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Sample records for conference fusion semiannual

  1. Inertial Conference Fusion Semiannual Report October 1999 - March 2000, Volume 1, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, Al; Carpenter, Jason; Cassady, Cindy

    2000-03-01

    This first issue of the ''ICF Semiannual Report'' contains articles whose diverse subjects attest to the broad technical and scientific challenges that are at the forefront of the ICF program at LLNL. The first article describes the progress being made at solving the surface roughness problem on capsule mandrels. All NIF capsule options, except machined beryllium, require a mandrel upon which the ablator is deposited. This mandrel sets the baseline sphericity of the final capsule. Problems involving defects in the mandrel have been overcome using various techniques so that 2-mm-size mandrels can now be made that meet the NIF design specification. The second article validates and provides a detailed numerical investigation of the shadowgraph technique currently used to diagnose the surface roughness of a fuel ice layer inside of a transparent capsule. It is crucial for the success of the indirect-drive ignition targets that the techniques used to characterize ice-surface roughness be well understood. This study identifies methods for analyzing the bright band that give an accurate measure of the ice-surface roughness. The third article describes a series of realistic laser and target modifications that can lead to 3-4 times more energy coupling and 10 times greater yield from a NIF indirect-drive ignition target. Target modifications include using various mixtures of rare-earth and other high-Z metals as hohlraum wall material and adjusting the laser-entrance-hole size and the case-to-capsule size ratio. Each option is numerically examined separately and together. The fourth article reviews how detailed x-ray and Thomson scattering measurements from a high-density and high-temperature gasbag plasma are used to test spectroscopic modeling techniques. There is good agreement between the model and experimental dielectronic capture satellite intensities. However, improvements are required in the modeling of inner shell collisionally populated satellite states. These

  2. 77 FR 25523 - Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Office of the Secretary Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference AGENCY: U.S. Department of... of Transportation, Office of the Secretary, announces the second Semi-Annual Workforce Management... for addressing labor/management issues, and safety. Registration Space is limited. Registration...

  3. Contribution to Fusion Materials Semiannual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Meier, W

    2012-02-24

    The objectives of this work are the following: (1) The application of micro and mesoscale modeling techniques to study dislocation properties in ferritic and W-based materials; and (2) The development of computational models and tools to study damage accumulation in >1 dpa (fusion-like) conditions, both for Fe and W-based alloys. The high-temperature strength of structural ferritic alloys (ferritic/martensitic steels, ODS steels, bcc refractory alloys) hinges on the thermal stability of second phase particles and their interactions with dislocations. Irradiation damage can modify the structure and stability of both the particles and dislocations, particularly by the introduction of gas atoms, point defects and point defect clusters. The three aspects of materials strength that we are studying are: (a) Computation of dislocation mobility functions (stress-velocity relations) as a function of temperature and dislocation character. This will be done via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of single dislocation motion under applied shear stress. This is a fundamental input to dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations and also provides fundamental insights into the high-temperature plastic behavior of ferritic materials. (b) Simulations of dislocation-obstacle interactions using MD and DD. This subtask includes simulating the effect on dislocation glide of precipitates (e.g., {alpha}' Cr precipitates), ODS particles, and irradiation induced defect clusters (e.g. voids, dislocation loops, etc.). (c) Implementation of this information (dislocation mobilities and dislocation-defect interaction rules) into DD codes that will allow us to study plasticity of single crystals Fe alloys under relevant irradiation conditions.

  4. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  5. 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This book is a guide to the 1995 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference. It consists largely of abstracts of the oral and poster presentations that were to be made, and gives some general information about the conference and its schedule.

  6. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  8. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    This is the second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities in the following areas: (1) Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; (2) Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and (3) Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. Separate analytics were prepared for the reports in this volume.

  9. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  10. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1999-09-01

    This is the twenty-sixth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and its reported separately.

  11. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  12. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  14. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  15. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, G.

    1998-03-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with their partners in Japan, Russia, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This is the seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance, damage analysis and fundamental studies, and special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  17. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  18. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  19. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This is the twenty-first in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The report covers the following topics: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composite materials; ferritic/martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects, mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; and irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods.

  20. (Fourth international conference on fusion reactor materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.E.

    1990-01-24

    This report summarizes the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-4) which was held December 4--9, 1989, in Kyoto, Japan, as well as the results of several workshops, planning meetings, and laboratory visits made by the travelers. The ICFRM-4 is the major forum to present and exchange information on materials research and development in support of the world's fusion development efforts. About 360 papers were presented by the 347 conference attendees. Highlights of the conference are presented. A proposal by the United States to host ICFRM-5 was accepted by the International Advisory Committee. ORNL will be the host laboratory. A meeting of the DOE/JAERI Annex I Steering Committee to review the US/Japan Collaborative Testing of First Wall and Blanket Structural Materials with Mixed Spectrum Fission Reactors was held at JAERI Headquarters on December 1. The Japanese emphasized the critical importance of a resumption of HFIR operation. Even though the HFIR outage has lasted three plus years this program has continued to provide new and important data on materials behavior which has particular relevance to ITER.

  1. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-04-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  2. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1987-09-01

    These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The major areas of concern covered in this report are irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; ceramics and superconducting magnet materials. There are 61 reports cataloged separately. (LSP)

  3. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R J

    2011-01-05

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  4. CHRONICLE: Conference on Laser Fusion, Leipzig, December 11-14, 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, Yurii V.; Rode, A. V.

    1981-03-01

    A brief review is given of the papers presented at the Thirteenth European Conference on Laser-Matter Interaction and Laser Fusion, held in Leipzig in 1979. An analysis is made of papers reporting research on high-power laser facilities, theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations of laser compression and thermonuclear combustion of targets, problems relating to the physics of interaction of high-power laser radiation with high-temperature plasma, as well as the technology of laser fusion targets.

  5. Highlights from the 2013 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Santa Fe, NM

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-15

    The 2013 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference was held in Santa Fe, NM from April 15-17. There were 15 invited talks spanning the field of fusion theory on topics such as stellerator theory, intrinsic rotation in tokamaks, transport in the plasma edge, and plasma-wall interactions. Author-provided summaries of several of the invited talks are included on pages 5 to 10 of this document. Plenary talks were given by Per Helander (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald, Germany) on “Overview of recent developments in stellerator theory”, Amit Misra (Los Alamos National Laboratory) on “Stable storage of Helium at interfaces in nanocomposites”, Sergei Krasheninnikov (UC San Diego) on “On the physics of the first wall in fusion devices”, and Stuart Bale (UC Berkeley) on “Solar wind thermodynamics and turbulence: collisional – collisionless transitions”.

  6. Conference Report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-02-01

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  7. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  8. One Cold Fusion Speaker is One Too Many for a Future Energy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Thomas

    2001-04-01

    In 1998, a Conference on Future Energy (COFE) was scheduled to take place at the State Department Open Forum in April, 1999. Only one speaker, Ed Storms (formerly with Los Alamos Lab), was scheduled to talk about cold fusion as part of fourteen plenary lectures over a two-day period. However, the entire meeting was labeled a "cold fusion" conference by APS Spokesperson Bob Park who repeated the words four times in one 1999 What's New column. What transpired afterwards has become a part of the cold fusion suppression history, including several APS ``pseudoscience" presentations mocking COFE scientists. A review of the actual COFE contents reveals the rational side of emerging energy technologies normally associated with the scientific process. The Park-related events display an opposite pattern of behavior ultimately designed to discredit the COFE organizer and deprive him of his livelihood (see APS News, March, 2000). The compiled record shows how the communication of scientific information becomes distorted by undue prejudice and unethical lobbying.

  9. Conference report on the 3rd International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Mazzitelli, Guiseppe; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; ...

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9-11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. Furthermore, this international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma-Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  10. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    The 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics took place in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, on 7th--11th July 2003. It was jointly organized by the Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, the St Petersburg State Polytechnical University and Technical University Applied Physics Ltd, on behalf of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society (EPS). The members of the local organizing committee were drawn from these institutions: B Kuteev, Chair, Polytechnical University S Lebedev, Vice-Chair, Ioffe Institute A Lebedev, Scientific Secretary, Ioffe Institute V Bakharev, TUAP Ltd V Grigor'yants, Ioffe Institute V Sergeev, Polytechnical University N Zhubr, Ioffe Institute Over the years, the annual conference of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society has widened its scope. Contributions to the present conference covered widely diversified fields of plasma physics, ranging from magnetic and inertial fusion to low temperature plasmas. Plasma sizes under investigation ranged from tiny to astronomical. The topics covered during the conference were distributed over the following categories: tokamaks, stellarators, high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement, alternative magnetic confinement, plasma edge physics, plasma heating and current drive, diagnostics, basic plasma physics, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas and low temperature plasmas. The scientific programme and paper selection were the responsibility of the Programme Committee appointed by the Board of the EPS Plasma Physics Division. The committee was composed of: R Koch, Chairman, ERM/KMS Brussels, Belgium E Ascasibar, CIEMAT Madrid, Spain S Atzeni, Università di Roma, Italy G Bonhomme, LPMI Nancy, France C Chiuderi, Università di Firenze, Italy B Kuteev, St Petersburg State Polytechnical,University, Russian Federation M Mauel, Contact person APS-DPP, Columbia University New York, USA R A Pitts, EPFL/CRPP Lausanne, Switzerland R Salomaa

  11. CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION Theory of Fusion Plasmas: Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Sauter, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas takes place every other year in a place particularly favourable for informal and in-depth discussions. Invited and contributed papers present state-of-the-art research in theoretical plasma physics, covering all domains relevant to fusion plasmas. This workshop always welcomes a fruitful mix of experienced researchers and students, to allow a better understanding of the key theoretical physics models and applications. Theoretical issues related to burning plasmas Anomalous Transport (Turbulence, Coherent Structures, Microinstabilities) RF Heating and Current Drive Macroinstabilities Plasma-Edge Physics and Divertors Fast particles instabilities Further details: http://Varenna-Lausanne.epfl.ch The conference is organized by: Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Association EURATOM - Confédération Suisse 'Piero Caldirola' International Centre for the Promotion of Science and International School of Plasma Physics Istituto di Fisica del Plasma del CNR, Milano Editors: X Garbet (CEA, Cadarache, France) and O Sauter (CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

  12. EDITORIAL: Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010) Special issue: overview reports from the Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) (Daejeon, South Korea, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2011-09-01

    The group of 27 papers published in this special issue of Nuclear Fusion aims to monitor the worldwide progress made in the period 2008-2010 in the field of thermonuclear fusion. Of these papers, 22 are based on overview reports presented at the 23rd Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2010) and five are summary reports. The conference was hosted by the Republic of Korea and organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the National Fusion Research Institute and the Daejeon Metropolitan City. It took place in Daejeon on 11-16 October 2010. The overviews presented at the conference have been rewritten and extended for the purpose of this special issue and submitted to the standard double-referee peer-review of Nuclear Fusion. The articles are placed in the following sequence: Conference summaries of the sessions devoted to: Tokamak and stellarator experiments, experimental divertor physics and plasma wall interaction experiments, stability experiments and waves and fast particles; ITER activities, fusion technology, safety and economics; Magnetic confinement theory and modelling; Inertial confinement fusion; Innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement. Overview articles, presented in programme order, are as follows: Tokamaks Overview of KSTAR initial experiments; Recent progress in RF heating and long-pulse experiments on EAST; Overview of JET results; DIII-D contributions toward the scientific basis for sustained burning plasmas; Overview of JT-60U results toward the resolution of key physics and engineering issues in ITER and JT-60SA; Overview of physics results from NSTX; Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results; Overview of physics results from MAST; Contribution of Tore Supra in preparation of ITER; Overview of FTU results; Overview of experimental results on the HL-2A tokamak; Progress and scientific results in the TCV tokamak; Overview of the JT-60SA project; Recent results of the T-10 tokamak; The reconstruction and research progress of the TEXT

  13. 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: summary of sessions EX/S, EX/W and ICC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a summary overview, based on papers presented at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC), in the area of magnetic confinement experiments related to stability (EX/S), wave-plasma interactions, current drive, heating, energetic particles (EX/W) and innovative confinement concepts (ICCs). A selection of results that represent progress made since the last FEC in a few important thematic areas that are relevant for the successful and safe operation of future fusion devices like ITER, is highlighted.

  14. Semiannual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    The issue of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to the congress covers the period from October 1, 1990, to March 31, 1991. Among the significant audits, inspections, and investigations presented in this Semiannual Report are those on environmental testing done by Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, issues relating to the construction of the Superconducting Super Collider, control exercised by the DOE over subcontracts awarded by DOE contractors in furtherance of the Work-For-Others Program, deficiencies in DOE's oversight of the personnel security program, vendors substituting used circuit breakers in place of new ones ordered, and noncompliance with DOE documentation and reporting requirements in making and managing major system acquisitions. The Semiannual report is organized into five major sections. The first section contains brief overviews of the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General, as well as OIG views on current legislative matters. The second section describes the significant operational results of OIG audit, inspection, and investigative activity. The third, fourth, and fifth sections contain compilations of OIG statistical data.

  15. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  16. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular

  17. CONFERENCE REPORT: 11th EU-US Transport Task Force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Angioni, C.; Diamond, P. H.; Hammett, G. W.; Hidalgo, C.; Loarte, A.; Mantica, P.

    2007-04-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 11th EU-US Transport Task Force workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Marseilles, France, 4-7 September, 20068The present workshop: http://www-fusion-magnetique.cea.fr/ttf2006.. There were sessions on momentum transport, multi-scale physics, electron transport, particle transport and transport in the scrape-off layer.

  18. Conference Report on the 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M. G.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Mazzitelli, G.; Menard, J. E.; Mirnov, S. V.; Shimada, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Tabares, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    The 2nd International Symposium on Lithium Applications for Fusion Devices (ISLA-2011) was held on 27-29 April 2011 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) with broad participation from the community working on aspects of lithium research for fusion energy development. This community is expanding rapidly in many areas including experiments in magnetic confinement devices and a variety of lithium test stands, theory and modeling and developing innovative approaches. Overall, 53 presentations were given representing 26 institutions from 10 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were given in 24 presentations, from NSTX (PPPL, USA), LTX (PPPL, USA), FT-U (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (TRINITY, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST (ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), and RFX (Padova, Italy). Sessions were devoted to: I. Lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), II. Lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), III. Special session on liquid lithium technology, IV. Lithium laboratory test stands, V. Lithium theory/modeling/comments, VI. Innovative lithium applications and VII. Panel discussion on lithium PFC viability in magnetic fusion reactors. There was notable participation from the fusion technology communities, including the IFE, IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchanges with the physics oriented magnetic confinement lithium research groups. It was agreed to continue future exchanges of ideas and data to help develop attractive liquid lithium solutions for very challenging magnetic fusion issues, such as development of a high heat flux steady-state divertor concept and acceptable plasma disruption mitigation techniques while improving plasma performance with lithium. The next workshop will be held at ENEA, Frascati, Italy in 2013.

  19. 78 FR 11735 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... February 19, 2013 Part II Small Business Administration Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction #0;#0... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Ch. I Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Semiannual Regulatory Agenda; correction. SUMMARY: This document contains a...

  20. CONFERENCE REPORT: 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.; Fasoli, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Kirk, A.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A. G.; Tala, T.

    2009-04-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 13th EU-US Transport Task Force Workshop on transport in fusion plasmas, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, 1-4 September 2008. There were sessions on core heat and particle transport; core and edge momentum transport; edge and scrape-off-layer transport and MHD and fast particle interaction with transport.

  1. The Mexican American Political Conference Urges Participation in National Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcelo, Cosme Juan, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Participants of the second semiannual meeting of the Arizona Mexican American Political Conference, held in Tucson on September 24, 1977, discussed the Mexican American influence and involvement in local, state, and national politics. (NQ)

  2. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 16th IAEA Technical Meeting on 'Research using Small Fusion Devices'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Van Oost, G.; Malaquias, A.; Herrera, J.

    2006-10-01

    Common research topics that are being studied in small, medium and large devices such as H-mode like or improved confinement, turbulence and transport are reported. These included modelling and diagnostic developments for edge and core, to characterize plasma density, temperature, electric potential, plasma flows, turbulence scale, etc. Innovative diagnostic methods were designed and implemented which could be used to develop experiments in small devices (in some cases not possible in large devices due to higher power deposition) to allow a better understanding of plasma edge and core properties. Reports are given addressing research in linear devices that can be used to study particular plasma physics topics relevant for other magnetic confinement devices such as the radial transport and the modelling of self-organized plasma jets involved in spheromak-like plasma formation. Some aspects of the work presented are of interest to the astrophysics community since they are believed to shed light on the basis of the physics of stellar jets. On the dense magnetized plasmas (DMP) topic, the present status of research, operation of new devices, plasma dynamics modelling and diagnostic developments is reported. The main devices presented belong to the class of Z-pinches, mostly plasma foci, and several papers were presented under this topic. The physics of DMP is important both for the main-stream fusion investigations as well as for providing the basis for elaboration of new concepts. New high-current technology introduced in the DMP devices design and construction make these devices nowadays more reliably fitted to various applications and give the possibility to widen the energy range used by them in both directions—to the multi-MJ level facilities and down to miniature plasma focus devices with energy of just a few J.

  3. Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XII Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Chs. I-III 23 CFR Chs. I-III 33 CFR Chs. I and IV 46 CFR Chs. I-III 48 CFR Ch. 12 49 CFR Subtitle A, Chs. I-VI and...

  4. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... [Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] Part XIV Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Ch. I EPA-HQ-OA-2007-1172 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0169 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0166 EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0052 Spring 2010 Regulatory Agenda...

  5. Federal Communications Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XVIII Federal Communications Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (FCC) FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Ch. I Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: Twice a year, in spring and...

  6. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components (PFMC-13) jointly organized with the 1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science (FEMaS-1) was held in Rosenheim (Germany) on 9-13 May 2011. PFMC-13 is a successor of the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003 ten 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. Then it was time for a change and redefinition of the scope of the symposium to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution in the field. Under the new name (PFMC-11), the workshop was first organized in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany and PFMC-12 took place in Jülich in 2009. Initially starting in 1985 with about 40 participants as a 1.5 day workshop, the event has continuously grown to about 220 participants at PFMC-12. Due to the joint organization with FEMaS-1, PFMC-13 set a new record with more than 280 participants. The European project Fusion Energy Materials Science, FEMaS, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), organizes and stimulates cooperative research activities which involve large-scale research facilities as well as other top-level materials characterization laboratories. Five different fields are addressed: benchmarking experiments for radiation damage modelling, the application of micro-mechanical characterization methods, synchrotron and neutron radiation-based techniques and advanced nanoscopic analysis based on transmission electron microscopy. All these fields need to be exploited further by the fusion materials community for timely materials solutions for a DEMO reactor. In order to integrate these materials research fields, FEMaS acted as a co-organizer for the 2011 workshop and successfully introduced a number of participants from research labs and universities into the PFMC community. Plasma-facing materials experience particularly hostile conditions as they are

  7. Special issue: overview and summary reports from the 24th Fusion Energy Conference (San Diego, CA, 8-13 October 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The group of 27 papers published in this special issue of Nuclear Fusion aims to monitor the worldwide progress made in the period 2010-2012 in the field of thermonuclear fusion. Of these papers, 24 are based on overview reports presented at the 24th Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2012) and three are summary reports. The conference was hosted by the Government of the United States of America and organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the United States Department of Energy and General Atomics. It took place in San Diego on 8-13 October 2012. The overviews presented at the conference have been rewritten and extended for the purpose of this special issue and submitted to the standard double-referee peer-review of Nuclear Fusion . The articles are placed in the following sequence: Overview articles, presented in programme order, are as follows: • Tokamaks DIII-D research towards resolving key issues for ITER and steady-state tokamaks; Overview of the JET results with the ITER-like wall; Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results; Overview of experimental results and code validation activities at Alcator C-Mod; An overview of KSTAR results; Progress of long pulse and H-mode experiments in EAST; Overview of physics results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment; Overview of physics results from MAST towards ITER/DEMO and the MAST Upgrade; An overview of recent HL-2A experiments; Progress of the JT-60SA project; Overview of recent and current research on the TCV tokamak; An overview of FTU results; New developments, plasma physics regimes and issues for the Ignitor experiment; Recent research work on the J-TEXT tokamak. • Other MCF Extension of operation regimes and investigation of three-dimensional current-less plasmas in the Large Helical Device; Dynamics of flows and confinement in the TJ-II stellarator; Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment; Overview of the RFX Fusion Science Program; An overview of intrinsic torque and momentum

  8. News Outreach: Polish physics club reaches out with practical demonstrations Networking: Online workspace helps teachers to share ideas Mauritius: Telescope inspires science specification Fusion: EFDA sparks resources Olympiad: British team enjoys success at the International Physics Olympiad 2009 Nanoscience: 'Quietest' building in the world opens in Bristol, UK Conference: University of Leicester hosts the GIREP EPEC 2009 international conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Outreach: Polish physics club reaches out with practical demonstrations Networking: Online workspace helps teachers to share ideas Mauritius: Telescope inspires science specification Fusion: EFDA sparks resources Olympiad: British team enjoys success at the International Physics Olympiad 2009 Nanoscience: 'Quietest' building in the world opens in Bristol, UK Conference: University of Leicester hosts the GIREP EPEC 2009 international conference

  9. Department of Commerce Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part IV Department of Commerce Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (DOC) DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Office of the Secretary 13 CFR Ch. III 15 CFR Subtitle A; Subtitle B, Chs. I, II, III, VII, VIII, IX, and XI 19 CFR Ch. III 37 CFR Chs. I, IV, and V 48 CFR Ch. 13 50 CFR Chs. II, III, IV, and VI Spring 2010 Semiannual Agenda...

  10. Microneedle delivery of an M2e-TLR5 ligand fusion protein to skin confers broadly cross-protective influenza immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Zhong; Gill, Harvinder S; He, Cheng; Ou, Changbo; Wang, Li; Wang, Ying-Chun; Feng, Hao; Zhang, Han; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W

    2014-03-28

    Influenza vaccines with broad cross-protection are urgently needed to prevent an emerging influenza pandemic. A fusion protein of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist domains from flagellin and multiple repeats of the conserved extracellular domain of the influenza matrix protein 2 (M2e) was constructed, purified and evaluated as such a vaccine. A painless vaccination method suitable for possible self-administration using coated microneedle arrays was investigated for skin-targeted delivery of the fusion protein in a mouse model. The results demonstrate that microneedle immunization induced strong humoral as well as mucosal antibody responses and conferred complete protection against homo- and heterosubtypic lethal virus challenges. Protective efficacy with microneedles was found to be significantly better than that seen with conventional intramuscular injection, and comparable to that observed with intranasal immunization. Because of its advantages for administration, safety and storage, microneedle delivery of M2e-flagellin fusion protein is a promising approach for an easy-to-administer universal influenza vaccine.

  11. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2001 - Mar 31, 2002

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-k-01-002, May, 2002. During this semiannual reporting period, EPA's Office of Inspector General, identified Major Management Challenges which could severely impact the attainment of EPA’s mission.

  12. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2005 - Mar 31, 2006

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-06-004, April, 2006. Many of the reviews that we conducted during the semiannual period provided recommendations to help the Agency achieve its mission of protecting human health and the environment.

  13. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2006 - Sept 30, 2006

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-06-005, Oct, 2006. This semiannual report includes details on these and other issues, including a number of investigations that resulted in payments to the Federal government and criminal, civil, or administrative actions.

