipitate is resuspended in distilled water and spun down again, then dissolved in three times its volume with 12 N HCl to make a 9 N HCl solution. A 1.5 cm×12 cm ion exchange column is filled with AG1×8 100-200 mesh resin and conditioned with 9 N HCl. The sample solution is run slowly through.

  10. Possible method for dissolved organic carbon speciation in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabek, O.; Tejnecký, V.; Ash, C.; Hubova, P.; Boruvka, L.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a natural part of dissolved organic matter and it plays an important role in the biogeochemistry of soil processes. Low Molecular Mass Organic Acids (LMMOA) are an essential part of DOC. These acids play a key role in chemical processes that affect the entire soil environment. Knowing the amount of DOC and the speciation of LMMOA is required for realistic equilibrium modelling of soil chemical processes and transport mechanisms. There have been a number of proposed methods for the quantitative analysis of DOC and for speciation of LMMOA. The first aim of this contribution is to introduce and test a modified spectroscopic method for the determination of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) from forest soils. In general this method is based on the oxidization of WEOC by chromium-sulphuric acid. The presented method can be used as an economical alternative to the classical, more financially demanding elemental analysis. However, the main aim is to test the reliability of the method for LMMOA speciation. Ion exchange chromatography (IC) with hydroxide elution has proven to be a useful tool for the determination of LMMOA in many different water-based samples. However, the influence of multivalent cations (often present in environmental samples) on IC results has not yet been sufficiently studied. In order to assess the influence of Al, Fe, Mn, Mg and Ca on the amount of LMMOA determined by IC, an extensive set of model solutions was prepared and immediately analysed by means of IC. Moreover, the influence of pH on determined amounts of LMMOA in model solutions and representative soil aqueous extracts was investigated. These experimental results were compared to expected values and also to results provided by the chemical equilibrium model - PHREEQC. Based on the above listed research, some modifications to the common IC method for LMMOA speciation are presented.

  11. Observations of changes in the dissolved CO2 system in the North Sea, in four summers of the 2001-2011 decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clargo, Nicola; Salt, Lesley; Thomas, Helmuth; de Baar, Hein

    2015-04-01

    Since the industrial revolution, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) have risen dramatically, largely due to the combustion of fossil fuels, changes in land-use patterns and the production of cement. The oceans have absorbed a large amount of this CO2, with resulting impacts on ocean chemistry. Coastal seas play a significant role in the mitigation of anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 as they contribute approximately 10-30% of global primary productivity despite accounting for only 7% of the surface area. The North Sea is a perfect natural laboratory in which to study the CO2 system as it consists of two biogeochemically distinct regions displaying both oceanic and relatively coastal behaviour. It has also been identified as a continental shelf pump with respect to CO2, transporting it to the deeper waters of the North Atlantic. Large scale forcing has been shown to have a significant impact on the CO2 system over varying time scales, often masking the effects of anthropogenic influence. Here, we present data from the North Sea spanning the 2001-2011 decade. In order to investigate the dynamics of the dissolved CO2 system in this region in the face of climate change, four basin-wide cruises were conducted during the summers of 2001, 2005, 2008 and 2011. The acquired Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) and alkalinity data were then used to fully resolve the carbon system in order to assess trends over the 2001-2011 decade. We find significant interannual variability, but with a consistent, notable trend in decreasing pH. We found that surface alkalinity remained relatively constant over the decade, whereas DIC increased, indicating that the pH decline is DIC-driven. We also found that the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increased faster than concurrent atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and that the CO2 buffering capacity of the North Sea decreased over the decade, with implications for future CO2 uptake.

  12. Effects of Co-Varying Diel-Cycling Hypoxia and pH on Growth in the Juvenile Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, Andrew G.; Breitburg, Denise L.; Burrell, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Shallow water provides important habitat for many species, but also exposes these organisms to daily fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH caused by cycles in the balance between photosynthesis and respiration that can contribute to repeated, brief periods of hypoxia and low pH (caused by elevated pCO2). The amplitude of these cycles, and the severity and duration of hypoxia and hypercapnia that result, can be increased by eutrophication, and are predicted to worsen with climate change. We conducted laboratory experiments to test the effects of both diel-cycling and constant low DO and pH (elevated pCO2) on growth of the juvenile eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), an economically and ecologically important estuarine species. Severe diel-cycling hypoxia (to 0.5 mg O2 L-1) reduced shell growth in juvenile oysters, as did constant hypoxia (1.2 and 2.0 mg O2 L-1), although effects varied among experiments, oyster ages, and exposure durations. Diel-cycling pH reduced growth only in experiments in which calcite saturation state cycled to ≤0.10 and only during the initial weeks of these experiments. In other cases, cycling pH sometimes led to increased growth rates. Comparisons of treatment effects across multiple weeks of exposure, and during a longer post-experiment field deployment, indicated that juvenile oysters can acclimate to, and in some cases compensate for initial reductions in growth. As a result, some ecosystem services dependent on juvenile oyster growth rates may be preserved even under severe cycling hypoxia and pH. PMID:27548256

  13. An in-situ Mobile pH Calibrator for application with HOV and ROV platform in deep sea environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, a novel in-situ sensor calibration instrument, Mobile pH Calibrator (MpHC), was developed for application with HOV Alvin. It was specifically designed to conduct in-situ pH measurement in deep sea hydrothermal diffuse fluids with in-situ calibration function. In general, the sensor calibrator involves three integrated electrodes (pH, dissolved H2 and H2S) and a temperature sensor, all of which are installed in a cell with a volume of ~ 1 ml. A PEEK check valve cartridge is installed at the inlet end of the cell to guide the flow path during the measurement and calibration processes. Two PEEK tubes are connected at outlet end of the cell for drawing out hydrothermal fluid and delivering pH buffer fluids. During its measurement operation, the pump draws in hydrothermal fluid, which then passes through the check valve directly into the sensing cell. When in calibration mode, the pump delivers pH buffers into the cell, while automatically closing the check valve to the outside environment. This probe has two advantages compared to our previous unit used during KNOX18RR MAR cruise in 2008 and MARS cabled observatory deployment in 2012. First, in the former design, a 5 cm solenoid valve was equipped with the probe. This enlarged size prevented its application in specific point or small area. In this version, the probe has only a dimension of 1.6 cm for an easy access to hydrothermal biological environments. Secondly, the maximum temperature condition of the earlier system was limited by the solenoid valve precluding operation in excess of 50 ºC. The new design avoids this problem, which improves its temperature tolerance. The upper limit of temperature condition is now up to 100oC, therefore enabling broader application in hydrothermal diffuse flow system on the seafloor. During SVC cruise (AT26-12) in the Gulf of Mexico this year, the MpHC was successfully tested with Alvin dives at the depth up to 2600 m for measuring pH with in-situ calibration in seafloor

  14. The impact of blocking natural peat pipes on dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Joseph; Baird, Andy; Parry, Lauren; Chapman, Pippa; Palmer, Sheila; Wallage, Zoe; Wynne, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Natural pipes transport water and aquatic carbon through peatlands. In 2010 pipes were blocked on Keighley Moor in northern England as part of a peatland restoration programme aimed at reducing water discolouration and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release into stream waters used for potable water supply. Blocked and open pipes were monitored for water quality between June 2012 and October 2013. The DOC, water colour, conductivity and pH were not significantly different between open pipes and water flowing from areas where pipe blocking had occurred. A before-after control-treatment experiment was devised at another peatland site - Moor House World Biosphere Reserve in northern England. Here, the areas around six pipes were monitored for water quality, discharge, water tables, and overland flow. Four of the pipes were then blocked while monitoring continued on all six pipes. The Moor House investigation suggests that the overall effects of blocking on water colour and DOC in the following summer were small (5 % decrease in absorbance at 254 nm but 7 % increase in absorbance at 400 nm, and 2 % decrease in DOC relative to open pipe controls). There were large (40-117 %) local increases in colour and DOC in overland flow but decreases in soil water (7-10 %) relative to the areas around open pipes. Water tables rose by a few cm upslope of the pipe dams. However, downslope, water tables fell by a similar amount, thereby potentially counteracting any water quality benefits resulting from shallower water tables upslope. Pipe blocking is expensive, and our results to date suggest that any water quality benefits are outweighed by the cost of blocking. However, in highly-degraded sites where pipes are rapidly expanding to form gullies, pipe blocking may be useful as part of a larger suite of measures to help reduce peat erosion.

  15. Mobilization of cadmium by dissolved organic matter in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingqiang; Liang, Chengfeng; Han, Xuan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2013-05-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to investigate the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Cd speciation in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype (HE) and non-hyperaccumulating ecotype (NHE) of Sedum alfredii and its effects on Cd mobility. After growing HE S. alfredii, the rhizosphere soil solution pH of heavily polluted soil (HPS) and slightly polluted soil (SPS) was reduced by 0.49 and 0.40 units, respectively, due to enhanced DOC derived from root exudation. The total Cd concentration in soil solution decreased significantly but the decrease accounted for less than 1% of the total Cd uptake in the shoots of HE S. alfredii. Visual MINTEQ speciation predicted that Cd-DOM complexes were the dominant Cd species in soil solutions after the growth of S. alfredii for both soils, followed by the free metal Cd(2+) species. However, Cd-DOM complexes fraction in the rhizosphere soil solution of HE S. alfredii (89.1% and 74.6% for HPS and SPS, respectively) were much greater than NHE S. alfredii (82.8% and 64.7% for HPS and SPS, respectively). Resin equilibration experiment results indicated that DOM from the rhizosphere (R-DOM) of both ecotypes of S. alfredii had the ability to form complexes with Cd, whereas the degree of complexation was significantly higher for HE-R-DOM (79-89%) than NHE-R-DOM (63-74%) in the undiluted sample. The addition of HE-R-DOM significantly (P<0.05) increased the solubility of four Cd minerals while NHE-R-DOM was not as effective at the same concentration. It was concluded that DOM in the rhizosphere of hyperaccumulating ecotype of S. alfredii could significantly increase Cd mobility through the formation of soluble DOM-metal complexes.

  16. Dissolved Zinc Measurements Using Shipboard FIA During the 2008 GEOTRACES Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnell, K. J.; Landing, W. M.; Milne, A.

    2008-12-01

    Zinc concentrations in the open ocean have been measured accurately by only a few investigators due to the extreme difficulties of collecting and processing seawater samples without introducing Zn contamination. Accurate measurements of dissolved Zn are important for understanding the biogeochemical behavior of this important biochemically required element in the open ocean. Historically, reliable samples for dissolved Zn were collected using Teflon-coated GO-FLO bottles individually hung on Kevlar line. To speed up sample collection, two "Trace Metal" rosette systems were tested during Leg 1 of the GEOTRACES 2008 intercalibration cruise: a large GEOTRACES 24-bottle rosette and the smaller Measures and Landing "CLIVAR" 12-bottle rosette. Both rosettes use 12-liter, Teflon-coated GO- FLO bottles equipped with Teflon spigots and modified air-relief fittings, allowing for pressure filtration. Contamination for dissolved Zn was eliminated in the 12-liter Teflon-lined GO-FLO bottles by repeated deployments ("flushing") on both rosette systems. A Flow Injection (FIA) technique for shipboard determination of total dissolved Zn was utilized to test rosette sampling methods for Zn contamination. Samples were acidified to 0.024M HCl (pH 2) for 16 hours. Samples were buffered to pH 5.5 using ammonium acetate buffer. Dissolved Zn was pre-concentrated using a small- volume column of 8-HQ cation exchange resin. After column rinsing, Zn was eluted into the flowing stream of organic reagent p-Tosyl-8-aminoquinoline (pTAQ), which forms fluorescent complexes with Zn. A flow- through fluorometer was used to record peak heights. Calibration was performed via standard additions. Accuracy of this method was established by measuring standard SAFe D2 and S1 samples, as well as multiple samples collected and analyzed throughout Leg 1 of the GEOTRACES 2008 cruise. Dissolved Cadmium (Cd) can additionally form fluorescent complexes with pTAQ. Thus, when necessary, a small, positive, Cd

  17. Probiotic and lactulose: influence on gastrointestinal flora and pH value in minimal hepatic encephalopathy rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Man; Jia, Lin; Zhang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to investigate the influence on gastrointestinal flora, counts of bifidobacteria and Enterobacterceae in colon and pH value of gastrointestinal after lactulose and probiotic treatment on rat experimental minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) induced by thioactamide (TAA). Methods: MHE was induced by intraperitoneal injection of TAA. 48 male MHE models were then randomly divided into 4 groups: control group (n = 12); MHE group (n = 12) received tap water ad libitum only; lactulose group (n = 12) and probiotics group (n = 12) gavaged respectively with 8 ml/kg of lactulose and 1.5 g/kg of probiotic preparation Golden Bifid (highly concentrated combination probiotic) dissolved in 2 ml of normal saline, once a day for 8 days. The latency of Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) I was used as objective index of MHE. Counts of gastrointestinal flora, counts of bifidobacteria and Enterobacterceae in colon and pH value of gastrointestinal were examined respectively. Results: Compared to MHE group, counts of gastrointestinal flora has greatly decreased, ratio of bifidobacteria and Enterobacterceae has greatly increased, pH value of colon has greatly descended (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference between lactulose group and probiotic group (P > 0.05). Both lactulose and probiotics can effectively prevent bacteria translocation and overgrowth, intensify CR, improved value of B/E, and acidify intestinal, decreased pH value of colon. Conclusion: Probiotic compound Golden Bifid is as useful as lactulose for the prevention and treatment of MHE. Probiotic therapy may be a safe, natural, well-tolerated therapy appropriate for the long-term treatment of MHE. PMID:26309689

  18. Influence of pH on microbial hydrogen metabolism in diverse sedimentary ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, S; Conrad, R; Zeikus, J G

    1988-02-01

    Hydrogen transformation kinetic parameters were measured in sediments from anaerobic systems covering a wide range of environmental pH values to assess the influence of pH on hydrogen metabolism. The concentrations of dissolved hydrogen were measured and hydrogen transformation kinetics of the sediments were monitored in the laboratory by monitoring hydrogen consumption progress curves. The hydrogen turnover rate constants (kt) decreased directly as a function of decreasing sediment pH, and the maximum hydrogen uptake velocities (Vmax) varied as a function of pH within each of the trophic states. Conversely, the half-saturation concentrations (Km) were independent of pH. The steady-state hydrogen concentrations were at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the half-saturation constants for hydrogen uptake. Dissolved hydrogen concentrations were at least fivefold higher in sediments from eutrophic systems than from oligotrophic and dystrophic systems. The rates of hydrogen production determined from the assumption of steady state decreased with sediment pH. These data indicate that progressively lower pH values inhibit microbial hydrogen-producing and -consuming processes within sedimentary ecosystems.

  19. The influence of pH on biotite dissolution and alteration kinetics at low temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Acker, James G.; Bricker, O.P.

    1992-01-01

    Biotite dissolution rates in acidic solutions were determined in fluidized-bed reactors and flowthrough columns. Biotite dissolution rates increased inversely as a linear function of pH in the pH range 3-7, where the rate order n = -0.34. Biotite dissolved incongruently over this pH range, with preferential release of magnesium and iron from the octahedral layer. Release of tetrahedral silicon was much greater at pH 3 than at higher pH. Iron release was significantly enhanced by low pH conditions. Solution compositions from a continuous exposure flow-through column of biotite indicated biotite dissolves incongruently at pH 4, consistent with alteration to a vermiculite-type product. Solution compositions from a second intermittent-flow column exhibited elevated cation release rates upon the initiation of each exposure to solution. The presence of strong oxidizing agents, the mineral surface area, and sample preparation methodology also influenced the dissolution or alteration kinetics of biotite. ?? 1992.

  20. Biogeochemical controls of uranium bioavailability from the dissolved phase in natural freshwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, Marie-Noele; Fuller, Christopher C.; Cain, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Aiken, George R.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insights into the risks associated with uranium (U) mining and processing, we investigated the biogeochemical controls of U bioavailability in the model freshwater speciesLymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda). Bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) was characterized in controlled laboratory experiments over a range of water hardness, pH, and in the presence of complexing ligands in the form of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM). Results show that dissolved U is bioavailable under all the geochemical conditions tested. Uranium uptake rates follow first order kinetics over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Uranium uptake rates in L. stagnalis ultimately demonstrate saturation uptake kinetics when exposure concentrations exceed 100 nM, suggesting uptake via a finite number of carriers or ion channels. The lack of a relationship between U uptake rate constants and Ca uptake rates suggest that U does not exclusively use Ca membrane transporters. In general, U bioavailability decreases with increasing pH, increasing Ca and Mg concentrations, and when DOM is present. Competing ions did not affect U uptake rates. Speciation modeling that includes formation constants for U ternary complexes reveals that the aqueous concentration of dicarbonato U species (UO2(CO3)2–2) best predicts U bioavailability to L. stagnalis, challenging the free-ion activity model postulate.

  1. Screening for Dissolved Methane in Groundwater Across Texas Shale Plays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Hildenbrand, Z.; Larson, T.; Darvari, R.; Uhlman, K.; Smyth, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    There is considerable interest in methane concentrations in groundwater, particularly as they relate to hydraulic fracturing in shale plays. Recent studies of aquifers in the footprint of several gas plays across the US have shown that (1) dissolved thermogenic methane may or may not be present in the shallow groundwater and (2) shallow thermogenic methane may be naturally occurring and emplaced through mostly vertical migration over geologic time and not necessarily a consequence of recent unconventional gas production. We are currently conducting a large sampling campaign across the state of Texas to characterize shallow methane in fresh-water aquifers overlying shale plays and other tight formations. We collected a total of ~800 water samples, ~500 in the Barnett, ~150 in the Eagle Ford, ~80 in the Haynesville shale plays as well as ~50 in the Delaware Basin of West Texas. Preliminary analytical results suggest that dissolved methane is not widespread in shallow groundwater and that, when present at concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L, it is often of thermogenic origin according to the isotopic signature and to the presence of other light hydrocarbons. The Barnett Shale contains a large methane hotspot (~ 2 miles wide) along the Hood-Parker county line which is likely of natural origin whereas the Eagle Ford and Haynesville shales, neglecting microbial methane, show more distributed methane occurrences. Samples from the Delaware Basin show no methane except close to blowouts.

  2. Chapter A6. Section 6.3. Specific Electrical Conductance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radtke, Dean B.; Davis, Jerri V.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductance is a measure of the capacity of a substance to conduct an electrical current. The specific electrical conductance (conductivity) of water is a function of the types and quantities of dissolved substances it contains, normalized to a unit length and unit cross section at a specified temperature. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of conductivity in ground and surface waters.

  3. Carbon System Measurements and Potential Climatic Drivers at a Site of Rapidly Declining Ocean pH

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, J. Timothy; Pfister, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored changes in ocean pH in coastal Washington state, USA, by extending a decadal-scale pH data series, by reporting independent measures of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), spectrophotometric pH, and total alkalinity (TA), by exploring pH patterns over larger spatial scales, and by probing for long-term trends in environmental variables reflecting potentially important drivers of pH. We found that pH continued to decline in this area at a rapid rate, that pH exhibited high natural variability within years, that our measurements of pH corresponded well to spectrophotometric pH measures and expected pH calculated from DIC/TA, and that TA estimates based on salinity predicted well actual alkalinity. Multiple datasets reflecting upwelling, including water temperature, nutrient levels, phytoplankton abundance, the NOAA upwelling index, and data on local wind patterns showed no consistent trends over the period of our study. Multiple datasets reflecting precipitation change and freshwater runoff, including precipitation records, local and regional river discharge, salinity, nitrate and sulfate in rainwater, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers also showed no consistent trends over time. Dissolved oxygen did not decline over time, indicating that long-term changes did not result from shifts in contributions of respiration to pH levels. These tests of multiple potential drivers of the observed rapid rate of pH decline indicate a primary role for inorganic carbon and suggest that geochemical models of coastal ocean carbon fluxes need increased investigation. PMID:23285290

  4. Adsorption of dissolved aluminum on sapphire-c and kaolinite: implications for points of zero charge of clay minerals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the impact of dissolved aluminum on interfacial properties of two aluminum bearing minerals, corundum and kaolinite. The effect of intentionally adding dissolved aluminum on electrokinetic potential of basal plane surfaces of sapphire was studied by streaming potential measurements as a function of pH and was complemented by a second harmonic generation (SHG) study at pH 6. The electrokinetic data show a similar trend as the SHG data, suggesting that the SHG electric field correlates to zeta-potential. A comparable study was carried out on kaolinite particles. In this case electrophoretic mobility was measured as a function of pH. In both systems the addition of dissolved aluminum caused significant changes in the charging behavior. The isoelectric point consistently shifted to higher pH values, the extent of the shift depending on the amount of aluminum present or added. The experimental results imply that published isoelectric points of clay minerals may have been affected by this phenomenon. The presence of dissolved aluminum in experimental studies may be caused by particular pre-treatment methods (such as washing in acids and subsequent adsorption of dissolved aluminum) or even simply by starting a series of measurements from extreme pH (causing dissolution), and subsequently varying the pH in the very same batch. This results in interactions of dissolved aluminum with the target surface. A possible interpretation of the experimental results could be that at low aluminum concentrations adatoms of aluminum (we will refer to adsorbed mineral constituents as adatoms) can form at the sapphire basal plane, which can be rather easily removed. Simultaneously, once the surface has been exposed to sufficiently high aluminum concentration, a visible change of the surface is seen by AFM which is attributed to a surface precipitate that cannot be removed under the conditions employed in the current study. In conclusion, whenever pre-treatment or the

  5. Fast dissolving strips: A novel approach for the delivery of verapamil

    PubMed Central

    Kunte, S.; Tandale, P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Fast dissolving drug delivery system offers a solution for those patients having difficulty in swallowing tablets/capsules etc. Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker used as an antianginal, antiarrhythmic, and antihypertensive agent with extensive first pass metabolism which results in less bioavailability. This work investigated the possibility of developing verapamil fast dissolving strips allowing fast, reproducible drug dissolution in the oral cavity; thus bypassing first pass metabolism. Materials and methods: The fast dissolving strips were prepared by solvent casting technique with the help of HPMC E6 and maltodextrin. The strips were evaluated for drug content uniformity, film thickness, folding endurance, in vitro disintegration time, in vitro dissolution studies, surface pH study, and palatability study. Results: Official criteria for evaluation parameters were fulfilled by all formulations. Disintegration time showed by formulations was found to be in range of 20.4–28.6 sec. Based on the evaluation parameters, the formulation containing 2% HPMC E6 and 3.5% maltodextrin showed optimum performance against other formulations. Conclusion: It was concluded that the fast dissolving strips of verapamil can be made by solvent casting technique with enhanced dissolution rate, taste masking, and hence better patient compliance and effective therapy PMID:21180465

  6. Conducting a thermal conductivity survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    A physically transparent approximate theory of phonon decay rates is presented starting from a pair potential model of the interatomic forces in an insulator or semiconductor. The theory applies in the classical regime and relates the 3-phonon decay rate to the third derivative of the pair potential. Phonon dispersion relations do not need to be calculated, as sum rules relate all the needed quantities directly to the pair potential. The Brillouin zone averaged phonon lifetime turns out to involve a dimensionless measure of the anharmonicity multiplied by an effective density of states for 3-phonon decay. Results are given for rare gas and alkali halide crystals. For rare gases, the results are in good agreement with more elaborate perturbation calculations. Comparison to experimental data on phonon linewidths and thermal conductivity are made.