  14. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2007 - Sept 30, 2007

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-07-003, Nov, 2007. This semiannual report includes details on these and other issues, including investigations that resulted in payments to the Federal Government and criminal, civil, or administrative actions.

  15. Semiannual Report: April 1, 2001 - Sept 30, 2001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-01-002, Nov, 2001. The report summaries included in this semiannual report clearly illustrate some of the challenges the new Administration faces in its quest to deliver efficient and effective environmental programs.

  16. MODIS Science Team Member Semi-annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermote, Eric; ElSaleous, Nazmi; Fisher, Paul; Karakos, Damianos; Ray, James; Vermeulen, Anne

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-annual report of the MODerate resolution imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team Members. The most important activities undertaken during this reporting period are the following: 1) Versions 2.1 and 2.2 surface reflectance L2/L3 DAAC/SDST delivery; 2) Version 2.0 1km and 250m VI product delivery (assist Arizona); 3) Version 2.1 surface reflectance L2 testing; 4) Land Synthetic data set generator improvements; 5) QA; 6) Surface reflectance error budget generation (SWAMP request); 7) SCF Hardware; 8) Aerosol transport modeling; 9) Aerosol optical depth retrieval from AVHRR data; 10) Aerosol characteristics retrieval from SeaWIFS/AVHRR fusioned data; 11) Validation activities; 12) Aerosol climatology; and 13) 6S code. The report includes summaries of the topics above.

  17. 32 CFR 70.11 - DoD semiannual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false DoD semiannual report. 70.11 Section 70.11... DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD (DRB) PROCEDURES AND STANDARDS § 70.11 DoD semiannual report. (a) Semiannual reports... from the first through the last days of each reporting period. (c) The report will contain four...

  18. 32 CFR 70.11 - DoD semiannual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DoD semiannual report. 70.11 Section 70.11... DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD (DRB) PROCEDURES AND STANDARDS § 70.11 DoD semiannual report. (a) Semiannual reports... from the first through the last days of each reporting period. (c) The report will contain four...

  19. A new electron temperature diagnostic of critical surface based on the ion acoustic decay instability in hot, high density plasma relevant to laser fusion. Semiannual report, April 1--September 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; DeGroot, J.S.; Drake, R.P.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    The authors made analysis of the IADI experiments previously made using OMEGA laser system. They obtained two important new results: the first direct observation of the epw excited by the Ion Acoustic Decay Instability, and the first study of the IADI in a plasma that approaches laser-fusion conditions, in the sense of having a density scale length of order 1 mm and an electron temperature, T{sub e}, in excess of 1 keV. Previous observations of the epw`s have been based on the second harmonic emission, from which little can be inferred because the emission is produced by unknown pairs of epw`s, integrated in a complicated way over wavenumber space and real space. In contrast, they have directly observed the epw by using the 90{degree}, collective Thomson scattering (CTS) of a UV laser (at the third harmonic of the pump) from the epw`s. Because the ratio of probe frequency to electron plasma frequency is only about three, the scattering is collective (i.e. k{sub epw}{lambda}{sub De} is small, where k{sub epw} is the epw wave number and {lambda}{sub De} is the Debye length),m even though the scattering angle is large. The electron temperature can then be deduced from the ion sound velocity, obtained from the measurement of the frequency at which growth is maximum at the scattering wavenumber.

  20. Analysis of the selective advantage conferred by a C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Claudia; Tzeng, W.-P.; Liebert, Uwe Gerd; Frey, Teryl K.

    2007-12-05

    During serial passaging of rubella virus (RUB) in cell culture, the dominant species of defective-interfering RNA (DI) generated contains an in-frame deletion between the capsid protein (C) gene and E1 glycoprotein gene resulting in production of a C-E1 fusion protein that is necessary for the maintenance of the DI [Tzeng, W.P., Frey, T.K. (2006). C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage. Virology 356 198-207.]. A BHK cell line stably expressing the RUB structural proteins was established which was used to package DIs into virus particles following transfection with in vitro transcripts from DI infectious cDNA constructs. Packaging of a DI encoding an in-frame C-GFP-E1 reporter fusion protein corresponding to the C-E1 fusion protein expressed in a native DI was only marginally more efficient than packaging of a DI encoding GFP, indicating that the C-E1 fusion protein did not function by enhancing packaging. However, infection with the DI encoding the C-GFP-E1 fusion protein (in the absence of wt RUB helper virus) resulted in formation of clusters of GFP-positive cells and the percentage of GFP-positive cells in the culture following infection remained relatively constant. In contrast, a DI encoding GFP did not form GFP-positive clusters and the percentage of GFP-positive cells declined by roughly half from 2 to 4 days post-infection. Cluster formation and sustaining the percentage of infected (GFP-positive) cells required the C part of the fusion protein, including the downstream but not the upstream of two arginine clusters (both of which are associated with RNA binding and association with mitochondrial p32 protein) and the E1 part through the transmembrane sequence, but not the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Among a collection of mutant DI constructs, cluster formation and sustaining infected cell percentage correlated with maintenance during serial passage with wt RUB. We hypothesize that cluster formation and

  1. Vaccination of Gerbils with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 Concurrently or as a Fusion Protein Confers Consistent and Improved Protection against Brugia malayi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Abraham, David; Bell, Aaron; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Zhan, Bin; Lustigman, Sara; Klei, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brugia malayi Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 proteins are orthologous to Onchocerca volvulus Ov-103 and Ov-RAL-2, and which were selected as the best candidates for the development of an O. volvulus vaccine. The B. malayi gerbil model was used to confirm the efficacy of these Ov vaccine candidates on adult worms and to determine whether their combination is more efficacious. Methodology and Principle Findings Vaccine efficacy of recombinant Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 administered individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein were tested in gerbils using alum as adjuvant. Vaccination with Bm-103 resulted in worm reductions of 39%, 34% and 22% on 42, 120 and 150 days post infection (dpi), respectively, and vaccination with Bm-RAL-2 resulted in worm reductions of 42%, 22% and 46% on 42, 120 and 150 dpi, respectively. Vaccination with a fusion protein comprised of Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 resulted in improved efficacy with significant reduction of worm burden of 51% and 49% at 90 dpi, as did the concurrent vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2, with worm reduction of 61% and 56% at 90 dpi. Vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 as a fusion protein or concurrently not only induced a significant worm reduction of 61% and 42%, respectively, at 150 dpi, but also significantly reduced the fecundity of female worms as determined by embryograms. Elevated levels of antigen-specific IgG were observed in all vaccinated gerbils. Serum from gerbils vaccinated with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually, concurrently or as a fusion protein killed third stage larvae in vitro when combined with peritoneal exudate cells. Conclusion Although vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 individually conferred protection against B. malayi infection in gerbils, a more consistent and enhanced protection was induced by vaccination with Bm-103 and Bm-RAL-2 fusion protein and when they were used concurrently. Further characterization and optimization of these filarial vaccines are warranted. PMID:27045170

  2. A Naturally Occurring rev1-vpu Fusion Gene Does Not Confer a Fitness Advantage to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Simon M.; Hopfensperger, Kristina; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Kreider, Edward F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Lee, Lan-Hui; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Pandemic strains of HIV-1 (group M) encode a total of nine structural (gag, pol, env), regulatory (rev, tat) and accessory (vif, vpr, vpu, nef) genes. However, some subtype A and C viruses exhibit an unusual gene arrangement in which the first exon of rev (rev1) and the vpu gene are placed in the same open reading frame. Although this rev1-vpu gene fusion is present in a considerable fraction of HIV-1 strains, its functional significance is unknown. Results Examining infectious molecular clones (IMCs) of HIV-1 that encode the rev1-vpu polymorphism, we show that a fusion protein is expressed in infected cells. Due to the splicing pattern of viral mRNA, however, these same IMCs also express a regular Vpu protein, which is produced at much higher levels. To investigate the function of the fusion gene, we characterized isogenic IMC pairs differing only in their ability to express a Rev1-Vpu protein. Analysis in transfected HEK293T and infected CD4+ T cells showed that all of these viruses were equally active in known Vpu functions, such as down-modulation of CD4 or counteraction of tetherin. Furthermore, the polymorphism did not affect Vpu-mediated inhibition of NF-кB activation or Rev-dependent nuclear export of incompletely spliced viral mRNAs. There was also no evidence for enhanced replication of Rev1-Vpu expressing viruses in primary PBMCs or ex vivo infected human lymphoid tissues. Finally, the frequency of HIV-1 quasispecies members that encoded a rev1-vpu fusion gene did not change in HIV-1 infected individuals over time. Conclusions Expression of a rev1-vpu fusion gene does not affect regular Rev and Vpu functions or alter HIV-1 replication in primary target cells. Since there is no evidence for increased replication fitness of rev1-vpu encoding viruses, this polymorphism likely emerged in the context of other mutations within and/or outside the rev1-vpu intergenic region, and may have a neutral phenotype. PMID:26554585

  3. Department of Transportation Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] Part XIII Department of Transportation Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Chs. I-III 23 CFR Chs. I-III 33 CFR Chs. I and IV 46 CFR Chs. I-III 48 CFR Ch. 12 49...

  4. 75 FR 79925 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    .... II Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System... Flexibility Act and the Board's Statement of Policy Regarding Expanded Rulemaking Procedures. The Board... Regulatory Flexibility Act, and public comment is invited on those entries. The complete Unified Agenda...

  5. 77 FR 8072 - Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    .... II Semiannual Regulatory Flexibility Agenda AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System... Flexibility Act and the Board's Statement of Policy Regarding Expanded Rulemaking Procedures. The Board... Regulatory Flexibility Act, and public comment is invited on those entries. The complete Unified Agenda...

  6. Department of Education Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Department of Education Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (ED) DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Executive Order 12866, dated September 30, 1993, requires the Department of Education (ED) to publish, at a... Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 602(a), requires ED to publish, in October and April of each year, a...

  7. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Meeting on 'Research Using Small Fusion Devices'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandas, C. A. F.; Silva, C.; Gribkov, V. A.; Malaquias, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of the recent results reported on several topics on magnetic confinement, dense magnetized plasmas and materials studies. The main topics covered on magnetic confinement devices are configuration studies, diagnostics developments, alternative fuelling techniques, turbulence and transport studies, confinement experiments, plasma facing materials, acquisition and control systems and integrated modelling. For the dense magnetized plasma devices results on development and commissioning of several devices (plasma focus, Z-pinch and plasma discharge type), material tests, scaling laws for plasma focus energy density from a few millijoule to megajoule, modelling of neutron and x-ray production mechanisms and fast diagnostic and signal formatting techniques were reported. Auxiliary heating systems for ITER, dedicated materials modelling and experimental studies relevant for several fusion applications and control and data acquisition systems have also been reported on in dedicated papers.

  8. Note on the semi-annual effect in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volland, H.; Mayr, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    The semi-annual variation in the thermospheric density is discussed in terms of the spatial and temporal variations in the solar heat input. Two heat sources are considered: the solar heat input associated with the semi-annual migration of the sun, and the auroral heat associated with the semi-annual component in magnetic storms. It is shown that the relatively large global component in the semi-annual effect of the total mass density can be explained by the lack of advective loss which otherwise damps the latitude dependent components in the annual and semi-annual variations, and the significant latitude dependence in the semi-annual variations of composition and temperature can be tied to the diffusion process which is induced by the thermospheric circulation.

  9. Particle-beam-fusion progress report, July 1979 through December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The following chapters are included in this semi-annual progress report: (1) fusion target studies, (2) target experiments, (3) particle-beam source developments, (4) particle beam experiments, (5) pulsed power, (6) pulsed power applications, and (7) electron beam fusion accelerator project. (MOW)

  10. Fusion of the OsmC domain from esterase EstO confers thermolability to the cold-active xylanase Xyn8 from Pseudoalteromonas arctica.

    PubMed

    Elleuche, Skander; Piascheck, Henning; Antranikian, Garabed

    2011-03-01

    The OsmC-region (osmotically induced protein family) of the two-domain esterase EstO from the psychrotolerant bacterium Pseudoalteromonas arctica has been shown to increase thermolability. In an attempt to test if these properties can be conferred to another enzyme, we genetically fused osmC to the 3'-region of the family 8 xylanase encoding gene xyn8 from P. arctica. The chimeric open reading frame xyn8-OsmC was cloned and the chimeric protein was purified after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Xyn8 and Xyn8-OsmC showed cold-adapted properties (more than 60% activity at 0°C) using birchwood xylan as the preferred substrate. Maximal catalytic activity is slightly shifted from 15°C (Xyn8) to 20°C for Xyn8-OsmC. Thermostability of Xyn8-OsmC is significantly changed in comparison to wild-type Xyn8. The OsmC-fusion variant showed an apparent decrease in thermostability between 40 and 45°C, while both proteins are highly instable at 50°C.

  11. Highlights from Sherwood 2014. International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, March 24-26, Bahia Resort Hotel, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-03-31

    Rob Goldston (PPPL) kicked off the Sherwood meeting with his review talk, “Understanding and innovation in magnetic fusion”. He covered a history of results from tokamak experiments in the areas of core confinement, stability, sustainment – tying the paradigms for understanding all three to the plasma edge, where outstanding questions remain. Two other review talks were given by Russel Caflisch (UCLA) on “Accelerated simulation of coulomb collisions in plasmas”, and Dan Barnes (Tri Alpha) on “Plasma theory as private enterprise”. Altogether, there were 15 invited talks spanning the field of fusion theory on topics such as nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the tokamak edge, plasma-wall modelling, toroidal rotation, zonal flows, magnetic field-line reconnection, coulomb collisions, and intrinsic momentum transport. Author-provided summaries of several of the invited talks are included on pages 7 to 14 of this document. There was a very strong showing by graduate students, postdocs, and young scientists at the meeting. More than 25 students from around the world presented papers. A list of all participating students can be found on page 5 of this document

  12. Princeton VLSI Project: Semi-Annual Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    A’D-A149 588 PRINCETON VLSI PROJECT: SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT(U) PRINCETON i/i UNIV NJ DEPT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE R J LIPTON 91...logic. We plan further experiments to further vali- date these results. Finally, we have also found a way to transform any combinational logic cir...Programming Richard J. Lptoi4 Sftp3 , C Nerth - Robert 5edgeutck Jacobo Vaides tDepartment of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Princeton

  13. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] Part XV Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Ch. I EPA-HQ-OA-2007-1172 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0169 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0166 EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0052 EPA-HQ-OW-2010-0728...

  14. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  15. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  16. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  17. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  18. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  19. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  20. 24 CFR 87.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 87.600 Section 87.600 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 87.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of...

  1. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  2. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 227.600 Section 227.600 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 227.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the...

  3. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2009 - Sept 30, 2009

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-09-036, Nov, 2009. The OIG took numerous steps during the past semiannual reporting period to help the EPA properly and efficiently spend the $7.2 billion it has received under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  4. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2004 - Mar 31, 2005

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-05-002, April, 2005. During this semiannual reporting period, two of our more important activities focused on the efforts of the EPA to make air safe and healthy to breathe, and to help improve homeland security.

  5. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  6. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  7. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  8. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  9. 22 CFR 311.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 311.600 Section 311.600 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 311.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the disclosure reports (see appendix B)...

  10. Note on the semiannual effect in the thermosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volland, H.; Mayr, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    There are two external heat sources known that oscillate with a period of half a year: (1) the solar heat input associated with the semiannual migration of the subsolar point between both hemispheres, which peaks at the equator and which is small in comparison with that in the annual component, and (2) the auroral heat input associated with the semiannual component in the occurrence of magnetic storms. An attempt is made to show that a number of apparent conflicts in the description and interpretation of the semiannual effect can be resolved by considering some of the dynamic properties of the thermosphere.

  11. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2012 - Sept 30, 2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA‐350‐R‐12‐003, Nov, 2012. Our work will continue to add value and assist the Agency in accomplishing its mission of safeguarding the health of the American people and protecting the environment.

  12. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2010 - Mar 31, 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-11-005, May, 2011. The dedicated staff of the OIG will continue to do its best to ensure that Agency programs achieve their intended results and that its funds are properly expended.

  13. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2009 - Mar 31, 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-10-004, May, 2010. EPA continues to face challenges in using its funds and accomplishing its mission in an efficient and effective manner, particularly concerning Recovery Act projects.

  14. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2012 - Mar 31, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-13-001, May, 2013. The EPA and the OIG remain responsible stewards of taxpayer dollars, striving to add value and transparency and assisting the agency in accomplishing its mission.

  15. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2014 - Mar 31, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-15-001, May, 2015. This report contains numerous examples where the agency could have put funds to better use, done more to improve efficiencies, or improved business practices and accountability.

  16. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2002 - Mar 31, 2003

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-03-001, May, 2003. The OIG completed a number of investigations, audits, and evaluations that demonstrate our commitment to help EPA better deliver cost-effective solutions to pressing environmental problems.

  17. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2015 - Sept 30, 2015

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-15-002, Nov, 2015. During this period, witnesses from the EPA OIG testified at congressional hearings, and the OIG produced reports in response to congressional requests, demonstrating their continued interest in our work.

  18. 48 CFR 1422.406-13 - Semiannual enforcement reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Involving Construction 1422.406-13 Semiannual enforcement reports. PAM is responsible for submitting the report required by FAR 22.406-13 to DOL. In accordance with DOL memoranda, PAM requires bureaus to...

  19. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2003 - Sept 30, 2003

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-03-002, Nov, 2003. We recently issued a major report examining how EPA responded to the crisis at the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

  20. First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glennan, T. Keith

    1959-01-01

    The First Semiannual Report of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 206 (a) of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the Earth's atmosphere, which states: The Administration shall submit to the President for transmittal to Congress, semiannually and at such other times as it deems desirable, a report on its activities and accomplishments.

  1. 40 CFR 60.1420 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report by August 1 of that year. (b) For data you collected during the second half of the calendar year, submit your semiannual report by February 1 of...

  2. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Steady State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices (Daejeon, Republic of Korea, 14 17 May 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G. S.; Na, Yong-Su; Becoulet, A.; Ide, S.; Kessel, C. E.; Komori, A.; Kuteev, B. V.; Mank, G.; Olstad, R. A.; Sarkar, B.; Sips, A. C. C.; van Houtte, D.; Vdovin, V. L.

    2008-08-01

    This report summarizes the contributions presented at the 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Steady State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices, held in Daejeon, Republic of Korea, 14-17 May 2007. The main topics of the meeting were overview and superconducting devices, long pulse operation and advanced tokamak, steady state fusion technology, heating and current drive, particle control and power exhaust and ITER-related issues.

  3. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  4. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  5. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  6. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table 1. What months make up the composite semiannual rate period? You may use the following table to find...

  7. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  8. 31 CFR 359.11 - What is the semiannual inflation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the semiannual inflation rate... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.11 What is the semiannual inflation rate? The index used to determine the semiannual inflation rate is the non-seasonally adjusted CPI-U (the Consumer Price Index...

  9. Synthetic fusion-protein containing domains of Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum lectin (ASAL) conferred enhanced insecticidal activity against major lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Tajne, Sunita; Boddupally, Dayakar; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-02-10

    Different transgenic crop plants, developed with δ-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and mannose-specific plant lectins, exhibited significant protection against chewing and sucking insects. In the present study, a synthetic gene (cry-asal) encoding the fusion-protein having 488 amino acids, comprising DI and DII domains from Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Ligand blot analysis disclosed that the fusion-protein could bind to more number of receptors of brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins of Helicoverpa armigera. Artificial diet bioassays revealed that 0.025 μg/g and 0.50 μg/g of fusion-protein were sufficient to cause 100% mortality in Pectinophora gossypiella and H. armigera insects, respectively. As compared to Cry1Ac, the fusion-protein showed enhanced (8-fold and 30-fold) insecticidal activity against two major lepidopteran pests. Binding of fusion-protein to the additional receptors in the midgut cells of insects is attributable to its enhanced entomotoxic effect. The synthetic gene, first of its kind, appears promising and might serve as a potential candidate for engineering crop plants against major insect pests.

  10. Mutations located on both F1 and F2 subunits of the Newcastle disease virus fusion protein confer resistance to neutralization with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Neyt, C; Geliebter, J; Slaoui, M; Morales, D; Meulemans, G; Burny, A

    1989-01-01

    The fusion gene sequence of six Newcastle disease virus escape mutants revealed that residues important for the integrity of antigenic site 1 and antigenic site 2 were located, respectively, on the F2 subunit and within the cysteine-rich domain of the F1 subunit. We further report the antibody-binding capacity of these mutants. PMID:2463386

  11. Semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This issue of the Office of Inspector General's (OIG's) Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from April 1, 1990, to September 30, 1990. During that time, the Office issued 130 audit and inspection reports. The Semiannual Report is organized into five major sections. The first section contains brief overviews of the Department of Energy and the Office of Inspector General, as well as OIG views on current legislative matters. The second section describes the significant operational results of OIG audit, inspection, and investigative activity. The third, fourth, and fifth sections contain compilations of OIG statistical data.

  12. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  13. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  14. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  15. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  16. 13 CFR 146.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 146.600 Section 146.600 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  17. 22 CFR 712.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 712.600 Section 712.600 Foreign Relations OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON... the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House...

  18. 22 CFR 712.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Semi-annual compilation. 712.600 Section 712.600 Foreign Relations OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON... the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House...

  19. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2000 - Mar 31, 2001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-K-01-001, May, 2001. Our new structure provides a solid foundation for the OIG's efforts to continuously improve its performance, and I am certain that it will greatly enhance our ability to be agents of positive change.

  20. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 2008 - Mar 31, 2009

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-09-003, May, 2009. The next few years will be challenging ones as the OIG works with the EPA to ensure that Recovery Act and other funding is expended efficiently and effectively to safeguard human health and the environment.

  1. Semiannual Report: Oct 1, 1997 - Mar 31, 1998

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-98-001, May, 1998. As evidenced by the success of our efforts in these and other areas, the Office of Inspector General remains committed to assisting the Agency in the accomplishment of its environmental goals.

  2. Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2002-March 31, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report to Congress by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education, covers the actions of the OIG from October 1, 2002, through March 31, 2003. The report discusses four goals of the President's Management Agenda: (1) improved financial performance: includes information on financial statement audits,…

  3. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2005 - Sept 30, 2005

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-05-003, Dec, 2005. We look forward to the challenges ahead as EPA and the Nation continue the effort to rebuild the Gulf States region and to safeguard our environment for us and for the generations that follow.

  4. Department of Health and Human Services Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... [The Regulatory Plan and Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions] Part VIII Department of Health and Human Services Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (HHS) DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 21 CFR Ch. I 42 CFR Chs. I-V 45 CFR Subtitle A; Subtitle B, Chs....

  5. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2010 - Sept 30, 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-10-005, Nov, 2010. The OIG will do its best to help the Agency address the nation’s critical environmental challenges by ensuring that Agency funds are properly expended to safeguard human health and the environment.

  6. 78 FR 1604 - Department Regulatory Agenda; Semiannual Summary

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual summary of all current and projected rulemakings, reviews of existing regulations, and completed actions of the Department. The Agenda provides the public with information about the Department of Transportation's regulatory activity. It is expected that this information will enable the public to be more aware of and allow it to more effectively participate......

  7. 22 CFR 227.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information... 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves... information shall not be available for public inspection. (e) The first semi-annual compilation shall...

  8. 38 CFR 45.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 45.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of... Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received... report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall...

  9. 40 CFR 34.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 34.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each... report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during... the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported...

  10. 12 CFR 411.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Reports § 411.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile the... information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending on March 31 or... public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c)...

  11. 22 CFR 138.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives a report containing a compilation of the information... 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves... information shall not be available for public inspection. (e) The first semi-annual compilation shall...

  12. 32 CFR 28.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports § 28.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each... report containing a compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during... the Secretary and the Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported...

  13. 45 CFR 93.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... LOBBYING Agency Reports § 93.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and... compilation of the information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending... Clerk. (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select...

  14. 15 CFR 28.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agency Reports § 28.600 Semi-annual compilation. (a) The head of each agency shall collect and compile... the information contained in the disclosure reports received during the six-month period ending on.... (c) Information that involves intelligence matters shall be reported only to the Select Committee...

  15. 77 FR 7980 - Department Regulatory Agenda; Semiannual Summary

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ...The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual summary of all current and projected rulemakings, reviews of existing regulations, and completed actions of the Department. The Agenda provides the public with information about the Department of Transportation's regulatory activity. It is expected that this information will enable the public to be more aware of and allow it to more effectively participate......

  16. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2011 - Sept 30, 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-11-036, Nov, 2011. We have made great progress and I look forward to fulfilling the new Office of Inspector General vision of being the best in public service and oversight for a better environment tomorrow.

  17. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 1998 - Sept 30, 1998

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-98-004, Nov, 1998. We look forward to working with the Administrator, Agency managers, Congress, and EPA's various stakeholders to help ensure that EPA delivers the maximum in environmental and health benefits to the public.

  18. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 604.600 Section 604.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW..., shall be available for public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and...

  19. 45 CFR 604.600 - Semi-annual compilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Semi-annual compilation. 604.600 Section 604.600 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NEW..., shall be available for public inspection 30 days after receipt of the report by the Secretary and...

  20. Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    Included among these are asset accountability, the Guam realignment, health care, Recovery Act projects, product substitution, and acquisitions and...Semiannual Report to the Congress October 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010 Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended Title 5, U.S. Code, Appendix 2 Purpose...General Act of 1978, as

  1. Semi-annual Sq-variation in solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnoy, V.; Malosiev, T.

    The peculiarities of semi-annual variation in solar activity cycle have been studied. The data from observatories having long observational series and located in different latitude zones were used. The following observatories were selected: Huancayo (magnetic equator), from 1922 to 1959; Apia (low latitudes), from 1912 to 1961; Moscow (middle latitudes), from 1947 to 1965. Based on the hourly values of H-components, the average monthly diurnal amplitudes (a difference between midday and midnight values), according to five international quiet days, were computed. Obtained results were compared with R (relative sunspot numbers) in the ranges of 0-30R, 40-100R, and 140-190R. It was shown, that the amplitude of semi-annual variation increases with R, from minimum to maximum values, on average by 45%. At equatorial Huancayo observatory, the semi-annual Sq(H)-variation appears especially clearly: its maximums take place at periods of equinoxes (March-April, September-October), and minimums -- at periods of solstices (June-July, December-January). At low (Apia observatory) and middle (Moscow observatory) latitudes, the character of semi-annual variation is somewhat different: it appears during the periods of equinoxes, but considerably less than at equator. Besides, with the growth of R, semi-annual variation appears against a background of annual variation, in the form of second peaks (maximum in June). At observatories located in low and middle latitudes, second peaks become more appreciable with an increase of R (March-April and September-October). During the periods of low solar activity, they are insignificant. This work has been carried out with the support from International Scientific and Technology Center (Project #KR-214).

  2. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  3. Efficient Multi-Source Data Fusion for Decentralized Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Information Fusion, 7-10 August 2001, Montreal, Canada. [2] E. Nettleton , “Decentralised Architectures for Tracking and Navigation with Multiple Flight...Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Information Fusion, 8-11 July 2002, Annapolis, MD. [16] M. Ridley, E Nettleton , S. Sukkarieh and H...Decentralized Sensing Networks,” Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Information Fusion, 7-10 August 2001, Montreal, Canada. [2] E. Nettleton

  4. 40 CFR 60.1895 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 60.1895 Section 60.1895 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION..., 1999 Model Rule-Reporting § 60.1895 If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15350 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 62.15350 Section 62.15350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... it? (a) For data collected during the first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1420 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? 60.1420 Section 60.1420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 60.1420 If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it? (a) For data collected during...

  7. 78 FR 1618 - Semiannual Agenda and Fiscal Year 2013 Regulatory Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... January 8, 2013 Part XIII Department of the Treasury Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No. 5 / Tuesday, January 8, 2013 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 31 CFR Subtitles A and B Semiannual Agenda and Fiscal Year 2013 Regulatory Plan AGENCY: Department of the...

  8. 77 FR 8034 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda and Fiscal Year 2011 Regulatory Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... February 13, 2012 Part XXI Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Semiannual Regulatory Agenda #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 29 / Monday, February 13, 2012 / Unified Agenda#0;#0; ] BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Ch. X Semiannual Regulatory Agenda and Fiscal Year 2011...

  9. 31 CFR Appendix B to Part 359 - Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table B Appendix B to Part 359 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... SAVINGS BONDS, SERIES I Pt. 359, App. B Appendix B to Part 359—Composite Semiannual Rate Period Table...

  10. Radioscapholunate Fusions

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Duncan Thomas; Bain, Gregory Ian

    2012-01-01

    Radiocarpal fusions are performed for a variety of indications, most commonly for debilitating painful arthritis. The goal of a wrist fusion is to fuse the painful, diseased joints and to preserve motion through the healthy joints. Depending on the extent of the disease process, radiocarpal fusions may take the form of radiolunate, radioscapholunate, or total wrist fusions. Surgical techniques and instrumentation have advanced over the last few decades, and consequently the functional outcomes have improved and complications decreased. Techniques for partial carpal fusions have improved and now include distal scaphoid and triquetrum excision, which improves range of motion and fusion rates. In this article we discuss the various surgical techniques and fixation methods available and review the corresponding evidence in the literature. The authors' preferred surgical technique of radioscapholunate fusion with distal scaphoid and triquetrum excision is outlined. New implants and new concepts are also discussed. PMID:24179717

  11. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy conferred by a novel recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin strain expressing interleukin-12p70 of human cytokine and Ag85A of Mycobacterium tuberculosis fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y H; He, H Y; Zhang, F J

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunization provides protection against tuberculosis (TB) in infants, but the antituberculosis protective immunity wanes gradually after initial immunization and lasts less than 15 years. Therefore, more efficacious vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we constructed a new tuberculosis vaccine of recombinant BCG strain (rBCG-IA), which could express IL-12p70 of human cytokine and Ag85A of M. tuberculosis fusion protein, and investigated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice by measuring antibody titres, proliferation rate of splenocytes, ratios of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells stimulated by specific antigens and levels of IFN-γ production in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. Meanwhile, we evaluated its protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection through detecting lung histopathology, organ bacterial loads and lung acid-fast stain. Immunogenicity experiments illustrated that from 2nd to 8th week after immunization, the rBCG-IA vaccine was able to induce the highest level of antibody titres, proliferation rate of splenocytes and IFN-γ production among groups and gained improved ratio of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells from 6th to 8th week after vaccination. And from 2nd to 8th week after M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection, the score of pathology and bacterial loads in the rBCG-IA group were obviously lower than that in rBCG-I group, rBCG-A group or control group (PBST group), but similar to that in BCG group. This study suggested that rBCG-IA was able to elicit stronger humoral and cellular immune responses, but could only confer similar protective efficacy compared with its parental BCG vaccine.

  12. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-04-20

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  13. Fusion breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-02-22

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the US fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the US fusion program and the US nuclear energy program. The purpose of this paper is to suggest this policy change be made and tell why it should be made, and to outline specific research and development goals so that the fusion breeder will be developed in time to meet fissile fuel needs.

  14. Cold Fusion Verification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater ...way of N-rays and polywater . To date, no one, including Pons and Fleischmann, has been able to construct a so-called CNF electrochemical cell that...Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The conclusion is that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater

  15. Spatial-temporal patterns and driving mechanisms of semiannual variations in the Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Yuanlong; Wang, Fan; Zhai, Fangguo; Yu, Xiaolin

    2012-10-01

    Satellite altimetric sea surface height (SSH) measurements from 1992 through 2010 are used to explore the oceanic semiannual variations in the Philippine Sea (PS). Pronounced semiannual SSH variations are detected within two zonal bands. One lies east of Luzon Strait (19°-22°N) in the northern PS, while the other is southeast of Mindanao coast (4°-7°N) in the southern PS. In the two near-coast boxes where semiannual harmonic amplitude exceeds 4 cm, the northern box (127°-133°E, 19°-22°N) and the southern box (127°-133°E, 4°-7°N), semiannual changes contribute considerably to the total annual SSH variance by 12% and 17%, respectively. Despite prominent SSH variability, the bifurcation latitude of the North Equatorial Current (NBL) exhibits weak fluctuations with a peak-to-peak difference of only 0.3° on semiannual time scale. While the in-phase annual SSH variations between the two boxes work together to enhance annual NBL changes, their out-of-phase semiannual SSH variations offset each other in driving the NBL displacements. Further analysis with a 11/2-layer reduced-gravity model forced by ECMWF wind stress reveals that the observed semiannual SSH variations are primarily driven by local wind forcing in the far western Pacific. Rossby wave signals propagating from the eastern/central Pacific contribute much less due to along-path dispersion and cancellation. Semiannual signals of wind field in the northern PS reflect mainly the semiannual changes of the Asian Monsoon system, while those in the southern PS arise from the combined effects of Monsoon transition and the annual migration of the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ).

  16. Magnetic fusion 1985: what next

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K.

    1985-03-01

    Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion.

  17. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  18. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, [mu]-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  19. 40 CFR 62.15350 - If a semiannual report is required, when must I submit it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... it? (a) For data collected during the first half of a calendar year, submit your semiannual report by August 1 of that year. (b) For data you collected during the second half of the calendar year,...

  20. Semiannual Report to Congress on the Effectiveness of the Civil Aviation Security Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-13

    AD-fl143 023 SEMIANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS ON THEUEFFECTIVENESS OF i/i THE CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY PROGRAM(U) FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION...Semiannual Report to O Congress on the US Deportmnent of TrasEffectiveness ofi of TransportationFedewl Avkffim Avao The Civil Aviation - Security Program... Aviation Security Program 8. Performing OrgniaetioNi RePwt Us. Aviation Security Division 9. Performing Organistion Name and Address 10. Work Unit No

  1. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  2. A model for the temperature and composition effects in the semiannual variations of the thermospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Volland, H.

    1971-01-01

    A model is proposed in which latitudinal variations in composition and temperature are used to interpret the semiannual effect in the thermospheric density. Two heat sources are postulated for the semiannual circulation: one at high latitudes associated with the semiannual component in the occurance of magnetic storms and a second weaker one that peaks at the equator associated with the semiannual migration between both hemispheres. Depending on the relative magnitude of these sources, the latitude regions in which composition and temperature effects dominate vary. The temperature effects however should be expected weakest at low to mid latitudes where the relative concentration of atomic oxygen is enriched during equinox. At high latitudes the semiannual temperature component would peak, associated with an oxygen depletion in the lower thermosphere during equinox. In combining these features it is shown that the total atmospheric density could still exhibit a relatively small latitude dependence in the semiannual component with the tendency to decrease at high latitudes, in agreement with observations.

  3. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. It is divided into the following chapters: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide components; ferritic-martensitic steels; copper alloys and high heat flux materials; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; radiation effects, mechanistic studies, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; and irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods. There were no papers for the chapters on solid breeding materials and materials engineering and design requirement. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This report mainly discusses topics on the physical effects of radiation on thermonuclear reactor materials. The areas discussed are: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; mechanistic studies, theory and modeling; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics. (FI)

  5. Heavy ion fusion program. Semi-annual progress report, October 1, 1979-March 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    HIF activity at ANL during FY 1980 has been primarily concentrated on conceptual design work, and on initial tests of the independently-phased rf acceleration cavities. Calculations for near-term foil-heating experiments were carried out, and a specific cost-effective synchrotron (Beam Development Facility) plan was developed. Program logics were further refined, and some conceptual reactor issues were addressed.

  6. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1992-04-01

    This report contains papers on topic in the following areas of thermonuclear reactor materials: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials and beryllium; and ceramics. These paper have been index separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  7. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1988-08-01

    This report contains papers on thermonuclear reactor materials. The general categories of these papers are: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; ceramics; and radiation effects. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the energy database. (LSP)

  8. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period October 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large number of which facilitated Department management`s efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures: (1) Recommendations accepted by management, (2) Audit/inspection savings, recoveries, and funds identified for better use, (3) Legislative/regulatory compliance to recommendations, (4) Positive impacts on the Department after implementation of recommendations, (5) Complaints resolved, and (6) Investigation recoveries, fines, and funds identified for better use.

  9. The Semiannual Oscillation of Southern Ocean Sea Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbert, A.

    2012-04-01

    The atmospheric Semiannual Oscillation (SAO) is a half-yearly wave in mean sea level air pressure, which exhibits equinoctial maxima between 45°S and 50°S and solstitial maxima between 55°S and 65°s, with a phase reversal occurring at around 60°S. Its existence has been attributed to a phase difference in the annual temperature cycle between mid- and high-latitudes which sets up meridional temperature and pressure gradients that are largest during September and March, enhancing atmospheric baroclinicity and inducing equinoctial maxima in the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies. In this study, we use harmonic analysis of atmospheric and oceanic Southern Ocean datasets to show that this atmospheric SAO induces oceanic counterparts in sea level and circumpolar transport. This aspect of atmosphere-ocean interaction is particularly important, given the capacity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) to influence regional climate through the exchange of heat, fresh water and nutrients to each of the major ocean basins. We examine the relative contributions of local and regional semiannual atmospheric fluctuations in explaining the observed sea level response at 20 Southern Ocean and South Atlantic tide gauge stations and find that the oceanic SAO is associated with a modulation of zonal surface wind strength at key latitudes between ~55°S and 65°S. We also explore whether a seasonal inequality in SAO amplitude might facilitate the deduction of the timescales upon which Southern Ocean 'eddy saturation' theory might operate. However, though we find evidence of biannual fluctuations in eddy kinetic energy, regional variations in the phases and amplitudes of these emergent harmonics prevent us from elucidating the possible timescales upon which an eddy response to the atmospheric SAO might arise.

  10. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues.

  11. Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2003: State of the Art 2003, Published by the American Nuclear Society

    SciTech Connect

    Editors: B. A. Hammel; D. D. Meyerhofer; J. Meyer-ter-Vehn; H. Azechi. Organizing Chair: W. J. Hogan

    2004-06-01

    Collection of all papers presented and submitted at the IFSA2003 conference. Topics included target design and performance, fast ignition, plasma instabilities, laser technology, fusion reactor technology

  12. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  13. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  14. Proceedings of the First ERDA Semiannual Solar Photovoltaic Conversion Program Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Organization, basic research and applied technology for the Solar Photovoltaic Conversion Program are outlined. The program aims to provide a technology base for low cost thin film solar cells and solar arrays.

  15. 76 FR 54829 - The First Semi-Annual Aviation Workforce Management Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... pass through a metal detector. No firearms are allowed in the building, including with protection... parking available at DOT headquarters and public parking in the area is limited. Car-pooling, taxis,...

  16. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  17. 78 FR 59047 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Title of Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-Annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report--Local Contracting Agencies (HUD Programs) AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information...

  18. 78 FR 45260 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards... (800) 877-8339. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colette Pollard, Reports Management Officer, QDAM... Collection: Semi-annual Labor Standards Enforcement Report-Local Contracting Agencies (HUD Programs)....

  19. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  20. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    Liu G, Wong HK. Laminectomy and fusion. In: Shen FH, Samartzis D, Fessler RG, eds. Textbook of the Cervical Spine . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 34. Wood GW. Arthrodesis of the spine. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative ...

  1. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  2. INTRODUCTION: Status report on fusion research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Werner

    2005-10-01

    A major milestone on the path to fusion energy was reached in June 2005 on the occasion of the signing of the joint declaration of all parties to the ITER negotiations, agreeing on future arrangements and on the construction site at Cadarache in France. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been promoting fusion activities since the late 1950s; it took over the auspices of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities in 1988, and of the ITER Engineering and Design Activities in 1992. The Agency continues its support to Member States through the organization of consultancies, workshops and technical meetings, the most prominent being the series of International Fusion Energy Conferences (formerly called the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research). The meetings serve as a platform for experts from all Member States to have open discussions on their latest accomplishments as well as on their problems and eventual solutions. The papers presented at the meetings and conferences are routinely published, many being sent to the journal it Nuclear Fusion, co-published monthly by Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK. The journal's reputation is reflected in the fact that it is a world-renowned publication, and the International Fusion Research Council has used it for the publication of a Status Report on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion in 1978 and 1990. This present report marks the conclusion of the preparatory phases of ITER activities. It provides background information on the progress of fusion research within the last 15 years. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), which initiated the report, was fully aware of the complexities of including all scientific results in just one paper, and so decided to provide an overview and extensive references for the interested reader who need not necessarily be a fusion specialist. Professor Predhiman K. Kaw, Chairman, prepared the report on behalf of the IFRC, reflecting

  3. Molecular pathways: targeting ETS gene fusions in cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Felix Y; Brenner, J Chad; Hussain, Maha; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-09-01

    Rearrangements, or gene fusions, involving the ETS family of transcription factors are common driving events in both prostate cancer and Ewing sarcoma. These rearrangements result in pathogenic expression of the ETS genes and trigger activation of transcriptional programs enriched for invasion and other oncogenic features. Although ETS gene fusions represent intriguing therapeutic targets, transcription factors, such as those comprising the ETS family, have been notoriously difficult to target. Recently, preclinical studies have demonstrated an association between ETS gene fusions and components of the DNA damage response pathway, such as PARP1, the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNAPK), and histone deactylase 1 (HDAC1), and have suggested that ETS fusions may confer sensitivity to inhibitors of these DNA repair proteins. In this review, we discuss the role of ETS fusions in cancer, the preclinical rationale for targeting ETS fusions with inhibitors of PARP1, DNAPK, and HDAC1, as well as ongoing clinical trials targeting ETS gene fusions.

  4. Surgical techniques for lumbo-sacral fusion.

    PubMed

    Tropiano, P; Giorgi, H; Faure, A; Blondel, B

    2017-02-01

    Lumbo-sacral (L5-S1) fusion is a widely performed procedure that has become the reference standard treatment for refractory low back pain. L5-S1 is a complex transition zone between the mobile lordotic distal lumbar spine and the fixed sacral region. The goal is to immobilise the lumbo-sacral junction in order to relieve pain originating from this site. Apart from achieving inter-vertebral fusion, the main challenge lies in the preoperative determination of the fixed L5-S1 position that will be optimal for the patient. Many lumbo-sacral fusion techniques are available. Stabilisation can be achieved using various methods. An anterior, posterior, or combined approach may be used. Recently developed minimally invasive techniques are gaining in popularity based on their good clinical outcomes and high fusion rates. The objective of this conference is to resolve the main issues faced by spinal surgeons in their everyday practice.

  5. Progress in Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1988-09-01

    The progress of the field of Heavy Ion Fusion has been documented in the proceedings of the series of International Symposia that, in recent years, have occurred every second year. The latest of these conferences was hosted by Gesellshaft fuer Schwerionenforshung (GSI) in Darmstadt, West Germany, June 28-30, 1988. For this report, a few highlights from the conference are selected, stressing experimental progress and prospects for future advances. A little extra time is devoted to report on the developments at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) which is the center for most of the HIFAR program. The Director of the HIFAR program at LBL is Denis Keefe, who presented the HIF report at the last two of the meetings in this series, and in whose place the author is appearing now. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  7. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. A major accomplishment during this period was the completion of financial statement audits for Fiscal Year 1995. Annual financial statement audits are mandated by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990. Narratives of our most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. During this reporting period, the Office of Inspector General issued 67 audit and 15 inspection reports. For reports issued during the period, the Office of Inspector General made audit recommendations that, when implemented by management, could result in $134.6 million being put to better use. Management committed to taking corrective actions which the Office of Inspector General estimates will result in a more efficient use of funds totaling $333.2 million. Office of Inspector General investigations led to 6 criminal convictions and 1 pretrial diversion, as well as criminal and civil prosecutions which resulted in fines and recoveries of $10,942,714. The Office of Inspector General also provided 33 investigative referrals to management for recommended positive action.

  8. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, July--December 1996. Volume 15, Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued semiannually.

  9. Inspector General's Semiannual Report to Congress, No. 55. April 1, 2007-September 30, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This semiannual report to Congress on the activities and accomplishments of the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education (Department) from April 1, 2007, through September 30, 2007, highlights the audits, inspections, investigations, and other activities to illustrate an ongoing commitment to promoting accountability,…

  10. Low-rank coal research semiannual report, January 1992--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This semiannual report is a compilation of seventeen reports on ongoing coal research at the University of North Dakota. The following research areas are covered: control technology and coal preparation; advanced research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction and gasification. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Unconventional gas recovery program. Semi-annual report for the period ending September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Manilla, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    This document is the third semi-annual report describing the technical progress of the US DOE projects directed at gas recovery from unconventional sources. Currently the program includes Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project, Eastern Gas Shales Project, Western Gas Sands Project, and Geopressured Aquifers Project.

  12. Annual and semi-annual cycle of equatorial Atlantic circulation associated with basin mode resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Peter; Claus, Martin; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Kopte, Robert; Toole, John M.; Johns, William E.; Böning, Claus W.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal variability of the tropical Atlantic circulation is dominated by the annual cycle, but semi-annual variability is also pronounced, despite weak forcing at that period. Here we use multi-year, full depth velocity measurements from the central equatorial Atlantic to analyze the vertical structure of annual and semi-annual variations of zonal velocity. A baroclinic modal decomposition finds that the annual cycle is dominated by the 4th mode and the semi-annual cycle by the 2nd mode. Similar local behavior is found in a high-resolution general circulation model. This simulation reveals that the annual and semi-annual cycles of the respective dominant baroclinic modes are associated with characteristic basin-wide structures. Using an idealized linear reduced-gravity model to simulate the dynamics of individual baroclinic modes, it is shown that the observed circulation variability can be best explained by resonant equatorial basin modes. Companion simulations using the reduced-gravity model varying the basin geometry, i.e. square basin versus realistic coastlines, and forcing, i.e. spatially uniform versus spatially varying wind forcing, show a structural robustness of the simulated basin modes. A main focus of this study is the seasonal variability of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) as identified in recent observational studies. Main characteristics of the observed EUC including seasonal variability of transport, core depth, and maximum core velocity can be explained by the linear superposition of the dominant equatorial basin modes as obtained from the reduced-gravity model.