  7. Distribution of dissolved silver in marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriada, J. L.; Achterberg, E. P.; Tappin, A.; Truscott, J.

    2003-04-01

    Silver is one of the most toxic heavy metals, surpassed only by mercury [1-3]. Monitoring of dissolved silver concentrations in natural waters is therefore of great importance. The determination of dissolved silver in waters is not without challenges, because of its low (picomolar) concentrations. Consequently, there are only a few reported studies in marine waters, which have been performed in USA [4-6] and Japan [7]. The analytical techniques used in the reported studies for the determination of silver in seawater were Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (GFAAS) after solvent extraction [2,4,5], and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after solvent extraction or solid phase extraction [7,8]. In this contribution, we will present an optimised Magnetic Sector (MS) ICP-MS technique for the determination of dissolved silver in marine waters. The MS-ICP-MS method used anion exchange column to preconcentrate silver from saline waters, and to remove the saline matrix. The ICP-MS method has been used successfully to determine total dissolved silver in estuarine and oceanic samples. Bibliography 1. H. T. Ratte, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 1999, 18: p. 89-108. 2. R. T. Herrin, A. W. Andren and D. E. Armstrong, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2001, 35: 1953-1958. 3. D. E. Schildkraut, P. T. Dao, J. P. Twist, A. T. Davis and K. A. Robillard, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 1998, 17: 642-649. 4. E. Breuer, S. A. Sanudo-Wilhelmy and R. C. Aller, Estuaries. 1999, 22:603-615. 5. A. R. Flegal, S. A. Sanudowilhelmy and G. M. Scelfo, Mar. Chem. 1995, 49: 315-320. 6. S. N. Luoma, Y. B. Ho and G. W. Bryan, Mar. Pollut. Bull. 1995, 31: 44-54. 7. Y. Zhang, H. Amakawa and Y. Nozaki, Mar. Chem. 2001, 75: 151-163. 8. L. Yang and R. E. Sturgeon, J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 2002, 17: 88-93.

  8. Preservation of samples for dissolved mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    Water samples for dissolved mercury requires special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a large variety of concentrations and dissolved forms. Because this acid-oxidant preservative acts as a sink for airborne mercury and plastic containers are permeable to mercury vapor, glass bottles are preferred for sample collection. To maintain a healthy work environment and minimize the potential for contamination of water samples, mercury and its compounds are isolated from the atmosphere while in storage. Concurrently, a program to monitor environmental levels of mercury vapor in areas of potential contamination is needed to define the extent of mercury contamination and to assess the effectiveness of mercury clean-up procedures.Water samples for dissolved mercury require special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a

  9. Investigating Students' Understanding of the Dissolving Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified several student misconceptions regarding the process of dissolving ionic compounds in water. The present study used multiple-choice questions whose distractors were derived from these misconceptions to assess students' understanding of the dissolving process at the symbolic and particulate levels. The symbolic-level questions were based on balanced equations, and the particulate-level questions used multiple-choice questions involving dynamic animations or static pictures. This paper analyzes students' responses to these questions to look for associations among four variables—Answer (the correct answer and three misconceptions), Representation (symbolic or particulate question), Visualization (static or animated pictures), and Representation Order (symbolic questions before or after the particulate questions). The results indicate that the correct answer and the acid-base misconception were more popular than the ion-pair or subscript error misconceptions, the ion-pair misconception was more popular for the particulate questions than the symbolic questions, and that participants were more likely to select the correct answer when viewing static particulate questions compared to animated particulate questions, especially if the particulate questions are seen first. These results suggest that the animated motion of dissolving these compounds in water may be distracting for students.

  10. Dissolvable microneedle fabrication using piezoelectric dispensing technology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Evin A; O'Mahony, Conor; Cronin, Michael; O'Mahony, Thomas; Moore, Anne C; Crean, Abina M

    2016-03-16

    Dissolvable microneedle (DMN) patches are novel dosage forms for the percutaneous delivery of vaccines. DMN are routinely fabricated by dispensing liquid formulations into microneedle-shaped moulds. The liquid formulation within the mould is then dried to create dissolvable vaccine-loaded microneedles. The precision of the dispensing process is critical to the control of formulation volume loaded into each dissolvable microneedle structure. The dispensing process employed must maintain vaccine integrity. Wetting of mould surfaces by the dispensed formulation is also an important consideration for the fabrication of sharp-tipped DMN. Sharp-tipped DMN are essential for ease of percutaneous administration. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of a piezoelectric dispensing system to dispense picolitre formulation volumes into PDMS moulds enabling the fabrication of bilayer DMN. The influence of formulation components (trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) content) and piezoelectric actuation parameters (voltage, frequency and back pressure) on drop formation is described. The biological integrity of a seasonal influenza vaccine following dispensing was investigated and maintained voltage settings of 30 V but undermined at higher settings, 50 and 80 V. The results demonstrate the capability of piezoelectric dispensing technology to precisely fabricate bilayer DMN. They also highlight the importance of identifying formulation and actuation parameters to ensure controlled droplet formulation and vaccine stabilisation.

  11. 7 CFR 760.908 - Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dissolved entity must be provided. (c) If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their...

  12. Characterisation and deployment of an immobilised pH sensor spot towards surface ocean pH measurements.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Jennifer S; Achterberg, Eric P; Rérolle, Victoire M C; Abi Kaed Bey, Samer; Floquet, Cedric F A; Mowlem, Matthew C

    2015-10-15

    The oceans are a major sink for anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide, and the uptake causes changes to the marine carbonate system and has wide ranging effects on flora and fauna. It is crucial to develop analytical systems that allow us to follow the increase in oceanic pCO2 and corresponding reduction in pH. Miniaturised sensor systems using immobilised fluorescence indicator spots are attractive for this purpose because of their simple design and low power requirements. The technology is increasingly used for oceanic dissolved oxygen measurements. We present a detailed method on the use of immobilised fluorescence indicator spots to determine pH in ocean waters across the pH range 7.6-8.2. We characterised temperature (-0.046 pH/°C from 5 to 25 °C) and salinity dependences (-0.01 pH/psu over 5-35), and performed a preliminary investigation into the influence of chlorophyll on the pH measurement. The apparent pKa of the sensor spots was 6.93 at 20 °C. A drift of 0.00014 R (ca. 0.0004 pH, at 25 °C, salinity 35) was observed over a 3 day period in a laboratory based drift experiment. We achieved a precision of 0.0074 pH units, and observed a drift of 0.06 pH units during a test deployment of 5 week duration in the Southern Ocean as an underway surface ocean sensor, which was corrected for using certified reference materials. The temperature and salinity dependences were accounted for with the algorithm, R=0.00034-0.17·pH+0.15·S(2)+0.0067·T-0.0084·S·1.075. This study provides a first step towards a pH optode system suitable for autonomous deployment. The use of a short duration low power illumination (LED current 0.2 mA, 5 μs illumination time) improved the lifetime and precision of the spot. Further improvements to the pH indicator spot operations include regular application of certified reference materials for drift correction and cross-calibration against a spectrophotometric pH system. Desirable future developments should involve novel

  13. A simple and rapid method for monitoring dissolved oxygen in water with a submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SBMFC) was developed as a biosensor for in situ and real time monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) in environmental waters. Domestic wastewater was utilized as a sole fuel for powering the sensor. The sensor performance was firstly examined with tap water at varying DO levels. With an external resistance of 1000Ω, the current density produced by the sensor (5.6 ± 0.5-462.2 ± 0.5 mA/m(2)) increased linearly with DO level up to 8.8 ± 0.3mg/L (regression coefficient, R(2)=0.9912), while the maximum response time for each measurement was less than 4 min. The current density showed different response to DO levels when different external resistances were applied, but a linear relationship was always observed. Investigation of the sensor performance at different substrate concentrations indicates that the organic matter contained in the domestic wastewater was sufficient to power the sensing activities. The sensor ability was further explored under different environmental conditions (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity, and alternative electron acceptor), and the results indicated that a calibration would be required before field application. Lastly, the sensor was tested with different environmental waters and the results showed no significant difference (p>0.05) with that measured by DO meter. The simple, compact SBMFC sensor showed promising potential for direct, inexpensive and rapid DO monitoring in various environmental waters.

  14. Measurements of the dissolved inorganic carbon system and associated biogeochemical parameters in the Canadian Arctic, 1974-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesbrecht, K. E.; Miller, L. A.; Davelaar, M.; Zimmermann, S.; Carmack, E.; Johnson, W. K.; Macdonald, R. W.; McLaughlin, F.; Mucci, A.; Williams, W. J.; Wong, C. S.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.

    2014-03-01

    We have assembled and conducted primary quality control on previously publicly unavailable water column measurements of the dissolved inorganic carbon system and associated biogeochemical parameters (oxygen, nutrients, etc.) made on 26 cruises in the subarctic and Arctic regions dating back to 1974. The measurements are primarily from the western side of the Canadian Arctic, but also include data that cover an area ranging from the North Pacific to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The data were subjected to primary quality control (QC) to identify outliers and obvious errors. This data set incorporates over four thousand individual measurements of total inorganic carbon (TIC), alkalinity, and pH from the Canadian Arctic over a period of more than 30 years and provides an opportunity to increase our understanding of temporal changes in the inorganic carbon system in northern waters and the Arctic Ocean. The data set is available for download on the CDIAC (Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center) website: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/ftp/oceans/IOS_Arctic_Database/ (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/OTG.IOS_ARCT_CARBN).

  15. Measurements of the dissolved inorganic carbon system and associated biogeochemical parameters in the Canadian Arctic, 1974-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giesbrecht, K. E.; Miller, L. A.; Zimmermann, S.; Carmack, E.; Johnson, W. K.; Macdonald, R. W.; McLaughlin, F.; Mucci, A.; Williams, W. J.; Wong, C. S.; Yamamoto-Kawai, M.

    2013-06-01

    We have assembled and conducted primary quality control on previously publically-unavailable water column measurements of the dissolved inorganic carbon system and associated biogeochemical parameters (oxygen, nutrients, etc.) made on 25 cruises in the subarctic and Arctic regions dating from as far back as 1974. The measurements are primarily from the western side of the Canadian Arctic, but also include data ranging from the North Pacific to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The data were subjected to primary quality control (QC) to identify outliers and obvious errors. This dataset incorporates over four thousand individual measurements of total inorganic carbon (TIC), alkalinity, and pH from the Canadian Arctic over a period of more than 30 yr and provides an opportunity to increase our understanding of temporal changes in the inorganic carbon system in northern waters and the Arctic Ocean. The dataset is available for download on the CDIAC website: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/ftp/oceans/IOS_Arctic_Database/ (doi:10.3334/CDIAC/OTG.IOS_ARCT_CARBN).

  16. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  17. Investigation of organic carbon transformation in soils of dominant dissolved organic carbon source zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pissarello, Anna; Miltner, Anja; Oosterwoud, Marieke; Fleckenstein, Jan; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 20 years both a decrease in soil organic matter (SOM) and an increase in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface water bodies, including drinking water reservoirs, have been recorded in the northern hemisphere. This development has severe consequences for soil fertility and for drinking water purification. As both processes occur simultaneously, we assume that microbial SOM degradation, which transforms SOM into CO2 and DOC, is a possible source of the additional DOC in the surface water. In addition we speculate that both processes are initially triggered by physical mechanisms, resulting in a modification of the organic matter solubility equilibria and thus in higher SOM availability and DOC mobilization. The general hypothesis of the study is therefore that SOM loss and DOC increase are combined consequences of enhanced microbial degradation of SOM and that this is a result of climate variations and global change, e.g. the increase of the temperature, the alteration of the water regime (i.e. increase of the frequency of drying and rewetting cycles and a higher number of heavy rain events), but also the decrease of the atmospheric acid deposition resulting in an increase of soil pH values. The general goal of the study is the identification of the dominant processes and controlling factors involved in soil microbial carbon turnover and mobilization of DOC in soils from catchment areas that contribute DOC to the receiving waters and the downstream Rappbode reservoir, which showed a pronounced increase in DOC concentration in recent years. This reservoir is the source of drinking water for about one million people in northern Germany. Preliminary screening experiments, consisting of 65-day soil batch incubation experiments, have been conducted in order to select the parameters (and the parameter ranges) of relevance for further in-depth experiments. During the experiments, different soil systems were exposed to different

  18. Role of structural Fe in nontronite NAu-1 and dissolved Fe(II) in redox transformations of arsenic and antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Foster, Andrea L.; Trainor, Thomas P.

    2012-10-01

    Oxidation state is a major factor affecting the mobility of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in soil and aquatic systems. Metal (hydr)oxides and clay minerals are effective sorbents, and may also promote redox reactions on their surfaces via direct or indirect facilitation of electron transfer. Iron substituted for Al in the octahedral sites of aluminosilicate clay minerals has the potential to be in variable oxidation states and is a key constituent of electron transfer reactions in clay minerals. This experimental work was conducted to determine whether structural Fe in clays can affect the oxidation state of As and Sb adsorbed at the clay surface. Another goal of our study was to compare the reactivity of clay structural Fe(II) with systems containing Fe(II) present in dissolved/adsorbed forms. The experimental systems included batch reactors with various concentrations of As(III), Sb(III), As(V), or Sb(V) equilibrated with oxidized (NAu-1) or partially reduced (NAu-1-Red) nontronite, hydrous aluminum oxide (HAO) and kaolinite (KGa-1b) suspensions under oxic and anoxic conditions. The reaction times ranged from 0.5 to 720 h, and pH was constrained at 5.5 (for As) and at 5.5 or 8.0 (for Sb). The oxidation state of As and Sb in the liquid phase was determined by liquid chromatography in line with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, and in the solid phase by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our findings show that structural Fe(II) in NAu-1-Red was not able to reduce As(V)/Sb(V) under the conditions examined, but reduction was seen when aqueous Fe(II) was present in the systems with kaolinite (KGa-1b) and nontronite (NAu-1). The ability of the structural Fe in nontronite clay NAu-1 to promote oxidation of As(III)/Sb(III) was greatly affected by its oxidation state: if all structural Fe was in the oxidized Fe(III) form, no oxidation was observed; however, when the clay was partially reduced (˜20% of structural Fe was reduced to Fe(II)), NAu-1-Red promoted

  19. Role of structural Fe in nontronite NAu-1 and dissolved Fe(II) in redox transformations of arsenic and antimony

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Foster, Andrea L.; Trainor, Thomas P.

    2012-11-01

    Oxidation state is a major factor affecting the mobility of arsenic (As) and antimony (Sb) in soil and aquatic systems. Metal (hydr)oxides and clay minerals are effective sorbents, and may also promote redox reactions on their surfaces via direct or indirect facilitation of electron transfer. Iron substituted for Al in the octahedral sites of aluminosilicate clay minerals has the potential to be in variable oxidation states and is a key constituent of electron transfer reactions in clay minerals. This experimental work was conducted to determine whether structural Fe in clays can affect the oxidation state of As and Sb adsorbed at the clay surface. Another goal of our study was to compare the reactivity of clay structural Fe(II) with systems containing Fe(II) present in dissolved/adsorbed forms. The experimental systems included batch reactors with various concentrations of As(III), Sb(III), As(V), or Sb(V) equilibrated with oxidized (NAu-1) or partially reduced (NAu-1-Red) nontronite, hydrous aluminum oxide (HAO) and kaolinite (KGa-1b) suspensions under oxic and anoxic conditions. The reaction times ranged from 0.5 to 720 h, and pH was constrained at 5.5 (for As) and at 5.5 or 8.0 (for Sb). The oxidation state of As and Sb in the liquid phase was determined by liquid chromatography in line with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, and in the solid phase by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our findings show that structural Fe(II) in NAu-1-Red was not able to reduce As(V)/Sb(V) under the conditions examined, but reduction was seen when aqueous Fe(II) was present in the systems with kaolinite (KGa-1b) and nontronite (NAu-1). The ability of the structural Fe in nontronite clay NAu-1 to promote oxidation of As(III)/Sb(III) was greatly affected by its oxidation state: if all structural Fe was in the oxidized Fe(III) form, no oxidation was observed; however, when the clay was partially reduced ({approx}20% of structural Fe was reduced to Fe(II)), NAu-1-Red

  20. Negative pH and extremely acidic mine waters from Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Alpers, C.N.; Ptacek, C.J.; Blowes, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Extremely acidic mine waters with pH values as low as -3.6, total dissolved metal concentrations as high as 200 g/L, and sulfate concentrations as high as 760 g/L, have been encountered underground in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA. These are the most acidic waters known. The pH measurements were obtained by using the Pitzer method to define pH for calibration of glass membrane electrodes. The calibration of pH below 0.5 with glass membrane electrodes becomes strongly nonlinear but is reproducible to a pH as low as -4. Numerous efflorescent minerals were found forming from these acid waters. These extreme acid waters were formed primarily by pyrite oxidation and concentration by evaporation with minor effects from aqueous ferrous iron oxidation and efflorescent mineral formation.

  1. Dissolved sulfide-catalyzed precipitation of disordered dolomite: Implications for the formation mechanism of sedimentary dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangfu; Xu, Huifang; Konishi, Hiromi; Kemp, Joshua M.; Roden, Eric E.; Shen, Zhizhang

    2012-11-01

    Dolomite is a common mineral in the rock record. However, the rarity of modern dolomite and the notorious difficulty in synthesizing dolomite abiotically under normal Earth-surface conditions result in the long-standing “dolomite problem” in sedimentary geology. Some modern dolomites are associated with sediments where microbial sulfate reduction is active; however, the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria in dolomite formation is still under debate. In this study, we tested the effect of dissolved sulfide on the precipitation of Ca-Mg carbonates, which has been never explored before although dissolved sulfide is one of the major products of microbial sulfate reduction. Our results demonstrated that dissolved sulfide with a concentration of as low as several millimoles can enhance the Mg2+ incorporation into the calcitic structure, and promote the crystallization of high magnesian calcite and disordered dolomite. We also conducted seeded precipitation in experimental solutions containing dissolved sulfide, which showed that calcite seeds can inhibit the precipitation of aragonite and monohydrocalcite (CaCO3·H2O), and induce more Mg2+ incorporation. We propose that accumulated dissolved sulfide in pore waters in organic-rich sediments may trigger the precipitation of disordered dolomite which can be considered as a precursor of some sedimentary dolomite. Our adsorption experiments revealed a strong adsorption of dissolved sulfide onto calcite faces. We suggest that adsorbed dissolved sulfide can lower the energy barrier to the dehydration of Mg2+-water complexes on the growing carbonate surfaces. This study sheds new light on understanding the role of sulfate-reducing bacteria in dolomite formation and the formation mechanism of sedimentary dolomite.

  2. Benthic flux of dissolved nickel into the water column of south San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Topping, B.R.; Kuwabara, J.S.; Parcheso, Francis; Hager, S.W.; Arnsberg, A.J.; Murphy, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were conducted between April, 1998 and May, 1999 to provide the first direct measurements of the benthic flux of dissolved (0.2-micron filtered) nickel between the bottom sediment and water column at three sites in the southern component of San Francisco Bay (South Bay), California. Dissolved nickel and predominant ligands (represented by dissolved organic carbon, and sulfides) were the solutes of primary interest, although a variety of ancillary measurements were also performed to provide a framework for interpretation. Results described herein integrate information needs identified by the State Water Resources Control Board and local stakeholders with fundamental research associated with the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program. Dissolved-Ni concentrations in the bottom water over the three sampling dates ranged from 34 to 43 nanomoles per liter. Dissolved-macronutrient concentrations in the bottom water were consistently higher (frequently by orders of magnitude) than surface-water determinations reported for similar times and locations (Regional Monitoring Program, 2001). This is consistent with measured positive benthic fluxes for the macronutrients. Benthic-flux estimates for dissolved nickel from core-incubations, when areally averaged over the South Bay, were significant (that is, of equivalent or greater order of magnitude) relative to previously reported freshwater point and non-point sources. This observation is consistent with previous determinations for other metals, and with the potential remobilization of sediment-associated metals that have been ubiquitously distributed in the South Bay. Similar to dissolved-nickel results, benthic flux of macronutrients was also consistently significant relative to surface-water inputs. These results add to a growing body of knowledge that strongly suggests a need to consider contaminant transport across the sediment-water interface when establishing future

  3. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, Rene; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle system has been developed and the specifications are being honed to maximize efficiency for the final application. The theoretical criteria of the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented in this report

  4. Biogeochemical controls on Diel cycling of stable isotopes of dissolved O2 and dissolved inorganic carbon in the Big Hole River, Montana.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stephen R; Poulson, Simon R; Gammons, Christopher H; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2005-09-15

    Rivers with high biological productivity typically show substantial increases in pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during the day and decreases at night, in response to changes in the relative rates of aquatic photosynthesis and respiration. These changes, coupled with temperature variations, may impart diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration of trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A better understanding of diel processes in rivers is needed and will lead to improved methods of data collection for both monitoring and research purposes. Previous studies have used stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen (DO) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as tracers of geochemical and biological processes in streams, lakes, and marine systems. Although seasonal variation in 6180 of DO in rivers and lakes has been documented, no study has investigated diel changes in this parameter. Here, we demonstrate large (up to 13%o) cycles in delta18O-DO for two late summer sampling periods in the Big Hole River of southwest Montana and illustrate that these changes are correlated to variations in the DO concentration, the C-isotopic composition of DIC, and the primary productivity of the system. The magnitude of the diel cycle in delta18O-DO was greater in August versus September because of the longer photoperiod and warmer water temperatures. This study provides another biogeochemical tool for investigating the O2 and C budgets in rivers and may also be applicable to lake and groundwater systems.

  5. Biogeochemical controls on diel cycling of stable isotopes of dissolved 02 and dissolved inorganic carbon in the Big Hole River, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Stephen R.; Poulson, Simon R.; Gammons, Christopher H.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Rivers with high biological productivity typically show substantial increases in pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration during the day and decreases at night, in response to changes in the relative rates of aquatic photosynthesis and respiration. These changes, coupled with temperature variations, may impart diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration of trace metals, nutrients, and other chemical species. A better understanding of diel processes in rivers is needed and will lead to improved methods of data collection for both monitoring and research purposes. Previous studies have used stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen (DO) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as tracers of geochemical and biological processes in streams, lakes, and marine systems. Although seasonal variation in δ18O of DO in rivers and lakes has been documented, no study has investigated diel changes in this parameter. Here, we demonstrate large (up to 13‰) cycles in δ18O-DO for two late summer sampling periods in the Big Hole River of southwest Montana and illustrate that these changes are correlated to variations in the DO concentration, the C-isotopic composition of DIC, and the primary productivity of the system. The magnitude of the diel cycle in δ18O-DO was greater in August versus September because of the longer photoperiod and warmer water temperatures. This study provides another biogeochemical tool for investigating the O2 and C budgets in rivers and may also be applicable to lake and groundwater systems.

  6. Urine pH test

    MedlinePlus

    ... pubmed/7797810 . Read More Acid loading test (pH) Acute kidney failure Alkalosis Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Diabetic ketoacidosis Diarrhea - overview Distal renal tubular acidosis Gastric suction Interstitial nephritis Kidney stones ...

  7. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Process: Some First Steps Adoption Success Story Watch Classroom Recordings Empowered Patient Online Toolkit Tab 1: Very ... Kathy Groebner Education Programs Patients and Caregivers PHA Classroom PHA on the Road: PH Patients and Families ...

  8. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... test can also be done during upper GI endoscopy by clipping a pH monitor to the lining of the esophagus. ... esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  9. Alteration of Tephra Conductivity Resulting From Secondary Pyroclast Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genareau, K. D.; Farley, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to influencing the electrical conductivity of volcanic ash, leachates bound to ash grain surfaces may pose significant hazards to water quality through the contribution of sulfates, fluoride, metals, and acidic compounds to local water supplies by either direct ash fallout or incorporation into precipitation runoff. In regions of active volcanism, remobilization of pyroclastic units may be a regular occurrence due to landslides or lahars, but the resultant effects of secondary disaggregation of pyroclasts have not been examined. Laboratory analyses of tephras from several eruptive centers have revealed variations in the pH, conductivity, and total dissolved solid (TDS) concentration of water-soluble compounds as a result of pyroclast disaggregation. Analyses were conducted using the standardized protocols for ash leachate analysis. TDS, conductivity, and pH were then measured and the tephra samples were allowed to air dry before being retested using identical methods. When pyroclast disaggregation was not performed, results show a progressive decrease in water conductivity, acidity, and TDS concentration following each stage of sonication. However, when an additional step of clast disaggregation (through crushing and grinding of samples) preceded the sonication step, water samples showed increases in measured properties. Mass spectroscopic analyses of water samples are in progress and results will be presented. These results indicate that secondary comminution of pyroclastic deposits will release water-soluble components from the pyroclast interior that may result in a renewed series of environmental hazards many years after the initial eruptive event. Break up of pyroclasts during transport in landslides or lahars (or even during cleanup efforts) will not only alter the size distribution of the deposit, but will also release metals, sulfates, and fluoride from the tephra interiors, altering the chemical and electrical properties of the tephra. This

  10. PhEDEx Data Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-04-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the "SiteDB" service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  11. Programmable pH buffers

    DOEpatents

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  12. Dissolved oxygen determination by electrocatalysed chemiluminescence with in-line solid phase media.

    PubMed

    Atwater, J E; DeHart, J; Wheeler, R R

    1998-01-01

    Dissolved elemental oxygen is determined in a flowing aqueous stream using glucose oxidase to catalyse the reaction between D-glucose and O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide. The levels of the resulting H2O2 are detected and quantified by luminol chemiluminescence using in-line solid phase media for pH adjustment of the reagent stream and for controlled release of the luminophore. The reaction is initiated by electrochemical catalysis. By the use of excess D-glucose in the reagent flow stream, the intensity of chemiluminescence is rendered proportional only to fluctuations in the dissolved O2 concentration. The methodology provides a means for the detection of aqueous O2 in the range 0-10 mg/L.

  13. Systematic evaluation of dissolved lead sorption losses to particulate syringe filter materials.

    PubMed

    Minning, Thomas; Lytle, Darren A; Pham, Maily; Kelty, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Distinguishing between soluble and particulate lead in drinking water is useful in understanding the mechanism of lead release and identifying remedial action. Typically, particulate lead is defined as the amount of lead removed by a 0.45-μm filter. Unfortunately, there is little guidance regarding selection of filter membrane material and little consideration to the possibility of the sorption of dissolved lead to the filter. The objective of this work was to examine the tendency of 0.45-μm syringe filter materials to adsorb lead. Tests were performed with water containing 40 and 24 μg/L soluble lead at pH 7 buffered with 50 mg C/L dissolved inorganic concentration (DIC). The amounts of lead sorbed greatly varied by filter, and only two filter types, polypropylene and mixed cellulose esters, performed well and are recommended. Great care must be taken in choosing a filter when filtering soluble lead and interpreting filter results.

  14. Diel behavior of iron and other heavy metals in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH: Fisher Creek, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; Cleasby, T.E.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Three simultaneous 24-h samplings at three sites over a downstream pH gradient were conducted to examine diel fluctuations in heavy metal concentrations in Fisher Creek, a small mountain stream draining abandoned mine lands in Montana. Average pH values at the upstream (F1), middle (F2), and downstream (F3) monitoring stations were 3.31, 5.46, and 6.80, respectively. The downstream increase in pH resulted in precipitation of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and hydrous aluminum oxide (HAO) on the streambed. At F1 and F2, Fe showed strong diel cycles in dissolved concentration and Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio; these cycles were attributed to daytime photoreduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), reoxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III), and temperature-dependent hydrolysis and precipitation of HFO. At the near-neutral downstream station, no evidence of Fe(III) photoreduction was observed, and suspended particles of HFO dominated the total Fe load. HFO precipitation rates between F2 and F3 were highest in the afternoon, due in part to reoxidation of a midday pulse of Fe2+ formed by photoreduction in the upper, acidic portions of the stream. Dissolved concentrations of Fe(II) and Cu decreased tenfold and 2.4-fold, respectively, during the day at F3. These changes were attributed to sorption onto fresh HFO surfaces. Results of surface complexation modeling showed good agreement between observed and predicted Cu concentrations at F3, but only when adsorption enthalpies were added to the thermodynamic database to take into account diel temperature variations. The field and modeling results illustrate that the degree to which trace metals adsorb onto actively forming HFO is strongly temperature dependent. This study is an example of how diel Fe cycles caused by redox and hydrolysis reactions can induce a diel cycle in a trace metal of toxicological importance in downstream waters. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.; Ganoe, R.

    2013-12-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle experiment has demonstrated the ability to remotely detect dissolved oxygen and nitrogen in pure water (also Chesapeake Bay water) using a 355nm Nd:YAG laser and a simple monochromater to detect the shifted Raman oxygen and nitrogen backscattered signals at 376.2 and 387.5 nm respectively. The theoretical basis for the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented. A 1.3-m water cell had an attached vertical column to house a Troll 9500 dissolved oxygen in-situ monitor (In-Situ Inc Troll 9500). The Raman oxygen signal could be calibrated with this devise. While Raman backscattered water signals are low a potential aircraft remote system was designed and will be presented.

  16. Interactive Effects of Soil ph, Halosulfuron Rate, and Application Method on Carryover to Turnip Green and Cabbage.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field studies were conducted in 2006 and 2007 to evaluate the tolerance of autumn-planted cabbage and turnip green to halosulfuron applied the previous spring to cantaloupe. Main plots were three levels of soil pH; maintained at a natural pH level, pH raised with Ca(OH)2, and pH lowered with Al2(SO...

  17. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Harada, Gakuro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Kabayama, Shigeru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles. PMID:28182635

  18. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Harada, Gakuro; Nakamichi, Noboru; Kabayama, Shigeru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Gong, Wei; Sakata, Ichiro; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles.

  19. Detoxification of Dissolved SO2 (Bisulfite) by Terricolous Mosses

    PubMed Central

    BHARALI, BHAGAWAN; BATES, JEFFREY W.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The widespread calcifuge moss Pleurozium schreberi is moderately tolerant of SO2, whereas Rhytidiadelphus triquetrus is limited to calcareous soils in regions of the UK that were strongly affected by SO2 pollution in the 20th century. The proposition that tolerance of SO2 by these terricolous mosses depends on metabolic detoxification of dissolved bisulfite was investigated. • Methods The capacities of the two mosses to accelerate loss of bisulfite from aqueous solutions of NaHSO3 were studied using DTNB [5, 5-dithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid)] to assay bisulfite, and HPLC to assay sulfate in the incubation solutions. Incubations were performed for different durations, in the presence and absence of light, at a range of solution pH values, in the presence of metabolic inhibitors and with altered moss apoplastic Ca2+ and Fe3+ levels. • Key Results Bisulfite disappearance was markedly stimulated in the light and twice as great for R. triquetrus as for P. schreberi. DCMU, an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron chain transport, significantly reduced bisufite loss. • Conclusions Bisulfite (SO2) tolerance in these terricolous mosses involves extracellular oxidation using metabolic (photo-oxidative) energy, passive oxidation by adsorbed Fe3+ (only available to the calcifuge) and probably also internal metabolic detoxification. PMID:16319108

  20. The measurement of dissolved and gaseous carbon dioxide concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosel, J.; Oelßner, W.; Decker, M.; Gerlach, G.; Guth, U.

    2011-07-01

    In this review the basic principles of carbon dioxide sensors and their manifold applications in environmental control, biotechnology, biology, medicine and food industry are reported. Electrochemical CO2 sensors based on the Severinghaus principle and solid electrolyte sensors operating at high temperatures have been manufactured and widely applied already for a long time. Besides these, nowadays infrared, non-dispersive infrared and acoustic CO2 sensors, which use physical measuring methods, are being increasingly used in some fields of application. The advantages and drawbacks of the different sensor technologies are outlined. Electrochemical sensors for the CO2 measurement in aqueous media are pointed out in more detail because of their simple setup and the resulting low costs. A detailed knowledge of the basic detection principles and the windows for their applications is necessary to find an appropriate decision on the technology to be applied for measuring dissolved CO2. In particular the pH value and the composition of the analyte matrix exert important influence on the results of the measurements.

  1. Oxidative dissolution of 4C- and NC-pyrrhotite: Intrinsic reactivity differences, pH dependence, and the effect of anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, Dennis; Pollok, Kilian; Langenhorst, Falko

    2013-02-01

    The crystallographic diversity of pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS), one of the most common iron sulfide minerals, offers insights into how mineral-fluid interactions are controlled by crystal structures. We have conducted oxidative dissolution experiments on monoclinic 4C-pyrrhotite and 'hexagonal' NC-pyrrhotite in aqueous H2O2/H2SO4 and FeCl3/HCl media at pH between 1.8 and 2.9 using polished surfaces of single crystals. Quantification and detailed characterization of the reaction interfaces has been accomplished by confocal 3D topometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) preparation. Crystallographically coherent intergrowths of 4C- and NC-pyrrhotite in a single sample allowed unambiguous identification of strong intrinsic reactivity differences between the two closely related phases. On {1 1 0} faces in the H2O2 medium at 35 °C and pH below 2.70, NC-pyrrhotite (N ˜ 4.85) reacts about 50-80% faster than 4C-pyrrhotite. Above pH 2.70, the behavior inverts and 4C-pyrrhotite dissolves faster, while overall reaction rates drop drastically by up to two orders of magnitude. Because the two pyrrhotite phases show only marginally different Fe/S ratios but substantial differences in structural complexity with regards to vacancy ordering, we attribute the reactivity differences to structurally controlled processes at the mineral-water interface. The transition at pH 2.70 is close to the reported isoelectric point of pyrrhotite. We attribute the pH dependent changes in reaction rates and behaviors to protonation/deprotonation of surface sulfhydryl groups and related changes in speciation and bonding mode of reactive oxygen species at the mineral interface. At pH <2.70, we find elemental sulfur as a frequent reaction product in H2O2 and FeCl3 media, indicating incomplete sulfur oxidation. Above pH 2.70, elemental sulfur was not found in H2O2 experiments (no data for FeCl3). Our results show that the effects of crystal anisotropy are

  2. Mechanistic Analysis of Cocrystal Dissolution as a Function of pH and Micellar Solubilization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide a mechanistic understanding of the dissolution behavior of cocrystals under the influence of ionization and micellar solubilization. Mass transport models were developed by applying Fick’s law of diffusion to dissolution with simultaneous chemical reactions in the hydrodynamic boundary layer adjacent to the dissolving cocrystal surface to predict the pH at the dissolving solid–liquid interface (i.e., interfacial pH) and the flux of cocrystals. To evaluate the predictive power of these models, dissolution studies of carbamazepine–saccharin (CBZ-SAC) and carbamazepine–salicylic acid (CBZ-SLC) cocrystals were performed at varied pH and surfactant concentrations above the critical stabilization concentration (CSC), where the cocrystals were thermodynamically stable. The findings in this work demonstrate that the pH dependent dissolution behavior of cocrystals with ionizable components is dependent on interfacial pH. This mass transport analysis demonstrates the importance of pH, cocrystal solubility, diffusivity, and micellar solubilization on the dissolution rates of cocrystals. PMID:26877267

  3. Effect of pH on the concentrations of lead and trace contaminants in drinking water: a combined batch, pipe loop and sentinel home study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jung; Herrera, Jose E; Huggins, Dan; Braam, John; Koshowski, Scott

    2011-04-01

    High lead levels in drinking water are still a concern for households serviced by lead pipes in many parts of North America and Europe. This contribution focuses on the effect of pH on lead concentrations in drinking water delivered through lead pipes. Though this has been addressed in the past, we have conducted a combined batch, pipe loop and sentinel study aiming at filling some of the gaps present in the literature. Exhumed lead pipes and water quality data from the City of London's water distribution system were used in this study. As expected, the lead solubility of corrosion scale generally decreased as pH increased; whereas dissolution of other accumulated metals present in the corrosion scale followed a variety of trends. Moreover, dissolved arsenic and aluminum concentrations showed a strong correlation, indicating that the aluminosilicate phase present in the scale accumulates arsenic. A significant fraction of the total lead concentration in water was traced to particulate lead. Our results indicate that particulate lead is the primary contributor to total lead concentration in flowing systems, whereas particulate lead contribution to total lead concentrations for stagnated systems becomes significant only at high water pH values.

  4. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  5. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  6. Dissolving variables in connectionist combinatory logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnden, John; Srinivas, Kankanahalli

    1990-01-01

    A connectionist system which can represent and execute combinator expressions to elegantly solve the variable binding problem in connectionist networks is presented. This system is a graph reduction machine utilizing graph representations and traversal mechanisms similar to ones described in the BoltzCONS system of Touretzky (1986). It is shown that, as combinators eliminate variables by introducing special functions, these functions can be connectionistically implemented without reintroducing variable binding. This approach 'dissolves' an important part of the variable binding problem, in that a connectionist system still has to manipulate complex data structures, but those structures and their manipulations are rendered more uniform.

  7. Influence of pH on transungual passive and iontophoretic transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kelly A; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of pH on nail permeability and the transport of ions such as sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) ions endogenous to nail and hydronium and hydroxide ions present at low and high pH, which might compete with drug transport across hydrated nail plate during iontophoresis. Nail hydration and passive transport of water across the nail at pH 1-13 were assessed. Subsequently, passive and iontophoretic transport experiments were conducted using (22)Na and (36)Cl ions under various pH conditions. Nail hydration was independent of pH under moderate pH conditions and increased significantly under extreme pH conditions (pH >11). Likewise, nail permeability for water was pH independent at pH 1-10 and an order of magnitude higher at pH 13. The results of passive and iontophoretic transport of Na and Cl ions are consistent with the permselective property of nail. Interestingly, extremely acidic conditions (e.g., pH 1) altered nail permselectivity with the effect lasting several days at the higher pH conditions. Hydronium and hydroxide ion competition in iontophoretic transport was generally negligible at pH 3-11 was significant at the extreme pH conditions studied.

  8. The Complexities of Conducting Ethnographic Race Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaas, Jongi

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges and dilemmas of conducting ethnographic race research in the context of the South African situation, forming part of my ethnographic race research PhD project, conducted in two historically white, single-sex schools in South Africa. First, it critically examines the theoretical dilemmas on crucial issues of…

  9. Towards an understanding of feedbacks between plant productivity, acidity and dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed; Davies, Jessica; Monteith, Don; Evans, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The recent origin of much dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (Tipping et al., 2010) implies that plant productivity is a major control on DOC fluxes. However, the flocculation, sorption and release of potentially-dissolved organic matter are governed by pH, and widespread increases in DOC concentrations observed in northern temperate freshwater systems seem to be primarily related to recovery from acidification (Monteith et al., 2007). We explore the relative importance of changes in productivity and pH using a model, MADOC, that incorporates both these effects (Rowe et al., 2014). The feedback whereby DOC affects pH is included. The model uses an annual timestep and relatively simple flow-routing, yet reproduces observed changes in DOC flux and pH in experimental (Evans et al., 2012) and survey data. However, the first version of the model probably over-estimated responses of plant productivity to nitrogen (N) deposition in upland semi-natural ecosystems. There is a strong case that plant productivity is an important regulator of DOC fluxes, and theoretical reasons for suspecting widespread productivity increases in recent years due not only to N deposition but to temperature and increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, evidence that productivity has increased in upland semi-natural ecosystems is sparse, and few studies have assessed the major limitations to productivity in these habitats. In systems where phosphorus (P) limitation prevails, or which are co-limited, productivity responses to anthropogenic drivers will be limited. We present a revised version of the model that incorporates P cycling and appears to represent productivity responses to atmospheric N pollution more realistically. Over the long term, relatively small fluxes of nutrient elements into and out of ecosystems can profoundly affect productivity and the accumulation of organic matter. Dissolved organic N (DON) is less easily intercepted by plants and microbes than mineral N, and DON

  10. Effect of Pattern Layout and Dissolved Oxygen in CO2 Rinse Water on Cu Corrosion during Post-Etch Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuri, Kentaro; Yamashita, Yukinari; Shiohara, Morio; Oda, Noriaki; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2010-05-01

    When post-etch cleaning was carried out in Cu dual-damascene process, Cu at the bottom of isolated via was etched out especially in the wafer edge, and this would become a critical issue as device scale is shrunk. The corrosion was caused in the rinse step rather than chemical cleaning step because dissolved oxygen in rinse water from the air increased oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and CO2 included in the rinse water for preventing wafer electrification decreased pH. The corrosion was found to be suppressed by increasing dummy pattern density and by controlling atmosphere and pH of the rinse water.