  13. Nuclear Fusion prize laudation Nuclear Fusion prize laudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, W.

    2011-01-01

    Clean energy in abundance will be of critical importance to the pursuit of world peace and development. As part of the IAEA's activities to facilitate the dissemination of fusion related science and technology, the journal Nuclear Fusion is intended to contribute to the realization of such energy from fusion. In 2010, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the IAEA journal. The excellence of research published in the journal is attested to by its high citation index. The IAEA recognizes excellence by means of an annual prize awarded to the authors of papers judged to have made the greatest impact. On the occasion of the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon, Republic of Korea at the welcome dinner hosted by the city of Daejeon, we celebrated the achievements of the 2009 and 2010 Nuclear Fusion prize winners. Steve Sabbagh, from the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York is the winner of the 2009 award for his paper: 'Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas' [1]. This is a landmark paper which reports record parameters of beta in a large spherical torus plasma and presents a thorough investigation of the physics of resistive wall mode (RWM) instability. The paper makes a significant contribution to the critical topic of RWM stabilization. John Rice, from the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge is the winner of the 2010 award for his paper: 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' [2]. The 2010 award is for a seminal paper that analyzes results across a range of machines in order to develop a universal scaling that can be used to predict intrinsic rotation. This paper has already triggered a wealth of experimental and theoretical work. I congratulate both authors and their colleagues on these exceptional papers. W. Burkart Deputy Director General Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna

  14. The Fusion Energy Option

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Stephen O.

    2004-06-01

    Presentations from a Fusion Power Associates symposium, The Fusion Energy Option, are summarized. The topics include perspectives on fossil fuel reserves, fusion as a source for hydrogen production, status and plans for the development of inertial fusion, planning for the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, status and promise of alternate approaches to fusion and the need for R&D now on fusion technologies.

  15. ICENES `91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, {mu}-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session.

  16. Modeling the Impact and Costs of Semiannual Mass Drug Administration for Accelerated Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    de Vlas, Sake J.; Fischer, Peter U.; Weil, Gary J.; Goldman, Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA) programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020. PMID:23301115

  17. Revitalizing Fusion via Fission Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    Existing tokamaks could generate significant nuclear fuel. TFTR, operating steady state with DT might generate enough fuel for a 300 MW nuclear reactor. The immediate goals of the magnetic fusion program would necessarily shift from a study of advanced plasma regimes in larger sized devices, to mostly known plasmas regimes, but at steady state or high duty cycle operation in DT plasmas. The science and engineering of breeding blankets would be equally important. Follow on projects could possibly produce nuclear fuel in large quantity at low price. Although today there is strong opposition to nuclear power in the United States, in a 21st century world of 10 billion people, all of whom will demand a middle class life style, nuclear energy will be important. Concern over greenhouse gases will also drive the world toward nuclear power. There are studies indicating that the world will need 10 TW of carbon free energy by 2050. It is difficult to see how this can be achieved without the breeding of nuclear fuel. By using the thorium cycle, proliferation risks are minimized. [1], [2]. 1 W. Manheimer, Fusion Technology, 36, 1, 1999, 2.W. Manheimer, Physics and Society, v 29, #3, p5, July, 2000

  18. New developments in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1983-04-01

    Beginning in 1984, the US Department of Energy plans a program aimed at determining the feasibility of using heavy ion accelerators as pellet drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This paper will describe the events in the field of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) that have occurred in the three years since the Lausanne conference in this series. The emphasis will be on the events leading towards the new energy oriented program. in addition to providing an overview of progress in HIF, such a discussion may prove useful for promoters of any emerging energy technology.

  19. Scientific and technological advancements in inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.

    2013-10-01

    Scientific advancements in inertial fusion energy (IFE) were reported on at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 2012. Results presented transect the different ways to assemble the fuel, different scenarios for igniting the fuel, and progress in IFE technologies. The achievements of the National Ignition Campaign within the USA, using the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to indirectly drive laser fusion, have found beneficial the achievements in other IFE arenas such as directly driven laser fusion and target fabrication. Moreover, the successes at NIF have pay-off to alternative scenarios such as fast ignition, shock ignition, and heavy-ion fusion as well as to directly driven laser fusion. This synergy is summarized here, and future scientific studies are detailed.

  20. Scientific and technological advancements in inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D. E.

    2013-09-26

    Scientific advancements in inertial fusion energy (IFE) were reported on at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 2012. Results presented transect the different ways to assemble the fuel, different scenarios for igniting the fuel, and progress in IFE technologies. The achievements of the National Ignition Campaign within the USA, using the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to indirectly drive laser fusion, have found beneficial the achievements in other IFE arenas such as directly driven laser fusion and target fabrication. Moreover, the successes at NIF have pay-off to alternative scenarios such as fast ignition, shock ignition, and heavy-ion fusion as well as to directly driven laser fusion. As a result, this synergy is summarized here, and future scientific studies are detailed.

  1. Scientific and technological advancements in inertial fusion energy

    DOE PAGES

    Hinkel, D. E.

    2013-09-26

    Scientific advancements in inertial fusion energy (IFE) were reported on at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, October 2012. Results presented transect the different ways to assemble the fuel, different scenarios for igniting the fuel, and progress in IFE technologies. The achievements of the National Ignition Campaign within the USA, using the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to indirectly drive laser fusion, have found beneficial the achievements in other IFE arenas such as directly driven laser fusion and target fabrication. Moreover, the successes at NIF have pay-off to alternative scenarios such as fast ignition, shock ignition, and heavy-ion fusion as well asmore » to directly driven laser fusion. As a result, this synergy is summarized here, and future scientific studies are detailed.« less

  2. The stratopause semiannual oscillation in the NCAR Community Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassi, Fabrizio; Garcia, Roland R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1993-01-01

    The middle atmospheric version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) has been used to study the development of the equatorial semiannual oscillation (SAO) in the stratosphere. The model domain extends from the ground to about 80 km, with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Transport of nitrous oxide (N2O) with simplified photochemistry is included in the calculation to illustrate the influence of tropical circulations on the distribution of trace species. Diagnosis of model output reveals two distinct phases in the evolution of the zonal mean state on the equator. In early December, a strong and broad easterly jet appears near the stratopause in connection with a midlatitude wave event (sudden stratospheric warming) that reverses the winter westerlies of the Northern Hemisphere throughout the upper stratosphere. When the wave forcing dies out, the radiative drive allows the westerlies to recover at midlatitudes, while easterlies persist in the tropics. The resulting strong meridional gradient of the zonal mean wind provides favorable conditions for the development of inertial instability at lower latitudes. The meridional circulation associated with the instability shapes the 'nose' of the easterly jet, reducing the extension of the unstable region. In equinoctial conditions, a jet of westerlies appears in the lower equatorial mesosphere and descends to lower altitudes; positive accelerations associated with the descending westerlies are due primarily to Kelvin waves. The descent of the westerly jet does not reproduce well the observed behavior of the SAO westerly phase, either in amplitude or in the extent of downward propagation. As a consequence, the model does not simulate the 'double peak' observed in the tropical distribution of N2O. Comparison of wave amplitudes in the model with those derived from satellite observations shows that the calculated amplitudes are larger than observed in the upper stratosphere. It follows that inadequate Kelvin wave forcing is

  3. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  4. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  5. Cold fusion verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, M. H.; Mastny, G. F.; Wesley, E. J.

    1991-03-01

    The objective of this work to verify and reproduce experimental observations of Cold Nuclear Fusion (CNF), as originally reported in 1989. The method was to start with the original report and add such additional information as became available to build a set of operational electrolytic CNF cells. Verification was to be achieved by first observing cells for neutron production, and for those cells that demonstrated a nuclear effect, careful calorimetric measurements were planned. The authors concluded, after laboratory experience, reading published work, talking with others in the field, and attending conferences, that CNF probably is chimera and will go the way of N-rays and polywater. The neutron detector used for these tests was a completely packaged unit built into a metal suitcase that afforded electrostatic shielding for the detectors and self-contained electronics. It was battery-powered, although it was on charge for most of the long tests. The sensor element consists of He detectors arranged in three independent layers in a solid moderating block. The count from each of the three layers as well as the sum of all the detectors were brought out and recorded separately. The neutron measurements were made with both the neutron detector and the sample tested in a cave made of thick moderating material that surrounded the two units on the sides and bottom.

  6. Distributed Fusion in Sensor Networks with Information Genealogy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-28

    published in Fusion 2009 [5] received one of the best student paper awards. Our overall goal is to provide provable methodologies which follow directly... 2009 . [5] Rommel Carvalho and KC Chang, "A Performance Evaluation Tool for Multi-Sensor Classification Systems," in Proc. 121 International...Conference on Information Fusion, Seattle, July, 2009 . [6] Wei Sun and KC Chang, "Message Passing for General Hybrid Bayesian Networks: Representation

  7. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  8. Neutron irradiation of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the BOR-60 fast reactor: Description of the fusion-1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Tsai, H.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    The FUSION-1 irradiation capsule was inserted in Row 5 of the BOR-60 fast reactor in June 1995. The capsule contains a collaborative RF/U.S. experiment to investigate the irradiation performance of V-Cr-Ti alloys in the temperature range 310 to 350{degrees}C. This report describes the capsule layout, specimen fabrication history, and the detailed test matrix for the U.S. specimens. A description of the operating history and neutronics will be presented in the next semiannual report.

  9. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its performance. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. Five such performance measures were used during this semiannual period to present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  10. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, G.C.

    1992-04-01

    This document is the Semi-Annual Report of the National Institute for Global Environmental Change for the reporting period July 1 to December 31, 1991. The report is in two parts. Part I presents the mission of the Institute, examples of progress toward that mission, a brief description of the revised management plan, and the financial report. Part II presents the statements of the Regional Center Directors along with progress reports of the projects written by the researchers themselves.

  11. Semiannual Report to Congress on the Effectiveness of the Civil Aviation Security Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-30

    and airport security measures in effect. Section V of this report provides a smry of firearms which were detected at screening points under suspicious...with the Secretary of State concerning threats, and (3) the inclusion of a sumnmary on foreign airport security in the Semiannual Report to Congress on...International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to embark inediately upon an intensified program aimed at responding to the need for enhanced airport security . As

  12. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  13. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Phat X; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B; Das, Subash C; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  14. Review of fusion synfuels

    SciTech Connect

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  15. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, W. H.

    1981-06-01

    The annual and semiannual variations of the quiet-sun year (1965) geomagnetic field are examined using geomagnetic records obtained from observatories located between about 0 and 30 deg N geomagnetic latitude. Three separate contributions are analyzed: (1) the quiet-day midnight level (MDT), (2) the solar-quiet daily variation (Sq), and (3) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation (L). Methods of three recent studies (Campbell, 1980a, 1980b) are used to emphasize the equatorial features, and the differences in the seasonal amplitude and phase changes, obtained from a Fourier analysis of annual and semiannual components in the three orthogonal magnetic-field directions, are illustrated. Conclusions are presented, including: (1) the equatorial MDT variations of the northward and vertical components at quiet periods seem to represent the expected seasonal nighttime magnetospheric distortions, (2) the seasonal equatorial region Sq follows closely the annual and semiannual patterns expected to be caused by ionospheric conductivity and heating variations that give rise to a dynamo current at E-region heights, and (3) the lunar seasonal variations show characteristics of dayside ionospheric electrojet origin.

  16. Conference Report: Masters Forum IV, February 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Todd

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the APPL Masters Forum is to bring together some of the best project managers at NASA, as well as those in industry and other government agencies, for 2 1/2 days of knowledge sharing. The project managers come eager to reflect on their project experiences, to learn new things from one another--and to unlearn a few things, too. This was the fourth Masters Forum, and the first one held outside Washington, DC. Fifty participants from across the country came to Dallas at the American Airlines Conference Center, a wonderful facility that was conveniently located by the airport and yet still seemed isolated from the rest of the world. Masters Forum IV was also the first one held during the winter. Previous Masters Forums have been during the summer. Hot, sticky Washington, D.C. in the summer may sound unpleasant, but frankly the popularity of earlier Forums is what led to this annual event becoming a semiannual one.

  17. FGFR-TACC gene fusions in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Lasorella, Anna; Sanson, Marc; Iavarone, Antonio

    2016-11-16

    Chromosomal translocations joining in-frame members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-transforming acidic coiled-coil gene families (the FGFR-TACC gene fusions) were first discovered in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and later in many other cancer types. Here, we review this rapidly expanding field of research and discuss the unique biological and clinical features conferred to isocitrate dehydrogenase wild-type glioma cells by FGFR-TACC fusions. FGFR-TACC fusions generate powerful oncogenes that combine growth-promoting effects with aneuploidy through the activation of as yet unclear intracellular signaling mechanisms. FGFR-TACC fusions appear to be clonal tumor-initiating events that confer strong sensitivity to FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Screening assays have recently been reported for the accurate identification of FGFR-TACC fusion variants in human cancer, and early clinical data have shown promising effects in cancer patients harboring FGFR-TACC fusions and treated with FGFR inhibitors. Thus, FGFR-TACC gene fusions provide a "low-hanging fruit" model for the validation of precision medicine paradigms in human GBM.

  18. HANFORD SITE AIR OPERATING PERMIT SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 07/01/2004 THRU 12/31/2004

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN, W.E.

    2005-01-19

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and September 15th each year, which are certified for truth, accuracy, and completeness by a Responsible Official. This semiannual report contains information from July 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004. Copies of semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, as amended in August 2002 and December 2002, identifies the following. (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5. ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period. (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2. 1.3, and 2.1, each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. Data derived from that monitoring will be reported in the Annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Report (AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.1). AOP requirement is for annual monitoring (e.g., four 1 week samples

  19. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  20. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  1. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  2. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; Betti, R.; Bauer, B. S.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Siemon, R. E.; Miller, R. L.; Laberge, M.; Delage, M.

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  3. ICASE semiannual report, April 1 - September 30, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science in order to extend and improve problem-solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space. The major categories of the current Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers. ICASE reports are considered to be primarily preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to appropriate research journals or that are to appear in conference proceedings.

  4. Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion condition is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion. .

  5. Applied Superconductivity Conference, Santa Fe, N. Mex., September 29-October 2, 1980, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorant, S. J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The conference focused on magnets for fusion technology, Ni-Ti conductors and critical current standards, microbridges and arrays, rotating machinery, discontinuous filament A15 superconductors, materials for tunnel junctions, magnets for energy storage and MHD, magnet technology, multifilamentary Nb3Sn conductors, and cavities and resonators. Papers included superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors, the circular form of the linear superconducting machine for marine propulsion, elastic buckling of superconducting Yin-Yang magnets for fusion, and magnetic energy storage.

  6. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Semiannual Report for the period July 21 2001 Thru December 31 2001

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN, W.E.

    2002-02-01

    The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit (AOP), Number 00-05-006, became effective on July 2, 2001. One condition contained in the AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, is the requirement to submit semiannual reports by March 15th and August 15th each year, which are certified for truth and accuracy by a Responsible Official. This first semiannual report contains information for the period from July 2, 2001 through December 31, 2001. Hereafter, the March 15th semiannual report will contain information for the period from July 1 through December 31. The semiannual report submitted by August 15th will contain information for the period from January 1 through June 30. Copies of the semiannual reports are transmitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), the Benton Clean Air Authority (BCAA), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. For the applicable reporting period, AOP, ''Standard Terms and Conditions'', Section 4.3.3, identifies the following: (1) Each semiannual report will provide a reference to deviation reports submitted to the regulatory agencies as required by Section 4.5, ''Permit Deviation Reporting''. (2) Each semiannual report will consist of reports of any required monitoring not submitted previously to the agencies or a reference to reports of required monitoring that were submitted during the reporting period. (3) Each semiannual report will contain a summary of any substantiated air emission complaint investigation(s) required in Table 1.2 of AOP, Attachment 1, and issued during the reporting period (4) For all minor radioactive emission points (potential to emit <0.1 mrem to the maximally exposed individual) listed in AOP, Attachment 2. Tables 1.2, 1.3 and 2.1. each semiannual report will confirm that any required monitoring was conducted to verify low emissions during the reporting period. The data derived from that monitoring will be reported

  7. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  8. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  9. Nuclear technology programs. Semiannual progress report, April--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April through September 1991. These programs involve R & D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  10. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1990--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1990--March 1991. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transpose of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  11. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  12. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, April-- September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1990. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions in a light water reactor, the thermophysical properties of the metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  13. Nuclear technology programs; Semiannual progress report, October 1989--March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories.

  14. Nuclear Technology Programs semiannual progress report, October 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1990-12-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1988--March 1989. These programs involve R&D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation`s high-level waste repositories. 127 refs., 76 figs., 103 tabs.

  15. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  16. Collation of monthly and semiannual reports covering instrumentation at the Decade 80 house in Tucson, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Decade 80 solar house, located in Tucson, Arizona, was built to show the use of copper in home building and to demonstrate the use of solar energy to provide space heating and cooling and domestic hot water. The auxiliary energy sources are electrical resistance heating for the domestic hot water and a gas fired boiler for space heating and operation of the absorption air conditioning units. The Semi-Annual report gives an overview of the instrumentation effort with the back-up monthly reports reflecting more detail of the effort that went into the implementation of the data acquisition system.

  17. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  18. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from nine selected papers presented at the 1982 Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference are provided. Copies of conference proceedings may be obtained for fifteen dollars from the Association. (MP)

  19. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

  20. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  1. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  2. A review of recent fusion neutronics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, Hiroshi; Oyama, Yukio; Ikeda, Yujiro

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews experimental activities in fusion neutronics experiments since the last International Conference on Nuclear Data. Many experiments have been carried out in Japan at FNS/JAERI, OKTAVIAN /Osaka University and KURRI/Kyoto University. Experiments on Be were performed at INEL/USA, KfK/FRG, SINPC/PRC, OKTAVIAN/Japan and several institutes in CIS, Czech Republic and Ukraine. A new series of shielding experiments have been started at FNS, ENEA/Frascati, TUD and Russian institutes for ITER/EDA R&D program.

  3. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  4. EDITORIAL: Conference program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Some of the papers and talks given at the conference have not been published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The attached PDF file lists the full conference program and indicates (with an asterisk) those papers or talks which are not present in this volume.

  5. Youth Conference Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.

    This handbook is designed to provide practical aid to those who have charge of the planning and organization of a youth conference, Defined as a conference to provide practical information as well as information about possible responsibilities, risks, and consequences of actions, related to the chosen conference topic. Suggestions are given for…

  6. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  7. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to DOT

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Uncorrected Flaw (number) 4. Positive Results Reported (total number) By Drug (a) Marijuana Metabolite (number... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. C Appendix C to Part 40—DOT Drug...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 40 - DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to Employers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... number) By Drug (a) Marijuana Metabolite (number) (b) Cocaine Metabolite (number) (c) Opiates (number) (1... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DOT Drug Testing Semi-Annual Laboratory Report to... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. B Appendix B to Part 40—DOT Drug...

  9. 17 CFR 270.30b1-1 - Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... registered management investment companies. 270.30b1-1 Section 270.30b1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....30b1-1 Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies. Every registered management... management investment company that has filed a registration statement with the Commission registering...

  10. 17 CFR 270.30b1-1 - Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... registered management investment companies. 270.30b1-1 Section 270.30b1-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges....30b1-1 Semi-annual report for registered management investment companies. Every registered management... management investment company that has filed a registration statement with the Commission registering...

  11. Research on Reading in Secondary Schools: A Semi-Annual Report, Volume 2, Number 2. Monograph Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Joseph L., Jr., Ed.; Gaus, Paula J., Ed.

    This monograph is the third in a series of semiannual reports of research related to reading in secondary schools. The first section of the monograph is made up of three research studies on the validation of teaching procedures to facilitate students' comprehension of content area texts, the graph-reading abilities of seventh grade students, and a…

  12. Data Summary Report for the 1997 Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.W. II

    1998-01-05

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1997 RFI/RI semiannual tritium survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The RFI/RI was performed under the direction of WSRC ESS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction EPD/EMS.

  13. Data Summary Report for the 1998 Semiannual Tritium Surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.

    1999-01-26

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1998 semiannual tritium surveys for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The project was performed under the direction of WSRC EAS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  14. Data Summary Report for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J. II

    1996-12-16

    This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The survey was performed at the request of the WSRC ERD and conducted by WSRC/ESS. This report was prepared under the direction of EPD/EMS.

  15. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App....

  16. Yeast Exocytic v-SNAREs Confer Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Chapman-Shimshoni, Daphne; Trajkovic, Selena; Gerst, Jeffrey E.

    2000-01-01

    In yeast, homologues of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family of v-SNAREs (Snc1 and Snc2) confer the docking and fusion of secretory vesicles at the cell surface. As no v-SNARE has been shown to confer endocytosis, we examined whether yeast lacking the SNC genes, or possessing a temperature-sensitive allele of SNC1 (SNC1ala43), are deficient in the endocytic uptake of components from the cell surface. We found that both SNC and temperature-shifted SNC1ala43 yeast are deficient in their ability to deliver the soluble dye FM4–64 to the vacuole. Under conditions in which vesicles accumulate, FM4–64 stained primarily the cytoplasm as well as fragmented vacuoles. In addition, α-factor–stimulated endocytosis of the α-factor receptor, Ste2, was fully blocked, as evidenced using a Ste2-green fluorescent protein fusion protein as well as metabolic labeling studies. This suggests a direct role for Snc v-SNAREs in the retrieval of membrane proteins from the cell surface. Moreover, this idea is supported by genetic and physical data that demonstrate functional interactions with t-SNAREs that confer endosomal transport (e.g., Tlg1,2). Notably, Snc1ala43 was found to be nonfunctional in cells lacking Tlg1 or Tlg2. Thus, we propose that synaptobrevin/VAMP family members are engaged in anterograde and retrograde protein sorting steps between the Golgi and the plasma membrane. PMID:11029060

  17. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall.

  18. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs. Semiannual report, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G. B.; Currie, J. W.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

  19. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  20. Antiproton catalyzed fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.L. Jr.; Perkins, L.J.; Haney, S.W.

    1995-05-15

    Because of the potential application to power production, it is important to investigate a wide range of possible means to achieve nuclear fusion, even those that may appear initially to be infeasible. In antiproton catalyzed fusion, the negative antiproton shields the repulsion between the positively charged nuclei of hydrogen isotopes, thus allowing a much higher level of penetration through the repulsive Coulomb barrier, and thereby greatly enhancing the fusion cross section. Because of their more compact wave function, the more massive antiprotons offer considerably more shielding than do negative muons. The effects of the shielding on fusion cross sections are most predominate, at low energies. If the antiproton could exist in the ground state with a nucleus for a sufficient time without annihilating, the fusion cross sections are so enhanced that at room temperature energies, values up to about 1,000 barns (that for d+t) would be possible. Unfortunately, the cross section for antiproton annihilation with the incoming nucleus is even higher. A model that provides an upper bound for the fusion to annihilation cross section for all relevant energies indicates that each antiproton will catalyze no more than about one fusion. Because the energy required to make one antiproton greatly exceeds the fusion energy that is released, this level of catalysis is far from adequate for power production.

  1. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  2. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  3. Fusion Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt; J.M. Ogden

    2002-02-06

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment.

  4. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities. Volume 2, Appendices. Semiannual technical progress report, September 28, 1994--March 27, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Bartley, D.A.; Hatcher, P.

    1996-10-15

    This semiannual progress report contains the following appendices: description of the 1,000 lb steam/h watertube research boiler; the Pennsylvania CGE model; Phase II, subtask 3.9 coal market analysis; the CGE model; and sector definition.