  11. Novel approach of aceclofenac fast dissolving tablet.

    PubMed

    Dave, Vivek; Yadav, Sachdev; Sharma, Swapnil; Vishwakarma, Pushpendra; Ali, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Fast disintegrating tablets (FDTs) have received ever increasing demand during the last decade, and the field has become a hastily growing area in the pharmaceutical industry. Upon introduction into the mouth, these tablets dissolve or disintegrate in the mouth in the absence of additional water for easy administration of active pharmaceutical ingredients. Aceclofenac, an NSAID, has been recommended orally for the treatment of bone and connective tissue disorder and thus the formulation of the same resulted in development of several FDT technologies. The present aim is to formulate a tablet which disintegrate and dissolve rapidly and give its rapid onset of action: analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory action. Besides, the conventional tablets also show poor patient compliance an attempt had been made to formulate for FDT of aceclofenac by using various super disintegrants like sodium starch glycolate, croscarmellose sodium and crosspovidone (polyplasdone XL) and PEG 6000 followed by novel technique. The tablets were evaluated for friability, hardness, weight variation, disintegration time, wetting time, in vitro dissolution studies and drug content studies. It was concluded that the batch which was prepared by using combination of crosspovidone and sodium starch glycolate as a super disintegrant shows excellent disintegration time, enhance dissolution rate, taste masking and hence lead to improve efficacy and bioavailability of drug.

  12. Nanostructured conductive polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are a suitable alternative to metals in many applications due to their light-weight, corrosion resistance, low cost, ease of processing and design flexibility. CPCs have been formulated using different types of conductive fillers. In this PhD thesis, the focus is on CPCs for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and electromagnetic interference (EMI) attenuation. Despite the versatility of conductive fillers, carbon black (CB) has been the dominant filler to make CPCs for ESD protection applications because CB/polymer composites have a cost advantage over all other CPCs. For EMI shielding, stainless steel fibres and metal coated fibers are the preferred fillers, however CPCs made of those fibers are not the dominant EMI shielding materials. Metal coated and polymer plated polymers are the most widely used EMI shielding options. The limited use of CPCs in the EMI shielding market is because the high filler loading required to formulate a composite with an adequate level of shielding remarkably increases the composite price. In order to increase the competitiveness of CPCs, percolation threshold should be minimized as much as possible and composites with high EMI shielding capabilities at low filler loading should be formulated because all conductive fillers are expensive compared to polymers. In this thesis, two different methodologies to reduce percolation threshold in CPCs have been successfully developed and a CPC with exceptional EMI shielding capability has been formulated using copper nanowires as conductive filler. The first percolation threshold reduction technique is based on the selective localization of CB at the interface of immiscible polymer blend. The technique requires adding a copolymer that prefers the blend's interface and for which CB nanoparticles has the highest affinity. The second method is based on producing a CPC powder and then using this powder as a conductive filler to produce composite by dry

  13. Modeling CO2 degassing and pH in a stream-aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Hulseapple, S.M.; Conklin, M.H.; Harvey, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Pinal Creek, Arizona receives an inflow of ground water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (57-75 mg/l) and low pH (5.8-6.3). There is an observed increase of in-stream pH from approximately 6.0-7.8 over the 3 km downstream of the point of groundwater inflow. We hypothesized that CO2 gas-exchange was the most important factor causing the pH increase in this stream-aquifer system. An existing transport model, for coupled ground water-surface water systems (OTIS), was modified to include carbonate equilibria and CO2 degassing, used to simulate alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon (C(T)), and pH in Pinal Creek. Because of the non-linear relation between pH and C(T), the modified transport model used the numerical iteration method to solve the non-linearity. The transport model parameters were determined by the injection of two tracers, bromide and propane. The resulting simulations of alkalinity, C(T) and pH reproduced, without fitting, the overall trends in downstream concentrations. A multi-parametric sensitivity analysis (MPSA) was used to identify the relative sensitivities of the predictions to six of the physical and chemical parameters used in the transport model. MPSA results implied that C(T) and pH in stream water were controlled by the mixing of ground water with stream water and CO2 degassing. The relative importance of these two processes varied spatially depending on the hydrologic conditions, such as stream flow velocity and whether a reach gained or lost stream water caused by the interaction with the ground water. The coupled transport model with CO2 degassing and generalized sensitivity analysis presented in this study can be applied to evaluate carbon transport and pH in other coupled stream-ground water systems.An existing transport model for coupled groundwater-surface water systems was modified to include carbonate equilibria and CO2 degassing. The modified model was used to simulate alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and

  14. Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

    2007-01-30

    At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at

  15. Photolytic processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved in cloud droplets.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Adam P; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-07-14

    The effect of UV irradiation on the molecular composition of aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was prepared by the dark reaction of ozone and d-limonene at 0.05-1 ppm precursor concentrations and collected with a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS). The PILS extracts were photolyzed by 300-400 nm radiation for up to 24 h. Water-soluble SOA constituents were analyzed using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) at different stages of photolysis for all SOA precursor concentrations. Exposure to UV radiation increased the average O/C ratio and decreased the average double bond equivalent (DBE) of the dissolved SOA compounds. Oligomeric compounds were significantly decreased by photolysis relative to the monomeric compounds. Direct pH measurements showed that acidic compounds increased in abundance upon photolysis. Methanol reactivity analysis revealed significant photodissociation of molecules containing carbonyl groups and the formation of carboxylic acids. Aldehydes, such as limononaldehyde, were almost completely removed. The removal of carbonyls was further confirmed by the UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy of the SOA extracts where the absorbance in the carbonyl n→π* band decreased significantly upon photolysis. The effective quantum yield (the number of carbonyls destroyed per photon absorbed) was estimated as ∼0.03. The total concentration of peroxides did not change significantly during photolysis as quantified with an iodometric test. Although organic peroxides were photolyzed, the likely end products of photolysis were smaller peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, resulting in a no net change in the peroxide content. Photolysis of dry limonene SOA deposited on substrates was investigated in a separate set of experiments. The observed effects on the average O/C and DBE were similar to the aqueous photolysis, but the extent of chemical change was smaller in dry SOA. Our results suggest

  16. CORRELATION OF THE PARTITIONING OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FRACTIONS WITH THE DESORPTION OF CD, CU, NI, PB AND ZN FROM 18 DUTCH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was also concentrated onto a macroreticular resin and fractionation into three operationally defined fract...

  17. Evaluation of potential factors affecting deriving conductivity benchmark by utilizing weighting methods in Hun-Tai River Basin, Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaobo; Zhao, Qian; Guo, Fen; Ma, Shuqin; Zhang, Yuan; Zang, Xiaomiao

    2017-03-01

    Specific conductivity is an increasingly important stressor for freshwater ecosystems. Interacting with other environmental factors, it may lead to habitat degradation and biodiversity loss. However, it is still poorly understood how the effect of specific conductivity on freshwater organisms is confounded by other environmental factors. In this study, a weight-of-evidence method was applied to evaluate the potential environmental factors that may confound the effect of specific conductivity on macroinvertebrate structure communities and identify the confounders affecting deriving conductivity benchmark in Hun-Tai River Basin, China. A total of seven potential environmental factors were assessed by six types of evidence (i.e., correlation of cause and confounder, correlation of effect and confounder, the contingency of high level cause and confounder, the removal of confounder, levels of confounder known to cause effects, and multivariate statistics for confounding). Results showed that effects of dissolved oxygen (DO), fecal coliform, habitat score, total phosphorus (TP), pH, and temperature on the relationship between sensitive genera loss and specific conductivity were minimal and manageable. NH3-N was identified as a confounder affecting deriving conductivity benchmark for macroinvertebrate. The potential confounding by high NH3-N was minimized by removing sites with NH3-N > 2.0 mg/L from the data set. Our study tailored the weighting method previously developed by USEPA to use field data to develop causal relationships for basin-scale applications and may provide useful information for pollution remediation and natural resource management.

  18. Effluent dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved phosphorus removal by enhanced coagulation and microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Arnaldos, Marina; Pagilla, Krishna

    2010-10-01

    Plants aiming to achieve very low effluent nutrient levels (<3 mg N/L for N, and <0.1 mg P/L for P) need to consider removal of effluent fractions hitherto not taken into account. Two of these fractions are dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved non-reactive phosphorus (DNRP) (mainly composed of organic phosphorus). In this research, enhanced coagulation using alum (at doses commonly employed in tertiary phosphorus removal) followed by microfiltration (using 0.22 μm pore size filters) was investigated for simultaneous effluent DON and dissolved phosphorus (DP) fractions removal. At an approximate dose of 3.2 mg Al(III)/L, corresponding to 1.5 Al(III)/initial DON-N and 3.8 Al(III)/initial DP-P molar ratios, maximum simultaneous removal of DON and DP was achieved (69% for DON and 72% for DP). At this dose, residual DON and DP concentrations were found to be 0.3 mg N/L and 0.25 mg P/L, respectively. Analysis of the trends of removal revealed that the DNRP removal pattern was similar to that commonly reported for dissolved reactive phosphorus. Since this study involved intensive analytical work, a secondary objective was to develop a simple and accurate measurement protocol for determining dissolved N and P species at very low levels in wastewater effluents. The protocol developed in this study, involving simultaneous digestion for DON and DNRP species, was found to be very reliable and accurate based on the results.

  19. Measurement of CO(2) Dissolved in Aqueous Solutions Using a Modified Infrared Gas Analyzer System.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, T E; Smucker, A J

    1983-05-01

    Total dissolved inorganic carbon (SigmaCO(2)) and aqueous carbon dioxide (H(2)CO(3) (*)) in nutrient solutions may be measured by the injection of small gas or liquid samples (1 microliter to 8 milliliters) into a gas stripping column connected in-line with an infrared gas analyzer. The measurement of SigmaCO(2) in solution requires sample acidification, while H(2)CO(3) (*) and gaseous CO(2) are measured without the addition of lactic acid. The standard curve for SigmaCO(2) was linear up to 300 nanomoles CO(2). Maximum sensitivity was approximately 300 picomoles. Measurements of H(2)CO(3) (*) were independent of pH. Consequently, SigmaCO(2) and H(2)CO(3) (*) could be used to calculate the pH, HCO(3) (-), and CO(3) (2-) values of nutrient solutions. Injection and complete analyses required from 0.8 to 2 minutes.

  20. Intragastric pH Monitoring,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    disposable sensor.. hnt Care 13. Peterson WL. GI bleeding. In: Sleisenger MH, Fordtran IS, Med 1988;14:232-5. ,. eds. Gastrointestinal disease: pathophysiology ... diagnosis and 27. Fimmel CL, Etienne A, Cilluffo T, et al. Long-term ambu- management, Vol I. 4th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders, latory gastric pH

  1. Making pH Tangible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Elizabeth; Moss, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Presents a laboratory exercise in which students test the pH of different substances, study the effect of a buffer on acidic solutions by comparing the behavior of buffered and unbuffered solutions upon the addition of acid, and compare common over-the-counter antacid remedies. (MKR)

  2. Effect of pH alkaline salts of fatty acids on the inhibition of bacteria associated with poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agar diffusion assay was used to examine the effect of pH on the ability of alkaline salts of three fatty acids (FA) to inhibit growth of bacteria associated with poultry processing. FA solutions were prepared by dissolving 0.5 M concentrations of caprylic, capric, or lauric acid in separate ali...

  3. Diel behavior of rare earth elements in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Wood, Scott A.; Nimick, David A.

    2005-08-01

    Diel (24-h) changes in concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) were investigated in Fisher Creek, a mountain stream in Montana that receives acid mine drainage in its headwaters. Three simultaneous 24-h samplings were conducted at an upstream station (pH = 3.3), an intermediate station (pH = 5.5), and a downstream station (pH = 6.8). The REE were found to behave conservatively at the two upstream stations. At the downstream station, REE partitioned into suspended particles to a degree that varied with the time of day, and concentrations of dissolved REE were 2.9- to 9.4-fold (190% to 830%) higher in the early morning vs. the late afternoon. The decrease in dissolved REE concentrations during the day coincided with a corresponding increase in the concentration of REE in suspended particles, such that diel changes in the total REE concentrations were relatively minor (27% to 55% increase at night). Across the lanthanide series, the heavy REE partitioned into the suspended solid phase to a greater extent than the light REE. Filtered samples from the downstream station showed a decrease in shale-normalized REE concentration across the lanthanide series, with positive anomalies at La and Gd, and a negative Eu anomaly. As the temperature of the creek increased in the afternoon, the slope of the REE profile steepened and the magnitude of the anomalies increased. The above observations are explained by cyclic adsorption of REE onto suspended particles of hydrous ferric and aluminum oxides (HFO, HAO). Conditional partition coefficients for each REE between the suspended solids and the aqueous phase reached a maximum at 1700 hours and a minimum at 0700 hours. This pattern is attributed to diel variations in stream temperature, possibly reinforced by kinetic factors (i.e., slower rates of reaction at night than during the day). Estimates of the enthalpy of adsorption of each REE onto suspended particles based on the field results averaged +82 kJ/mol and are similar in

  4. Diel behavior of rare earth elements in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Wood, S.A.; Nimick, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Diel (24-h) changes in concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) were investigated in Fisher Creek, a mountain stream in Montana that receives acid mine drainage in its headwaters. Three simultaneous 24-h samplings were conducted at an upstream station (pH = 3.3), an intermediate station (pH = 5.5), and a downstream station (pH = 6.8). The REE were found to behave conservatively at the two upstream stations. At the downstream station, REE partitioned into suspended particles to a degree that varied with the time of day, and concentrations of dissolved REE were 2.9- to 9.4-fold (190% to 830%) higher in the early morning vs. the late afternoon. The decrease in dissolved REE concentrations during the day coincided with a corresponding increase in the concentration of REE in suspended particles, such that diel changes in the total REE concentrations were relatively minor (27% to 55% increase at night). Across the lanthanide series, the heavy REE partitioned into the suspended solid phase to a greater extent than the light REE. Filtered samples from the downstream station showed a decrease in shale-normalized REE concentration across the lanthanide series, with positive anomalies at La and Gd, and a negative Eu anomaly. As the temperature of the creek increased in the afternoon, the slope of the REE profile steepened and the magnitude of the anomalies increased. The above observations are explained by cyclic adsorption of REE onto suspended particles of hydrous ferric and aluminum oxides (HFO, HAO). Conditional partition coefficients for each REE between the suspended solids and the aqueous phase reached a maximum at 1700 hours and a minimum at 0700 hours. This pattern is attributed to diel variations in stream temperature, possibly reinforced by kinetic factors (i.e., slower rates of reaction at night than during the day). Estimates of the enthalpy of adsorption of each REE onto suspended particles based on the field results averaged +82 kJ/mol and are similar in

  5. Effect of magnesium ions on the stable oxygen isotope equilibrium between dissolved inorganic carbon species and water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) values of foraminiferal calcites, which represent one of the most fundamental paleoceanographic tools to reconstruct ancient seawater temperatures, are influenced by seawater pH variations. Understanding the driving mechanism for such phenomenon requires precise knowledge of the equilibrium 18O fractionation factors between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species and water. An experimental study by Beck et al. (2005) successfully refined the 18O fractionation factors between DIC components and water. Based on these results, the overall 18O fractionation between total DIC and water as a function of pH can be readily calculated (e.g., Zeebe, 2007). However, these calculations may not be applicable to seawater because the fractionation factors were measured in freshwater. Natural seawater contains numerous ionic species and other dissolved constituents, which may affect the fractionation factors. For example, it has been experimentally demonstrated that the presence of magnesium ions (Mg2+) in solutions affect equilibrium carbon isotope (13C) fractionation between aqueous CO2 and carbonate ions presumably due to the enrichment of 13C isotopes in Mg-CO30 complexes (Thode et al., 1965). This suggests that the presence of Mg2+ in solutions similarly affects the 18O fractionation factors between DIC species and water. On the other hand, Beck et al. (2005) concluded that the effect of ion pairs on the δ18O equilibrium appears to be negligible. However, this conclusion may not apply to ion paring in general, because experiments were not conducted for metal ions other than Na+. Given that Mg2+ has a marked effect on the equilibrium δ13C fractionation factors and Mg-CO30 is the most abundant form of metal-CO3-complexes in natural seawater, the potential effect of Mg2+ on the 18O fractionation factors between DIC components and water needs to be examined. Here, we will present preliminary results from quantitative carbonate precipitation

  6. Conductance fluctuations in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ningjia

    1997-12-01

    In this Ph.D thesis the conductance fluctuations of different physical origins in semi-conductor nanostructures were studied using both diagrammatic analytical methods and large scale numerical techniques. In the "mixed" transport regime where both mesoscopic and ballistic features play a role, for the first time I have analytically calculated the non-universal conductance fluctuations. This mixed regime is reached when impurities are distributed near the walls of a quantum wire, leaving the center region ballistic. I have discovered that the existence of a ballistic region destroys the universal conductance fluctuations. The crossover behavior of the fluctuation amplitude from the usual quasi-1D situation to that of the mixed regime is clearly revealed, and the role of various length scales are identified. My analytical predictions were confirmed by a direct numerical simulation by evaluating the Landauer formula. In another direction, I have made several studies of conductance or resistance oscillations and fluctuations in systems with artificial impurities in the ballistic regime. My calculation gave explanations of all the experimental results concerning the classical focusing peaks of the resistance versus magnetic field, the weak localization peak in a Sinai billiard system, the formation of a chaotic billiard, and predicted certain transport features which were indeed found experimentally. I have further extended the calculation to study the Hall resistance in a four-terminal quantum dot in which there is an antidot array. From my numerical data I analyzed the classical paths of electron motion and its quantum oscillations. The results compare well with recent experimental studies on similar systems. Since these billiard systems could provide quantum chaotic dynamics, I have made a detailed study of the consequence of such dynamics. In particular I have investigated the resonant transmission of electrons in these chaotic systems, and found that the level

  7. The effect of ultrasonic waves in conducting polymer solution.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo, W M; de Oliveira Luna, A J H; Silva, E F V B N; Silva, R O

    2006-07-01

    The effects of ultrasonic wave on the conducting polymer polyaniline dissolved in DMSO were observed. The UV-visible, infrared and NMR analysis show that the polymer undergo a redox and doping transition when the ultrasound wave interacts with the polymer dissolved into the solvent. The proposed mechanism to explain these effects is based on the solvent's hygroscopicity properties. The interaction with the ultrasonic wave, homolitically dissociates the water molecule producing radical species, and these species interact with the dissolved conducting polymer changing its oxidation and doped state. The resulting effects of that interaction are the modification of oxidation state of the conducting polymer and the decrease of the amount of water molecule in the solvent. From those results, we have proposed one straightforward method to eliminate water contamination in the solvent DMSO using ultrasonic waves.

  8. pH optrode for the complete working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnoi, Gargi; Goel, Tara C.; Pillai, P. K. C.

    1999-01-01

    We report a fast response and inexpensive optical sensor capable of measuring pH in the range of 0.5 to 13.5 units with good resolution. Three indicator dyes viz. Bromocresol Green, Bromothymol Blue and Nile Blue were used to fabricate the sensor head. ion-exchange resin, Amberlite IRA 400, was powdered and immobilized by these dye solutions. In order to prepare sensing membranes, Polyvinyl chloride was dissolved in Tetrahydrofuran and the solution was poured on to a glass plate. Before the membrane was completely dry, the immobilized resin powder was uniformly sprinkled so that the granules are properly glued to it. A bundle of fibers was attached to the membrane mechanically to carry the light from the source to the membrane and collect the reflected optical signal. He-He laser was used as a light source. The experimental results show a linear dependence of pH value on reflected optical signal for the pH range of 0.5 to 13.5 with the resolution of 0.02 unit. The optrode was also characterized by studying the effect of ionic strength and temperature of the solution on the probe response.

  9. Characterizing natural dissolved organic matter in a freshly submerged catchment (Three Gorges Dam, China) using UV absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and PARAFAC.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zheng, Binghui

    2012-01-01

    This study applied parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) of natural water samples in a freshly submerged catchment in the upper reach of Three Gorges Dam (China). Two fluorescent natural dissolved organic matter (NDOM) components (humic/fulvic-like) were uncovered and were positively correlated with selected water quality parameters, i.e. dissolved oxygen concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen concentration and total (dissolved plus particulate) phosphorus concentration, respectively. To other water quality parameters (i.e. total nitrogen, particulate nitrogen, particulate phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, dissolved nitrate, pH, and chemical oxygen demand), either the two components did not show any correlation or only one component showed correlation. In particular, particulate N correlated significantly to the fulvic acid, but not to the humic acid. Meanwhile, two conventional spectroscopic indices i.e. specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254) and fluorescence index (FI) indicated that the whole NDOM in the waters were low in aromaticity and predominantly derived from aquatic microbial processes. Given together, it concludes that N and P did not function equally in the NDOM production, and the two components were not derived from the same microbial processes. The EEMs-PARAFAC has proven to be of potential as an effective tool in investigation of the interlink between NDOM and nutrients which may be utilized as an indicator of water environment.

  10. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  11. Numerical simulation of dissolved oxygen in Jakarta Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdjaman, Susanna; Radjawane, Ivonne M.; Jamelina, Sripardi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an ecosystem model is proposed to study interaction between ecosystem compartment such as nutrient, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus on dissolved oxygen (DO) in Jakarta Bay. Three-Dimensional NPZD model with adding DO compartment is applied in this region. The average of current circulation in west and east season is used as input in the model. It is assumed that the nutrients are discharged into water body with constant rates. The analysis of the model shows that the concentration of dissolved oxygen was distributed with range value 3 - 4 ppm in the bay. The air-sea interaction plays important role in decrease of dissolved oxygen than the nutrient discharge from the river. Over all the decrease of dissolved oxygen mainly due to decrease of saturated dissolved oxygen which is caused by high water temperature. There is no significant variation of dissolved oxygen concentration in west and east seasons.

  12. Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Karraker, David G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and potassium fluoride to a temperature between 40.degree. and 70.degree. C., then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not more than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 0.1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.

  13. Attributing seasonal pH variability in surface ocean waters to governing factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagens, M.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    On-going ocean acidification and increasing availability of high-frequency pH data have stimulated interest to understand seasonal pH dynamics in surface waters. Here we show that it is possible to accurately reproduce observed pH values by combining seasonal changes in temperature (T), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity (TA) from three time series stations with novel pH sensitivity factors. Moreover, we quantify the separate contributions of T, DIC, and TA changes to winter-to-summertime differences in pH, which are in the ranges of -0.0334 to -0.1237, 0.0178 to 0.1169, and -0.0063 to 0.0234, respectively. The effects of DIC and temperature are therefore largely compensatory, and are slightly tempered by changes in TA. Whereas temperature principally drives pH seasonality in low-latitude to midlatitude systems, winter-to-summer DIC changes are most important at high latitudes. This work highlights the potential of pH sensitivity factors as a tool for quantifying the driving mechanisms behind pH changes.

  14. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  15. Formulation of rizatriptan benzoate fast dissolving buccal films by emulsion evaporation technique

    PubMed Central

    Vidyadhara, Suryadevara; Sasidhar, Reddyvallam Lankapalli; Balakrishna, Thalamanchi; Vardhan, Malapolu Santha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study deals with the formulation of fast dissolving films of Rizatriptan benzoate that is used for the treatment of Migraine. The concept of fast-dissolving drug delivery emerged from the desire to provide patient with more conventional means of taking their medication. Materials and Methods: In the present research work, various trials were carried out using film forming agents such as maltodextrin, gum karaya and xanthan gum to prepare an ideal film. Emulsion evaporation method was used for the preparation of films. The prepared films were evaluated for weight uniformity, drug content, film thickness, folding endurance, dispersion test and curling. The in vitro dissolution studies were carried out using simulated salivary fluid (pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Results: About 97% of the drug was found to be released from the film within 10 min that is a desirable character for fast absorption. The drug excipient interaction studies carried out by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and Fourier transform infrared studies revealed that there were no major interactions between the drugs and excipients used for the preparation of films. Conclusion: Fast dissolving films of Rizatriptan benzoate prepared by emulsion evaporation technique were found to be suitable for eliciting better therapeutic effect in the treatment of migraine. PMID:25838995

  16. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants.

    PubMed

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose.

  17. Development of polymer-bound fast-dissolving metformin buccal film with disintegrants

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shaikh Ershadul; Sheela, Angappan

    2015-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug-delivery systems are considered advantageous over the existing conventional oral dosage forms like tablets, capsules, and syrups for being patient friendly. Buccal films are one such system responsible for systemic drug delivery at the desired site of action by avoiding hepatic first-pass metabolism. Metformin hydrochloride (Met), an antidiabetic drug, has poor bioavailability due to its high solubility and low permeability. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a polymer-bound fast-dissolving buccal film of metformin to exploit these unique properties. In the study, metformin fast-dissolving films were prepared by the solvent-casting method using chitosan, a bioadhesive polymer. Further, starch, sodium starch glycolate, and microcrystalline cellulose were the disintegrants added to different ratios, forming various formulations (F1 to F7). The buccal films were evaluated for various parameters like weight variation, thickness, folding endurance, surface pH, content uniformity, tensile strength, and percentage of elongation. The films were also subjected to in vitro dissolution study, and the disintegration time was found to be less than 30 minutes for all formulations, which was attributed to the effect of disintegrants. Formulation F6 showed 92.2% drug release within 6 minutes due to the combined effect of sodium starch glycolate and microcrystalline cellulose. PMID:26491321

  18. Oxidation of dissolved elemental mercury by thiol compounds under anoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wang; Lin, Hui; Mann, Benjamin F; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Mercuric mercury, Hg(II), forms strong complexes with thiol compounds that commonly dominate Hg(II) speciation in natural freshwater. However, reactions between dissolved elemental Hg(0) and thiols are not well understood although these processes are likely to be important in determining Hg speciation and geochemical cycling in the environment. In this study, reaction rates and mechanisms between dissolved Hg(0) and a number of selected organic ligands with varying molecular structures and sulfur (S) oxidation states were determined to assess the role of these ligands in Hg(0) redox transformation. We found that all thiols caused oxidation of Hg(0) under anoxic conditions but, contrary to expectation, compounds with higher S-oxidation states (e.g., disulfide) than thiols exhibited little or no reactivity with Hg(0) at pH 7. The rate and extent of Hg(0) oxidation varied widely, with smaller aliphatic thiols showing the greatest degree of oxidation. The mechanism of the oxidation is attributed to a two-step process involving adsorption of Hg(0) to thiols followed by the charge transfer from Hg(0) to electron acceptors. These observations demonstrate a unique thiol-induced oxidation pathway of dissolved Hg(0), with important implications for the redox transformation, speciation, and bioavailability of Hg for microbial methylation in anoxic environments.

  19. The role of fossil fuel combustion on the stability of dissolved iron in rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Joan D.; Kieber, Robert J.; Humphreys, Joshua J.; Rice, Briana C.; Hopwood, Mark J.; Avery, G. Brooks; Mead, Ralph N.

    2015-04-01

    The concentration of dissolved Fe(II) has decreased in coastal NC rainwater because of less complexation and stabilization of Fe(II) (aq) by automobile and coal combustion emissions. Better emission control has removed stabilizing organic ligands hence dissolved Fe(II) currently occurs more as inorganic iron, which is not protected against oxidation. Increasing rainwater pH allows oxidation by molecular O2 in addition to H2O2 and also increases the ratio of the ion pair Fe(OH)+ to Fe(II) free ion, which increases the oxidation rates by both H2O2 and molecular oxygen. The concentration of H2O2 in rain has increased; hydrogen peroxide is the primary oxidant of inorganic Fe(II) in precipitation. The East Coast of the USA is also receiving less rain of terrestrial origin, which tends to be higher in dissolved iron and organic compounds. All these factors operate in the same direction and contribute to the lower concentrations and lack of stability of Fe(II) in rainwater currently observed. Results of this study suggest that wet deposition of soluble Fe(II) is an episodic, temporally variable factor in the iron cycle in oceanic regions adjacent to developed or developing coastal regions.

  20. Analysis of RFSA Campaign No.2 Dissolver Solution for Hg(I) and Hg(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    2001-05-17

    TA 2-1083, under which RFSA processing is conducted, calls for a nominal mercuric ion concentration in the dissolver solution of 0.006M with a maximum of 0.01 M. The second RFSA campaign operated according to these guidelines with the initial Hg(II) concentration being 0.0068 M. Part of this study is to ascertain optimum excess Hg(I) for chloride removal.

  1. Method to Estimate the Dissolved Air Content in Hydraulic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify the air content in hydraulic fluid, an instrument was needed to measure the dissolved air content before the fluid was loaded into the system. The instrument also needed to measure the dissolved air content in situ and in real time during the de-aeration process. The current methods used to measure the dissolved air content require the fluid to be drawn from the hydraulic system, and additional offline laboratory processing time is involved. During laboratory processing, there is a potential for contamination to occur, especially when subsaturated fluid is to be analyzed. A new method measures the amount of dissolved air in hydraulic fluid through the use of a dissolved oxygen meter. The device measures the dissolved air content through an in situ, real-time process that requires no additional offline laboratory processing time. The method utilizes an instrument that measures the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. By using a standardized calculation procedure that relates the oxygen partial pressure to the volume of dissolved air in solution, the dissolved air content is estimated. The technique employs luminescent quenching technology to determine the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. An estimated Henry s law coefficient for oxygen and nitrogen in hydraulic fluid is calculated using a standard method to estimate the solubility of gases in lubricants. The amount of dissolved oxygen in the hydraulic fluid is estimated using the Henry s solubility coefficient and the measured partial pressure of oxygen in solution. The amount of dissolved nitrogen that is in solution is estimated by assuming that the ratio of dissolved nitrogen to dissolved oxygen is equal to the ratio of the gas solubility of nitrogen to oxygen at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The technique was performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The technique could be theoretically carried out at higher pressures and elevated

  2. Method for dissolving plutonium oxide with HI and separating plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Vondra, Benedict L.; Tallent, Othar K.; Mailen, James C.

    1979-01-01

    PuO.sub.2 -containing solids, particularly residues from incomplete HNO.sub.3 dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels, are dissolved in aqueous HI. The resulting solution is evaporated to dryness and the solids are dissolved in HNO.sub.3 for further chemical reprocessing. Alternatively, the HI solution containing dissolved Pu values, can be contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the Pu values to load the resin. The Pu values are selectively eluted from the resin with more concentrated HI.

  3. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

    1961-08-01

    A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

  4. Long-term patterns in dissolved organic carbon, major elements and trace metals in boreal headwater catchments: trends, mechanisms and heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oni, S. K.; Futter, M. N.; Bishop, K.; Köhler, S. J.; Ottosson-Löfvenius, M.; Laudon, H.

    2013-04-01

    The boreal landscape is a complex, spatio-temporally varying mosaic of forest and mire landscape elements that control surface water hydrology and chemistry. Here, we assess long-term water quality time series from three nested headwater streams draining upland forest (C2), peat/mire (C4) and mixed (C7) (forest and mire) catchments. Acid deposition in this region is low and is further declining. Temporal trends in weather and runoff (1981-2008), dissolved organic carbon concentration [DOC] (1993-2010) and other water quality parameters (1987-2011) were assessed. There was no significant annual trend in precipitation or runoff. However, runoff increased in March and declined in May. This suggested an earlier snowmelt regime in recent years. Significant monotonic increasing trends in air temperature and length of growing season suggested a decrease in snowfall and less spring runoff. Stream [DOC] was positively correlated with some trace metals (copper, iron and zinc) and negatively with several other chemical parameters (e.g. sulfate, conductivity, calcium). Both sulfate and conductivity showed declining trends, while a significant increase was observed in pH during winter and spring. Calcium and magnesium showed monotonic decreasing trends. The declining trajectories of stream base cation and sulfate concentrations during other times of the year were not accompanied by changes in pH and alkalinity. These results indicate subtle effects of recovery from acidification. Water temperature increased significantly both annually and in most months. A simultaneous monotonic increase in iron (Fe) and [DOC] in autumn suggests co-transport of Fe-DOC in the form of organometallic complexes. A monotonic increase in UV absorbance in most months without co-occurring changes in DOC trend suggests a shift in DOC quality to a more humic-rich type. The observed increase in soil solution [DOC] and subtle trends in stream [DOC] suggest that climate rather than recovery from

  5. Impact of dissolved organic matter on colloid transport in the vadose zone: deterministic approximation of transport deposition coefficients from polymeric coating characteristics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Verónica L; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Bin; Lion, Leonard W; Bisogni, James J; McDonough, Brendan A; Steenhuis, Tammo S

    2011-02-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted to discern colloid transport and stability processes, the mechanistic understanding of how dissolved organic matter (DOM) affects colloid fate in unsaturated soils (i.e., the vadose zone) remains unclear. This study aims to bridge the gap between the physicochemical responses of colloid complexes and porous media interfaces to solution chemistry, and the effect these changes have on colloid transport and fate. Measurements of adsorbed layer thickness, density, and charge of DOM-colloid complexes and transport experiments with tandem internal process visualization were conducted for key constituents of DOM, humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), at acidic, neutral and basic pH and two CaCl(2) concentrations. Polymeric characteristics reveal that, of the two tested DOM constituents, only HA electrosterically stabilizes colloids. This stabilization is highly dependent on solution pH which controls DOM polymer adsorption affinity, and on the presence of Ca(+2) which promotes charge neutralization and inter-particle bridging. Transport experiments indicate that HA improved colloid transport significantly, while FA only marginally affected transport despite having a large effect on particle charge. A transport model with deposition and pore-exclusion parameters fit experimental breakthrough curves well. Trends in deposition coefficients are correlated to the changes in colloid surface potential for bare colloids, but must include adsorbed layer thickness and density for sterically stabilized colloids. Additionally, internal process observations with bright field microscopy reveal that, under optimal conditions for retention, experiments with FA or no DOM promoted colloid retention at solid-water interfaces, while experiments with HA enhanced colloid retention at air-water interfaces, presumably due to partitioning of HA at the air-water interface and/or increased hydrophobic characteristics of HA-colloid complexes.

  6. Heat conduction in conducting polyaniline nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Chandrani; Kumar, A.; Syu, K.-Z.; Kuo, Y.-K.

    2013-09-01

    Thermal conductivity and specific heat of conducting polyaniline nanofibers are measured to identify the nature of heat carrying modes combined with their inhomogeneous structure. The low temperature thermal conductivity results reveal crystalline nature while the high temperature data confirm the amorphous nature of the material suggesting heterogeneous model for conducting polyaniline. Extended acoustic phonons dominate the low temperature (<100 K) heat conduction, while localized optical phonons hopping, assisted by the extended acoustic modes, account for the high temperature (>100 K) heat conduction.

  7. Electrostatic Spraying With Conductive Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Dawn, Frederic S.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Atkins, Loren E.

    1989-01-01

    Thin, uniform polymer coatings applied in water base normally impossible to charge. Electrostatic sprayer modified so applies coatings suspended or dissolved in electrically conductive liquids. Nozzle and gun constructed of nonconductive molded plastic. Liquid passageway made long enough electrical leakage through it low. Coaxial hose for liquid built of polytetrafluoroethylene tube, insulating sleeve, and polyurethane jacket. Sprayer provided with insulated seal at gun-to-hose connection, nonconductive airhose, pressure tank electrically isolated from ground, and special nozzle electrode. Supply of atomizing air reduced so particle momentum controlled by electrostatic field more effectively. Developed to apply water-base polyurethane coating to woven, shaped polyester fabric. Coating provides pressure seal for fabric, which is part of spacesuit. Also useful for applying waterproof, decorative, or protective coatings to fabrics for use on Earth.

  8. Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Xiong, Tiantian; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Leveque, Tibo; Dumat, Camille

    2013-12-01

    In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

  9. Compost impacts on dissolved organic carbon and available nitrogen and phosphorus in turfgrass soil.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alan L; Provin, Tony L; Hons, Frank M; Zuberer, David A; White, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Compost application to turfgrass soils may increase dissolved organic C (DOC) levels which affects nutrient dynamics in soil. The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of compost source and application rate on soil organic C (SOC), DOC, NO(3), and available P during 29 months after a one-time application to St. Augustinegrass [Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze] turf. Compost sources had variable composition, yet resulted in few differences in SOC, DOC, and NO(3) after applied to soil. Available NO(3) rapidly decreased after compost application and was unaffected by compost source and application rate. Available P increased after compost application and exhibited cyclical seasonal patterns related to DOC. Compost application decreased soil pH relative to unamended soil, but pH increased during the course of the study due to irrigation with sodic water. Increasing the compost application rate increased SOC by 3 months, and levels remained fairly stable to 29 months. In contrast, DOC continued to increase from 3 to 29 months after application, suggesting that compost mineralization and growth of St. Augustinegrass contributed to seasonal dynamics. Dissolved organic C was 75%, 78%, and 101% greater 29 months after application of 0, 80, and 160 Mg compostha(-1), respectively, than before application. Impacts of composts on soil properties indicated that most significant effects occurred within a few months of application. Seasonal variability of SOC, DOC, and available P was likely related to St. Augustinegrass growth stages as well as precipitation, as declines occurred after precipitation events.

  10. [Oxidation Process of Dissolvable Sulfide by Manganite and Its Influencing Factors].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Li, Shan; Tan, Wen-feng; Liu, Fan; Cai, Chong-fa; Qiu, Guo-hong

    2016-04-15

    As one of the manganese oxides, which are easily generated and widely distributed in supergene environment, manganite participates in the oxidation of dissolvable sulfide (S²⁻), and affects the migration, transformation, and the fate of sulfides. In the present work, the redox mechanism was studied by determining the intermediates, and the influence of initial pH and oxygen atmosphere on the processes were studied. The chemical composition, crystal structures and micromorphologies were characterized by XRD, FTIR and TEM. The concentration of S²⁻ and its oxidation products were analyzed using spectrophotometer, high performance liquid chromatograph and ion chromatograph. The results indicated that elemental sulfur was formed as the major oxidation product of S²⁻ oxidation, and decreased pH could accelerate the oxidation rate of S²⁻ in the initial stage, however, there was no significant influence on final products. Elemental S could be further oxidized to S₂O₃²⁻ when the reaction system was bubbled with oxygen, and manganite exhibited excellent catalytic performance and chemical stability during the oxidation of dissolvable sulfide by oxygen. After reaction of more than 10 h, the crystal structure of manganite remained stable.

  11. Removal of actinides from dissolved ORNL MVST sludge using the TRUEX process

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z.; Chase, C.W.

    1997-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transuranium extraction process for partitioning actinides from actual dissolved high-level radioactive waste sludge. All tests were performed at ambient temperature. Time and budget constraints permitted only two experimental campaigns. Samples of sludge from Melton Valley Storage Tank W-25 were rinsed with mild caustic (0.2 M NaOH) to reduce the concentrations of nitrates and fission products associated with the interstitial liquid. In one campaign, the rinsed sludge was dissolved in nitric acid to produce a solution containing total metal concentrations of ca. 1.8 M with a nitric acid concentration of ca. 2.9 M. About 50% of the dry mass of the sludge was dissolved. In the other campaign, the sludge was neutralized with nitric acid to destroy the carbonates, then leached with ca. 2.6 M NaOH for ca. 6 h before rinsing with the mild caustic. The sludge was then dissolved in nitric acid to produce a solution containing total metal concentrations of ca. 0.6 M with a nitric acid concentration of ca. 1.7 M. About 80% of the sludge dissolved. The dissolved sludge solution form the first campaign began gelling immediately, and a visible gel layer was observed after 8 days. In the second campaign, the solution became hazy after ca. 8 days, indicating gel formation, but did not display separated gel layers after aging for 20 days. Batch liquid-liquid equilibrium tests of both the extraction and stripping operations were conducted. Chemical analyses of both phases were used to evaluate the process. Evaluation was based on two metrics: the fraction of TRU elements removed from the dissolved sludge and comparison of the results with predictions made with the Generic TRUEX Model (GTM). The fractions of Eu, Pu, Cm, Th, and U species removed from aqueous solution in only one extraction stage were > 95% and were close to the values predicted by the GTM. Mercury was also found to be strongly extracted, with a one-stage removal of > 92%.

  12. PhDs by Publications: An "Easy Way Out"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niven, Penelope; Grant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    PhDs by publications are a relatively new model for doctoral research, especially in the context of the Humanities or Education. This paper describes two writers' experiences of conducting doctoral studies in this genre and in these faculties. Each discover alternative ways of employing a body of published research papers in development of an…

  13. Asad Umar, DVM, PhD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Asad Umar received his PhD in Biochemistry and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, in 1993. He conducted his postdoctoral training in the laboratories of Patricia Gearhart in Baltimore, MD and Thomas Kunkel at the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences in Research Triangle Park, NC. Dr. |

  14. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup and White rivers, Washington, August and September 2000 and 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebbert, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, Washington State Department of Ecology, and Puyallup Tribe of Indians conducted a study in August and September 2001 to assess factors affecting concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup and White Rivers, Washington. The study was initiated because observed concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup River fell to levels ranging from less than 1 milligram per liter (mg/L) to about 6 mg/L on several occasions in September 2000. The water quality standard for the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the Puyallup River is 8 mg/L.This study concluded that inundation of the sensors with sediment was the most likely cause of the low concentrations of dissolved oxygen observed in September 2000. The conclusion was based on (1) knowledge gained when a dissolved-oxygen sensor became covered with sediment in August 2001, (2) the fact that, with few exceptions, concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup and White Rivers did not fall below 8 mg/L in August and September 2001, and (3) an analysis of other mechanisms affecting concentrations of dissolved oxygen.The analysis of other mechanisms indicated that they are unlikely to cause steep declines in concentrations of dissolved oxygen like those observed in September 2000. Five-day biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 0.22 to 1.78 mg/L (mean of 0.55 mg/L), and river water takes only about 24 hours to flow through the study reach. Photosynthesis and respiration cause concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the lower Puyallup River to fluctuate as much as about 1 mg/L over a 24-hour period in August and September. Release of water from Lake Tapps for the purpose of hydropower generation often lowered concentrations of dissolved oxygen downstream in the White River by about 1 mg/L. The effect was smaller farther downstream in the Puyallup River at river mile 5.8, but was still observable as a slight decrease in concentrations of dissolved oxygen caused by

  15. Experimental investigation and modeling of dissolved organic carbon removal by coagulation from seawater.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sanghyun; Sathasivan, Arumugam; Kastl, George; Shim, Wang Geun; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation removes colloidal matters and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which can cause irreversible membrane fouling. However, how DOC is removed by coagulant is not well-known. Jar test was used to study the removal of hydrophobic and hydrophilic DOC fractions at various doses (0.5-8.0 mg-Fe(+3) L(-1)) of ferric chloride (FeCl3) and pH (5.0-9.0). Natural organic matter (NOM) in seawater and treated seawater were fractionated by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detector (LC-OCD). Compared to surface water, the removal of DOC in seawater by coagulation was remarkably different. Majority of DOC could be easily removed with very low coagulant dose (<5.0 mg-Fe(+3) L(-1)) and the removal efficiency did not vary with pH, but the DOC composition in treated water had significantly changed. Hydrophobic fraction (HB) was better removed at high pH while hydrophilic fraction (HF) was better removed at low pH. A modified model of Kastl et al. (2004) which assumed that the removal occurred by adsorption of un-dissociated compounds onto ferric hydroxide was formulated and successfully validated against the jar test data.