  5. The Long way Towards Inertial Fusion Energy (lirpp Vol. 13)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    In 1955 the first Geneva Conference was held in which two important events took place. Firstly, the announcement by President Eisenhower of the Program Atoms for Peace declassifying the information concerning nuclear fission reactors. Secondly, it was forecast that due to the research made on stellerators and magnetic mirrors, the first demo fusion facility would be in operation within ten years. This forecasting, as all of us know today, was a mistake. Forty years afterwards, we can say that probably the first Demo Reactor will be operative in some years more and I sincerely hope that it will be based on the inertial fusion concept...

  6. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  7. CHRONICLE: Fourth International Conference on Lasers and Their Applications (Leipzig, East Germany, October 19-23, 1981)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhenskiĭ, M. F.; Polkovnikov, Boris F.

    1983-06-01

    A brief review is given of the more important papers presented at the Fourth International Conference on Lasers and Their Applications. The Conference topics were as follows: lasers (development of new and improvement of old types); laser thermonuclear fusion; nonlinear optics; laser spectroscopy; optoelectronics; applications of lasers in chemistry, biology, and medicine; fundamental investigations; other applications.

  8. Particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-31

    Today, in keeping with Sandia Laboratories` designation by the Department of Energy as the lead laboratory for the pulsed power approach to fusion, its efforts include major research activities and the construction of new facilities at its Albuquerque site. Additionally, in its capacity as lead laboratory, Sandia coordinates DOE-supported pulsed power fusion work at other government operated laboratories, with industrial contractors, and universities. The beginning of Sandia`s involvement in developing fusion power was an outgrowth of its contributions to the nation`s nuclear weapon program. The Laboratories` work in the early 1960`s emphasized the use of pulsed radiation environments to test the resistance of US nuclear weapons to enemy nuclear bursts. A careful study of options for fusion power indicated that Sandia`s expertise in the pulsed power field could provide a powerful match to ignite fusion fuel. Although creating test environments is an achieved goal of Sandia`s overall program, this work and other military tasks protected by appropriate security regulations will continue, making full use of the same pulsed power technology and accelerators as the fusion-for-energy program. Major goals of Sandia`s fusion program including the following: (1) complete a particle accelerator to deliver sufficient beam energy for igniting fusion targets; (2) obtain net energy gain, this goal would provide fusion energy output in excess of energy stored in the accelerator; (3) develop a technology base for the repetitive ignition of pellets in a power reactor. After accomplishing these goals, the technology will be introduced to the nation`s commercial sector.

  9. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  10. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). 501.32... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a...

  11. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1... Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a) The... to appear at a specified time and place for a conference prior to a hearing, or to submit...

  12. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  13. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  14. Laser-Driven Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of laser-driven fusion. Current research (which is classified under three main headings: laser-matter interaction processes, compression, and laser development) is also presented. (HM)

  15. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    Infection by viruses having lipid-bilayer envelopes proceeds through fusion of the viral membrane with a membrane of the target cell. Viral ‘fusion proteins’ facilitate this process. They vary greatly in structure, but all seem to have a common mechanism of action, in which a ligand-triggered, large-scale conformational change in the fusion protein is coupled to apposition and merger of the two bilayers. We describe three examples—the influenza virus hemagglutinin, the flavivirus E protein and the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein—in some detail, to illustrate the ways in which different structures have evolved to implement this common mechanism. Fusion inhibitors can be effective antiviral agents. PMID:18596815

  16. Fusion-breeder program

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1982-11-19

    The various approaches to a combined fusion-fission reactor for the purpose of breeding /sup 239/Pu and /sup 233/U are described. Design aspects and cost estimates for fuel production and electricity generation are discussed. (MOW)

  17. Glossary of fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitson, M. O.

    1985-02-01

    The Glossary of Fusion Energy is an attempt to present a concise, yet comprehensive collection of terms that may be beneficial to scientists and laymen who are directly or tangentially concerned with this burgeoning energy enterprise. Included are definitions of terms in theoretical plasma physics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, and some related physics concepts. Also, short descriptions of some of the major thermonuclear experiments currently under way in the world today are included.

  18. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  19. Fusion ignition research experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  20. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

    1998-07-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

  1. NNWSI waste from testing at Argonne National Laboratory. Semiannual report, July-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.

    1986-03-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. As part of the waste package development portion of this project, experiments are being performed by the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory to study the behavior of the waste forms under anticipated repository conditions. These experiments include (1) the development and performance of a test to measure waste form behavior in unsaturated conditions and (2) the performance of tests designed to study the behavior of waste package components in an irradiated environment. Previous reports document developments in these areas through 1984. This report summarizes progress in 1985. Reports will be issued semi-annually hereafter.

  2. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology. Volume 2, No. 2, Semiannual report, April--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tehmanu; Carpenter, J.

    1993-12-31

    This is the second issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives of the ISAM Program include: the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) process, and advanced manufacturing technologies which include industrial laser materials processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. Topics included in this issue are: production plant product system conceptual design, development and operation of a solid-state switch for thyratron replacement, high-performance optical components for high average power laser systems, use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy for control of uranium vaporization rates, a two-dimensional time dependent hydrodynamical ion extraction model, and design of a formaldehyde photodissociation process for carbon and oxygen isotope separation.

  3. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This Office of Inspector General (OIG) Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period that facilitated Department of Energy (Department) efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. This report highlights OIG accomplishments in support of its Strategic Plan. Narratives of the Office`s most significant reports are grouped by the strategic goals against which the OIG measures its performance. To put the OIG accomplishments for this reporting period in context, the following statistical information is provided: audit and inspection reports issued -- 47; recommendations that funds be put to better use -- $356,257,856; management commitment to taking corrective actions -- $289,106,445; criminal indictments/convictions -- 8; fines and recoveries -- $1,612,932; and investigative reports to management recommending positive change -- 21.

  4. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, January--June 1997. Volume 16, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition. The agenda consists of two sections that have been updated through June 30, 1997. Section 1, ``Rules,`` includes (A) rules on which final action has been taken since December 31, 1996, the closing date of the last NRC Regulatory Agenda; (B) rules published previously as proposed rules on which the Commission has not taken final action; (C) rules published as advance notices of proposed rulemaking for which neither a proposed nor final rule has been issued; and (D) unpublished rules on which the NRC expects to take action. Section 2, ``Petitions for Rulemaking,`` includes (A) petitions denied or incorporated into final rules since December 31, 1996; (B) petitions incorporated into proposed rules; and (C) petitions pending staff review.

  5. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period from April 1 through September 30, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large portion of which facilitated Department of Energy management efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation of its programs. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures which the Office of Inspector General uses to gauge its attainment of the outcomes established in the Office of Inspector General Strategic Plan. The common thread that ties the performance measures together is their emphasis on supporting Department efforts to produce high quality products at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. The six performance measures present outcomes of Office of Inspector General work in terms of improvements in Department programs and operations.

  6. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee. Semiannual Report, October 1, 1991 Through March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G B

    1992-07-01

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities supported by Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and other federal agencies focused on meeting the President`s Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the FERM Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from October 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for the federal energy manager to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems modernization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities.

  7. Equatorial semiannual oscillation in zonally averaged temperature observed by the Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1988-04-01

    Zonally averaged equatorial temperatures obtained aboard Nimbus 7 by the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) are compared to comparable data obtained from the limb IR monitor of the stratosphere. The SAMS data are shown to confirm the seasonal asymmetry in semiannual wind regimes previously noted in rocketsonde observations near the equator. Two explanations for the asymmetry are considered: (1) an improved Kelvin and gravity wave transmissivity in stronger equatorial easterlies (resulting from planetary Rossby wave momentum transport), implying stronger westerly mean flow acceleration in the first cycle than in the second; and (2) evidence of strong polar-tropical coupling in the northern winter indicating that mean meridional circulations are present on a global scale.

  8. The tropical semiannual oscillations in temperature and ozone as observed my the MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric A.; Holton, James R.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    The first two years of Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) temperature and ozone data are used to examine the tropical upper-stratospheric semiannual oscillation (SAO). Time series analysis revealed that the strongest amplitudes of the SAO occurred near the equator at 2 mb for temperature and 5 mb for ozone, consistent with previous observations. The first cycle of each calendar year was observed to have a much higher amplitude than the second cycle except for the warm phase in late 1991. Interannual variability in the strength of the SAO, such as the much stronger warm phase of late 1991 as compared to late 1992, was significant and could be partly attributed to the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in zonal wind.

  9. Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlaw, P.D.

    1998-01-01

    This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

  10. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  11. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2016-07-12

    ITER (in Latin “the way”) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project – China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States – represent more than half the world’s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  12. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November...

  13. Overview of the RFX fusion science program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Adamek, J.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Angioni, C.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Barison, S.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Boozer, A. H.; Brombin, M.; Brotankova, J.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chacon, L.; Chitarin, G.; Cooper, W. A.; Dal Bello, S.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Masi, G.; Dong, J. Q.; Drevlak, M.; Escande, D. F.; Fantini, F.; Fassina, A.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Fiameni, S.; Fiorentin, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Garbet, X.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Hirano, Y.; Hirshman, S. P.; Ide, S.; Igochine, V.; In, Y.; Innocente, P.; Kiyama, S.; Liu, S. F.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lòpez Bruna, D.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; McCollam, K.; Menmuir, S.; Milani, F.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Munaretto, S.; Novello, L.; Okabayashi, M.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Perverezev, G. V.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Pomphrey, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rigato, V.; Rizzolo, A.; Rostagni, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Ruzzon, A.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Sattin, F.; Scaggion, A.; Scarin, P.; Schneider, W.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D. A.; Spizzo, G.; Takechi, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Valisa, M.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; Wang, Z.; White, R. B.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper summarizes the main achievements of the RFX fusion science program in the period between the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conferences. RFX-mod is the largest reversed field pinch in the world, equipped with a system of 192 coils for active control of MHD stability. The discovery and understanding of helical states with electron internal transport barriers and core electron temperature >1.5 keV significantly advances the perspectives of the configuration. Optimized experiments with plasma current up to 1.8 MA have been realized, confirming positive scaling. The first evidence of edge transport barriers is presented. Progress has been made also in the control of first-wall properties and of density profiles, with initial first-wall lithization experiments. Micro-turbulence mechanisms such as ion temperature gradient and micro-tearing are discussed in the framework of understanding gradient-driven transport in low magnetic chaos helical regimes. Both tearing mode and resistive wall mode active control have been optimized and experimental data have been used to benchmark numerical codes. The RFX programme also provides important results for the fusion community and in particular for tokamaks and stellarators on feedback control of MHD stability and on three-dimensional physics. On the latter topic, the result of the application of stellarator codes to describe three-dimensional reversed field pinch physics will be presented.

  14. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Second semiannual status report, July 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee`s activities to date have focused primarily on the ``technology transfer`` aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  15. Annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field at equatorial locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    For a year of quiet solar-activity level, geomagnetic records from American hemisphere observatories located between about 0?? and 30?? north geomagnetic latitude were used to compare the annual and semiannual variations of the geomagnetic field associated with three separate contributions: (a) the quiet-day midnight level, MDT; (b) the solar-quiet daily variation, Sq; (c) the quiet-time lunar semidiurnal tidal variation, L(12). Four Fourier spectral constituents (24, 12, 8, 6 h periods) of Sq were individually treated. All three orthogonal elements (H, D and Z) were included in the study. The MDT changes show a dominant semiannual variation having a range of about 7 gammas in H and a dominant annual variation in Z having a range of over 8 gammas. These changes seem to be a seasonal response to the nightside distortions by magnetospheric currents. There is a slow decrease in MDT amplitudes with increasing latitude. The Sq changes follow the patterns expected from an equatorial ionospheric dynamo electrojet current system. The dominant seasonal variations occur in H having a range of over 21 gammas for the 24 h period and over 12 gammas for the 12 h period spectral components. The higher-order components are relatively smaller in size. The Sq(H) amplitudes decrease rapidly with increasing latitude. Magnetospheric contributions to the equatorial Sq must be less than a few per cent of the observed magnitude. The L(12) variation shows the ionospheric electrojet features by the dominance of H and the rapid decrease in amplitude with latitude away from the equator. However, the seasonal variation range of over 7 gammas has a maximum in early February and minimum in late June that is not presently explainable by the known ionospheric conductivity and tidal behavior. ?? 1981.

  16. Issues and challenges of the applications of context to enhance information fusion: panel summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Kadar, Ivan; Chong, Chee; Steinberg, Alan; Mahler, Ronald P. S.; Yang, Shanchieh Jay; Fenstermacher, Laurie H.; Chan, Alex L.; Tandy, Paul

    2016-05-01

    During the 2015 SPIE DSS conference, nine panelists were invited to highlight the trends and use of context for information fusion. This paper highlights the common issues and trends presented from the panel discussion. The different panelists highlighted methods of filtering methods, data aggregation, and the importance of context for realtime analytics. Using the panelist perspectives, the review organizes the common issues and themes as well areas of future analysis of content and context enrichment from information fusion.

  17. Mini-Conference on the First Microns of the First Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Rognlien, T. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2008-03-20

    Interactions between plasmas and their surrounding materials (plasma facing components) are of great interest to present and future magnetic fusion experiments, and ITER [ITER Physics Basis Editors, ITER Physics Exper Group Chairs, ITER Joint Central Team, and Physics Inte gration Unit, Nucl. Fusion 39, 2137 (1999)] in particular. This interest is the result of concerns with the survivability of these materials, as well as the impact of these interactions back on the plasma. These interactions begin on the surface, but can have consequences a few microns into the material.This mini-conference on these "first microns" was designed to bring to the Division of Plasma Physics Meeting experts on these topics who would otherwise not attend. At the same time, the mini-conference was intended to expose the broader fusion community to these issues. The mini-conference covered in three, half-day sessions the topics of lithium coatings and surfaces, mixed materials characteristics, and issues associated with graphite.

  18. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Yasuyuki; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Millay, Douglas P

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge regarding cellular fusion and nuclear reprogramming may aid in cell therapy strategies for skeletal muscle diseases. An issue with cell therapy approaches to restore dystrophin expression in muscular dystrophy is obtaining a sufficient quantity of cells that normally fuse with muscle. Here we conferred fusogenic activity without transdifferentiation to multiple non-muscle cell types and tested dystrophin restoration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. We previously demonstrated that myomaker, a skeletal muscle-specific transmembrane protein necessary for myoblast fusion, is sufficient to fuse 10T 1/2 fibroblasts to myoblasts in vitro. Whether myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion is functional in vivo and whether the newly introduced nonmuscle nuclei undergoes nuclear reprogramming has not been investigated. We showed that mesenchymal stromal cells, cortical bone stem cells, and tail-tip fibroblasts fuse to skeletal muscle when they express myomaker. These cells restored dystrophin expression in a fraction of dystrophin-deficient myotubes after fusion in vitro. However, dystrophin restoration was not detected in vivo although nuclear reprogramming of the muscle-specific myosin light chain promoter did occur. Despite the lack of detectable dystrophin reprogramming by immunostaining, this study indicated that myomaker could be used in nonmuscle cells to induce fusion with muscle in vivo, thereby providing a platform to deliver therapeutic material.-Mitani, Y., Vagnozzi, R. J., Millay, D. P. In vivo myomaker-mediated heterologous fusion and nuclear reprogramming.

  19. The semiannual variation of great geomagnetic storms and the postshock Russell-Mcpherron effect preceding coronal mass ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Cliver, E. W.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results indicate that the intense southward interplanetary magnetic fields (IMFs) responsible for great storms can reside in the postshock plasma preceding the driver gas of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) as well as in the driver gas itself. It is proposed here that strong southward fields in the postshock flow result from a major increase in the Russell-McPherron polarity effect through a systematic pattern of compression and draping within the ecliptic plane. Differential compression at the shock increases the Parker spiral angle and, consequently, the azimuthal field component that projects as a southward component onto earth's dipole axis. The resulting prediction is that southward fields in the postshock plasma maximize at the spring (fall) equinox in CMEs emerging from toward (away) sectors. This pattern produces a strong semiannual variation in postshock IMF orientation and may account at least in part for the observed semiannual variation of the occurrence of great geomagnetic storms.

  20. Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992. Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K.

    1992-12-31

    This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks.

  1. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes.…

  2. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  3. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  4. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  5. Analysis of Satellite sea surface temperature time series in the Brazil-Malvinas Current confluence region: Dominance of the annual and semiannual periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Christine; Garcia, Omar; GarçOn, VéRonique

    1992-11-01

    We study the dominant periodic variations of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence region from a satellite-derived data set compiled by Olson et al. (1988). This data set is composed of 202 sea surface temperature images with a 4 × 4 km resolution and extends over 3 years (from July 1984 to July 1987). Each image is a 5-day composite. The dominant signal, as already observed by Podesta et al. (1991), has a 1-year period. We first fit a single-frequency sinusoidal model of the annual cycle in order to estimate mean temperature, amplitude, and phase at 159 points uniformly distributed over the region. The residuals are generally small (less than 2°C). The largest departures from this cycle are located either in the Brazil-Malvinas frontal region or in the southeastern part of the region. Other periods in SST variations are identified by means of periodograms of the 159 residual time series in which the annual cycle has been substracted. The periodograms show that a semiannual frequency signal is present at almost every location. The ratio of the semiannual amplitude to the annual amplitude increases southward from 0% at 30°S to reach up to 45% at 50°S. In the south the semiannual signal creates an asymmetry, and the resulting (total) annual cycle has a cold period (winter) longer than the warm one (summer). In the frontal region the annual and semiannual signals have an important interannual variation. This semiannual frequency is associated with the semiannual wave present in the atmospheric forcing of the southern hemisphere. Differential heating over the mid-latitude oceans and the high-latitude ice-covered Antarctic Continent has been suggested as the cause of this semiannual wave (Van Loon, 1967).

  6. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Fifth semi-annual status report, April 1990--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  7. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  8. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  9. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  10. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  11. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nejat Veziroglu, T.

    1980-01-01

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen production and uses, formulation of workable policies on energy use and energy conservation, heat and energy storage, and energy education. The volume of the proceedings presents the papers and lectures in condensed format grouped by subject under forty-two sessions for 319 presentations.

  12. APS Conference on Understanding the Biological Clock: From Genetics to Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The Conference was designed to take advantage of the fusion of two intellectually dominant but heretofore separate lines of clock research, vertebrate physiology and invertebrate and microbial genetics. The APS Conference attracted 251 scientists, 68 of whom were students. In addition to the excellent speaker program organized by Dunlap and Loros, the attendees also submitted 93 volunteer abstracts that were programmed in poster sessions. Thirty-four percent of the submitted abstracts were first authorized by a female student or scientist.

  13. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  14. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  15. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-04-04

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  16. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  17. Fusion research at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The ORNL Fusion Program includes the experimental and theoretical study of two different classes of magnetic confinement schemes - systems with helical magnetic fields, such as the tokamak and stellarator, and the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) class of toroidally linked mirror systems; the development of technologies, including superconducting magnets, neutral atomic beam and radio frequency (rf) heating systems, fueling systems, materials, and diagnostics; the development of databases for atomic physics and radiation effects; the assessment of the environmental impact of magnetic fusion; and the design of advanced demonstration fusion devices. The program involves wide collaboration, both within ORNL and with other institutions. The elements of this program are shown. This document illustrates the program's scope; and aims by reviewing recent progress.

  18. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  19. Semiannual report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period 1 Oct. 1994 - 31 Mar. 1995.

  20. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  1. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conferences; conference memorandum . 6101.11 Section 6101.11 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  2. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs.

  3. Atomic data for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  4. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  5. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and

  6. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  7. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  8. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  9. Fusion engineering device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  10. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  11. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  12. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  13. Tackling conference carbon footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozier, Jim

    2016-12-01

    In reply to Margaret Harris's Lateral Thoughts article "Putting my foot down", which discussed the challenges of attending a conference with a physical disability (October p76) and a subsequent letter by Anna Wood (November p18).

  14. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  15. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.; Buchholtz, B.; Ward, P.; Freuh, J.; Jensen, E.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium. Helium can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  16. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedrick, James; Buchholtz, Brent; Ward, Paul; Freuh, Jim; Jensen, Eric

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium-3. Helium-3 can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  17. Auditory Fusion in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Sylvia M.; McCroskey, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on auditory fusion (defined in terms of a listerner's ability to distinguish paired acoustic events from single acoustic events) in 3- to 12-year-old children. The subjects listened to 270 pairs of tones controlled for frequency, intensity, and duration. (CM)

  18. A fusion of minds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfield, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Mystery still surrounds the visit of the astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell to the Soviet Union in 1963. But his collaboration - and that of other British scientists - eased geopolitical tensions at the height of the Cold War and paved the way for today's global ITER fusion project, as Richard Corfield explains.

  19. Synergetic Multisensor Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    technology have led to increased interest in using DEMs for navigation and other applications. In particular, DEMs are attractive for use in aircraft...Multisensor Fusion for Computer Vision [67]. 30 6. POSI!IONAL zSTIM&TION TECEnIQUzs FOR AN OUTDOOR MOBLE ROBOT The autonomous navigation of mobile robots is

  20. Fusion reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  1. Human-Centered Fusion Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; White, Amanda M.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2007-05-16

    In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4) perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.

  2. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source. (JDH)

  3. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  4. Overview of the RFX-mod fusion science programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Puiatti, M. E.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Alonso, J. A.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Avino, F.; Barbalace, A.; Barbisan, M.; Barbui, T.; Barison, S.; Barp, M.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bigi, M.; Bilel, R.; Boldrin, M.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Bustreo, C.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carralero, D.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Chacon, L.; Chapman, B.; Chitarin, G.; Ciaccio, G.; Cooper, W. A.; Dal Bello, S.; Dalla Palma, M.; Delogu, R.; De Lorenzi, A.; Delzanno, G. L.; De Masi, G.; De Muri, M.; Dong, J. Q.; Escande, D. F.; Fantini, F.; Fasoli, A.; Fassina, A.; Fellin, F.; Ferro, A.; Fiameni, S.; Finn, J. M.; Finotti, C.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Framarin, J.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Furno, I.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Ghezzi, F.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Gonzales, W. A.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Hanson, J. D.; Hidalgo, C.; Hirano, Y.; Hirshman, S. P.; Ide, S.; In, Y.; Innocente, P.; Jackson, G. L.; Kiyama, S.; Liu, S. F.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lòpez Bruna, D.; Lorenzini, R.; Luce, T. C.; Luchetta, A.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marchiori, G.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Matsunaga, G.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; McCollam, K.; Momo, B.; Moresco, M.; Munaretto, S.; Novello, L.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, E.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pesce, A.; Pilan, N.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Piron, L.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Recchia, M.; Rigato, V.; Rizzolo, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Rostagni, G.; Ruzzon, A.; Sakakita, H.; Sanchez, R.; Sarff, J. S.; Sartori, E.; Sattin, F.; Scaggion, A.; Scarin, P.; Schneider, W.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spong, D. A.; Spizzo, G.; Takechi, M.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Theiler, C.; Toigo, V.; Trevisan, G. L.; Valente, M.; Valisa, M.; Veltri, P.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; Wang, Z. R.; White, R. B.; Xu, X. Y.; Zaccaria, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports the highlights of the RFX-mod fusion science programme since the last 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. The RFX-mod fusion science programme focused on two main goals: exploring the fusion potential of the reversed field pinch (RFP) magnetic configuration and contributing to the solution of key science and technology problems in the roadmap to ITER. Active control of several plasma parameters has been a key tool in this endeavour. New upgrades on the system for active control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability are underway and will be presented in this paper. Unique among the existing fusion devices, RFX-mod has been operated both as an RFP and as a tokamak. The latter operation has allowed the exploration of edge safety factor qedge < 2 with active control of MHD stability and studies concerning basic energy and flow transport mechanisms. Strong interaction has continued with the stellarator community in particular on the physics of helical states and on three-dimensional codes.

  5. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    PubMed

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  6. (Experimental development, testing and research work in support of the inertial confinement fusion program)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Luckhardt, R.; Terry, N.; Drake, D.; Gaines, J.

    1990-04-27

    This KMS Fusion Semi-Annual Technical Report covers the period October 1989 through March 1990. It contains a review of work performed by KMS Fusion, Inc. (KMSF), in support of the national program to achieve inertially confined fusion (ICF). A major section of the report is devoted to target technology, a field which is expected to play an increasingly important role in the overall KMSF fusion effort. Among the highlights of our efforts in this area covered in this report are: improvements and new developments in target fabrication techniques, including a discussion of techniques for introducing gaussian bumps and bands on target surfaces. Development of a single automated system for the interferometric characterization of transparent shells. Residual gas analysis of the blowing gases contained in glass shells made from xerogels. These usually include CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}, and are objectionable because they dilute the fuel. Efforts to observe the ice layers formed in the {beta}-layering process in cryogenic targets, and to simulate the formation of these layers. In addition to our work on target technology, we conducted experiments with the Chroma laser and supported the ICF effort at other labs with theoretical and computational support as well as diagnostic development. Included in the work covered in this report are: experiments on Chroma to study interpenetration of and ionization balance in laser generated plasmas. Diagnostic development, including an optical probe for the Aurora laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a high energy x-ray continuum spectrograph for Aurora. Investigation of the radiation cooling instability as a possible mechanism for the generation of relatively cold, dense jets observed in ICF experiments.

  7. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

  8. Surgical fusion in childhood spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Stanton, R P; Meehan, P; Lovell, W W

    1985-01-01

    Twenty cases of surgical fusion for spondylolisthesis were reviewed at the Scottish Rite Hospital (Atlanta, GA, U.S.A.) to determine whether a procedure other than a simple posterolateral fusion is necessary for most patients. The patients were treated postoperatively with pantaloon spica cast immobilization. The fusion rate was high (90%), and patient satisfaction was high. One patient developed neurologic loss postoperatively. Two patients' slips progressed greater than 10% before solid fusion occurred. Thus, bilateral posterolateral fusion, followed by pantaloon spica cast immobilization, is effective for patients with symptomatic spondylolisthesis or asymptomatic children with grade 3 or greater slips. Reduction was not performed in this series.

  9. Semi-annual oscillations in Saturn's low-latitude stratospheric temperatures.

    PubMed

    Orton, Glenn S; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A; Fisher, Brendan M; Friedson, A James; Parrish, Paul D; Nelson, Jesse F; Bauermeister, Amber Swenson; Fletcher, Leigh; Gezari, Daniel Y; Varosi, Frank; Tokunaga, Alan T; Caldwell, John; Baines, Kevin H; Hora, Joseph L; Ressler, Michael E; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Fuse, Tetsuharu; Hagopian, Hagop; Martin, Terry Z; Bergstralh, Jay T; Howett, Carly; Hoffmann, William F; Deutsch, Lynne K; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E; Noe, Eldar; Adams, Joseph D; Kassis, Marc; Tollestrup, Eric

    2008-05-08

    Observations of oscillations of temperature and wind in planetary atmospheres provide a means of generalizing models for atmospheric dynamics in a diverse set of planets in the Solar System and elsewhere. An equatorial oscillation similar to one in the Earth's atmosphere has been discovered in Jupiter. Here we report the existence of similar oscillations in Saturn's atmosphere, from an analysis of over two decades of spatially resolved observations of its 7.8-microm methane and 12.2-microm ethane stratospheric emissions, where we compare zonal-mean stratospheric brightness temperatures at planetographic latitudes of 3.6 degrees and 15.5 degrees in both the northern and the southern hemispheres. These results support the interpretation of vertical and meridional variability of temperatures in Saturn's stratosphere as a manifestation of a wave phenomenon similar to that on the Earth and in Jupiter. The period of this oscillation is 14.8 +/- 1.2 terrestrial years, roughly half of Saturn's year, suggesting the influence of seasonal forcing, as is the case with the Earth's semi-annual oscillation.

  10. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General Audit Reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s twelfth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1994 through March 31, 1995, the Department took final action on 32 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 90 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on four contract and financial assistance audits, leaving four reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  11. Semiannual variations of great geomagnetic storms: Solar sources of great storms. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E.W.; Crooker, N.U.; Cane, H.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report preliminary results of an investigation of the solar sources of 25 great geomagnetic storms with D sub st < or = {minus}250 nT occurring from 1957-1990. These storms exhibit a clear semiannual variation with 14 events occurring within {+-} 30 days of the equinoxes vs. 5 storms within {+-} 30 days of the solstices. This seasonal variation appears to result from a variable threshold for the size of a solar event required to produce a great geomagnetic storm, in the sense that weaker solar events, such as disappearing solar filaments, are more likely to produce great storms at the equinoxes than near the solstices. The great problem storms of the last four solar cycles, i.e., those storms lacking commensurate preceding solar activity, are all found to occur relatively near the equinoxes. Conversely, four of the five great storms that occurred near the solstices were preceded by truly outstanding solar flares. About half (11/25) of the great storms had obvious precursor geomagnetic activity, i.e., periods of approximately > 1 day with D sub st approximately < {minus}30 nT. The precursors can enable some weaker solar events to be more geoeffective than would otherwise be the case in two ways: (1) compression and amplification of pre-existing southward (precursor) fields by the transient shock, and (2) establishment of a lower D sub st baseline , making it easier for transient events to drive D sub st to values < or = {minus}250 nT.

  12. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fourteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996, the Department took final action on 35 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 92 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on two contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  13. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fifteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1996, through September 30, 1996, the Department took final action on 34 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 87 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on seven contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector Generator audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective action on each of these reports.

  14. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s sixteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997, the Department took final action on 31 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 74 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 11 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving no reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  15. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998, the Department took final action on 20 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 80 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on one contract and financial assistance audit, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  16. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s seventeenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1997, the Department took final action on 29 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 72 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on five contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  17. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s thirteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1995, through September 30, 1995, the Department took final action on 33 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 96 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 2 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving 2 reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  18. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, January--June 1995. Volume 14, Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition. The agenda consists of two sections that have been updated through June 30, 1995. Section 1, ``Rules,`` includes (A) rules on which final action has been taken since December 30, 1994, the closing date of the last NRC Regulatory Agenda; (B) rules published previously as proposed rules on which the Commission has not taken final action; (C) rules published as advance notices of proposed rulemaking for which neither a proposed nor final rule has been issued; and (D) unpublished rules on which the NRC expects to take action. Section 2, ``Petitions for Rulemaking,`` includes (A) petitions denied or incorporated into final rules since December 30, 1994; (B) petitions incorporated into proposed rules; (C) petitions pending staff review, and (D) petitions with deferred action.

  19. Federal Energy Resources Modernization Coordinating Committee; Semiannual report, April 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G. B.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the broad range of activities that are focused on meeting the President's Executive Order on Federal Energy Management promulgated to meet energy savings goals and encourage more efficient management of all federal energy resources. These activities are reported semiannually under the auspices of the Federal Energy Resource Modernization (FERM) Coordinating Committee, and as such include activities undertaken from April 1, 1992, through September 30, 1992. The activities reported are classified into four major categories: (1) technology-base support, which includes development of processes, software, metering and monitoring equipment and strategies, and other tools for federal energy managers to better understand and characterize their energy resources; (2) federal energy systems testing and monitoring; (3) federal energy systems revitalization projects at federal installations in cooperation with the utilities serving the sites; and (4) energy supply, distribution and end-use conservation assessment for federal agencies and/or facilities. Lighting systems and air conditioning projects at federal facilities, especially military bases are updated.

  20. Global features of the semiannual oscillation in stratospheric temperatures and comparison between seasons and hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xin-Hai; Yu, Wen-Bi; Stanford, John L.

    1987-01-01

    Four years of satellite-derived microwave and infrared radiances are analyzed for the three-dimensional and seasonal variation of semiannual oscillations (SAO) in stratospheric temperatures, with particular focus on high latitudes, to investigate the effect of stratospheric warmings on SAO. Separate analyses of individual seasons in each hemisphere reveal that the strongest SAO in temperature occur in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) winter polar upper stratosphere. These results, together with the latitudinal structure of the temperature SAO and the fact that the NH polar SAO is nearly out of phase with the lower latitude SAO, are consistent with the existence of a global-scale, meridional circulation on the SAO time scale. The results suggest that polar stratospheric warmings are an important source of SAO in both high and low latitude stratospheric temperature fields. Interannual variations, three-dimensional phase structure, and zonal asymmetry of SAO are also detailed. The SH stratospheric SAO is dominated by a localized feature in the high-latitude, eastern hemisphere which tilts westward with height.

  1. Middle atmosphere dynamical sources of the semiannual oscillation in the thermosphere and ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Emmert, J. T.; Drob, D. P.; Siskind, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    The strong global semiannual oscillation (SAO) in thermospheric density has been observed for five decades, but definitive knowledge of its source has been elusive. We use the National Center of Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) to study how middle atmospheric dynamics generate the SAO in the thermosphere-ionosphere (T-I). The "standard" TIME-GCM simulates, from first principles, SAOs in thermospheric mass density and ionospheric total electron content that agree well with observed climatological variations. Diagnosis of the globally averaged continuity equation for atomic oxygen ([O]) shows that the T-I SAO originates in the upper mesosphere, where an SAO in [O] is forced by nonlinear, resolved-scale variations in the advective, net tidal, and diffusive transport of O. Contrary to earlier hypotheses, TIME-GCM simulations demonstrate that intra-annually varying eddy diffusion by breaking gravity waves may not be the primary driver of the T-I SAO: A pronounced SAO is produced without parameterized gravity waves.

  2. Office of Inspector General semiannual report to Congress, April 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Semiannual Report to Congress covers the period April 1 to September 30, 1998. The report summarizes significant Office of Inspector General (OIG) audit, inspection, and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period.These OIG efforts facilitated Department of Energy (DOE) efforts to improve the overall management of its programs. The OIG has developed a Strategic Plan which sets out its overall goals and objectives. The Office`s significant accomplishments are grouped by the strategic goals against which the OIG measures its performance. Highlights are presented on the following items: prime contractor fees policy strengthening; low-level and low-level mixed waste management program improvement; hazardous waste training agreement cost $6 million more than necessary; controls over architect-engineering costs improvement; funds expended contrary to Congressional direction and internal budget execution guidelines; company mischarges costs on several federal contracts; year 2000 computer issues; Qui Tam investigations; task force investigations; financial assistance grantees; DOE suspect/counterfeit items information trending and analysis; and management information systems.

  3. Preparing for a Semiannual IACUC Inspection of a Satellite Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Facility

    PubMed Central

    Koerber, Amy S; Kalishman, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Institutions worldwide have experienced a rapid growth in the use of zebrafish as a research model for a variety of molecular and genetic studies of vertebrate development. This expansion in zebrafish research essentially has outpaced the establishment of specific recommendations for the care and use of fish in research. In some cases, this situation has created a dilemma where an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, which is responsible for oversight of vertebrate animal research, is not fully prepared to undertake this role for a decentralized zebrafish facility. IACUC inspectors will be more equipped to ask pertinent questions by understanding the basic principles of zebrafish health and facility management. Concurrently, zebrafish facility managers can contribute to the progress of a semiannual facility inspection by maintaining fully accessible operating records. In the context of presenting a well-established and useful model of zebrafish management and recordkeeping to the zebrafish facility operator, the information we present here also prepares a potential IACUC inspector to conduct a constructive and positive inspection. PMID:19245754

  4. TFE Verification Program. Semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern.

  5. Four Mile Creek semi-annual sampling report, January 1993 sampling event

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    From 1955 to 1988 low-level radioactive wastewater generated by chemical separation processes within the General Separations Area (GSA) was discharged to seepage basins in the F and H Areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). These basins were designed to permit the infiltration of the process wastewaters. As wastewater percolated downward through the basins, chemical and radioactive constituents were retained or sequestered in the subsoils. An extensive study aimed at characterizing the groundwater seeping into Four Mile Creek and its associated seepline was conducted in 1988 and 1989 (Haselow et al. 1990). Results of this study suggested that contaminants leaching from the F and H Area seepage basins were impacting the Four Mile Creek wetland system. The seepage basins were closed in 1988 and capped and sealed in 1990. This effectively eliminated the source of the contaminants and the hydraulic head driving the migration of contaminants from the basins. It has been hypothesized that, after the elimination of the source and head, annual rainfall amounts would be sufficient to dilute and flush out contaminants remaining in the subsoils and groundwaters beneath the basins. Westinghouse Savannah River Company has designed a semi-annual sampling and analytical program for the Four Mile Creek (FMC) seepline and stream water to test the hypothesis. This report summarizes field monitoring activities from January 25, 1993 to February 4, 1993.

  6. Semi-annual technical report, September 30, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Dorin

    2000-04-01

    The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR) continues to operate according to objectives outlined in the proposal funded through the cooperative agreement. The italicized objectives below are addressed in this report, which covers the period September 30,1999 through March 31, 2000. (1) Update the research agenda using information obtained from member companies. (2) Identify and implement research projects that are deemed by industrial, scientific, and sponsoring agency evaluation to address significantly the problems and future of U.S. energy resources and that are relevant to the Department of Energy's mission. Specifically: (1) Announce research grants competition through a Request for Preproposals. (2) Conduct a dual-stage review process: Stage one--industrial and DOE review of preproposals; and Stage two--peer review, scientific consultants' review, DOE review of full proposals and Project Recommendation Committee evaluation and recommendation for funding. (3) Board of Directors approval of recommended awards. (4) Conduct ongoing project management. (5) Obtain semiannual, annual and final reports for evaluation of research goals and technology transfer. (6) Present reports to DOE.

  7. The path to fusion power.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn Smith, Chris; Ward, David

    2007-04-15

    Fusion is potentially an environmentally responsible and intrinsically safe source of essentially limitless power. It should be possible to build viable fusion power stations, and it looks as if the cost of fusion power will be reasonable. But time is needed to further develop the technology and to test in power station conditions the materials that would be used in their construction. Assuming no major adverse surprises, an orderly fusion development programme could lead to a prototype fusion power station putting electricity into the grid within 30 years, with commercial fusion power following some 10 or more years later. In the second half of the century, fusion could therefore be an important part of the portfolio of measures that are needed to cope with rising demand for energy in an environmentally responsible manner. In this paper, we describe the basics of fusion, its potential attractions, the status of fusion R&D, the remaining challenges and how they will be tackled at the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and the proposed International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, and the timetable for the subsequent commercialization of fusion power.

  8. The Need for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassibry, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Fusion propulsion is inevitable if the human race remains dedicated to exploration of the solar system. There are fundamental reasons why fusion surpasses more traditional approaches to routine crewed missions to Mars, crewed missions to the outer planets, and deep space high speed robotic missions, assuming that reduced trip times, increased payloads, and higher available power are desired. A recent series of informal discussions were held among members from government, academia, and industry concerning fusion propulsion. We compiled a sufficient set of arguments for utilizing fusion in space. If the U.S. is to lead the effort and produce a working system in a reasonable amount of time, NASA must take the initiative, relying on, but not waiting for, DOE guidance. In this talk those arguments for fusion propulsion are presented, along with fusion enabled mission examples, fusion technology trade space, and a proposed outline for future efforts.

  9. Nuclear Rocket Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center has a strong interest in nuclear rocket propulsion and provides active support of the graphite reactor program in such nonnuclear areas as cryogenics, two-phase flow, propellant heating, fluid systems, heat transfer, nozzle cooling, nozzle design, pumps, turbines, and startup and control problems. A parallel effort has also been expended to evaluate the engineering feasibility of a nuclear rocket reactor using tungsten-matrix fuel elements and water as the moderator. Both of these efforts have resulted in significant contributions to nuclear rocket technology. Many successful static firings of nuclear rockets have been made with graphite-core reactors. Sufficient information has also been accumulated to permit a reasonable Judgment as to the feasibility of the tungsten water-moderated reactor concept. We therefore consider that this technoIogy conference on the nuclear rocket work that has been sponsored by the Lewis Research Center is timely. The conference has been prepared by NASA personnel, but the information presented includes substantial contributions from both NASA and AEC contractors. The conference excludes from consideration the many possible mission requirements for nuclear rockets. Also excluded is the direct comparison of nuclear rocket types with each other or with other modes of propulsion. The graphite reactor support work presented on the first day of the conference was partly inspired through a close cooperative effort between the Cleveland extension of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (headed by Robert W. Schroeder) and the Lewis Research Center. Much of this effort was supervised by Mr. John C. Sanders, chairman for the first day of the conference, and by Mr. Hugh M. Henneberry. The tungsten water-moderated reactor concept was initiated at Lewis by Mr. Frank E. Rom and his coworkers. The supervision of the recent engineering studies has been shared by Mr. Samuel J. Kaufman, chairman for the second day of the

  10. Fusion Data Grid Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Wang, Nanbor

    2004-11-01

    Simulations and experiments in the fusion and plasma physics community generate large datasets at remote sites. Visualization and analysis of these datasets are difficult because of the incompatibility among the various data formats adopted by simulation, experiments, and analysis tools, and the large sizes of analyzed data. Grids and Web Services technologies are capable of providing solutions for such heterogeneous settings, but need to be customized to the field-specific needs and merged with distributed technologies currently used by the community. This paper describes how we are addressing these issues in the Fusion Grid Service under development. We also present performance results of relevant data transfer mechanisms including binary SOAP, DIME, GridFTP and MDSplus and CORBA. We will describe the status of data converters (between HDF5 and MDSplus data types), developed in collaboration with MIT (J. Stillerman). Finally, we will analyze bottlenecks of MDSplus data transfer mechanism (work performed in collaboration with General Atomics (D. Schissel and M. Qian).

  11. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  12. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Unconventional approaches to fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Brunelli, B.; Leotta, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to unconventional approaches to fusionthose thermonuclear reactors that, in comparison with Tokamak and other main lines, have received little attention in the worldwide scientific community. Many of the approaches considered are still in the embryonic stages. The authors-an international group of active nuclear scientists and engineers-focus on the parameters achieved in the use of these reactors and on the meaning of the most recent physical studies and their implications for the future. They also compare these approaches with conventional ones, the Tokamak in particular, stressing the non-plasma-physics requirements of fusion reactors. Unconventional compact toroids, linear systems, and multipoles are considered, as are the ''almost conventional'' fusion machines: stellarators, mirrors, reversed-field pinches, and EBT.

  14. Airborne Wind Shear Detection and Warning Systems: Third Combined Manufacturers' and Technologists' Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D. (Compiler); Bowles, Roland L. (Compiler); Schlickenmaier, Herbert (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on airborne wind shear detection and warning systems are compiled. The following subject areas are covered: terms of reference; case study; flight management; sensor fusion and flight evaluation; Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data link/display; heavy rain aerodynamics; and second generation reactive systems.

  15. Maximum Likelihood Fusion Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-09

    data fusion, hypothesis testing,maximum likelihood estimation, mobile robot navigation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT...61 vi 9 Bibliography 62 vii 10 LIST OF FIGURES 1.1 Illustration of mobile robotic agents. Land rovers such as (left) Pioneer robots ...simultaneous localization and mapping 1 15 Figure 1.1: Illustration of mobile robotic agents. Land rovers such as (left) Pioneer robots , (center) Segways

  16. Fusion development and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  17. (Fusion energy research)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  18. Modular Aneutronic Fusion Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Pajer, Yosef Razin, Michael Paluszek, A.H. Glasser and Samuel Cohen

    2012-05-11

    NASA's JUNO mission will arrive at Jupiter in July 2016, after nearly five years in space. Since operational costs tend to rise with mission time, minimizing such times becomes a top priority. We present the conceptual design for a 10MW aneutronic fusion engine with high exhaust velocities that would reduce transit time for a Jupiter mission to eighteen months and enable more challenging exploration missions in the solar system and beyond. __________________________________________________

  19. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  20. Stabilized Spheromak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T

    2007-04-03

    The U.S. fusion energy program is focused on research with the potential for studying plasmas at thermonuclear temperatures, currently epitomized by the tokamak-based International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) but also continuing exploratory work on other plasma confinement concepts. Among the latter is the spheromak pursued on the SSPX facility at LLNL. Experiments in SSPX using electrostatic current drive by coaxial guns have now demonstrated stable spheromaks with good heat confinement, if the plasma is maintained near a Taylor state, but the anticipated high current amplification by gun injection has not yet been achieved. In future experiments and reactors, creating and maintaining a stable spheromak configuration at high magnetic field strength may require auxiliary current drive using neutral beams or RF power. Here we show that neutral beam current drive soon to be explored on SSPX could yield a compact spheromak reactor with current drive efficiency comparable to that of steady state tokamaks. Thus, while more will be learned about electrostatic current drive in coming months, results already achieved in SSPX could point to a productive parallel development path pursuing auxiliary current drive, consistent with plans to install neutral beams on SSPX in the near future. Among possible outcomes, spheromak research could also yield pulsed fusion reactors at lower capital cost than any fusion concept yet proposed.

  1. Program for the improvement of downhole drilling motor bearings and seals. Phase IV. Semi-annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbitts, G.A.; DeLafosse, P.H.; Black, A.; Green, S.J.

    1980-07-01

    Four main areas of development for the project are covered: design and fabrication of a dynamometer and a mud cooling system for the Bearing-Seal Package Test Facility; modification of the Bearing-Seal Package Test Facility based on test results; testing of new lubricant samples from Pacer Lubricants, Inc., in the Terra Tek High Temperature Lubricant Tester; and testing of new seal types in the Terra Tek Sea Tester. The Maurer Engineering Report, Semi-Annual Progress Report on Improvement of Downhole Motor Bearings and Seals by Jeff L. Barnwell, has been included as Appendix B.

  2. Sensor fusion: Spatial reasoning and scene interpretation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Nov. 7-9, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, Paul S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fusion of active and passive sensors, object estimation and verification, three-dimensional representation and knowledge integration, three-dimensional perception from multisensor data, the representation of uncertainty in multisensor fusion, and sensor calibration and registration. Also discussed are the areas of multisensor target detection and classification, multisensor processing architectures, knowledge structures and spatial reasoning, sensory interfaces to telerobotic systems, and navigation with spatial data bases.

  3. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... the conference is to discuss policy issues related to the reliability of the Bulk-Power System. A more... Webcast. Anyone with Internet access who desires to listen to this event can do so by navigating to...

  4. [Image fusion in medical radiology].

    PubMed

    Burger, C

    1996-07-20

    Image fusion supports the correlation between images of two or more studies of the same organ. First, the effect of differing geometries during image acquisitions, such as a head tilt, is compensated for. As a consequence, congruent images can easily be obtained. Instead of merely putting them side by side in a static manner and burdening the radiologist with the whole correlation task, image fusion supports him with interactive visualization techniques. This is especially worthwhile for small lesions as they can be more precisely located. Image fusion is feasible today. Easy and robust techniques are readily available, and furthermore DICOM, a rapidly evolving data exchange standard, diminishes the once severe compatibility problems for image data originating from systems of different manufacturers. However, the current solutions for image fusion are not yet established enough for a high throughput of fusion studies. Thus, for the time being image fusion is most appropriately confined to clinical research studies.