  16. Lithium isotopes in foraminifera shells as a novel proxy for the ocean dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Nathalie; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Levenson, Yaël; Erez, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Past ocean pH and pCO2 are critical parameters for establishing relationships between Earth's climate and the carbon cycle. Previous pCO2 estimates are associated with large uncertainties and are debated. In this study, laboratory cultures of the foraminiferan genus Amphistegina were performed in order to examine the possible factors that control the Li isotope composition (δ7Li) of their shells. δ7Li is insensitive to temperature and pH variations but correlates positively with the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) of seawater. Li/Ca ratio in the shells shows negative correlation with δ7Li, consistent with published data for planktonic foraminifera from core tops and from short periods during the Cenozoic. We propose that the sensitivity of δ7Li and Li/Ca ratio to DIC is a biological phenomenon and is related to biomineralization mechanisms in foraminifera. We used the published foraminiferal δ7Li records, and our experimental results, to determine the paleo-ocean DIC and pH for the last glacial-interglacial cycle. The results are consistent with published estimates of pH and pCO2 based on boron isotopes and ice cores. We suggest Li and its isotopes may serve as a new complementary proxy for the paleo-ocean carbonate chemistry.

  17. Photolytic processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved in cloud droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-05-26

    The effect of UV irradiation on the molecular composition of aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was prepared by the dark reaction of ozone and d-limonene at 0.05 - 1 ppm precursor concentrations and collected with a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS). The PILS extracts were photolyzed by 300 - 400 nm radiation for up to 24 hours. Water-soluble SOA constituents were analyzed using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) at different stages of photolysis for all SOA precursor concentrations. Exposure to UV radiation increased the average O/C ratio and decreased the average double bond equivalent (DBE) of the dissolved SOA compounds. Oligomeric compounds were significantly reduced by photolysis relative to the monomeric compounds. Direct pH measurements showed that compounds containing carboxylic acids increased upon photolysis. Methanol reactivity analysis revealed significant photodissociation of molecules containing carbonyl groups and formation of carboxylic acids. Aldehydes, such as limononaldehyde, were almost completely removed. The removal of carbonylswas confirmed by the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of the SOA extracts where the absorbance in the carbonyl n→π* band decreased significantly upon photolysis. The effective quantum yield (the number of carbonyls destroyed per photon absorbed) was estimated as ~ 0.03. The concentration of peroxides did not change significantly during photolysis as quantified with an iodometric test. Although organic peroxides were photolyzed, the likely end products of photolysis were smaller peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, resulting in a no net change in the peroxide content.

  18. Temperature Dependence of Photodegradation of Dissolved Organic Matter to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Particulate Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, Peter J.; Molot, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied for more than two decades. Usually, laboratory or “in-situ” experiments are used to determine photodegradation variables. A common problem with these experiments is that the photodegradation experiments are done at higher than ambient temperature. Five laboratory experiments were done to determine the effect of temperature on photochemical degradation of DOM. Experimental results showed strong dependence of photodegradation on temperature. Mathematical modeling of processes revealed that two different pathways engaged in photochemical transformation of DOM to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) strongly depend on temperature. Direct oxidation of DOM to DIC dominated at low temperatures while conversion of DOM to intermediate particulate organic carbon (POC) prior to oxidation to DIC dominated at high temperatures. It is necessary to consider this strong dependence when the results of laboratory experiments are interpreted in regard to natural processes. Photodegradation experiments done at higher than ambient temperature will necessitate correction of rate constants. PMID:26106898

  19. Adsorption of dissolved organics in lake water by aluminum oxide. Effect of molecular weight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.; Gloor, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dissolved organic compounds in a Swiss lake were fractionated into three molecular size classes by gel exclusion chromatography, and adsorption of each fraction on colloidal alumina was studied as a function of pH. Organic compounds with molecular weight (Mr) greater than 1000 formed strong complexes with the alumina surface, but low molecular weight compounds were weakly adsorbed. Electrophoretic mobility measurements indicated that alumina particles suspended in the original lake water were highly negatively charged because of adsorbed organic matter. Most of the adsorbed organic compounds were in the Mr range 1000 < Mr < 3000. Adsorption of these compounds during the treatment of drinking water by alum coagulation may be responsible for the preferential removal of trihalomethane precursors. Adsorption may also influence the molecular-weight distribution of dissolved organic material in lakes. surface, the present work will focus on the influence of molecular size and pH on the adsorption behavior of dissolved organic material of a Swiss lake. From a geochemical point of view, it is important to know the molecular-weight distribution of adsorbed organic matter so that we may better assess its reactivity with trace elements. The study also serves as a first step in quantifying the role of adsorption in the geochemical cycle of organic carbon in lacustrine environments. For water-treatment practice, we need to determine whether molecular weight fractionation occurs during adsorption by aluminum oxide. Such a fractionation could be significant in the light of recent reports that chloroform and other organochlorine compounds are preferentially produced by particular molecular-weight fractions (25-27). ?? 1981 American Chemical Society.

  20. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Lofts, Stephen; Tipping, Edward; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2002-11-15

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The results show that the DOM-complexed species is generally more significant for Cu and Pb than for Cd, Zn, and Ni. The ability of two advanced models for ion binding to humic substances, e.g., model VI and NICA-Donnan, in the simulation of metal binding to natural DOM was assessed by comparing the model predictions with the measurements. Using the default parameters of fulvic and humic acid, the predicted concentrations of free metal ions from the solution speciation calculation using the two models are mostly within 1 order of magnitude difference from the measured concentrations, except for Ni and Pb in a few samples. Furthermore, the solid-solution partitioning of the metals was simulated using a multisurface model, in which metal binding to soil organic matter, dissolved organic matter, clay, and iron hydroxides was accounted for using adsorption and cation exchange models (NICA-Donnan, Donnan, DDL, CD-MUSIC). The model estimation of the dissolved concentration of the metals is mostly within 1 order of magnitude difference from those measured except for Ni in some samples and Pb. The solubility of the metals depends mainly on the metal loading over soil sorbents, pH, and the concentration of inorganic ligands and DOM in the soil solution.

  1. The Al(I) molecule, Ph2COAl and its anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Eichhorn, Bryan; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Bowen, Kit

    2016-08-01

    We have formed the Al(I)-containing molecule, benzophenone-aluminum, i.e., Ph2COAl, and studied it by conducting density functional theory calculations on both its neutral and anionic forms and by measuring the photoelectron spectrum of its anion. Our calculations identified two nearly iso-energetic anion isomers, (Ph2COAl)-, the vertical detachment energies (VDE) of which are in excellent agreement with our photoelectron spectrum. Natural population analysis (NPA) of Ph2COAl found the Al moiety to be positively charged by +0.81 e, indicating a strongly ionic bond between Al and Ph2CO, i.e., Ph2CO-Al+.

  2. Selected methods for dissolved iron (II, III) and dissolved sulfide (-II) determinations in geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vivit, D.V.; Jenne, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolved sulfide (-II) and dissolved iron (II, III) were determined in geothermal well water samples collected at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Most samples consisted of liquid and gas (two phases) at the instant of collection; and a subset of samples, referred to as ' flashed ' samples, consisted of pressurized steam samples which were allowed to condense. Sulfide was determined by sulfide specific ion electrode; Fe(II) and Fe(III) plus Fe(II) were determined spectrophotometrically. The precision and accuracy of the methods were evaluated for these high-silica waters with replicate analyses, spike recoveries, and an alternate method. Direct current (d.c.) argon plasma emission spectrometry was the alternate method used for Fe(III)-plus-Fe(II) analyses. Mean dissolved iron concentrations ranged from 20.2 to 834 micrograms/L (ug/L) as Fe(II) and 26.8 to 904 ug/L as Fe(III) plus Fe(II). Mean sulfide concentrations ranged from about 0.01 to 5.3 mg/L (S-II) Generally, higher S(-II) values and larger Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were found in the two-phase samples. These findings suggest that the ' flashed ' samples are at a less reduced state than the two-phase samples. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Effects of pH on aquatic biodegradation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachler, R. F.; Krachler, R.; Stojanovic, A.; Wielander, B.; Herzig, A.

    2009-01-01

    To date, little is known about the pH-stimulated mineralization of organic matter in aquatic environments. In this study, we investigated biodegradation processes in alkaline waters. Study site is a large shallow soda lake in Central Europe (Neusiedler See/Ferto). The decomposition rate of plant litter was measured as a function of pH by incubating air-saturated lake-water samples in contact with Phragmites litter (leaves) from the littoral vegetation. All samples showed high decomposition rates (up to 32% mass loss within 35 days) and a characteristic two-step degradation mechanism. During the degradation process, the solid plant litter was dissolved forming humic colloids. Subsequently, the humic colloids were mineralized to CO2 in the water column. The decomposition rate was linearly related to pH. Increasing pH values accelerated significantly the leaching of humic colloids as well as the final degradation process. The observed two-step mechanism controls the wetland/lake/air carbon fluxes, since large quantities of humic colloids are currently produced in the reed belt, exported through wind-driven circulations and incorporated into the open lake foodweb. At present, the lake is rapidly shrinking due to peat deposition in the littoral zone, whereas it has been resistant to silting-up processes for thousands of years. In order to investigate the cause of this abrupt change, the chemical composition of the lake-water was measured during 1995-2007. A thorough analysis of these data revealed that major lake-water discharges through the lake's artificial outlet channel led to a decline in salinity and alkalinity. According to our estimates, the lake's original salinity and alkalinity was 70-90% higher compared to the present conditions, with the consequence of substantially lower pH values in the present lake. The observed pH dependence of reed litter biodegradation rates points to a causal connection between low pH values and accumulation of peat in the lake basin

  4. Formation of haloacetic acids from dissolved organic matter fractions during chloramination.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying; Song, Hocheol; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the roles of dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions, pH and bromide concentration in the formation of haloacetic acids (HAA) during chloramination. DOM from two surface waters with a low (2.9 L/mg-m) and high (5.1 L/mg-m) specific UV absorbance (SUVA(254)) values was isolated and fractionated into three fractions based on the hydrophobicity [i.e., hydrophobic (HPO), transphilic (TPH) and hydrophilic (HPI)]. DOM mass balances and DBP reactivity checks were performed to characterize the effects of isolation and fractionation steps. The fractions were chloraminated at three pHs and three bromide concentrations. The results showed that pH was the most important factor controlling HAA formation and speciation. The HAA yields significantly decreased with increase in pH from 6.3 to 9.0. The impact of bromide in the formation of brominated HAA species also became less important with increasing pH, and no brominated specie was detectable at pH 9. HPO fractions of the two source waters consistently showed higher HAA yields than TPH and HPI fractions. On the other hand, HPI fractions showed higher bromine incorporation than HPO and TPH fractions. To maintain higher and relatively stable combined chlorine residuals while reducing HAA formation, water utilities may consider keeping pH above 7.5 as one strategy. This will also lower the formation of brominated HAA species which have been shown to be more cyto- and geno-toxic than their chlorinated analogs.

  5. Electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistors for detecting pH and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Yamashiro, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-09-01

    We investigated electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) for electrical detecting pH and protein adsorptions. Nonfunctionalized single-layer graphene was used as a channel. GFETs immersed in an electrolyte showed transconductances 30 times higher than those in a vacuum and their conductances exhibited a direct linear increase with electrolyte pH, indicating their potential for use in pH sensor applications. We also attempted to direct surface-protein adsorption and showed that the conductance of GFETs increased with exposure to a protein at several hundred picomolar. The GFETs thus acted as highly sensitive electrical sensors for detecting pH and biomolecule concentrations.

  6. Contribution of ferric iron to the absorption by chromophoric dissolved matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y. H.; Sara-aho, T.; Vähätalo, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a major absorber of ultraviolet and visible radiation in surface waters. CDOM consists primarily of humic substances (HS), which can adsorb inorganic cations such as ferric iron. Often more than 99% of dissolved iron is complexed by CDOM in natural waters. Our study assessed the contribution of ferric iron to the absorption of CDOM by mixing dissolved humic substance (HS) standards with iron(III) in acidic conditions and later adjusting the pH to 8. The maximum iron-binding capacities for Suwannee River humic acid, Suwannee River fulvic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid were 13.0, 13.5 and 7.64 μmol iron [mg C]-1, respectively, suggesting higher iron-binding capacity for terrestrial- than microbial-derived CDOM. Iron(III) associated with HS increased the absorption coefficient by CDOM by 1.73-5.33 times (λ=254-550 nm). Inorganic iron, thus, contributed up to 4/5 of the absorption by CDOM (λ=550 nm). In other words, only less than 1/5 of the absorption by CDOM-iron mixture was generated by organic chromophores. The associated iron decreased spectral slope coefficients of HS. This finding indicates that changes of the spectral slope by CDOM can be solely caused by inorganic interference (e.g. iron). The increase of absorption by associated iron(III) was always spectrally similar among different HS standards. We calculated a specific absorption spectrum for iron associated with dissolved HS standards. This spectrum allows estimates for the absorption by iron associated with HS in circum neutral natural waters. For Löytynlähde spring water, iron contributed over 1/10 (ca. 0.108, λ=400 nm) to the total absorption. The contribution of iron to total absorption increased with wavelength. In typical CDOM absorption measurement, water samples are filtered for the removal of particulate constituents but no attempts are implemented for separating the organic chromophores from inorganic chromophores. Our findings show that

  7. Abundance and Characterization of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Suburban Streams of Baltimore, Maryland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, G.; Fazekas, M.

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of streams and rivers to the carbon cycle is significant, transporting to the oceans ~1.4 Pg C/yr, with dissolved carbon corresponding to as much as 0.7 Pg C/yr. Changes in land use have the potential effect of modifying this flux, particularly in urban areas where impervious areas are common. To investigate the effect of urbanization on riverine carbon transport, we studied four first-order streams in Towson, a suburb of Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The watersheds from the studied streams exhibit different levels of urbanization as measured by the percentage of impervious areas. Samples from these four streams were taken weekly, and several chemical constituents were measured either in the field or in the laboratory. These constituents included nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), phosphate, the carbon isotopic compositions of DOC and DIC, and fluorescence intensity of the DOC. Results show that DOC concentrations were consistently below 5 mg C/L regardless of the level of imperviousness of the watershed. Similarly, carbon isotope ratios were consistent across the studied streams, with values centered around -26.4 per mil, thus suggesting a significant influx of soil-derived organic carbon originated from C3 plants that are common in the watersheds. Confirming this interpretation, fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest a humic-like origin for the DOC of the streams, thus pointing to the heterotrophic nature of the streams. The combined results suggest that the studied streams exhibit similar DOC concentrations, carbon isotopic values, and fluorescence spectra, despite their level of impervious surfaces in their watersheds.

  8. Impact of salinity and pH on the UVC/H2O2 treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate produced from municipal wastewater reclamation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Roddick, Felicity A; Fan, Linhua

    2012-06-15

    While reverse osmosis (RO) technology is playing an increasingly important role in the reclamation of municipal wastewater, safe disposal of the resulting RO concentrate (ROC), which can have high levels of effluent organic pollutants, remains a challenge to the water industry. The potential of UVC/H(2)O(2) treatment for degrading the organic pollutants and increasing their biodegradability has been demonstrated in several studies, and in this work the impact of the water quality variables pH, salinity and initial organic concentration on the UVC/H(2)O(2) (3 mM) treatment of a municipal ROC was investigated. The reduction in chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon was markedly faster and greater under acidic conditions, and the treatment performance was apparently not affected by salinity as increasing the ROC salinity 4-fold had only minimal impact on organics reduction. The biodegradability of the ROC (as indicated by biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) level) was at least doubled after 2 h UVC/H(2)O(2) treatment under various reaction conditions. However, the production of biodegradable intermediates was limited after 30 min treatment, which was associated with the depletion of the conjugated compounds. Overall, more than 80% of the DOC was removed after 2 h UVC/3 mM H(2)O(2) treatment followed by biological treatment (BDOC test) for the ROC at pH 4-8.5 and electrical conductivity up to 11.16 mS/cm. However, shorter UV irradiation time gave markedly higher energy efficiency (e.g., EE/O 50 kWh/m(3) at 30 min (63% DOC removal) cf. 112 kWh/m(3) at 2 h). No toxicity was detected for the treated ROC using Microtox(®) tests. Although the trihalomethane formation potential increased after the UVC/H(2)O(2) treatment, it was reduced to below that of the raw ROC after the biological treatment.

  9. Dissolved organic C export is highly dynamic - capturing this variability and challenges in modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, S.; Coleman, M.; Scott, E. M.; Drew, S.

    2013-12-01

    [DOC] range of 8 - 55.6 mg/l C, with the greatest shift in a single day being 23.5 mg/l C. We will present this highly dynamic [DOC] time series and also contemporaneous data from an in-situ water chemistry sonde profiling other measures of the ';riverine circulation system': pH, conductivity, temperature and stage height. The challenge now is how to allow data series of ~17,500 measurements per annum to interact to better understand and model drivers of carbon export. We are exploring the application of wavelet analysis to identify periods of coherence between [DOC] and these other variables. Our initial results indicate show that coherence with [DOC] can be intermittent and irregular, and so the challenge sensor technology presents continues.

  10. Improvement of virus removal by pilot-scale coagulation-ultrafiltration process for wastewater reclamation: Effect of optimization of pH in secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Ihara, M; Yamashita, N; Tanaka, H

    2017-02-09

    Reclaimed water (i.e., reused advanced-treated wastewater) offers an alternative water resource. To reduce the health risks associated with its use, efficient virus removal such as with advanced wastewater treatment processes is important. Virus removal by coagulation followed by ultrafiltration (UF) for the treatment of drinking water has been well examined. But its efficacy in wastewater reclamation purpose using secondary treated effluent (SE) from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) as feed water is unclear. Here, we optimized the virus removal efficiency of coagulation-UF in pilot-scale wastewater reclamation plants using SE as feed water, using the F-specific RNA bacteriophage MS2 as a model virus, at two wastewater treatment plants in Japan. We investigated how using coagulation as a pretreatment for UF improved virus removal efficiency. The efficiency varied greatly between SEs. To reveal the cause of the variation, we conducted laboratory-scale batch coagulation experiments. The efficiency of viral coagulation was negatively correlated with the concentration of dissolved organic matter in the feed water. The optimum pH for coagulation differed between SEs, and the efficiency of coagulation could be dramatically improved by optimizing the pH. We confirmed that the virus removal efficiency in the pilot-scale facility actually could be improved by adjusting the pH. In addition, we confirmed that coagulation-sedimentation-UF with pH adjustment could operate stably for more than 30 days at the pilot scale, with a high virus removal rate. Thus, the wastewater reclamation process described here offers promise in terms of reduced health risks and practical operation.

  11. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  12. Comparing Single species Toxicity Tests to Mesocosm Community-Level Responses to Total Dissolved Solids Comprised of Different Major Ions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) dosing studies representing different sources of ions were conducted from 2011-2015. Emergence responses in stream mesocosms were compared to single-species exposures using a whole effluent testing (WET) format and an ex-situ method (single species te...

  13. Composition of dissolved organic matter in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longnecker, Krista; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2011-05-01

    Groundwater constitutes a globally important source of freshwater for drinking water and other agricultural and industrial purposes, and is a prominent source of freshwater flowing into the coastal ocean. Therefore, understanding the chemical components of groundwater is relevant to both coastal and inland communities. We used electrospray ionization coupled with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to examine dissolved organic compounds in groundwater prior to and after passage through a sediment-filled column containing microorganisms. The data revealed that an unexpectedly high proportion of organic compounds contained nitrogen and sulfur, possibly due to transport of surface waters from septic systems and rain events. We matched 292 chemical features, based on measured mass:charge ( m/z) values, to compounds stored in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). A subset of these compounds (88) had only one structural isomer in KEGG, thus supporting tentative identification. Most identified elemental formulas were linked with metabolic pathways that produce polyketides or with secondary metabolites produced by plants. The presence of polyketides in groundwater is notable because of their anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties. However, their relative abundance must be quantified with appropriate analyses to assess any implications for public health.

  14. Fast dissolving films made of maltodextrins.

    PubMed

    Cilurzo, Francesco; Cupone, Irma E; Minghetti, Paola; Selmin, Francesca; Montanari, Luisa

    2008-11-01

    This work aimed to study maltodextrins (MDX) with a low dextrose equivalent as film forming material and their application in the design of oral fast-dissolving films. The suitable plasticizer and its concentration were selected on the basis of flexibility, tensile strength and stickiness of MDX films, and the MDX/plasticizer interactions were investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Flexible films were obtained by using 16-20% w/w glycerin (GLY). This basic formulation was adapted to the main production technologies, casting and solvent evaporation (Series C) or hot-melt extrusion (Series E), by adding sorbitan monoleate (SO) or cellulose microcrystalline (MCC), respectively. MCC decreased the film ductility and significantly affected the film disintegration time both in vitro and in vivo (Series C<10s; Series E approximately 1min). To assess the film loading capacity, piroxicam (PRX), a water insoluble drug, was selected. The loading of a drug as a powder decreased the film ductility, but the formulation maintained satisfactory flexibility and resistance to elongation for production and packaging procedures. The films present a high loading capacity, up to 25mg for a surface of 6cm(2). The PRX dissolution rate significantly improved in Series C films independently of the PRX/MDX ratio.

  15. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  16. The fluorescence properties of the phenylated fullerenes C 70Ph 4, C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10 in room temperature solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwell, Martin; Gustavsson, Thomas; Marguet, Sylvie; Vaissière, Benoı̂t de La; Wachter, Norbert K.; Birkett, Paul R.; Mialocq, Jean-Claude; Leach, Sydney

    2001-12-01

    The emission and excitation spectra of four phenylated [70] fullerenes, C 70Ph 4, C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10 in cyclohexane and toluene solutions have been measured. The fluorescence spectra and related excited state properties are found to depend strongly on the number of attached phenyl groups, but with no systematic trends. Quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes were measured for C 70Ph 6, C 70Ph 8, and C 70Ph 10, allowing the determination of S1 → S0 radiative transition rates kR. It is found that kR for C 70Ph 10 is about six times larger than for the other compounds. This is consistent with measured absorbtivities for these compounds. The particular character of C 70Ph 10 is also manifested by its higher intersystem crossing rate kISC.

  17. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range.

  18. pH treatment as an effective tool to select the functional and structural properties of yak milk caseins.

    PubMed

    Liu, H N; Zhang, C; Zhang, H; Guo, H Y; Wang, P J; Zhu, Y B; Ren, F Z

    2013-09-01

    Qula is made from yak milk after defatting, acidifying, and drying. Yak milk caseins are purified from Qula by dissolving in alkali solution. The effects of different pH treatments on the functional and structural properties of yak milk caseins were investigated. Over a broad range of pH (from 6.0 to 12.0), functional properties of yak milk caseins, including solubility, emulsifying activities, and thermal characteristics, and the structural properties, including 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonate fluorescence, turbidity and particle diameter, were evaluated. The results showed that the yak milk casein yield increased as the pH increased from 6.0 to 12.0. The solubility dramatically increased as the pH increased from 6.0 to 8.0, and decreased as the pH increased from 9.0 to 12.0. The changes in emulsifying activity were not significant. Caseins were remarkably heat stable at pH 9.0. The turbidity of the casein solution decreased rapidly as the pH increased from 6.0 to 12.0, and the results suggested that reassembled casein micelles were more compact at low pH than high pH. At pH values higher than 8.0, the yield of yak milk caseins reached more than 80%. The highest solubility was at pH 8.0, the best emulsification was at pH 10.0 and the greatest thermal stability was at pH 9.0. According to the functional characteristics of yak milk caseins, alkali conditions (pH 8.0-10.0) should be selected for optimum production. These results suggested that pH-dependent treatment could be used to modify the properties of yak milk caseins by appropriate selection of the pH level.

  19. Modeling the low pH limit of Nitrosomonas eutropha in high-strength nitrogen wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Fumasoli, Alexandra; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2015-10-15

    In wastewater treatment, the rate of ammonia oxidation decreases with pH and stops very often slightly below a pH of 6. Free ammonia (NH3) limitation, inhibition by nitrous acid (HNO2), limitation by inorganic carbon or direct effect of high proton concentrations have been proposed to cause the rate decrease with pH as well as the cessation of ammonia oxidation. In this study, we compare an exponential pH term common for food microbiology with conventionally applied rate laws based on Monod-type kinetics for NH3 limitation and non-competitive HNO2 inhibition as well as sigmoidal pH functions to model the low pH limit of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). For this purpose we conducted well controlled batch experiments which were then simulated with a computer model. The results showed that kinetics based on NH3 limitation and HNO2 inhibition can explain the rate decrease of ammonia oxidation between pH 7 and 6, but fail in predicting the pH limit of Nitrosomonas eutropha at pH 5.4 and rates close to that limit. This is where the exponential pH term becomes important: this term decreases the rate of ammonia oxidation to zero, as the pH limit approaches. Previously proposed sigmoidal pH functions that affect large pH regions, however, led to an overestimation of the pH effect and could therefore not be applied successfully. We show that the proposed exponential pH term can be explained quantitatively with thermodynamic principles: at low pH values, the energy available from the proton motive force is too small for the NADH production in Nitrosomonas eutropha and related AOB causing an energy limited state of the bacterial cell. Hence, energy limitation and not inhibition or limitation of enzymes is responsible for the cessation of the AOB activity at low pH values.

  20. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  1. A multi-scale comparison of dissolved Al, Fe and S in a boreal acid sulphate soil.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Seija; Simojoki, Asko; Rita, Hannu; Toivonen, Janne; Hartikainen, Helinä; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2014-11-15

    Acid sulphate (AS) soils are most prevalent in the tropics, but the acidic discharge from cultivated AS soils also threatens water bodies under boreal conditions. Feasible options to reduce the acid load are needed. In this study, the groundwater of an AS field was monitored for 3.5 years, and the efficiency of waterlogging in mitigating the environmental risks caused by acidic discharge was investigated in a 2.5-year experiment with 10 monolithic lysimeters taken from the same field. In order to unravel the transferability of the results from lysimeters to the field scale, the Al, Fe and S concentrations in discharge water from the lysimeters were compared with those in the groundwater of the AS field (pedon and field scale), and in pore water (pedon and horizon scale). In the waterlogged bare lysimeters (HWB), the Al, Fe and S concentrations in discharge waters were broadly similar to those measured in the groundwater and followed the changes in the pore water. In the waterlogged cropped (reed canary grass, Phalaris arundinacea) lysimeters (HWC), in contrast, the discharge waters were markedly higher in Fe and lower in Al than the groundwater in the field. This outcome was attributable to the reduction of Fe(3+) to the more soluble Fe(2+) and the reduction-induced increase in pH, which enhanced the formation of Al(3+) hydroxy species. Lowering of the water table (LWC) caused soil ripening, which resulted in increased saturated hydraulic conductivity and porosity and enhanced the oxidation of sulphidic materials and acid formation. The responses of Al, Fe and S in drainage waters from HWC and LWC lysimeters resembled previous findings in AS soils. Based on this and the similarity between dissolved element concentrations in the discharge water of HWB lysimeters and groundwater in the field, we conclude that our monolithic lysimeters yielded realistic results concerning the efficiency of various methods in mitigating environmental risks related to cultivated AS

  2. Dissolved Oxygen in Guadalupe Slough and Pond A3W, South San Francisco Bay, California, August and September 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shellenbarger, Gregory; Schoellhamer, David H.; Morgan, Tara L.; Takekawa, John Y.; Athearn, Nicole D.; Henderson, Kathleen D.

    2008-01-01

    Initial restoration of former salt evaporation ponds under the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay included the changing of water-flow patterns and the monitoring of water quality of discharge waters from the ponds. Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations became evident in discharge waters when the ponds first were opened in 2004. This was a concern, because of the potential for low-DO pond discharge to decrease the DO concentrations in the sloughs that receive water from the ponds. However, as of summer 2007, only limited point-measurements of DO concentrations had been made in the receiving sloughs adjacent to the discharge ponds. In this report, we describe two short studies aimed at understanding the natural variability of slough DO and the effect of pond discharge on the DO concentrations in the sloughs. Pond A3W (a discharge pond) and the adjacent Guadalupe Slough were instrumented in August and September 2007 to measure DO, temperature, conductivity, and pH. In addition, Mowry and Newark Sloughs were instrumented during the August study to document DO variability in nearby sloughs that were unaffected by pond discharge. The results showed that natural tidal variability in the slough appeared to dominate and control the slough DO concentrations. Water-quality parameters between Guadalupe Slough and Mowry and Newark Sloughs could not be directly compared because deployment locations were different distances from the bay. Pond-discharge water was identified in Guadalupe Slough using the deployed instruments, but, counter to the previous assumption, the pond discharge, at times, increased DO concentrations in the slough. The effects of altering the volume of pond discharge were overwhelmed by natural spring-neap tidal variability in the slough. This work represents a preliminary investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey of the effects of pond discharge on adjacent sloughs, and the results will be used in designing a comprehensive DO

  3. High dissolved methane concentrations in the deep-water Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Byong-Jae; Chun, Jong-Hwa

    2014-05-01

    As a part of the Korean National Gas Hydrate Program, a production test in the Ulleung Basin is planned to be performed in 2015. The targets are the gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs, which were found during the Second Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate Drilling Expedition (UBGH2) in 2010. To ensure a safe production test, an environmental program has been conducted by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) since 2012. This program includes a baseline survey using a KIGAM Seafloor Observation System (KISOS) and R/V TAMHAE II of KIGAM, development of a KIGAM Seafloor Monitoring System (KIMOS), and seafloor monitoring on various potential hazards associated with the dissociated gas from gas hydrates using the KIMOS during the production test. A survey for measuring the dissolved methane concentrations in the area at and nearby the gas hydrate production testing site was performed using R/V TAMHAE II and the KISOS. The water samples were also collected and analyzed to measure the dissolved methane concentrations by the SBE carousel water sampler installed in the KISOS and gas chromatography (GC) at KIGAM. The dissolved methane concentrations were also measured using a Frantech METS methane sensor installed in the KISOS. No dissolved methane anomaly was detected at the site where any evidence of gas hydrate presence has not been observed. On the other hand, the water analysis showed high dissolved methane concentrations at the water depth above and within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) at the site where gas hydrates were identified by drilling. However, these dissolved methane anomalies within the GHSZ were not detected by methane sensor. To examine these uncertain dissolved methane anomalies within the GHSZ, the water samples will be collected and analyzed once again, and the analytical result will be also carefully compared with the data collected using the methane sensor and deep ocean mass spectrometer (DOMS) developed by the University of

  4. Regulation of arsenic mobility on basaltic glass surfaces by speciation and pH.

    PubMed

    Sigfusson, Bergur; Meharg, Andrew A; Gislason, Sigurdur R

    2008-12-01

    The importance of geothermal energy as a source for electricity generation and district heating has increased over recent decades. Arsenic can be a significant constituent of the geothermal fluids pumped to the surface during power generation. Dissolved As exists in different oxidation states, mainly as As(III) and As(V), and the charge of individual species varies with pH. Basaltic glass is one of the most important rock types in many high-temperature geothermal fields. Static batch and dynamic column experiments were combined to generate and validate sorption coefficients for As(III) and As(V) in contact with basaltic glass at pH 3-10. Validation was carried out by two empirical kinetic models and a surface complexation model (SCM). The SCM provided a better fit to the experimental column data than kinetic models at high pH values. However, in certain circumstances, an adequate estimation of As transport in the column could not be attained without incorporation of kinetic reactions. The varying mobility with pH was due to the combined effects of the variable charge of the basaltic glass with the pH point of zero charge at 6.8 and the individual As species as pH shifted, respectively. The mobility of As(III) decreased with increasing pH. The opposite was true for As(V), being nearly immobile at pH 3 to being highly mobile at pH 10. Incorporation of appropriate sorption constants, based on the measured pH and Eh of geothermal fluids, into regional groundwater-flow models should allow prediction of the As(III) and As(V) transport from geothermal systems to adjacent drinking water sources and ecosystems.

  5. The pH of antiseptic cleansers

    PubMed Central

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Varothai, Supenya; Nuchkull, Piyavadee

    2014-01-01

    Background Daily bathing with antiseptic cleansers are proposed by some physicians as an adjunctive management of atopic dermatitis (AD). As atopic skin is sensitive, selection of cleansing products becomes a topic of concern. Objective Our purpose is to evaluate the pH of various antiseptic body cleansers to give an overview for recommendation to patients with AD. Methods Commonly bar and liquid cleansers consisted of antiseptic agents were measured for pH using pH meter and pH-indicator strips. For comparison, mild cleansers and general body cleansers were also measured. Results All cleansing bars had pH 9.8-11.3 except syndet bar that had neutral pH. For liquid cleansers, three cleansing agents had pH close to pH of normal skin, one of antiseptic cleansers, one of mild cleansers and another one of general cleansers. The rest of antiseptic cleansers had pH 8.9-9.6 while mild cleansers had pH 6.9-7.5. Syndet liquid had pH 7 and general liquid cleansers had pH 9.6. Conclusion The pH of cleanser depends on composition of that cleanser. Adding antiseptic agents are not the only factor determining variation of pH. Moreover, benefit of antiseptic properties should be considered especially in cases of infected skin lesions in the selection of proper cleansers for patients with AD. PMID:24527408

  6. Bioavailability and characterization of dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorus in wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; Liu, Haizhou; Liu, Lei; Smith, Scott; Sedlak, David L; Gu, April Z

    2015-04-01

    There is still a great knowledge gap in the understanding of characteristics and bioavailability of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in wastewater effluents, which surmise implications related to both discharge regulation and treatment practice. In this study, we simultaneously investigated the characteristics and bioavailability of both DON and DOP, with separated hydrophilic versus hydrophobic fractions, in highly-treated wastewater effluents for the first time. The tertiary effluents from two wastewater treatment plants were separated into two fractions by XAD-8 resin coupled with anion exchange resin based on the hydrophobicity. Results showed that the majority of DON was present in hydrophilic forms while more DOP existed in hydrophobic forms. Hydrophilic DON contributed to 64.0%-72.2% of whole DON, while hydrophobic DOP accounted for 61.4%-80.7% of total DOP for the two plants evaluated. The effluents and their fractions were then subject to bioavailability assay based on 14-day algae growth. The results indicated that majority (~73-75%) of the effluent DOP, particularly the hydrophobic fraction with lower C/P ratio was more likely to be bioavailable for algal growth. The bioavailable fraction of DON varied widely (28%-61%) for the two plants studied and the hydrophilic fraction with lower C/N ratio seemed to exhibit higher bioavailability than the hydrophobic portion. The differences in bioavailable DON and DOP distributions of effluents from those two plants could be attributed to different receiving effluent compositions and wastewater treatment processes. In addition, fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) were used to characterize the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in wastewater effluent, which provided insights into the nature of organic matter in wastewater samples with different characteristics and originating sources.

  7. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Robert G.M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  8. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Manaka, M; Takeda, M

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m(2)s(-1)) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69×10(-11)

  9. Consumption and diffusion of dissolved oxygen in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaka, M.; Takeda, M.

    2016-10-01

    Fe(II)-bearing minerals (e.g., biotite, chlorite, and pyrite) are a promising reducing agent for the consumption of atmospheric oxygen in repositories for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. To estimate effective diffusion coefficients (De, in m2 s- 1) for dissolved oxygen (DO) and the reaction rates for the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals in a repository environment, we conducted diffusion-chemical reaction experiments using intact rock samples of Mizunami sedimentary rock. In addition, we conducted batch experiments on the oxidation of crushed sedimentary rock by DO in a closed system. From the results of the diffusion-chemical reaction experiments, we estimated the values of De for DO to lie within the range 2.69 × 10- 11 < De < 6.30 × 10- 11. Values of the second-order rate constant (k, in L mol-1 s- 1) were in the range - 3.66 < log k < - 2.83 (from batch experiments) and in the range - 3.87 < log k < - 2.22 (from diffusion-chemical reaction experiments). Many of these values are within the range of previously published rates for reaction between O2(aq) and Fe(II) surface complexes. The average value for the total concentration of reactive sites was about 10- 4 mol m- 2 from batch experiments. In contrast, the value of reactive sites estimated from the physical surface area was about 10- 8 mol m- 2, indicating that the reaction within intact rock is limited to the sites that originally existed with accessible porosity for O2(aq). This difference arises because the batch experiments used powdered samples, meaning that new sites which formed during milling were added to the original reaction sites. On the basis of these observations and interpretations, diffusion-chemical reaction experiments make it possible to determine the values of the kinetic parameter and diffusivity for an intact rock sample simultaneously.

  10. Response of Dissolved Organic Matter to Warming and Nitrogen Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Nguyen, H.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) is a ubiquitous mixture of soluble organic components. Since DOM is produced from the terrestrial leachate of various soil types, soil may influence the chemistry and biology of freshwater through the input of leachate and run-off. The increased temperature by climate change could dramatically change the DOM characteristics of soils through enhanced decomposition rate and losses of carbon from soil organic matter. In addition, the increase in the N-deposition affects DOM leaching from soils by changing the carbon cycling and decomposition rate of soil decay. In this study, we conducted growth chamber experiments using two types of soil (wetland and forest) under the conditions of temperature increase and N-deposition in order to investigate how warming and nitrogen addition influence the characteristics of the DOM leaching from different soil types. This leachate controls the quantity and quality of DOM in surface water systems. After 10 months of incubation, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decreased for almost samples in the range of 7.6 to 87.3% (ANOVA, p<0.05). The specific UV absorption (SUVA) values also decreased for almost samples after the first 3 months and then increased gradually afterward in range of 3.3 to 108.4%. Both time and the interaction between time and the temperature had the statistically significant effects on the SUVA values (MANOVA, p<0.05). Humification index (HIX) showed the significant increase trends during the duration of incubation and temperature for almost the samples (ANOVA, p<0.05). Higher decreases in the DOC values and increases in HIX were observed at higher temperatures, whereas the opposite trend was observed for samples with N-addition. The PARAFAC results showed that three fluorescence components: terrestrial humic (C1), microbial humic-like (C2), and protein-like (C3), constituted the fluorescence matrices of soil samples. During the experiment, labile DOM from the soils was

  11. Distribution of dissolved pesticides and other water quality constituents in small streams, and their relation to land use, in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Chauncey W.; Wood, Tamara M.; Morace, Jennifer L.

    1997-01-01

    Water quality samples were collected at sites in 16 randomly selected agricultural and 4 urban subbasins as part of Phase III of the Willamette River Basin Water Quality Study in Oregon during 1996. Ninety-five samples were collected and analyzed for suspended sediment, conventional constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, and bacteria) and a suite of 86 dissolved pesticides. The data were collected to characterize the distribution of dissolved pesticide concentrations in small streams (drainage areas 2.6? 13 square miles) throughout the basin, to document exceedances of water quality standards and guidelines, and to identify the relative importance of several upstream land use categories (urban, agricultural, percent agricultural land, percent of land in grass seed crops, crop diversity) and seasonality in affecting these distributions. A total of 36 pesticides (29 herbicides and 7 insecticides) were detected basinwide. The five most frequently detected compounds were the herbicides atrazine (99% of samples), desethylatrazine (93%), simazine (85%), metolachlor (85%), and diuron (73%). Fifteen compounds were detected in 12?35% of samples, and 16 compounds were detected in 1?9% of samples. Water quality standards or criteria were exceeded more frequently for conventional constituents than for pesticides. State of Oregon water quality standards were exceeded at all but one site for the indicator bacteria E. coli, 3 sites for nitrate, 10 sites for water temperature, 4 sites for dissolved oxygen, and 1 site for pH. Pesticide concentrations, which were usually less than 1 part per billion, exceeded State of Oregon or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency aquatic life toxicity criteria only for chlorpyrifos, in three samples from one site; such criteria have been established for only two other detected pesticides. However, a large number of unusually high concentrations (1?90 parts per billion) were

  12. A variable stoichiometry model for pH homeostasis in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Macnab, R M; Castle, A M

    1987-01-01

    The composition of the proton-motive force of a hypothetical bacterial cell of wide pH tolerance is analyzed according to a model whereby the electron transport chain and various proton-linked sodium and potassium ion transporting modes are responsible for the development of the membrane potential and the chemical potentials of the three cations. Simultaneous use of two or more modes employing the same metal cation, but at a different stoichiometric ratio with respect to protons, produces nonintegral stoichiometry; the modes could represent either different devices or different states of a single device. Cycling of the cation, driven by proton-motive force, results. The relative conductances of the various modes are postulated to be pH-dependent. The pattern of potentials that results is qualitatively in accord with current knowledge and may reflect the mechanism of pH homeostasis in bacteria. The membrane potential is outwardly directed (positive inside) at extremely acid pH, becoming inwardly directed as the pH increases; the pH gradient across the membrane is large and inwardly directed (alkaline inside) at acid pH, becoming smaller and eventually inverting at alkaline pH values; the transmembrane potassium gradient is outwardly directed (high concentration inside) at all pH values; the transmembrane sodium gradient is inwardly directed at all pH values, following the pH gradient from acid through neutral pH, but then diverging at alkaline pH. PMID:3676443

  13. Evaluation of filter media for clarification of partially dissolved residues containing plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, E.S.

    1989-10-09

    A common process in the chemical industry employs the leaching of a desirable component from an insoluble substrate, followed by filtration to produce a clarified solution of the desirable component and a discardable residue. The work described here involved evaluating sintered metal filter media for separating dissolved plutonium from undissolved residues generated at various locations owned by the Department of Energy throughout the United States. The work was performed during a six-week assignment at the Savannah River Laboratory as part of a high school science enrichment program conducted in the summer of 1989. The leach step used included dissolving the plutonium-containing solids in a solution of nitric-hydrofluoric acid. To simulate the partial solubility of the actual plutonium-containing residues, a non-radioactive power plant flyash was used. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Porosity and Dissolved Salt Load Estimation from Geophysical Airborne Em and Borehole EC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley-Cooper, Y.; Macnae, J.; Tweed, S.

    2006-12-01

    Dissolved salt in aquifers can be a hazard to fresh water resources. Interpolated grid maps at the depth of the aquifer, derived from EC measurements on borehole water samples, can be combined with more detailed bulk electrical conductivities from airborne electromagnetics to provide detailed predictions of subsurface porosity and total dissolved salt load. The calculated porosity and salt load are in fact maximum estimate values since a resistive host matrix is assumed. The technique has been applied to vertically distinct aquifers in two different areas of the salt-threatened Murray-Darling basin in Australia. This technique may provide extensive information on the hydraulic properties of aquifers, has important implications for quantitative hydrological models, particularly in estimations of sustainable groundwater use, and timeframes for saline groundwater migration

  15. Scavenging dissolved oxygen via acoustic droplet vaporization.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Holland, Christy K; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) of perfluorocarbon emulsions has been explored for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that vaporization of a liquid droplet results in a gas microbubble with a diameter 5-6 times larger than the initial droplet diameter. The expansion factor can increase to a factor of 10 in gassy fluids as a result of air diffusing from the surrounding fluid into the microbubble. This study investigates the potential of this process to serve as an ultrasound-mediated gas scavenging technology. Perfluoropentane droplets diluted in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were insonified by a 2 MHz transducer at peak rarefactional pressures lower than and greater than the ADV pressure amplitude threshold in an in vitro flow phantom. The change in dissolved oxygen (DO) of the PBS before and after ADV was measured. A numerical model of gas scavenging, based on conservation of mass and equal partial pressures of gases at equilibrium, was developed. At insonation pressures exceeding the ADV threshold, the DO of air-saturated PBS decreased with increasing insonation pressures, dropping as low as 25% of air saturation within 20s. The decrease in DO of the PBS during ADV was dependent on the volumetric size distribution of the droplets and the fraction of droplets transitioned during ultrasound exposure. Numerically predicted changes in DO from the model agreed with the experimentally measured DO, indicating that concentration gradients can explain this phenomenon. Using computationally modified droplet size distributions that would be suitable for in vivo applications, the DO of the PBS was found to decrease with increasing concentrations. This study demonstrates that ADV can significantly decrease the DO in an aqueous fluid, which may have direct therapeutic applications and should be considered for ADV-based diagnostic or therapeutic applications.

  16. Dissolved organic carbon release by marine macrophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón, C.; Apostolaki, E. T.; Duarte, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release by marine macrophyte communities (seagrass meadows and macroalgal beds) were obtained experimentally using in situ benthic chambers. The effect of light availability on DOC release by macrophyte communities was examined in two communities both by comparing net DOC release under light and dark, and by examining the response of net DOC release to longer-term (days) experimental shading of the communities. All most 85% of the seagrass communities and almost all of macroalgal communities examined acted as net sources of DOC. There was a weak tendency for higher DOC fluxes under light than under dark conditions in seagrass meadow. There is no relationship between net DOC fluxes and gross primary production (GPP) and net community production (NCP), however, this relationship is positive between net DOC fluxes and community respiration. Net DOC fluxes were not affected by shading of a T. testudinum community in Florida for 5 days, however, shading of a mixed seagrass meadow in the Philippines led to a significant reduction on the net DOC release when shading was maintained for 6 days compared to only 2 days of shading. Based on published and unpublished results we also estimate the global net DOC production by marine macrophytes. The estimated global net DOC flux, and hence export, from marine macrophyte is about 0.197 ± 0.015 Pg C yr-1 or 0.212 ± 0.016 Pg C yr-1 depending if net DOC flux by seagrass meadows was estimated by taking into account the low or high global seagrass area, respectively.

  17. Generation of pH responsive fluorescent nano capsules through simple steps for the oral delivery of low pH susceptible drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakumary, Changerath; Sreenivasan, Kunnatheeri

    2016-11-01

    pH responsive nano capsules are promising as it can encapsulate low pH susceptible drugs like insulin and guard them from the hostile environments in the intestinal tract. The strong acidity of the gastro-intestinal tract and the presence of proteolytic enzymes are the tumbling blocks for the design of drug delivery vehicles through oral route for drugs like insulin. Nano capsules are normally built over templates which are subsequently removed by further steps. Such processes are complex and often lead into deformed and collapsed capsules. In this study, we choose calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nano particles to serve as template. Over CaCO3 nanoparticles, silica layers were built followed by polymethacrylic acid chains to acquire pH responsiveness. During the polymerization process of the methacrylic acid, the calcium carbonate core particles were dissolved leading to the formation of nano hollow capsules having a size that ranges from 225 to 246 nm and thickness from 19 to 58 nm. The methodology is simple and devoid of additional steps. The nano shells exhibited 80% release of the loaded model drug, insulin at pH 7.4 while at pH 2.0 the capsules nearly stopped the release of the drug. Polymethacrylic acid shows pH responsive swelling behavior that it swells at intestinal pH (7.0-7.5) and shrinks at gastric pH (˜2.0) thus enabling the safe unloading of the drug from the nano capsules.

  18. A diet with a struvite relative supersaturation less than 1 is effective in dissolving struvite stones in vivo.

    PubMed

    Houston, Doreen M; Weese, Heather E; Evason, Michelle D; Biourge, Vincent; van Hoek, Ingrid

    2011-10-01

    Magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) is one of the most common minerals found in feline uroliths. Previous studies have shown the efficacy of acidifying calculolytic diets (inducing urine pH < 6.5), in dissolving struvite stones in cats. Recent work in our laboratory found that wet and dry test diets induce a struvite urinary relative supersaturation (RSS) < 1 and that the urine of healthy cats fed the dry test diet dissolved feline struvite stones in vitro. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the efficacy of those test diets on naturally occurring struvite urocystoliths in cats. A total of twenty-one cats were used, of which seventeen completed the study. Of the seventeen cats, eight were fed the wet test diet and nine the dry test diet. Uroliths dissolved in a median of 18 (10-55) d. In the remaining four cats, uroliths failed to dissolve and were removed surgically. Quantitative analysis showed that these uroliths contained either calcium oxalate or calcium phosphate. The present study demonstrates that diets that induce a struvite RSS < 1 result in struvite stone dissolution in vivo.

  19. Soil redox and pH effects on methane production in a flooded rice soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.P.; DeLaune, R.D.; Masscheleyn, P.H.; Patrick, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Methane formation in soil is a microbiological process controlled by many factors. Of them soil redox potential (Eh) and soil pH are considered as critical controls. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to study the critical initiation soil Eh, the optimum soil pH, and the interaction of Eh and pH on methane production. A small decrease in pH resulting from the introduction of acidic materials significantly decreased methane production. However, a slight increase in soil pH (about 0.2 unit higher than the natural soil suspension pH) resulted in an enhancement of methane production by 11-20 percent and 24-25 percent at controlled Eh of -250 mV and -200 mV, respectively. Results suggest that decrease in methane emission could be obtained by a small reduction in soil pH in Crowley soil.

  20. Formation of Hg(II) tetrathiolate complexes with cysteine at neutral pH

    DOE PAGES

    Warner, Thomas; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2016-01-04

    Mercury(II) ions precipitate from aqueous cysteine (H2Cys) solutions containing H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 2.0 as Hg(S-HCys)2. In absence of additional cysteine, the precipitate dissolves at pH ~12 with the [Hg(S,N-Cys)2]2- complex dominating. With excess cysteine (H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 4.0), higher complexes form and the precipitate dissolves at lower pH values. Previously, we found that tetrathiolate [Hg(S-Cys)4]6- complexes form at pH = 11.0; in this work we extend the investigation to pH values of physiological interest. We examined two series of Hg(II)-cysteine solutions in which CHg(II) varied between 8 – 9 mM and 80 – 100 mM, respectively, with H2Cys/Hg(II)more » mole ratios from 4 to ~20. The solutions were prepared in the pH range 7.1 – 8.8, at the pH at which the initial Hg(S-HCys)2 precipitate dissolved. The variations in the Hg(II) speciation were followed by 199Hg NMR, X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Our results show that in the dilute solutions (CHg(II) = 8 – 9 mM), mixtures of di-, tri- (major) and tetrathiolate complexes exist at moderate cysteine excess (CH2Cys ~ 0.16 M) at pH 7.1. In the more concentrated solutions (CHg(II) = 80 – 100 mM) with high cysteine excess (CH2Cys > 0.9 M), tetrathiolate [Hg(S-cysteinate)4]m-6 (m = 0 – 4) complexes dominate in the pH range 7.3 – 7.8, with lower charge than for the [Hg(S-Cys)4]6- complex due to protonation of some (m) of the amino groups of the coordinated cysteine ligands. In conclusion, the results of this investigation could provide a key to the mechanism of biosorption and accumulation of Hg(II) ions in biological / environmental systems.« less

  1. Formation of Hg(II) tetrathiolate complexes with cysteine at neutral pH

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Thomas; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2016-01-04

    Mercury(II) ions precipitate from aqueous cysteine (H2Cys) solutions containing H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 2.0 as Hg(S-HCys)2. In absence of additional cysteine, the precipitate dissolves at pH ~12 with the [Hg(S,N-Cys)2]2- complex dominating. With excess cysteine (H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 4.0), higher complexes form and the precipitate dissolves at lower pH values. Previously, we found that tetrathiolate [Hg(S-Cys)4]6- complexes form at pH = 11.0; in this work we extend the investigation to pH values of physiological interest. We examined two series of Hg(II)-cysteine solutions in which CHg(II) varied between 8 – 9 mM and 80 – 100 mM, respectively, with H2Cys/Hg(II) mole ratios from 4 to ~20. The solutions were prepared in the pH range 7.1 – 8.8, at the pH at which the initial Hg(S-HCys)2 precipitate dissolved. The variations in the Hg(II) speciation were followed by 199Hg NMR, X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Our results show that in the dilute solutions (CHg(II) = 8 – 9 mM), mixtures of di-, tri- (major) and tetrathiolate complexes exist at moderate cysteine excess (CH2Cys ~ 0.16 M) at pH 7.1. In the more concentrated solutions (CHg(II) = 80 – 100 mM) with high cysteine excess (CH2Cys > 0.9 M), tetrathiolate [Hg(S-cysteinate)4]m-6 (m = 0 – 4) complexes dominate in the pH range 7.3 – 7.8, with lower charge than for the [Hg(S-Cys)4]6- complex due to protonation of some (m) of the amino groups of the coordinated cysteine ligands. In conclusion, the results of this investigation could provide a key to the mechanism of biosorption and accumulation of Hg(II) ions in biological / environmental systems.

  2. Fetal scalp pH testing

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  3. Acid loading test (pH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  4. Effects of Dissolved Carbonate on Arsenate Adsorption and Surface Speciation at the Hematite-Water Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; Sparks, D.L.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of dissolved carbonate on arsenate [As(V)] reactivity and surface speciation at the hematite-water interface were studied as a function of pH and two different partial pressures of carbon dioxide gas [PCO2 = 10 -3.5 atm and ???0; CO2-free argon (Ar)] using adsorption kinetics, pseudo-equilibrium adsorption/titration experiments, extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic (EXAFS) analyses, and surface complexation modeling. Different adsorbed carbonate concentrations, due to the two different atmospheric systems, resulted in an enhanced and/or suppressed extent of As(V) adsorption. As(V) adsorption kinetics [4 g L -1, [As(V)]0 = 1.5 mM and / = 0.01 M NaCl] showed carbonate-enhanced As(V) uptake in the air-equilibrated systems at pH 4 and 6 and at pH 8 after 3 h of reaction. Suppressed As(V) adsorption was observed in the air-equilibrated system in the early stages of the reaction at pH 8. In the pseudo-equilibrium adsorption experiments [1 g L-1, [As(V)] 0 = 0.5 mM and / = 0.01 M NaCl], in which each pH value was held constant by a pH-stat apparatus, effects of dissolved carbonate on As(V) uptake were almost negligible at equilibrium, but titrant (0.1 M HCl) consumption was greater in the air-equilibrated systems (PCO2 = 10-3.5 atm)than in the CO2-free argon system at pH 4-7.75. The EXAFS analyses indicated that As(V) tetrahedral molecules were coordinated on iron octahedral via bidentate mononuclear (???2.8 A??) and bidentate binuclear (???3.3 A??) bonding at pH 4.5-8 and loading levels of 0.46-3.10 ??M m-2. Using the results of the pseudoequilibrium adsorption data and the XAS analyses, the pH-dependent As(V) adsorption under the PCO2 = 10-3.5 atm and the CO2-free argon system was modeled using surface complexation modeling, and the results are consistent with the formation of nonprotonated bidentate surface species at the hematite surfaces. The results also suggest that the acid titrant consumption was strongly affected by changes to

  5. Nickel-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxide Coating on the Surface of Conductive Substrates by Liquid Phase Deposition.

    PubMed

    Maki, Hideshi; Takigawa, Masashi; Mizuhata, Minoru

    2015-08-12

    The direct synthesis of the adhered Ni-Al LDH thin film onto the surface of electrically conductive substrates by the liquid phase deposition (LPD) reaction is carried out for the development of the positive electrode. The complexation and solution equilibria of the dissolved species in the LPD reaction have been clarified by a theoretical approach, and the LPD reaction conditions for the Ni-Al LDH depositions are shown to be optimized by controlling the fluoride ion concentration and the pH of the LPD reaction solutions. The yields of metal oxides and hydroxides by the LPD method are very sensitive to the supersaturation state of the hydroxide in the reaction solution. The surfaces of conductive substrates are completely covered by the minute mesh-like Ni-Al LDH thin film; furthermore, there is no gap between the surfaces of conductive substrates and the deposited Ni-Al LDH thin film. The active material layer thickness was able to be controlled within the range from 100 nm to 1 μm by the LPD reaction time. The high-crystallinity and the arbitrary-thickness thin films on the conductive substrate surface will be beneficial for the interface control of charge transfer reaction fields and the internal resistance reduction of various secondary batteries.

  6. Complexation of arsenite with dissolved organic matter: conditional distribution coefficients and apparent stability constants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2010-11-01

    The complexation of arsenic (As) with dissolved organic matter (DOM), although playing an important role in regulating As mobility and transformation, is poorly characterized, as evidenced by scarce reporting of fundamental parameters of As-DOM complexes. The complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with Aldrich humic acid (HA) at different pHs was characterized using a recently developed analytical technique to measure both free and DOM-bound As. Conditional distribution coefficient (KD), describing capacity of DOM in binding AsIII from the mass perspective, and apparent stability constant (Ks), describing stability of resulting AsIII-DOM complexes, were calculated to characterize AsIII-DOM complexation. LogKD of AsIII ranged from 3.7 to 2.2 (decreasing with increase of As/DOM ratio) at pH 5.2, from 3.6 to 2.6 at pH 7, and from 4.3 to 3.2 at pH=9.3, respectively. Two-site ligand binding models can capture the heterogeneity of binding sites and be used to calculate Ks by classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) groups. LogKs for S1 sites are 7.0, 6.5, and 5.9 for pH 5.2, 7, and 9.3, respectively, which are approximately 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than for weak S2 sites. The results suggest that AsIII complexation with DOM increases with pH, as evidenced by significant spikes in concentrations of DOM-bound AsIII and in KD values at pH 9.3. In contrary to KD, logKs decreased with pH, in particular for S1 sites, probably due to the presence of negatively charged H2AsO3- and the involvement of metal-bridged AsIII-DOM complexation at pH 9.3.

  7. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasagara Nagarajan, Varun

    hydrogen induced failure mechanism in this material during cyclic loading. The secondary objective of this investigation was to determine the role of inclusions and their influence in affecting the fatigue crack growth rate of this material. Compact tension and tensile specimens were prepared as per ASTM E-647, E-399 and E-8 standards. The specimens were tested in three different heat treated conditions i.e. annealed (as received) as well as two austempered conditions. These specimens were precharged with hydrogen (ex situ) using cathodic charging method at a constant current density at three different time periods ranging from 150 to 250 hours before conducting fatigue crack growth tests. Mode 1 type fatigue tests were then performed in ambient atmosphere at constant amplitude using load ratio R of 0.1. The near threshold fatigue crack growth rate, fatigue threshold and the fatigue crack growth rate in the linear region were determined. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of specimens without any dissolve hydrogen were then compared with the specimens with different concentration of dissolved hydrogen. The test results show that the dissolved hydrogen concentration increases with the increase in charging time in all three heat treated conditions and the hydrogen uptake shows a strong dependence on the microstructure of the alloy. It was also observed that the microstructure has a significant influence of on the fatigue crack growth and SCC behaviour of the alloy with dissolved hydrogen. As the dissolved hydrogen concentration increases, the fatigue threshold was found to decrease and the near threshold crack growth rate increases in all three heat treated conditions showing the deleterious effect of hydrogen, but to a different extent in each condition. Current test results also indicate that the fatigue crack growth rates in the linear region increases as the dissolved hydrogen content increases in all three heat treated conditions. It is also observed that increasing the

  8. Effects of ph, carbonate, orthophosphate, and redox potential on cuprosolvency

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, M.R.; Lytle, D.A.; Clement, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive solubility model for copper in drinking water has been developed, that is consistent with available data for copper dissolution and passivation in drinking water systems. Copper solubility (cuprosolvency) is greatly affected by the redox conditions of the systems. The concentration of Cu(I) is dominated by Cu{sub 2}O(s) or CuOH(s) solid phases, plus soluble aqueous ammonia and chloride complexes. In new piping, the concentration of Cu(II) is mainly governed by Cu(OH){sub 2}(s) (cupric hydroxide), rather than CuO(s) (tenorite) or Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s)(malachite). Complexation of Cu(II) by DIC and hydroxide ion is extremely important. Increases in DIC are predicted to cause significant increases in copper solubility in the pH range of 7.5--10. Utilities may trade off increasing cuprosolvency by DIC addition for ensuring adequate buffering intensity in the finished water. Sufficient dosages of orthophosphate in the pH range of 6.5 to 7.5 may reduce cuprosolvency under oxidizing conditions. Sulfate may decrease cuprosolvency under some conditions, or may interfere with the formation of cupric hydroxide films under mildly alkaline conditions. Dissolved oxygen and chlorine residual play complicated roles in determining copper concentrations after various standing times. Frequently, 48--72 hours are necessary to reach equilibrium levels of copper in disinfected systems.

  9. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2002-10-15

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics.

  10. Accuracy of different sensors for the estimation of pollutant concentrations (total suspended solids, total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand) in wastewater and stormwater.

    PubMed

    Lepot, Mathieu; Aubin, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Many field investigations have used continuous sensors (turbidimeters and/or ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrophotometers) to estimate with a short time step pollutant concentrations in sewer systems. Few, if any, publications compare the performance of various sensors for the same set of samples. Different surrogate sensors (turbidity sensors, UV-visible spectrophotometer, pH meter, conductivity meter and microwave sensor) were tested to link concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS), total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD), and sensors' outputs. In the combined sewer at the inlet of a wastewater treatment plant, 94 samples were collected during dry weather, 44 samples were collected during wet weather, and 165 samples were collected under both dry and wet weather conditions. From these samples, triplicate standard laboratory analyses were performed and corresponding sensors outputs were recorded. Two outlier detection methods were developed, based, respectively, on the Mahalanobis and Euclidean distances. Several hundred regression models were tested, and the best ones (according to the root mean square error criterion) are presented in order of decreasing performance. No sensor appears as the best one for all three investigated pollutants.

  11. Electroanalytical measurements without electrolytes: conducting polymers as probes for redox titration in non-conductive organic media.

    PubMed

    Lange, Ulrich; Mirsky, Vladimir M

    2012-09-26

    Electroanalytical methods have been applied only in conducting media. An application of conducting polymers allows to overcome this limitation. If such material is in electrochemical equilibrium with dissolved redox active species, its electrical conductivity depends on the redox potential of these species. Therefore, conductometric measurements with conducting polymers can provide about the same information as classical redox electrodes. The approach was applied for redox titration. Equivalent points obtained by this titration in aqueous and organic electrolytes were identical. Then the approach was applied for determ