  5. Turbomachinery controls conference (TCC) 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The proceedings of the Turbomachinery Controls Conference 1995 are presented. Eleven papers were presented at the conference. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the nine papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  6. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special…

  7. Twitter use in physics conferences.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stephen

    An analysis of Twitter use in 116 conferences suggests that the service is used more extensively at PACS10 conferences (those devoted to the physics of elementary particles and fields) and PACS90 conferences (those devoted to geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics) than at conferences in other fields of physics. Furthermore, Twitter is used in a qualitatively different manner. A possible reason for these differences is discussed.

  8. High Level Information Fusion (HLIF) with nested fusion loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Fischer, Amber

    2013-05-01

    Situation modeling and threat prediction require higher levels of data fusion in order to provide actionable information. Beyond the sensor data and sources the analyst has access to, the use of out-sourced and re-sourced data is becoming common. Through the years, some common frameworks have emerged for dealing with information fusion—perhaps the most ubiquitous being the JDL Data Fusion Group and their initial 4-level data fusion model. Since these initial developments, numerous models of information fusion have emerged, hoping to better capture the human-centric process of data analyses within a machine-centric framework. 21st Century Systems, Inc. has developed Fusion with Uncertainty Reasoning using Nested Assessment Characterizer Elements (FURNACE) to address challenges of high level information fusion and handle bias, ambiguity, and uncertainty (BAU) for Situation Modeling, Threat Modeling, and Threat Prediction. It combines JDL fusion levels with nested fusion loops and state-of-the-art data reasoning. Initial research has shown that FURNACE is able to reduce BAU and improve the fusion process by allowing high level information fusion (HLIF) to affect lower levels without the double counting of information or other biasing issues. The initial FURNACE project was focused on the underlying algorithms to produce a fusion system able to handle BAU and repurposed data in a cohesive manner. FURNACE supports analyst's efforts to develop situation models, threat models, and threat predictions to increase situational awareness of the battlespace. FURNACE will not only revolutionize the military intelligence realm, but also benefit the larger homeland defense, law enforcement, and business intelligence markets.

  9. 17 CFR 270.30b1-2 - Semi-annual report for totally-owned registered management investment company subsidiary of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-owned registered management investment company subsidiary of registered management investment company...-owned registered management investment company subsidiary of registered management investment company... subsidiary of a registered management investment company need not file a semi-annual report on Form N-SAR...

  10. 17 CFR 270.30b1-2 - Semi-annual report for totally-owned registered management investment company subsidiary of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-owned registered management investment company subsidiary of registered management investment company...-owned registered management investment company subsidiary of registered management investment company... subsidiary of a registered management investment company need not file a semi-annual report on Form N-SAR...

  11. U.S. Department of Education, Office of the Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress: No. 50, October 1, 2004-March 31, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This document presents the 50th semiannual report on the activities and accomplishments of the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education (Department). During this reporting period, the OIG issued 123 audits, inspection reports and memoranda, and closed 95 investigations. As detailed in this report, this office continues to…

  12. Conference on Navajo Orthography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohannessian, Sirarpi; And Others

    This report on the Conference on Navajo Orthography, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 2-3, 1969 constitutes a summary of the discussion and decisions of a meeting which was convened by the Center for Applied Linguistics under contract with the Bureau of Indian Affairs to agree on an orthography for the Navajo language. The immediate purpose…

  13. DEVELOP students attend conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Last month, Madeline Brozen and Jason Jones of the DEVELOP Program at John C. Stennis Space Center joined members from the program's national office at Langley Research Center to attend the Southern Growth Policies Board annual conference in Biloxi. Pictured are (l to r): Karen Allsbrook, Jonathan Gleason, Gov. Haley Barbour, Madeline Brozen, Lindsay Rogers and Tracey Silcox.

  14. Hydrogen Conference: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is currently a major chemical/fuel with long-term energy system benefits that may impact the industry's physical and economic well-being. EPRI's recent hydrogen conference concluded that to be competitive, the production cost must take into account environmental and end-use efficiency benefits.

  15. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  16. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  17. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  18. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  19. Effective Parent Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Conferences with an upset parent, teacher, or student should be opportunities for schools to build relationships with the community and to foster a positive school culture. But in reality, they are often held because a problem has arisen and often end with stakeholders having a less-than-positive image of the school. Understanding the steps that…

  20. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The Association of Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference included 102 presentations. Abstracts of seven of these presentations are provided. Topic areas considered include LOGO, teaching probability through a computer game, writing effective computer assisted instructional materials, computer literacy, research on instructional…

  1. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  2. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  3. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  4. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  5. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  6. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  7. Conference Rules, Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Linda K.

    2008-01-01

    Most academic conferences are preceded by some effort to make the sessions different from the usual format, but the usual format overwhelmingly prevails. That is: Each panel discussion runs no longer than two hours, during which two, three, or four specialists stand at a lectern and talk. Sometimes they will read a prepared paper; sometimes they…

  8. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  9. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  10. Network-centric data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David; Lloyd, C. M.; Collins, Peter R. C.

    2002-08-01

    The performance of three distributed sensor fusion network architectures is investigated: a fully-connected and a partially-connected measurement fusion system and a partially-connected track fusion system. The investigation employs an advanced military scenario generator, FLAMES, which was customised for exercising a range of distributed data fusion experiments. Specifically, it includes a representative model of the delays in a communication system (such as JTIDS or Link 16). Here the delays were used to modify communication bandwidth and to evaluate how this affected the performance of the fusion architectures/algorithms. Under certain specific scenario conditions, it was found that decentralised measurement fusion system was severely affected by reduced bandwidth. This is because each node loads its communication buffer with every measurement and consequently some measurements are never transmitted. The decentralised track fusion system exhibits improved performance because it lumps measurements into tracks and thereby it makes much more effective use of the bandwidth. Moreover, it was found that the performance of the partially connected decentralised track fusion system was very close to the optimal performance achieved by the fully-connected decentralised measurement fusion system.

  11. OCULUS Sea Track Fusion Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotou, Stylianos C.; Rizogiannis, Constantinos; Katsoulis, Stavros; Lampropoulos, Vassilis; Kanellopoulos, Sotirios; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-06-01

    Oculus Sea is a complete solution regarding maritime surveillance and communications at Local as well as Central Command and Control level. It includes a robust and independent track fusion service whose main functions include: 1) Interaction with the User to suggest the fusion of two or more tracks, confirm Track ID and Vessel Metadata creation for the fused track, and suggest de-association of two tracks 2) Fusion of same vessel tracks arriving simultaneously from multiple radar sensors featuring track Association, track Fusion of associated tracks to produce a more accurate track, and Multiple tracking filters and fusion algorithms 3) Unique Track ID Generator for each fused track 4) Track Dissemination Service. Oculus Sea Track Fusion Service adopts a system architecture where each sensor is associated with a Kalman estimator/tracker that obtains an estimate of the state vector and its respective error covariance matrix. Finally, at the fusion center, association and track state estimation fusion are carried out. The expected benefits of this system include multi-sensor information fusion, enhanced spatial resolution, and improved target detection.

  12. Economic potential of inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1984-04-01

    Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

  13. Scientific performance metrics for data fusion: new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajic, Tim; Hoffman, John L.; Mahler, Ronald P. S.

    2000-08-01

    Last year at this conference we described initial result in the practical implementation of a unified, scientific approach to performance measurement for data fusion algorithms. The proposed approach is based on 'finite-set statistics' (FISST), a generalization of conventional statistics to multisource, multitarget problems. Finite-set statistics makes it possible to directly extend Shannon-type information metrics to multisource, multitarget problems in such a way that 'information' can be defined and measured even though any given end-user may have conflicting or even subjective definitions of what 'information' means. In this follow-on paper we describe progress on this work completed over the last year. We describe the performance of additional FISST metrics, including metrics which estimate the amount of information attributable to specific algorithm functions and which include the classification performance of the fusion algorithm. In addition we consider metrics that can be applied when ground truth is not known, based on comparisons to complete uncertainty.

  14. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  15. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  16. Summary: A Very Timely Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2012-04-01

    The conference poster includes a very apt phrase that describes a primary motivation for this conference: Time discovers truth. This aphorism, attributed to Seneca, was certainly affirmed by the many exciting talks and discussions at this conference, in both formal and informal settings.

  17. Making Connections: Attending Professional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherrstrom, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Attending a professional conference is an effective way to explore and advance knowledge, skills, and careers. For graduate students, attending a conference is an effective way to explore academic fields and new professions. However, attending a professional conference requires precious resources--time and money--so the decision to attend, or not,…

  18. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  19. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  20. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

  1. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  2. Statistics in fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, D. H.

    1997-11-01

    Since the reasons for the variability in data from plasma experiments are often unknown or uncontrollable, statistical methods must be applied. Reliable interpretation and public accountability require full data sets. Two examples of data misrepresentation at PPPL are analyzed: Te >100 eV on S-1 spheromak.(M. Yamada, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1327 (1985); reports to DoE; etc.) The reported high values (statistical artifacts of Thomson scattering measurements) were selected from a mass of data with an average of 40 eV or less. ``Correlated'' spectroscopic data were meaningless. (2) Extrapolation to Q >=0.5 for DT in TFTR.(D. Meade et al., IAEA Baltimore (1990), V. 1, p. 9; H. P. Furth, Statements to U. S. Congress (1989).) The DD yield used there was the highest through 1990 (>= 50% above average) and the DT to DD power ratio used was about twice any published value. Average DD yields and published yield ratios scale to Q<0.15 for DT, in accord with the observed performance over the last 3 1/2 years. Press reports of outlier data from TFTR have obscured the fact that the DT behavior follows from trivial scaling of the DD data. Good practice in future fusion research would have confidence intervals and other descriptive statistics accompanying reported numerical values (cf. JAMA).

  3. PREFACE: XXII International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    The 22nd International Conference on Spectral Line Shapes (ICSLS) was convened at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA, during June 1 to 6, 2014. A variety of topics of interest to the line shape community were addressed during invited and contributed oral and poster presentations. General categories of the ICSLS 2014 scientific contents included Astrophysics, Biomedical Physics, High and Low Temperature Plasma Physics, Magnetic Fusion Physics, Neutrals Atomic-Molecular-Optical (AMO) Physics, and Applied Physics. Research interests at UTSI and at the Center for Laser Applications (CLA) focus on Applied Physics and Plasma Physics areas such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, spectroscopy with ultra-short light pulses, combustion diagnostics, to name a few. Consequently, the presentations during the conference addressed a variety of these topics. Attendance at the conference included researchers from North America, Africa, Asia and Europe, with an international representation showing 250 authors and co-authors with over 25 different citizenships, and 100 participants at the Conference. Figure 1 shows a photo of Conference attendees. The schedule included 82 contributions, 41 oral and 41 poster presentations. The 29 invited, 12 contributed oral and 41 contributed poster presentations were selected following communication with the international organizing committee members. A smart phone ''app'' was also utilized, thanks to Elsevier, to communicate electronic versions of the posters during the conference. Special thanks go to the members of the international and local committees for their work in organizing the 22nd ICSLS. In addition, thank you notes also go to the peer reviewers for the proceedings. Following the success of the IOP: Journal of Physics Conference Series selected for the 21st ICSLS publication, the proceedings papers report ongoing research activities. Papers submitted amount to 68 in number, or 83% of

  4. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  5. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  6. Fusion Power measurement at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Bertalot, L.; Barnsley, R.; Krasilnikov, V.; Stott, P.; Suarez, A.; Vayakis, G.; Walsh, M.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear fusion research aims to provide energy for the future in a sustainable way and the ITER project scope is to demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear fusion energy. ITER is a nuclear experimental reactor based on a large scale fusion plasma (tokamak type) device generating Deuterium - Tritium (DT) fusion reactions with emission of 14 MeV neutrons producing up to 700 MW fusion power. The measurement of fusion power, i.e. total neutron emissivity, will play an important role for achieving ITER goals, in particular the fusion gain factor Q related to the reactor performance. Particular attention is given also to the development of the neutron calibration strategy whose main scope is to achieve the required accuracy of 10% for the measurement of fusion power. Neutron Flux Monitors located in diagnostic ports and inside the vacuum vessel will measure ITER total neutron emissivity, expected to range from 1014 n/s in Deuterium - Deuterium (DD) plasmas up to almost 10{sup 21} n/s in DT plasmas. The neutron detection systems as well all other ITER diagnostics have to withstand high nuclear radiation and electromagnetic fields as well ultrahigh vacuum and thermal loads. (authors)

  7. Multi-sensor fusion development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bish, Sheldon; Rohrer, Matthew; Scheffel, Peter; Bennett, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and McQ Inc. are developing a generic sensor fusion architecture that involves several diverse processes working in combination to create a dynamic task-oriented, real-time informational capability. Processes include sensor data collection, persistent and observational data storage, and multimodal and multisensor fusion that includes the flexibility to modify the fusion program rules for each mission. Such a fusion engine lends itself to a diverse set of sensing applications and architectures while using open-source software technologies. In this paper, we describe a fusion engine architecture that combines multimodal and multi-sensor fusion within an Open Standard for Unattended Sensors (OSUS) framework. The modular, plug-and-play architecture of OSUS allows future fusion plugin methodologies to have seamless integration into the fusion architecture at the conceptual and implementation level. Although beyond the scope of this paper, this architecture allows for data and information manipulation and filtering for an array of applications.

  8. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  9. Cold fusion; Myth versus reality

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Experiments indicate that several different nuclear reactions are taking place. Some of the experiments point to D-D fusion with a cominant tritium channel as one of the reactions. The article notes a similarity between Prometheus and the discoveries of cold fusion.

  10. Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan.

  11. Cold Fusion, A Journalistic Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivit, Steven B.

    2005-03-01

    Author of the recent book, The Rebirth of Cold Fusion, and founder of New Energy Times, Steven B. Krivit presents a summary of cold fusion's, past, present and possible future. This talk will briefly review five highlights of the recent New Energy Times investigation into cold fusion research:1. Analysis of early studies that supposedly disproved cold fusion.2. Key early corroborations that supported the claims of Fleischmann and Pons.3. The evolving understanding of cold fusion reaction paths and by-products.4. A look at volumetric power density.5. Brief comparison of the progress in hot fusion research as compared to cold fusion research.New Energy Times, founded in 2000, is an independent communications company which currently specializes in reporting on cold fusion researchootnotetextReferences and copies of the presentation are available at www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htmhttp://www.newenergytimes.com/reports/aps2005.htm. It has no affiliations with any organization, entity or party which invests in these technologies, nor any individual researcher or research facility.

  12. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  13. Membrane fusion during poxvirus entry.

    PubMed

    Moss, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    Poxviruses comprise a large family of enveloped DNA viruses that infect vertebrates and invertebrates. Poxviruses, unlike most DNA viruses, replicate in the cytoplasm and encode enzymes and other proteins that enable entry, gene expression, genome replication, virion assembly and resistance to host defenses. Entry of vaccinia virus, the prototype member of the family, can occur at the plasma membrane or following endocytosis. Whereas many viruses encode one or two proteins for attachment and membrane fusion, vaccinia virus encodes four proteins for attachment and eleven more for membrane fusion and core entry. The entry-fusion proteins are conserved in all poxviruses and form a complex, known as the Entry Fusion Complex (EFC), which is embedded in the membrane of the mature virion. An additional membrane that encloses the mature virion and is discarded prior to entry is present on an extracellular form of the virus. The EFC is held together by multiple interactions that depend on nine of the eleven proteins. The entry process can be divided into attachment, hemifusion and core entry. All eleven EFC proteins are required for core entry and at least eight for hemifusion. To mediate fusion the virus particle is activated by low pH, which removes one or more fusion repressors that interact with EFC components. Additional EFC-interacting fusion repressors insert into cell membranes and prevent secondary infection. The absence of detailed structural information, except for two attachment proteins and one EFC protein, is delaying efforts to determine the fusion mechanism.

  14. The rhetoric of science: A case study of the cold fusion controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation examines the circumstances surrounding and the rhetoric involved in the cold fusion controversy begun on March 23, 1989, when two University of Utah electrochemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, announced by press conference the discovery of room-temperature nuclear fusion. The dissertation seeks to determine to what extent a rhetorical analysis of cold fusion discourse may increase understanding of the controversy; the success of Fleischmann and Pons as scientific rhetors; the ways in which scientists' attitudes, values, and assumptions manifest themselves in the discourse; and finally, what may be learned about scientific discourse by examining the cold fusion controversy in particular. Examined were Fleischmann and Pon's initial publication announcing the cold fusion discovery in the Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry; Steven E. Jones's initial publication of his cold fusion discovery and several representative discourse samples from the journal Nature; and Fleischmann and Pons's latest article in the Journal of Fusion Technology. Cold fusion discourse addressed evidential issues, questioning the existence of the cold fusion phenomenon. Several lines of argument were evoked to address this issue, including experimental competence, experimental replication, external consistency, communality, and disinterestedness. Also discovered is division between electrochemists and physicists over what constitutes valid evidence: electrochemists looked to excess heat production as proof of fusion; physicists looked to neutron production. The study concludes that Fleischmann and Pons followed an unsuccessful rhetorical strategy in their initial published paper. An alternative rhetorical strategy was available to Fleischmann and Pons, one in which they could have interpreted their evidence, thereby evoking a less confrontational response from the scientific community.

  15. Is there hope for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-04-12

    From the outset in the 1950's, fusion research has been motivated by environmental concerns as well as long-term fuel supply issues. Compared to fossil fuels both fusion and fission would produce essentially zero emissions to the atmosphere. Compared to fission, fusion reactors should offer high demonstrability of public protection from accidents and a substantial amelioration of the radioactive waste problem. Fusion still requires lengthy development, the earliest commercial deployment being likely to occur around 2025--2050. However, steady scientific progress is being made and there is a wide consensus that it is time to plan large-scale engineering development. A major international effort, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is being carried out under IAEA auspices to design the world's first fusion engineering test reactor, which could be constructed in the 1990's. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  17. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  18. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  19. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described.

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into the following areas: (1) experimental research program; (2) theoretical research program; (3) accelerator research and development; (4) divisional computing activities; (5) publications; (6) colloquia and conference talks; (7) high energy physics community activities; and (7) High Energy Physics Division research personnel. Summaries are given for individual research programs for activities (1), (2) and (3).

  1. Information integration for data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, O.H.

    1997-01-01

    Data fusion has been identified by the Department of Defense as a critical technology for the U.S. defense industry. Data fusion requires combining expertise in two areas - sensors and information integration. Although data fusion is a rapidly growing area, there is little synergy and use of common, reusable, and/or tailorable objects and models, especially across different disciplines. The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project had two purposes: to see if a natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used for data fusion problems, and if so, to determine whether this methodology would help identify commonalities across areas and achieve greater synergy. The project confirmed both of the initial hypotheses: that the natural language-based information modeling methodology could be used effectively in data fusion areas and that commonalities could be found that would allow synergy across various data fusion areas. The project found five common objects that are the basis for all of the data fusion areas examined: targets, behaviors, environments, signatures, and sensors. Many of the objects and the specific facts related to these objects were common across several areas and could easily be reused. In some cases, even the terminology remained the same. In other cases, different areas had their own terminology, but the concepts were the same. This commonality is important with the growing use of multisensor data fusion. Data fusion is much more difficult if each type of sensor uses its own objects and models rather than building on a common set. This report introduces data fusion, discusses how the synergy generated by this LDRD would have benefited an earlier successful project and contains a summary information model from that project, describes a preliminary management information model, and explains how information integration can facilitate cross-treaty synergy for various arms control treaties.

  2. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    2015-06-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  3. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  4. CONFERENCE NOTE: Forthcoming Conference on Frequency Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-04-01

    The Third Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology will be held 5 7 October 1981 at the Centre Paul Langevin, Aussois, Savoie, France. This Conference will follow the lines of its predecessors at Forêt Montmorency, Quebec, Canada in September 1971 and at Copper Mountain, Colorado, USA in July 1976. It is intended to serve as a discussion forum on recent progress and ideas relating to precision frequency standards, the associated metrology and the specific fields of applications. A tentative list of the topics to be covered is the following: Progress in the field of atomic/molecular frequency standards throughout the electromagnetic spectrum Current trends and discussion of the precision capabilities of new techniques (Ramsey fringes in optics, cooling of atoms and ions . . . ) System application (VLBI, navigation . . .) and scientific applications (relativity, geodesy . . .) of atomic/molecular frequency standards and needs in these fields Modern distant time and frequency comparisons Progress in frequency synthesis of microwave to visible frequencies, etc. Most of the talks will be by invitation. Time will be provided for discussion, as well as for presentation of selected late ideas and results. Those interested in the Symposium should communicate with: Dr C Audoin, Laboratoire de l'Horloge Atomique, Bât. 221, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

  5. Fusion heating technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    John Lawson established the criterion that in order to produce more energy from fusion than is necessary to heat the plasma and replenish the radiation losses, a minimum value for both the product of plasma density and confinement time t, and the temperature must be achieved. There are two types of plasma heating: neutral beam and electromagnetic wave heating. A neutral beam system is shown. Main development work on negative ion beamlines has focused on the difficult problem of the production of high current sources. The development of a 30 keV-1 ampere multisecond source module is close to being accomplished. In electromagnetic heating, the launcher, which provides the means of coupling the power to the plasma, is most important. The status of heating development is reviewed. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), lower hybrid heating (HHH), and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) are reviewed.

  6. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  7. Fusion pumped light source

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of light radiation. A fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The neutron flux is coupled directly with the lasing medium. The lasing medium includes a first component selected from Group O of the periodic table of the elements and having a high inelastic scattering cross section. Gamma radiation from the inelastic scattering reactions interacts with the first component to excite the first component, which decays by photon emission at a first output wavelength. The first output wavelength may be shifted to a second output wavelength using a second liquid component responsive to the first output wavelength. The light outputs may be converted to a coherent laser output by incorporating conventional optics adjacent the laser medium.

  8. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  9. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  10. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  11. Microwave superheaters for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B.; Hoffman, M.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1987-10-16

    The microwave superheater uses the synchrotron radiation from a thermonuclear plasma to heat gas seeded with an alkali metal to temperatures far above the temperature of material walls. It can improve the efficiency of the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFAR) cycle described elsewhere in these proceedings. For a proof-of-principle experiment using helium, calculations show that a gas superheat ..delta..T of 2000/sup 0/K is possible when the wall temperature is maintained at 1000/sup 0/K. The concept can be scaled to reactor grade systems. Because of the need for synchrotron radiation, the microwave superheater is best suited for use with plasmas burning an advanced fuel such as D-/sup 3/He. 5 refs.

  12. Dynamic Information Collection and Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-02

    Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers, Nov 2013, pp. 1085– 1089 . 4 [57] S. Liu, M. Fardad, E. Masazade, and P. K. Varshney, “On optimal periodic...design for target tracking in wireless sensor networks,” in Proceedings of Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers, Nov 2013, pp. 1085– 1089

  13. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  14. Soldier systems sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Kathryne M.

    1998-08-01

    This paper addresses sensor fusion and its applications in emerging Soldier Systems integration and the unique challenges associated with the human platform. Technology that,provides the highest operational payoff in a lightweight warrior system must not only have enhanced capabilities, but have low power components resulting in order of magnitude reductions coupled with significant cost reductions. These reductions in power and cost will be achieved through partnership with industry and leveraging of commercial state of the art advancements in microelectronics and power sources. As new generation of full solution fire control systems (to include temperature, wind and range sensors) and target acquisition systems will accompany a new generation of individual combat weapons and upgrade existing weapon systems. Advanced lightweight thermal, IR, laser and video senors will be used for surveillance, target acquisition, imaging and combat identification applications. Multifunctional sensors will provide embedded training features in combat configurations allowing the soldier to 'train as he fights' without the traditional cost and weight penalties associated with separate systems. Personal status monitors (detecting pulse, respiration rate, muscle fatigue, core temperature, etc.) will provide commanders and highest echelons instantaneous medical data. Seamless integration of GPS and dead reckoning (compass and pedometer) and/or inertial sensors will aid navigation and increase position accuracy. Improved sensors and processing capability will provide earlier detection of battlefield hazards such as mines, enemy lasers and NBC (nuclear, biological, chemical) agents. Via the digitized network the situational awareness database will automatically be updated with weapon, medical, position and battlefield hazard data. Soldier Systems Sensor Fusion will ultimately establish each individual soldier as an individual sensor on the battlefield.

  15. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  16. Solar Rotational Periodicities and the Semiannual Variation in the Solar Wind, Radiation Belt, and Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Barbara A.; Richardson, Ian G.; Evans, David S.; Rich, Frederick J.; Wilson, Gordon R.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of a number of solar wind, radiation belt, auroral and geomagnetic parameters is examined during the recent extended solar minimum and previous solar cycles, covering the period from January 1972 to July 2010. This period includes most of the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24, which was more extended than recent solar minima, with historically low values of most of these parameters in 2009. Solar rotational periodicities from S to 27 days were found from daily averages over 81 days for the parameters. There were very strong 9-day periodicities in many variables in 2005 -2008, triggered by recurring corotating high-speed streams (HSS). All rotational amplitudes were relatively large in the descending and early minimum phases of the solar cycle, when HSS are the predominant solar wind structures. There were minima in the amplitudes of all solar rotational periodicities near the end of each solar minimum, as well as at the start of the reversal of the solar magnetic field polarity at solar maximum (approx.1980, approx.1990, and approx. 2001) when the occurrence frequency of HSS is relatively low. Semiannual equinoctial periodicities, which were relatively strong in the 1995-1997 solar minimum, were found to be primarily the result of the changing amplitudes of the 13.5- and 27-day periodicities, where 13.5-day amplitudes were better correlated with heliospheric daily observations and 27-day amplitudes correlated better with Earth-based daily observations. The equinoctial rotational amplitudes of the Earth-based parameters were probably enhanced by a combination of the Russell-McPherron effect and a reduction in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency during solstices. The rotational amplitudes were cross-correlated with each other, where the 27 -day amplitudes showed some of the weakest cross-correlations. The rotational amplitudes of the > 2 MeV radiation belt electron number fluxes were progressively weaker from 27- to 5-day periods

  17. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  18. NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

    2010-02-05

    The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass

  19. Analytical performance evaluation for autonomous sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. C.

    2008-04-01

    A distributed data fusion system consists of a network of sensors, each capable of local processing and fusion of sensor data. There has been a great deal of work in developing distributed fusion algorithms applicable to a network centric architecture. Currently there are at least a few approaches including naive fusion, cross-correlation fusion, information graph fusion, maximum a posteriori (MAP) fusion, channel filter fusion, and covariance intersection fusion. However, in general, in a distributed system such as the ad hoc sensor networks, the communication architecture is not fixed. Each node has knowledge of only its local connectivity but not the global network topology. In those cases, the distributed fusion algorithm based on information graph type of approach may not scale due to its requirements to carry long pedigree information for decorrelation. In this paper, we focus on scalable fusion algorithms and conduct analytical performance evaluation to compare their performance. The goal is to understand the performance of those algorithms under different operating conditions. Specifically, we evaluate the performance of channel filter fusion, Chernoff fusion, Shannon Fusion, and Battachayya fusion algorithms. We also compare their results to NaÃve fusion and "optimal" centralized fusion algorithms under a specific communication pattern.

  20. Evolution and function of anterior cervical vertebral fusion in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Collin S; Evans, David C

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of vertebral fusion is a poorly understood phenomenon that results in the loss of mobility between sequential vertebrae. Non-pathological fusion of the anterior cervical vertebrae has evolved independently in numerous extant and extinct mammals and reptiles, suggesting that the formation of a 'syncervical' is an adaptation that arose to confer biomechanical advantage(s) in these lineages. We review syncervical anatomy and evolution in a broad phylogenetic context for the first time and provide a comprehensive summary of proposed adaptive hypotheses. The syncervical generally consists of two vertebrae (e.g. hornbills, porcupines, dolphins) but can include fusion of seven cervical vertebrae in some cetaceans. Based on the ecologies of taxa with this trait, cervical fusion most often occurs in fossorial and pelagic taxa. In fossorial taxa, the syncervical likely increases the out-lever force during head-lift digging. In cetaceans and ricochetal rodents, the syncervical may stabilize the head and neck during locomotion, although considerable variation exists in its composition without apparent variability in locomotion. Alternatively, the highly reduced cervical vertebral centra may require fusion to prevent mechanical failure of the vertebrae. In birds, the syncervical of hornbills may have evolved in response to their unique casque-butting behaviour, or due to increased head mass. The general correlation between ecological traits and the presence of a syncervical in extant taxa allows more accurate interpretation of extinct animals that also exhibit this unique trait. For example, syncervicals evolved independently in several groups of marine reptiles and may have functioned to stabilize the head at the craniocervical joint during pelagic locomotion, as in cetaceans. Overall, the origin and function of fused cervical vertebrae is poorly understood, emphasizing the need for future comparative biomechanical studies interpreted in an evolutionary context.

  1. Fusion Simulation Project Workshop Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritz, Arnold; Keyes, David

    2009-03-01

    The mission of the Fusion Simulation Project is to develop a predictive capability for the integrated modeling of magnetically confined plasmas. This FSP report adds to the previous activities that defined an approach to integrated modeling in magnetic fusion. These previous activities included a Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee panel that was charged to study integrated simulation in 2002. The report of that panel [Journal of Fusion Energy 20, 135 (2001)] recommended the prompt initiation of a Fusion Simulation Project. In 2003, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences formed a steering committee that developed a project vision, roadmap, and governance concepts [Journal of Fusion Energy 23, 1 (2004)]. The current FSP planning effort involved 46 physicists, applied mathematicians and computer scientists, from 21 institutions, formed into four panels and a coordinating committee. These panels were constituted to consider: Status of Physics Components, Required Computational and Applied Mathematics Tools, Integration and Management of Code Components, and Project Structure and Management. The ideas, reported here, are the products of these panels, working together over several months and culminating in a 3-day workshop in May 2007.

  2. Engineering of a parainfluenza virus type 5 fusion protein (PIV-5 F): development of an autonomous and hyperfusogenic protein by a combinational mutagenesis approach.

    PubMed

    Terrier, O; Durupt, F; Cartet, G; Thomas, L; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M

    2009-12-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is accomplished by fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane. For the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5), this fusion involves an attachment protein (HN) and a class I viral fusion protein (F). We investigated the effect of 20 different combinations of 12 amino-acid substitutions within functional domains of the PIV-5 F glycoprotein, by performing cell surface expression measurements, quantitative fusion and syncytia assays. We found that combinations of mutations conferring an autonomous phenotype with mutations leading to an increased fusion activity were compatible and generated functional PIV-5 F proteins. The addition of mutations in the heptad-repeat domains led to both autonomous and hyperfusogenic phenotypes, despite the low cell surface expression of the corresponding mutants. Such engineering approach may prove useful not only for deciphering the fundamental mechanism behind viral-mediated membrane fusion but also in the development of potential therapeutic applications.

  3. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the sizemore » of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.« less

  4. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the size of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.

  5. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  6. Effect of aniseikonia on fusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Prakash, P

    1991-01-01

    Physiological aniseikonia is the basis of stereopsis but beyond certain limits it becomes an obstacle to fusion. It is not well established as to how much aniseikonia can be tolerated by the fusional mechanism. Different tests under different testing conditions have given a wide range of variation. On the synoptophore we had observed tolerance upto 35% aniseikonia in some cases. Under more physiological conditions on a polaroid dissociation stereoprojector we observed lesser baseline fusional vergences but tolerance in about 70% of the cases upto 30% aniseikonia while 25% could tolerate even 35% aniseikonia. However we realise that these indicate the maximal potential and not the symptom free tolerable limits.

  7. The path to fusion power†

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Chris Llewellyn; Cowley, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The promise, status and challenges of developing fusion power are outlined. The key physics and engineering principles are described and recent progress quantified. As the successful demonstration of 16 MW of fusion in 1997 in the Joint European Torus showed, fusion works. The central issue is therefore to make it work reliably and economically on the scale of a power station. We argue that to meet this challenge in 30 years we must follow the aggressive programme known as the ‘Fast Track to Fusion’. This programme is described in some detail. PMID:20123748

  8. Generalized Chernoff Fusion Approximation for Practical Distributed Data Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Generalized Chernoff Fusion Approximation for Practical Distributed Data Fusion William J. Farrell III R&D Department Adaptive Methods , Inc...independence or modify legacy systems with pedigree tagging techniques . Leveraging the well- known Covariance Intersection algorithm, its generalization...Adaptive Methods , Inc.,Centreville, VA , , 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR

  9. A residue located at the junction of the head and stalk regions of measles virus fusion protein regulates membrane fusion by controlling conformational stability.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yuto; Yonemori, Saeka; Hirose, Mitsuhiro; Shogaki, Hiroko; Wakimoto, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Gotoh, Bin; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ken-Ichi; Itoh, Masae

    2017-02-01

    The fusion (F) protein of measles virus performs refolding from the thermodynamically metastable prefusion form to the highly stable postfusion form via an activated unstable intermediate stage, to induce membrane fusion. Some amino acids involved in the fusion regulation cluster in the heptad repeat B (HR-B) domain of the stalk region, among which substitution of residue 465 by various amino acids revealed that fusion activity correlates well with its side chain length from the Cα (P<0.01) and van der Waals volume (P<0.001), except for Phe, Tyr, Trp, Pro and His carrying ring structures. Directed towards the head region, longer side chains of the non-ring-type 465 residues penetrate more deeply into the head region and may disturb the hydrophobic interaction between the stalk and head regions and cause destabilization of the molecule by lowering the energy barrier for refolding, which conferred the F protein enhanced fusion activity. Contrarily, the side chain of ring-type 465 residues turned away from the head region, resulting in not only no contact with the head region but also extensive coverage of the HR-B surface, which may prevent the dissociation of the HR-B bundle for initiation of membrane fusion and suppress fusion activity. Located in the HR-B domain just at the junction between the head and stalk regions, amino acid 465 is endowed with a possible ability to either destabilize or stabilize the F protein depending on its molecular volume and the direction of the side chain, regulating fusion activity of measles virus F protein.

  10. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation... Systems and Processes for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA),...

  11. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project. Semiannual progress report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Spaniol, C.

    1993-06-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, the authors plan to continue their dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  12. Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing Technology. ISAM semiannual report, Volume 3, Number 1, October 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    1994-10-01

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (I) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (II) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Title V Semi-Annual Emissions Report for Permit P100R1 July 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Whetham, Walter

    2012-03-15

    Reports of actual emissions from permitted sources in Section 2.0 shall be submitted on a 6 month basis. Reports shall not include emissions from insignificant activities. Emission estimates of criteria pollutants NOx, CO, SO2, PM and VOCs shall not include fugitive emissions. Emission estimates of HAPs shall include fugitive emissions. The reports shall include a comparison of actual emissions that occurred during the reporting period with the facility-wide allowable emission limits specified in Section 2.11 of this permit. The report required by Condition 4.1 shall be submitted within 90 days from the end of the reporting period. The semiannual report required by Condition 4.2 shall be submitted within 45 days from the end of the reporting period. The reporting periods are January 1st to June 30th and July 1st to December 31st. This condition is pursuant to 20.2.70.302.E.1 NMAC.

  14. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  15. Advanced Researech and Technology Development fossil energy materials program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the ARandTD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure in which projects are organized according to materials research thrust areas. These areas are (1) Structural Ceramics, (2) Alloy Development and Mechanical Properties, (3) Corrosion and Erosion of Alloys, and (4) Assessments and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  16. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  17. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  18. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  19. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    It is a great honor to receive the 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize, here at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. On behalf of everyone involved in this work, I would like to thank the IAEA, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, the IOP, and specifically Mitsuru Kikuchi, for their support of this important award. I would also like to acknowledge the many important contributions made by the other ten papers nominated for this prize. Our paper investigates the physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamaks, specifically the development of a predictive understanding of the pedestal structure based on electromagnetic instabilities which constrain it, and the testing of the resulting theoretical model (EPED) against detailed observations on multiple devices. In addition to making pedestal predictions for existing devices, the paper also presents predictions for ITER, including methods for optimizing its pedestal height and fusion performance. What made this work possible, and indeed a pleasure to be involved with, was an extensive set of collaborations, including theory-experiment, multi-institutional, and international collaborations. Many of these collaborations have gone on for over a decade, and have been fostered in part by the ITPA Pedestal Group. The eight authors of this paper, from five institutions, all made important contributions. Rich Groebner, Tom Osborne and Tony Leonard carried out dedicated experiments and data analysis on the DIII-D tokamak, testing the EPED model over a very wide range of parameters. Jerry Hughes led dedicated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which tested the model at high magnetic field and pedestal pressure. Marc Beurskens carried out experiments and data analysis on the JET tokamak, testing the model at large scale. Xueqiao Xu conducted two-fluid studies of diamagnetic stabilization, which enabled a more accurate treatment of this important effect. Finally, Howard Wilson and I have been working together for many years to develop analytic formalism

  20. 5 CFR 185.120 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 185.120 Section... FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 185.120 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences... conference at a reasonable time in advance of the hearing. (c) The ALJ may use prehearing conferences...

  1. 7 CFR 1753.10 - Preconstruction conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preconstruction conference. 1753.10 Section 1753.10... conference. The borrower shall conduct a conference, attended by the borrower, contractor, and resident... participant with a copy of the conference results. The GFR shall be invited to attend this conference....

  2. 10 CFR 820.22 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal conference. 820.22 Section 820.22 Energy... conference. The Director may convene an informal conference to discuss any situation that might be a... information. The Director may compel a person to attend the conference. This conference will not normally...

  3. 34 CFR 668.87 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prehearing conference. 668.87 Section 668.87 Education... Proceedings § 668.87 Prehearing conference. (a) A hearing official may convene a prehearing conference if he or she thinks that the conference would be useful, or if the conference is requested by— (1)...

  4. 29 CFR 2570.40 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conferences. 2570.40 Section 2570.40 Labor Regulations... Transaction Exemption Applications § 2570.40 Conferences. (a) Any conference between the Department and an... conference will be held at the applicant's request. (b) An applicant is entitled to only one conference...

  5. Characterization of fusion genes and the significantly expressed fusion isoforms in breast cancer by hybrid sequencing.

    PubMed

    Weirather, Jason L; Afshar, Pegah Tootoonchi; Clark, Tyson A; Tseng, Elizabeth; Powers, Linda S; Underwood, Jason G; Zabner, Joseph; Korlach, Jonas; Wong, Wing Hung; Au, Kin Fai

    2015-10-15

    We developed an innovative hybrid sequencing approach, IDP-fusion, to detect fusion genes, determine fusion sites and identify and quantify fusion isoforms. IDP-fusion is the first method to study gene fusion events by integrating Third Generation Sequencing long reads and Second Generation Sequencing short reads. We applied IDP-fusion to PacBio data and Illumina data from the MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Compared with the existing tools, IDP-fusion detects fusion genes at higher precision and a very low false positive rate. The results show that IDP-fusion will be useful for unraveling the complexity of multiple fusion splices and fusion isoforms within tumorigenesis-relevant fusion genes.

  6. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  7. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  8. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  9. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  10. Outcomes of Demineralized Bone Matrix Enriched with Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate in Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Eckardt, Mark A.; Hamamoto, Jason T.; Plotkin, Benjamin; Daubs, Michael D.; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple studies have demonstrated that a significant amount of variability exists in various demineralized bone matrix (DBM) formulations, which casts doubts on its reliability in consistently promoting fusion. Bone marrow aspirate (BMA) is a cellular based graft that contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and growth factors can confer osteogenic and osteoinductive potential to DBM. The goal of this study was to describe the outcome of DBM enriched with concentrated BMA in patients undergoing combined lumbar interbody and posterolateral fusion. Methods Eighty patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up were evaluated. Fusion and rates of complication were evaluated. Functional outcomes were assessed based on the modified Odom’s criteria. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effects of independent variables on fusion outcome. Results The overall rate of solid fusion (i.e patients with both solid posterolateral and interbody fusion) was 81.3% (65/80). Specifically, the radiographic evidence of solid posterolateral and interbody fusions were 81.3% (65/80) and 92.5% (74/80), respectively. Seven (8.75%) patients developed hardware-related complications, 2 (2.5%) patients developed a postoperative infection and 2 (2.5%) patients developed clinical pseudarthrosis. Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores of 3 and 4 were associated with non-solid unions (CCI-3, p = 0.048; CCI-4, p = 0.03). Excellent or good outcomes were achieved in 58 (72.5%) patients. Conclusions Patients undergoing lumbar fusion using an enriched bone graft containing concentrated BMA added to DBM can achieve successful fusion with relatively low complications and good functional outcomes. Despite these findings, more studies with higher level of evidence are needed to better understand the efficacy of this promising graft option. PMID:27909656

  11. Semi-annual sampling of Fourmile Branch and its seeplines in the F and H Areas of SRS: July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L.; Rogers, V.A.

    1994-04-01

    In July 1992, water samples were collected from Fourmile Branch (FMB) and its seeplines in the vicinity of the F and H-Area seepage basins. The samples were collected from five seepline locations in F Area, five seepline locations in H Area, and three stream locations on FMB. The sampling event was the first in a series of three semi-annual sampling event was the first in a series of three semi-annual sampling events aimed at characterizing the shallow groundwater outcropping into FMB and its wetlands. In the past, this groundwater has been shown to contain contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. The samples were analyzed for Appendix 9 metals, various radionuclides, selected volatile compounds, and selected inorganic constituents and parameters. Results from the July 1992 sampling event suggest that the seeplines in both F and H Areas and FMB continue to be influenced by contaminants migrating from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. However, when compared to 1989 measurements, the concentrations of most of the constituents have declined. Contaminant concentration measured in July 1992 were compared to primary drinking water standards (PDWS), secondary drinking water standards (SDWS), and maximum contaminant levels (MCL) enforceable in 1993. Results were also compared to 1989 measurements at corresponding sampling locations and to background samples collected as part of the July 1992 sampling event. Using two different statistical tests, concentrations of selected F- and H-Area seepline analytes were compared to background samples. These tests were designed to detect if concentrations of contaminants along the F- and H-Area seeplines were greater than background concentrations.

  12. Osmotic control of bilayer fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, L R; Parker, N S

    1984-01-01

    We have used photography and capacitance measurement to monitor the steps in the interaction and eventual fusion of optically black lipid bilayers (BLMs), hydrostatically bulged to approximately hemispherical shape and pushed together mechanically. A necessary first step is drainage of aqueous solution from between the bilayers to allow close contact of the bilayers. The drainage can be controlled by varying the osmotic difference across the bilayers. If the differences are such as to remove water from between the bilayers, fusion occurs after a time that depends on the net osmotic difference and the area of contact. If there is an osmotic flow of water into the space between the bilayers, fusion never occurs. In the fusion process, a single central bilayer forms from the original apposed pair of bilayers. The central bilayer may later burst to allow mixing of the two volumes originally bounded by the separate bilayer; the topological equivalent of exocytosis. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6541065

  13. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power.

  14. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  15. National Conference[s] on Career Education: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joseph F.; And Others

    The report describes a series of conferences whose objective was to orient selected educational leaders to the implications of preparing educational personnel with a career education perspective. The first 32 pages of the report discuss project objectives and procedures, and detail participant profiles, pre- and post-conference career education…

  16. World progress toward fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J. F.

    1989-09-01

    This paper will describe the progress in fusion science and technology from a world perspective. The paper will cover the current technical status, including the understanding of fusion's economic, environmental, and safety characteristics. Fusion experiments are approaching the energy breakeven condition. An energy gain (Q) of 30 percent has been achieved in magnetic confinement experiments. In addition, temperatures required for an ignited plasma (Ti = 32 KeV) and energy confinements (about 75 percent of that required for ignition) have been achieved in separate experiments. Two major facilities have started the experimental campaign to extend these results and achieve or exceed Q = 1 plasma conditions by 1990. Inertial confinement fusion experiments are also approaching thermonuclear conditions and have achieved a compression factor 100-200 times liquid D-T. Because of this progress, the emphasis in fusion research is turning toward questions of engineering feasibility. Leaders of the major fusion R and D programs in the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have agreed on the major steps that are needed to reach the point at which a practical fusion system can be designed. The United States is preparing for an experiment to address the last unexplored scientific issue, the physics of an ignited plasma, during the late 1990's. The EC, Japan, U.S.S.R., and the United States have joined together under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to jointly design and prepare the validating R&D for an international facility, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), to address all the remaining scientific issues and to explore the engineering technology of fusion around the turn of the century.

  17. Horizontal model fusion paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julier, Simon J.; Durrant-Whyte, Hugh F.

    1996-05-01

    In navigation and tracking problems, the identification of an appropriate model of vehicular or target motion is vital to most practical data fusion algorithms. The true system dynamics are rarely known, and approximations are usually employed. Since systems can exhibit strikingly different behaviors, multiple models may be needed to describe each of these behaviors. Current methods either use model switching (a single process model is chosen from the set using a decision rule) or consider the models as a set of competing hypothesis, only one of which is 'correct'. However, these methods fail to exploit the fact that all models are of the same system and that all of them are, to some degree, 'correct'. In this paper we present a new paradigm for fusing information from a set of multiple process models. The predictions from each process model are regarded as observations which are corrupted by correlated noise. By employing the standard Kalman filter equations we combine data from multiple sensors and multiple process models optimally. There are a number of significant practical advantages to this technique. First, the performance of the system always equals or betters that of the best estimator in the set of models being used. Second, the same decision theoretic machinery can be used to select the process models as well as the sensor suites.

  18. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  19. Tritium accountancy in fusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Clark, E.A.; Harvel, C.D.; Farmer, D.A.; Tovo, L.L.; Poore, A.S.; Moore, M.L.

    2015-03-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MCA) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MCA requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBA) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material sub-accounts (MSA) are established along with key measurement points (KMP) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSA. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breeding, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of 'net' tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines. (authors)

  20. TRITIUM ACCOUNTANCY IN FUSION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Farmer, D. A.; Moore, M. L.; Tovo, L. L.; Poore, A. S.; Clark, E. A.; Harvel, C. D.

    2014-03-06

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MC&A) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MC&A requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBAs) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material subaccounts (MSAs) are established along with key measurement points (KMPs) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSAs. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breading, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of “net” tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines.